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Sample records for plasmid partition complex

  1. Plasmid Partition Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jamie C; Funnell, Barbara E

    2014-12-01

    The stable maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids in bacteria is actively driven by partition mechanisms that are responsible for the positioning of plasmids inside the cell. Partition systems are ubiquitous in the microbial world and are encoded by many bacterial chromosomes as well as plasmids. These systems, although different in sequence and mechanism, typically consist of two proteins and a DNA partition site, or prokaryotic centromere, on the plasmid or chromosome. One protein binds site-specifically to the centromere to form a partition complex, and the other protein uses the energy of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to transport the plasmid, via interactions with this partition complex inside the cell. For plasmids, this minimal cassette is sufficient to direct proper segregation in bacterial cells. There has been significant progress in the last several years in our understanding of partition mechanisms. Two general areas that have developed are (i) the structural biology of partition proteins and their interactions with DNA and (ii) the action and dynamics of the partition ATPases that drive the process. In addition, systems that use tubulin-like GTPases to partition plasmids have recently been identified. In this chapter, we concentrate on these recent developments and the molecular details of plasmid partition mechanisms.

  2. ParB Partition Proteins: Complex Formation and Spreading at Bacterial and Plasmid Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Funnell, Barbara E.

    2016-01-01

    In bacteria, active partition systems contribute to the faithful segregation of both chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids. Each system depends on a site-specific DNA binding protein to recognize and assemble a partition complex at a centromere-like site, commonly called parS. Many plasmid, and all chromosomal centromere-binding proteins are dimeric helix-turn-helix DNA binding proteins, which are commonly named ParB. Although the overall sequence conservation among ParBs is not high, the proteins share similar domain and functional organization, and they assemble into similar higher-order complexes. In vivo, ParBs “spread,” that is, DNA binding extends away from the parS site into the surrounding non-specific DNA, a feature that reflects higher-order complex assembly. ParBs bridge and pair DNA at parS and non-specific DNA sites. ParB dimers interact with each other via flexible conformations of an N-terminal region. This review will focus on the properties of the HTH centromere-binding protein, in light of recent experimental evidence and models that are adding to our understanding of how these proteins assemble into large and dynamic partition complexes at and around their specific DNA sites. PMID:27622187

  3. Plasmid partitioning systems of conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Watts, Thomas D; Bulach, Dieter M; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2015-07-01

    Many pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens carry several highly similar toxin or antibiotic resistance plasmids that have 35 to 40 kb of very closely related syntenous sequences, including regions that carry the genes encoding conjugative transfer, plasmid replication and plasmid maintenance functions. Key questions are how are these closely related plasmids stably maintained in the same cell and what is the basis for plasmid incompatibility in C. perfringens. Comparative analysis of the Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids suggested that this protein was not the basis for plasmid incompatibility since plasmids carried in a single strain often encoded an almost identical Rep protein. These plasmids all carried a similar, but not identical, parMRC plasmid partitioning locus. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced ParM proteins revealed that these proteins could be divided into ten separate groups. Importantly, in every strain that carried more than one of these plasmids, the respective ParM proteins were from different phylogenetic groups. Similar observations were made from the analysis of phylogenetic trees of the ParR proteins and the parC loci. These findings provide evidence that the basis for plasmid incompatibility in the conjugative toxin and resistance plasmid family from C. perfringens resides in subtle differences in the parMRC plasmid partitioning loci carried by these plasmids.

  4. Bacterial plasmid partition machinery: a minimalist approach to survival.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A

    2012-02-01

    The accurate segregation or partition of replicated DNA is essential for ensuring stable genome transmission. Partition of bacterial plasmids requires only three elements: a centromere-like DNA site and two proteins, a partition NTPase, and a centromere-binding protein (CBP). Because of this simplicity, partition systems have served as tractable model systems to study the fundamental molecular mechanisms required for DNA segregation at an atomic level. In the last few years, great progress has been made in this endeavor. Surprisingly, these studies have revealed that although the basic partition components are functionally conserved between three types of plasmid partition systems, these systems employ distinct mechanisms of DNA segregation. This review summarizes the molecular insights into plasmid segregation that have been achieved through these recent structural studies.

  5. pTAR-encoded proteins in plasmid partitioning.

    PubMed

    Kalnin, K; Stegalkina, S; Yarmolinsky, M

    2000-04-01

    Partition cassettes, essential for the segregational stability of low-copy-number bacterial plasmids, typically encode two autoregulated proteins and an adjacent cis-acting centromere analog to which one or perhaps both proteins bind. The diminutive partition region of pTAR of Agrobacterium spp. was reported to be exceptional, encoding only a single protein, ParA (D. R. Gallie and C. I. Kado, J. Mol. Biol. 193:465-478, 1987). However, resequencing of the region revealed two small downstream genes, parB and orf-84, of which only parB was found to be essential for partitioning in A. tumefaciens. Purified ParA exhibited a weak ATPase activity that was modestly increased by nonspecific DNA. ParB bound in vitro to repeated sequences present in a region, parS, that possesses centromere and operator functions and within which we identified the primary transcription start site by primer extension. In certain respects the Par proteins behave normally in the foreign host Escherichia coli. In E. coli, as in A. tumefaciens, ParB repressed the partition operon; ParA, inactive alone, augmented this repression. Functional similarities between the partition system of pTAR and those of other plasmids and bacteria are prominent, despite differences in size, organization, and amino acid sequence.

  6. Structural biology of plasmid partition: uncovering the molecular mechanisms of DNA segregation.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Maria A

    2008-05-15

    DNA segregation or partition is an essential process that ensures stable genome transmission. In prokaryotes, partition is best understood for plasmids, which serve as tractable model systems to study the mechanistic underpinnings of DNA segregation at a detailed atomic level owing to their simplicity. Specifically, plasmid partition requires only three elements: a centromere-like DNA site and two proteins: a motor protein, generally an ATPase, and a centromere-binding protein. In the first step of the partition process, multiple centromere-binding proteins bind co-operatively to the centromere, which typically consists of several tandem repeats, to form a higher-order nucleoprotein complex called the partition complex. The partition complex recruits the ATPase to form the segrosome and somehow activates the ATPase for DNA separation. Two major families of plasmid par systems have been delineated based on whether they utilize ATPase proteins with deviant Walker-type motifs or actin-like folds. In contrast, the centromere-binding proteins show little sequence homology even within a given family. Recent structural studies, however, have revealed that these centromere-binding proteins appear to belong to one of two major structural groups: those that employ helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs or those with ribbon-helix-helix DNA-binding domains. The first structure of a higher-order partition complex was recently revealed by the structure of pSK41 centromere-binding protein, ParR, bound to its centromere site. This structure showed that multiple ParR ribbon-helix-helix motifs bind symmetrically to the tandem centromere repeats to form a large superhelical structure with dimensions suitable for capture of the filaments formed by the actinlike ATPases. Surprisingly, recent data indicate that the deviant Walker ATPase proteins also form polymer-like structures, suggesting that, although the par families harbour what initially appeared to be structurally and functionally

  7. Complex nature of enterococcal pheromone-responsive plasmids.

    PubMed

    Wardal, Ewa; Sadowy, Ewa; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2010-01-01

    Pheromone-responsive plasmids constitute a unique group of approximately 20 plasmids identified, as yet, only among enterococcal species. Several of their representatives, e.g. pAD1, pCF10, pPD1 and pAM373 have been extensively studied. These plasmids possess a sophisticated conjugation mechanism based on response to sex pheromones--small peptides produced by plasmid-free recipient cells. Detailed analysis of regulation and function of the pheromone response process revealed its great complexity and dual role--in plasmid conjugation and modulation of enterococcal virulence. Among other functional modules identified in pheromone plasmids, the stabilization/partition systems play a crucial role in stable maintenance of the plasmid molecule in host bacteria. Among them, the par locus of pAD1 is one of the exceptional RNA addiction systems. Pheromone-responsive plasmids contribute also to enterococcal phenotype being an important vehicle of antibiotic resistance in this genus. Both types of acquired vancomycin resistance determinants, vanA and vanB, as well many other resistant phenotypes, were found to be located on these plasmids. They also encode two basic agents of enterococcal virulence, i.e. aggregation substance (AS) and cytolysin. AS participates in mating-pair formation during conjugation but can also facilitate the adherence ofenterococci to human tissues during infection. The second protein, cytolysin, displays hemolytic activity and helps to invade eukaryotic cells. There are still many aspects of the nature of pheromone plasmids that remain unclear and more detailed studies are needed to understand their uniqueness and complexity.

  8. Partition of the linear plasmid N15: interactions of N15 partition functions with the sop locus of the F plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ravin, N; Lane, D

    1999-11-01

    A locus close to one end of the linear N15 prophage closely resembles the sop operon which governs partition of the F plasmid; the promoter region contains similar operator sites, and the two putative gene products have extensive amino acid identity with the SopA and -B proteins of F. Our aim was to ascertain whether the N15 sop homologue functions in partition, to identify the centromere site, and to examine possible interchangeability of function with the F Sop system. When expressed at a moderate level, N15 SopA and -B proteins partly stabilize mini-F which lacks its own sop operon but retains the sopC centromere. The stabilization does not depend on increased copy number. Likewise, an N15 mutant with most of its sop operon deleted is partly stabilized by F Sop proteins and fully stabilized by its own. Four inverted repeat sequences similar to those of sopC were located in N15. They are distant from the sop operon and from each other. Two of these were shown to stabilize a mini-F sop deletion mutant when N15 Sop proteins were provided. Provision of the SopA homologue to plasmids with a sopA deletion resulted in further destabilization of the plasmid. The N15 Sop proteins exert effective, but incomplete, repression at the F sop promoter. We conclude that the N15 sop locus determines stable inheritance of the prophage by using dispersed centromere sites. The SopB-centromere and SopA-operator interactions show partial functional overlap between N15 and F. SopA of each plasmid appears to interact with SopB of the other, but in a way that is detrimental to plasmid maintenance.

  9. Extended function of plasmid partition genes: the Sop system of linear phage-plasmid N15 facilitates late gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David

    2008-05-01

    The mitotic stability of the linear plasmid-prophage N15 of Escherichia coli depends on a partition system closely related to that of the F plasmid SopABC. The two Sop systems are distinguished mainly by the arrangement of their centromeric SopB-binding sites, clustered in F (sopC) and dispersed in N15 (IR1 to IR4). Because two of the N15 inverted repeat (IR) sites are located close to elements presumed (by analogy with phage lambda) to regulate late gene expression during the lytic growth of N15, we asked whether Sop partition functions play a role in this process. In N15, a putative Q antiterminator gene is located 6 kb upstream of the probable major late promoter and two intrinsic terminator-like sequences, in contrast to lambda, where the Q gene is adjacent to the late promoter. Northern hybridization and lacZ reporter activity confirmed the identity of the N15 late promoter (p52), demonstrated antiterminator activity of the Q analogue, and located terminator sequences between p52 and the first open reading frame. Following prophage induction, N15 mutated in IR2 (downstream from gene Q) or IR3 (upstream of p52) showed a pronounced delay in lysis relative to that for wild-type N15. Expression of ir3(-)-p52::lacZ during N15 wild-type lytic growth was strongly reduced relative to the equivalent ir3(+) fusion. The provision of Q protein and the IR2 and SopAB proteins in trans to ir3(+)-p52::lacZ increased expression beyond that seen in the absence of any one of these factors. These results indicate that the N15 Sop system has a dual role: partition and regulation of late gene transcription during lytic growth.

  10. Conjugative DNA Transfer Is Enhanced by Plasmid R1 Partitioning Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian J.; Lang, Silvia; Rajendra, Vinod K. H.; Nuk, Monika; Raffl, Sandra; Schildbach, Joel F.; Zechner, Ellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is a form of type IV secretion used to transport protein and DNA directly to recipient bacteria. The process is cell contact-dependent, yet the mechanisms enabling extracellular events to trigger plasmid transfer to begin inside the cell remain obscure. In this study of plasmid R1 we investigated the role of plasmid proteins in the initiation of gene transfer. We find that TraI, the central regulator of conjugative DNA processing, interacts physically, and functionally with the plasmid partitioning proteins ParM and ParR. These interactions stimulate TraI catalyzed relaxation of plasmid DNA in vivo and in vitro and increase ParM ATPase activity. ParM also binds the coupling protein TraD and VirB4-like channel ATPase TraC. Together, these protein-protein interactions probably act to co-localize the transfer components intracellularly and promote assembly of the conjugation machinery. Importantly these data also indicate that the continued association of ParM and ParR at the conjugative pore is necessary for plasmid transfer to start efficiently. Moreover, the conjugative pilus and underlying secretion machinery assembled in the absence of Par proteins mediate poor biofilm formation and are completely dysfunctional for pilus specific R17 bacteriophage uptake. Thus, functional integration of Par components at the interface of relaxosome, coupling protein, and channel ATPases appears important for an optimal conformation and effective activation of the transfer machinery. We conclude that low copy plasmid R1 has evolved an active segregation system that optimizes both its vertical and lateral modes of dissemination. PMID:27486582

  11. ATP-regulated interactions between P1 ParA, ParB and non-specific DNA that are stabilized by the plasmid partition site, parS

    PubMed Central

    Havey, James C.; Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Funnell, Barbara E.

    2012-01-01

    Localization of the P1 plasmid requires two proteins, ParA and ParB, which act on the plasmid partition site, parS. ParB is a site-specific DNA-binding protein and ParA is a Walker-type ATPase with non-specific DNA-binding activity. In vivo ParA binds the bacterial nucleoid and forms dynamic patterns that are governed by the ParB–parS partition complex on the plasmid. How these interactions drive plasmid movement and localization is not well understood. Here we have identified a large protein–DNA complex in vitro that requires ParA, ParB and ATP, and have characterized its assembly by sucrose gradient sedimentation and light scattering assays. ATP binding and hydrolysis mediated the assembly and disassembly of this complex, while ADP antagonized complex formation. The complex was not dependent on, but was stabilized by, parS. The properties indicate that ParA and ParB are binding and bridging multiple DNA molecules to create a large meshwork of protein–DNA molecules that involves both specific and non-specific DNA. We propose that this complex represents a dynamic adaptor complex between the plasmid and nucleoid, and further, that this interaction drives the redistribution of partition proteins and the plasmid over the nucleoid during partition. PMID:21965538

  12. Characterization of the Partitioning System of Myxococcus Plasmid pMF1

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jing; Zhao, Jing-yi; Li, Yue-zhong

    2011-01-01

    pMF1 is the only autonomously replicating plasmid that has been recently identified in myxobacteria. This study characterized the partitioning (par) system of this plasmid. The fragment that significantly increased the retaining stability of plasmids in Myxococcus cells in the absence of selective antibiotics contained three open reading frames (ORFs) pMF1.21-pMF1.23 (parCAB). The pMF1.22 ORF (parA) is homologous to members of the parA ATPase family, with the highest similarity (56%) to the Sphingobium japonicum ParA-like protein, while the other two ORFs had no homologs in GenBank. DNase I footprinting and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the pMF1.23 (parB) product is a DNA-binding protein of iteron DNA sequences, while the product of pMF1.21 (parC) has no binding activity but is able to enhance the DNA-binding activity of ParB to iterons. The ParB protein autogenously repressed the expression of the par genes, consistent with the type Ib par pattern, while the ParC protein has less repressive activity. The ParB-binding iteron sequences are distributed not only near the partitioning gene loci but also along pMF1. These results indicate that the pMF1 par system has novel structural and functional characteristics. PMID:22174771

  13. Excess intracellular concentration of the pSC101 RepA protein interferes with both plasmid DNA replication and partitioning.

    PubMed Central

    Ingmer, H; Cohen, S N

    1993-01-01

    RepA, a plasmid-encoded gene product required for pSC101 replication in Escherichia coli, is shown here to inhibit the replication of pSC101 in vivo when overproduced 4- to 20-fold in trans. Unlike plasmids whose replication is prevented by mutations in the repA gene, plasmids prevented from replicating by overproduction of the RepA protein were lost rapidly from the cell population instead of being partitioned evenly between daughter cells. Removal of the partition (par) locus increased the inhibitory effect of excess RepA on replication, while host and plasmid mutations that compensate for the absence of par, or overproduction of the E. coli DnaA protein, diminished it. A repA mutation (repA46) that elevates pSC101 copy number almost entirely eliminated the inhibitory effect of RepA at high concentration and stimulated replication when the protein was moderately overproduced. As the RepA protein can exist in both monomer and dimer forms, we suggest that overproduction promotes RepA dimerization, reducing the formation of replication initiation complexes that require the RepA monomer and DnaA; we propose that the repA46 mutation alters the ability of the mutant protein to dimerize. Our discovery that an elevated intracellular concentration of RepA specifically impedes plasmid partitioning implies that the RepA-containing complexes initiating pSC101 DNA replication participate also in the distribution of plasmids at cell division. Images PMID:8253672

  14. A Type Ib ParB Protein Involved in Plasmid Partitioning in a Gram-Positive Bacterium▿

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ping; Li, Tai-Yuan; Xie, Mao-Hua; Jiang, Lina; Zhang, Yi

    2006-01-01

    Our current understanding of segregation of prokaryotic plasmids has been derived mainly from the study of the gram-negative bacterial plasmids. We previously reported a replicon of the cryptic plasmid from a gram-positive bacterium, Leifsonia xyli subsp. cynodontis. The replicon contains a putative plasmid partition cassette including a Walker-type ATPase followed by open reading frame 4 without sequence homologue. Here we reported that the orf4 gene was essential for maintaining the plasmid stability in L. xyli subsp. cynodontis. Furthermore, the purified orf4 protein specifically and cooperatively bound to direct repeat sequences located upstream of the parA gene in vitro, indicating that orf4 is a parB gene and that the direct repeat DNA sequences constitute a partition site, parS. The location of parS and the features of ParA and ParB proteins suggest that this plasmid partition cassette belongs to type Ib, representing the first type Ib cassette identified from a gram-positive bacterial plasmid. PMID:16997970

  15. High-copy bacterial plasmids diffuse in the nucleoid-free space, replicate stochastically and are randomly partitioned at cell division.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Tran, Tung; Meas, Diane; Lee, Laura; Li, Alice M; Sherratt, David J; Tolmasky, Marcelo E

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids play important roles in the metabolism, pathogenesis and bacterial evolution and are highly versatile biotechnological tools. Stable inheritance of plasmids depends on their autonomous replication and efficient partition to daughter cells at cell division. Active partition systems have not been identified for high-copy number plasmids, and it has been generally believed that they are partitioned randomly at cell division. Nevertheless, direct evidence for the cellular location of replicating and nonreplicating plasmids, and the partition mechanism has been lacking. We used as model pJHCMW1, a plasmid isolated from Klebsiella pneumoniae that includes two β-lactamase and two aminoglycoside resistance genes. Here we report that individual ColE1-type plasmid molecules are mobile and tend to be excluded from the nucleoid, mainly localizing at the cell poles but occasionally moving between poles along the long axis of the cell. As a consequence, at the moment of cell division, most plasmid molecules are located at the poles, resulting in efficient random partition to the daughter cells. Complete replication of individual molecules occurred stochastically and independently in the nucleoid-free space throughout the cell cycle, with a constant probability of initiation per plasmid.

  16. Agrobacterium tumefaciens pTAR parA promoter region involved in autoregulation, incompatibility and plasmid partitioning.

    PubMed

    Gallie, D R; Kado, C I

    1987-02-05

    The locus responsible for directing proper plasmid partitioning of Agrobacterium tumefaciens pTAR is contained within a 1259 base-pair region. Insertions or deletions within this locus can result in the loss of the plasmid's ability to partition properly. One protein product (parA), approximately 25,000 Mr, is expressed from the par locus in Escherichia coli and A. tumefaciens protein analysis systems in vitro. DNA sequence analysis of the locus revealed a single 23,500 Mr open reading frame, confirming the protein data. A 248 base-pair region immediately upstream from the 23,500 Mr open reading frame, containing an array of 12 seven-base-pair palindromic repeats each of which are separated by exactly ten base-pairs of A + T-rich (75%) sequence, not only serves to provide the promoter but is also involved in parA autoregulation. In addition, this region containing a set of 12 seven-base-pair palindromic repeats, is responsible for plasmid-associated incompatibility within Inc Ag-1 and also functions as the cis-acting recognition site at which parA interacts to bring about partitioning. Transcriptional analysis indicated that only the DNA strand responsible for parA is actively transcribed, and that active transcription of the opposite strand of par can inhibit the production of parA, resulting in plasmid destabilization. The presence of the par locus in a plasmid results in stable inheritance within a wide range of members of Rhizobiaceae. Segregation rates of par-defective derivatives can be influenced by the host.

  17. A Single Gene on the Staphylococcal Multiresistance Plasmid pSK1 Encodes a Novel Partitioning System

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Alice E.; Skurray, Ronald A.; Firth, Neville

    2003-01-01

    The orf245 gene is located immediately upstream of, and divergently transcribed from, the replication initiation gene, rep, of the Staphylococcus aureus multiresistance plasmid pSK1, and related genes have been found in association with a range of evolutionarily distinct replication genes on plasmids from various gram-positive genera. orf245 has been shown previously to extend the segregational stability of a pSK1 minireplicon. Here we describe an investigation into the basis of orf245-mediated stabilization. orf245 was not found to influence transcription of pSK1 rep, indicating that it is not directly involved in plasmid replication. This was confirmed by demonstrating that orf245 is able to enhance the segregational stability of heterologous theta- and rolling-circle-replicating replicons, suggesting that it encodes a plasmid maintenance function. Evidence inconsistent with postsegregational killing and multimer resolution mechanisms was obtained; however, the intergenic region upstream of orf245 was found to mediate orf245-dependent incompatibility, as would be expected if it encodes a cis-acting centromere-like site. Taken together, these findings implicate active partitioning as the probable basis of the activity of orf245, which is therefore redesignated par. Since it is unrelated to any gene known to play a role in plasmid segregation, it seems likely that pSK1 par potentially represents the prototype of a novel class of active partitioning systems that are distinguished by their capacity to enhance plasmid segregational stability via a single protein-encoding gene. PMID:12644483

  18. Bacterial partition complexes segregate within the volume of the nucleoid

    PubMed Central

    Le Gall, Antoine; Cattoni, Diego I.; Guilhas, Baptiste; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Oudjedi, Laura; Fiche, Jean-Bernard; Rech, Jérôme; Abrahamsson, Sara; Murray, Heath; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Nollmann, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Precise and rapid DNA segregation is required for proper inheritance of genetic material. In most bacteria and archaea, this process is assured by a broadly conserved mitotic-like apparatus in which a NTPase (ParA) displaces the partition complex. Competing observations and models imply starkly different 3D localization patterns of the components of the partition machinery during segregation. Here we use super-resolution microscopies to localize in 3D each component of the segregation apparatus with respect to the bacterial chromosome. We show that Par proteins locate within the nucleoid volume and reveal that proper volumetric localization and segregation of partition complexes requires ATPase and DNA-binding activities of ParA. Finally, we find that the localization patterns of the different components of the partition system highly correlate with dense chromosomal regions. We propose a new mechanism in which the nucleoid provides a scaffold to guide the proper segregation of partition complexes. PMID:27377966

  19. The partitioning and copy number control systems of the selfish yeast plasmid: an optimized molecular design for stable persistence in host cells.

    PubMed

    Yen-Ting-Liu; Sau, Saumitra; Ma, Chien-Hui; Kachroo, Aashiq H; Rowley, Paul A; Chang, Keng-Ming; Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Jayaram, Makkuni

    2014-10-01

    The multi-copy 2 micron plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a resident of the nucleus, is remarkable for its high chromosome-like stability. The plasmid does not appear to contribute to the fitness of the host, nor does it impose a significant metabolic burden on the host at its steady state copy number. The plasmid may be viewed as a highly optimized selfish DNA element whose genome design is devoted entirely towards efficient replication, equal segregation and copy number maintenance. A partitioning system comprised of two plasmid coded proteins, Rep1 and Rep2, and a partitioning locus STB is responsible for equal or nearly equal segregation of plasmid molecules to mother and daughter cells. Current evidence supports a model in which the Rep-STB system promotes the physical association of the plasmid with chromosomes and thus plasmid segregation by a hitchhiking mechanism. The Flp site-specific recombination system housed by the plasmid plays a critical role in maintaining steady state plasmid copy number. A decrease in plasmid population due to rare missegregation events is rectified by plasmid amplification via a recombination induced rolling circle replication mechanism. Appropriate plasmid amplification, without runaway increase in copy number, is ensured by positive and negative regulation of FLP gene expression by plasmid coded proteins and by the control of Flp level/activity through host mediated post-translational modification(s) of Flp. The Flp system has been successfully utilized to understand mechanisms of site-specific recombination, to bring about directed genetic alterations for addressing fundamental problems in biology, and as a tool in biotechnological applications.

  20. Partition operon expression in the linear plasmid prophage N15 is controlled by both Sop proteins and protelomerase.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Boris D; Lane, David; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2003-10-01

    The temperate coliphage N15, unlike most low copy-number prokaryotic replicons, is maintained as a linear DNA molecule with covalently closed ends. Accurate partitioning of the plasmid prophage is assured by a close homologue of the sop locus of the F plasmid. However, the region upstream of the N15 sopAB genes contains multiple putative promoters, in contrast to F sop whose expression is driven by one negatively autoregulated promoter. In addition, the centromere of N15 is represented by four inverted repeats located at widely separated sites within the region essential for replication and control of lytic functions. We have analysed expression of N15 sop genes. We find that transcription of N15 sop is driven by two major promoters. The first, P1, is similar in sequence and function to the F sop promoter; it is repressed by Sop proteins. The second promoter, P2, is upstream of P1 and is several times stronger. It is insensitive to regulation by Sop proteins but is tightly repressed by protelomerase, the N15 enzyme that completes prophage replication by generating hairpin telomeres. These results establish a regulatory link between the partition system and other processes of N15 maintenance.

  1. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  2. Commuting quantum circuits and complexity of Ising partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2017-03-01

    Instantaneous quantum polynomial-time (IQP) computation is a class of quantum computation consisting only of commuting two-qubit gates and is not universal. Nevertheless, it has been shown that if there is a classical algorithm that can simulate IQP efficiently, the polynomial hierarchy collapses to the third level, which is highly implausible. However, the origin of the classical intractability is still less understood. Here we establish a relationship between IQP and computational complexity of calculating the imaginary-valued partition functions of Ising models. We apply the established relationship in two opposite directions. One direction is to find subclasses of IQP that are classically efficiently simulatable by using exact solvability of certain types of Ising models. Another direction is applying quantum computational complexity of IQP to investigate (im)possibility of efficient classical approximations of Ising partition functions with imaginary coupling constants. Specifically, we show that a multiplicative approximation of Ising partition functions is #P-hard for almost all imaginary coupling constants even on planar lattices of a bounded degree.

  3. Reconstructing the complex evolutionary history of mobile plasmids in red algal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JunMo; Kim, Kyeong Mi; Yang, Eun Chan; Miller, Kathy Ann; Boo, Sung Min; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2016-01-01

    The integration of foreign DNA into algal and plant plastid genomes is a rare event, with only a few known examples of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Plasmids, which are well-studied drivers of HGT in prokaryotes, have been reported previously in red algae (Rhodophyta). However, the distribution of these mobile DNA elements and their sites of integration into the plastid (ptDNA), mitochondrial (mtDNA), and nuclear genomes of Rhodophyta remain unknown. Here we reconstructed the complex evolutionary history of plasmid-derived DNAs in red algae. Comparative analysis of 21 rhodophyte ptDNAs, including new genome data for 5 species, turned up 22 plasmid-derived open reading frames (ORFs) that showed syntenic and copy number variation among species, but were conserved within different individuals in three lineages. Several plasmid-derived homologs were found not only in ptDNA but also in mtDNA and in the nuclear genome of green plants, stramenopiles, and rhizarians. Phylogenetic and plasmid-derived ORF analyses showed that the majority of plasmid DNAs originated within red algae, whereas others were derived from cyanobacteria, other bacteria, and viruses. Our results elucidate the evolution of plasmid DNAs in red algae and suggest that they spread as parasitic genetic elements. This hypothesis is consistent with their sporadic distribution within Rhodophyta. PMID:27030297

  4. Enantioselective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA catalyzed by chiral macrocyclic lanthanide(III) complexes.

    PubMed

    Krężel, Artur; Lisowski, Jerzy

    2012-02-01

    The enantiomers of the Sm (III), Eu (III) and Yb (III) complexes [LnL(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) of a chiral hexaazamacrocycle were tested as catalysts for the hydrolytic cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA. The catalytic activity was remarkably enantioselective; while the [LnL(SSSS)(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) enantiomers promoted the cleavage of plasmid pBR322 from the supercoiled form (SC) to the nicked form (NC), the [LnL(RRRR)(NO(3))(2)](NO(3)) enantiomers were inactive. Kinetics of plasmid DNA hydrolysis was also investigated by agarose electrophoresis and it indicated typical single-exponential cleavage reaction. The hydrolytic mechanism of DNA cleavage was confirmed by the successful ligation of hydrolysis product by T4 ligase. The NMR study of the solutions of the complexes in various buffers indicated that the complexes exist as monomeric cationic complexes [LnL(H(2)O)(3)](3+) in slightly acidic solutions and as dimeric cationic complexes [Ln(2)L(2)(μ-OH)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](4+) in slightly basic 8mM solutions, with the latter form being a possible catalyst for hydrolysis of phosphodiester bonds.

  5. Complex dissemination of the diversified mcr-1-harbouring plasmids in Escherichia coli of different sequence types

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jingxia; Wang, Xiuna; Deng, Xianbo; Feng, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the mobilized colistin resistance gene, representing a novel mechanism for bacterial drug resistance, challenges the last resort against the severe infections by Gram-negative bacteria with multi-drug resistances. Very recently, we showed the diversity in the mcr-1-carrying plasmid reservoirs from the gut microbiota. Here, we reported that a similar but more complex scenario is present in the healthy swine populations, Southern China, 2016. Amongst the 1026 pieces of Escherichia coli isolates from 3 different pig farms, 302 E. coli isolates were determined to be positive for the mcr-1 gene (30%, 302/1026). Multi-locus sequence typing assigned no less than 11 kinds of sequence types including one novel Sequence Type to these mcr-1-positive strains. PCR analyses combined with the direct DNA sequencing revealed unexpected complexity of the mcr-1-harbouring plasmids whose backbones are at least grouped into 6 types four of which are new. Transcriptional analyses showed that the mcr-1 promoter of different origins exhibits similar activity. It seems likely that complex dissemination of the diversified mcr-1-bearing plasmids occurs amongst the various ST E. coli inhabiting the healthy swine populations, in Southern China. PMID:27741523

  6. Structural complexity of the symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli.

    PubMed Central

    Girard, M L; Flores, M; Brom, S; Romero, D; Palacios, R; Dávila, G

    1991-01-01

    The complete physical map of the symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. phaseoli strain CFN42 was established. The data support the concept that Rhizobium symbiotic genes are part of a complex genomic structure which contains a large amount of reiterated DNA sequences. This plasmid is a circular structure of 390 kb with approximately 10 families of internally reiterated DNA sequences of two to three elements each. One family includes two directly oriented nitrogenase operons situated 120 kb apart. We also found several stretches of pSym that are reiterated in other replicons of the cell. Localization of symbiotic gene sequences by heterologous hybridization revealed that nodABC sequences are separated in two regions, each of which contains a nod boxlike element, and it also suggested the presence of two copies of the nifA and nodD gene sequences. We propose that the complex structure of the symbiotic plasmid allows interactions between repeated DNA sequences which, in turn, might result in frequent rearrangements. Images PMID:2013564

  7. Efficient plasmid DNA cleavage by a mononuclear copper(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Sissi, Claudia; Mancin, Fabrizio; Gatos, Maddalena; Palumbo, Manlio; Tecilla, Paolo; Tonellato, Umberto

    2005-04-04

    The Cu(II) complex of the ligand all-cis-2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trihydroxycyclohexane (TACI) is a very efficient catalyst of the cleavage of plasmid DNA in the absence of any added cofactor. The maximum rate of degradation of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form, obtained at pH 8.1 and 37 degrees C, in the presence of 48 microM TACI.Cu(II), is 2.3 x 10(-3) s(-1), corresponding to a half-life time of only 5 min for the cleavage of form I (supercoiled) to form II (relaxed circular). The dependence of the rate of plasmid DNA cleavage from the TACI.Cu(II) complex concentration follows an unusual and very narrow bell-like profile, which suggests an high DNA affinity of the complexes but also a great tendency to form unreactive dimers. The reactivity of the TACI.Cu(II) complexes is not affected by the presence of several scavengers for reactive oxygen species or when measured under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, no degradation of the radical reporter Rhodamine B is observed in the presence of such complexes. These results are consistent with the operation of a prevailing hydrolytic pathway under the normal conditions used, although the failure to obtain enzymatic religation of the linearized DNA does not allow one to rule out the occurrence of a nonhydrolytic oxygen-independent cleavage. A concurrent oxidative mechanism becomes competitive upon addition of reductants or in the presence of high levels of molecular oxygen: under such conditions, in fact, a remarkable increase in the rate of DNA cleavage is observed.

  8. The mechanism of plasmid curing in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Gabriella; Molnár, Annamária; Schelz, Zsuzsanna; Amaral, Leonard; Sharples, Derek; Molnár, Joseph

    2006-07-01

    Bacterial plasmids have a major impact on metabolic function. Lactose fermentation of E. coli or hemolysin B transporter expressed by the plasmids that carry these respective genes could be readily obviated by heterocyclic compounds that readily bind to plasmid DNA. These compounds could also reverse the resistance to antibiotics of E. coli, Enterobacter, Proteus, Staphylococcus and Yersinia strains by eliminating plasmids. However, the frequency and extent of this effect was significantly less than might have been expected based on a complex interaction with plasmid DNA. The effects of heterocyclic compounds on the plasmids responsible for the virulence of Yersinia and A. tumefaciens, or on nodulation, nitrogen fixation of Rhizobia accounted for the elimination of 0.1 to 1.0 % of plasmids present in the populations studied. Bacterial plasmids can be eliminated from bacterial species grown as pure or mixed bacterial cultures in the presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of non-mutagenic heterocyclic compounds. The antiplasmid action of the compounds depends on the chemical structure of amphiphillic compounds having a planar ring system with substitution in the L-molecular region. A symmetrical pi-electron conjugation at the highest occupied molecular orbitals favours the antiplasmid effect. The antiplasmid effect of heterocyclic compounds is expressed differentially in accordance with the structural form of the DNA to which they bind. In this manner "extrachromosomal" plasmid DNA that exists in a superhelical state binds more compound than its linear or open-circular form; and least to the chromosomal DNA of the bacterium, that carries the plasmid. It can also be noted that these compounds are not mutagenic and their antiplasmid effects correlate with the energy of HOMO-orbitals. Plasmid elimination is considered also to take place in ecosystems containing numerous bacterial species. This opens up a new perspective in rational drug design against bacterial

  9. Protein Diversity Confers Specificity in Plasmid Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, Timothy J. G.; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-01-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation. PMID:15805511

  10. Protein diversity confers specificity in plasmid segregation.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-04-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation.

  11. Bacterial Genome Partitioning: N-Terminal Domain of IncC Protein Encoded by Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RK2 Modulates Oligomerisation and DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Batt, Sarah M.; Bingle, Lewis E.H.; Dafforn, Tim R.; Thomas, Christopher M.

    2009-01-01

    ParA Walker ATPases form part of the machinery that promotes better-than-random segregation of bacterial genomes. ParA proteins normally occur in one of two forms, differing by their N-terminal domain (NTD) of approximately 100 aa, which is generally associated with site-specific DNA binding. Unusually, and for as yet unknown reasons, parA (incC) of IncP-1 plasmids is translated from alternative start codons producing two forms, IncC1 (364 aa) and IncC2 (259 aa), whose ratio varies between hosts. IncC2 could be detected as an oligomeric form containing dimers, tetramers and octamers, but the N-terminal extension present in IncC1 favours nucleotide-stimulated dimerisation as well as high-affinity and ATP-dependent non-specific DNA binding. The IncC1 NTD does not dimerise or bind DNA alone, but it does bind IncC2 in the presence of nucleotides. Mixing IncC1 and IncC2 improved polymerisation and DNA binding. Thus, the NTD may modulate the polymerisation interface, facilitating polymerisation/depolymerisation and DNA binding, to promote the cycle that drives partitioning. PMID:19109978

  12. Dinuclear Zinc (II) Complexes of Macrocyclic Polyamine Ligands Containing an Imidazolium Bridge: Synthesis, Characterization, and Their Interaction with Plasmid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Huang, Qing-Dong; Zhang, Ji; Zhou, Li-Hong; Li, Qiang-Lin; Li, Kun; Jiang, Ning; Lin, Hong-Hui; Wu, Jiang; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2007-01-01

    Two novel macrocyclic polyamine ligands and their dinuclear zinc (II) complexes were synthesized and characterized. Their interaction with plasmid DNA was studied by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence quenching experiment. The result showed that these complexes could bind DNA efficiently under physiological conditions.

  13. Chemical Partition of the Radiative Decay Rate of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-01-01

    The spontaneous emission coefficient, Arad, a global molecular property, is one of the most important quantities related to the luminescence of complexes of lanthanide ions. In this work, by suitable algebraic transformations of the matrices involved, we introduce a partition that allows us to compute, for the first time, the individual effects of each ligand on Arad, a property of the molecule as a whole. Such a chemical partition thus opens possibilities for the comprehension of the role of each of the ligands and their interactions on the luminescence of europium coordination compounds. As an example, we applied the chemical partition to the case of repeating non-ionic ligand ternary complexes of europium(III) with DBM, TTA, and BTFA, showing that it allowed us to correctly order, in an a priori manner, the non-obvious pair combinations of non-ionic ligands that led to mixed-ligand compounds with larger values of Arad. PMID:26892900

  14. Chemical Partition of the Radiative Decay Rate of Luminescence of Europium Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Nathalia B. D.; Dutra, José Diogo L.; Gonçalves, Simone M. C.; Freire, Ricardo O.; Simas, Alfredo M.

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous emission coefficient, Arad, a global molecular property, is one of the most important quantities related to the luminescence of complexes of lanthanide ions. In this work, by suitable algebraic transformations of the matrices involved, we introduce a partition that allows us to compute, for the first time, the individual effects of each ligand on Arad, a property of the molecule as a whole. Such a chemical partition thus opens possibilities for the comprehension of the role of each of the ligands and their interactions on the luminescence of europium coordination compounds. As an example, we applied the chemical partition to the case of repeating non-ionic ligand ternary complexes of europium(III) with DBM, TTA, and BTFA, showing that it allowed us to correctly order, in an a priori manner, the non-obvious pair combinations of non-ionic ligands that led to mixed-ligand compounds with larger values of Arad.

  15. Degradative plasmids from sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Large plasmids ('megaplasmids') are commonly found in members of the Alphaproteobacterial family Sphingomonadaceae ('sphingomonads'). These plasmids contribute to the extraordinary catabolic flexibility of this group of organisms, which degrade a broad range of recalcitrant xenobiotic compounds. The genomes of several sphingomonads have been sequenced during the last years. In the course of these studies, also the sequences of several plasmids have been determined. The analysis of the published information and the sequences deposited in the public databases allowed a first classification of these plasmids into a restricted number of groups according to the proteins involved in the initiation of replication, plasmid partition and conjugation. The sequence comparisons demonstrated that the plasmids from sphingomonads encode for four main groups of replication initiation (Rep) proteins. These Rep proteins belong to the protein superfamilies RepA_C (Pfam 04796), Rep_3 (Pfam 01051), RPA (Pfam 10134) and HTH-36 (Pfam 13730). The 'degradative megaplasmids' pNL2, pCAR3, pSWIT02, pCHQ1, pISP0, and pISP1, which code for genes involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, carbazole, dibenzo-p-dioxin and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, carry Rep proteins which either belong to the RepA_C- (plasmids pNL2, pCAR3, pSWIT02), Rep-3- (plasmids pCHQ1, pISP0) or RPA-superfamily (pISP1). The classification of these 'degradative megaplasmids' into three groups is also supported by sequence comparisons of the proteins involved in plasmid partition (ParAB) and the organization of the three genes on the respective plasmids. All analysed 'degradative megaplasmids' carry genes, which might allow a conjugative transfer of the plasmids. Sequence comparisons of these genes suggest the presence of at least two types of transfer functions, which either are closer related to the tra- or vir-genes previously described for plasmids from other sources.

  16. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    PubMed

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  17. Photoinduced interactions of supramolecular ruthenium(II) complexes with plasmid DNA: synthesis and spectroscopic, electrochemical, and DNA photocleavage studies.

    PubMed

    Swavey, Shawn; DeBeer, Madeleine; Li, Kaiyu

    2015-04-06

    Two new bridging ligands have been synthesized by combining substituted benzaldehydes with phenanthrolinopyrrole (php), resulting in new polyazine bridging ligands. The ligands have been characterized by (1)H NMR, mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. These new ligands display π-π* transitions above 500 nm with modest molar absorptivities. Upon excitation at the ligand-centered charge-transfer transition, weak emission with a maximum wavelength of 612 nm is observed. When coordinated to two ruthenium(II) bis(bipyridyl) groups, the new bimetallic complexes generated give an overall 4+ charge. The electronic transitions of the bimetallic ruthenium(II) complexes display traditional π-π* transitions at 287 nm and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer transitions at 452 nm with molar absorptivities greater than 30000 M(-1) cm(-1). Oxidation of the ruthenium(II) metal centers to ruthenium(III) occurs at potentials above 1.4 V versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Spectroscopic and electrochemical measurements indicate that the ruthenium(II) moieties behave independently. Both complexes are water-soluble and show the ability to photonick plasmid DNA when irradiated with low-energy light above 550 nm. In addition, one of the complexes, [Ru(bpy)2php]2Van(4+), shows the ability to linearize plasmid DNA and gives evidence, by gel electrophoresis, of photoinduced binding to plasmid DNA.

  18. Molecular Characterization of Adenylyl Cyclase Complex Proteins Using Versatile Protein-Tagging Plasmid Systems in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    So, Yee-Seul; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Huh, Won-Ki; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2017-02-28

    In this study, we aimed to generate a series of versatile tagging plasmids that can be used in diverse molecular biological studies of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We constructed 12 plasmids that can be used to tag a protein of interest with a GFP, mCherry, 4×FLAG, or 6×HA, along with nourseothricin-, neomycin-, or hygromycin-resistant selection markers. Using this tagging plasmid set, we explored the adenylyl cyclase complex (ACC), consisting of adenylyl cyclase (Cac1) and its associated protein Aca1, in the cAMP-signaling pathway, which is critical for the pathogenicity of C. neoformans. We found that Cac1-mCherry and Aca1-GFP were mainly colocalized as punctate forms in the cell membrane and nonnuclear cellular organelles. We also demonstrated that Cac1 and Aca1 interacted in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation, using Cac1-6×HA and Aca1-4×FLAG tagging strains. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation further confirmed the in vivo interaction of Cac1 and Aca1 in live cells. Finally, protein pull-down experiments using aca1Δ::ACA1-GFP and aca1Δ::ACA1- GFP cac1Δ strains and comparative mass spectrometry analysis identified Cac1 and a number of other novel ACC-interacting proteins. Thus, this versatile tagging plasmid system will facilitate diverse mechanistic studies in C. neoformans and further our understanding of its biology.

  19. Size effect on transfection and cytotoxicity of nanoscale plasmid DNA/polyethyleneimine complexes for aerosol gene delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon Byeon, Jeong; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2014-02-03

    Nanoscale plasmid DNA (pDNA)/polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes were fabricated in the aerosol state using a nebulization system consisting of a collison atomizer and a cool-walled diffusion dryer. The aerosol fabricated nanoscale complexes were collected and employed to determine fundamental properties of the complexes, such as size, structure, surface charge, and in vitro gene transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity. The results showed that mass ratio between pDNA and PEI should be optimized to enhance gene transfection efficiency without a significant loss of cell viability. These findings may support practical advancements in the field of nonviral gene delivery.

  20. Calculation of equilibrium stable isotope partition function ratios for aqueous zinc complexes and metallic zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Jay R.; Kavner, Abby; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this study is to determine reduced partition function ratios for a variety of species of zinc, both as a metal and in aqueous solutions in order to calculate equilibrium stable isotope partitioning. We present calculations of the magnitude of Zn stable-isotope fractionation ( 66,67,68Zn/ 64Zn) between aqueous species and metallic zinc using measured vibrational spectra (fit from neutron scattering studies of metallic zinc) and a variety of electronic structure models. The results show that the reduced metal, Zn(0), will be light in equilibrium with oxidized Zn(II) aqueous species, with the best estimates for the Zn(II)-Zn(0) fractionation between hexaquo species and metallic zinc being Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 1.6‰ at 25 °C, and Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 0.8‰ between the tetrachloro zinc complex and metallic zinc at 25 °C using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and basis set. To examine the behavior of zinc in various aqueous solution chemistries, models for Zn(II) complex speciation were used to determine which species are thermodynamically favorable and abundant under a variety of different conditions relevant to natural waters, experimental and industrial solutions. The optimal molecular geometries for [Zn(H 2O) 6] 2+, [Zn(H 2O) 6]·SO 4, [ZnCl 4] 2- and [Zn(H 2O) 3(C 3H 5O(COO) 3)] - complexes in various states of solvation, protonation and coordination were calculated at various levels of electronic structure theory and basis set size. Isotopic reduced partition function ratios were calculated from frequency analyses of these optimized structures. Increasing the basis set size typically led to a decrease in the calculated reduced partition function ratios of ˜0.5‰ with values approaching a plateau using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set or larger. The widest range of species were studied at the B3LYP/LAN2DZ/6-31G ∗ level of theory and basis-set size for comparison. Aqueous zinc complexes where oxygen is bound to the metal center tended to have the

  1. Crystal Structure of pi Initiator Protein-iteron Complex of Plasmid R6K: Implications for Initiation of Plasmid DNA Replication

    SciTech Connect

    Swan,M.; Bastia, D.; Davies, C.

    2006-01-01

    We have determined the crystal structure of a monomeric biologically active form of the {pi} initiator protein of plasmid R6K as a complex with a single copy of its cognate DNA-binding site (iteron) at 3.1-{angstrom} resolution. The initiator belongs to the family of winged helix type of proteins. The structure reveals that the protein contacts the iteron DNA at two primary recognition helices, namely the C-terminal {alpha}4' and the N-terminal {alpha}4 helices, that recognize the 5' half and the 3' half of the 22-bp iteron, respectively. The base-amino acid contacts are all located in {alpha}4', whereas the {alpha}4 helix and its vicinity mainly contact the phosphate groups of the iteron. Mutational analyses show that the contacts of both recognition helices with DNA are necessary for iteron binding and replication initiation. Considerations of a large number of site-directed mutations reveal that two distinct regions, namely {alpha}2 and {alpha}5 and its vicinity, are required for DNA looping and initiator dimerization, respectively. Further analysis of mutant forms of {pi} revealed the possible domain that interacts with the DnaB helicase. Thus, the structure-function analysis presented illuminates aspects of initiation mechanism of R6K and its control.

  2. Recursive partitioning analysis of complex disease pharmacogenetic studies. I. Motivation and overview.

    PubMed

    Young, S Stanley; Ge, Nanxiang

    2005-01-01

    Identifying genetic variation predictive of important phenotypes, including disease susceptibility, drug efficacy, and adverse events, is a challenging task, and theory and computer science work is being carried out in an attempt to tackle this issue. For many important diseases, such as diabetes, schizophrenia, and depression, the etiology is complex; either the disease is a result of several multiple mechanisms or is caused by an interaction among multiple genes or gene-environment interactions, or both. There is a need for statistical methods to deal with the large, complex data sets that will be used to disentangle these diseases. Each putative genetic polymorphism can be tested for association sequentially. The most difficult problem, however, is the identification of combinations of polymorphisms or genetic markers with increased predictive characteristics. Data from clinical trials, where patients with a particular disease are treated with certain drugs, can be retrospectively assembled using a case-control design. Such data will typically include treatment assignment, demographics, medical history, and genotypes for a large number of genetic markers. The number of variables in such data is expected to be much larger than the number of subjects. This report focuses on some of the methods being employed to deal with this complex data and covers, in some detail, a data-mining method--recursive partitioning--to analyze such data. The methods are demonstrated using a complex simulated data set, as there are few available public data sets. This explication of recursive partitioning should provide researchers with a better idea of the current available analysis techniques, in order to allow them to plan their experiments more effectively.

  3. Engineering Complex Microbial Phenotypes with Continuous Genetic Integration and Plasmid Based Multi-gene Library

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-09

    control LoxSp strains under ethanol stress were investigated to determine if the generated strain had enhanced tolerance in alcohol . It must be...the control plasmid (pDEST-gus) with 3 different alcohols . (A) Cells were grown in LB medium with 50 g/l ethanol . (B) Cells were grown in LB medium... ethanol tolerance Examined effects of iron transporters on oxidative stress in E. coli Impact: Significant improvements in alcohol and oxidative

  4. Iteron Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Igor; Bury, Katarzyna; Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Iteron-containing plasmids are model systems for studying the metabolism of extrachromosomal genetic elements in bacterial cells. Here we describe the current knowledge and understanding of the structure of iteron-containing replicons, the structure of the iteron plasmid encoded replication initiation proteins, and the molecular mechanisms for iteron plasmid DNA replication initiation. We also discuss the current understanding of control mechanisms affecting the plasmid copy number and how host chaperone proteins and proteases can affect plasmid maintenance in bacterial cells.

  5. Enhanced suppression of tumor growth using a combination of NK4 plasmid DNA-PEG engrafted cationized dextran complex and ultrasound irradiation.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, H; Kushibiki, T; Matsumoto, K; Nakamura, T; Tabata, Y

    2006-05-01

    This investigation aims to determine experimentally whether or not ultrasound (US) irradiation is effective in enhancing the in vivo gene expression of NK4 plasmid DNA and suppressing tumor growth. NK4, composed of the NH2-terminal hairpin and subsequent four-kringle domains of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), acts as an HGF-antagonist and angiogenesis inhibitor. Dextran was cationized by introducing spermine to the hydroxyl groups to allow for polyionic complexation with NK4 plasmid DNA. The cationized dextran was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules giving PEG engrafted cationized dextran. Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed when PEG engrafted cationized dextran-NK4 plasmid DNA complexes were intravenously injected into mice carrying a subcutaneous Lewis lung carcinoma tumor mass with subsequent US irradiation when compared with the cationized dextran-NK4 plasmid DNA complex and naked NK4 plasmid DNA with or without US irradiation. We conclude that complexation with PEG-engrafted cationized dextran in combination with US irradiation is a promising way to target the NK4 plasmid DNA to the tumor for gene expression.

  6. The Agrobacterium Ti Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Christie, Peter J; Gordon, Jay E

    2014-12-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen with the capacity to deliver a segment of oncogenic DNA carried on a large plasmid called the tumor-inducing or Ti plasmid to susceptible plant cells. A. tumefaciens belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria, whose members include other plant pathogens (Agrobacterium rhizogenes), plant and insect symbionts (Rhizobium spp. and Wolbachia spp., respectively), human pathogens (Brucella spp., Bartonella spp., Rickettsia spp.), and nonpathogens (Caulobacter crescentus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides). Many species of Alphaproteobacteria carry large plasmids ranging in size from ∼100 kb to nearly 2 Mb. These large replicons typically code for functions essential for cell physiology, pathogenesis, or symbiosis. Most of these elements rely on a conserved gene cassette termed repABC for replication and partitioning, and maintenance at only one or a few copies per cell. The subject of this review is the ∼200-kb Ti plasmids carried by infectious strains of A. tumefaciens. We will summarize the features of this plasmid as a representative of the repABC family of megaplasmids. We will also describe novel features of this plasmid that enable A. tumefaciens cells to incite tumor formation in plants, sense and respond to an array of plant host and bacterial signal molecules, and maintain and disseminate the plasmid among populations of agrobacteria. At the end of this review, we will describe how this natural genetic engineer has been adapted to spawn an entire industry of plant biotechnology and review its potential for use in future therapeutic applications of plant and nonplant species.

  7. Development of a full automation solid phase microextraction method for investigating the partition coefficient of organic pollutant in complex sample.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruifen; Lin, Wei; Wen, Sijia; Zhu, Fang; Luan, Tiangang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2015-08-07

    A fully automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) depletion method was developed to study the partition coefficient of organic compound between complex matrix and water sample. The SPME depletion process was conducted by pre-loading the fiber with a specific amount of organic compounds from a proposed standard gas generation vial, and then desorbing the fiber into the targeted samples. Based on the proposed method, the partition coefficients (Kmatrix) of 4 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between humic acid (HA)/hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-HPCD) and aqueous sample were determined. The results showed that the logKmatrix of 4 PAHs with HA and β-HPCD ranged from 3.19 to 4.08, and 2.45 to 3.15, respectively. In addition, the logKmatrix values decreased about 0.12-0.27 log units for different PAHs for every 10°C increase in temperature. The effect of temperature on the partition coefficient followed van't Hoff plot, and the partition coefficient at any temperature can be predicted based on the plot. Furthermore, the proposed method was applied for the real biological fluid analysis. The partition coefficients of 6 PAHs between the complex matrices in the fetal bovine serum and water were determined, and compared to ones obtained from SPME extraction method. The result demonstrated that the proposed method can be applied to determine the sorption coefficients of hydrophobic compounds between complex matrix and water in a variety of samples.

  8. Prevalence and significance of plasmid maintenance functions in the virulence plasmids of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Manjistha; Austin, Stuart

    2011-07-01

    Virulence functions of pathogenic bacteria are often encoded on large extrachromosomal plasmids. These plasmids are maintained at low copy number to reduce the metabolic burden on their host. Low-copy-number plasmids risk loss during cell division. This is countered by plasmid-encoded systems that ensure that each cell receives at least one plasmid copy. Plasmid replication and recombination can produce plasmid multimers that hinder plasmid segregation. These are removed by multimer resolution systems. Equitable distribution of the resulting monomers to daughter cells is ensured by plasmid partition systems that actively segregate plasmid copies to daughter cells in a process akin to mitosis in higher organisms. Any plasmid-free cells that still arise due to occasional failures of replication, multimer resolution, or partition are eliminated by plasmid-encoded postsegregational killing systems. Here we argue that all of these three systems are essential for the stable maintenance of large low-copy-number plasmids. Thus, they should be found on all large virulence plasmids. Where available, well-annotated sequences of virulence plasmids confirm this. Indeed, virulence plasmids often appear to contain more than one example conforming to each of the three system classes. Since these systems are essential for virulence, they can be regarded as ubiquitous virulence factors. As such, they should be informative in the search for new antibacterial agents and drug targets.

  9. Europium coordination complexes as potential anticancer drugs: their partitioning and permeation into lipid bilayers as revealed by pyrene fluorescence quenching.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya; Yudintsev, Andrey; Limanskaya, Ludmila; Gorbenko, Galyna; Deligeorgiev, Todor

    2013-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the membrane-associating properties of a series of novel antitumor agents, Eu(III) coordination complexes (EC), using the pyrene fluorescence quenching as an analytical instrument. Analysis of EC-induced decrease in pyrene fluorescence intensity in terms of partition and solubility-diffusion models allowed us to evaluate the partition and permeation coefficients of the examined compounds into the lipid vesicles prepared from zwitterionic lipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with cholesterol (Chol) and anionic lipid cardiolipin (CL). The drug-lipid interactions were found to have the complex nature determined by both EC structure and lipid bilayer composition. High values of the obtained partition and permeation coefficients create the background for the development of EC liposomal formulations.

  10. Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary transtension and strain partitioning in the Chugach Accretionary Complex, SE Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.S.; Roeske, S.M.; Karl, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Shear zones in the Late Cretaceous Sitka Graywacke of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeast Alaska record constrictional finite strains, with maximum principal s tretches plunging shallowly subparallel to strike of the shear zones. Macrostructural analysis indicates the finite strain formed during one deformation event. Microstructural analysis of the shear zones shows that this deformation is ductile, promoted mostly through deformation of low-strength lithic clasts and pressure solution. Kinematic indicators from some of the shear zones indicate dominantly dextral motion. Although multiple scenarios can explain constrictional finite strains in a shear zone, these dextral strike-slip shear zones must have experienced a component of extension across them in order to generate constrictional finite strains. Therefore, the shear zones are dextral transtensional shear zones, an uncommon tectinic regime in an accretionary complex. The transtensional shear zones reflect strike-slip motion related to partitioning of Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary right-oblique convergence between North America and the Farallon plate. The extensional component that was superposed on the strike-slip shear zones to generate transtension resulted from contemporaneous collapse of the forearc following thickening related to underplating.Shear zones in the Late Cretaceous Sitka Graywacke of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeast Alaska record constrictional finite strains, with maximum principal stretches plunging shallowy sub-parallel to strike of the shear zones. Macrostructural analysis indicates the finite strain formed during one deformation event. Microstructural analysis of the shear zones shows that this deformation is ductile, promoted mostly through deformation of low-strength lithic clasts and pressure solution. Kinematic indicators from some of the shear zones indicate dominantly dextral motion. Although multiple scenarios can explain constrictional finite strains

  11. Inhibition of endonuclease cleavage and DNA replication of E. coli plasmid by the antitumor rhodium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Masudur; Yasuda, Hachiro; Katsura, Shinji; Mizuno, Akira

    2007-08-01

    Binding effect of the antitumor complex rhodium(II) acetate [Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4)] (Rh1) to the plasmid pUC19 DNA has been studied under different molar ratio of Rh1 compound to base pair of pUC19 DNA (R(f)) and reaction time. The Rh1 binding inhibited the activity of restriction enzyme. The binding effect was monitored using gel electrophoresis. The results indicate that at least one Rh1 binds with the recognition sequence and the binding has no preference between A-T and G-C pairs. At high value of R(f)=100, ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) measurement confirmed that 46% of Rh1 binds to DNA. PCR amplification of the DNA was also inhibited by the Rh1 binding. The transformation experiment using Escherichia coli suggested that the cell growth was inhibited after binding the Rh1 to the plasmid. These results indicated that DNA synthesis could be inhibited both in vitro and in vivo by the Rh(2)(O(2)CCH(3))(4) binding.

  12. Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary transtension and strain partitioning in the Chugach accretionary complex, SE Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J. Steven; Roeske, Sarah M.; Karl, Sue M.

    1998-05-01

    Shear zones in the Late Cretaceous Sitka Graywacke of the Chugach accretionary complex in southeast Alaska record constrictional finite strains, with maximum principal stretches plunging shallowly subparallel to strike of the shear zones. Macrostructural analysis indicates the finite strain formed during one deformation event. Microstructural analysis of the shear zones shows that this deformation is ductile, promoted mostly through deformation of low-strength lithic clasts and pressure solution. Kinematic indicators from some of the shear zones indicate dominantly dextral motion. Although multiple scenarios can explain constrictional finite strains in a shear zone, these dextral strike-slip shear zones must have experienced a component of extension across them in order to generate constrictional finite strains. Therefore, the shear zones are dextral transtensional shear zones, an uncommon tectonic regime in an accretionary complex. The transtensional shear zones reflect strike-slip motion related to partitioning of Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary right-oblique convergence between North America and the Farallon plate. The extensional component that was superposed on the strike-slip shear zones to generate transtension resulted from contemporaneous collapse of the forearc following thickening related to underplating.

  13. NMDA receptors are selectively partitioned into complexes and supercomplexes during synapse maturation

    PubMed Central

    Frank, René A. W.; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Ryan, Tomás J.; Zhu, Fei; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2016-01-01

    How neuronal proteomes self-organize is poorly understood because of their inherent molecular and cellular complexity. Here, focusing on mammalian synapses we use blue-native PAGE and ‘gene-tagging' of GluN1 to report the first biochemical purification of endogenous NMDA receptors (NMDARs) directly from adult mouse brain. We show that NMDARs partition between two discrete populations of receptor complexes and ∼1.5 MDa supercomplexes. We tested the assembly mechanism with six mouse mutants, which indicates a tripartite requirement of GluN2B, PSD93 and PSD95 gate the incorporation of receptors into ∼1.5 MDa supercomplexes, independent of either canonical PDZ-ligands or GluN2A. Supporting the essential role of GluN2B, quantitative gene-tagging revealed a fourfold molar excess of GluN2B over GluN2A in adult forebrain. NMDAR supercomplexes are assembled late in postnatal development and triggered by synapse maturation involving epigenetic and activity-dependent mechanisms. Finally, screening the quaternary organization of 60 native proteins identified numerous discrete supercomplexes that populate the mammalian synapse. PMID:27117477

  14. Characterization of a targeted gene carrier, lactose-polyethylene glycol-grafted poly-L-lysine and its complex with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Choi, Y H; Liu, F; Choi, J S; Kim, S W; Park, J S

    1999-11-01

    The physicochemical properties and gene transfer ability of lactose-polyethylene glycol-grafted poly-L-lysine (Lac-PEG-PLL) were investigated. A dye displacement assay showed that plasmid DNA self-assembled with Lac-PEG-PLL, and condensation began at a <1:1 charge ratio of plasmid DNA to polymer. In atomic force microscopy, spontaneously assembled Lac-PEG-PLL/DNA complexes revealed a compact structure, with a size of about 100-200 nm. Circular dichroism spectra of Lac-PEG-PLL/DNA complexes revealed that the secondary structure of DNA was altered by complex formation and was similar to that of the poly-L-lysine/DNA complex. Lac-PEG-PLL was shown to protect DNA against nuclease action in a DNase I protection assay. The cytotoxicity test demonstrated that the complex composed of plasmid DNA and Lac-PEG-PLL had little influence on the viability of HepG2 cells, especially in comparison with that of poly-L-lysine/DNA complexes. In conclusion, our copolymer, Lac-PEG-PLI, formed complexes with plasmid DNA (on average, 150 nm), gave little cytotoxicity, and showed increased efficiency of gene transfer into hepatoma cells in vitro. Lactose-polyethylene glycol was grafted to poly-L-lysine to be used as a gene carrier for hepatoma cell targeting and to improve the solubility of the polyplexes. The average size of the carrier/DNA complexes was about 150 nm. The complexes also proved to have high resistance against nuclease attack and little cytotoxicity. The polymer also delivered plasmid DNA efficiently into a HepG2 cell line. Lac-PEG-PLL was more efficient than Lipofectin or galactose-PEG-PLL in transfection efficiency.

  15. Successful gene transfer into dendritic cells with cationized gelatin and plasmid DNA complexes via a phagocytosis-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Inada, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Atsuji, Kiyoto; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Araki, Yasunobu; Kubota, Takeshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yamagishi, Hisakazu

    2006-01-01

    The use of gene-modified dendritic cells (DC) is a powerful tool to enhance antitumor immune responses stimulated by these cells in cancer immunotherapy. Cationized gelatin is preferably incorporated via phagocytosis and is gradually degraded by proteolysis while buffering lysosomal activity. This may be appropriate for gene transfer into phagocytic cells, such as immature DC. In the present study, successful transfection into monocyte-derived immature DC was demonstrated using cationized gelatin and plasmid DNA complexes. A high transfection efficiency, approaching 16%, was obtained upon transfection of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene as evaluated by flow cytometry. Transgene expression of EGFP and murine interleukin 12 were also detected by RT-PCR. The antigen-presenting capacity of the transfected DC was equal to that of untransfected DC as evaluated by the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Cationized gelatin has the potential to be a unique non-viral vector for gene transfer into DC.

  16. Escherichia coli harboring a natural IncF conjugative F plasmid develops complex mature biofilms by stimulating synthesis of colanic acid and Curli.

    PubMed

    May, Thithiwat; Okabe, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    It has been shown that Escherichia coli harboring the derepressed IncFI and IncFII conjugative F plasmids form complex mature biofilms by using their F-pilus connections, whereas a plasmid-free strain forms only patchy biofilms. Therefore, in this study we investigated the contribution of a natural IncF conjugative F plasmid to the formation of E. coli biofilms. Unlike the presence of a derepressed F plasmid, the presence of a natural IncF F plasmid promoted biofilm formation by generating the cell-to-cell mating F pili between pairs of F(+) cells (approximately two to four pili per cell) and by stimulating the formation of colanic acid and curli meshwork. Formation of colanic acid and curli was required after the initial deposition of F-pilus connections to generate a three-dimensional mushroom-type biofilm. In addition, we demonstrated that the conjugative factor of F plasmid, rather than a pilus synthesis function, was involved in curli production during biofilm formation, which promoted cell-surface interactions. Curli played an important role in the maturation process. Microarray experiments were performed to identify the genes involved in curli biosynthesis and regulation. The results suggested that a natural F plasmid was more likely an external activator that indirectly promoted curli production via bacterial regulatory systems (the EnvZ/OmpR two-component regulators and the RpoS and HN-S global regulators). These data provided new insights into the role of a natural F plasmid during the development of E. coli biofilms.

  17. The ABCs of plasmid replication and segregation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Uelinton M; Pappas, Katherine M; Winans, Stephen C

    2012-11-01

    To ensure faithful transmission of low-copy plasmids to daughter cells, these plasmids must replicate once per cell cycle and distribute the replicated DNA to the nascent daughter cells. RepABC family plasmids are found exclusively in alphaproteobacteria and carry a combined replication and partitioning locus, the repABC cassette, which is also found on secondary chromosomes in this group. RepC and a replication origin are essential for plasmid replication, and RepA, RepB and the partitioning sites distribute the replicons to predivisional cells. Here, we review our current understanding of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the Rep proteins and of their functions in plasmid replication and partitioning.

  18. Specificity and Membrane Partitioning of Grsp1 Signaling Complexes with Grp1 Family ARF Exchange Factors

    PubMed Central

    DiNitto, Jonathan P.; Lee, Meng-Tse; Malaby, Andrew W.; Lambright, David G.

    2010-01-01

    The Arf exchange factor Grp1 selectively binds phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3), which is required for recruitment to the plasma membrane in stimulated cells. The mechanisms for phosphoinositide recognition by the PH domain, catalysis of nucleotide exchange by the Sec7 domain, and autoinhibition by elements proximal to the PH domain are well characterized. The N-terminal heptad repeats in Grp1 have also been shown to mediate homodimerization in vitro as well as heteromeric interactions with heptad repeats in the FERM domain-containing protein Grsp1 both in vitro and in cells (1). Here, we have characterized the oligomeric state of Grsp1 and Grp1 family proteins (Grp1, ARNO, and Cytohesin-1) as well as the oligomeric state, stoichiometry, and specificity of Grsp1 complexes with Grp1, ARNO and Cytohesin-1. At low micromolar concentrations, Grp1 and ARNO are homodimeric whereas Cytohesin-1 and Grsp1 are monomeric. When mixed with Grsp1, Grp1 homodimers and Cytohesin-1 monomers spontaneously re-equilibrate to form heterodimers whereas approximately 50% of ARNO remains homodimeric under the same conditions. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments suggest that the Grsp1 heterodimers with Grp1 and Cytohesin-1 adopt a largely anti-parallel orientation. Finally, formation of Grsp1-Grp1 heterodimers does not substantially influence Grp1 binding to the head groups of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 or PtdIns(4,5)P2 nor does it influence partitioning with liposomes containing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, PtdIns(4,5)P2 and/or phosphatidyl serine. PMID:20527794

  19. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  20. Prediction of partitioning between complex organic mixtures and water: application of polyparameter linear free energy relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Satoshi Endo; Torsten C. Schmidt

    2006-01-15

    Equilibrium partitioning between nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and water is a governing process for contaminants leaching from NAPLs. This study introduces a polyparameter linear free energy relationship (PP-LFER) approach as a more general tool to predict NAPL-water partitioning coefficients. The approach was evaluated using 441 experimental partitioning data from 30 references. Experimental fuel-water partitioning coefficients were generally well reproduced by existing PP-LFERs for pure solvents using either a volume-fraction weighted sum of partitioning coefficients K (linear model, R{sup 2} = 0.983, root-mean-squared error (rmse) = 0.23) or a volume-fraction weighted sum of log K (log linear model, R{sup 2} = 0.976, rmse = 0.28). Using the linear model, estimations were, in most cases, within a factor of 2 from the experimental values, regardless of the type of compounds and the presence of a fuel additive. In contrast, the log linear model considerably underestimated partitioning coefficients in the presence of strong solute-solvent hydrogen bonding. For coal tar-water partitioning coefficients (K{sub coal tar/w}), new PP-LFER equations were calculated based on experimental log K{sub coal tar/w} values of 35 compounds. The resulting regression equation was log K{sub coal tar/w} = 0.40({+-}0.33) + 0.34({+-}0.32)E + 0.61({+-}0.57)S - 0.55({+-}0.61)A - 5.07({+-}0.61)B + 3.22({+-}0.35)V with the rmse equal to 0.21, where E, S, A, B, and V are Abraham's solute descriptors. Partitioning coefficients for phenol and alcohols, were closer to the experimental values than to those estimated by the SP-LFER approach with octanol-water partitioning coefficients. The values of the coefficients also provide insight into the properties of coal tar in terms of molecular interactions with solutes. 45 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Assessment of aryl hydrocarbon receptor complex interactions using pBEVY plasmids: expressionvectors with bi-directional promoters for use in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miller, C A; Martinat, M A; Hyman, L E

    1998-08-01

    The pBEVY (bi-directional expression vectors for yeast) plasmids were designed with constitutive and galactose-induced bi-directional promoters to direct the expression of multiple proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae . Using human estrogen receptor as a test gene, relatively balanced expression levels from each side of a bi-directional promoter were observed. Expression of a functional heterodimeric transcription factor composed of human aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (Arnt) proteins was accomplished using a single pBEVY plasmid. Previous studies suggest that inhibitory cross-talk between the estrogen receptor and the Ahr/Arnt complex may occur and that Hsp90-Ahr complex formation is important for Ahr-mediated signal transduction. Evidence for functional interaction among these proteins was investigated using pBEVY plasmids in a yeast system. No inhibitory cross-talk was observed in signaling assays performed with yeast that co-expressed Ahr, Arnt and estrogen receptor. In contrast, Ahr/Arnt-mediated signal transduction was reduced by 80% in a temperature-sensitive Hsp90 strain grown under non-permissive conditions. We conclude that pBEVY plasmids facilitate the examination of multiple protein interactions in yeast model systems.

  2. Demonstrating plasmid-based horizontal gene transfer in complex environmental matrices: a practical approach for a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Xavier; Guilloteau, Hélène; Bonot, Sébastien; Merlin, Christophe

    2014-09-15

    Plasmid-based dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental microbial communities is a matter of concern for public health, but it remains difficult to study for methodological reasons. In this study, we used the broad host range plasmid pB10 to compare and to point out the main drawbacks of the three different approaches currently used to evaluate plasmid transfer in natural communities. Culture-based selection of transconjugants appeared to be compromised by high prevalence of antibiotic resistances among natural communities, unless high loads of initial pB10-donor inocula were used. Fluorescence-based detection of transconjugants reached a dead-end consequently to the narrow host range of bacteria expressing fluorescent proteins from a genetically modified pB10 plasmid, in addition to the relatively high background level of fluorescence exhibited by some environmental matrices. The molecular-based approach was the only one to provide a mean to detect rare plasmid transfer events following a low but realistic initial pB10-donor inoculation. Whatever the method, culture-based or molecular-based, the detection of successful transfer events in a given environmental matrix seemed to be linked to the initial stability of the donor inoculum. Depending on the matrix considered, eukaryotic predation plays a significant role in either limiting or promoting the plasmid transfer events.

  3. Highly Effective Non-Viral Antitumor Gene Therapy System Comprised of Biocompatible Small Plasmid Complex Particles Consisting of pDNA, Anionic Polysaccharide, and Fully Deprotected Linear Polyethylenimine

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Sugiura, Kikuya; Yoshihara, Chieko; Inaba, Toshio; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    We have reported that ternary complexes of plasmid DNA with conventional linear polyethylenimine (l-PEI) and certain polyanions were very stably dispersed, and, with no cryoprotectant, they could be freeze-dried and re-hydrated without the loss of transfection ability. These properties enabled the preparation of a concentrated suspension of very small pDNA complex, by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by condensation via lyophilization-and-rehydration procedure. Recently, a high potency linear polyethylenimine having no residual protective groups, i.e., Polyethylenimine “Max” (PEI “Max”), is available, which has been reported to induce much higher gene expression than conventional l-PEI. We tried to prepare the small DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes by a similar freeze-drying method. Small complex particles could be obtained without apparent aggregation, but transfection activity of the rehydrated complexes was severely reduced. Complex-preparation conditions were investigated in details to achieve the freeze-dried DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion small ternary complexes with high transfection efficiency. DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes containing cytokine-coding plasmids were then prepared, and their anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy was examined in tumor-bearing mice. PMID:26213961

  4. Complex integrons containing qnrB4-ampC (bla(DHA-1)) in plasmids of multidrug-resistant Citrobacter freundii from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yim, Grace; Kwong, Waldan; Davies, Julian; Miao, Vivian

    2013-02-01

    Microbial populations in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are increasingly being recognized as environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes. PCR amplicons for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS were recorded in samples from a WWTP in Vancouver, British Columbia. Six strains of ciprofloxacin-resistant Citrobacter freundii were isolated and found to carry mutations in gyrA and parC, as well as multiple plasmid-borne resistance genes, collectively including qnrB; aac(6')-Ib-cr; β-lactamase-encoding genes from molecular classes A (blaTEM-1), C (ampC), D (blaOXA-1, blaOXA-10); and genes for resistance to 5 other types of antibiotics. In 3 strains, large (>60 kb) plasmids carried qnrB4 and ampC as part of a complex integron in a 14 kb arrangement that has been reported worldwide but, until recently, only among pathogenic strains of Klebsiella. Analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the qnrB4-ampC regions infers 2 introductions into the WWTP environment. These results suggest recent passage of plasmid-borne fluoroquinolone and β-lactam resistance genes from pathogens to bacteria that may be indigenous inhabitants of WWTPs, thus contributing to an environmental pool of antibiotic resistance.

  5. Molecular docking between the RNA polymerase of the Moniliophthora perniciosa mitochondrial plasmid and Rifampicin produces a highly stable complex

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Moniliophthora perniciosa (Stahel) Aime & Phillips-Mora is the causal agent of witches’ broom disease (WBD) in cacao (Theobroma cacao). When the mitochondrial genome of this fungus had been completely sequenced, an integrated linear-type plasmid that encodes viral-like RNA polymerases was found. The structure of this polymerase was previously constructed using a homology modeling approach. Methods Using a virtual screening process, accessing the Kegg, PubChem and ZINC databases, we selected the eight most probable macrocyclic polymerase inhibitors to test against M. perniciosa RNA polymerase (RPO). AutoDock Vina was used to perform docking calculations for each molecule. This software returned affinity energy values for several ligand conformations. Subsequently, we used PyMOL 1.4 and Ligand Scout 3.1 to check the stereochemistry of chiral carbons, substructure, superstructure, number of rotatable bonds, number of rings, number of donor groups, and hydrogen bond receptors. Results On the basis of this evidence we selected Rifampicin, a bacterial RNA polymerase inhibitor, and then AMBER 12 was used to simulate the behavior of the RPO-Rifampicin complex after a set of 5000 ps and up to 300 K in water. This calculation returned a graph of potential energy against simulation time and showed that the ligand remained inside the active site after the simulation was complete, with an average energy of -15 x 102 Kcal/Mol. Conclusions The results indicate that Rifampicin could be a good inhibitor for testing in vitro and in vivo against M. perniciosa. PMID:23442217

  6. Open-complex formation by the host initiator, DnaA, at the origin of P1 plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, G; Carr, K M; Kaguni, J M; Chattoraj, D K

    1993-01-01

    Replication of P1 plasmid requires both the plasmid-specific initiator, RepA, and the host initiator, DnaA. Here we show that DnaA can make the P1 origin reactive to the single-strand specific reagents KMnO4 and mung bean nuclease. Addition of RepA further increased the KMnO4 reactivity of the origin, although RepA alone did not influence the reaction. The increased reactivity implies that the two initiators interact in some way to alter the origin conformation. The KMnO4 reactivity was restricted to one strand of the origin. We suggest that the roles of DnaA in P1 plasmid and bacterial replication are similar: origin opening and loading of the DnaB helicase. The strand-bias in chemical reactivity at the P1 origin most likely indicates that only one of the strands is used for the loading of DnaB, a scenario consistent with the unidirectional replication of the plasmid. Images PMID:8223464

  7. Differential salt-induced dissociation of the p53 protein complexes with circular and linear plasmid DNA substrates suggest involvement of a sliding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2015-01-30

    A study of the effects of salt conditions on the association and dissociation of wild type p53 with different ~3 kbp long plasmid DNA substrates (supercoiled, relaxed circular and linear, containing or lacking a specific p53 binding site, p53CON) using immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads is presented. Salt concentrations above 200 mM strongly affected association of the p53 protein to any plasmid DNA substrate. Strikingly different behavior was observed when dissociation of pre-formed p53-DNA complexes in increased salt concentrations was studied. While contribution from the p53CON to the stability of the p53-DNA complexes was detected between 100 and 170 mM KCl, p53 complexes with circular DNAs (but not linear) exhibited considerable resistance towards salt treatment for KCl concentrations as high as 2 M provided that the p53 basic C-terminal DNA binding site (CTDBS) was available for DNA binding. On the contrary, when the CTDBS was blocked by antibody used for immunoprecipitation, all p53-DNA complexes were completely dissociated from the p53 protein in KCl concentrations≥200 mM under the same conditions. These observations suggest: (a) different ways for association and dissociation of the p53-DNA complexes in the presence of the CTDBS; and (b) a critical role for a sliding mechanism, mediated by the C-terminal domain, in the dissociation process.

  8. Experimental partitioning of Zr, Ti, and Nb between silicate liquid and a complex noble metal alloy and the partitioning of Ti between perovskite and platinum metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, Stephen R.; Jones, John H.

    1993-01-01

    El Goresy et al.'s observation of Nb, Zr, and Ta in refractory platinum metal nuggets (RPMN's) from Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) in the Allende meteorite led them to propose that these lithophile elements alloyed in the metallic state with noble metals in the early solar nebula. However, Grossman pointed out that the thermodynamic stability of Zr in the oxide phase is vastly greater than metallic Zr at estimated solar nebula conditions. Jones and Burnett suggested this discrepancy may be explained by the very non-ideal behavior of some lithophile transition elements in noble metal solutions and/or intermetallic compounds. Subsequently, Fegley and Kornacki used thermodynamic data taken from the literature to predict the stability of several of these intermetallic compounds at estimated solar nebula conditions. Palme and Schmitt and Treiman et al. conducted experiments to quantify the partitioning behavior of certain lithophile elements between silicate liquid and Pt-metal. Although their results were somewhat variable, they did suggest that Zr partition coefficients were too small to explain the observed 'percent' levels in some RPMN's. Palme and Schmitt also observed large partition coefficients for Nb and Ta. No intermetallic phases were identified. Following the work of Treiman et al., Jurewicz and Jones performed experiments to examine Zr, Nb, and Ti partitioning near solar nebula conditions. Their results showed that Zr, Nb, and Ti all have an affinity for the platinum metal, with Nb and Ti having a very strong preference for the metal. The intermetallic phases (Zr,Fe)Pt3, (Nb,Fe)Pt3, and (Ti,Fe)Pt3 were identified. Curiously, although both experiments and calculations indicate that Ti should partition strongly into Pt-metal (possibly as TiPt3), no Ti has ever been observed in any RPMN's. Fegley and Kornacki also noticed this discrepancy and hypothesized that the Ti was stabilized in perovskite which is a common phase in Allende CAI's.

  9. [Partitioning of taxifolin-iron ions complexes in octanol-water system].

    PubMed

    Shatalin, Iu V; Shubina, V S

    2014-01-01

    The composition of taxifolin-iron ions complexes in an octanol-water biphasic system was studied using the method of absorption spectrophotometry. It was found that at pH 5.0 in an aqueous biphasic system the complex of [Tf2 x Fe x (OH)k(H2O)8-k] is present, but at pH 7.0 and 9.0 the complexes of [Tf2 x Fe x (OH)k(H2O)2-k] and [Tf x Fe x OH)k(H2O)4-k] are predominantly observed. The formation of a stable [Tf3 x Fe] complex occurred in octanol phase. The charged iron ion of this complex is surrounded by taxifolin molecules, which shield the iron ion from lipophilic solvent. During transition from water to octanol phase the changes of the composition of complexes are accompanied by reciprocal changes in portion of taxifolin and iron ions in these phases. It was shown that the portion of taxifolin in aqueous solution in the presence of iron ions is increased at high pH values, and the portion of iron ions is minimal at pH 7.0. In addition, the parameters of solubility limits of taxifolin-iron ions complexes in an aqueous solution were determined. The data obtained gain a better understanding of the role of complexation of polyphenol with metal of variable valency in passive transport of flavonoids and metal ions across lipid membranes.

  10. Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates harboring blaNMC-A or blaIMI-type class A carbapenemase genes on novel chromosomal integrative elements and plasmids.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David A; Mataseje, Laura F; Davidson, Ross; Delport, Johannes A; Fuller, Jeff; Hoang, Linda; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Levett, Paul; Roscoe, Diane L; Willey, Barbara M; Mulvey, Michael R

    2017-02-21

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates submitted to a reference laboratory from 2010 to 2015 were screened by PCR for seven common carbapenemase gene groups, namely, KPC, NDM, OXA-48, VIM, IMP, GES, and NMC-A/IMI. Nineteen of the submitted isolates (1.7%) were found to harbor Ambler class A blaNMC-A or blaIMI-type carbapenemases. All 19 isolates were resistant to at least one carbapenem but susceptible to aminoglycosides, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, tigecycline, and ciprofloxacin. Most isolates (17/19) gave positive results with the Carba-NP test for phenotypic carbapenemase detection. Isolates were genetically diverse by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis macrorestriction analysis, multilocus sequence typing, and hsp60 gene analysis. The genes were found in various Enterobacter cloacae complex species, however blaNMC-A was highly associated with Enterobacter ludwiggii Whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics analysis revealed that all NMC-A (n=10), IMI-1 (n=5), and IMI-9 (n=2) producers harbored the carbapenemase gene on EludIMEX-1-like integrative mobile elements, EcloIMEXs, located in the identical chromosomal locus. Two novel genes, blaIMI-5 and blaIMI-6, were harbored on different IncFII-type plasmids. Enterobacter cloacae complex isolates harboring blaNMC-A/IMI-type carbapenemases are relatively rare in Canada. Though mostly found integrated into the chromosome, some variants are located on plasmids that may enhance their mobility potential.

  11. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  12. Repeated intrathecal administration of plasmid DNA complexed with polyethylene glycol-grafted polyethylenimine led to prolonged transgene expression in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Tang, G P; Gao, S J; Ma, Y X; Liu, B H; Li, Y; Zeng, J M; Ng, Y K; Leong, K W; Wang, S

    2003-07-01

    Gene delivery into the spinal cord provides a potential approach to the treatment of spinal cord traumatic injury, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. These disorders progress over long periods of time, necessitating a stable expression of functional genes at therapeutic levels for months or years. We investigated in this study the feasibility of achieving prolonged transgene expression in the rat spinal cord through repeated intrathecal administration of plasmid DNA complexed with 25 kDa polyethylenimine (PEI) into the lumbar subarachnoid space. With a single injection, DNA/PEI complexes could provide transgene expression in the spinal cord 40-fold higher than naked plasmid DNA. The transgene expression at the initial level persisted for about 5 days, with a low-level expression being detectable for at least 8 weeks. When repeated dosing was tested, a 70% attenuation of gene expression was observed following reinjection at a 2-week interval. This attenuation was associated with apoptotic cell death and detected even using complexes containing a noncoding DNA that did not mediate any gene expression. When each component of the complexes, PEI polymer or naked DNA alone, were tested in the first dosing, no reduction was found. Using polyethylene glycol (PEG)-grafted PEI for DNA complexes, no attenuation of gene expression was detected after repeated intrathecal injections, even in those rats receiving three doses, administered 2 weeks apart. Lumbar puncture is a routine and relatively nontraumatic clinical procedure. Repeated administration of DNA complexed with PEG-grafted PEI through this less invasive route may prolong the time span of transgene expression when needed, providing a viable strategy for the gene therapy of spinal cord disorders.

  13. N15: the linear phage-plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V

    2011-03-01

    The lambdoid phage N15 of Escherichia coli is very unusual among temperate phages in that its prophage is not integrated into chromosome but is a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends. Upon infection the phage DNA circularises via cohesive ends, then phage-encoded enzyme, protelomerase, cuts at an inverted repeat site and forms hairpin ends (telomeres) of the linear plasmid prophage. Replication of the N15 prophage is initiated at an internally located ori site and proceeds bidirectionally resulting in formation of duplicated telomeres. Then the N15 protelomerase cuts duplicated telomeres generating two linear plasmid molecules with hairpin telomeres. Stable inheritance of the plasmid prophage is ensured by partitioning operon similar to the F factor sop operon. Unlike F sop, the N15 centromere consists of four inverted repeats dispersed in the genome. The multiplicity and dispersion of centromeres are required for efficient partitioning of a linear plasmid. The centromeres are located in N15 genome regions involved in phage replication and control of lysogeny, and binding of partition proteins at these sites regulates these processes. Two N15-related lambdoid Siphoviridae phages, φKO2 in Klebsiella oxytoca and pY54 in Yersinia enterocolitica, also lysogenize their hosts as linear plasmids, as well as Myoviridae marine phages VP882 and VP58.5 in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and ΦHAP-1 in Halomonas aquamarina. The genomes of all these phages contain similar protelomerase genes, lysogeny modules and replication genes, as well as plasmid-partitioning genes, suggesting that these phages may belong to a group diverged from a common ancestor.

  14. Spontaneous Partitioning of Californium from Curium: Curious Cases from the Crystallization of Curium Coordination Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Cary, Samantha K.; Silver, Mark A.; Liu, Guokui; Wang, Jamie C.; Bogart, Justin A.; Stritzinger, Jared T.; Arico, Alexandra A.; Hanson, Kenneth; Schelter, Eric J.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2015-12-07

    The reaction of 248CmCl3 with excess 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (DPA) under mild solvothermal conditions results in crystallization of the tris-chelate complex Cm(HDPA)3·H2O. Approximately half of the curium remains in solution at the end of this process, and evaporation of the mother liquor results in crystallization of the bis-chelate complex [Cm(HDPA)- (H2DPA)(H2O)2Cl]Cl·2H2O. 248Cm is the daughter of the α decay of 252Cf and is extracted in high purity from this parent. However, trace amounts of 249,250,251Cf are still present in all samples of 248Cm. During the crystallization of Cm(HDPA)3·H2O and [Cm(HDPA)(H2DPA)(H2O)2Cl]Cl·2H2O, californium(III) spontaneously separates itself from the curium complexes and is found doped within crystals of DPA in the form of Cf(HDPA)3. These results add to the growing body of evidence that the chemistry of californium is fundamentally different from that of earlier actinides.

  15. Spontaneous Partitioning of Californium from Curium: Curious Cases from the Crystallization of Curium Coordination Complexes.

    PubMed

    Cary, Samantha K; Silver, Mark A; Liu, Guokui; Wang, Jamie C; Bogart, Justin A; Stritzinger, Jared T; Arico, Alexandra A; Hanson, Kenneth; Schelter, Eric J; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2015-12-07

    The reaction of (248)CmCl3 with excess 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (DPA) under mild solvothermal conditions results in crystallization of the tris-chelate complex Cm(HDPA)3 · H2O. Approximately half of the curium remains in solution at the end of this process, and evaporation of the mother liquor results in crystallization of the bis-chelate complex [Cm(HDPA)(H2DPA)(H2O)2Cl]Cl·2H2O. (248)Cm is the daughter of the α decay of (252)Cf and is extracted in high purity from this parent. However, trace amounts of (249,250,251)Cf are still present in all samples of (248)Cm. During the crystallization of Cm(HDPA)3 · H2O and [Cm(HDPA)(H2DPA)(H2O)2Cl]Cl · 2H2O, californium(III) spontaneously separates itself from the curium complexes and is found doped within crystals of DPA in the form of Cf(HDPA)3. These results add to the growing body of evidence that the chemistry of californium is fundamentally different from that of earlier actinides.

  16. Tri-partite complex for axonal transport drug delivery achieves pharmacological effect

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Targeted delivery of pharmaceutical agents into selected populations of CNS (Central Nervous System) neurons is an extremely compelling goal. Currently, systemic methods are generally used for delivery of pain medications, anti-virals for treatment of dermatomal infections, anti-spasmodics, and neuroprotectants. Systemic side effects or undesirable effects on parts of the CNS that are not involved in the pathology limit efficacy and limit clinical utility for many classes of pharmaceuticals. Axonal transport from the periphery offers a possible selective route, but there has been little progress towards design of agents that can accomplish targeted delivery via this intraneural route. To achieve this goal, we developed a tripartite molecular construction concept involving an axonal transport facilitator molecule, a polymer linker, and a large number of drug molecules conjugated to the linker, then sought to evaluate its neurobiology and pharmacological behavior. Results We developed chemical synthesis methodologies for assembling these tripartite complexes using a variety of axonal transport facilitators including nerve growth factor, wheat germ agglutinin, and synthetic facilitators derived from phage display work. Loading of up to 100 drug molecules per complex was achieved. Conjugation methods were used that allowed the drugs to be released in active form inside the cell body after transport. Intramuscular and intradermal injection proved effective for introducing pharmacologically effective doses into selected populations of CNS neurons. Pharmacological efficacy with gabapentin in a paw withdrawal latency model revealed a ten fold increase in half life and a 300 fold decrease in necessary dose relative to systemic administration for gabapentin when the drug was delivered by axonal transport using the tripartite vehicle. Conclusion Specific targeting of selected subpopulations of CNS neurons for drug delivery by axonal transport holds great promise

  17. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Results Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Conclusion Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via

  18. Synthesis, characterization, in vitro antitumoral investigations and interaction with plasmid pBR322 DNA of R2eddp-platinum(IV) complexes (R = Et, n-Pr).

    PubMed

    Kaluderović, Goran N; Kommera, Harish; Schwieger, Sebastian; Paethanom, Anchan; Kunze, Michael; Schmidt, Harry; Paschke, Reinhard; Steinborn, Dirk

    2009-12-28

    The studies on synthetic, spectroscopic and biological properties of platinum(IV) complexes, [PtCl(4)(R(2)eddp)] (R = Et, 1; n-Pr, 2), containing kappa(2)N,N' bidentate ligands, esters of ethylenediamine-N,N'-di-3-propionic acid (HOOCCH(2)CH(2)NHCH(2)CH(2)NHCH(2)CH(2)COOH, H(2)eddp), are reported. Complexes have been characterized by infrared, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis and it was concluded that the coordination of the ligands occurs via nitrogen donor atoms of the ester ligands (R(2)eddp). Cytotoxicity studies were performed for ligand precursors and corresponding platinum(IV) complexes. Although the n-Pr(2)eddp.2HCl itself showed no activity (IC(50) values > 125 microM) in selected cell lines, the activity of complex 2, via apoptotic mode of cell death, has increased significantly for a broad range of cancer cell lines tested in vitro (IC(50) = 8.6-49 microM). As it was found that complexes 1 and 2 are able to interact with pBR322 plasmid DNA, platinum(IV) complexes of this type may act as drugs and pro-drugs.

  19. Tn6026 and Tn6029 are found in complex resistance regions mobilised by diverse plasmids and chromosomal islands in multiple antibiotic resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Reid, Cameron J; Roy Chowdhury, Piklu; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2015-07-01

    Transposons flanked by direct copies of IS26 are important contributors to the evolution of multiple antibiotic resistance. Tn6029 and Tn6026 are examples of composite transposons that have become widely disseminated on small and large plasmids with different incompatibility markers in pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli and various serovars of Salmonella enterica. Some of the plasmids that harbour these transposons also carry combinations of virulence genes. Recently, Tn6029 and Tn6026 and derivatives thereof have been found on chromosomal islands in both established and recently emerged pathogens. While Tn6029 and Tn6026 carry genes encoding resistance to older generation antibiotics, they also provide a scaffold for the introduction of genes encoding resistance to a wide variety of clinically relevant antibiotics that are mobilised by IS26. As a consequence, Tn6029 and Tn6026 or variants are likely to increasingly feature in complex resistance regions in multiple antibiotic resistant Enterobacteriaceae that threaten the health of humans and food production animals.

  20. Proteolysis in plasmid DNA stable maintenance in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Karlowicz, Anna; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Dubiel, Andrzej; Ropelewska, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Plasmids, as extrachromosomal genetic elements, need to work out strategies that promote independent replication and stable maintenance in host bacterial cells. Their maintenance depends on constant formation and dissociation of nucleoprotein complexes formed on plasmid DNA. Plasmid replication initiation proteins (Rep) form specific complexes on direct repeats (iterons) localized within the plasmid replication origin. Formation of these complexes along with a strict control of Rep protein cellular concentration, quaternary structure, and activity, is essential for plasmid maintenance. Another important mechanism for maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids are the toxin-antitoxin (TA) post-segregational killing (psk) systems, which prevent plasmid loss from the bacterial cell population. In this mini review we discuss the importance of nucleoprotein complex processing by energy-dependent host proteases in plasmid DNA replication and plasmid type II toxin-antitoxin psk systems, and draw attention to the elusive role of DNA in this process.

  1. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  2. Plasmids in diatom species.

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, M; Corey, D K; Ludwig, J R; Kukel, A; Feng, T Y; Volcani, B E

    1991-01-01

    We have discovered plasmids in 5 of 18 diatom species surveyed. In several species, more than one type of plasmid is present. Several of the plasmids show similarity by hybridization previously characterized plasmids in Cylindrotheca fusiformis (J. D. Jacobs et al., unpublished data). Additionally, there is similarity between the plasmids found in C. fusiformis and chloroplast DNA in three diatom species. These results add to the evidence that the plasmids have features of mobile genetic elements. Images PMID:1885558

  3. Partitioning the non‑consumptive effects of predators on preywith complex life histories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davenport, Jon M.; Hossack, Blake R.; Lowe, Winsor H.

    2014-01-01

    Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators on prey can be as strong as consumptive effects (CEs) and may be driven by numerous mechanisms, including predator characteristics. Previous work has highlighted the importance of predator characteristics in predicting NCEs, but has not addressed how complex life histories of prey could mediate predator NCEs. We conducted a meta-analysis to compare the effects of predator gape limitation (gape limited or not) and hunting mode (active or sit-and-pursue) on the activity, larval period, and size at metamorphosis of larval aquatic amphibians and invertebrates. Larval prey tended to reduce their activity and require more time to reach metamorphosis in the presence of all predator functional groups, but the responses did not differ from zero. Prey metamorphosed at smaller size in response to non-gape-limited, active predators, but counter to expectations, prey metamorphosed larger when confronted by non-gape-limited, sit-and-pursue predators. These results indicate NCEs on larval prey life history can be strongly influenced by predator functional characteristics. More broadly, our results suggest that understanding predator NCEs would benefit from greater consideration of how prey life history attributes mediate population and community-level outcomes.

  4. Plasmid pSM19035, a model to study stable maintenance in Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Lioy, Virginia S; Pratto, Florencia; de la Hoz, Ana B; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C

    2010-07-01

    pSM19035 is a low-copy-number theta-replicating plasmid, which belongs to the Inc18 family. Plasmids of this family, which show a modular organization, are functional in evolutionarily diverse bacterial species of the Firmicutes Phylum. This review summarizes our understanding, accumulated during the last 20 years, on the genetics, biochemistry, cytology and physiology of the five pSM19035 segregation (seg) loci, which map outside of the minimal replicon. The segA locus plays a role both in maximizing plasmid random segregation, and in avoiding replication fork collapses in those plasmids with long inverted repeated regions. The segB1 locus, which acts as the ultimate determinant of plasmid maintenance, encodes a short-lived epsilon(2) antitoxin protein and a long-lived zeta toxin protein, which form a complex that neutralizes zeta toxicity. The cells that do not receive a copy of the plasmid halt their proliferation upon decay of the epsilon(2) antitoxin. The segB2 locus, which encodes two trans-acting, ParA- and ParB-like proteins and six cis-acting parS centromeres, actively ensures equal or roughly equal distribution of plasmid copies to daughter cells. The segC locus includes functions that promote the shift from the use of DNA polymerase I to the replicase (PolC-PolE DNA polymerases). The segD locus, which encodes a trans-acting transcriptional repressor, omega(2), and six cis-acting cognate sites, coordinates the expression of genes that control copy number, better-than-random segregation and partition, and assures the proper balance of these different functions. Working in concert the five different loci achieve almost absolute plasmid maintenance with a minimal growth penalty.

  5. Maintenance of a Pseudomonas fluorescens plasmid in heterologous hosts: metabolic burden as a more reliable variable to predict plasmid instability.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, S; Lalithakumari, D

    1998-07-01

    The stability of a large, multiresistance plasmid, pSCL of P. fluorescens CAS102 was studied in Pseudomonas putida and E. coli under various non-stress conditions. Both the strains lost the plasmid within 25 days when repeatedly subcultured in LB broth without any antibiotic. The transformants survived in sterile soil and water without any marked reduction in the viability. In sterile soil, P. putida lost 93% and E. coli, 98% of their plasmid containing population in 30 days, while in sterile water the plasmid loss was 92.5% and 97% respectively. The two variables, viz. the efficiency of plasmid-partitioning during cell division and measurement of relative specific growth rates of plasmid-plus and plasmid-minus cells which are used to predict plasmid instability cannot be used to predict plasmid loss during starvation. The utility of a third variable, viz. the metabolic burden due to plasmid maintenance in predicting plasmid instability in different hosts is discussed. The rate of plasmid loss was found to be comparatively faster in E. coli than in P. putida. The biosynthetic burden due to plasmid maintenance was also more in E. coli than in P. putida when compared to the plasmid-plus and plasmid-minus cells of the two strains which was evident from the increased nutrient uptake rates (glucose, O2, and amino acid) and increased protein content of the plasmid-plus cells of E. coli. From the results, a correlation could be found between the degree of metabolic burden and the rate of plasmid loss. The reliability of metabolic burden, to predict plasmid instability versus the relative specific growth rates is discussed.

  6. MSTor: A program for calculating partition functions, free energies, enthalpies, entropies, and heat capacities of complex molecules including torsional anharmonicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jingjing; Mielke, Steven L.; Clarkson, Kenneth L.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-08-01

    We present a Fortran program package, MSTor, which calculates partition functions and thermodynamic functions of complex molecules involving multiple torsional motions by the recently proposed MS-T method. This method interpolates between the local harmonic approximation in the low-temperature limit, and the limit of free internal rotation of all torsions at high temperature. The program can also carry out calculations in the multiple-structure local harmonic approximation. The program package also includes six utility codes that can be used as stand-alone programs to calculate reduced moment of inertia matrices by the method of Kilpatrick and Pitzer, to generate conformational structures, to calculate, either analytically or by Monte Carlo sampling, volumes for torsional subdomains defined by Voronoi tessellation of the conformational subspace, to generate template input files, and to calculate one-dimensional torsional partition functions using the torsional eigenvalue summation method. Catalogue identifier: AEMF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 77 434 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 264 737 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 90, C, and Perl Computer: Itasca (HP Linux cluster, each node has two-socket, quad-core 2.8 GHz Intel Xeon X5560 “Nehalem EP” processors), Calhoun (SGI Altix XE 1300 cluster, each node containing two quad-core 2.66 GHz Intel Xeon “Clovertown”-class processors sharing 16 GB of main memory), Koronis (Altix UV 1000 server with 190 6-core Intel Xeon X7542 “Westmere” processors at 2.66 GHz), Elmo (Sun Fire X4600 Linux cluster with AMD Opteron cores), and Mac Pro (two 2.8 GHz Quad-core Intel Xeon

  7. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  8. Plasmid segregation: how to survive as an extra piece of DNA.

    PubMed

    Salje, Jeanne

    2010-08-01

    Non-essential extra-chromosomal DNA elements such as plasmids are responsible for their own propagation in dividing host cells, and one means to ensure this is to carry a miniature active segregation system reminiscent of the mitotic spindle. Plasmids that are maintained at low numbers in prokaryotic cells have developed a range of such active partitioning systems, which are characterized by an impressive simplicity and efficiency and which are united by the use of dynamic, nucleotide-driven filaments to separate and position DNA molecules. A comparison of different plasmid segregation systems reveals (i) how unrelated filament-forming and DNA-binding proteins have been adopted and modified to create a range of simple DNA segregating complexes and (ii) how subtle changes in the few components of these DNA segregation machines has led to a remarkable diversity in the molecular mechanisms of closely related segregation systems. Here, our current understanding of plasmid segregation systems is reviewed and compared with other DNA segregation systems, and this is extended by a discussion of basic principles of plasmid segregation systems, evolutionary implications and the relationship between an autonomous DNA element and its host cell.

  9. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart; Raymann, Kasie; Soler, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Many plasmids have been described in Euryarchaeota, one of the three major archaeal phyla, most of them in salt-loving haloarchaea and hyperthermophilic Thermococcales. These plasmids resemble bacterial plasmids in terms of size (from small plasmids encoding only one gene up to large megaplasmids) and replication mechanisms (rolling circle or theta). Some of them are related to viral genomes and form a more or less continuous sequence space including many integrated elements. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota have been useful for designing efficient genetic tools for these microorganisms. In addition, they have also been used to probe the topological state of plasmids in species with or without DNA gyrase and/or reverse gyrase. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota encode both DNA replication proteins recruited from their hosts and novel families of DNA replication proteins. Euryarchaeota form an interesting playground to test evolutionary hypotheses on the origin and evolution of viruses and plasmids, since a robust phylogeny is available for this phylum. Preliminary studies have shown that for different plasmid families, plasmids share a common gene pool and coevolve with their hosts. They are involved in gene transfer, mostly between plasmids and viruses present in closely related species, but rarely between cells from distantly related archaeal lineages. With few exceptions (e.g., plasmids carrying gas vesicle genes), most archaeal plasmids seem to be cryptic. Interestingly, plasmids and viral genomes have been detected in extracellular membrane vesicles produced by Thermococcales, suggesting that these vesicles could be involved in the transfer of viruses and plasmids between cells.

  10. Dissemination of blaKPC-2 by the spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae clonal complex 258 clones (ST258, ST11, ST437) and plasmids (IncFII, IncN, IncL/M) among Enterobacteriaceae species in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leonardo Neves; Curiao, Tânia; Ferreira, Joseane Cristina; Longo, Juliana Mucedola; Clímaco, Eduardo Carneiro; Martinez, Roberto; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Basile-Filho, Aníbal; Evaristo, Marco Antônio; Del Peloso, Pedro F; Ribeiro, Vanessa Bley; Barth, Afonso Luis; Paula, Milena Cristina; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Darini, Ana Lúcia da Costa; Coque, Teresa M

    2011-07-01

    This article reports the spread of bla(KPC-2) in the Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro states, facilitated by globally spread K. pneumoniae clonal complex 258 (CC258) clones (ST258, ST11, and ST437) and a diversity of plasmids (IncFII, IncN, and IncL/M, two untypeable plasmids carrying Tn4401a or Tn4401b) successfully disseminated among species of the Enterobacteriaceae (Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens, and Citrobacter freundii). It also constitutes the first description of sequence type 258 (ST258) in Brazil, which was associated with a nosocomial hospital outbreak in Ribeirao Preto city.

  11. A segregated model for plasmid content and product synthesis in unstable binary fission recombinant organisms.

    PubMed

    Seo, J H; Bailey, J E

    1985-02-01

    Plasmid propagation in populations of unstable, binary fission recombinant organisms has been studied using a segregated, population balance mathematical model. Segregated models have the advantage of direct incorporation of basic information on mechanisms and kinetics of plasmid replication and segregation at the single-cell level. The distribution of cellular plasmid content and specific rates of plasmid gene expression have been obtained for several single-cell models of plasmid replication, partition, and gene expression. Plasmid replication kinetics during cell growth significantly influence the plasmid content distribution. In the case of transient growth of plasmid-containing and plasmid-free cells in partially selective medium, the degree of selection required for stable maintenance of plasmid-containing cells has been determined. Guidelines are presented for applicability of simpler, nonsegregated models and for evaluation of the parameters in these models based on single-cell mechanisms and associated parameters.

  12. Partition search

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a new form of game search called partition search that incorporates dependency analysis, allowing substantial reductions in the portion of the tree that needs to be expanded. Both theoretical results and experimental data are presented. For the game of bridge, partition search provides approximately as much of an improvement over existing methods as {alpha}-{beta} pruning provides over minimax.

  13. Auto-assembly of nanometer thick, water soluble layers of plasmid DNA complexed with diamines and basic amino acids on graphite: Greatest DNA protection is obtained with arginine.

    PubMed

    Khalil, T T; Boulanouar, O; Heintz, O; Fromm, M

    2017-02-01

    We have investigated the ability of diamines as well as basic amino acids to condense DNA onto highly ordered pyrolytic graphite with minimum damage after re-dissolution in water. Based on a bibliographic survey we briefly summarize DNA binding properties with diamines as compared to basic amino acids. Thus, solutions of DNA complexed with these linkers were drop-cast in order to deposit ultra-thin layers on the surface of HOPG in the absence or presence of Tris buffer. Atomic Force Microscopy analyses showed that, at a fixed ligand-DNA mixing ratio of 16, the mean thickness of the layers can be statistically predicted to lie in the range 0-50nm with a maximum standard deviation ±6nm, using a simple linear law depending on the DNA concentration. The morphology of the layers appears to be ligand-dependent. While the layers containing diamines present holes, those formed in the presence of basic amino acids, except for lysine, are much more compact and dense. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements provide compositional information indicating that, compared to the maximum number of DNA sites to which the ligands may bind, the basic amino acids Arg and His are present in large excess. Conservation of the supercoiled topology of the DNA plasmids was studied after recovery of the complex layers in water. Remarkably, arginine has the best protection capabilities whether Tris was present or not in the initial solution.

  14. Cationic Lipid-Nucleic Acid Complexes for Gene Delivery And Silencing: Pathways And Mechanisms for Plasmid Dna And Sirna

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, K.K.; Zidovska, A.; Ahmad, A.; Bouxsein, N.F.; Evans, H.M.; McAllister, C.S.; Samuel, C.E.; Safinya, C.R.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    Motivated by the promises of gene therapy, there is great interest in developing non-viral lipid-based vectors for therapeutic applications due to their low immunogenicity, low toxicity, ease of production, and the potential of transferring large pieces of DNA into cells. In fact, cationic liposome (CL) based vectors are among the prevalent synthetic carriers of nucleic acids (NAs) currently used in gene therapy clinical trials worldwide. These vectors are studied both for gene delivery with CL-DNA complexes and gene silencing with CL-siRNA (short interfering RNA) complexes. However, their transfection efficiencies and silencing efficiencies remain low compared to those of engineered viral vectors. This reflects the currently poor understanding of transfection-related mechanisms at the molecular and self-assembled levels, including a lack of knowledge about interactions between membranes and double stranded NAs and between CL-NA complexes and cellular components. In this review we describe our recent efforts to improve the mechanistic understanding of transfection by CL-NA complexes, which will help to design optimal lipid-based carriers of DNA and siRNA for therapeutic gene delivery and gene silencing.

  15. Plasmid diversity in neisseriae.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; van der Ende, Arie; Bart, Aldert

    2006-08-01

    Horizontal gene transfer constitutes an important force in prokaryotic genome evolution, and it is well-known that plasmids are vehicles for DNA transfer. Chromosomal DNA is frequently exchanged between pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, but relatively little is known about plasmid diversity and prevalence among these nasopharyngeal inhabitants. We investigated the plasmid contents of 18 Neisseria lactamica isolates and 20 nasopharyngeal Neisseria meningitidis isolates. Of 18 N. lactamica strains, 9 harbored one or more plasmids, whereas only one N. meningitidis isolate contained a plasmid. Twelve plasmids were completely sequenced, while five plasmid sequences from the public databases were also included in the analyses. On the basis of nucleic acid sequences, mobilization, and replicase protein alignments, we distinguish six different plasmid groups (I to VI). Three plasmids from N. lactamica appeared to be highly similar on the nucleotide level to the meningococcal plasmids pJS-A (>99%) and pJS-B (>75%). The genetic organizations of two plasmids show a striking resemblance with that of the recently identified meningococcal disease-associated (MDA) phage, while four putative proteins encoded by these plasmids show 25% to 39% protein identity to those encoded by the MDA phage. The putative promoter of the gene encoding the replicase on these plasmids contains a polycytidine tract, suggesting that replication is subjected to phase variation. In conclusion, extensive plasmid diversity is encountered among commensal neisseriae. Members of three plasmid groups are found in both pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, indicating plasmid exchange between these species. Resemblance between plasmids and MDA phage may be indicative of dissemination of phage-related sequences among pathogenic and commensal neisseriae.

  16. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pNA6 reveals the high plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Xu, Yan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-10-10

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in health care and is of widespread public concern. Conjugative plasmids are the most important vectors in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of plasmid pNA6, a plasmid which was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to ampicillin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pNA6 was 52,210bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.70%. Plasmid pNA6 belongs to the IncU group by sequence queries against the GenBank database. This plasmid has a typical IncU backbone and shows the highest similarities with plasmid RA3 and plasmid pFBAOT6. Plasmid pNA6 carries a class 1 integron consisting of aacA4, ereA and dfrA1 genes. Moreover, plasmid pNA6 also harbors a blaTEM-1-containing complex structure which inserted into the replication region and maintenance region. This insertion site has never been found on other IncU plasmids. The sequencing of plasmid pNA6 will add new sequence information to IncU family plasmids and enhance our understanding of the plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

  17. Footprinting studies of specific complexes formed by RepA, a replication initiator of plasmid pCU1, and its binding site.

    PubMed

    Papp, P P; Elö, P; Semsey, S; Orosz, L

    2000-10-01

    The basic replicon of plasmid pCU1 contains three different replication origins. Replication initiated from the oriB origin requires pCU1-encoded protein RepA. Previously, information analysis of 19 natural RepA binding sequences predicted a 20-bp sequence as a RepA binding site. Guanines contacting RepA in the major groove of DNA have also been determined. In this study, we used the missing-nucleoside method to determine all of the bases relevant to RepA binding. The importance of some thymine bases was also confirmed by a missing-thymine site interference assay. Participation of the 5-methyl groups of two thymines (at positions -6 and 7) in RepA binding was pointed out by a missing-thymine methyl site interference assay. Phosphate groups of the DNA backbone which strongly interfered with RepA binding upon ethylation were also identified. The pattern of contacting positions mapped by hydroxyl radical protection footprinting indicates that RepA binds to one face of B-form DNA. The length of the binding site was found to be 20 bp by dissociation rate measurement of complexes formed between RepA and a variety of binding sequences. The symmetry of the binding site and that of the contacting bases, particularly the reacting 5-methyl groups of two thymines, suggest that pCU1-encoded RepA may contact its site as a homodimer.

  18. Large Linear Plasmids of Borrelia Species That Cause Relapsing Fever

    PubMed Central

    Porcella, Stephen F.; Raffel, Sandra J.; Schwan, Tom G.; Barbour, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Borrelia species of relapsing fever (RF) and Lyme disease (LD) lineages have linear chromosomes and both linear and circular plasmids. Unique to RF species, and little characterized to date, are large linear plasmids of ∼160 kb, or ∼10% of the genome. By a combination of Sanger and next-generation methods, we determined the sequences of large linear plasmids of two New World species: Borrelia hermsii, to completion of its 174-kb length, and B. turicatae, partially to 114 kb of its 150 kb. These sequences were then compared to corresponding sequences of the Old World species B. duttonii and B. recurrentis and to plasmid sequences of LD Borrelia species. The large plasmids were largely colinear, except for their left ends, about 27 kb of which was inverted in New World species. Approximately 60% of the B. hermsii lp174 plasmid sequence was repetitive for 6 types of sequence, and half of its open reading frames encoded hypothetical proteins not discernibly similar to proteins in the database. The central ∼25 kb of all 4 linear plasmids was syntenic for orthologous genes for plasmid maintenance or partitioning in Borrelia species. Of all the sequenced linear and circular plasmids in Borrelia species, the large plasmid's putative partition/replication genes were most similar to those of the 54-kb linear plasmids of LD species. Further evidence for shared ancestry was the observation that two of the hypothetical proteins were predicted to be structurally similar to the LD species' CspA proteins, which are encoded on the 54-kb plasmids. PMID:23749977

  19. Large linear plasmids of Borrelia species that cause relapsing fever.

    PubMed

    Miller, Shelley Campeau; Porcella, Stephen F; Raffel, Sandra J; Schwan, Tom G; Barbour, Alan G

    2013-08-01

    Borrelia species of relapsing fever (RF) and Lyme disease (LD) lineages have linear chromosomes and both linear and circular plasmids. Unique to RF species, and little characterized to date, are large linear plasmids of ∼160 kb, or ∼10% of the genome. By a combination of Sanger and next-generation methods, we determined the sequences of large linear plasmids of two New World species: Borrelia hermsii, to completion of its 174-kb length, and B. turicatae, partially to 114 kb of its 150 kb. These sequences were then compared to corresponding sequences of the Old World species B. duttonii and B. recurrentis and to plasmid sequences of LD Borrelia species. The large plasmids were largely colinear, except for their left ends, about 27 kb of which was inverted in New World species. Approximately 60% of the B. hermsii lp174 plasmid sequence was repetitive for 6 types of sequence, and half of its open reading frames encoded hypothetical proteins not discernibly similar to proteins in the database. The central ∼25 kb of all 4 linear plasmids was syntenic for orthologous genes for plasmid maintenance or partitioning in Borrelia species. Of all the sequenced linear and circular plasmids in Borrelia species, the large plasmid's putative partition/replication genes were most similar to those of the 54-kb linear plasmids of LD species. Further evidence for shared ancestry was the observation that two of the hypothetical proteins were predicted to be structurally similar to the LD species' CspA proteins, which are encoded on the 54-kb plasmids.

  20. Designing plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy vectors are commonly based on recombinant bacterial plasmids or their derivatives. The plasmids are propagated in bacteria, so, in addition to their therapeutic cargo, they necessarily contain a bacterial replication origin and a selection marker, usually a gene conferring antibiotic resistance. Structural and maintenance plasmid stability in bacteria is required for the plasmid DNA production and can be achieved by carefully choosing a combination of the therapeutic DNA sequences, replication origin, selection marker, and bacterial strain. The use of appropriate promoters, other regulatory elements, and mammalian maintenance devices ensures that the therapeutic gene or genes are adequately expressed in target human cells. Optimal immune response to the plasmid vectors can be modulated via inclusion or exclusion of DNA sequences containing immunostimulatory CpG sequence motifs. DNA fragments facilitating construction of plasmid vectors should also be considered for inclusion in the design of plasmid vectors. Techniques relying on site-specific or homologous recombination are preferred for construction of large plasmids (>15 kb), while digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes with subsequent ligation of the resulting DNA fragments continues to be the mainstream approach for generation of small- and medium-size plasmids. Rapid selection of a desired recombinant plasmid against a background of other plasmids continues to be a challenge. In this chapter, the emphasis is placed on efficient and flexible versions of DNA cloning protocols using selection of recombinant plasmids by restriction endonucleases directly in the ligation mixture.

  1. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  2. In vivo expansion of regulatory T cells with IL-2/IL-2 mAb complexes prevents anti-factor VIII immune responses in hemophilia A mice treated with factor VIII plasmid-mediated gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao-Lien; Ye, Peiqing; Yen, Benjamin C; Miao, Carol H

    2011-08-01

    Generation of transgene-specific immune responses can constitute a major complication following gene therapy treatment. An in vivo approach to inducing selective expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells by injecting interleukin-2 (IL-2) mixed with a specific IL-2 monoclonal antibody (JES6-1) was adopted to modulate anti-factor VIII (anti-FVIII) immune responses. Three consecutive IL-2 complexes treatments combined with FVIII plasmid injection prevented anti-FVIII formation and achieved persistent, therapeutic-level of FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HemA) mice. The IL-2 complexes treatment expanded CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells five- to sevenfold on peak day, and they gradually returned to normal levels within 7-14 days without changing other lymphocyte populations. The transiently expanded Treg cells are highly activated and display suppressive function in vitro. Adoptive transfer of the expanded Treg cells protected recipient mice from generation of high-titer antibodies following FVIII plasmid challenge. Repeated plasmid transfer is applicable in tolerized mice without eliciting immune responses. Mice treated with IL-2 complexes mounted immune responses against both T-dependent and T-independent neoantigens, indicating that IL-2 complexes did not hamper the immune system for long. These results demonstrate the important role of Treg cells in suppressing anti-FVIII immune responses and the potential of developing Treg cell expansion therapies that induce long-term tolerance to FVIII.

  3. Seasonal variation and spatial distribution of atmospheric mercury and its gas-particulate partition in the vicinity of a semiconductor manufacturing complex.

    PubMed

    Jen, Yi-Hsiu; Chen, Wei-Hsiang; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Ie, Iau-Ren; Hung, Chung-Hsuang

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated the tempospatial variation of atmospheric mercury and its gas-particulate partition in the vicinity of a semiconductor manufacturing complex, where a plenty of flat-monitor manufacturing plants using elemental mercury as a light-initiating medium to produce backlight fluorescence tubes and may fugitively emit mercury-containing air pollutants to the atmosphere. Atmospheric mercury speciation, concentration, and the partition of total gaseous mercury (TGM) and particulate mercury (Hgp) were measured at four sites surrounding the semiconductor manufacturing intensive district/complex. One-year field measurement showed that the seasonal averaged concentrations of TGM and Hgp were in the range of 3.30-6.89 and 0.06-0.14 ng/m(3), respectively, whereas the highest 24-h TGM and Hgp concentrations were 10.33 and 0.26 ng/m(3), respectively. Atmospheric mercury apportioned as 92.59-99.01 % TGM and 0.99-7.41 % Hgp. As a whole, the highest and lowest concentrations of TGM were observed in the winter and summer sampling periods, respectively, whereas the concentration of Hgp did not vary much seasonally. The highest TGM concentrations were always observed at the downwind sites, indicating that the semiconductor manufacturing complex was a hot spot of mercury emission source, which caused severe atmospheric mercury contamination over the investigation region.

  4. Partitioning: splitting fact from fiction.

    PubMed

    Pike, Brian

    2012-05-01

    Many larger hospitals are sprawling complexes with endless corridors and rooms of varying purpose. While cleanliness and infection control are, understandably, leading considerations in any hospital building, fire safety also plays a crucial role. Here Brian Pike MBE, technical consultant at partitioning system designer and manufacturer, Komfort Workspace, looks at how current fire guidelines impact on the use of partitioning systems in hospital premises.

  5. Partition Equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Michal; Tennenholtz, Moshe

    We introduce partition equilibrium and study its existence in resource selection games (RSG). In partition equilibrium the agents are partitioned into coalitions, and only deviations by the prescribed coalitions are considered. This is in difference to the classical concept of strong equilibrium according to which any subset of the agents may deviate. In resource selection games, each agent selects a resource from a set of resources, and its payoff is an increasing (or non-decreasing) function of the number of agents selecting its resource. While it has been shown that strong equilibrium exists in resource selection games, these games do not possess super-strong equilibrium, in which a fruitful deviation benefits at least one deviator without hurting any other deviator, even in the case of two identical resources with increasing cost functions. Similarly, strong equilibrium does not exist for that restricted two identical resources setting when the game is played repeatedly. We prove that for any given partition there exists a super-strong equilibrium for resource selection games of identical resources with increasing cost functions; we also show similar existence results for a variety of other classes of resource selection games. For the case of repeated games we identify partitions that guarantee the existence of strong equilibrium. Together, our work introduces a natural concept, which turns out to lead to positive and applicable results in one of the basic domains studied in the literature.

  6. The Third Replicon of Members of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex, Plasmid pC3, Plays a Role in Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Agnoli, Kirsty; Frauenknecht, Carmen; Freitag, Roman; Schwager, Stephan; Jenul, Christian; Vergunst, Annette; Carlier, Aurelien

    2014-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) occupies a variety of niches, including the plant rhizosphere and the cystic fibrosis lung (where it is often fatal to the patient). Bcc members have multipartite genomes, of which the third replicon, pC3 (previously chromosome 3), has been shown to be a nonessential megaplasmid which confers virulence and both antifungal and proteolytic activity on several strains. In this study, pC3 curing was extended to cover strains of 16 of the 17 members of the Bcc, and the phenotypes conferred by pC3 were determined. B. cenocepacia strains H111, MCO-3, and HI2424 were previously cured of pC3; however, this had not proved possible in the epidemic strain K56-2. Here, we investigated the mechanism of this unexpected stability and found that efficient toxin-antitoxin systems are responsible for maintaining pC3 of strain K56-2. Identification of these systems allowed neutralization of the toxins and the subsequent deletion of K56-2pC3. The cured strain was found to exhibit reduced antifungal activity and was attenuated in both the zebrafish and the Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection. We used a PCR screening method to examine the prevalence of pC3 within 110 Bcc isolates and found that this replicon was absent in only four cases, suggesting evolutionary fixation. It is shown that plasmid pC3 increases the resistance of B. cenocepacia H111 to various stresses (oxidative, osmotic, high-temperature, and chlorhexidine-induced stresses), explaining the prevalence of this replicon within the Bcc. PMID:24334662

  7. Condensation and localization of the partitioning protein ParB on the bacterial chromosome.

    PubMed

    Broedersz, Chase P; Wang, Xindan; Meir, Yigal; Loparo, Joseph J; Rudner, David Z; Wingreen, Ned S

    2014-06-17

    The ParABS system mediates chromosome segregation and plasmid partitioning in many bacteria. As part of the partitioning mechanism, ParB proteins form a nucleoprotein complex at parS sites. The biophysical basis underlying ParB-DNA complex formation and localization remains elusive. Specifically, it is unclear whether ParB spreads in 1D along DNA or assembles into a 3D protein-DNA complex. We show that a combination of 1D spreading bonds and a single 3D bridging bond between ParB proteins constitutes a minimal model for a condensed ParB-DNA complex. This model implies a scaling behavior for ParB-mediated silencing of parS-flanking genes, which we confirm to be satisfied by experimental data from P1 plasmids. Furthermore, this model is consistent with experiments on the effects of DNA roadblocks on ParB localization. Finally, we show experimentally that a single parS site is necessary and sufficient for ParB-DNA complex formation in vivo. Together with our model, this suggests that ParB binding to parS triggers a conformational switch in ParB that overcomes a nucleation barrier. Conceptually, the combination of spreading and bridging bonds in our model provides a surface tension ensuring the condensation of the ParB-DNA complex, with analogies to liquid-like compartments such as nucleoli in eukaryotes.

  8. Condensation and localization of the partitioning protein ParB on the bacterial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Broedersz, Chase P.; Wang, Xindan; Meir, Yigal; Loparo, Joseph J.; Rudner, David Z.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2014-01-01

    The ParABS system mediates chromosome segregation and plasmid partitioning in many bacteria. As part of the partitioning mechanism, ParB proteins form a nucleoprotein complex at parS sites. The biophysical basis underlying ParB–DNA complex formation and localization remains elusive. Specifically, it is unclear whether ParB spreads in 1D along DNA or assembles into a 3D protein–DNA complex. We show that a combination of 1D spreading bonds and a single 3D bridging bond between ParB proteins constitutes a minimal model for a condensed ParB–DNA complex. This model implies a scaling behavior for ParB-mediated silencing of parS-flanking genes, which we confirm to be satisfied by experimental data from P1 plasmids. Furthermore, this model is consistent with experiments on the effects of DNA roadblocks on ParB localization. Finally, we show experimentally that a single parS site is necessary and sufficient for ParB–DNA complex formation in vivo. Together with our model, this suggests that ParB binding to parS triggers a conformational switch in ParB that overcomes a nucleation barrier. Conceptually, the combination of spreading and bridging bonds in our model provides a surface tension ensuring the condensation of the ParB–DNA complex, with analogies to liquid-like compartments such as nucleoli in eukaryotes. PMID:24927534

  9. Plasmid accumulation reduces life span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Falcón, Alaric A; Aris, John P

    2003-10-24

    Aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is under the control of multiple pathways. The production and accumulation of extrachromosomal rDNA circles (ERCs) is one pathway that has been proposed to bring about aging in yeast. To test this proposal, we have developed a plasmid-based model system to study the role of DNA episomes in reduction of yeast life span. Recombinant plasmids containing different replication origins, cis-acting partitioning elements, and selectable marker genes were constructed and analyzed for their effects on yeast replicative life span. Plasmids containing the ARS1 replication origin reduce life span to the greatest extent of the plasmids analyzed. This reduction in life span is partially suppressed by a CEN4 centromeric element on ARS1 plasmids. Plasmids containing a replication origin from the endogenous yeast 2 mu circle also reduce life span, but to a lesser extent than ARS1 plasmids. Consistent with this, ARS1 and 2 mu origin plasmids accumulate in approximately 7-generation-old cells, but ARS1/CEN4 plasmids do not. Importantly, ARS1 plasmids accumulate to higher levels in old cells than 2 mu origin plasmids, suggesting a correlation between plasmid accumulation and life span reduction. Reduction in life span is neither an indirect effect of increased ERC levels nor the result of stochastic cessation of growth. The presence of a fully functional 9.1-kb rDNA repeat on plasmids is not required for, and does not augment, reduction in life span. These findings support the view that accumulation of DNA episomes, including episomes such as ERCs, cause cell senescence in yeast.

  10. Plasmids of Distinct IncK Lineages Show Compatible Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rozwandowicz, Marta; Brouwer, Michael S. M.; Zomer, Aldert L.; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Mevius, Dik J.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT IncK plasmids are some of the main carriers of blaCTX-M-14 and blaCMY-2 genes and show high similarity to other plasmids belonging to the I complex, including IncB/O plasmids. Here, we studied the phylogenetic relationship of 37 newly sequenced IncK and IncB/O plasmids. We show that IncK plasmids can be divided into two compatible lineages named IncK1 and IncK2. PMID:28052854

  11. Identification of bacterial plasmids based on mobility and plasmid population biology.

    PubMed

    Garcillán-Barcia, Maria Pilar; Alvarado, Andrés; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Plasmids contain a backbone of core genes that remains relatively stable for long evolutionary periods, making sense to speak about plasmid species. The identification and characterization of the core genes of a plasmid species has a special relevance in the study of its epidemiology and modes of transmission. Besides, this knowledge will help to unveil the main routes that genes, for example antibiotic resistance (AbR) genes, use to travel from environmental reservoirs to human pathogens. Global dissemination of multiple antibiotic resistances and virulence traits by plasmids is an increasing threat for the treatment of many bacterial infectious diseases. To follow the dissemination of virulence and AbR genes, we need to identify the causative plasmids and follow their path from reservoirs to pathogens. In this review, we discuss how the existing diversity in plasmid genetic structures gives rise to a large diversity in propagation strategies. We would like to propose that, using an identification methodology based on plasmid mobility types, we can follow the propagation routes of most plasmids in Gammaproteobacteria, as well as their cargo genes, in complex ecosystems. Once the dissemination routes are known, designing antidissemination drugs and testing their efficacy will become feasible. We discuss in this review how the existing diversity in plasmid genetic structures gives rise to a large diversity in propagation strategies. We would like to propose that, by using an identification methodology based on plasmid mobility types, we can follow the propagation routes of most plasmids in ?-proteobacteria, as well as their cargo genes, in complex ecosystems.

  12. Interactions of Kid-Kis toxin-antitoxin complexes with the parD operator-promoter region of plasmid R1 are piloted by the Kis antitoxin and tuned by the stoichiometry of Kid-Kis oligomers.

    PubMed

    Monti, Maria C; Hernández-Arriaga, Ana M; Kamphuis, Monique B; López-Villarejo, Juan; Heck, Albert J R; Boelens, Rolf; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; van den Heuvel, Robert H H

    2007-01-01

    The parD operon of Escherichia coli plasmid R1 encodes a toxin-antitoxin system, which is involved in plasmid stabilization. The toxin Kid inhibits cell growth by RNA degradation and its action is neutralized by the formation of a tight complex with the antitoxin Kis. A fascinating but poorly understood aspect of the kid-kis system is its autoregulation at the transcriptional level. Using macromolecular (tandem) mass spectrometry and DNA binding assays, we here demonstrate that Kis pilots the interaction of the Kid-Kis complex in the parD regulatory region and that two discrete Kis-binding regions are present on parD. The data clearly show that only when the Kis concentration equals or exceeds the Kid concentration a strong cooperative effect exists between strong DNA binding and Kid2-Kis2-Kid2-Kis2 complex formation. We propose a model in which transcriptional repression of the parD operon is tuned by the relative molar ratio of the antitoxin and toxin proteins in solution. When the concentration of the toxin exceeds that of the antitoxin tight Kid2-Kis2-Kid2 complexes are formed, which only neutralize the lethal activity of Kid. Upon increasing the Kis concentration, (Kid2-Kis2)n complexes repress the kid-kis operon.

  13. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  14. 3D Numerical Experiments of Lithospheric Transtension Reveal Complex Crustal-Scale Flow and Strain Partitioning in Transdomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, P. F.; Mondy, L. S.; Duclaux, G.; Teyssier, C. P.; Whitney, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    We have used Underworld to perform a series of numerical experiments involving a 256 x 256 x 128 km domain, at a grid resolution of 1.33 km. The kinematic boundary conditions simulate a lithospheric-scale pull-apart setting. We compare the structural and thermal evolution of a model involving a crust of thickness 40 km (TMoho=540ºC) with a model with a crust of thickness 60 km (TMoho=830ºC). We show that in the thick, hot crust model the flow in the pull-apart region is strongly partitioned between the strong upper crust and the weak lower crust. The weak, deep crust flows toward the pull-apart region to isostatically compensate the stretching and thinning of the upper crust. In contrast, the velocity field in the upper crust remains parallel to the imposed direction of extension. In the pull-apart region a transdome, made of two parallel foliation folds (or sub-domes), forms. In the dome, fabrics evolve from strong vertical flattening in between the two sub-domes, to shallow dipping constriction roughly parallel to the direction of extension in the upper part of the transdome.

  15. A partition experimental evidence of molecular complex formation of some quinones with sodium dodecyl sulphate anion in aqueous phase by spectrophotometric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Asim K.; Saha, Avijit; Mukherjee, Asok K.

    2005-01-01

    In an experiment involving partition of four different quinones between their saturated solutions in CCl 4 and aqueous solution of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), done spectrophotometrically, it was observed that below the critical micellisation concentration (c.m.c.) of SDS, the solubility of each quinone in aqueous phase increased linearly with [SDS], just above c.m.c. it dropped sharply and then again increased, becoming nearly constant at very high [SDS]. The absorption λmax of each quinone (excepting o-chloranil) in aqueous SDS showed a red shift relative to that in CCl 4 and the red-shifted λmax is independent of [SDS]. These observations were rationalised by considering complexation and phase equilibria.

  16. Mobility of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Chris; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Francia, M Victoria; Rocha, Eduardo P C; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Plasmids are key vectors of horizontal gene transfer and essential genetic engineering tools. They code for genes involved in many aspects of microbial biology, including detoxication, virulence, ecological interactions, and antibiotic resistance. While many studies have decorticated the mechanisms of mobility in model plasmids, the identification and characterization of plasmid mobility from genome data are unexplored. By reviewing the available data and literature, we established a computational protocol to identify and classify conjugation and mobilization genetic modules in 1,730 plasmids. This allowed the accurate classification of proteobacterial conjugative or mobilizable systems in a combination of four mating pair formation and six relaxase families. The available evidence suggests that half of the plasmids are nonmobilizable and that half of the remaining plasmids are conjugative. Some conjugative systems are much more abundant than others and preferably associated with some clades or plasmid sizes. Most very large plasmids are nonmobilizable, with evidence of ongoing domestication into secondary chromosomes. The evolution of conjugation elements shows ancient divergence between mobility systems, with relaxases and type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) often following separate paths from type IV secretion systems. Phylogenetic patterns of mobility proteins are consistent with the phylogeny of the host prokaryotes, suggesting that plasmid mobility is in general circumscribed within large clades. Our survey suggests the existence of unsuspected new relaxases in archaea and new conjugation systems in cyanobacteria and actinobacteria. Few genes, e.g., T4CPs, relaxases, and VirB4, are at the core of plasmid conjugation, and together with accessory genes, they have evolved into specific systems adapted to specific physiological and ecological contexts.

  17. Different Phenotypes of Walker-Like A Box Mutants of ParA Homolog IncC of Broad-Host-Range IncP Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Azeem; Figurski, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The promiscuous IncPα plasmids RK2 and R995 encode a broad-host-range partition system, whose essential components include the incC and korB genes and a DNA site (OB) to which the korB product binds. IncC2, the smaller of the two incC products, is sufficient for stabilization of R995ΔincC. It is a member of the type Ia ParA family of partition ATPases. To better understand the role of ATP in partition, we constructed three alanine-substitution mutants of IncC2. Each mutation changed a different residue of the Walker-like ATP-binding and hydrolysis motif, including a lysine (K10) conserved solely among members of the ParA and MinD families. All three IncC2 mutants were defective in plasmid partition, but they differed from one another in other respects. The IncC2 T16A mutant, predicted to be defective in Mg2+ coordination, was severely impaired in all activities tested. IncC2 K10A, predicted to be defective in ATP hydrolysis, mediated enhanced incompatibility with R995 derivatives. IncC2 K15A, predicted to be defective in ATP binding, exhibited two distinct incompatibility properties depending on the genotype of the target plasmid. When in trans to plasmids carrying a complementable incC deletion, IncC2 K15A caused dramatic plasmid loss, even at low levels of expression. In trans to wild-type R995 or to R995ΔincC carrying a functional P1 partition system, IncC2 K15A-mediated incompatibility was significantly less than that caused by wild-type IncC2. All three Walker-like A box mutants were also defective for the host toxicity that normally results from co-overexpression of incC and korB. The phenotypes of the mutants support a model in which nucleotide hydrolysis is required for separation of paired plasmid complexes and possible interaction with a host factor. PMID:22579980

  18. Identification of IncA/C Plasmid Replication and Maintenance Genes and Development of a Plasmid Multilocus Sequence Typing Scheme.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Steven J; Phan, Minh-Duy; Peters, Kate M; Forde, Brian M; Chong, Teik Min; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Beatson, Scott A; Schembri, Mark A

    2017-02-01

    Plasmids of incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) are becoming increasingly prevalent within pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae They are associated with the dissemination of multiple clinically relevant resistance genes, including blaCMY and blaNDM Current typing methods for IncA/C plasmids offer limited resolution. In this study, we present the complete sequence of a blaNDM-1-positive IncA/C plasmid, pMS6198A, isolated from a multidrug-resistant uropathogenic Escherichia coli strain. Hypersaturated transposon mutagenesis, coupled with transposon-directed insertion site sequencing (TraDIS), was employed to identify conserved genetic elements required for replication and maintenance of pMS6198A. Our analysis of TraDIS data identified roles for the replicon, including repA, a toxin-antitoxin system; two putative partitioning genes, parAB; and a putative gene, 053 Construction of mini-IncA/C plasmids and examination of their stability within E. coli confirmed that the region encompassing 053 contributes to the stable maintenance of IncA/C plasmids. Subsequently, the four major maintenance genes (repA, parAB, and 053) were used to construct a new plasmid multilocus sequence typing (PMLST) scheme for IncA/C plasmids. Application of this scheme to a database of 82 IncA/C plasmids identified 11 unique sequence types (STs), with two dominant STs. The majority of blaNDM-positive plasmids examined (15/17; 88%) fall into ST1, suggesting acquisition and subsequent expansion of this blaNDM-containing plasmid lineage. The IncA/C PMLST scheme represents a standardized tool to identify, track, and analyze the dissemination of important IncA/C plasmid lineages, particularly in the context of epidemiological studies.

  19. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  20. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  1. Replication and Maintenance of Linear Phage-Plasmid N15.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V

    2015-02-01

    The lambdoid phage N15 of Escherichia coli is very unusual among temperate phages in that its prophage is not integrated into the chromosome but is a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends (telomeres). Upon infection, the phage DNA circularizes via cohesive ends, and then a special phage enzyme of the tyrosine recombinase family, protelomerase, cuts at another site and joins the ends, forming hairpin telomeres of the linear plasmid prophage. Replication of the N15 prophage is initiated at an internally located ori site and proceeds bidirectionally, resulting in the formation of duplicated telomeres. The N15 protelomerase cuts them, generating two linear plasmid molecules with hairpin telomeres. Stable inheritance of the plasmid prophage is ensured by a partitioning operon similar to the F factor sop operon. Unlike the F centromere, the N15 centromere consists of four inverted repeats dispersed in the genome. The multiplicity and dispersion of centromeres are required for efficient partitioning of a linear plasmid. The centromeres are located in the N15 genome regions involved in phage replication and control of lytic development, and binding of partition proteins at these sites regulates these processes. The family of N15-like linear phage-plasmids includes lambdoid phages ɸKO2 and pY54, as well as Myoviridae phages ΦHAP-1, VHML, VP882, Vp58.5, and vB_VpaM_MAR of marine gamma-proteobacteria. The genomes of these phages contain similar protelomerase genes, lysogeny control modules, and replication genes, suggesting that these phages may belong to a group diverged from a common ancestor.

  2. The 2 micron plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a miniaturized selfish genome with optimized functional competence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Keng-Ming; Liu, Yen-Ting; Ma, Chien-Hui; Jayaram, Makkuni; Sau, Soumitra

    2013-07-01

    The 2 micron plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relatively small multi-copy selfish DNA element that resides in the yeast nucleus at a copy number of 40-60 per haploid cell. The plasmid is able to persist in host populations with almost chromosome-like stability with the help of a partitioning system and a copy number control system. The first part of this article describes the properties of the partitioning system comprising two plasmid coded proteins, Rep1 and Rep2, and a partitioning locus STB. Current evidence supports a model in which the Rep-STB system couples plasmid segregation to chromosome segregation by promoting the physical association of plasmid molecules with chromosomes. In the second part, the focus is on the Flp site-specific recombination system housed by the plasmid, which plays a critical role in maintaining steady state plasmid copy number. The Flp system corrects any decrease in plasmid population by promoting plasmid amplification via a recombination induced rolling circle replication mechanism. Appropriate plasmid amplification, without runaway increase in copy number, is ensured by positive and negative regulation of FLP gene expression by plasmid coded proteins and by the control of Flp level/activity through post-translational modification of Flp by the cellular sumoylation system. The Flp system has been successfully utilized to understand mechanisms of site-specific recombination and to bring about directed genetic alterations for addressing fundamental problems in biology and for accomplishing bio-engineering objectives. A particularly interesting, and perhaps less well known and underappreciated, application of Flp in revealing unique DNA topologies required to confer functional competence to DNA-protein machines is discussed.

  3. Identification of Multiresistance Gene cfr in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Pigs: Plasmid Location and Integration into a Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec Complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dexi; Wu, Congming; Wang, Yang; Fan, Run

    2015-01-01

    The multiresistance gene cfr was found in 8/231 porcine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates. They were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, spa typing, dru typing, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing as ST627-t002-dt12w-IVb, ST6-t304-dt12w-IVb, ST9-t899-dt12w-IVb, ST9-t899-dt12ae-IVb, or ST63-t899-dt12v-IVb. Different cfr gene regions were detected on plasmids of ca. 35 kb in seven isolates. For the first time, an ISEnfa4-cfr-IS256 fragment was found to be inserted upstream of the ccr genes in a chromosomal SCCmec IVb element of the remaining isolate. PMID:25824234

  4. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  5. Plasmid Detection, Characterization, and Ecology.

    PubMed

    Smalla, Kornelia; Jechalke, Sven; Top, Eva M

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are important vehicles for rapid adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environmental conditions. It is thought that to reduce the cost of plasmid carriage, only a fraction of a local population carries plasmids or is permissive to plasmid uptake. Plasmids provide various accessory traits which might be beneficial under particular conditions. The genetic variation generated by plasmid carriage within populations ensures the robustness toward environmental changes. Plasmid-mediated gene transfer plays an important role not only in the mobilization and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes but also in the spread of degradative pathways and pathogenicity determinants of pathogens. Here we summarize the state-of-the-art methods to study the occurrence, abundance, and diversity of plasmids in environmental bacteria. Increasingly, cultivation-independent total-community DNA-based methods are being used to characterize and quantify the diversity and abundance of plasmids in relation to various biotic and abiotic factors. An improved understanding of the ecology of plasmids and their hosts is crucial in the development of intervention strategies for antibiotic-resistance-gene spread. We discuss the potentials and limitations of methods used to determine the host range of plasmids, as the ecology of plasmids is tightly linked to their hosts. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide an enormous potential for plasmid classification, diversity, and evolution studies, but numerous challenges still exist.

  6. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  7. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-29

    multiresistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, mediated drug resistance are the emergence of strains determined by R-plasmids, causes treatment failures of Haemophilus ... influenzae , resistant to ampicillin [8] of hospital infections, foremost in patients with a or chloramphenicol [9] and of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

  8. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  9. In vitro DNA binding, pBR322 plasmid cleavage and molecular modeling study of chiral benzothiazole Schiff-base-valine Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes to evaluate their enantiomeric biological disposition for molecular target DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Rahman; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-10-01

    Bicyclic heterocyclic compounds viz. benzothiazoles are key components of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules and participate directly in the encoding of genetic information. Benzothiazoles, therefore, represent a potent and selective class of antitumor compounds. The design and synthesis of chiral antitumor chemotherapeutic agents of Cu(II) and Zn(II), L- and -D benzothiazole Schiff base-valine complexes 1a &b and 2a &b, respectively were carried out and thoroughly characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Interaction of 1a and b and 2a and b with CT DNA by employing UV-vis, florescence, circular dichroic methods and cleavage studies of 1a with pBR322 plasmid, molecular docking were done in order to demonstrate their enantiomeric disposition toward the molecular drug target DNA. Interestingly, these studies unambiguously demonstrated the greater potency of L-enantiomer in comparison to D-enantiomer.

  10. In vitro DNA binding, pBR322 plasmid cleavage and molecular modeling study of chiral benzothiazole Schiff-base-valine Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes to evaluate their enantiomeric biological disposition for molecular target DNA.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Rahman; Afzal, Mohd; Arjmand, Farukh

    2014-10-15

    Bicyclic heterocyclic compounds viz. benzothiazoles are key components of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules and participate directly in the encoding of genetic information. Benzothiazoles, therefore, represent a potent and selective class of antitumor compounds. The design and synthesis of chiral antitumor chemotherapeutic agents of Cu(II) and Zn(II), L- and -D benzothiazole Schiff base-valine complexes 1a &b and 2a &b, respectively were carried out and thoroughly characterized by spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Interaction of 1a and b and 2a and b with CT DNA by employing UV-vis, florescence, circular dichroic methods and cleavage studies of 1a with pBR322 plasmid, molecular docking were done in order to demonstrate their enantiomeric disposition toward the molecular drug target DNA. Interestingly, these studies unambiguously demonstrated the greater potency of L-enantiomer in comparison to D-enantiomer.

  11. Bacteriophages Limit the Existence Conditions for Conjugative Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A. Jamie; Dytham, Calvin; Pitchford, Jonathan W.; Truman, Julie; Spiers, Andrew; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteriophages are a major cause of bacterial mortality and impose strong selection on natural bacterial populations, yet their effects on the dynamics of conjugative plasmids have rarely been tested. We combined experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and individual-based simulations to explain how the ecological and population genetics effects of bacteriophages upon bacteria interact to determine the dynamics of conjugative plasmids and their persistence. The ecological effects of bacteriophages on bacteria are predicted to limit the existence conditions for conjugative plasmids, preventing persistence under weak selection for plasmid accessory traits. Experiments showed that phages drove faster extinction of plasmids in environments where the plasmid conferred no benefit, but they also revealed more complex effects of phages on plasmid dynamics under these conditions, specifically, the temporary maintenance of plasmids at fixation followed by rapid loss. We hypothesized that the population genetic effects of bacteriophages, specifically, selection for phage resistance mutations, may have caused this. Further mathematical modeling and individual-based simulations supported our hypothesis, showing that conjugative plasmids may hitchhike with phage resistance mutations in the bacterial chromosome. PMID:26037122

  12. A Complex Insertion Sequence Cluster at a Point of Interaction between the Linear Plasmid SCP1 and the Linear Chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2)

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Masayuki; Miyashita, Kiyotaka; Cullum, John; Kinashi, Haruyasu

    2000-01-01

    The giant linear plasmid SCP1 can integrate into the central region of the linear chromosome of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Nucleotide sequence analysis around the target site for SCP1 integration in strain M145 identified a total of five copies of four insertion sequences (ISs) in a 6.5-kb DNA stretch. Three of the four (IS468, IS469, and IS470) are new IS elements, and the other is IS466. All of these elements contain one open reading frame which encodes a transposase-like protein. Two copies of IS468 (IS468A and -B) are tandemly aligned at the left end of the cluster. Following these, IS469 and IS466 are located in a tail-to-tail orientation with 69.3% identity to each other. IS470 is located at the right end of the cluster. The activities of IS466 and IS468 were demonstrated by transposition experiments and sequence comparison of several copies, respectively. PMID:10809688

  13. Optimization of Plasmid Maintenance in the Attenuated Live Vector Vaccine Strain Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA†

    PubMed Central

    Galen, James E.; Nair, Jay; Wang, Jin Yuang; Wasserman, Steven S.; Tanner, Michael K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    The broad objective of the research presented here is to develop a noncatalytic plasmid maintenance system for the stabilization of multicopy expression plasmids encoding foreign antigens in a Salmonella typhi live-vector vaccine strain such as CVD 908-htrA. We have enhanced the maintenance of expression plasmids at two independent levels. First, we removed dependence upon balanced-lethal maintenance systems that involve catalytic enzymes expressed from multicopy plasmids; we accomplished this through incorporation into expression plasmids of a postsegregational killing system based on the noncatalytic hok-sok plasmid addiction system from the antibiotic resistance factor pR1. We also included at least one naturally occurring plasmid partition function in our expression plasmids, which eliminates random segregation of these plasmids, thereby enhancing their inheritance and stability; to accomplish this, we incorporated either the par locus from pSC101, the parA locus from pR1, or both. We monitored the stability of optimized expression plasmids within CVD 908-htrA by quantitating expression of a variant of green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by using flow cytometry. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this novel plasmid maintenance system in enhancing the stability of our expression plasmids and go on to show that as the copy number of stabilized plasmids increases, the toxicity of GFPuv synthesis also increases. The implications of these observations for the rational design of immunogenic and protective bacterial live vector vaccines are discussed. PMID:10569759

  14. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  15. Peaceful coexistence amongst Borrelia plasmids: getting by with a little help from their friends?

    PubMed

    Chaconas, George; Norris, Steven J

    2013-09-01

    Borrelia species comprise a unique genus of bacterial pathogens. These organisms contain a segmented genome with up to two dozen plasmids ranging in size from 5 kb up to about 200 kb. The plasmids have also been referred to as mini-chromosomes or essential genetic elements, as some of them carry information important for infection of vertebrates or for survival in the tick vector. Most of the plasmids are linear with covalently closed hairpin telomeres and these linear plasmids are in a constant state of genetic rearrangement. The mechanisms of plasmid replication, maintenance and partitioning remain largely obscure and are complicated by a long doubling time, the requirement for expensive media and inefficient genetic manipulation. A set of five parologous protein families (PFs) are believed to confer the ability for autonomous replication and plasmid maintenance. The number of plasmids also complicates analyses because of the possibility that PFs from one plasmid may sometimes function in trans on other plasmids. Two papers in the last year have moved the field forward and their combined data suggest that trans complementation amongst Borrelia plasmids may sometimes occur.

  16. New tool for CO2 flux partitioning with soil chamber flux implementation as a solution for site in topographically complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šigut, Ladislav; Mammarella, Ivan; Kolari, Pasi; Dařenová, Eva; Novosadová, Kateřina; Pietras, Justina; Pokorný, Radek; Sedlák, Pavel; Mauder, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Eddy covariance method (EC) is one of the most accurate and direct approaches for measurements of fluxes of matter and energy on the level of an entire ecosystem. CO2 flux data acquired using the global network of EC flux towers help us to better understand the impacts of natural and anthropogenic phenomena on the global carbon balance. Comparisons among different sites are usually performed on annual sums of net ecosystem exchange (annual sums of NEE). Nowadays, EC is also used in complex terrain on the edge of its applicability (e.g. hills, cities) such as the mountain forest site at Bílý Kříž, Beskydy Mountains, Czech Republic. This requires revisiting of generally applied algorithms for computation of annual sums of NEE. The first aim of this study is the assessment of the performance and correctness of a newly developed tool for CO2 flux separation in comparison with standard algorithms. Simple models describing response of NEE to temperature and photosynthetic active radiation will be used for flux partitioning and a new approach to remove seasonality from datasets will be demonstrated. The second aim of this study will be to evaluate whether it is possible to estimate defensible annual sums of NEE for complex terrain site Bílý Kříž with the help of auxiliary biomass inventory and soil chamber measurements. Here the up-scaling of soil respiration to ecosystem respiration will be attempted and the resulting sums of NEE will be compared to independent biomass inventory estimates of net primary productivity. The importance of this research lies in extending the boundaries of EC application, thus contributing to better understanding of carbon balance in mountainous regions ecosystems which are not well represented within networks of EC flux towers. Acknowledgement This work was supported by CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0073, CZ.1.07/2.4.00/31.0056, OU SGS20/PřF/2014 grants and MICMoR graduate programme.

  17. Partitioning the Quaternary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Philip L.; Lewin, John

    2016-11-01

    We review the historical purposes and procedures for stratigraphical division and naming within the Quaternary, and summarize the current requirements for formal partitioning through the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS). A raft of new data and evidence has impacted traditional approaches: quasi-continuous records from ocean sediments and ice cores, new numerical dating techniques, and alternative macro-models, such as those provided through Sequence Stratigraphy and Earth-System Science. The practical usefulness of division remains, but there is now greater appreciation of complex Quaternary detail and the modelling of time continua, the latter also extending into the future. There are problems both of commission (what is done, but could be done better) and of omission (what gets left out) in partitioning the Quaternary. These include the challenge set by the use of unconformities as stage boundaries, how to deal with multiphase records in ocean and terrestrial sediments, what happened at the 'Early-Mid- (Middle) Pleistocene Transition', dealing with trends that cross phase boundaries, and the current controversial focus on how to subdivide the Holocene and formally define an 'Anthropocene'.

  18. Molecular delivery of plasmids for genetic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mazid, Romiza; Tan, Melvin X; Danquah, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid vaccination is a smart gene delivery application mostly achieved through the utilisation of viral or copolymeric systems as surrogated carriers in micro or nano formulations. A common polymeric protocol for plasmid vaccine formulation, which as somewhat been successful, is via the complexation of the DNA molecules with a cationic polymer, and encapsulating in a vehicular carrier polymer. Even though plasmid vaccination research has not witnessed the much anticipated success, due a number of cellular and physicochemical reasons, application of copolymeric carriers with tight functionalities is a promising strategy to optimally deliver the DNA molecules; in view of the available chemistries and physical properties that could be tuned to enable enhanced targeted delivery, uptake and specific transfection. This also enables the targeting of specific epitopes and antigen presenting cells for the treatment of many pathogenic infections and cancer. This paper provides a brief critical review of the current state of plasmid vaccines formulation and molecular delivery with analysis of performance data obtained from clinical trials.

  19. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  20. The broad-host-range plasmid pSFA231 isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment represents a new member of the PromA plasmid family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M.; Wang, Yafei; Brown, Celeste J.; Yao, Fei; Yang, Shan; Jiang, Yong; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    A self-transmissible broad-host-range (BHR) plasmid pSFA231 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment in Shen-fu wastewater irrigation zone, China, using the triparental mating exogenous plasmid capture method. Based on its complete sequence the plasmid has a size of 41.5 kb and codes for 50 putative open reading frames (orfs), 29 of which represent genes involved in replication, partitioning and transfer functions of the plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis grouped pSFA231 into the newly defined PromA plasmid family, which currently includes five members. Further comparative genomic analysis shows that pSFA231 shares the common backbone regions with the other PromA plasmids, i.e., genes involved in replication, maintenance and control, and conjugative transfer. Nevertheless, phylogenetic divergence was found in specific gene products. We propose to divide the PromA group into two subgroups, PromA-α (pMRAD02, pSB102) and PromA-β (pMOL98, pIPO2T, pSFA231, pTer331), based on the splits network analysis of the RepA protein. Interestingly, a cluster of hypothetical orfs located between parA and traA of pSFA231 shows high similarity with the corresponding regions on pMOL98, pIPO2T, and pTer331, suggesting these hypothetical orfs may represent “essential” plasmid backbone genes for the PromA-β subgroup. Alternatively, they may also be accessory genes that were first acquired and then stayed as the plasmid diverged. Our study increases the available collection of complete genome sequences of BHR plasmids, and since pSFA231 is the only characterized PromA plasmid from China, our findings also enhance our understanding of the genetic diversity of this plasmid group in different parts of the world. PMID:25628616

  1. blaCMY-2-positive IncA/C plasmids from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are a distinct component of a larger lineage of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas R; Singer, Randall S; Meng, Da; Broschat, Shira L; Orfe, Lisa H; Anderson, Janet M; Herndon, David R; Kappmeyer, Lowell S; Daniels, Joshua B; Besser, Thomas E

    2010-02-01

    Large multidrug resistance plasmids of the A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) have been found in a diverse group of Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We present three completed sequences from IncA/C plasmids that originated from Escherichia coli (cattle) and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (human) and that carry the cephamycinase gene blaCMY-2. These large plasmids (148 to 166 kbp) share extensive sequence identity and synteny. The most divergent plasmid, peH4H, has lost several conjugation-related genes and has gained a kanamycin resistance region. Two of the plasmids (pAM04528 and peH4H) harbor two copies of blaCMY-2, while the third plasmid (pAR060302) harbors a single copy of the gene. The majority of single-nucleotide polymorphisms comprise nonsynonymous mutations in floR. A comparative analysis of these plasmids with five other published IncA/C plasmids showed that the blaCMY-2 plasmids from E. coli and S. enterica are genetically distinct from those originating from Yersinia pestis and Photobacterium damselae and distal to one originating from Yersinia ruckeri. While the overall similarity of these plasmids supports the likelihood of recent movements among E. coli and S. enterica hosts, their greater divergence from Y. pestis or Y. ruckeri suggests less recent plasmid transfer among these pathogen groups.

  2. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  3. Topological Behavior of Plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Higgins, N Patrick; Vologodskii, Alexander V

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of the B-form structure of DNA by Watson and Crick led to an explosion of research on nucleic acids in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and genetics. Powerful techniques were developed to reveal a myriad of different structural conformations that change B-DNA as it is transcribed, replicated, and recombined and as sister chromosomes are moved into new daughter cell compartments during cell division. This article links the original discoveries of superhelical structure and molecular topology to non-B form DNA structure and contemporary biochemical and biophysical techniques. The emphasis is on the power of plasmids for studying DNA structure and function. The conditions that trigger the formation of alternative DNA structures such as left-handed Z-DNA, inter- and intra-molecular triplexes, triple-stranded DNA, and linked catenanes and hemicatenanes are explained. The DNA dynamics and topological issues are detailed for stalled replication forks and for torsional and structural changes on DNA in front of and behind a transcription complex and a replisome. The complex and interconnected roles of topoisomerases and abundant small nucleoid association proteins are explained. And methods are described for comparing in vivo and in vitro reactions to probe and understand the temporal pathways of DNA and chromosome chemistry that occur inside living cells.

  4. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  5. Mechanisms of Theta Plasmid Replication.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating pieces of DNA. This article discusses theta plasmid replication, which is a class of circular plasmid replication that includes ColE1-like origins of replication popular with expression vectors. All modalities of theta plasmid replication initiate synthesis with the leading strand at a predetermined site and complete replication through recruitment of the host's replisome, which extends the leading strand continuously while synthesizing the lagging strand discontinuously. There are clear differences between different modalities of theta plasmid replication in mechanisms of DNA duplex melting and in priming of leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. In some replicons duplex melting depends on transcription, while other replicons rely on plasmid-encoded trans-acting proteins (Reps); primers for leading-strand synthesis can be generated through processing of a transcript or in other replicons by the action of host- or plasmid-encoded primases. None of these processes require DNA breaks. The frequency of replication initiation is tightly regulated to facilitate establishment in permissive hosts and to achieve a steady state. The last section of the article reviews how plasmid copy number is sensed and how this feedback modulates the frequency of replication.

  6. Plasmid acquisition in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.; Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, bacteria often show an increased resistance to antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance to an antibiotic after transformation, the acquisition of DNA, usually in the form of a plasmid containing a gene for resistance to one or more antibiotics. In order to study the capacity of bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics in microgravity, we have modified the standard protocol for transformation of Escherichia coli for use in the NASA-flight-certified hardware package, The Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). Here we report on the ability of E. coli to remain competent for long periods of time at temperatures that are readily available on the Space Shuttle, and present some preliminary flight results.

  7. Tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels as local reservoirs for plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Ducrocq, Grégory; Hlawaty, Hanna; Bataille, Isabelle; Guénin, Erwann; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we measured the ability of various cationized pullulan tubular hydrogels to retain plasmid DNA, and tested the ability of retained plasmid DNA to transfect vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cationized pullulans were obtained by grafting at different charge densities ethylamine (EA) or diethylaminoethylamine (DEAE) on the pullulan backbone. Polymers were characterized by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, size exclusion chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The complexation of cationized pullulans in solution with plasmid DNA was evidenced by fluorescence quenching with PicoGreen. Cationized pullulans were then chemically crosslinked with phosphorus oxychloride to obtain tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels. Native pullulan tubes did not retain loaded plasmid DNA. In contrast, the ability of cationized pullulan tubes to retain plasmid DNA was dependent on both the amine content and the type of amine. The functional integrity of plasmid DNA in cationized pullulan tubes was demonstrated by in vitro transfection of VSMCs. Hence, cationized pullulan hydrogels can be designed as tubular structures with high affinity for plasmid DNA, which may provide new biomaterials to enhance the efficiency of local arterial gene transfer strategies.

  8. Ultrasound enhances in vivo tumor expression of plasmid DNA by PEG-introduced cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-11-28

    This study is an investigation to experimentally confirm whether or not ultrasound (US) irradiation is effective in enhancing the in vivo gene expression of plasmid DNA in tumor. Dextran was cationized by introducing spermine to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with a plasmid DNA. The cationized dextran prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have an active ester and methoxy groups at each terminal, to obtain cationized dextran with different percentages of PEG introduced. Various cationized dextrans with or without PEG introduction were mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes. Electrophoretical examination revealed that the plasmid DNA was complexed both with the cationized dextran and PEG-introduced cationized dextran, irrespective of the PEG introduction percentage, although the higher N/P ratio was needed for plasmid DNA complexation with the latter. By complexation with the cationized dextran, the zeta potential of plasmid DNA was changed to be positive. The charge of PEG-introduced cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes became close to 0 mV as their percentage of PEG introduced increased, although the molecular size was about 250 nm, irrespective of the PEG introduction. When cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEG introduction were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass and the subsequent US irradiation to the tumor mass percutaneously, the PEG-introduced cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complex plus US irradiation enhanced the tumor level of gene expression to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized dextran-plasmid DNA complex and free plasmid DNA with or without US irradiation. The enhanced level depended on the time period and timing of US irradiation. Fluorescent microscopic studies revealed that the localization of plasmid DNA and the gene expression were observed in

  9. Study of recombinant micro-organism populations characterized by their plasmid content per cell using a segregated model.

    PubMed

    Shene, C; Andrews, B A; Asenjo, J A

    2003-07-01

    Numerous observations from recombinant systems have shown that properties such as the specific cell growth rate and the plasmid-free cell formation rate are related, not only to the average plasmid content per cell, but also to the plasmid distribution within a population. The plasmid distribution in recombinant cultures can have an effect on the culture productivity that cannot be modelled using average values of the overall culture. The prediction of the behaviour of a plasmid content distribution and its causes and effects can only be studied using segregated models. A segregated model that describes populations of recombinant cells characterized by their plasmid content distribution has been developed. This model includes critical causes of recombinant culture instability such as the plasmid partition mechanism at cell division, plasmid replication kinetics and the effect of the plasmid content on the specific growth rate. The segregated model allows investigation of the effect of each of these causes and that of the plasmid content distribution on the observable behaviour of a recombinant culture. The effect of two partitioning mechanisms (Gaussian distribution and binomial distribution) on culture stability was investigated. The Gaussian distribution is slightly more stable. A small plasmid replication rate constant results in a very unstable culture even after short periods of time. This instability is dramatically improved for a larger value of this constant, hence improving protein synthesis. For a very narrow initial plasmid distribution, a given plasmid replication rate and partitioning mechanism can become broad even after a relatively short period of time. In contrast, a very "broad" initial distribution gave rise to a "Gamma-like" distribution profile. If we compare the results obtained in the simulations of the segregated model with those of the non-segregated one (average model), the latter model predicts much more stable behaviour, thus these

  10. blaCMY-2-positive IncA/C plasmids from escherichia coli and salmonella enterica are a distinct component of a larger lineage of plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Large multidrug resistance plasmids of the A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) have been found in a diverse group of Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We present three completed sequences from IncA/C plasmids that originated from Escherichia coli (cattle) and Salmonella enterica sero...

  11. Rapid plasmid library screening using RecA-coated biotinylated probes.

    PubMed

    Rigas, B; Welcher, A A; Ward, D C; Weissman, S M

    1986-12-01

    A method for the rapid physical isolation of recombinant plasmids of interest from a mixture of plasmids such as a plasmid cDNA library is presented. This method utilizes the ability of RecA protein to form stable complexes between linear single-stranded and circular double-stranded DNA molecules sharing sequence homology, and procedures allowing isolation of biotinylated nucleic acid. Biotinylated linear DNA probes coated with RecA have been used to screen reconstituted plasmid libraries consisting of two plasmid species, one homologous and the other heterologous to the probe. When the link between biotin and the nucleotide base could be cleaved by reducing agents, the complex was purified by streptavidin-agarose chromatography and the recovered plasmid was propagated in Escherichia coli. When the link was not cleavable the complex was bound to avidin in solution and purified by cupric iminodiacetic acid-agarose chromatography. The complex was then dissociated and the plasmids were propagated in E. coli. With either protocol, homologous plasmid recovery was between 10% and 20%, and enrichment was between 10(4)- and 10(5)-fold. Potential applications and extensions of this method, such as plasmid, cosmid, and phage library screening and facilitation of physical mapping of macroregions of mammalian genomes are presented and discussed.

  12. Modeling sRNA-Regulated Plasmid Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    We study a theoretical model for the toxin-antitoxin (hok/sok) mechanism for plasmid maintenance in bacteria. Toxin-antitoxin systems enforce the maintenance of a plasmid through post-segregational killing of cells that have lost the plasmid. Key to their function is the tight regulation of expression of a protein toxin by an sRNA antitoxin. Here, we focus on the nonlinear nature of the regulatory circuit dynamics of the toxin-antitoxin mechanism. The mechanism relies on a transient increase in protein concentration rather than on the steady state of the genetic circuit. Through a systematic analysis of the parameter dependence of this transient increase, we confirm some known design features of this system and identify new ones: for an efficient toxin-antitoxin mechanism, the synthesis rate of the toxin’s mRNA template should be lower that of the sRNA antitoxin, the mRNA template should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin, and the mRNA-sRNA complex should be more stable than the sRNA antitoxin. Moreover, a short half-life of the protein toxin is also beneficial to the function of the toxin-antitoxin system. In addition, we study a therapeutic scenario in which a competitor mRNA is introduced to sequester the sRNA antitoxin, causing the toxic protein to be expressed. PMID:28085919

  13. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    PubMed

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  14. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, George A; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C

    2014-10-01

    Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat.

  15. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  16. Chemical adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Greenland, John R; Letvin, Norman L

    2007-05-10

    Plasmid DNA vaccines are a promising modality for immunization against a variety of human pathogens. Immunization via multiple routes with plasmid DNA can elicit potent cellular immune responses, and these immunogens can be administered repeatedly without inducing anti-vector immunity. Nonetheless, the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines has been limited by problems associated with delivery. A number of adjuvants have been designed to improve plasmid DNA immunogenicity, either by directly stimulating the immune system or by enhancing plasmid DNA expression. Chemical adjuvants for enhancing plasmid DNA expression include liposomes, polymers, and microparticles, all of which have shown promise for enhancing the expression and immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines in animal models. Micro- and nanoparticles have not been shown to enhance immune responses to plasmid DNA vaccines. However, formulation of plasmid DNA with some non-particulate polymeric adjuvants has led to a statistically significant enhancement of immune responses. Further development of these technologies will significantly improve the utility of plasmid DNA vaccination.

  17. The Benefits of Adaptive Partitioning for Parallel AMR Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Steensland, Johan

    2008-07-01

    Parallel adaptive mesh refinement methods potentially lead to realistic modeling of complex three-dimensional physical phenomena. However, the dynamics inherent in these methods present significant challenges in data partitioning and load balancing. Significant human resources, including time, effort, experience, and knowledge, are required for determining the optimal partitioning technique for each new simulation. In reality, scientists resort to using the on-board partitioner of the computational framework, or to using the partitioning industry standard, ParMetis. Adaptive partitioning refers to repeatedly selecting, configuring and invoking the optimal partitioning technique at run-time, based on the current state of the computer and application. In theory, adaptive partitioning automatically delivers superior performance and eliminates the need for repeatedly spending valuable human resources for determining the optimal static partitioning technique. In practice, however, enabling frameworks are non-existent due to the inherent significant inter-disciplinary research challenges. This paper presents a study of a simple implementation of adaptive partitioning and discusses implied potential benefits from the perspective of common groups of users within computational science. The study is based on a large set of data derived from experiments including six real-life, multi-time-step adaptive applications from various scientific domains, five complementing and fundamentally different partitioning techniques, a large set of parameters corresponding to a wide spectrum of computing environments, and a flexible cost function that considers the relative impact of multiple partitioning metrics and diverse partitioning objectives. The results show that even a simple implementation of adaptive partitioning can automatically generate results statistically equivalent to the best static partitioning. Thus, it is possible to effectively eliminate the problem of determining the

  18. pA506, a Conjugative Plasmid of the Plant Epiphyte Pseudomonas fluorescens A506

    PubMed Central

    Stockwell, Virginia O.; Davis, Edward W.; Carey, Alyssa; Shaffer, Brenda T.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Hassan, Karl A.; Hockett, Kevin; Thomashow, Linda S.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Conjugative plasmids are known to facilitate the acquisition and dispersal of genes contributing to the fitness of Pseudomonas spp. Here, we report the characterization of pA506, the 57-kb conjugative plasmid of Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, a plant epiphyte used in the United States for the biological control of fire blight disease of pear and apple. Twenty-nine of the 67 open reading frames (ORFs) of pA506 have putative functions in conjugation, including a type IV secretion system related to that of MOBP6 family plasmids and a gene cluster for type IV pili. We demonstrate that pA506 is self-transmissible via conjugation between A506 and strains of Pseudomonas spp. or the Enterobacteriaceae. The origin of vegetative replication (oriV) of pA506 is typical of those in pPT23A family plasmids, which are present in many pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae, but pA506 lacks repA, a defining locus for pPT23A plasmids, and has a novel partitioning region. We selected a plasmid-cured derivative of A506 and compared it to the wild type to identify plasmid-encoded phenotypes. pA506 conferred UV resistance, presumably due to the plasmid-borne rulAB genes, but did not influence epiphytic fitness of A506 on pear or apple blossoms in the field. pA506 does not appear to confer resistance to antibiotics or other toxic elements. Based on the conjugative nature of pA506 and the large number of its genes that are shared with plasmids from diverse groups of environmental bacteria, the plasmid is likely to serve as a vehicle for genetic exchange between A506 and its coinhabitants on plant surfaces. PMID:23811504

  19. Thioredoxin-like proteins in F and other plasmid systems.

    PubMed

    Hemmis, Casey W; Schildbach, Joel F

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial conjugation is the process by which a conjugative plasmid transfers from donor to recipient bacterium. During this process, single-stranded plasmid DNA is actively and specifically transported from the cytoplasm of the donor, through a large membrane-spanning assembly known as the pore complex, and into the cytoplasm of the recipient. In Gram negative bacteria, construction of the pore requires localization of a subset of structural and catalytically active proteins to the bacterial periplasm. Unlike the cytoplasm, the periplasm contains proteins that promote disulfide bond formation within or between cysteine-containing proteins. To ensure proper protein folding and assembly, bacteria employ periplasmic redox systems for thiol oxidation, disulfide bond/sulfenic acid reduction, and disulfide bond isomerization. Recent data suggest that plasmid-based proteins belonging to the disulfide bond formation family play an integral role in the conjugative process by serving as mediators in folding and/or assembly of pore complex proteins. Here we report the identification of 165 thioredoxin-like family members across 89 different plasmid systems. Using phylogenetic analysis, all but nine family members were categorized into thioredoxin-like subfamilies. In addition, we discuss the diversity, conservation, and putative roles of thioredoxin-like proteins in plasmid systems, which include homologs of DsbA, DsbB, DsbC, DsbD, DsbG, and CcmG from Escherichia coli, TlpA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Com1 from Coxiella burnetii, as well as TrbB and TraF from plasmid F, and the absolute conservation of a disulfide isomerase in plasmids containing homologs of the transfer proteins TraH, TraN, and TraU.

  20. Partitioning Breaks Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    Considering a clique as a conservative definition of community structure, we examine how graph partitioning algorithms interact with cliques. Many popular community-finding algorithms partition the entire graph into non-overlapping communities. We show that on a wide range of empirical networks, from different domains, significant numbers of cliques are split across the separate partitions produced by these algorithms. We then examine the largest connected component of the subgraph formed by retaining only edges in cliques, and apply partitioning strategies that explicitly minimise the number of cliques split. We further examine several modern overlapping community finding algorithms, in terms of the interaction between cliques and the communities they find, and in terms of the global overlap of the sets of communities they find. We conclude that, due to the connectedness of many networks, any community finding algorithm that produces partitions must fail to find at least some significant structures. Moreover, contrary to traditional intuition, in some empirical networks, strong ties and cliques frequently do cross community boundaries; much community structure is fundamentally overlapping and unpartitionable in nature.

  1. Use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the study of Ln(III) complexation and extraction speciation with calixarene-CMPO in the fuel partitioning concept.

    PubMed

    Lamouroux, C; Rateau, S; Moulin, C

    2006-01-01

    The calixarene-bearing CMPO groups belong to a family of extracting agents recently developed for nuclear reprocessing. These molecules exhibit specific properties to separate actinides(III) from lanthanides(III) in nitric acid solution. Speciation of two distinct calixarene-CMPO (carbamoyl phosphine oxide), substituted either in the wide rim or in the narrow rim with lanthanides (La, Eu, Yb), was undertaken. The complexation behaviour in single phase or in liquid-liquid extraction was examined with two different electrospray spectrometer source geometries. The stoichiometries of the different complexes were reported and the selectivity of these calixarenes towards lanthanides was determined. The results obtained were concordant for the two spectrometers and confirm that electrospray mass spectrometry is a useful tool to study non-covalently bonded complexes.

  2. Homology of cryptic plasmid of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with plasmids from Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    Ison, C A; Bellinger, C M; Walker, J

    1986-10-01

    DNA probe hybridisation was used to examine the relation between the cryptic plasmid from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and plasmids carried by pharyngeal isolates of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica. The complete gonococcal cryptic plasmid and HinfI derived digestion fragments subcloned into Escherichia coli were used to probe Southern blots of plasmid extracts. Homology was found to a plasmid of approximate molecular weight 4.5 kilobase pairs (Kb) but not to plasmids of less than 3.2 Kb or 6.5 Kb. Eleven of 16 strains of N meningitidis and two of six strains of N lactamica carried plasmids that showed strong hybridisation with the 4.2 Kb gonococcal plasmid. Hybridisation of plasmids from non-gonococcal species of neisseria with the gonococcal cryptic plasmid indicates that caution should be taken when using the cryptic plasmid as a diagnostic probe for gonorrhoea.

  3. Iron Partitioning in Ferropericlase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, J. W. H.; Stixrude, L. P.; Pinilla, C.; Holmstrom, E.

    2015-12-01

    Ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O, is the second most abundant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. Whether iron favours the liquid or solid phase of (Mg,Fe)O has important implications for the Earth's mantle, both chemically and dynamically. As iron is much heavier than magnesium, the partitioning of iron between liquid and solid will lead to a contrast in densities. This difference in density will lead one phase to be more buoyant than the other and would help, in part, to explain how the mantle crystallised from the magma ocean of the Hadean eon to its current state. The partitioning of iron between the two phases is characterized by partition coefficients. Using ab-initio methods, thermodynamic integration and adiabatic switching these coefficients have been determined. Results are presented for pressures encompassing the region between the upper mantle and the core-mantle boundary (10-140GPa).

  4. Two-plasmid vector system for independently controlled expression of green and red fluorescent fusion proteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Brzoska, Anthony J; Firth, Neville

    2013-05-01

    We have constructed a system for the regulated coexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusions in Staphylococcus aureus. It was validated by simultaneous localization of cell division proteins FtsZ and Noc and used to detect filament formation by an actin-like ParM plasmid partitioning protein in its native coccoid host.

  5. Structure and regulation of gene expression of a Clo DF13 plasmid DNA region involved in plasmid segregation and incompatibility.

    PubMed Central

    van den Elzen, P J; Hakkaart, M J; van Putten, A J; Walters, H H; Veltkamp, E; Nijkamp, H J

    1983-01-01

    The bacteriocinogenic plasmid Clo DF13 contains genetic information involved in the accurate partitioning of the plasmid (parA and parB) as well as in incompatibility phenomena (incA, B, C and D). In this paper we report on the primary structure and regulation of gene expression of the 29% - 50% part of Clo DF13, containing the DNA regions incA, incB and parB as well as genes K and L. According to the results of our DNA sequence analysis, mapping of transposon insertions, RNA blotting and S1 mapping experiments, we conclude that: a) genes K and L are transcribed as one operon; transcription of this operon is initiated at a promoter (P2) located at 32.5% and proceeds in a clockwise direction. b) treatment of cells with mitomycin-C, significantly enhances transcription from P2, although this promoter is probably not directly repressed by lexA protein. c) Termination of transcription of this operon occurs between genes K and L, as well as distal to gene L. The possible role of gene products and/or sites, located within the 29-50% DNA region, in plasmid incompatibility and segregation is discussed. Images PMID:6324101

  6. FNAS phase partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanalstine, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Project NAS8-36955 D.O. #100 initially involved the following tasks: (1) evaluation of various coatings' ability to control wall wetting and surface zeta potential expression; (2) testing various methods to mix and control the demixing of phase systems; and (3) videomicroscopic investigation of cell partition. Three complementary areas were identified for modification and extension of the original contract. They were: (1) identification of new supports for column cell partition; (2) electrokinetic detection of protein adsorption; and (3) emulsion studies related to bioseparations.

  7. Cochlear implant in incomplete partition type I.

    PubMed

    Berrettini, S; Forli, F; De Vito, A; Bruschini, L; Quaranta, N

    2013-02-01

    In this investigation, we report on 4 patients affected by incomplete partition type I submitted to cochlear implant at our institutions. Preoperative, surgical, mapping and follow-up issues as well as results in cases with this complex malformation are described. The cases reported in the present study confirm that cochlear implantation in patients with incomplete partition type I may be challenging for cochlear implant teams. The results are variable, but in many cases satisfactory, and are mainly related to the surgical placement of the electrode and residual neural nerve fibres. Moreover, in some cases the association of cochlear nerve abnormalities and other disabilities may significantly affect results.

  8. Production of Plasmid DNA as Pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Marco; Schleef, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical applications of plasmid DNA require certain quality standards, depending on the intended use of the plasmids. That is, for direct gene transfer into human, GMP Grade is mandatory, however, for GMP production of for example viral vectors (AAV or mRNA etc.), the plasmid DNA used has not to be produced under GMP necessarily. Here we summarize important features of producing plasmid DNA, ensuring the required quality for the intended (pharmaceutical) application.

  9. Broad host range plasmids can invade an unexpectedly diverse fraction of a soil bacterial community

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, Uli; Riber, Leise; Dechesne, Arnaud; Sannazzarro, Analia; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2015-01-01

    Conjugal plasmids can provide microbes with full complements of new genes and constitute potent vehicles for horizontal gene transfer. Conjugal plasmid transfer is deemed responsible for the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among microbes. While broad host range plasmids are known to transfer to diverse hosts in pure culture, the extent of their ability to transfer in the complex bacterial communities present in most habitats has not been comprehensively studied. Here, we isolated and characterized transconjugants with a degree of sensitivity not previously realized to investigate the transfer range of IncP- and IncPromA-type broad host range plasmids from three proteobacterial donors to a soil bacterial community. We identified transfer to many different recipients belonging to 11 different bacterial phyla. The prevalence of transconjugants belonging to diverse Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria suggests that inter-Gram plasmid transfer of IncP-1 and IncPromA-type plasmids is a frequent phenomenon. While the plasmid receiving fractions of the community were both plasmid- and donor- dependent, we identified a core super-permissive fraction that could take up different plasmids from diverse donor strains. This fraction, comprising 80% of the identified transconjugants, thus has the potential to dominate IncP- and IncPromA-type plasmid transfer in soil. Our results demonstrate that these broad host range plasmids have a hitherto unrecognized potential to transfer readily to very diverse bacteria and can, therefore, directly connect large proportions of the soil bacterial gene pool. This finding reinforces the evolutionary and medical significances of these plasmids. PMID:25333461

  10. Transcription of ColE1Ap mbeC induced by conjugative plasmids from twelve different incompatibility groups.

    PubMed Central

    Selvaratnam, S; Gealt, M A

    1993-01-01

    Although nonconjugative mobilizable plasmids require helping functions of conjugative plasmids in order to be mobilized into recipients, at least some genes from the nonconjugative plasmids may be induced to assist in the DNA transfer process. Conjugative plasmids from 12 different incompatibility groups mobilized the nonconjugative plasmid ColE1Ap between Escherichia coli strains. Introduction of any of the conjugative plasmids into the ColE1Ap-containing strain resulted in an induction of mbeC, the product of which is a component of the mobilization relaxation complex. Each of the conjugative plasmids caused protein to bind specifically to mbe promoter DNA, suggesting a direct regulatory interaction. Images PMID:8226641

  11. Building mosaics of therapeutic plasmid gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2011-12-01

    Plasmids are circular or linear DNA molecules propagated extra-chromosomally in bacteria. Evolution shaped plasmids are inherently mosaic structures with individual functional units represented by distinct segments in the plasmid genome. The patchwork of plasmid genetic modules is a convenient template and a model for the generation of artificial plasmids used as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells. Plasmid gene vectors are an important tool in gene therapy and in basic biomedical research, where these vectors offer efficient transgene expression in many settings in vitro and in vivo. Plasmid vectors can be attached to nuclear directing ligands or transferred by electroporation as naked DNA to deliver the payload genes to the nuclei of the target cells. Transgene expression silencing by plasmid sequences of bacterial origin and immune stimulation by bacterial unmethylated CpG motifs can be avoided by the generation of plasmid-based minimized DNA vectors, such as minicircles. Systems of efficient site-specific integration into human chromosomes and stable episomal maintenance in human cells are being developed for further reduction of the chances for transgene silencing. The successful generation of plasmid vectors is governed by a number of vector design rules, some of which are common to all gene vectors, while others are specific to plasmid vectors. This review is focused both on the guiding principles and on the technical know-how of plasmid gene vector design.

  12. The plasmid replicon of EBV consists of multiple cis-acting elements that facilitate DNA synthesis by the cell and a viral maintenance element.

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, A; Tyree, C; Sugden, B

    1998-01-01

    Plasmids containing oriP, the plasmid origin of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), are replicated stably in human cells that express a single viral trans-acting factor, EBNA-1. Unlike plasmids of other viruses, but akin to human chromosomes, oriP plasmids are synthesized once per cell cycle, and are partitioned faithfully to daughter cells during mitosis. Although EBNA-1 binds multiple sites within oriP, its role in DNA synthesis and partitioning has been obscure. EBNA-1 lacks enzymatic activities that are present in the origin-binding proteins of other mammalian viruses, and does not interact with human cellular proteins that provide equivalent enzymatic functions. We demonstrate that plasmids with oriP or its constituent elements are synthesized efficiently in human cells in the absence of EBNA-1. Further, we show that human cells rapidly eliminate or destroy newly synthesized plasmids, and that both EBNA-1 and the family of repeats of oriP are required for oriP plasmids to escape this catastrophic loss. These findings indicate that EBV's plasmid replicon consists of genetic elements with distinct functions, multiple cis-acting elements that facilitate DNA synthesis and viral cis/trans elements that permit retention of replicated DNA in daughter cells. They also explain historical failures to identify mammalian origins of DNA synthesis as autonomously replicating sequences. PMID:9799247

  13. Plasmid diversity in Vibrio vulnificus biotypes.

    PubMed

    Roig, Francisco J; Amaro, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a heterogeneous bacterial species that can be virulent for humans and fish. Virulence in fish seems to rely on a recently described plasmid that can be transmitted between strains, aided by a conjugative plasmid. The main objective of this work was to analyse the plasmid content of a wide collection of strains from the three biotypes of the species, as well as to identify putative conjugative and virulence plasmids by means of Southern hybridization with specific probes and sequence analysis of selected gene markers. We found 28 different plasmid profiles in a total of 112 strains, which were relatively biotype- or serovar-specific. Biotype 1 lacked high-molecular-mass plasmids, with the exception of a putative conjugative plasmid of 48 kb that was present in 42.8% of clinical and environmental strains isolated worldwide. All biotype 2 strains possessed the virulence plasmid, whose molecular mass ranged between 68 and 70 kb, and 89.65% of these strains also had a putative conjugative plasmid with a molecular size of 52-56 kb. Finally, a 48 kb putative conjugative plasmid was present in all biotype 3 strains. Data from partial sequencing of traD, traI and the whole vep07 (a recently described plasmid-borne virulence gene) from a selection of strains suggest that the plasmids of 48-56 kb probably belong to the same family of F-plasmids as pYJ016 and that the gene vep07 is absolutely essential for fish virulence. Additional cryptic plasmids of low molecular mass were present in the three biotypes. In conclusion, plasmids are widespread among V. vulnificus species and could contribute substantially to genetic plasticity of the species.

  14. STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS OF METAL PARTITIONING TO MINERAL SURFACES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The conceptual understanding of surface complexation reactions that control trace element partitioning to mineral surfaces is limited by the assumption that the solid reactant possesses a finite, time-invariant population of surface functional groups. This assumption has limited...

  15. VIEW OF EASTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EASTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. VIEW OF EASTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EASTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. VIEW OF WESTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WESTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. VIEW OF WESTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WESTERN PARTITION OF FRONT BAY ROOM, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. Ultrasound enhancement of in vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by a cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Aoyama, Teruyoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-05-01

    In vitro transfection efficiency of a plasmid DNA for rat gastric mucosal (RGM)-1 cells was enhanced by ultrasound (US) irradiation. Ethylenediamine was introduced to the carboxyl groups of gelatin to prepare a cationized gelatin as the vector of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. An electrophoresis experiment revealed that the cationized gelatin was mixed with plasmid DNA at the weight ratio of 5.0 to form a cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex. The complex obtained was about 200nm in diameter with a positive charge. When incubated with the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex and subsequently exposed to US, RGM-1 cells exhibited a significantly enhanced luciferase activity although the extent increased with an increase in the DNA concentration, in contrast to the cationized gelatin alone with or without US irradiation and US irradiation alone. US irradiation was also effective in enhancing the activity by free plasmid DNA although the extent was less than that of the complex. The US-induced enhancement of luciferase activity was influenced by the exposure time period, frequency, and intensity of US. The activity enhancement became higher to be significant at the irradiation time period of 60 s and thereafter decreased. A series of cytotoxicity experiments revealed that an increase in the irradiation time period and intensity of US decreased the viability of cells themselves. It is possible that US irradiation under an appropriate condition enables cells to accelerate the permeation of the cationized gelatin-plasmid DNA complex through the cell membrane, resulted in enhanced transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA. These findings clearly indicate that US exposure is a simple and promising method to enhance the gene expression of plasmid DNA.

  20. Defining the Role of ATP Hydrolysis in Mitotic Segregation of Bacterial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Ah-Seng, Yoan; Rech, Jérôme; Lane, David; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2013-01-01

    Hydrolysis of ATP by partition ATPases, although considered a key step in the segregation mechanism that assures stable inheritance of plasmids, is intrinsically very weak. The cognate centromere-binding protein (CBP), together with DNA, stimulates the ATPase to hydrolyse ATP and to undertake the relocation that incites plasmid movement, apparently confirming the need for hydrolysis in partition. However, ATP-binding alone changes ATPase conformation and properties, making it difficult to rigorously distinguish the substrate and cofactor roles of ATP in vivo. We had shown that mutation of arginines R36 and R42 in the F plasmid CBP, SopB, reduces stimulation of SopA-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis without changing SopA-SopB affinity, suggesting the role of hydrolysis could be analyzed using SopA with normal conformational responses to ATP. Here, we report that strongly reducing SopB-mediated stimulation of ATP hydrolysis results in only slight destabilization of mini-F, although the instability, as well as an increase in mini-F clustering, is proportional to the ATPase deficit. Unexpectedly, the reduced stimulation also increased the frequency of SopA relocation over the nucleoid. The increase was due to drastic shortening of the period spent by SopA at nucleoid ends; average speed of migration per se was unchanged. Reduced ATP hydrolysis was also associated with pronounced deviations in positioning of mini-F, though time-averaged positions changed only modestly. Thus, by specifically targeting SopB-stimulated ATP hydrolysis our study reveals that even at levels of ATPase which reduce the efficiency of splitting clusters and the constancy of plasmid positioning, SopB still activates SopA mobility and plasmid positioning, and sustains near wild type levels of plasmid stability. PMID:24367270

  1. Segrosome Complex Formation during DNA Trafficking in Bacterial Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Oliva, María A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialized partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  2. Plasmid curing of Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Mesas, Juan M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Alegre, M Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Two strains of Oenococcus oeni, RS1 (which carries the plasmid pRS1) and RS2 (which carries the plasmids pRS2 and pRS3), were grown in the presence of different curing agents and at different temperatures. Sublethal temperature together with acriflavine generated all possible types of cured strains, i.e., lacking pRS1 (from strain RS1), and lacking pRS2, pRS3, or both (from strain RS2). Sublethal temperature together with acridine orange only generated cured strains lacking pRS3. These results suggest that acriflavine is a better curing agent than acridine orange for O. oeni, and that pRS3 is the most sensitive to these curing agents. We also observed spontaneous loss of pRS2 or both pRS2 and pRS3 by electroporation. The ability to cure O. oeni strains of plasmids provides a critical new tool for the genetic analysis and engineering of this commercially important bacterium.

  3. Variable length adjacent partitioning for PTS based PAPR reduction of OFDM signal

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Zeyid T.; Rahman, Md. Mijanur; Yaakob, S. N.; Razalli, Mohammad Shahrazel; Kadhim, Rasim A.

    2015-05-15

    Peak-to-Average power ratio (PAPR) is a major drawback in OFDM communication. It leads the power amplifier into nonlinear region operation resulting into loss of data integrity. As such, there is a strong motivation to find techniques to reduce PAPR. Partial Transmit Sequence (PTS) is an attractive scheme for this purpose. Judicious partitioning the OFDM data frame into disjoint subsets is a pivotal component of any PTS scheme. Out of the existing partitioning techniques, adjacent partitioning is characterized by an attractive trade-off between cost and performance. With an aim of determining effects of length variability of adjacent partitions, we performed an investigation into the performances of a variable length adjacent partitioning (VL-AP) and fixed length adjacent partitioning in comparison with other partitioning schemes such as pseudorandom partitioning. Simulation results with different modulation and partitioning scenarios showed that fixed length adjacent partition had better performance compared to variable length adjacent partitioning. As expected, simulation results showed a slightly better performance of pseudorandom partitioning technique compared to fixed and variable adjacent partitioning schemes. However, as the pseudorandom technique incurs high computational complexities, adjacent partitioning schemes were still seen as favorable candidates for PAPR reduction.

  4. Plasmid Diversity and Adaptation Analyzed by Massive Sequencing of Escherichia coli Plasmids.

    PubMed

    de Toro, María; Garcilláon-Barcia, M Pilar; De La Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is revolutionizing the analysis of bacterial genomes. It leads to a massive increase in the amount of available data to be analyzed. Bacterial genomes are usually composed of one main chromosome and a number of accessory chromosomes, called plasmids. A recently developed methodology called PLACNET (for plasmid constellation networks) allows the reconstruction of the plasmids of a given genome. Thus, it opens an avenue for plasmidome analysis on a global scale. This work reviews our knowledge of the genetic determinants for plasmid propagation (conjugation and related functions), their diversity, and their prevalence in the variety of plasmids found by whole-genome sequencing. It focuses on the results obtained from a collection of 255 Escherichia coli plasmids reconstructed by PLACNET. The plasmids found in E. coli represent a nonaleatory subset of the plasmids found in proteobacteria. Potential reasons for the prevalence of some specific plasmid groups will be discussed and, more importantly, additional questions will be posed.

  5. Plasmid-Encoded Iron Uptake Systems.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids confer genetic information that benefits the bacterial cells containing them. In pathogenic bacteria, plasmids often harbor virulence determinants that enhance the pathogenicity of the bacterium. The ability to acquire iron in environments where it is limited, for instance the eukaryotic host, is a critical factor for bacterial growth. To acquire iron, bacteria have evolved specific iron uptake mechanisms. These systems are often chromosomally encoded, while those that are plasmid-encoded are rare. Two main plasmid types, ColV and pJM1, have been shown to harbor determinants that increase virulence by providing the cell with essential iron for growth. It is clear that these two plasmid groups evolved independently from each other since they do not share similarities either in the plasmid backbones or in the iron uptake systems they harbor. The siderophores aerobactin and salmochelin that are found on ColV plasmids fall in the hydroxamate and catechol group, respectively, whereas both functional groups are present in the anguibactin siderophore, the only iron uptake system found on pJM1-type plasmids. Besides siderophore-mediated iron uptake, ColV plasmids carry additional genes involved in iron metabolism. These systems include ABC transporters, hemolysins, and a hemoglobin protease. ColV- and pJM1-like plasmids have been shown to confer virulence to their bacterial host, and this trait can be completely ascribed to their encoded iron uptake systems.

  6. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins.

  7. Crystal/liquid partitioning in augite - Effects of cooling rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, R. P.; Taylor, L. A.

    1980-03-01

    The partitioning of major and minor elements between augite and melt was determined as a function of cooling rate for two high-titanium basalt compositions. The results of this study of lunar rock systems 10017 and 75055 were compared with the results of other kinetic studies of augite-liquid partitioning in other rock systems. It was found that the partitioning of major elements (i.e., Ca, Fe, Mg) is essentially rate independent and is insensitive to bulk rock composition and to the nature and order of appearance of coexisting phases for cooling rates of less than 100 C/hr. The partitioning behavior of minor elements (i.e., Al, Cr, Ti) for the same range of cooling rates is complex, being dependent on cooling rate and bulk rock composition. Consideration of these factors is important when augite chemistry and/or partitioning behavior are used in modeling certain magmatic processes or in estimating the thermal history of basaltic rocks.

  8. [Structural organization and control of expression of the sop-operon of linear plasmid prophage N15].

    PubMed

    Ravin, N V; Dorokhov, B D; Lane, D

    2004-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low-copy-number plasmids depends on the active partition of replicated molecules between daughter cells. The partition mechanism is well known for circular plasmids F and P1. The mechanism of partition of linear replicons was studied with the example of bacteriophage N15, which persists as a linear plasmid with covalently closed ends on lysogeny, rather than integrating into the Escherichia coli chromosome. Since stable inheritance of N15 is due to the sop operon homologous to sop of the F plasmid, the control of expression of the N15 sop genes was analyzed. The sop promoter (Psop) contains a binding site for bacterial IHF and five CTTTGC copies, which overlap the -35 and -10 elements. The Sop proteins were shown to interact with a Psop-containing DNA fragment in vitro. Transcription of the sop operon is regulated by the Sop proteins: SopA represses Psop, and SopB enhances the repression, having no effect on the promoter activity in the absence of SopA. In N15 lysogenic cells, Psop proved to be repressed. This regulatory mechanism was assumed to ensure production of SopA and SopB in amounts required for the segregation stability of N15 and to neutralize occasional fluctuations of their concentration in the cell.

  9. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  10. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    13). which they were isolated and the number of the isolate The Legionnaires disease bacterium, L. pneu. from that city. The following 16... Legionnaires disease bacterium. .1. (un. Micro. biol. 8:320-:t25. appears reasonable that this organism could sup- 1:l. Fraser, D5. W., and J. F. McI~ade. 1979...INFECTION AND IMMUNITY, Sept. 1980, p. 1(92-1095 Vol. 29, No. :1 0I 9-9567/A)/- 1092/14$02.00/0. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila_ ( (/’ )GREGORY

  11. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, J L; Swicord, M L; Davis, C C

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  12. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  13. Spatial partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, Andrew; Tostevin, Filipe; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2013-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity is a hallmark of living systems, even at the molecular scale in individual cells. A key example is the partitioning of membrane-bound proteins via lipid domain formation or cytoskeleton-induced corralling. However, the impact of this spatial heterogeneity on biochemical signaling processes is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling. We exactly solve a stochastic model describing a ubiquitous motif in membrane signaling. The solution reveals that partitioning improves signaling reliability via two effects: it moderates the nonlinearity of the switching response, and it reduces noise in the response by suppressing correlations between molecules. An optimal partition size arises from a trade-off between minimizing the number of proteins per partition to improve signaling reliability and ensuring sufficient proteins per partition to maintain signal propagation. The predicted optimal partition size agrees quantitatively with experimentally observed systems. These results persist in spatial simulations with explicit diffusion barriers. Our findings suggest that molecular partitioning is not merely a consequence of the complexity of cellular substructures, but also plays an important functional role in cell signaling. PMID:23530194

  14. Replisome Assembly at Bacterial Chromosomes and Iteron Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna E.; Gross, Marta; Uciechowska, Urszula; Konieczny, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The proper initiation and occurrence of DNA synthesis depends on the formation and rearrangements of nucleoprotein complexes within the origin of DNA replication. In this review article, we present the current knowledge on the molecular mechanism of replication complex assembly at the origin of bacterial chromosome and plasmid replicon containing direct repeats (iterons) within the origin sequence. We describe recent findings on chromosomal and plasmid replication initiators, DnaA and Rep proteins, respectively, and their sequence-specific interactions with double- and single-stranded DNA. Also, we discuss the current understanding of the activities of DnaA and Rep proteins required for replisome assembly that is fundamental to the duplication and stability of genetic information in bacterial cells. PMID:27563644

  15. Survey of plasmids in various mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Harasawa, R.; Barile, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-three strains representing 15 distinct Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Spiroplasma species were examined for the presence of plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic patterns of the DNAs of three strains, Mycoplasma sp. strain 747, Spiroplasma mirum strain SMCA, and M. hominis strain 1257, suggested the presence of a plasmid with molecular weights of approximately 70, 10, and 9 megadaltons, respectively. The functions of these plasmids are currently unknown. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6679154

  16. Biofilms and the plasmid maintenance question.

    PubMed

    Imran, Mudassar; Jones, Don; Smith, Hal

    2005-02-01

    Can a conjugative plasmid encoding enhanced biofilm forming abilities for its bacterial host facilitate the persistence of the plasmid in a bacterial population despite conferring diminished growth rate and segregative plasmid loss on its bearers? We construct a mathematical model in a chemostat and in a plug flow environment to answer this question. Explicit conditions for an affirmative answer are derived. Numerical simulations support the conclusion.

  17. Plasmid-encoded trimethoprim resistance in staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Coughter, J P; Johnston, J L

    1986-01-01

    High-level (greater than 1,000 micrograms/ml) resistance to the antimicrobial agent trimethoprim was found in 17 of 101 (17%) coagulase-negative staphylococci and 5 of 51 (10%) Staphylococcus aureus from a number of different hospitals in the United States. Resistance was plasmid encoded and could be transferred by conjugation in 4 of the 17 (24%) Tpr coagulase-negative staphylococci and 3 of the 5 (60%) Tpr S. aureus. A 1.2-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA from one of the plasmids (pG01) was cloned on a high-copy-number vector in Escherichia coli and expressed high-level Tpr (MIC, 1,025 micrograms/ml) in the gram-negative host. In situ filter hybridization demonstrated homology between the cloned Tpr gene probe and plasmid DNA from each conjugative Tpr plasmid, a single nonconjugative plasmid from a United States Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate, a nonconjugative plasmid from an Australian methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, and chromosomal DNA from three Tpr S. epidermidis isolates that did not contain any plasmid DNA that was homologous with the probe. No homology was seen between the probe and staphylococcal plasmids not mediating Tpr, plasmid DNA from 12 Tpr S. epidermidis isolates not transferring Tpr by conjugation, or plasmid-encoded Tpr genes derived from gram-negative bacteria. Plasmid-encoded Tpr appears to be a relatively new gene in staphylococci and, because it can be transferred by conjugation, could become more prevalent in nonsocomial isolates. Images PMID:3729338

  18. pLS101 plasmid vector

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Balganesh, T.S.

    1985-02-19

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb ma1M gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb Tcr DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. pLS010 plasmid vector

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Balganesh, Tanjore S.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb malM gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb T.sub.c r DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems.

  20. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    model  broad-­‐host-­‐range  MDR  plasmids  pRGM1  and... model   plasmids,   the   IncU   plasmid   pRGM1   and   the   IncP-­‐1   plasmid   pB10,   with   mini-­‐Tn5-­‐PA1-­‐ 04/03...we  have  focused  on  this   strain   as   our   main   model   host   (from   here   on   often  

  1. Plasmid transfer systems in the rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Hynes, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    Rhizobia are agriculturally important bacteria that can form nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Agricultural application of rhizobial inoculants can play an important role in increasing leguminous crop yields. In temperate rhizobia, genes involved in nodulation and nitrogen fixation are usually located on one or more large plasmids (pSyms) or on symbiotic islands. In addition, other large plasmids of rhizobia carry genes that are beneficial for survival and competition of rhizobia in the rhizosphere. Conjugative transfer of these large plasmids thus plays an important role in the evolution of rhizobia. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of conjugative transfer of large rhizobial plasmids provides foundations for maintaining, monitoring, and predicting the behaviour of these plasmids during field release events. In this minireview, we summarize two types of known rhizobial conjugative plasmids, including quorum sensing regulated plasmids and RctA-repressed plasmids. We provide evidence for the existence of a third type of conjugative plasmid, including pRleVF39c in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain VF39SM, and we provide a comparison of the different types of conjugation genes found in members of the rhizobia that have had their genomes sequenced so far.

  2. In vitro transfection of plasmid DNA by cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Tomoshige, Ryuji; Iwanaga, Kazunori; Kakemi, Masawo; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to compare the in vitro transfection efficiency of a luciferase plasmid DNA using cationized gelatin prepared from different amine compounds. The compounds used here were ethylenediamine, putrescine, spermidine and spermine, chemically introduced to the carboxyl group of gelatin for the cationization. Complexation of the cationized gelatin with the plasmid DNA was performed by simply mixing the two materials at various N+/P- mixing ratios (the molar number ratio of amino groups of gelatin to the phosphate groups of DNA) in aqueous solution. Gel retardation studies revealed that the formation of cationized-gelatin-plasmid DNA complexes depended on the N+/P- mixing ratio. The stronger interaction of plasmid DNA with the cationized gelatin of spermine compared to the other cationized gelatins was observed by an ethidium bromide intercalation assay and Scatchard binding analysis. When the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA complexed with the various cationized gelatins at different N+/P- mixing ratios was evaluated for mouse L929 fibroblasts, the highest transfection efficiency was observed for the complex prepared from the cationized gelatin of spermine at a N+/P- mixing ratio of 2. The present study indicates that there is an optimal N+/P- mixing ratio and a type of amine compound or cationization extent of cationized gelatin to enhance the transfection efficiency of plasmid DNA.

  3. Microbial degradation of pyridine using Pseudomonas sp. and isolation of plasmid responsible for degradation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Sistla, Srinivas; Guru, R Kumar; Prasad, K Krishna; Kumar, C Suresh; Ramakrishna, S V; Sarma, P N

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas (PI2) capable of degrading pyridine was isolated from the mixed population of the activated sludge unit which was being used for treating complex effluents, the strain was characterized. Aerobic degradation of pyridine was studied with the isolated strain and the growth parameters were evaluated. Pyridine degradation was further conformed by chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The process parameters like biomass growth and dissolved oxygen consumption were monitored during pyridine degradation. In order to conform with the plasmid capability to degrade pyridine, the requisite plasmid was isolated and transferred to DH 5alpha Escherichia coli. The subsequent biodegradation studies revealed the ability of the transformed plasmid capability to degrade the pyridine.

  4. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Elkin, Chris

    2006-05-09

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  5. Selection of a multidrug resistance plasmid by sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I

    2014-10-07

    How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. Importance: Antibiotic resistance is in many pathogenic bacteria caused by genes that are carried on large conjugative plasmids. These plasmids typically contain multiple antibiotic resistance genes as well as genes that confer resistance to

  6. Selection of a Multidrug Resistance Plasmid by Sublethal Levels of Antibiotics and Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gullberg, Erik; Albrecht, Lisa M.; Karlsson, Christoffer; Sandegren, Linus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT How sublethal levels of antibiotics and heavy metals select for clinically important multidrug resistance plasmids is largely unknown. Carriage of plasmids generally confers substantial fitness costs, implying that for the plasmid-carrying bacteria to be maintained in the population, the plasmid cost needs to be balanced by a selective pressure conferred by, for example, antibiotics or heavy metals. We studied the effects of low levels of antibiotics and heavy metals on the selective maintenance of a 220-kbp extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid identified in a hospital outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. The concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals required to maintain plasmid-carrying bacteria, the minimal selective concentrations (MSCs), were in all cases below (almost up to 140-fold) the MIC of the plasmid-free susceptible bacteria. This finding indicates that the very low antibiotic and heavy metal levels found in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficiently high to maintain multiresistance plasmids. When resistance genes were moved from the plasmid to the chromosome, the MSC decreased, showing that MSC for a specific resistance conditionally depends on genetic context. This finding suggests that a cost-free resistance could be maintained in a population by an infinitesimally low concentration of antibiotic. By studying the effect of combinations of several compounds, it was observed that for certain combinations of drugs each new compound added lowered the minimal selective concentration of the others. This combination effect could be a significant factor in the selection of multidrug resistance plasmids/bacterial clones in complex multidrug environments. PMID:25293762

  7. Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor.

    PubMed

    Samson, Jacopo; Piscopo, Irene; Yampolski, Alex; Nahirney, Patrick; Parpas, Andrea; Aggarwal, Amit; Saleh, Raihan; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-10-21

    Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials.

  8. Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Samson, Jacopo; Piscopo, Irene; Yampolski, Alex; Nahirney, Patrick; Parpas, Andrea; Aggarwal, Amit; Saleh, Raihan; Drain, Charles Michael

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials.

  9. Autotransmissible resident plasmid of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1980-01-01

    A resident plasmid of wild-type strains of Rhizobium meliloti of 59.6 megadaltons has been shown to be transferred at a high frequency to "cured" strains of this bacterial species. This plasmid, named pEZ1, that confers phage-sensitivity to cells carrying it is also transmissible to Escherichia coli and from it to "cured" R. meliloti strains.

  10. Partition Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasserman, Adam

    2012-02-01

    Partition Density Functional Theory (PDFT) is a formally exact method for obtaining molecular properties from self-consistent calculations on isolated fragments [1,2]. For a given choice of fragmentation, PDFT outputs the (in principle exact) molecular energy and density, as well as fragment densities that sum to the correct molecular density. I describe our progress understanding the behavior of the fragment energies as a function of fragment occupations, derivative discontinuities, practical implementation, and applications of PDFT to small molecules. I also discuss implications for ground-state Density Functional Theory, such as the promise of PDFT to circumvent the delocalization error of approximate density functionals. [4pt] [1] M.H. Cohen and A. Wasserman, J. Phys. Chem. A, 111, 2229(2007).[0pt] [2] P. Elliott, K. Burke, M.H. Cohen, and A. Wasserman, Phys. Rev. A 82, 024501 (2010).

  11. Large-scale preparation of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Heilig, J S; Elbing, K L; Brent, R

    2001-05-01

    Although the need for large quantities of plasmid DNA has diminished as techniques for manipulating small quantities of DNA have improved, occasionally large amounts of high-quality plasmid DNA are desired. This unit describes the preparation of milligram quantities of highly purified plasmid DNA. The first part of the unit describes three methods for preparing crude lysates enriched in plasmid DNA from bacterial cells grown in liquid culture: alkaline lysis, boiling, and Triton lysis. The second part describes four methods for purifying plasmid DNA in such lysates away from contaminating RNA and protein: CsCl/ethidium bromide density gradient centrifugation, polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, and size-exclusion chromatography.

  12. ParABS Systems of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia: New Chromosome Centromeres Confer Partition Specificity†

    PubMed Central

    Dubarry, Nelly; Pasta, Franck; Lane, David

    2006-01-01

    Most bacterial chromosomes carry an analogue of the parABS systems that govern plasmid partition, but their role in chromosome partition is ambiguous. parABS systems might be particularly important for orderly segregation of multipartite genomes, where their role may thus be easier to evaluate. We have characterized parABS systems in Burkholderia cenocepacia, whose genome comprises three chromosomes and one low-copy-number plasmid. A single parAB locus and a set of ParB-binding (parS) centromere sites are located near the origin of each replicon. ParA and ParB of the longest chromosome are phylogenetically similar to analogues in other multichromosome and monochromosome bacteria but are distinct from those of smaller chromosomes. The latter form subgroups that correspond to the taxa of their hosts, indicating evolution from plasmids. The parS sites on the smaller chromosomes and the plasmid are similar to the “universal” parS of the main chromosome but with a sequence specific to their replicon. In an Escherichia coli plasmid stabilization test, each parAB exhibits partition activity only with the parS of its own replicon. Hence, parABS function is based on the independent partition of individual chromosomes rather than on a single communal system or network of interacting systems. Stabilization by the smaller chromosome and plasmid systems was enhanced by mutation of parS sites and a promoter internal to their parAB operons, suggesting autoregulatory mechanisms. The small chromosome ParBs were found to silence transcription, a property relevant to autoregulation. PMID:16452432

  13. Stabilization of the Virulence Plasmid pSLT of Salmonella Typhimurium by Three Maintenance Systems and Its Evaluation by Using a New Stability Test

    PubMed Central

    Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Molina-García, Laura; Moreno-Córdoba, Inma; García-del Portillo, Francisco; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Certain Salmonella enterica serovars belonging to subspecies I carry low-copy-number virulence plasmids of variable size (50–90 kb). All of these plasmids share the spv operon, which is important for systemic infection. Virulence plasmids are present at low copy numbers. Few copies reduce metabolic burden but suppose a risk of plasmid loss during bacterial division. This drawback is counterbalanced by maintenance modules that ensure plasmid stability, including partition systems and toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci. The low-copy number virulence pSLT plasmid of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encodes three auxiliary maintenance systems: one partition system (parAB) and two TA systems (ccdABST and vapBC2ST). The TA module ccdABST has previously been shown to contribute to pSLT plasmid stability and vapBC2ST to bacterial virulence. Here we describe a novel assay to measure plasmid stability based on the selection of plasmid-free cells following elimination of plasmid-containing cells by ParE toxin, a DNA gyrase inhibitor. Using this new maintenance assay we confirmed a crucial role of parAB in pSLT maintenance. We also showed that vapBC2ST, in addition to contribute to bacterial virulence, is important for plasmid stability. We have previously shown that ccdABST encodes an inactive CcdBST toxin. Using our new stability assay we monitored the contribution to plasmid stability of a ccdABST variant containing a single mutation (R99W) that restores the toxicity of CcdBST. The “activation” of CcdBST (R99W) did not increase pSLT stability by ccdABST. In contrast, ccdABST behaves as a canonical type II TA system in terms of transcriptional regulation. Of interest, ccdABST was shown to control the expression of a polycistronic operon in the pSLT plasmid. Collectively, these results show that the contribution of the CcdBST toxin to pSLT plasmid stability may depend on its role as a co-repressor in coordination with CcdAST antitoxin more than on its toxic activity. PMID

  14. Stabilization of the Virulence Plasmid pSLT of Salmonella Typhimurium by Three Maintenance Systems and Its Evaluation by Using a New Stability Test.

    PubMed

    Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Molina-García, Laura; Moreno-Córdoba, Inma; García-Del Portillo, Francisco; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón

    2016-01-01

    Certain Salmonella enterica serovars belonging to subspecies I carry low-copy-number virulence plasmids of variable size (50-90 kb). All of these plasmids share the spv operon, which is important for systemic infection. Virulence plasmids are present at low copy numbers. Few copies reduce metabolic burden but suppose a risk of plasmid loss during bacterial division. This drawback is counterbalanced by maintenance modules that ensure plasmid stability, including partition systems and toxin-antitoxin (TA) loci. The low-copy number virulence pSLT plasmid of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium encodes three auxiliary maintenance systems: one partition system (parAB) and two TA systems (ccdABST and vapBC2ST). The TA module ccdABST has previously been shown to contribute to pSLT plasmid stability and vapBC2ST to bacterial virulence. Here we describe a novel assay to measure plasmid stability based on the selection of plasmid-free cells following elimination of plasmid-containing cells by ParE toxin, a DNA gyrase inhibitor. Using this new maintenance assay we confirmed a crucial role of parAB in pSLT maintenance. We also showed that vapBC2ST, in addition to contribute to bacterial virulence, is important for plasmid stability. We have previously shown that ccdABST encodes an inactive CcdBST toxin. Using our new stability assay we monitored the contribution to plasmid stability of a ccdABST variant containing a single mutation (R99W) that restores the toxicity of CcdBST. The "activation" of CcdBST (R99W) did not increase pSLT stability by ccdABST. In contrast, ccdABST behaves as a canonical type II TA system in terms of transcriptional regulation. Of interest, ccdABST was shown to control the expression of a polycistronic operon in the pSLT plasmid. Collectively, these results show that the contribution of the CcdBST toxin to pSLT plasmid stability may depend on its role as a co-repressor in coordination with CcdAST antitoxin more than on its toxic activity.

  15. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  16. Scheduling Independent Partitions in Integrated Modular Avionics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chenglie; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently the integrated modular avionics (IMA) architecture has been widely adopted by the avionics industry due to its strong partition mechanism. Although the IMA architecture can achieve effective cost reduction and reliability enhancement in the development of avionics systems, it results in a complex allocation and scheduling problem. All partitions in an IMA system should be integrated together according to a proper schedule such that their deadlines will be met even under the worst case situations. In order to help provide a proper scheduling table for all partitions in IMA systems, we study the schedulability of independent partitions on a multiprocessor platform in this paper. We firstly present an exact formulation to calculate the maximum scaling factor and determine whether all partitions are schedulable on a limited number of processors. Then with a Game Theory analogy, we design an approximation algorithm to solve the scheduling problem of partitions, by allowing each partition to optimize its own schedule according to the allocations of the others. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to show the efficiency and reliability of the approach proposed in terms of time consumption and acceptance ratio. PMID:27942013

  17. Scheduling Independent Partitions in Integrated Modular Avionics Systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinchao; Du, Chenglie; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently the integrated modular avionics (IMA) architecture has been widely adopted by the avionics industry due to its strong partition mechanism. Although the IMA architecture can achieve effective cost reduction and reliability enhancement in the development of avionics systems, it results in a complex allocation and scheduling problem. All partitions in an IMA system should be integrated together according to a proper schedule such that their deadlines will be met even under the worst case situations. In order to help provide a proper scheduling table for all partitions in IMA systems, we study the schedulability of independent partitions on a multiprocessor platform in this paper. We firstly present an exact formulation to calculate the maximum scaling factor and determine whether all partitions are schedulable on a limited number of processors. Then with a Game Theory analogy, we design an approximation algorithm to solve the scheduling problem of partitions, by allowing each partition to optimize its own schedule according to the allocations of the others. Finally, simulation experiments are conducted to show the efficiency and reliability of the approach proposed in terms of time consumption and acceptance ratio.

  18. Antibiotic multiresistance plasmid pRSB101 isolated from a wastewater treatment plant is related to plasmids residing in phytopathogenic bacteria and carries eight different resistance determinants including a multidrug transport system.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowski, Rafael; Krahn, Irene; Linke, Burkhard; Goesmann, Alexander; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2004-11-01

    Ten different antibiotic resistance plasmids conferring high-level erythromycin resistance were isolated from an activated sludge bacterial community of a wastewater treatment plant by applying a transformation-based approach. One of these plasmids, designated pRSB101, mediates resistance to tetracycline, erythromycin, roxythromycin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, spectinomycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim, nalidixic acid and low concentrations of norfloxacin. Plasmid pRSB101 was completely sequenced and annotated. Its size is 47 829 bp. Conserved synteny exists between the pRSB101 replication/partition (rep/par) module and the pXAC33-replicon from the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri. The second pRSB101 backbone module encodes a three-Mob-protein type mobilization (mob) system with homology to that of IncQ-like plasmids. Plasmid pRSB101 is mobilizable with the help of the IncP-1alpha plasmid RP4 providing transfer functions in trans. A 20 kb resistance region on pRSB101 is located within an integron-containing Tn402-like transposon. The variable region of the class 1 integron carries the genes dhfr1 for a dihydrofolate reductase, aadA2 for a spectinomycin/streptomycin adenylyltransferase and bla(TLA-2) for a so far unknown Ambler class A extended spectrum beta-lactamase. The integron-specific 3'-segment (qacEDelta1-sul1-orf5Delta) is connected to a macrolide resistance operon consisting of the genes mph(A) (macrolide 2'-phosphotransferase I), mrx (hydrophobic protein of unknown function) and mphR(A) (regulatory protein). Finally, a putative mobile element with the tetracycline resistance genes tetA (tetracycline efflux pump) and tetR was identified upstream of the Tn402-specific transposase gene tniA. The second 'genetic load' region on pRSB101 harbours four distinct mobile genetic elements, another integron belonging to a new class and footprints of two more transposable elements. A tripartite multidrug (MDR) transporter consisting of an ATP

  19. Yeast telomere repeat sequence (TRS) improves circular plasmid segregation, and TRS plasmid segregation involves the RAP1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, M S; Enomoto, S; Finstad, S L; Berman, J

    1992-01-01

    Telomere repeat sequences (TRSs) can dramatically improve the segregation of unstable circular autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion analysis demonstrated that yeast TRSs, which conform to the general sequence (C(1-3)A)n, are able to stabilize circular ARS plasmids. A number of TRS clones of different primary sequence and C(1-3)A tract length confer the plasmid stabilization phenotype. TRS sequences do not appear to improve plasmid replication efficiency, as determined by plasmid copy number analysis and functional assays for ARS activity. Pedigree analysis confirms that TRS-containing plasmids are missegregated at low frequency and that missegregated TRS-containing plasmids, like ARS plasmids, are preferentially retained by the mother cell. Plasmids stabilized by TRSs have properties that distinguish them from centromere-containing plasmids and 2 microns-based recombinant plasmids. Linear ARS plasmids, which include two TRS tracts at their termini, segregate inefficiently, while circular plasmids with one or two TRS tracts segregate efficiently, suggesting that plasmid topology or TRS accessibility interferes with TRS segregation function on linear plasmids. In strains carrying the temperature-sensitive mutant alleles rap1grc4 and rap1-5, TRS plasmids are not stable at the semipermissive temperature, suggesting that RAP1 protein is involved in TRS plasmid stability. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an ARS plasmid was stabilized by the addition of S. pombe telomere sequence, suggesting that the ability to improve the segregation of ARS plasmids is a general property of telomere repeats. PMID:1569937

  20. Rolling-circle replication of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S A

    1997-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by a rolling-circle (RC) mechanism. Their replication properties have many similarities to as well as significant differences from those of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) coliphages, which also replicate by an RC mechanism. Studies on a large number of RC plasmids have revealed that they fall into several families based on homology in their initiator proteins and leading-strand origins. The leading-strand origins contain distinct sequences that are required for binding and nicking by the Rep proteins. Leading-strand origins also contain domains that are required for the initiation and termination of replication. RC plasmids generate ssDNA intermediates during replication, since their lagging-strand synthesis does not usually initiate until the leading strand has been almost fully synthesized. The leading- and lagging-strand origins are distinct, and the displaced leading-strand DNA is converted to the double-stranded form by using solely the host proteins. The Rep proteins encoded by RC plasmids contain specific domains that are involved in their origin binding and nicking activities. The replication and copy number of RC plasmids, in general, are regulated at the level of synthesis of their Rep proteins, which are usually rate limiting for replication. Some RC Rep proteins are known to be inactivated after supporting one round of replication. A number of in vitro replication systems have been developed for RC plasmids and have provided insight into the mechanism of plasmid RC replication. PMID:9409148

  1. In-Situ Characterization of Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids Using Partitioning Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Gary A. Pope; Daene C. McKinney; Akhil Datta Gupta; Richard E. Jackson; Minquan Jin

    2000-03-20

    Majors advances have been made during the past three years in our research on interwell partitioning tracers tests (PITTs). These advances include (1) progress on the inverse problem of how to estimate the three-dimensional distribution of NAPL in aquifers from the tracer data, (2) the first ever partitioning tracer experiments in dual porosity media, (3) the first modeling of partitioning tracers in dual porosity media (4) experiments with complex NAPLs such as coal tar, (5) the development of an accurate and simple method to predict partition coefficients using the equivalent alkane carbon number approach, (6) partitioning tracer experiments in large model aquifers with permeability layers, (7) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data to estimate the change in composition of a NAPL before and after remediation (8) the first ever analysis of partitioning tracer data after a field demonstration of surfactant foam to remediate NAPL and (9) experiments at elevated temperatures .

  2. Domain Decomposition By the Advancing-Partition Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.

    2008-01-01

    A new method of domain decomposition has been developed for generating unstructured grids in subdomains either sequentially or using multiple computers in parallel. Domain decomposition is a crucial and challenging step for parallel grid generation. Prior methods are generally based on auxiliary, complex, and computationally intensive operations for defining partition interfaces and usually produce grids of lower quality than those generated in single domains. The new technique, referred to as "Advancing Partition," is based on the Advancing-Front method, which partitions a domain as part of the volume mesh generation in a consistent and "natural" way. The benefits of this approach are: 1) the process of domain decomposition is highly automated, 2) partitioning of domain does not compromise the quality of the generated grids, and 3) the computational overhead for domain decomposition is minimal. The new method has been implemented in NASA's unstructured grid generation code VGRID.

  3. Engineering of bacterial strains and vectors for the production of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Bower, Diana M; Prather, Kristala L J

    2009-04-01

    The demand for plasmid DNA (pDNA) is anticipated to increase significantly as DNA vaccines and non-viral gene therapies enter phase 3 clinical trials and are approved for use. This increased demand, along with renewed interest in pDNA as a therapeutic vector, has motivated research targeting the design of high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. An important aspect of this research is engineering bacterial strains and plasmids that are specifically suited to the production of plasmid biopharmaceuticals. This review will survey recent innovations in strain and vector engineering that aim to improve plasmid stability, enhance product safety, increase yield, and facilitate downstream purification. While these innovations all seek to enhance pDNA production, they can vary in complexity from subtle alterations of the host genome or vector backbone to the investigation of non-traditional host strains for higher pDNA yields.

  4. Evaluating metabolic stress and plasmid stability in plasmid DNA production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2012-01-01

    In the context of recombinant DNA technology, the development of feasible and high-yielding plasmid DNA production processes has regained attention as more evidence for its efficacy as vectors for gene therapy and DNA vaccination arise. When producing plasmid DNA in Escherichia coli, a number of biological restraints, triggered by plasmid maintenance and replication as well as culture conditions are responsible for limiting final biomass and product yields. This termed "metabolic burden" can also cause detrimental effects on plasmid stability and quality, since the cell machinery is no longer capable of maintaining an active metabolism towards plasmid synthesis and the stress responses elicited by plasmid maintenance can also cause increased plasmid instability. The optimization of plasmid DNA production bioprocesses is still hindered by the lack of information on the host metabolic responses as well as information on plasmid instability. Therefore, systematic and on-line approaches are required not only to characterise this "metabolic burden" and plasmid stability but also for the design of appropriate metabolic engineering and culture strategies. The monitoring tools described to date rapidly evolve from laborious, off-line and at-line monitoring to online monitoring, at a time-scale that enables researchers to solve these bioprocessing problems as they occur. This review highlights major E. coli biological alterations caused by plasmid maintenance and replication, possible causes for plasmid instability and discusses the ability of currently employed bioprocess monitoring techniques to provide information in order to circumvent metabolic burden and plasmid instability, pointing out the possible evolution of these methods towards online bioprocess monitoring.

  5. Choosing and using Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasmids.

    PubMed

    Siam, Rania; Dolan, William P; Forsburg, Susan L

    2004-07-01

    A wide range of plasmids has been developed for molecular studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This includes general purpose episomes, expression vectors, epitope tagging plasmids, and integration vectors. This review describes the typical features of S. pombe vectors, including replication origins, positive and negative selection markers, and constitutive and inducible promoter systems. We will also discuss vectors with epitope tags and how these can be used to modify episomal or endogenous gene sequences. Considerations for choosing and using a plasmid are presented and specialized methods are described.

  6. Partitioning ecosystems for sustainability.

    PubMed

    Murray, Martyn G

    2016-03-01

    Decline in the abundance of renewable natural resources (RNRs) coupled with increasing demands of an expanding human population will greatly intensify competition for Earth's natural resources during this century, yet curiously, analytical approaches to the management of productive ecosystems (ecological theory of wildlife harvesting, tragedy of the commons, green economics, and bioeconomics) give only peripheral attention to the driving influence of competition on resource exploitation. Here, I apply resource competition theory (RCT) to the exploitation of RNRs and derive four general policies in support of their sustainable and equitable use: (1) regulate resource extraction technology to avoid damage to the resource base; (2) increase efficiency of resource use and reduce waste at every step in the resource supply chain and distribution network; (3) partition ecosystems with the harvesting niche as the basic organizing principle for sustainable management of natural resources by multiple users; and (4) increase negative feedback between consumer and resource to bring about long-term sustainable use. A simple policy framework demonstrates how RCT integrates with other elements of sustainability science to better manage productive ecosystems. Several problem areas of RNR management are discussed in the light of RCT, including tragedy of the commons, overharvesting, resource collapse, bycatch, single species quotas, and simplification of ecosystems.

  7. Impact of phospholipids on plasmid packaging and toxicity of gemini nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chilbert; Badea, Ildiko; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Verrall, Ronald; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-12-07

    Understanding the relationship of structural modifications on the assembly and disassembly of synthetic or non-viral gene delivery is crucial with regard to their rational development. This study describes the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), as a new tool, to investigate the effect of systematic chemical modifications to dicationic N,N-bis(dimethylalkyl)-α,ω-alkanediammonium surfactants (gemini surfactants) on the self-assembly and physical properties of a series of gemini nanoparticles (gemini NPs). A systematic screening of 27 gemini-plasmid (GP) complexes and gemini NPs showed that their final morphology is governed by the pre-compaction of plasmid by the gemini surfactants. The assembly process of gemini-plasmid intermediate complex (GP) and the final gemini NP (or gemini-plasmid-lipid complex, GPL) was monitored by the tracking of the Cy5-labeled plasmid. Based on diffusion properties, GP complexes were larger than gemini NPs (300-500 nm for GP and 200-300 nm for GPLs). Stoichiometric analysis of the raw intensity histograms showed that both GPs and GPLs particles were composed of multiple plasmids. The final GPLs contain fewer plasmids (2-20 per particle) compared to the intermediate GP (5-35 per particle). The addition of phospholipids dispersed and stabilized GPs to form GPL, but the type of phospholipid (DOPE or DD 1:3) had little effect on the final size of the particles. The FCS data were both validated and complemented by the results of studies of dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray scattering and dye-exclusion assays. A model for gemini NP assembly involving supramolecular aggregate intermediates is proposed.

  8. Impact of phospholipids on plasmid packaging and toxicity of gemini nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chilbert; Badea, Ildiko; Poorghorban, Masoomeh; Verrall, Ronald; Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the relationship of structural modifications on the assembly and disassembly of synthetic or non-viral gene delivery is crucial with regard to their rational development. This study describes the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), as a new tool, to investigate the effect of systematic chemical modifications to dicationic N,N-bis(dimethylalkyl)-α,ω-alkanediammonium surfactants (gemini surfactants) on the self-assembly and physical properties of a series of gemini nanoparticles (gemini NPs). A systematic screening of 27 gemini-plasmid (GP) complexes and gemini NPs showed that their final morphology is governed by the pre-compaction of plasmid by the gemini surfactants. The assembly process of gemini-plasmid intermediate complex (GP) and the final gemini NP (or gemini-plasmid-lipid complex, GPL) was monitored by the tracking of the Cy5-labeled plasmid. Based on diffusion properties, GP complexes were larger than gemini NPs (300–500 nm for GP and 200–300 nm for GPLs). Stoichiometric analysis of the raw intensity histograms showed that both GPs and GPLs particles were composed of multiple plasmids. The final GPLs contain fewer plasmids (2–20 per particle) compared to the intermediate GP (5–35 per particle). The addition of phospholipids dispersed and stabilized GPs to form GPL, but the type of phospholipid (DOPE or DD 1:3) had little effect on the final size of the particles. The FCS data were both validated and complemented by the results of studies of dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray scattering and dye-exclusion assays. A model for gemini NP assembly involving supramolecular aggregate intermediates is proposed. PMID:26693021

  9. Plasmids as Tools for Containment.

    PubMed

    García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Active containment systems are a major tool for reducing the uncertainty associated with the introduction of monocultures, genetically engineered or not, into target habitats for a large number of biotechnological applications (e.g., bioremediation, bioleaching, biopesticides, biofuels, biotransformations, live vaccines, etc.). While biological containment reduces the survival of the introduced organism outside the target habitat and/or upon completion of the projected task, gene containment strategies reduce the lateral spread of the key genetic determinants to indigenous microorganisms. In fundamental research, suicide circuits become relevant tools to address the role of gene transfer, mainly plasmid transfer, in evolution and how this transfer contributes to genome plasticity and to the rapid adaptation of microbial communities to environmental changes. Many lethal functions and regulatory circuits have been used and combined to design efficient containment systems. As many new genomes are being sequenced, novel lethal genes and regulatory elements are available, e.g., new toxin-antitoxin modules, and they could be used to increase further the current containment efficiencies and to expand containment to other organisms. Although the current containment systems can increase the predictability of genetically modified organisms in the environment, containment will never be absolute, due to the existence of mutations that lead to the appearance of surviving subpopulations. In this sense, orthogonal systems (xenobiology) appear to be the solution for setting a functional genetic firewall that will allow absolute containment of recombinant organisms.

  10. [Sop proteins can cause transcriptional silencing of genes located close to the centromere sites of linear plasmid N15].

    PubMed

    Mardanov, A V; Lane, D; Ravin, N V

    2010-01-01

    Stable inheritance of bacterial chromosomes and low copy number plasmids is ensured by accurate partitioning of replicated molecules between the daughter cells at division. Partitioning of the prophage of the temperate bacteriophage N15, which exists as a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends, depends on the sop locus, comprising genes sopA and sopB, as well as four centromere sites located in different regions of the N15 genome essential for replication and the control of lysogeny. We found that binding of SopB to the centromere can silence centromere-proximal promoters, presumably due to subsequent polymerizing of SopB along the DNA. Close to the IR4 centromere site we identified a promoter, P59, able to drive expression of phage late genes encoding the structural proteins of virion. We found that following binding to IR4 the N15 Sop proteins can cause repression of this promoter. The repression depends on SopB and became stronger in the presence of SopA. Sop-dependent silencing of centromere-proximal promoters control gene expression in phage N15, particularly preventing undesired expression of late genes in the N15 prophage. Thus, the phage N15 sop system not only ensures plasmid partitioning but is also involved in the genetic network controlling prophage replication and the maintenance of lysogeny.

  11. Biogeography of time partitioning in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bennie, Jonathan J.; Duffy, James P.; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals regulate their activity over a 24-h sleep–wake cycle, concentrating their peak periods of activity to coincide with the hours of daylight, darkness, or twilight, or using different periods of light and darkness in more complex ways. These behavioral differences, which are in themselves functional traits, are associated with suites of physiological and morphological adaptations with implications for the ecological roles of species. The biogeography of diel time partitioning is, however, poorly understood. Here, we document basic biogeographic patterns of time partitioning by mammals and ecologically relevant large-scale patterns of natural variation in “illuminated activity time” constrained by temperature, and we determine how well the first of these are predicted by the second. Although the majority of mammals are nocturnal, the distributions of diurnal and crepuscular species richness are strongly associated with the availability of biologically useful daylight and twilight, respectively. Cathemerality is associated with relatively long hours of daylight and twilight in the northern Holarctic region, whereas the proportion of nocturnal species is highest in arid regions and lowest at extreme high altitudes. Although thermal constraints on activity have been identified as key to the distributions of organisms, constraints due to functional adaptation to the light environment are less well studied. Global patterns in diversity are constrained by the availability of the temporal niche; disruption of these constraints by the spread of artificial lighting and anthropogenic climate change, and the potential effects on time partitioning, are likely to be critical influences on species’ future distributions. PMID:25225371

  12. Biogeography of time partitioning in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bennie, Jonathan J; Duffy, James P; Inger, Richard; Gaston, Kevin J

    2014-09-23

    Many animals regulate their activity over a 24-h sleep-wake cycle, concentrating their peak periods of activity to coincide with the hours of daylight, darkness, or twilight, or using different periods of light and darkness in more complex ways. These behavioral differences, which are in themselves functional traits, are associated with suites of physiological and morphological adaptations with implications for the ecological roles of species. The biogeography of diel time partitioning is, however, poorly understood. Here, we document basic biogeographic patterns of time partitioning by mammals and ecologically relevant large-scale patterns of natural variation in "illuminated activity time" constrained by temperature, and we determine how well the first of these are predicted by the second. Although the majority of mammals are nocturnal, the distributions of diurnal and crepuscular species richness are strongly associated with the availability of biologically useful daylight and twilight, respectively. Cathemerality is associated with relatively long hours of daylight and twilight in the northern Holarctic region, whereas the proportion of nocturnal species is highest in arid regions and lowest at extreme high altitudes. Although thermal constraints on activity have been identified as key to the distributions of organisms, constraints due to functional adaptation to the light environment are less well studied. Global patterns in diversity are constrained by the availability of the temporal niche; disruption of these constraints by the spread of artificial lighting and anthropogenic climate change, and the potential effects on time partitioning, are likely to be critical influences on species' future distributions.

  13. Isolation and physical characterization of streptomycete plasmids.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Guerineau, M

    1981-01-01

    Covalently closed circular DNA was isolated from a strain of Streptomyces coelicolor ATCC 10147 and from a strain of Streptomyces coelicolor subspecies flavus ATCC 19894, using two different methods. The two plasmids were of uniform monomer size: 8.9 kb for pS 10147, the plasmid from S. coelicolor ATCC 10147, and around 125 kb for the plasmid from S. coelicolor ATCC 19894. A restriction enzyme map was constructed for pS 10147, using seven enzymes. Four of the enzymes, (BamHI, Bgl,II, PvuII, and XhoI) cut pS 10147 once while PstI made two cuts. The GC content of this plasmid was calculated to be 72%. The possible utilisation of pS 10147 as a cloning vector in Streptomyces is discussed.

  14. Marine Diatom Plasmids and their Biotechnological Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-27

    plasmid is homologous to the Tn21-type transposable elements. The element carries an open reading frame encoding a DNA invertase gene. Sequence comparisons...of regions upstream and downstream of the invertase gene indicate that the diatom plasmid is most similar to the Staphylococcus aureus transposon...the highly prokaryotic nature (i.e., codon usage bias, promoter sequences, etc.) of the invertase gene we have sequenced, we have tentatively

  15. Plasmid Replication Control by Antisense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Plasmids are selfish genetic elements that normally constitute a burden for the bacterial host cell. This burden is expected to favor plasmid loss. Therefore, plasmids have evolved mechanisms to control their replication and ensure their stable maintenance. Replication control can be either mediated by iterons or by antisense RNAs. Antisense RNAs work through a negative control circuit. They are constitutively synthesized and metabolically unstable. They act both as a measuring device and a regulator, and regulation occurs by inhibition. Increased plasmid copy numbers lead to increasing antisense-RNA concentrations, which, in turn, result in the inhibition of a function essential for replication. On the other hand, decreased plasmid copy numbers entail decreasing concentrations of the inhibiting antisense RNA, thereby increasing the replication frequency. Inhibition is achieved by a variety of mechanisms, which are discussed in detail. The most trivial case is the inhibition of translation of an essential replication initiator protein (Rep) by blockage of the rep-ribosome binding site. Alternatively, ribosome binding to a leader peptide mRNA whose translation is required for efficient Rep translation can be prevented by antisense-RNA binding. In 2004, translational attenuation was discovered. Antisense-RNA-mediated transcriptional attenuation is another mechanism that has, so far, only been detected in plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria. ColE1, a plasmid that does not need a plasmid-encoded replication initiator protein, uses the inhibition of primer formation. In other cases, antisense RNAs inhibit the formation of an activator pseudoknot that is required for efficient Rep translation.

  16. Polynucleotide sequence relationships among Ent plasmids and the relationship between Ent and other plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    So, M; Crosa, J H; Falkow, S

    1975-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization studies reveal that the plasmids coding for the production of heat stable and heat labile enteroxtoxins of Escherichia coli, regardless of their origin, have a majority of their polynucleotide sequences in common, but are not related in any significant way to those plasmids coding for the synthesis of only ST toxin. The heat stable and heat labile plasmids also share a significant degree of their polynucleotide sequences with plasmids of the FI and FII incompatibility groups, but not with R factors belonging to the I, N, W, P, or X incompatibility groups. PMID:1090570

  17. Recombination-dependent concatemeric plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Viret, J F; Bravo, A; Alonso, J C

    1991-01-01

    The replication of covalently closed circular supercoiled (form I) DNA in prokaryotes is generally controlled at the initiation level by a rate-limiting effector. Once initiated, replication proceeds via one of two possible modes (theta or sigma replication) which do not rely on functions involved in DNA repair and general recombination. Recently, a novel plasmid replication mode, leading to the accumulation of linear multigenome-length plasmid concatemers in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, has been described. Unlike form I DNA replication, an intermediate recombination step is most probably involved in the initiation of concatemeric plasmid DNA replication. On the basis of structural and functional studies, we infer that recombination-dependent plasmid replication shares important features with phage late replication modes and, in several aspects, parallels the synthesis of plasmid concatemers in phage-infected cells. The characterization of the concatemeric plasmid replication mode has allowed new insights into the mechanisms of DNA replication and recombination in prokaryotes. PMID:1779931

  18. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of 4-chlorobiphenyl.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Hooper, S W; Sayler, G S

    1985-01-01

    Strains of Alcaligenes and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from a mixed culture already proven to be proficient at complete mineralization of monohalogenated biphenyls. These strains were shown to harbor a 35 X 10(6)-dalton plasmid mediating a complete pathway for 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB) oxidation. Subsequent plasmid curing of these bacteria resulted in the abolishment of the 4CB mineralization phenotype and loss of even early 4CB metabolism by Acinetobacter spp. Reestablishment of the Alcaligenes plasmid, denoted pSS50, in the cured Acinetobacter spp. via filter surface mating resulted in the restoration of 4CB mineralization abilities. 4CB mineralization, however, proved to be an unstable characteristic in some subcultured strains. Such loss was not found to coincide with any detectable alteration in plasmid size. Cultures capable of complete mineralization, as well as those limited to partial metabolism of 4CB, produced 4-chlorobenzoate as a metabolite. Demonstration of mineralization of a purified 14C-labeled chlorobenzoate showed it to be a true intermediate in 4CB mineralization. Unlike the mineralization capability, the ability to produce a metabolite has proven to be stable on subculture. These results indicate the occurrence of a novel plasmid, or evolved catabolic plasmid, that mediates the complete mineralization of 4CB. Images PMID:2993249

  19. Genomic Sequence and Transcriptional Analysis of a 23-Kilobase Mycobacterial Linear Plasmid: Evidence for Horizontal Transfer and Identification of Plasmid Maintenance Systems

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Corinne; Winter, Nathalie; Gicquel, Brigitte; Vincent, Véronique; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2001-01-01

    Linear plasmids were unknown in mycobacteria until recently. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of 23-kb linear plasmid pCLP from Mycobacterium celatum, an opportunistic pathogen. The sequence of pCLP revealed at least 19 putative open reading frames (ORFs). Expression of pCLP genes in exponential-phase cultures was determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Twelve ORFs were expressed, whereas no transcription of the 7 other ORFs of pCLP was detected. Five of the 12 transcribed ORFs detected by RT-PCR are of unknown function. Sequence analysis revealed similar loci in both M. celatum pCLP and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis chromosome, including transposase-related sequences. This result suggests horizontal transfer between these two organisms. pCLP also contains ORFs that are similar to genes of bacterial circular plasmids involved in partition (par operon) and postsegregational (pem operon) mechanisms. Functional analysis of these ORFs suggests that they probably carry out similar maintenance roles in pCLP. PMID:11244052

  20. [Progress in endogenous plasmid curing of bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-04

    To investigate the functions of the bacteria endogenous plasmid, which include bacterial drug resistance, symbiosis, capsular formation and heavy metal resistance, the endogenous plasmid needs to be cured first. We reviewed physical, chemical and molecular biological methods of endogenous plasmid curing, clarified the curing principles. The prospective of research on plasmid curing was also discussed, based on our own studies.

  1. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process.

  2. Complexity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hernández, J Jaime

    2006-01-01

    It is difficult to define complexity in modeling. Complexity is often associated with uncertainty since modeling uncertainty is an intrinsically difficult task. However, modeling uncertainty does not require, necessarily, complex models, in the sense of a model requiring an unmanageable number of degrees of freedom to characterize the aquifer. The relationship between complexity, uncertainty, heterogeneity, and stochastic modeling is not simple. Aquifer models should be able to quantify the uncertainty of their predictions, which can be done using stochastic models that produce heterogeneous realizations of aquifer parameters. This is the type of complexity addressed in this article.

  3. Clostridium perfringens type A-E toxin plasmids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Theoret, James R; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell.

  4. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  5. Spatial partitions systematize visual search and enhance target memory.

    PubMed

    Solman, Grayden J F; Kingstone, Alan

    2017-02-01

    Humans are remarkably capable of finding desired objects in the world, despite the scale and complexity of naturalistic environments. Broadly, this ability is supported by an interplay between exploratory search and guidance from episodic memory for previously observed target locations. Here we examined how the environment itself may influence this interplay. In particular, we examined how partitions in the environment-like buildings, rooms, and furniture-can impact memory during repeated search. We report that the presence of partitions in a display, independent of item configuration, reliably improves episodic memory for item locations. Repeated search through partitioned displays was faster overall and was characterized by more rapid ballistic orienting in later repetitions. Explicit recall was also both faster and more accurate when displays were partitioned. Finally, we found that search paths were more regular and systematic when displays were partitioned. Given the ubiquity of partitions in real-world environments, these results provide important insights into the mechanisms of naturalistic search and its relation to memory.

  6. Crystal-chemistry and partitioning of REE in whitlockite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colson, R. O.; Jolliff, B. L.

    1993-01-01

    Partitioning of Rare Earth Elements (REE) in whitlockite is complicated by the fact that two or more charge-balancing substitutions are involved and by the fact that concentrations of REE in natural whitlockites are sufficiently high such that simple partition coefficients are not expected to be constant even if mixing in the system is completely ideal. The present study combines preexisting REE partitioning data in whitlockites with new experiments in the same compositional system and at the same temperature (approximately 1030 C) to place additional constraints on the complex variations of REE partition coefficients and to test theoretical models for how REE partitioning should vary with REE concentration and other compositional variables. With this data set, and by combining crystallographic and thermochemical constraints with a SAS simultaneous-equation best-fitting routine, it is possible to infer answers to the following questions: what is the speciation on the individual sites Ca(B), Mg, and Ca(IIA) (where the ideal structural formula is Ca(B)18 Mg2Ca(IIA)2P14O56); how are REE's charge-balanced in the crystal; and is mixing of REE in whitlockite ideal or non-ideal. This understanding is necessary in order to extrapolate derived partition coefficients to other compositional systems and provides a broadened understanding of the crystal chemistry of whitlockite.

  7. Targeting of plasmid DNA to renal interstitial fibroblasts by cationized gelatin.

    PubMed

    Kushibiki, Toshihiro; Nagata-Nakajima, Natsuki; Sugai, Manabu; Shimizu, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2005-10-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is the common pathway of chronic renal disease, while it causes end-stage renal failure. A lot of cytokines and biologically active substances are well recognized to be the candidates of primary mediators to induce accumulation of extracelluar matrix (ECM) in the interstitial fibrotic area. Interstitial fibroblasts are played a crucial role in the accumulation of excess ECM during renal interstitial fibrogenesis. Therefore, the targeting of therapeutic drugs and genes to interstitial renal fibroblasts is effective in suppressing the progress of interstitial renal failure. However, despite various approaches and techniques, few successful results have been reported on the in vivo targeting for interstitial fibroblasts. The objective of this study is to deliver an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmid DNA, as a model plasmid DNA, into renal interstitial space by a cationized gelatin. After the plasmid DNA with or without complexation of the cationized gelatin was injected to the left kidney of mice via the ureter, unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) was performed for the mice injected to induce the renal interstitial fibrosis. When the EGFP plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin was injected, EGFP expression was observed in the fibroblasts in the interstitial area of renal cortex. It is concluded that the retrograde injection of EGFP plasmid DNA complexed with the cationized gelatin is available to target the interstitial renal fibroblasts which are currently considered as the cell source responsible for excessive ECM synthesis.

  8. Historical Events That Spawned the Field of Plasmid Biology.

    PubMed

    Kado, Clarence I

    2014-10-01

    This chapter revisits the historical development and outcome of studies focused on the transmissible, extrachromosomal genetic elements called plasmids. Early work on plasmids involved structural and genetic mapping of these molecules, followed by the development of an understanding of how plasmids replicate and segregate during cell division. The intriguing property of plasmid transmission between bacteria and between bacteria and higher cells has received considerable attention. The utilitarian aspects of plasmids are described, including examples of various plasmid vector systems. This chapter also discusses the functional attributes of plasmids needed for their persistence and survival in nature and in man-made environments. The term plasmid biology was first conceived at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference on Promiscuous Plasmids, 1990, Lake Tahoe, California. The International Society for Plasmid Biology was established in 2004 (www.ISPB.org).

  9. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  10. Enhanced recognition of hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA by circulating cancer antibodies.

    PubMed

    Khan, F; Ali, A; Ali, R

    2005-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in various human diseases which are also responsible for the elimination of invading pathogens. In disease state and inflammatory responses, the excess of these radicals damage cellular macromolecules. DNA is susceptible to attacks by OH-induced damage. Oxidative DNA damage is an important factor in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the present study, purified plasmid Bluescript DNA was modified by hydroxyl radical. Modifications incurred in DNA were characterized by physico-chemical techniques. Sera from patients of cancer were studied for their binding to native and hydroxyl radical modified plasmid DNA. Direct binding ELISA and competition binding results indicated that autoantibodies in cancer showed higher recognition to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to the native form. Retarded mobility of the immune complex formation between IgG isolated from cancer sera using native and ROS-plasmid DNA as antigens reiterated preferential recognition of modified plasmid DNA by cancer autoantibodies. Therefore, it can be concluded that circulating autoantibodies in cancer sera bind preferentially to ROS-plasmid DNA as compared to native polymer. The data presented in the present communication suggest a role of ROS in the etiology of cancer.

  11. Centromere Binding and Evolution of Chromosomal Partition Systems in the Burkholderiales

    PubMed Central

    Passot, Fanny M.; Calderon, Virginie; Fichant, Gwennaele; Lane, David

    2012-01-01

    How split genomes arise and evolve in bacteria is poorly understood. Since each replicon of such genomes encodes a specific partition (Par) system, the evolution of Par systems could shed light on their evolution. The cystic fibrosis pathogen Burkholderia cenocepacia has three chromosomes (c1, c2, and c3) and one plasmid (pBC), whose compatibility depends on strictly specific interactions of the centromere sequences (parS) with their cognate binding proteins (ParB). However, the Par systems of B. cenocepacia c2, c3, and pBC share many features, suggesting that they arose within an extended family. Database searching revealed seven subfamilies of Par systems like those of B. cenocepacia. All are from plasmids and secondary chromosomes of the Burkholderiales, which reinforces the proposal of an extended family. The subfamily of the Par system of B. cenocepacia c3 includes plasmid variants with parS sequences divergent from that of c3. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we found that ParB-c3 binds specifically to centromeres of these variants, despite high DNA sequence divergence. We suggest that the Par system of B. cenocepacia c3 has preserved the features of an ancestral system. In contrast, these features have diverged variably in the plasmid descendants. One such descendant is found both in Ralstonia pickettii 12D, on a free plasmid, and in Ralstonia pickettii 12J, on a plasmid integrated into the main chromosome. These observations suggest that we are witnessing a plasmid-chromosome interaction from which a third chromosome will emerge in a two-chromosome species. PMID:22522899

  12. Electrotransformation of Yersinia ruckeri by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Cutrín, J M; Conchas, R F; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri, a fish pathogenic bacterium in aquaculture, was used to evaluate the electroporation as a new transformation method for this species. DNA used for the electrotransformation were plasmids of molecular mass ranging from 2.3 kb to 33 kb, and diverse replicons. To optimize this method we used Y. ruckeri 11.29 strain (from serotype 02) and pSU2718 DNA. The best transformation efficiency (6.0 x 10(5) transformants/micrograms DNA) was obtained with 12.5 kV/cm, 25 microF, 400 omega and 2 hours of incubation after pulse. When these conditions were applied to other strains belonging to different serotypes and other plasmids, we obtained transformants in all strains assayed, but only when using low molecular weight plasmids. Plasmid vectors and resident plasmid were not modified in host strains after electrotransformation. In studies of conformation we confirmed that only circular DNA was able for transformation. The utilization of this technique for direct cloning in Y. ruckeri makes possible further studies on recombinant DNA.

  13. GFP plasmid-induced defects in Salmonella invasion depend on plasmid architecture, not protein expression.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leann; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Humphrey, Tom J; Jepson, Mark A

    2009-02-01

    We have investigated the impact of plasmids and GFP expression on invasion of cultured epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica Typhimurium strain SL1344. The invasiveness of SL1344 carrying plasmids derived from pBR322, encoding promoterless GFP or constitutively expressed rpsM-GFP, was compared under optimal growth conditions with that of SL1344(pBR322), unmodified SL1344 and a strain with chromosome-integrated rpsM-GFP. The strain carrying pBR322 exhibited normal invasion, but the presence of modified plasmids impaired invasiveness, and impairment was exacerbated by plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol resistance (CmR). Using a different antibiotic resistance marker, kanamycin (KmR), did not impair invasiveness. Despite the effect of plasmid-encoded CmR, the strain containing chromosomally encoded GFP, also carrying a CmR gene, was as invasive as the wild-type. To investigate the mechanism by which plasmid carriage decreases invasion, we monitored SPI-1 gene expression using prgH promoter activity as an index of SPI-1 activity. An SL1344 strain with a chromosome-integrated prgH::gfp reporter construct exhibited lower GFP expression during exponential phase when carrying plasmids incorporating CmR or gfp, mirroring invasion data. These data provide evidence that suppression of SPI-1 gene expression is a major factor in the loss of invasiveness associated with plasmid carriage. Our findings also indicate that some plasmids, especially those carrying CmR, should be used with caution, as virulence traits and gene expression may be affected by their presence. Integration of reporter proteins into the bacterial chromosome, however, appears to circumvent the adverse effects observed with plasmids.

  14. 12. VIEW OF SPACE BETWEEN EAST FALSE PARTITION WALL IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF SPACE BETWEEN EAST FALSE PARTITION WALL IN CLEAN ROOM (102) AND EAST WALL OF VEHICLE SUPPORT BUILDING SHOWING PREFILTER NEAR SOUTH WALL - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  15. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  16. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA: a perilous journey from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lechardeur, Delphine; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2006-09-01

    Nonviral vectors represent a promising approach for the safe delivery of therapeutic DNA in genetic and acquired human diseases. Before synthetic vector systems can be used for clinical applications, their limited efficacy must be addressed. At the cellular level, successful gene transfer is dependent on several additional factors including DNA uptake, release from the DNA-vector complex, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. This paper reviews the major metabolic and physical impediments that plasmid DNA vectorized by synthetic vectors encounters between the cytosol and the nucleus. Plasmid DNA that escapes the endolysosomal compartment encounters the diffusional and metabolic barriers of the cytoplasm, reducing the number of intact plasmids that reach the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation of DNA requires either the disassembly of the nuclear envelope during cell division or active nuclear transport via the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, plasmid DNA is relatively stable, but its transcription and its fate during cell division are still debated. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of nonviral gene transfer during nucleocytoplasmic trafficking may provide strategies to overcome those obstacles that limit the efficiency of nonviral gene delivery. We review some of the current methods of gene transfer mediated by synthetic vectors, highlighting systems that exploit our actual knowledge of the nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA.

  17. Tissue-specific Calibration of Real-time PCR Facilitates Absolute Quantification of Plasmid DNA in Biodistribution Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Joan K; White, Paul J; Pouton, Colin W

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of the tissue distribution of plasmid DNA after administration of nonviral gene delivery systems is best accomplished using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), although published strategies do not allow determination of the absolute mass of plasmid delivered to different tissues. Generally, data is expressed as the mass of plasmid relative to the mass of genomic DNA (gDNA) in the sample. This strategy is adequate for comparisons of efficiency of delivery to a single site but it does not allow direct comparison of delivery to multiple tissues, as the mass of gDNA extracted per unit mass of each tissue is different. We show here that by constructing qPCR standard curves for each tissue it is possible to determine the dose of intact plasmid remaining in each tissue, which is a more useful parameter when comparing the fates of different formulations of DNA. We exemplify the use of this tissue-specific qPCR method by comparing the delivery of naked DNA, cationic DNA complexes, and neutral PEGylated DNA complexes after intramuscular injection. Generally, larger masses of intact plasmid were present 24 hours after injection of DNA complexes, and neutral complexes resulted in delivery of a larger mass of intact plasmid to the spleen. PMID:27701400

  18. Temporal Partitioning on Multicore Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmud Pathan, Ristat; Hashi, Feysal; Stenstrom, Per; Green, Lars-Goran; Hult, Torbjorn; Sandin, Patrik

    2014-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of ensuring temporal partitioning according to the ARINC-653 standard for integrating multiple applications on the same multicore platform. To employ temporal partitioning, we propose the design and analysis of a hierarchical scheduling framework (HSF) for multicore platform. In HSF, each application has a server task, which is mapped to one of the physical cores of the multicore platform. The HSF framework is based on scheduling at two-levels: (i) a system-level scheduler for each core schedules the server tasks that are mapped to that core, and (ii) a task- level scheduler for each application schedules the tasks of the application. This paper presents the design and analysis of this two-level HSF that can be used to ensure temporal partitioning and meeting all the deadlines of each application tasks. The effectiveness of our technique is demonstrated using real-world space applications provided by RUAG Space Sweden AB.

  19. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-01-01

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13−26% of available metabolites, with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. These results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity. PMID:26392107

  20. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; Hummel, Eric; Da Rocha, Ulisses Nunes; Chakraborty, Romy; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Karaoz, Ulas; Cadillo-Quiroz, Hinsby; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Northen, Trent R.

    2015-09-22

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13-26% of available metabolites, with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. In conclusion, these results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity.

  1. Exometabolite niche partitioning among sympatric soil bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Baran, Richard; Brodie, Eoin L.; Mayberry-Lewis, Jazmine; ...

    2015-09-22

    Soils are arguably the most microbially diverse ecosystems. Physicochemical properties have been associated with the maintenance of this diversity. Yet, the role of microbial substrate specialization is largely unexplored since substrate utilization studies have focused on simple substrates, not the complex mixtures representative of the soil environment. Here we examine the exometabolite composition of desert biological soil crusts (biocrusts) and the substrate preferences of seven biocrust isolates. The biocrust's main primary producer releases a diverse array of metabolites, and isolates of physically associated taxa use unique subsets of the complex metabolite pool. Individual isolates use only 13-26% of available metabolites,more » with only 2 out of 470 used by all and 40% not used by any. An extension of this approach to a mesophilic soil environment also reveals high levels of microbial substrate specialization. In conclusion, these results suggest that exometabolite niche partitioning may be an important factor in the maintenance of microbial diversity.« less

  2. Sorting by Recursive Partitioning,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    asymptotic time-complexity. This paper has the following main parts: First, a Pidgin -Algol version of the algorithm is presented and we discuss the main...those sorted subsets e) end "UsingBin*; end "AdaptSorting. 4 "Figure 1: A condensed Pidgin -Algol version of Adaptsort eiFor some conditions that we will...algorithm which have to be completed in either linear or constant times (these required critical times appear as comments in the Pidgin -Algol version

  3. Electrotransfer of Plasmid Vector DNA into Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    Wolff et al. (1990) first reported that plasmid DNA injected into skeletal muscle is taken up by muscle cells and the genes in the plasmid are expressed for more than two months thereafter, although the transfected DNA does not usually undergo chromosomal integration (Wolff et al., 1991, 1992). However, the relatively low expression levels attained by this method have hampered its applications for uses other than as a DNA vaccine (Davis et al., 1995). There are a number of reports analyzing the conditions that affect the efficiency of gene transfer by intramuscular DNA injection and assessing the fine structures of expression plasmid vectors that may affect expression levels (Davis et al., 1993; Liang et al., 1996; Norman et al., 1997). Furthermore, various attempts were done to improve the efficiency of gene transfer by intramus cular DNA injection. Consequently, regenerating muscle was shown to produce 80-fold or more protein than did normal muscle, following injection of an expression plas-mid. Muscle regeneration was induced by treatment with cardiotoxin or bupivacaine (Wells, 1993; Vitadello et al., 1994). We previously demonstrated that by combining a strong promoter and bupivacaine pretreatment intramuscular injection of an IL-5 expression plasmid results in IL-5 production in muscle at a level sufficient to induce marked proliferation of eosinophils in the bone marrow and eosinophil infiltration of various organs (Tokui et al., 1997). It was also reported that a single intramuscular injection of an erythropoietin expression plasmid produced physiologically significant elevations in serum erythropoietin levels and increased hematocrits in adult mice (Tripathy et al., 1996). Hematocrits in these animals remained elevated at >60% for at least 90 days after a single injection. However, improvements to this method have not been sufficient to extend its applications including clinical use.

  4. Mutation detection in plasmid-based biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Prather, Kristala L J; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2011-04-01

    As the number of applications involving therapeutic plasmid DNA (pDNA) increases worldwide, there is a growing concern over maintaining rigorous quality control through a panel of high-quality assays. For this reason, efficient, cost-effective and sensitive technologies enabling the identification of genetic variants and unwanted side products are needed to successfully establish the identity and stability of a plasmid-based biopharmaceutical. This review highlights several bioinformatic tools for ab initio detection of potentially unstable DNA regions, as well as techniques used for mutation detection in nucleic acids, with particular emphasis on pDNA.

  5. Plasmid IL-12 electroporation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Edward; Daud, Adil

    2012-01-01

    Intratumoral gene electroporation uses electric charges to facilitate entry of plasmid DNA into cells in a reproducible and highly efficient manner, especially to accessible sites such as cutaneous and subcutaneous melanomas. Effective for locally treated disease, electroporation of plasmid DNA encoding interleukin-12 can also induce responses in untreated distant disease, suggesting that adaptive immune responses are being elicited that can target melanoma-associated antigens. In vivo electroporation with immunomodulatory cytokine DNA is a promising approach that can trigger systemic anti-tumor immune responses without the systemic toxicity associated with intravenous cytokine delivery and potentially offer complete long-term tumor regression. PMID:23151447

  6. Biodegradable poly(ethylenimine) for plasmid DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Cheol-Hee; Chae, Su Young; Bae, You Han; Kim, Sung Wan

    2002-04-23

    Poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) has been known as an efficient gene carrier with the highest cationic charge potential. High transfection efficiency of PEI, along with its cytotoxicity, strongly depends on the molecular weight. Synthesis of cationic copolymers derived from the low molecular weight of PEI and hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), which are water soluble and degradable under physiological conditions, was investigated for plasmid delivery. Hydrophilic PEG is expected to reduce the toxicity of the copolymer, improve the poor solubility of the PEI and DNA complexes, and help to introduce degradable bonds by reaction with the primary amines in the PEI. Considering the dependence of transfection efficiency and cytotoxicity on the molecular weight of the PEI, high transfection efficiency is expected from an increased molecular weight of the copolymer and low cytotoxicity from the introduction of PEG and the degradation of the copolymer into low molecular weight PEIs. Reaction conditions were carefully controlled to produce water soluble copolymers. Results from a gel retardation assay and zetapotentiometer indicated that complete neutralization of the complexes was achieved at the charge ratios of copolymer/pSV-beta-gal plasmid from 0.8 to 1.0 with the mean particle size of the polyplexes ranging from 129.8+/-0.9 to 151.8+/-3.4 nm. In vitro transfection efficiency of the synthesized copolymer increased up to three times higher than that of starting low molecular weight PEI, while the cell viability was maintained over 80%.

  7. Small-plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance is enhanced by increases in plasmid copy number and bacterial fitness.

    PubMed

    San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Ortega-Huedo, Rafael; Bernabe-Balas, Cristina; Kennedy, Sean P; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids play a key role in the horizontal spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among bacterial pathogens. When an antibiotic resistance plasmid arrives in a new bacterial host, it produces a fitness cost, causing a competitive disadvantage for the plasmid-bearing bacterium in the absence of antibiotics. On the other hand, in the presence of antibiotics, the plasmid promotes the survival of the clone. The adaptations experienced by plasmid and bacterium in the presence of antibiotics during the first generations of coexistence will be crucial for the progress of the infection and the maintenance of plasmid-mediated resistance once the treatment is over. Here we developed a model system using the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae carrying the small plasmid pB1000 conferring resistance to β-lactam antibiotics to investigate host and plasmid adaptations in the course of a simulated ampicillin therapy. Our results proved that plasmid-bearing clones compensated for the fitness disadvantage during the first 100 generations of plasmid-host adaptation. In addition, ampicillin treatment was associated with an increase in pB1000 copy number. The augmentation in both bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number gave rise to H. influenzae populations with higher ampicillin resistance levels. In conclusion, we show here that the modulations in bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number help a plasmid-bearing bacterium to adapt during antibiotic therapy, promoting both the survival of the host and the spread of the plasmid.

  8. Plasmid Introduction in Metal-Stressed, Subsurface-Derived Microcosms: Plasmid Fate and Community Response

    PubMed Central

    Smets, Barth F.; Morrow, Jayne B.; Arango Pinedo, Catalina

    2003-01-01

    The nonconjugal IncQ plasmids pMOL187 and pMOL222, which contain the metal resistance-encoding genes czc and ncc, were introduced by using Escherichia coli as a transitory delivery strain into microcosms containing subsurface-derived parent materials. The microcosms were semicontinuously dosed with an artificial groundwater to set a low-carbon flux and a target metal stress (0, 10, 100, and 1,000 μM CdCl2), permitting long-term community monitoring. The broad-host-range IncPα plasmid RP4 was also transitorily introduced into a subset of microcosms. No novel community phenotype was detected after plasmid delivery, due to the high background resistances to Cd and Ni. At fixed Cd doses, however, small but consistent increases in Cdr or Nir density were measured due to the introduction of a single pMOL plasmid, and this effect was enhanced by the joint introduction of RP4; the effects were most significant at the highest Cd doses. The pMOL plasmids introduced could, however, be monitored via czc- and ncc-targeted infinite-dilution PCR (ID-PCR) methods, because these genes were absent from the indigenous community: long-term presence of czc (after 14 or 27 weeks) was contingent on the joint introduction of RP4, although RP4 cointroduction was not yet required to ensure retention of ncc after 8 weeks. Plasmids isolated from Nir transconjugants further confirmed the presence and retention of a pMOL222-sized plasmid. ID-PCR targeting the RP4-specific trafA gene revealed retention of RP4 for at least 8 weeks. Our findings confirm plasmid transfer and long-term retention in low-carbon-flux, metal-stressed subsurface communities but indicate that the subsurface community examined has limited mobilization potential for the IncQ plasmids employed. PMID:12839785

  9. First Report of Complete Sequence of a blaNDM-13-Harboring Plasmid from an Escherichia coli ST5138 Clinical Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jingnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Zhang, Dan; Zheng, Zhou; Chen, Yuehui; Guo, Yinjuan; Wang, Shanshan; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Tang, Yi-Wei; Chen, Zengqiang; Hu, Longhua; Wang, Liangxing; Yu, Fangyou

    2016-01-01

    Since the first report of blaNDM-1, 16 blaNDM variants have been identified among Gram-negative bacteria worldwide. Recently, a novel blaNDM variant, blaNDM-13, was identified in the chromosome of an ST101 Escherichia coli isolate from Nepal. Here we first reported plasmid-mediated blaNDM-13 in a carbapenem-resistant E. coli ST5138 clinical isolate associated with hospital-acquired urinary tract infection from China. blaNDM-13 and blaSHV-12 coexisted on the a ~54 Kb self-transferable plasmid. Compared with NDM-1, NDM-13, NDM-3, and NDM-4 had two amino acid substitutions (D95N and M154L), one amino acid substitution (D95N) and one amino acid substitutions (M154L), respectively. Complete plasmid sequencing showed that blaNDM-13-harboring plasmid (pNDM13-DC33) was highly similar to the blaNDM-1-harboring IncX3 plasmid pNDM-HN380, a common blaNDM-harboring vector circulating in China. In accordance with the structure of pNDM-HN380, pNDM13-DC33 consists of a 33-kb backbone encoding plasmid replication (repB), stability partitioning, and transfer (tra, trb, and pil) functions, and a 21-kb antimicrobial resistance region with high GC content between umuD and mpr genes. In conclusion, the present study is the first report of a plasmid-encoded blaNDM-13 and the complete sequence of a blaNDM-13-harboring plasmid (pNDM13-DC33). blaNDM-13 maybe originate from blaNDM-1 located on a pNDM-HN380-like plasmid by sequential mutations. PMID:27790412

  10. Identification of regions essential for extrachromosomal replication and maintenance of an endogenous plasmid in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed Central

    Ahern, K G; Howard, P K; Firtel, R A

    1988-01-01

    Initial experiments with the endogenous 12.3 kb Dictyostelium discoideum plasmid Ddp1 led to the generation of a large shuttle vector, Ddp1-20. In addition to Ddp1, this vector contains pBR322 and a gene fusion that confers G418 resistance in Dictyostelium cells. We have shown that Ddp1-20 replicates extrachromosomally in Dictyostelium cells and can be grown in Escherichia coli cells (1). We have now examined deletions within this vector to identify the elements essential for extrachromosomal replication and stable maintenance of the plasmid. We find that a 2.2 kb fragment is sufficient to confer stable, extrachromosomal replication with a reduction in copy number from about 40 to approximately 10-15 copies per cell. Vectors containing additional Ddp1 sequences have a higher copy number. The 2.2 kb region contains none of the complete, previously identified transcription units on Ddp1 expressed during vegetative growth or development. These results suggest that gene products expressed by Ddp1 are not essential for replication, stability, or partitioning of the plasmid between daughter cells. Vectors carrying only the 2.2 kb fragment plus the gene fusion conferring G418 resistance transform Dictyostelium cells with high efficiency using either calcium phosphate mediated transformation or electroporation. Finally, we have examined the relative levels of expression of actin promoters driving neoR genes when in extrachromosomal or integrating vectors. Images PMID:3405751

  11. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  12. METAL PARTITIONING IN COMBUSTION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article summarizes ongoing research efforts at the National Risk Management Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency examining [high temperature] metal behavior within combustion environments. The partitioning of non-volatile (Cr and Ni), semi-volatil...

  13. Robust and efficient overset grid assembly for partitioned unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roget, Beatrice; Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a method to perform efficient and automated Overset Grid Assembly (OGA) on a system of overlapping unstructured meshes in a parallel computing environment where all meshes are partitioned into multiple mesh-blocks and processed on multiple cores. The main task of the overset grid assembler is to identify, in parallel, among all points in the overlapping mesh system, at which points the flow solution should be computed (field points), interpolated (receptor points), or ignored (hole points). Point containment search or donor search, an algorithm to efficiently determine the cell that contains a given point, is the core procedure necessary for accomplishing this task. Donor search is particularly challenging for partitioned unstructured meshes because of the complex irregular boundaries that are often created during partitioning.

  14. Integrating GIS and genetic algorithms for automating land partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demetriou, Demetris; See, Linda; Stillwell, John

    2014-08-01

    Land consolidation is considered to be the most effective land management planning approach for controlling land fragmentation and hence improving agricultural efficiency. Land partitioning is a basic process of land consolidation that involves the subdivision of land into smaller sub-spaces subject to a number of constraints. This paper explains the development of a module called LandParcelS (Land Parcelling System) that integrates geographical information systems and a genetic algorithm to automate the land partitioning process by designing and optimising land parcels in terms of their shape, size and value. This new module has been applied to two land blocks that are part of a larger case study area in Cyprus. Partitioning is carried out by guiding a Thiessen polygon process within ArcGIS and it is treated as a multiobjective problem. The results suggest that a step forward has been made in solving this complex spatial problem, although further research is needed to improve the algorithm. The contribution of this research extends land partitioning and space partitioning in general, since these approaches may have relevance to other spatial processes that involve single or multi-objective problems that could be solved in the future by spatial evolutionary algorithms.

  15. Some trees with partition dimension three

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredlina, Ketut Queena; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    The concept of partition dimension of a graph was introduced by Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang (1998) [2]. Let G(V, E) be a connected graph. For S ⊆ V (G) and v ∈ V (G), define the distance d(v, S) from v to S is min{d(v, x)|x ∈ S}. Let Π be an ordered partition of V (G) and Π = {S1, S2, ..., Sk }. The representation r(v|Π) of vertex v with respect to Π is (d(v, S1), d(v, S2), ..., d(v, Sk)). If the representations of all vertices are distinct, then the partition Π is called a resolving partition of G. The partition dimension of G is the minimum k such that G has a resolving partition with k partition classes. In this paper, we characterize some classes of trees with partition dimension three, namely olive trees, weeds, and centipedes.

  16. The Virulence Plasmid of Yersinia, an Antihost Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cornelis, Guy R.; Boland, Anne; Boyd, Aoife P.; Geuijen, Cecile; Iriarte, Maite; Neyt, Cécile; Sory, Marie-Paule; Stainier, Isabelle

    1998-01-01

    The 70-kb virulence plasmid enables Yersinia spp. (Yersinia pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica) to survive and multiply in the lymphoid tissues of their host. It encodes the Yop virulon, an integrated system allowing extracellular bacteria to disarm the cells involved in the immune response, to disrupt their communications, or even to induce their apoptosis by the injection of bacterial effector proteins. This system consists of the Yop proteins and their dedicated type III secretion apparatus, called Ysc. The Ysc apparatus is composed of some 25 proteins including a secretin. Most of the Yops fall into two groups. Some of them are the intracellular effectors (YopE, YopH, YpkA/YopO, YopP/YopJ, YopM, and YopT), while the others (YopB, YopD, and LcrV) form the translocation apparatus that is deployed at the bacterial surface to deliver the effectors into the eukaryotic cells, across their plasma membrane. Yop secretion is triggered by contact with eukaryotic cells and controlled by proteins of the virulon including YopN, TyeA, and LcrG, which are thought to form a plug complex closing the bacterial secretion channel. The proper operation of the system also requires small individual chaperones, called the Syc proteins, in the bacterial cytosol. Transcription of the genes is controlled both by temperature and by the activity of the secretion apparatus. The virulence plasmid of Y. enterocolitica and Y. pseudotuberculosis also encodes the adhesin YadA. The virulence plasmid contains some evolutionary remnants including, in Y. enterocolitica, an operon encoding resistance to arsenic compounds. PMID:9841674

  17. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase and fluoroquinolone resistance genes and plasmids among Escherichia coli isolates from zoo animals, Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Dolejska, Monika; Jamborova, Ivana; Brhelova, Eva; Blazkova, Lucie; Papousek, Ivo; Kozlova, Marketa; Klimes, Jiri; Cizek, Alois; Literak, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    Commensal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy zoo animals kept in Ostrava Zoological Garden, Czech Republic, were investigated to evaluate the dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. A total of 160 faecal samples of various animal species were inoculated onto MacConkey agar with cefotaxime (2 mg L(-1)) or ciprofloxacin (0.05 mg L(-1)) to obtain ESBL- or PMQR-positive E. coli isolates. Clonality of E. coli isolates was investigated by multilocus sequence typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Plasmids carrying ESBL or PMQR genes were typed by PCR-based replicon typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Forty-nine (71%, n = 69) cefotaxime-resistant and 15 (16%, n = 94) ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates harboured ESBL or PMQR genes. Isolates were assigned to 18 sequence types (ST) and 20 clusters according to their macrorestriction patterns by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The genes blaCTX -M-1 and qnrS1 were detected on highly related IncI1 plasmids assigned to clonal complex 3 (ST3, ST38) and on non-related IncN plasmids of ST1 and ST3, respectively. The gene qnrS1 was located on related IncX1 plasmids. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance is associated with spreading of particular E. coli clones and plasmids of specific incompatibility groups among various animal species.

  18. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    There is a recognized need to understand and predict the fate, transport and bioavailability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic and soil ecosystems. Recent research focuses on either collection of empirical data (e.g., removal of a specific NP through water or soil matrices under variable experimental conditions) or precise NP characterization (e.g. size, degree of aggregation, morphology, zeta potential, purity, surface chemistry, and stability). However, it is almost impossible to transition from these precise measurements to models suitable to assess the NP behavior in the environment with complex and heterogeneous matrices. For decades, the USEPA has developed and applies basic partitioning parameters (e.g., octanol-water partition coefficients) and models (e.g., EPI Suite, ECOSAR) to predict the environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of organic pollutants (e.g., pesticides, hydrocarbons, etc.). In this project we have investigated the hypothesis that NP partition coefficients between water and organic phases (octanol or lipid bilayer) is highly dependent on their physiochemical properties, aggregation, and presence of natural constituents in aquatic environments (salts, natural organic matter), which may impact their partitioning into biological matrices (bioaccumulation) and human exposure (bioavailability) as well as the eventual usage in modeling the fate and bioavailability of ENPs. In this report, we use the terminology "partitioning" to operationally define the fraction of ENPs distributed among different phases. The mechanisms leading to this partitioning probably involve both chemical force interactions (hydrophobic association, hydrogen bonding, ligand exchange, etc.) and physical forces that bring the ENPs in close contact with the phase interfaces (diffusion, electrostatic interactions, mixing turbulence, etc.). Our work focuses on partitioning, but also provides insight into the relative behavior of ENPs as either "more like

  19. Diversity, biology and evolution of IncQ-family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Rawlings, Douglas E

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids of IncQ-family are distinguished by having a unique strand-displacement mechanism of replication that is capable of functioning in a wide variety of bacterial hosts. In addition, these plasmids are highly mobilizable and therefore very promiscuous. Common features of the replicons have been used to identify IncQ-family plasmids in DNA sequence databases and in this way several unstudied plasmids have been compared to more well-studied IncQ plasmids. We propose that IncQ plasmids can be divided into four subgroups based on a number of mutually supportive criteria. The most important of these are the amino acid sequences of their three essential replication proteins and the observation that the replicon of each subgroup has become fused to four different lineages of mobilization genes. This review of IncQ-family plasmid diversity has highlighted several events in the evolution of these plasmids and raised several questions for further research.

  20. A novel method of plasmid isolation using laundry detergent.

    PubMed

    Yadav, P; Yadav, A; Garg, V; Datta, T K; Goswami, S L; De, S

    2011-07-01

    Since the discovery of plasmid, various methods have been developed to isolate plasmid DNA. All the methods have one common and important target of isolating plasmid DNA of high quality and quantity in less time. These methods are not completely safe because of use of toxic chemicals compounds. The developed protocol for plasmid extraction is based on the alkaline lysis method of plasmid preparation (extraction atpH 8.0) with slight modifications. Cell lysis reagent sodium dodecyl sulfate is replaced by lipase enzyme present in laundry detergent. A good plasmid preparation can be made, which is well suited for subsequent molecular biology applications. By taking safety measures on count, contaminants like, RNA and protein can be completely avoided with maximized plasmid yield. The resultant plasmid quality and quantity can be well comparable to other prevalent methods.

  1. Antibiotic resistance and R-plasmids in food chain Salmonella: evidence of plasmid relatedness.

    PubMed Central

    Bezanson, G S; Pauzé, M; Lior, H

    1981-01-01

    A large number of strains (1,783) belonging to 15 Salmonella serovars isolated, in Canada, from the three major links of the human food chain were screened for multiple antibiotic resistance and the presence of R-plasmids. Multiresistant strains occurred among animal feed, livestock, and human isolates at frequencies of 4, 22, and 14%, respectively. Conjugation analysis revealed that 58% of the isolates from feeds, 87% of those from livestock, and 89% of the human strains carried all or part of their resistance determinants extrachromosomally on R-plasmids. Conjugative plasmids representing nine different incompatibility groups were detected, with the Inc I alpha group being predominant. Within the limits of the parameters measured, certain of these plasmids show a degree of relatedness suggestive of a common ancestry. PMID:7013704

  2. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  3. Cholesterol-conjugated supramolecular assemblies of low generations polyamidoamine dendrimers for enhanced EGFP plasmid DNA transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golkar, Nasim; Samani, Soliman Mohammadi; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad

    2016-05-01

    Aimed to prepare an enhanced gene delivery system with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, various cholesterol-conjugated derivates of low generation polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were prepared. The conjugates were characterized by TNBS assay, FTIR, and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. Self-assembly of the dendrimer conjugates (G1-Chol, G2-Chol, and G3-Chol) was investigated by pyrene assay. Following formation of the complexes between enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid and the dendrimer conjugates at various N (primary amine)/P (phosphate) mole ratios, plasmid condensation, biologic stability, cytotoxicity, and protein expression were investigated. The conjugates self-assembled into micellar dispersions with the critical micelle concentration values (<50 µg/ml) depending on the dendrimer generation and cholesterol/amine mole ratio. Cholesterol conjugation resulted in higher resistance of the condensed plasmid DNA in a competition assay with heparin sulfate. Also, the transfection efficiency was determined higher for the cholesterol conjugates than unmodified dendrimers in HepG2 cells, showing the highest for G2-Chol at 40 % degree of cholesterol modification (G2-Chol40 %) among various dendrimer generations. Interestingly, such conjugate showed a complete protection of plasmid against serum nucleases. Our results confirmed that the cholesterol conjugation to PAMAM dendrimers of low generations bearing little cytotoxicity improves their several physicochemical and biological characteristics required for an enhanced delivery of plasmid DNA into cells.

  4. Ecological dynamics and complex interactions of Agrobacterium megaplasmids

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Thomas G.; Morton, Elise R.; Barton, Ian S.; Bever, James D.; Fuqua, Clay

    2014-01-01

    As with many pathogenic bacteria, agrobacterial plant pathogens carry most of their virulence functions on a horizontally transmissible genetic element. The tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid encodes the majority of virulence functions for the crown gall agent Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This includes the vir genes which drive genetic transformation of host cells and the catabolic genes needed to utilize the opines produced by infected plants. The Ti plasmid also encodes, an opine-dependent quorum sensing system that tightly regulates Ti plasmid copy number and its conjugal transfer to other agrobacteria. Many natural agrobacteria are avirulent, lacking the Ti plasmid. The burden of harboring the Ti plasmid depends on the environmental context. Away from diseased hosts, plasmid costs are low but the benefit of the plasmid is also absent. Consequently, plasmidless genotypes are favored. On infected plants the costs of the Ti plasmid can be very high, but balanced by the opine benefits, locally favoring plasmid bearing cells. Cheating derivatives which do not incur virulence costs but can benefit from opines are favored on infected plants and in most other environments, and these are frequently isolated from nature. Many agrobacteria also harbor an At plasmid which can stably coexist with a Ti plasmid. At plasmid genes are less well characterized but in general facilitate metabolic activities in the rhizosphere and bulk soil, such as the ability to breakdown plant exudates. Examination of A. tumefaciens C58, revealed that harboring its At plasmid is much more costly than harboring it’s Ti plasmid, but conversely the At plasmid is extremely difficult to cure. The interactions between these co-resident plasmids are complex, and depend on environmental context. However, the presence of a Ti plasmid appears to mitigate At plasmid costs, consistent with the high frequency with which they are found together. PMID:25452760

  5. Photoreactivation of Ultraviolet-Irradiated, Plasmid-Bearing and Plasmid-Free Strains of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-19

    NUMBER __ vation Bacillus anthracis) ś 7. AUTHOR(’a) B.KusnShD . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(a) PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT... Bacillus anthracis, anthrax, photoreactivation, DNA repair, plasmid A6SSTACT (Cinvt ass,.yme eEb ir "mease wy f dentif by block nlmbaw) Iee. he...effects of toxin- a’nd capsule-encoding plasmids on the kinetics of UIV inactivation of various strains of Bacillus anthracis were investigated. :Z

  6. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.E.; Weightman, A.J.; Fry, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} per recipient at 20C. The sizes of the mobilizing plasmids isolated ranged from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was also found but not resistance to UV light or various heavy metals. Eight plasmids of epilithic bacteria, analyzed by comparing restriction fragmentation patterns, showed significant differences between those isolated from different independent matings. Optimal temperatures for mobilization of pD10 were between 15 and 25C. Four mercury resistance plasmids were found to be broad host range, transferring mercury resistance and mobilizing pD10 readily to representative species of {beta}- and {gamma}-purple bacteria. In general, frequencies of pD10 mobilization by plasmids of epilithic bacteria were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than conjugal transfer frequencies. Thus, there is a high potential for exchange of recombinant genes introduced into the epilithon by mobilization between a variety of bacterial species.

  7. Effect of amine type on the expression of plasmid DNA by cationized dextran.

    PubMed

    Jo, Jun-ichiro; Nagane, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Masaya; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to prepare a non-viral carrier of gene expression from the polysaccharide dextran and evaluate the effect of amine compounds introduced to dextran on the level of gene expression. Dextran with a molecular weight of 74 x 10(3) was cationized by the chemical introduction of different amine compounds. The cationized dextran was complexed with a plasmid DNA and the vitro gene transfection was investigated for HeLa cells. The level of gene expression depended on the amine compound introduced to dextran. The highest level was observed for the complex of spermine-introduced dextran and plasmid DNA. The highest cellular internalization and the best buffering effect were observed among every cationized dextran. Every complex did not show any cytotoxicity. It is concluded that the superior properties of spermine-introduced dextran enabled the plasmid DNA to enhance the expression level to a great extent compared with other cationized dextrans. Cationized dextran is a promising non-viral carrier of plasmid DNA.

  8. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs.

    PubMed

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity.

  9. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  10. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K.; Sartor, Anna L.; Williamson, Deborah A.; Forde, Brian M.; Beatson, Scott A.; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family. PMID:27114281

  11. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Wailan, Alexander M; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K; Sartor, Anna L; Williamson, Deborah A; Forde, Brian M; Schembri, Mark A; Beatson, Scott A; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Partridge, Sally R

    2016-07-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family.

  12. pRMH760, a precursor of A/C₂ plasmids carrying blaCMY and blaNDM genes.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the evolution of plasmids in the repA/C2 group carrying genes conferring resistance to cephalosporins (bla(CMY)) or to carbapenems (bla(NDM)) and cephalosporins (bla(CMY)), the sequence of plasmid pRMH760 that lacks the β-lactamase genes was determined and compared to all available A/C2 plasmid sequences. pRMH760 is 170.6 kb and carries several antibiotic resistance genes in a 45.1 kb complex transposon structure located upstream of the rhs gene. In plasmid pR148, the closest relative of pRMH760, the antibiotic resistance island is in the same position but the resistance genes differ. pRMH760 also contains a deletion in the rhs gene. Sequenced A/C2 plasmids containing bla(CMY) or bla(CMY) and bla(NDM) have backbones closely related to the pRMH760/pR148 backbone, and they include resistance islands in the same location, indicating that they arose from a plasmid related to pRMH760/pR148. However, the gene content of this resistance island differs in each case, and the island family was designated ARI-A. The bla(NDM) gene is within ARI-A. The ISEcp1-bla(CMY) fragment is located elsewhere and is always in the same location, consistent with a single acquisition event. Plasmids containing only bla(CMY) carry a second resistance island, designated ARI-B, which includes the sul2 gene and a variable set of further resistance genes. Nine A/C2 plasmids that were not of this type (type 1) were found to have a similar backbone that can be simply distinguished by the presence of two exchanged regions and two insertions. Antibiotic resistance islands in type 2 plasmids are in different locations and have different structures.

  13. Efficient replication of Epstein-Barr virus-derived plasmids requires tethering by EBNA1 to host chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Hodin, Theresa L; Najrana, Tanbir; Yates, John L

    2013-12-01

    The EBNA1 protein of Epstein-Barr virus enables plasmids carrying oriP both to duplicate and to segregate efficiently in proliferating cells. EBNA1 recruits the origin recognition complex (ORC) to establish a replication origin at one element of oriP, DS (dyad symmetry); at another element, FR (family of repeats), EBNA1 binds to an array of sites from which it tethers plasmids to host chromosomes for mitotic stability. We report experiments leading to the conclusion that tethering by EBNA1 to host chromosomes is also needed within interphase nuclei in order for plasmids to be replicated efficiently from oriP. The DNA-binding domain of EBNA1, which lacks chromosome-binding ability, was found to support weak, DS-specific replication in HEK293 cells after transient transfection, being 17% as active as wild-type EBNA1. The low efficiency of replication was not due to the failure of the DNA-binding domain to retain plasmids within nuclei, because plasmids were recovered in similar amounts and entirely from the nuclear fraction of these transiently transfected cells. A derivative of EBNA1 with its chromosome-tethering domains replaced by a 22-amino-acid nucleosome-binding domain was fully active in supporting oriP functions. The implication is that EBNA1's DNA-binding domain is able to recruit ORC to DS, but either this step or subsequent replication is only efficient if the plasmid is tethered to a host chromosome. Finally, with some cell lines, DS can hardly support even transient plasmid replication without FR. A loss of plasmids lacking FR from nuclei cannot account for this requirement, suggesting that the stronger tethering to chromosomes by FR is needed for plasmid replication within the nuclei of such cells.

  14. Partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kolda, T.G.

    1998-05-01

    The authors are interested in partitioning sparse rectangular matrices for parallel processing. The partitioning problem has been well-studied in the square symmetric case, but the rectangular problem has received very little attention. They will formalize the rectangular matrix partitioning problem and discuss several methods for solving it. They will extend the spectral partitioning method for symmetric matrices to the rectangular case and compare this method to three new methods -- the alternating partitioning method and two hybrid methods. The hybrid methods will be shown to be best.

  15. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  16. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET), a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Val F; de Toro, María; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  17. Plasmid Flux in Escherichia coli ST131 Sublineages, Analyzed by Plasmid Constellation Network (PLACNET), a New Method for Plasmid Reconstruction from Whole Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ–proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  18. Comparative genetic organization of incompatibility group P degradative plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Burlage, R S; Bemis, L A; Layton, A C; Sayler, G S; Larimer, F

    1990-01-01

    Plasmids that encode genes for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds are often examined only for characteristics of the degradative pathways and ignore regions that are necessary for plasmid replication, incompatibility, and conjugation. If these characteristics were known, then the mobility of the catabolic genes between species could be predicted and different catabolic pathways might be combined to alter substrate range. Two catabolic plasmids, pSS50 and pSS60, isolated from chlorobiphenyl-degrading strains and a 3-chlorobenzoate-degrading plasmid, pBR60, were compared with the previously described IncP group (Pseudomonas group P-1) plasmids pJP4 and R751. All three of the former plasmids were also members of the IncP group, although pBR60 is apparently more distantly related. DNA probes specific for known genetic loci were used to determine the order of homologous loci on the plasmids. In all of these plasmids the order is invariant, demonstrating the conservation of this "backbone" region. In addition, all five plasmids display at least some homology with the mercury resistance transposon, Tn501, which has been suggested to be characteristic of the beta subgroup of the IncP plasmids. Plasmids pSS50 and pSS60 have been mapped in detail, and repeat sequences that surround the suspected degradation genes are described. Images PMID:2254257

  19. Plasmids of ’Legionella’ Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-09

    reports of cytotoxin and 8-lactamase production and the virulent to avirulent conversion of Legionella pneumophila through serial passage on...strains of L. pneumophila and 12 strains representing four other species of Legionella were screened for the presence of plasmid DNA’ by a variety of lysing...several well-established methods. Table 1. Legionella -like Strains Legionella pneumophila Legionella bozemanii OLDA WIGA, MI-15 Legionella micdadei

  20. Plasmid Stabilization to Insure Gene Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-10

    suspended colony was used to initiate growth), independent growth rate measurements and a simple mathematical model, the kinetics of the loss of the LacZ...thermophilic anaerobe, C. thermocellum, an organism which degrades cellulose and hemicellulose at high temperature and carries out a direct fermentation... Kinetics of loss of a recombinant plasmid in Bacillus subtilis. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 37: 927-935. Shoham, Y., E. Israeli, A. L. Sonenshein and A. L

  1. The Influence of Biofilms in the Biology of Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laura C C; Dunny, Gary M

    2014-10-01

    The field of plasmid biology has historically focused on bacteria growing in liquid culture. Surface-attached communities of bacterial biofilms have recently been understood to be the normal environment of bacteria in the natural world. Thus, studies examining plasmid replication, maintenance, and transfer in biofilms are essential for a true understanding of bacterial plasmid biology. This article reviews the current knowledge of the interplay between bacterial biofilms and plasmids, focusing on the role of plasmids in biofilm development and the role of biofilms in plasmid maintenance, copy-number control, and transfer. The studies examined herein highlight the importance of biofilms as an important ecological niche in which bacterial plasmids play an essential role.

  2. Plasmid R6K replication control.

    PubMed

    Rakowski, Sheryl A; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2013-05-01

    The focus of this minireview is the replication control of the 39.9-kb plasmid R6K and its derivatives. Historically, this plasmid was thought to have a narrow host range but more recent findings indicate that its derivatives can replicate in a variety of enteric and non-enteric bacterial species (Wild et al., 2004). In the four-plus decades since it was first described, R6K has proven to be an excellent model for studies of plasmid DNA replication. In part this is because of its similarities to other systems in which replication is activated and regulated by Rep protein and iteron-containing DNA. However its apparent idiosynchracies have also added to its significance (e.g., independent and co-dependent replication origins, and Rep dimers that stably bind iterons). Here, we survey the current state of knowledge regarding R6K replication and place individual regulatory elements into a proposed homeostatic model with implications for the biological significance of R6K and its multiple origins of replication.

  3. Conflicting selection alters the trajectory of molecular evolution in a tripartite bacteria-plasmid-phage interaction.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ellie; Hall, James J P; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria engage in a complex network of ecological interactions, which includes mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as phages and plasmids. These elements play a key role in microbial communities as vectors of horizontal gene transfer but can also be important sources of selection for their bacterial hosts. In natural communities bacteria are likely to encounter multiple MGEs simultaneously and conflicting selection among MGEs could alter the bacterial evolutionary response to each MGE. Here we test the effect of interactions with multiple MGEs on bacterial molecular evolution in the tripartite interaction between the bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens, the lytic bacteriophage SBW25φ2 and conjugative plasmid, pQBR103, using genome sequencing of experimentally evolved bacteria. We show that, individually, both plasmids and phages impose selection leading to bacterial evolutionary responses that are distinct from bacterial populations evolving without MGEs, but that together, plasmids and phages impose conflicting selection on bacteria, constraining the evolutionary responses observed in pairwise interactions. Our findings highlight the likely difficulties of predicting evolutionary responses to multiple selective pressures from the observed evolutionary responses to each selective pressure alone. Understanding evolution in complex microbial communities comprising many species and MGEs will require that we go beyond studies of pairwise interactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Plasmid Dynamics in KPC-Positive Klebsiella pneumoniae during Long-Term Patient Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Park, Morgan; Deming, Clayton; Thomas, Pamela J.; Young, Alice C.; Coleman, Holly; Sison, Christina; Weingarten, Rebecca A.; Lau, Anna F.; Dekker, John P.; Palmore, Tara N.; Frank, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains are formidable hospital pathogens that pose a serious threat to patients around the globe due to a rising incidence in health care facilities, high mortality rates associated with infection, and potential to spread antibiotic resistance to other bacterial species, such as Escherichia coli. Over 6 months in 2011, 17 patients at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Center became colonized with a highly virulent, transmissible carbapenem-resistant strain of K. pneumoniae. Our real-time genomic sequencing tracked patient-to-patient routes of transmission and informed epidemiologists’ actions to monitor and control this outbreak. Two of these patients remained colonized with carbapenemase-producing organisms for at least 2 to 4 years, providing the opportunity to undertake a focused genomic study of long-term colonization with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Whole-genome sequencing studies shed light on the underlying complex microbial colonization, including mixed or evolving bacterial populations and gain or loss of plasmids. Isolates from NIH patient 15 showed complex plasmid rearrangements, leaving the chromosome and the blaKPC-carrying plasmid intact but rearranging the two other plasmids of this outbreak strain. NIH patient 16 has shown continuous colonization with blaKPC-positive organisms across multiple time points spanning 2011 to 2015. Genomic studies defined a complex pattern of succession and plasmid transmission across two different K. pneumoniae sequence types and an E. coli isolate. These findings demonstrate the utility of genomic methods for understanding strain succession, genome plasticity, and long-term carriage of antibiotic-resistant organisms. PMID:27353756

  5. Heterogeneous selection in a spatially structured environment affects fitness tradeoffs of plasmid carriage in pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Slater, Frances R; Bruce, Kenneth D; Ellis, Richard J; Lilley, Andrew K; Turner, Sarah L

    2008-05-01

    Environmental conditions under which fitness tradeoffs of plasmid carriage are balanced to facilitate plasmid persistence remain elusive. Periodic selection for plasmid-encoded traits due to the spatial and temporal variation typical in most natural environments (such as soil particles, plant leaf and root surfaces, gut linings, and the skin) may play a role. However, quantification of selection pressures and their effects is difficult at a scale relevant to the bacterium in situ. The present work describes a novel experimental system for such fine-scale quantification, with conditions designed to mimic the mosaic of spatially variable selection pressures present in natural surface environments. The effects of uniform and spatially heterogeneous mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) on the dynamics of a model community of plasmid-carrying, mercury-resistant (Hg(r)) and plasmid-free, mercury-sensitive (Hg(s)) pseudomonads were compared. Hg resulted in an increase in the surface area occupied by, and therefore an increase in the fitness of, Hg(r) bacteria relative to Hg(s) bacteria. Uniform and heterogeneous Hg distributions were demonstrated to result in different community structures by epifluorescence microscopy, with heterogeneous Hg producing spatially variable selection landscapes. The effects of heterogeneous Hg were only apparent at scales of a few hundred micrometers, emphasizing the importance of using appropriate analysis methods to detect effects of environmental heterogeneity on community dynamics. Heterogeneous Hg resulted in negative frequency-dependent selection for Hg(r) cells, suggesting that sporadic selection may facilitate the discontinuous distribution of plasmids through host populations in complex, structured environments.

  6. Laser system with partitioned prism

    SciTech Connect

    Nettleton, J. E.; Barr, D. N.

    1985-03-26

    An array of optical frequency-sensitive elements such as diffraction gratings or interference filters are arranged in a row, and the optical path of the laser cavity can be directed to include one of these elements. A partitioned optical prism consisting of a triangular portion and one or more paralleogramatic portions are used to direct the path. Between the portions are piezoelectric elements which, when energized, expand to provide an air gap between the portions and to allow total reflection of an optical ray at the surface of the prism next to the gap.

  7. Unsupervised segmentation of MRI knees using image partition forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marčan, Marija; Voiculescu, Irina

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays many people are affected by arthritis, a condition of the joints with limited prevention measures, but with various options of treatment the most radical of which is surgical. In order for surgery to be successful, it can make use of careful analysis of patient-based models generated from medical images, usually by manual segmentation. In this work we show how to automate the segmentation of a crucial and complex joint -- the knee. To achieve this goal we rely on our novel way of representing a 3D voxel volume as a hierarchical structure of partitions which we have named Image Partition Forest (IPF). The IPF contains several partition layers of increasing coarseness, with partitions nested across layers in the form of adjacency graphs. On the basis of a set of properties (size, mean intensity, coordinates) of each node in the IPF we classify nodes into different features. Values indicating whether or not any particular node belongs to the femur or tibia are assigned through node filtering and node-based region growing. So far we have evaluated our method on 15 MRI knee images. Our unsupervised segmentation compared against a hand-segmented gold standard has achieved an average Dice similarity coefficient of 0.95 for femur and 0.93 for tibia, and an average symmetric surface distance of 0.98 mm for femur and 0.73 mm for tibia. The paper also discusses ways to introduce stricter morphological and spatial conditioning in the bone labelling process.

  8. Plasmid and clonal interference during post horizontal gene transfer evolution.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, S; Perez Pantoja, D; Bravo, I G

    2017-02-16

    Plasmids are nucleic acid molecules that can drive their own replication in a living cell. They can be transmitted horizontally and can thrive in the host cell to high-copy numbers. Plasmid replication and gene expression consume cellular resources and cells carrying plasmids incur fitness costs. But many plasmids carry genes that can be beneficial under certain conditions, allowing the cell to endure in the presence of antibiotics, toxins, competitors or parasites. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded genes can thus instantaneously confer differential adaptation to local or transient selection conditions. This conflict between cellular fitness and plasmid spread sets the scene for multilevel selection processes. We have engineered a system to study the short-term evolutionary impact of different synonymous versions of a plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance gene. Applying experimental evolution under different selection conditions and deep sequencing allowed us to show rapid local adaptation to the presence of antibiotic and to the specific version of the resistance gene transferred. We describe the presence of clonal interference at two different levels: at the within-cell level, because a single cell can carry several plasmids, and at the between-cell level, because a bacterial population may contain several clones carrying different plasmids and displaying different fitness in the presence/absence of antibiotic. Understanding the within-cell and between-cell dynamics of plasmids after horizontal gene transfer is essential to unravel the dense network of mobile elements underlying the worldwide threat to public health of antibiotic resistance.

  9. Selective ploidy ablation, a high-throughput plasmid transfer protocol, identifies new genes affecting topoisomerase I–induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Robert J.D.; González-Barrera, Sergio; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Alvaro, David; Ciccone, Samantha; Wagner, Marisa; Rothstein, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    We have streamlined the process of transferring plasmids into any yeast strain library by developing a novel mating-based, high-throughput method called selective ploidy ablation (SPA). SPA uses a universal plasmid donor strain that contains conditional centromeres on every chromosome. The plasmid-bearing donor is mated to a recipient, followed by removal of all donor-strain chromosomes, producing a haploid strain containing the transferred plasmid. As proof of principle, we used SPA to transfer plasmids containing wild-type and mutant alleles of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) into the haploid yeast gene-disruption library. Overexpression of Top1 identified only one sensitive mutation, rpa34, while overexpression of top1-T722A allele, a camptothecin mimetic, identified 190 sensitive gene-disruption strains along with rpa34. In addition to known camptothecin-sensitive strains, this set contained mutations in genes involved in the Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex, the kinetochore, and vesicle trafficking. We further show that mutations in several ESCRT vesicle trafficking components increase Top1 levels, which is dependent on SUMO modification. These findings demonstrate the utility of the SPA technique to introduce plasmids into the haploid gene-disruption library to discover new interacting pathways. PMID:21173034

  10. On some trees having partition dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida Bagus Kade Puja Arimbawa, K.; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    In 1998, G. Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang introduced the notion of partition dimension of a graph. Since then, the study of this graph parameter has received much attention. A number of results have been obtained to know the values of partition dimensions of various classes of graphs. However, for some particular classes of graphs, finding of their partition dimensions is still not completely solved, for instances a class of general tree. In this paper, we study the properties of trees having partition dimension 4. In particular, we show that, for olive trees O(n), its partition dimension is equal to 4 if and only if 8 ≤ n ≤ 17. We also characterize all centipede trees having partition dimension 4.

  11. Displaying multimedia environmental partitioning by triangular diagrams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.C.; Mackay, D.

    1995-11-01

    It is suggested that equilateral triangular diagrams are a useful method of depicting the equilibrium partitioning of organic chemicals among the three primary environmental media of the atmosphere, the hydrosphere, and the organosphere (natural organic matter and biotic lipids and waxes). The technique is useful for grouping chemicals into classes according to their partitioning tendencies, for depicting the incremental effects of substituents such as alkyl groups and chlorine, and for showing how partitioning changes in response to changes in temperature.

  12. Chemical amplification based on fluid partitioning in an immiscible liquid

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Brian L.; Colston, Bill W.; Elkin, Christopher J.

    2010-09-28

    A system for nucleic acid amplification of a sample comprises partitioning the sample into partitioned sections and performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample. Another embodiment of the invention provides a system for nucleic acid amplification and detection of a sample comprising partitioning the sample into partitioned sections, performing PCR on the partitioned sections of the sample, and detecting and analyzing the partitioned sections of the sample.

  13. The stringy instanton partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonelli, Giulio; Sciarappa, Antonio; Tanzini, Alessandro; Vasko, Petr

    2014-01-01

    We perform an exact computation of the gauged linear sigma model associated to a D1-D5 brane system on a resolved A 1 singularity. This is accomplished via supersymmetric localization on the blown-up two-sphere. We show that in the blow-down limit the partition function reduces to the Nekrasov partition function evaluating the equivariant volume of the instanton moduli space. For finite radius we obtain a tower of world-sheet instanton corrections, that we identify with the equivariant Gromov-Witten invariants of the ADHM moduli space. We show that these corrections can be encoded in a deformation of the Seiberg-Witten prepotential. From the mathematical viewpoint, the D1-D5 system under study displays a twofold nature: the D1-branes viewpoint captures the equivariant quantum cohomology of the ADHM instanton moduli space in the Givental formalism, and the D5-branes viewpoint is related to higher rank equivariant Donaldson-Thomas invariants of.

  14. Automatic analysis of D-partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaevskaya, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to automatization of D-partition analysis. D-partition is one of the most common methods for determination of solution stability in systems with time-delayed feedback control and its dependency on values of control parameters. A transition from analytical form of D-partition to plain graph has been investigated. An algorithm of graph faces determination and calculation of count of characteristic equation roots with positive real part for appropriate area of D-partition has been developed. The algorithm keeps an information about analytical formulas for edges of faces. It allows to make further analytical research based on the results of computer analysis.

  15. The IntXO-PSL Recombination System Is a Key Component of the Second Maintenance System for Bacillus anthracis Plasmid pXO1

    PubMed Central

    Pomerantsev, Andrei P.; Rappole, Catherine; Chang, Zanetta; Chahoud, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously identified three noncontiguous regions on Bacillus anthracis plasmid pXO1 that comprise a system for accurate plasmid partitioning and maintenance. However, deletion of these regions did not decrease retention of certain shortened pXO1 plasmids during vegetative growth. Using two genetic tools developed for DNA manipulation in B. anthracis (the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems), we found two other noncontiguous pXO1 regions that together are sufficient for plasmid stability. This second pXO1 maintenance system includes the tubZ and tubR genes, characteristic of a type III partitioning system, and the IntXO recombinase gene (GBAA_RS29165), encoding a tyrosine recombinase, along with its adjacent 37-bp perfect stem-loop (PSL) target. Insertion of either the tubZ and tubR genes or the IntXO-PSL system into an unstable mini-pXO1 plasmid did not restore plasmid stability. The need for the two components of the second pXO1 maintenance system follows from the sequential roles of IntXO-PSL in generating monomeric circular daughter pXO1 molecules (thereby presumably preventing dimer catastrophe) and of TubZ/TubR in partitioning the monomers during cell division. We show that the IntXO recombinase deletes DNA regions located between two PSL sites in a manner similar to the actions of the Cre-loxP and Flp-FRT systems. IMPORTANCE Tyrosine recombinases catalyze cutting and joining reactions between short specific DNA sequences. Three types of reactions occur: integration and excision of DNA segments, inversion of DNA segments, and separation of monomeric forms from replicating circular DNA molecules. Here we show that the newly discovered site-specific IntXO-PSL recombinase system that contributes to the maintenance of the B. anthracis plasmid pXO1 can be used for genome engineering in a manner similar to that of the Cre-loxP or Flp-FRT system. PMID:27137503

  16. Therapeutic option of plasmid-DNA based gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Kunugiza, Yasuo; Iekushi, Kazuma; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common method in clinical cases because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. In this situation, more efficient plasmid DNA gene transfer is needed all over the world. This review focuses on plasmid DNA gene transfer and its enhancement, including ultrasound with microbubbles, electroporation, hydrodynamic method, gene gun, jet injection, cationic lipids and cationic polymers.

  17. Identification and sequence homology relationships of plasmids from various micrococci

    SciTech Connect

    Mathis, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    Plasmids have been found in strains of the following Micrococcus species M. nishinomiyaensis (9/22), M. luteus (8/47), and M. agilis (1/5). No plasmids were detected in strains of M. lylae (0/16) or M. sedentarius (0/20). Thirty-eight antibiotics and 23 inorganic salts were screened in an attempt to determine plasmid function. None of these antibiotics and inorganic salts were found to be associated with the presence or absence of plasmid DNA within these strains. Minimum inhibitory concentration experiments and curing experiments in which phenotypic change occurred without plasmid loss are the basis for this conclusion. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis parameters in certain Micrococcus strains previously analyzed were also shown not to be clearly associated to the presence or absence of plasmid DNA.

  18. Community-wide plasmid gene mobilization and selection

    PubMed Central

    Sentchilo, Vladimir; Mayer, Antonia P; Guy, Lionel; Miyazaki, Ryo; Green Tringe, Susannah; Barry, Kerrie; Malfatti, Stephanie; Goessmann, Alexander; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; van der Meer, Jan R

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids have long been recognized as an important driver of DNA exchange and genetic innovation in prokaryotes. The success of plasmids has been attributed to their independent replication from the host's chromosome and their frequent self-transfer. It is thought that plasmids accumulate, rearrange and distribute nonessential genes, which may provide an advantage for host proliferation under selective conditions. In order to test this hypothesis independently of biases from culture selection, we study the plasmid metagenome from microbial communities in two activated sludge systems, one of which receives mostly household and the other chemical industry wastewater. We find that plasmids from activated sludge microbial communities carry among the largest proportion of unknown gene pools so far detected in metagenomic DNA, confirming their presumed role of DNA innovators. At a system level both plasmid metagenomes were dominated by functions associated with replication and transposition, and contained a wide variety of antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. Plasmid families were very different in the two metagenomes and grouped in deep-branching new families compared with known plasmid replicons. A number of abundant plasmid replicons could be completely assembled directly from the metagenome, providing insight in plasmid composition without culturing bias. Functionally, the two metagenomes strongly differed in several ways, including a greater abundance of genes for carbohydrate metabolism in the industrial and of general defense factors in the household activated sludge plasmid metagenome. This suggests that plasmids not only contribute to the adaptation of single individual prokaryotic species, but of the prokaryotic community as a whole under local selective conditions. PMID:23407308

  19. Drug resistance plasmids in Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus reuteri.

    PubMed Central

    Vescovo, M; Morelli, L; Bottazzi, V

    1982-01-01

    Sixteen strains of Lactobacillus reuteri and 20 strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus were tested for resistance to 22 antibiotics by using commercially available sensitivity disks. Evidence suggesting linkage of these resistances to plasmids was obtained by "curing" experiments with acridine dyes and high growth temperatures. Examination of plasmid patterns of agarose gel electrophoresis provided further evidence of loss in plasmid DNA under curing conditions in some of the strains examined. Images PMID:6798933

  20. Photonic plasmid stability of transformed Salmonella typhimurium: A comparison of three unique plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella typhimurium (S. typh-lux) u...

  1. Photonic Plasmid Stability of Transformed Salmonella Typhimurium: A Comparison of Three Unique Plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Acquiring a highly stable photonic plasmid in transformed Salmonella Typhimurium for use in biophotonic studies of bacterial tracking in vivo is critical to experimental paradigm development. The objective of this study was to determine stability of transformed Salmonella Typhimurium (S....

  2. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans.

  3. Sequence-based analysis of pQBR103; a representative of a unique, transfer-proficient mega plasmid resident in the microbial community of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Tett, Adrian; Spiers, Andrew J; Crossman, Lisa C; Ager, Duane; Ciric, Lena; Dow, J Maxwell; Fry, John C; Harris, David; Lilley, Andrew; Oliver, Anna; Parkhill, Julian; Quail, Michael A; Rainey, Paul B; Saunders, Nigel J; Seeger, Kathy; Snyder, Lori A S; Squares, Rob; Thomas, Christopher M; Turner, Sarah L; Zhang, Xue-Xian; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J

    2007-08-01

    The plasmid pQBR103 was found within Pseudomonas populations colonizing the leaf and root surfaces of sugar beet plants growing at Wytham, Oxfordshire, UK. At 425 kb it is the largest self-transmissible plasmid yet sequenced from the phytosphere. It is known to enhance the competitive fitness of its host, and parts of the plasmid are known to be actively transcribed in the plant environment. Analysis of the complete sequence of this plasmid predicts a coding sequence (CDS)-rich genome containing 478 CDSs and an exceptional degree of genetic novelty; 80% of predicted coding sequences cannot be ascribed a function and 60% are orphans. Of those to which function could be assigned, 40% bore greatest similarity to sequences from Pseudomonas spp, and the majority of the remainder showed similarity to other gamma-proteobacterial genera and plasmids. pQBR103 has identifiable regions presumed responsible for replication and partitioning, but despite being tra+ lacks the full complement of any previously described conjugal transfer functions. The DNA sequence provided few insights into the functional significance of plant-induced transcriptional regions, but suggests that 14% of CDSs may be expressed (11 CDSs with functional annotation and 54 without), further highlighting the ecological importance of these novel CDSs. Comparative analysis indicates that pQBR103 shares significant regions of sequence with other plasmids isolated from sugar beet plants grown at the same geographic location. These plasmid sequences indicate there is more novelty in the mobile DNA pool accessible to phytosphere pseudomonas than is currently appreciated or understood.

  4. Distribution of Plasmids in Distinct Leptospira Pathogenic Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhuo; Zhuang, Xuran; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Cuicai; Zhang, Yan; Zeng, Lingbing; Zhu, Yongzhang; He, Ping; Dong, Ke; Pal, Utpal; Guo, Xiaokui; Qin, Jinhong

    2015-01-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic Leptospira, is a worldwide zoonotic infection. The genus Leptospira includes at least 21 species clustered into three groups—pathogens, non-pathogens, and intermediates—based on 16S rRNA phylogeny. Research on Leptospira is difficult due to slow growth and poor transformability of the pathogens. Recent identification of extrachromosomal elements besides the two chromosomes in L. interrogans has provided new insight into genome complexity of the genus Leptospira. The large size, low copy number, and high similarity of the sequence of these extrachromosomal elements with the chromosomes present challenges in isolating and detecting them without careful genome assembly. In this study, two extrachromosomal elements were identified in L. borgpetersenii serovar Ballum strain 56604 through whole genome assembly combined with S1 nuclease digestion following pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) analysis. Further, extrachromosomal elements in additional 15 Chinese epidemic strains of Leptospira, comprising L. borgpetersenii, L. weilii, and L. interrogans, were successfully separated and identified, independent of genome sequence data. Southern blot hybridization with extrachromosomal element-specific probes, designated as lcp1, lcp2 and lcp3-rep, further confirmed their occurrences as extrachromosomal elements. In total, 24 plasmids were detected in 13 out of 15 tested strains, among which 11 can hybridize with the lcp1-rep probe and 11 with the lcp2-rep probe, whereas two can hybridize with the lcp3-rep probe. None of them are likely to be species-specific. Blastp search of the lcp1, lcp2, and lcp3-rep genes with a nonredundant protein database of Leptospira species genomes showed that their homologous sequences are widely distributed among clades of pathogens but not non-pathogens or intermediates. These results suggest that the plasmids are widely distributed in Leptospira species, and further elucidation of their biological

  5. Raster Data Partitioning for Supporting Distributed GIS Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen Thai, B.; Olasz, A.

    2015-08-01

    In the geospatial sector big data concept also has already impact. Several studies facing originally computer science techniques applied in GIS processing of huge amount of geospatial data. In other research studies geospatial data is considered as it were always been big data (Lee and Kang, 2015). Nevertheless, we can prove data acquisition methods have been improved substantially not only the amount, but the resolution of raw data in spectral, spatial and temporal aspects as well. A significant portion of big data is geospatial data, and the size of such data is growing rapidly at least by 20% every year (Dasgupta, 2013). The produced increasing volume of raw data, in different format, representation and purpose the wealth of information derived from this data sets represents only valuable results. However, the computing capability and processing speed rather tackle with limitations, even if semi-automatic or automatic procedures are aimed on complex geospatial data (Kristóf et al., 2014). In late times, distributed computing has reached many interdisciplinary areas of computer science inclusive of remote sensing and geographic information processing approaches. Cloud computing even more requires appropriate processing algorithms to be distributed and handle geospatial big data. Map-Reduce programming model and distributed file systems have proven their capabilities to process non GIS big data. But sometimes it's inconvenient or inefficient to rewrite existing algorithms to Map-Reduce programming model, also GIS data can not be partitioned as text-based data by line or by bytes. Hence, we would like to find an alternative solution for data partitioning, data distribution and execution of existing algorithms without rewriting or with only minor modifications. This paper focuses on technical overview of currently available distributed computing environments, as well as GIS data (raster data) partitioning, distribution and distributed processing of GIS algorithms

  6. Why is entry exclusion an essential feature of conjugative plasmids?

    PubMed

    Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    Entry exclusion is a property of plasmids by which the cells that contain them become bad recipients in additional conjugation rounds. This work reviews entry exclusion essential features and analyzes the mechanisms of action of the best studied systems. We searched for homologs of the proteins responsible for experimentally known exclusion systems. Results were used to classify exclusion systems in families of related elements. We arrive to the conclusion that all conjugative plasmids contain at least one entry exclusion gene. Although entry exclusion genes seem to be part of the plasmid conjugative machinery, they are systematically absent in phylogenetically related type IV protein exporting machines involved in virulence for plants and animals. We infer from this fact that entry exclusion is an essential feature of conjugative plasmid biology. Mathematical models suggest that plasmids expressing entry exclusion selectively eliminate plasmids lacking it, reinforcing its essential character and suggesting that entry exclusion plays a direct role in plasmid survival. Other experimental results confirm that entry exclusion is essential for the stability of a conjugative plasmid. We suggest that entry exclusion limits the damage of lethal zygosis (bacterial death produced by excessive rounds of conjugation). Additionally, it avoids competition in a host among identical plasmid backbones. Conversely, the lack of entry exclusion in conjugative transposons can be understood as a means of generating rapid evolutionary change.

  7. [Isolation of the R'his plasmids of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Rusina, O Iu; Tiganova, I G; Aleshkin, G I; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaia, A G

    1987-06-01

    V. cholerae strain VT5104 capable of donor activity in conjugation has been constructed by the genetic technique based on plasmid RP4::Mucts62 integration into V. cholerae chromosome due to plasmid homology with Mucts62 inserted into the chromosome. The gene for histidine synthesis has been mobilized and transferred into the recipient cells from VT5104 donor. The conjugants obtained are able to efficiently transfer his+ gene included into the plasmid structure in conjugation with eltor recipient. Thus, the constructed strain VT5104 generates R' plasmids carrying V. cholerae chromosomal genes.

  8. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-04-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication.

  9. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-01-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication. Images PMID:3007432

  10. Plasmid genes required for microcin B17 production.

    PubMed Central

    San Millán, J L; Kolter, R; Moreno, F

    1985-01-01

    The production of the antibiotic substance microcin B17 (Mcc) is determined by a 3.5-kilobase DNA fragment from plasmid pMccB17. Several Mcc- mutations on plasmid pMccB17 were obtained by both transposon insertion and nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. Plasmids carrying these mutations were tested for their ability to complement Mcc- insertion or deletion mutations on pMM102 (pMM102 is a pBR322 derivative carrying the region encoding microcin B17). Results from these experiments indicate that at least four plasmid genes are required for microcin production. PMID:2993228

  11. Plasmid DNA hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Miguel, M Graça; Queiroz, João

    2014-03-01

    In the last few years, our research group has focused on the design and development of plasmid DNA (pDNA) based systems as devices to be used therapeutically in the biomedical field. Biocompatible macro and micro plasmid DNA gels were prepared by a cross-linking reaction. For the first time, the pDNA gels have been investigated with respect to their swelling in aqueous solution containing different additives. Furthermore, we clarified the fundamental and basic aspects of the solute release mechanism from pDNA hydrogels and the significance of this information is enormous as a basic tool for the formulation of pDNA carriers for drug/gene delivery applications. The co-delivery of a specific gene and anticancer drugs, combining chemical and gene therapies in the treatment of cancer was the main challenge of our research. Significant progresses have been made with a new p53 encoding pDNA microgel that is suitable for the loading and release of pDNA and doxorubicin. This represents a strong valuable finding in the strategic development of systems to improve cancer cure through the synergetic effect of chemical and gene therapy.

  12. Ionic partitioning and stomatal regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanoubar, Rabab; Orsini, Francesco; Gianquinto, Giorgio Prosdocimi

    2013-01-01

    Vegetable grafting is commonly claimed to improve crop’s tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salinity. Although the use of inter-specific graftings is relatively common, whether the improved salt tolerance should be attributed to the genotypic background rather than the grafting per se is a matter of discussion among scientists. It is clear that most of published research has to date overlooked the issue, with the mutual presence of self-grafted and non-grafted controls resulting to be quite rare within experimental evidences. It was recently demonstrated that the genotype of the rootstock and grafting per se are responsible respectively for the differential ion accumulation and partitioning as well as to the stomatal adaptation to the stress. The present paper contributes to the ongoing discussion with further data on the differences associated to salinity response in a range of grafted melon combinations. PMID:24309549

  13. Assimilate partitioning during reproductive growth

    SciTech Connect

    Finazzo, S.F.; Davenport, T.L.

    1987-04-01

    Leaves having various phyllotactic relationships to fruitlets were labeled for 1 hour with 10/sub r/Ci of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Fruitlets were also labeled. Fruitlets did fix /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. Translocation of radioactivity from the peel into the fruit occurred slowly and to a limited extent. No evidence of translocation out of the fruitlets was observed. Assimilate partitioning in avocado was strongly influenced by phyllotaxy. If a fruit and the labeled leaf had the same phyllotaxy then greater than 95% of the radiolabel was present in this fruit. When the fruit did not have the same phyllotaxy as the labeled leaf, the radiolabel distribution was skewed with 70% of the label going to a single adjacent position. Avocado fruitlets exhibit uniform labeling throughout a particular tissue. In avocado, assimilates preferentially move from leaves to fruits with the same phyllotaxy.

  14. MULTIVARIATE KERNEL PARTITION PROCESS MIXTURES

    PubMed Central

    Dunson, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Mixtures provide a useful approach for relaxing parametric assumptions. Discrete mixture models induce clusters, typically with the same cluster allocation for each parameter in multivariate cases. As a more flexible approach that facilitates sparse nonparametric modeling of multivariate random effects distributions, this article proposes a kernel partition process (KPP) in which the cluster allocation varies for different parameters. The KPP is shown to be the driving measure for a multivariate ordered Chinese restaurant process that induces a highly-flexible dependence structure in local clustering. This structure allows the relative locations of the random effects to inform the clustering process, with spatially-proximal random effects likely to be assigned the same cluster index. An exact block Gibbs sampler is developed for posterior computation, avoiding truncation of the infinite measure. The methods are applied to hormone curve data, and a dependent KPP is proposed for classification from functional predictors. PMID:24478563

  15. HPAM: Hirshfeld partitioned atomic multipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elking, Dennis M.; Perera, Lalith; Pedersen, Lee G.

    2012-02-01

    An implementation of the Hirshfeld (HD) and Hirshfeld-Iterated (HD-I) atomic charge density partitioning schemes is described. Atomic charges and atomic multipoles are calculated from the HD and HD-I atomic charge densities for arbitrary atomic multipole rank l on molecules of arbitrary shape and size. The HD and HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are tested by comparing molecular multipole moments and the electrostatic potential (ESP) surrounding a molecule with their reference ab initio values. In general, the HD-I atomic charges/multipoles are found to better reproduce ab initio electrostatic properties over HD atomic charges/multipoles. A systematic increase in precision for reproducing ab initio electrostatic properties is demonstrated by increasing the atomic multipole rank from l=0 (atomic charges) to l=4 (atomic hexadecapoles). Both HD and HD-I atomic multipoles up to rank l are shown to exactly reproduce ab initio molecular multipole moments of rank L for L⩽l. In addition, molecular dipole moments calculated by HD, HD-I, and ChelpG atomic charges only ( l=0) are compared with reference ab initio values. Significant errors in reproducing ab initio molecular dipole moments are found if only HD or HD-I atomic charges used. Program summaryProgram title: HPAM Catalogue identifier: AEKP_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License v2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 500 809 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 13 424 494 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: Any Operating system: Linux RAM: Typically, a few hundred megabytes Classification: 16.13 External routines: The program requires 'formatted checkpoint' files obtained from the Gaussian 03 or Gaussian 09 quantum chemistry program. Nature of problem: An ab initio

  16. Development of plasmid cloning vectors for Thermus thermophilus HB8: Expression of a heterologous, plasmid-borne kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mather, M.W.; Fee, J.A. )

    1992-01-01

    While several thermus genes have been cloned and T. thermophilus has been shown to be transformable, molecular genetic studies of these thermophiles have been hampered by the absence of selectable cloning vectors. The authors have constructed a selectable plasmid by random insertion of a heterologous gene encoding a thermostable kanamycin nucleotidyltransferase activity into a cryptic, multicopy plasmid from T. thermophilus HB8. This plasmid should serve as a suitable starting point for the development of a gene expression system for T. thermophilus.

  17. Plasmids in different strains of Streptomyces ambofaciens: free and integrated form of plasmid pSAM2.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Simonet, J M; Guérineau, M

    1984-01-01

    Five strains of Streptomyces ambofaciens were examined for their plasmid content. Among these strains, four belong to the same lineage (strains B) and the other was isolated independently (strain A). A large plasmid (ca. 80 kb), called pSAM1 in this paper and already described, was present in all B strains, and absent in strain A. A second plasmid, not described before, was found as covalently closed circular DNA in two of the four B strains. This plasmid with a size of 11.1 kb was called pSAM2. A restriction map for 14 enzymes was established. Hybridization experiments showed that a unique sequence homologous to this plasmid is integrated in a larger replicon, which is not pSAM1 and is probably the chromosome, in all B strains and not in strain A. It seems probable that the integrated sequence is the origin of the free plasmid found in two strains of the B family. It is noteworthy that the integrated form and the free plasmid may be found together. Transformation experiments proved that pSAM2 may be maintained autonomously in S. ambofaciens strain A and in S. lividans. pSAM2 is a self-transmissible plasmid, able to elicit the lethal zygosis reaction. pSAM2 was compared to the plasmids SLP1, pIJ110 and pIJ408, which all come from integrated sequences in three Streptomyces species and are found as autonomous plasmids after transfer to S. lividans. If pSAM2 resembles these plasmids in its origin, it does not appear to be related directly to them. Concerning their plasmid content, the two isolates of S. ambofaciens are very different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. [On the partition of acupuncture academic schools].

    PubMed

    Yang, Pengyan; Luo, Xi; Xia, Youbing

    2016-05-01

    Nowadays extensive attention has been paid on the research of acupuncture academic schools, however, a widely accepted method of partition of acupuncture academic schools is still in need. In this paper, the methods of partition of acupuncture academic schools in the history have been arranged, and three typical methods of"partition of five schools" "partition of eighteen schools" and "two-stage based partition" are summarized. After adeep analysis on the disadvantages and advantages of these three methods, a new method of partition of acupuncture academic schools that is called "three-stage based partition" is proposed. In this method, after the overall acupuncture academic schools are divided into an ancient stage, a modern stage and a contemporary stage, each schoolis divided into its sub-school category. It is believed that this method of partition can remedy the weaknesses ofcurrent methods, but also explore a new model of inheritance and development under a different aspect through thedifferentiation and interaction of acupuncture academic schools at three stages.

  19. Continuous Graph Partitioning for Camera Network Surveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-23

    Symmetric Gossip partitioning algorithm The distributed algorithm presented in this section assumes a symmetric gossip -type communication protocol . In... gossip communication. We prove convergence of all these algorithms, and we analyze their performance in a simulation study. 2 Continuous Partitions of...section assumes an asymmetric broadcast communication protocol . In particular, at each iteration only one camera updates its state by using local

  20. Building Ecology and Partition Design. Technical Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Education, Baltimore.

    This bulletin is intended as a resource for school system facility planners and architects who design schools. Ways in which decision makers can incorporate environmental concerns in the design of school buildings are detailed. Focus is on the design of interior partition systems. Partition systems in schools serve several purposes; they define…

  1. Graph Partitioning Models for Parallel Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, B.; Kolda, T.G.

    1999-03-02

    Calculations can naturally be described as graphs in which vertices represent computation and edges reflect data dependencies. By partitioning the vertices of a graph, the calculation can be divided among processors of a parallel computer. However, the standard methodology for graph partitioning minimizes the wrong metric and lacks expressibility. We survey several recently proposed alternatives and discuss their relative merits.

  2. Molecular characterisation of the Chlamydia pecorum plasmid from porcine, ovine, bovine, and koala strains indicates plasmid-strain co-evolution.

    PubMed

    Jelocnik, Martina; Bachmann, Nathan L; Seth-Smith, Helena; Thomson, Nicholas R; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Highly stable, evolutionarily conserved, small, non-integrative plasmids are commonly found in members of the Chlamydiaceae and, in some species, these plasmids have been strongly linked to virulence. To date, evidence for such a plasmid in Chlamydia pecorum has been ambiguous. In a recent comparative genomic study of porcine, ovine, bovine, and koala C. pecorum isolates, we identified plasmids (pCpec) in a pig and three koala strains, respectively. Screening of further porcine, ovine, bovine, and koala C. pecorum isolates for pCpec showed that pCpec is common, but not ubiquitous in C. pecorum from all of the infected hosts. Methods. We used a combination of (i) bioinformatic mining of previously sequenced C. pecorum genome data sets and (ii) pCpec PCR-amplicon sequencing to characterise a further 17 novel pCpecs in C. pecorum isolates obtained from livestock, including pigs, sheep, and cattle, as well as those from koala. Results and Discussion. This analysis revealed that pCpec is conserved with all eight coding domain sequences (CDSs) present in isolates from each of the hosts studied. Sequence alignments revealed that the 21 pCpecs show 99% nucleotide sequence identity, with 83 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) shown to differentiate all of the plasmids analysed in this study. SNPs were found to be mostly synonymous and were distributed evenly across all eight pCpec CDSs as well as in the intergenic regions. Although conserved, analyses of the 21 pCpec sequences resolved plasmids into 12 distinct genotypes, with five shared between pCpecs from different isolates, and the remaining seven genotypes being unique to a single pCpec. Phylogenetic analysis revealed congruency and co-evolution of pCpecs with their cognate chromosome, further supporting polyphyletic origin of the koala C. pecorum. This study provides further understanding of the complex epidemiology of this pathogen in livestock and koala hosts and paves the way for studies to evaluate

  3. The Complete Nucleotide Sequence of the Carbapenem Resistance-Conferring Conjugative Plasmid pLD209 from a Pseudomonas putida Clinical Strain Reveals a Chimeric Design Formed by Modules Derived from Both Environmental and Clinical Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marchiaro, Patricia M.; Brambilla, Luciano; Morán-Barrio, Jorgelina; Revale, Santiago; Pasteran, Fernando; Vila, Alejandro J.; Viale, Alejandro M.

    2014-01-01

    The complete sequence of the carbapenem-resistance-conferring conjugative plasmid pLD209 from a Pseudomonas putida clinical strain is presented. pLD209 is formed by 3 well-defined regions: an adaptability module encompassing a Tn402-like class 1 integron of clinical origin containing blaVIM-2 and aacA4 gene cassettes, partitioning and transfer modules, and a replication module derived from plasmids of environmental bacteria. pLD209 is thus a mosaic of modules originating in both the clinical and environmental (nonclinical) microbiota. PMID:24395220

  4. Separation of the strain components for use in strainrange partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Two methods are presented for separating the inelastic strain components of a complex hysteresis loop so that strainrange partitioning formulas can be applied to accurately determine cyclic life at elevated temperatures. These methods are required only if lower bounds established by strainrange partitioning concepts have been deemed inadequate in the establishment of expected lifetime. In one method, rapid loading and unloading is applied in the tensile and compressive half to isolate the plastic strain. In the second method, the creep is measured at a discrete number of points along the hysteresis loop by combining load-control tests into the general pattern of strain cycling under arbitrary temperature. Both methods are shown to give good results.

  5. Various pAQU plasmids possibly contribute to disseminate tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) among marine bacterial community.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Lisa; Maruyama, Fumito; Onishi, Yuki; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Satoru; Masuda, Michiaki

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the aquaculture environment is a significant problem for disease control of cultured fish as well as in human public health. Conjugative mobile genetic elements (MGEs) are involved in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) among marine bacteria. In the present study, we first designed a PCR targeting traI gene encoding essential relaxase for conjugation. By this new PCR, we demonstrated that five of 83 strains isolated from a coastal aquaculture site had traI-positive MGEs. While one of the five strains that belonged to Shewanella sp. was shown to have an integrative conjugative element of the SXT/R391 family (ICEVchMex-like), the MGEs of the other four strains of Vibrio spp. were shown to have the backbone structure similar to that of previously described in pAQU1. The backbone structure shared by the pAQU1-like plasmids in the four strains corresponded to a ~100-kbp highly conserved region required for replication, partition and conjugative transfer, suggesting that these plasmids constituted "pAQU group." The pAQU group plasmids were shown to be capable of conjugative transfer of tet(M) and other ARGs from the Vibrio strains to E. coli. The pAQU group plasmid in one of the examined strains was designated as pAQU2, and its complete nucleotide sequence was determined and compared with that of pAQU1. The results revealed that pAQU2 contained fewer ARGs than pAQU1 did, and most of the ARGs in both of these plasmids were located in the similar region where multiple transposases were found, suggesting that the ARGs were introduced by several events of DNA transposition into an ancestral plasmid followed by drug selection in the aquaculture site. The results of the present study indicate that the "pAQU group" plasmids may play an important role in dissemination of ARGs in the marine environment.

  6. Purification of biomaterials by phase partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    A technique which is particularly suited to microgravity environments and which is potentially more powerful than electrophoresis is phase partitioning. Phase partitioning is purification by partitioning between the two immiscible aqueous layers formed by solution of the polymers poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran in water. This technique proved to be very useful for separations in one-g but is limited for cells because the cells are more dense than the phase solutions thus tend to sediment to the bottom of the container before reaching equilibrium with the preferred phase. There are three phases to work in this area: synthesis of new polymers for affinity phase partitioning; development of automated apparatus for ground-based separations; and design of apparatus for performing simple phase partitioning space experiments, including examination of mechanisms for separating phases in the absence of gravity.

  7. Cell partition in two phase polymer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, D. E.

    1979-01-01

    Aqueous phase-separated polymer solutions can be used as support media for the partition of biological macromolecules, organelles and cells. Cell separations using the technique have proven to be extremely sensitive to cell surface properties but application of the systems are limited to cells or aggregates which do not significantly while the phases are settling. Partition in zero g in principle removes this limitation but an external driving force must be applied to induce the phases to separate since their density difference disappears. We have recently shown that an applied electric field can supply the necessary driving force. We are proposing to utilize the NASA FES to study field-driven phase separation and cell partition on the ground and in zero g to help define the separation/partition process, with the ultimate goal being to develop partition as a zero g cell separation technique.

  8. Parallel hypergraph partitioning for scientific computing.

    SciTech Connect

    Heaphy, Robert; Devine, Karen Dragon; Catalyurek, Umit; Bisseling, Robert; Hendrickson, Bruce Alan; Boman, Erik Gunnar

    2005-07-01

    Graph partitioning is often used for load balancing in parallel computing, but it is known that hypergraph partitioning has several advantages. First, hypergraphs more accurately model communication volume, and second, they are more expressive and can better represent nonsymmetric problems. Hypergraph partitioning is particularly suited to parallel sparse matrix-vector multiplication, a common kernel in scientific computing. We present a parallel software package for hypergraph (and sparse matrix) partitioning developed at Sandia National Labs. The algorithm is a variation on multilevel partitioning. Our parallel implementation is novel in that it uses a two-dimensional data distribution among processors. We present empirical results that show our parallel implementation achieves good speedup on several large problems (up to 33 million nonzeros) with up to 64 processors on a Linux cluster.

  9. Efficient multiple-way graph partitioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Dasdan, A.; Aykanat, C.

    1995-12-01

    Graph partitioning deals with evenly dividing a graph into two or more parts such that the total weight of edges interconnecting these parts, i.e., cutsize, is minimized. Graph partitioning has important applications in VLSI layout, mapping, and sparse Gaussian elimination. Since graph partitioning problem is NP-hard, we should resort to polynomial-time algorithms to obtain a good solution, or hopefully a near-optimal solution. Kernighan-Lin (KL) propsoed a 2-way partitioning algorithms. Fiduccia-Mattheyses (FM) introduced a faster version of KL algorithm. Sanchis (FMS) generalized FM algorithm to a multiple-way partitioning algorithm. Simulated Annealing (SA) is one of the most successful approaches that are not KL-based.

  10. Recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning.

    PubMed

    Jauregi, P; Hoeben, M A; van der Lans, R G J M; Kwant, G; van der Wielen, L A M

    2002-05-20

    In this article, a qualitative study of the recovery of small bioparticles by interfacial partitioning in liquid-liquid biphasic systems is presented. A range of crystallised biomolecules with varying polarities have been chosen such as glycine, phenylglycine and ampicillin. Liquid-liquid biphasic systems in a range of polarity differences were selected such as an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), water-butanol and water-hexanol. The results indicate that interfacial partitioning of crystals occurs even when their density exceeds that of the individual liquid phases. Yet, not all crystals partition to the same extent to the interface to form a stable and thick interphase layer. This indicates some degree of selectivity. From the analysis of these results in relation to the physicochemical properties of the crystals and the liquid phases, a hypothetical mechanism for the interfacial partitioning is deduced. Overall these results support the potential of interfacial partitioning as a large scale separation technology.

  11. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the lactose plasmid in Streptococcus lactis ML3 and two recombinant lactose plasmids.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P M; McKay, L L

    1982-05-01

    We investigated the molecular relationship between the 60-megadalton (Mdal) recombinant lactose plasmids in ML 3 x LM2301 lactose-positive (Lac+) transconjugants and the genetic material of Streptococcus lactis ML3. Lactose metabolism is linked to the 33-Mdal plasmid pSK08 in ML3, and the recipient LM2301 is cured of plasmid DNA. The plasmids were analyzed with a series of restriction enzymes. We found that the 60-Mdal plasmids of Lac+ transconjugants contained pSK08 DNA, but were not simply dimers of pSK08. The 60-Mdal plasmids contained a segment of DNA not apparent in pSK08. The restriction patterns of the 60-Mdal plasmid in a Lac+ nonclumping transconjugant and that in a Lac+ clumping transconjugant were different. This suggested that there was a molecular differences between these two recombinant plasmids. We conclude that the segment of DNA in the 60-Mdal plasmids that was not present in pSK08 was the proposed transfer factor responsible for cell aggregation and high-frequency conjugation.

  12. Plasmid pGA1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum codes for a gene product that positively influences plasmid copy number.

    PubMed Central

    Nesvera, J; Pátek, M; Hochmannová, J; Abrhámová, Z; Becvárová, V; Jelínkova, M; Vohradský, J

    1997-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence (4,826 bp) of the cryptic plasmid pGA1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum was determined. DNA sequence analysis revealed four putative coding regions (open reading frame A [ORFA], ORFA2, ORFB, and ORFC). ORFC was identified as a rep gene coding for an initiator of plasmid replication (Rep) according to the high level of homology of its deduced amino acid sequence with the Rep proteins of plasmids pSR1 (from C. glutamicum) and pNG2 (from Corynebacterium diphtheriae). This function was confirmed by deletion mapping of the minimal replicon of pGA1 (1.7 kb) which contains only ORFC. Deletion derivatives of pGA1 devoid of ORFA exhibited significant decreases in the copy number in C. glutamicum cells and displayed segregational instability. Introduction of ORFA in trans into the cells harboring these deletion plasmids dramatically increased their copy number and segregational stability. The ORFA gene product thus positively influences plasmid copy number. This is the first report on such activity associated with a nonintegrating bacterial plasmid. The related plasmids pGA1, pSR1, and pNG2 lacking significant homology with any other plasmid seem to be representatives of a new group of plasmids replicating in the rolling-circle mode. PMID:9045809

  13. A mesh partitioning algorithm for preserving spatial locality in arbitrary geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Nivarti, Girish V. Salehi, M. Mahdi; Bushe, W. Kendal

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: •An algorithm for partitioning computational meshes is proposed. •The Morton order space-filling curve is modified to achieve improved locality. •A spatial locality metric is defined to compare results with existing approaches. •Results indicate improved performance of the algorithm in complex geometries. -- Abstract: A space-filling curve (SFC) is a proximity preserving linear mapping of any multi-dimensional space and is widely used as a clustering tool. Equi-sized partitioning of an SFC ignores the loss in clustering quality that occurs due to inaccuracies in the mapping. Often, this results in poor locality within partitions, especially for the conceptually simple, Morton order curves. We present a heuristic that improves partition locality in arbitrary geometries by slicing a Morton order curve at points where spatial locality is sacrificed. In addition, we develop algorithms that evenly distribute points to the extent possible while maintaining spatial locality. A metric is defined to estimate relative inter-partition contact as an indicator of communication in parallel computing architectures. Domain partitioning tests have been conducted on geometries relevant to turbulent reactive flow simulations. The results obtained highlight the performance of our method as an unsupervised and computationally inexpensive domain partitioning tool.

  14. Characterization of a Novel Plasmid, pMAH135, from Mycobacterium avium Subsp. hominissuis

    PubMed Central

    Uchiya, Kei-ichi; Takahashi, Hiroyasu; Nakagawa, Taku; Yagi, Tetsuya; Moriyama, Makoto; Inagaki, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Kazuya; Nikai, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causes mainly two types of disease. The first is disseminated disease in immunocompromised hosts, such as individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The second is pulmonary disease in individuals without systemic immunosuppression, and the incidence of this type is increasing worldwide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis, a component of MAC, causes infection in pigs as well as in humans. Many aspects of the different modes of M. avium infection and its host specificity remain unclear. Here, we report the characteristics and complete sequence of a novel plasmid, designated pMAH135, derived from M. avium strain TH135 in an HIV-negative patient with pulmonary MAC disease. The pMAH135 plasmid consists of 194,711 nucleotides with an average G + C content of 66.5% and encodes 164 coding sequences (CDSs). This plasmid was unique in terms of its homology to other mycobacterial plasmids. Interestingly, it contains CDSs with sequence homology to mycobactin biosynthesis proteins and type VII secretion system-related proteins, which are involved in the pathogenicity of mycobacteria. It also contains putative conserved domains of the multidrug efflux transporter. Screening of isolates from humans and pigs for genes located on pMAH135 revealed that the detection rate of these genes was higher in clinical isolates from pulmonary MAC disease patients than in those from HIV-positive patients, whereas the genes were almost entirely absent in isolates from pigs. Moreover, variable number tandem repeats typing analysis showed that isolates carrying pMAH135 genes are grouped in a specific cluster. Collectively, the pMAH135 plasmid contains genes associated with M. avium’s pathogenicity and resistance to antimicrobial agents. The results of this study suggest that pMAH135 influence not only the pathological manifestations of MAC disease, but also the host specificity of MAC infection. PMID:25671431

  15. The First Report of a Fully Sequenced Resistance Plasmid from Shigella boydii

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Liu, Lei; Liu, Dong; Yin, Zhe; Feng, Jiao; Zhang, Defu; Fang, Haihong; Qiu, Yefeng; Chen, Weijun; Yang, Ruisheng; Wang, Jinglin; Fa, Yunzhi; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize mechanisms of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance in Shigella boydii. S. boydii strain 2246 with resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone and azithromycin was isolated from a human case of watery diarrhea in a Chinese public hospital. Resistance in strain 2246 to ceftriaxone and azithromycin was attributable to the presence of blaCTX-M-14, and erm(B) and mph(A), respectively, which were co-located on a multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmid p2246-CTXM. p2246-CTXM represented a novel IncFII-type MDR plasmid with a very complex chimera structure. Its master backbone was genetically closely related to the R100 plasmid, but p2246-CTXM had evolved to integrate additional R100-unrelated backbone regions as well as massive exogenous mobile elements that carried multiple resistance determinants. In p2246-CTXM, erm(B) together with its leading peptide gene erm(C), mph(A) together with its regulatory genes mrx and mphR(A), and blaCTX-M-14 were captured by three different mobile elements Tn6295, the IS26-mph(A)-mrx-mphR(A)-IS6100 unit, and a truncated ISEcp1-blaCTX-M-14-IS903D-iroN transposition unit, respectively, all of which were harbored in a large Tn3-family transposon Tn6285. p2246-CTXM still carried additional resistance determinants mer (mercury resistance), aacA4 (aminoglycoside resistance), cmlA1 (chloramphenicol resistance), and qacED1 (quaternary ammonium compound resistance). This is the first report of identifying a clinical S. boydii strain simultaneously resistant to ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, and azithromycin, and determining the complete sequence of a resistance plasmid from S. boydii. PMID:27766094

  16. Video partitioning by segmenting moving object trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badal, Tapas; Nain, Neeta; Ahmed, Mushtaq

    2015-02-01

    Video partitioning may be involve in a number of applications and present solutions for monitoring and tracking particular person trajectory and also helps in to generate semantic analysis of single entity or of entire video. Many recent advances in object detection and tracking concern about motion structure and data association used to be assigned a label to trajectories and analyze them independently. In this work we propose an approach for video portioning and a structure is given to store motion structure of target set to monitor in video. Spatio-temporal tubes separate individual objects that help to generate semantic analysis report for each object individually. The semantic analysis system for video based on this framework provides not only efficient synopsis generation but also spatial collision where the temporal consistency can be resolved for representation of semantic knowledge of each object. For keeping low computational complexity trajectories are generated online and classification, knowledge representation and arrangement over spatial domain are suggested to perform in offline manner.

  17. An oligonucleotide microarray to characterize multidrug resistant plasmids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteria plasmids are fragments of extra-chromosomal double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that can contain a variety of genes beneficial to the host organism like antibiotic drug resistance. Many of the Enterobacteriaceae carry multiple drug resistance (MDR) genes on large plasmids of replic...

  18. Plasmid-Mediated Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococci and Other Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Shen, Jianzhong; Wendlandt, Sarah; Fessler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Wu, Cong-Ming

    2014-12-01

    In staphylococci and other Firmicutes, resistance to numerous classes of antimicrobial agents, which are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, is mediated by genes that are associated with mobile genetic elements. The gene products of some of these antimicrobial resistance genes confer resistance to only specific members of a certain class of antimicrobial agents, whereas others confer resistance to the entire class or even to members of different classes of antimicrobial agents. The resistance mechanisms specified by the resistance genes fall into any of three major categories: active efflux, enzymatic inactivation, and modification/replacement/protection of the target sites of the antimicrobial agents. Among the mobile genetic elements that carry such resistance genes, plasmids play an important role as carriers of primarily plasmid-borne resistance genes, but also as vectors for nonconjugative and conjugative transposons that harbor resistance genes. Plasmids can be exchanged by horizontal gene transfer between members of the same species but also between bacteria belonging to different species and genera. Plasmids are highly flexible elements, and various mechanisms exist by which plasmids can recombine, form cointegrates, or become integrated in part or in toto into the chromosomal DNA or into other plasmids. As such, plasmids play a key role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes within the gene pool to which staphylococci and other Firmicutes have access. This chapter is intended to provide an overview of the current knowledge of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance in staphylococci and other Firmicutes.

  19. Plasmid-encoded copper resistance and precipitation by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Erardi, F X; Failla, M L; Falkinham, J O

    1987-01-01

    A copper-tolerant Mycobacterium scrofulaceum strain was able to remove copper from culture medium by sulfate-dependent precipitation as copper sulfide. Such precipitation of copper sulfide was not observed in a derivative that lacks a 173-kilobase plasmid. In addition, the plasmid-carrying strain has a sulfate-independent copper resistance mechanism. PMID:3662522

  20. Disentangling event-scale hydrologic flow partitioning in mountains of the Korean Peninsula under extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shope, Christopher L.

    2016-07-01

    Mountainous headwaters include a variety of spatial landscape units; however, the flow contribution from different hydrologic components is complex and often unclear. In addition to complex landscape controls, temporal meteorological drivers play an important role in the distribution between surface runoff and subsurface storage changes. This spatiotemporal variability in partitioning can influence catchment-wide flow accumulation and nutrient and sediment loading. We use a multi-year, multi-method analysis of stable isotopes, geochemical indicators, and discharge distributed throughout the Haean catchment in South Korea to identify temporal variability in hydrologic flow partitioning from surface runoff, springs, shallow interflow, and groundwater under monsoonal conditions. By combining a weighted, multi-method discharge approach, high frequency, synoptic, catchment-wide isotopic and geochemical sampling, and baseflow analysis, we characterize watershed-scale spatiotemporal hydrologic flow partitioning. Meteorological drivers are spatially variable throughout the catchment and temporally between individual events. Baseflow contributions in the high elevation, forested areas are up to 50%, while the majority of the catchment is approximately 20%. Our study builds on previously reported seasonality of isotopic signatures by quantifying trends in distributed event-based partitioning of isotopic tracers. We demonstrate that high frequency flow partitioning can accurately be determined in mountainous topography with high precipitation and that there is a need for multiple method characterizations. Our results further show the benefit of spatially distributed synoptic sampling for process understanding of hydrologic partitioning throughout the watersheds.

  1. The Master Activator of IncA/C Conjugative Plasmids Stimulates Genomic Islands and Multidrug Resistance Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands. PMID:25340549

  2. The master activator of IncA/C conjugative plasmids stimulates genomic islands and multidrug resistance dissemination.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Nicolas; Matteau, Dominick; Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands.

  3. Manipulating yeast genome using plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Stearns, T; Ma, H; Botstein, D

    1990-01-01

    The vectors and techniques described here enable one to manipulate the yeast genome to meet specific needs. Genes can be cloned, and the clone used to delete the wild-type gene from the chromosome, or replace it with mutant versions. Mutants derived by classical methods, such as mutagenesis of whole cells, or by reversion of a phenotype, can be cloned and analyzed in vitro. Yeast genes and foreign genes can either be inserted into autonomously replicating plasmid vectors that are reasonably stable or integrated into a yeast chromosome where they are maintained at one copy per genome. The combination of these techniques with the characterized promoter systems available in yeast make it possible to express almost any gene in yeast. Once this is achieved, the entire repertoire of yeast genetics is available to probe the function of the gene, or to engineer the expression in useful ways.

  4. Dynamics of a 2D Piecewise Linear Braess Paradox Model: Effect of the Third Partition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrutin, Viktor; Dibak, Christoph; Dal Forno, Arianna; Merlone, Ugo

    In this work, we investigate the dynamics of a piecewise linear 2D discontinuous map modeling a simple network showing the Braess paradox. This paradox represents an example in which adding a new route to a specific congested transportation network makes all the travelers worse off in terms of their individual travel time. In the particular case in which the modeled network corresponds to a binary choice situation, the map is defined on two partitions and its dynamics has already been described. In the general case corresponding to a ternary choice, a third partition appears leading to significantly more complex bifurcation structures formed by border collision bifurcations of stable cycles with points located in all three partitions. Considering a map taking a constant value on one of the partitions, we provide a first systematic description of possible dynamics for this case.

  5. Domain Decomposition By the Advancing-Partition Method for Parallel Unstructured Grid Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirzadeh, Shahyar Z.; Zagaris, George

    2009-01-01

    A new method of domain decomposition has been developed for generating unstructured grids in subdomains either sequentially or using multiple computers in parallel. Domain decomposition is a crucial and challenging step for parallel grid generation. Prior methods are generally based on auxiliary, complex, and computationally intensive operations for defining partition interfaces and usually produce grids of lower quality than those generated in single domains. The new technique, referred to as "Advancing Partition," is based on the Advancing-Front method, which partitions a domain as part of the volume mesh generation in a consistent and "natural" way. The benefits of this approach are: 1) the process of domain decomposition is highly automated, 2) partitioning of domain does not compromise the quality of the generated grids, and 3) the computational overhead for domain decomposition is minimal. The new method has been implemented in NASA's unstructured grid generation code VGRID.

  6. Plasmid addiction systems: perspectives and applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jens; Klinter, Stefan; Schneider, Cornelia; Voss, Isabella; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Biotechnical production processes often operate with plasmid-based expression systems in well-established prokaryotic and eukaryotic hosts such as Escherichia coli or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively. Genetically engineered organisms produce important chemicals, biopolymers, biofuels and high-value proteins like insulin. In those bioprocesses plasmids in recombinant hosts have an essential impact on productivity. Plasmid-free cells lead to losses in the entire product recovery and decrease the profitability of the whole process. Use of antibiotics in industrial fermentations is not an applicable option to maintain plasmid stability. Especially in pharmaceutical or GMP-based fermentation processes, deployed antibiotics must be inactivated and removed. Several plasmid addiction systems (PAS) were described in the literature. However, not every system has reached a full applicable state. This review compares most known addiction systems and is focusing on biotechnical applications.

  7. Intradermal naked plasmid DNA immunization: mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Mazal; Furmanov, Karina; Hovav, Avi-Hai

    2011-08-01

    Plasmid DNA is a promising vaccine modality that is regularly examined in prime-boost immunization regimens. Recent advances in skin immunity increased our understanding of the sophisticated cutaneous immune network, which revived scientific interest in delivering vaccines to the skin. Intradermal administration of plasmid DNA via needle injection is a simple and inexpensive procedure that exposes the plasmid and its encoded antigen to the dermal immune surveillance system. This triggers unique mechanisms for eliciting local and systemic immunity that can confer protection against pathogens and tumors. Understanding the mechanisms of intradermal plasmid DNA immunization is essential for enhancing and modulating its immunogenicity. With regard to vaccination, this is of greater importance as this routine injection technique is highly desirable for worldwide immunization. This article will focus on the current understanding of the mechanisms involved in antigen expression and presentation during primary and secondary syringe and needle intradermal plasmid DNA immunization.

  8. Marker-free plasmids for biotechnological applications - implications and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Mairhofer, Juergen

    2013-09-01

    Nonviral gene therapy and DNA vaccines have become the first promising approaches to treat, cure, or ultimately prevent disease by providing genetic information encoded on a plasmid. Since 1989, more than 1800 clinical trials have been approved worldwide, and approximately 20% of them are using plasmid DNA (pDNA) as a vector system. Although much safer than viral approaches, DNA vectors generally do encode antibiotic resistance genes in the plasmid backbone. These antibiotic resistance markers constitute a possible safety risk, and they are associated with structural plasmid instabilities and decreased gene delivery efficiency. These drawbacks have initiated the development of various antibiotic marker-free selection approaches. We provide an overview on the potential implications of marker-free plasmids and perspectives for their successful biotechnological use in the future.

  9. Characterization of chimeric plasmid cloning vehicles in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Gryczan, T; Shivakumar, A G; Dubnau, D

    1980-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease cleavage maps of seven chimeric plasmids that may be used for molecular cloning in Bacillus subtilis are presented. These plasmids all carry multiple antibiotic resistance markers and were constructed by in vitro molecular cloning techniques. Several of the antibiotic resistance markers were shown to undergo insertional inactivation at specific restriction endonuclease sites. Kanamycin inactivation occurred at the BglII site of pUB110 derivatives, erythromycin inactivation occurred at the HpaI and BclI sites of pE194 derivatives, and streptomycin inactivation occurred at the HindIII site of pSA0501 derivatives. A stable mini-derivative of pBD12 was isolated and characterized. By using these plasmids, we identified proteins involved in plasmid-coded kanamycin and erythromycin resistance. The properties and uses of these chimeric plasmids in the further development of recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology in B. subtilis are discussed.

  10. Partition and generating function zeros in adsorbing self-avoiding walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janse van Rensburg, E. J.

    2017-03-01

    The Lee–Yang theory of adsorbing self-avoiding walks is presented. It is shown that Lee–Yang zeros of the generating function of this model asymptotically accumulate uniformly on a circle in the complex plane, and that Fisher zeros of the partition function distribute in the complex plane such that a positive fraction are located in annular regions centred at the origin. These results are examined in a numerical study of adsorbing self-avoiding walks in the square and cubic lattices. The numerical data are consistent with the rigorous results; for example, Lee–Yang zeros are found to accumulate on a circle in the complex plane and a positive fraction of partition function zeros appear to accumulate on a critical circle. The radial and angular distributions of partition function zeros are also examined and it is found to be consistent with the rigorous results.

  11. Antibiotic resistance of vibrio cholerae: special considerations of R-plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, S

    1978-09-01

    Studies on the transmission of R plasmid by conjugation between enterobacteria and vibrio or related bacteria were reviewed. The majority of the reports confirmed successful transmission from enterobacteria to Vibrio cholerae and related species, although the transmission frequencies were extremely low and the transmitted R plasmid was very unstable except for thermosensitive kanamycin plasmid and usual R plasmid coexisting with P plasmid. Strains of V. cholerae and Aeromonas liquefaciens as well as A. salmonicida bearing R plasmid were detected in nature. R plasmid was relatively unstable in V. cholerae strains with which transmission of R plasmid to enterobacteria was confirmed. At present, only 3 R plasmids have been obtained from naturally occurring strains of V. cholerae. Although the 2 European plasmids belong to the C incompatibility group with 98 megadalton closed covalent circular DNA molecule, one plasmid belongs to the J group with more than 25 megadalton molecular weight, and no CCC of satelite DNA was detected in bacteria harboring this plasmid.

  12. Introducing Meta-Partition, a Useful Methodology to Explore Factors That Influence Ecological Effect Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Vallejo, Javier; Mencía, Abraham; Galindo-Villardón, Maria Purificación; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín

    2016-01-01

    The study of the heterogeneity of effect sizes is a key aspect of ecological meta-analyses. Here we propose a meta-analytic methodology to study the influence of moderators in effect sizes by splitting heterogeneity: meta-partition. To introduce this methodology, we performed a meta-partition of published data about the traits that influence species sensitivity to habitat loss, that have been previously analyzed through meta-regression. Thus, here we aim to introduce meta-partition and to make an initial comparison with meta-regression. Meta-partition algorithm consists of three steps. Step 1 is to study the heterogeneity of effect sizes under the assumption of fixed effect model. If heterogeneity is found, we perform step 2, that is, to partition the heterogeneity by the moderator that minimizes heterogeneity within a subset while maximizing heterogeneity between subsets. Then, if effect sizes of the subset are still heterogeneous, we repeat step 1 and 2 until we reach final subsets. Finally, step 3 is to integrate effect sizes of final subsets, with fixed effect model if there is homogeneity, and with random effects model if there is heterogeneity. Results show that meta-partition is valuable to assess the importance of moderators in explaining heterogeneity of effect sizes, as well as to assess the directions of these relations and to detect possible interactions between moderators. With meta-partition we have been able to evaluate the importance of moderators in a more objective way than with meta-regression, and to visualize the complex relations that may exist between them. As ecological issues are often influenced by several factors interacting in complex ways, ranking the importance of possible moderators and detecting possible interactions would make meta-partition a useful exploration tool for ecological meta-analyses. PMID:27409084

  13. Partitioned Bayesian analyses, partition choice, and the phylogenetic relationships of scincid lizards.

    PubMed

    Brandley, Matthew C; Schmitz, Andreas; Reeder, Tod W

    2005-06-01

    Partitioned Bayesian analyses of approximately 2.2 kb of nucleotide sequence data (mtDNA) were used to elucidate phylogenetic relationships among 30 scincid lizard genera. Few partitioned Bayesian analyses exist in the literature, resulting in a lack of methods to determine the appropriate number of and identity of partitions. Thus, a criterion, based on the Bayes factor, for selecting among competing partitioning strategies is proposed and tested. Improvements in both mean -lnL and estimated posterior probabilities were observed when specific models and parameter estimates were assumed for partitions of the total data set. This result is expected given that the 95% credible intervals of model parameter estimates for numerous partitions do not overlap and it reveals that different data partitions may evolve quite differently. We further demonstrate that how one partitions the data (by gene, codon position, etc.) is shown to be a greater concern than simply the overall number of partitions. Using the criterion of the 2 ln Bayes factor > 10, the phylogenetic analysis employing the largest number of partitions was decisively better than all other strategies. Strategies that partitioned the ND1 gene by codon position performed better than other partition strategies, regardless of the overall number of partitions. Scincidae, Acontinae, Lygosominae, east Asian and North American "Eumeces" + Neoseps; North African Eumeces, Scincus, and Scincopus, and a large group primarily from sub-Saharan Africa, Madagascar, and neighboring islands are monophyletic. Feylinia, a limbless group of previously uncertain relationships, is nested within a "scincine" clade from sub-Saharan Africa. We reject the hypothesis that the nearly limbless dibamids are derived from within the Scincidae, but cannot reject the hypothesis that they represent the sister taxon to skinks. Amphiglossus, Chalcides, the acontines Acontias and Typhlosaurus, and Scincinae are paraphyletic. The globally widespread

  14. REE Partitioning in Lunar Minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, J. F.; Lapen, T. J.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are an extremely useful tool in modeling lunar magmatic processes. Here we present the first experimentally derived plagioclase/melt partition coefficients in lunar compositions covering the entire suite of REE. Positive europium anomalies are ubiquitous in the plagioclase-rich rocks of the lunar highlands, and complementary negative Eu anomalies are found in most lunar basalts. These features are taken as evidence of a large-scale differentiation event, with crystallization of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) resulting in a plagioclase flotation crust and a mafic lunar interior from which mare basalts were subsequently derived. However, the extent of the Eu anomaly in lunar rocks is variable. Fagan and Neal [1] reported highly anorthitic plagioclase grains in lunar impact melt rock 60635,19 that displayed negative Eu anomalies as well as the more usual positive anomalies. Indeed some grains in the sample are reported to display both positive and negative anomalies. Judging from cathodoluminescence images, these anomalies do not appear to be associated with crystal overgrowths or zones.

  15. Spectral partitioning in diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

    1999-06-14

    The scattering mechanism of diffraction tomography is described by the integral form of the Helmholtz equation. The goal of diffraction tomography is to invert this equation in order to reconstruct the object function from the measured scattered fields. During the forward propagation process, the spatial spectrum of the object under investigation is ''smeared,'' by a convolution in the spectral domain, across the propagating and evanescent regions of the received field. Hence, care must be taken in performing the reconstruction, as the object's spectral information has been moved into regions where it may be considered to be noise rather than useful information. This will reduce the quality and resolution of the reconstruction. We show haw the object's spectrum can be partitioned into resolvable and non-resolvable parts based upon the cutoff between the propagating and evanescent fields. Operating under the Born approximation, we develop a beam-forming on transmit approach to direct the energy into either the propagating or evanescent parts of the spectrum. In this manner, we may individually interrogate the propagating and evanescent regions of the object spectrum.

  16. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  17. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung Fung

    1988-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  18. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Fung F.

    1990-01-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  19. Partitioning of regular computation on multiprocessor systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F. . Computer Systems Lab.)

    1990-07-01

    Problem partitioning of regular computation over two-dimensional meshes on multiprocessor systems is examined. The regular computation model considered involves repetitive evaluation of values at each mesh point with local communication. The computational workload and the communication pattern are the same at each mesh point. The regular computation model arises in numerical solutions of partial differential equations and simulations of cellular automata. Given a communication pattern, a systematic way to generate a family of partitions is presented. The influence of various partitioning schemes on performance is compared on the basis of computation to communication ratio.

  20. The worldwide distribution of genetically and phylogenetically diverse Bacillus cereus isolates harbouring Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Paulina Sylwia; Yernazarova, Aliya; Drewnowska, Justyna Malgorzata; Zambrowski, Grzegorz; Swiecicka, Izabela

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus cereus is a close relative of B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax whose pathogenic determinants are located on pXO1 and pXO2 plasmids. Bacillus anthracis-like plasmids have been also noted among B. cereus, however, genetic features of B. cereus harbouring these elements remain largely undescribed, especially from the global perspective. Herein, we present the genetic polymorphism, population structure and phylogeny of B. cereus with pXO1-/pXO2-like plasmids originating from Argentina, Kazakhstan, Kenya and Poland. The plasmids were found in about 17% of the isolates, but their frequencies and expression of replicons differed within and between populations. In the multi-locus sequence typing, the bacteria exhibited high genetic polymorphism reflected by 116 sequencing types, including 84 singletons and 10 clonal complexes, which mainly consisted of isolates of the same origin. The phylogenetic analysis of pXO1-/pXO2-like positive B. cereus isolates revealed six independent clades; in certain clades individual populations predominated. Generally, B. cereus with pXO1-/pXO2-like plasmids did not indicate the genetic relationship with B. anthracis, and cannot be classified into an evolutionary independent anthrax line within the B. cereus group. Our report is of a crucial importance for discovering the genetic specificity and evolution of B. cereus bacilli.

  1. Conjugative transfer of an IncA/C plasmid-borne blaCMY-2 gene through genetic re-arrangements with an IncX1 plasmid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    transfer of the YU39 blaCMY-2 gene harbored on a non- conjugative pA/C requires the machinery of a highly conjugative pX1 plasmid. Our experiments demonstrate the complex interactions a single strain can exploit to contend with the challenge of horizontal transfer and antibiotic selective pressure. PMID:24262067

  2. [Effect of He-Ne-laser irradiation on plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli bacteria].

    PubMed

    Tiflova, O A; Leonov, P G; Karbysheva, E A; Shakhnabatian, L G

    1997-01-01

    The influence of the of radiation a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm, 30 W/m2, 5-20 J/m2) on the transformation of Escherichia coli cells with plasmid DNA was studied. The irradiation of a mixture of bacterial cells and plasmid DNA increased the transformation efficiency 2.5-3 times, thus offering an alternative to the heat treatment commonly used. In contrast to the standard techniques, the laser-induced increase in the transformation efficiency was accompanied by a 1.7- to 2-fold increase in cell survival. The effect of the 632.8-nm light, know to be absorbed by membrane porphyrin components, is supposed to be mediated via a modification in the replication and transformation DNA-membrane complexes in E. coli cells.

  3. Equilibrium absorptive partitioning theory between multiple aerosol particle modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, Matthew; Connolly, Paul; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    An existing equilibrium absorptive partitioning model for calculating the equilibrium gas and particle concentrations of multiple semi-volatile organics within a bulk aerosol is extended to allow for multiple involatile aerosol modes of different sizes and chemical compositions. In the bulk aerosol problem, the partitioning coefficient determines the fraction of the total concentration of semi-volatile material that is in the condensed phase of the aerosol. This work modifies this definition for multiple polydisperse aerosol modes to account for multiple condensed concentrations, one for each semi-volatile on each involatile aerosol mode. The pivotal assumption in this work is that each aerosol mode contains an involatile constituent, thus overcoming the potential problem of smaller particles evaporating completely and then condensing on the larger particles to create a monodisperse aerosol at equilibrium. A parameterisation is proposed in which the coupled non-linear system of equations is approximated by a simpler set of equations obtained by setting the organic mole fraction in the partitioning coefficient to be the same across all modes. By perturbing the condensed masses about this approximate solution a correction term is derived that accounts for many of the removed complexities. This method offers a greatly increased efficiency in calculating the solution without significant loss in accuracy, thus making it suitable for inclusion in large-scale models.

  4. Parameters controlling interbacterial plasmid spreading in a gnotoxenic chicken gut system: influence of plasmid and bacterial mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Sansonetti, P; Lafont, J P; Jaffé-Brachet, A; Guillot, J F; Chaslus-Dancla, E

    1980-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of R plasmids R64 and R64drd-11 has been compared in vitro and in vivo without selective pressure by antibiotics in a simplified experimental system; the ecosystem was the bowel of germfree chickens, with the host bacteria almost isogenic, and the plasmids differing only in their conjugative transfer frequency. The spread of repressed and derepressed (drd) R plasmids in recipient bacterial populations was very extensive. The repressed phenotype had only a transient effect during the first 4 h. The level of implantation of the donor bacterial population seems to be of minor importance. Only with a poor recipient (con strain) could the spread of R plasmids be reduced and a steady state with a predominantly sensitive bacterial population be established. It is suggested that this steady state results from an equilibrium between the frequencies of R plasmid transfer and loss. PMID:6999980

  5. PCR-based typing of IncC plasmids.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    IncC (A/C2) plasmids are known to play an important role in the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance determinants, including extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenamases, amongst Gram negative bacterial populations. The ability to identify and track these plasmids is valuable in epidemiological and clinical studies. A recent comparative analysis of the backbones of sequenced IncC plasmids identified two distinct lineages, type 1 and type 2, with different evolutionary histories. Here, a simple PCR method to rapidly assign plasmids to one of these lineages by detecting variable regions in the backbone was developed. This PCR scheme uses two primer pairs to assign the plasmid to a lineage, and an additional two PCRs can be used to detect the i1 and i2 insertions, which are only found in type 2. PCRs were also developed to detect the presence or absence of the sul2-containing ARI-B island, which is found in some plasmids belonging to both type 1 and type 2, and the ARI-A island found in most type 1 plasmids. The PCR strategy was validated using sequenced type 1 plasmids pRMH760 and pDGO100, and the type 2 plasmid pSRC119-A/C, and a collection of non-IncC plasmids in Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Klebsiella pneumoniae backgrounds. An IncC plasmid detected in an antibiotic susceptible commensal E. coli isolate was examined and found to be a type 1, lacking any antibiotic resistance islands and missing a large backbone segment. Examination of pIP40a, an IncC plasmid isolated in Paris in 1969, by PCR revealed that it belongs to type 1 but lacks ARI-A. However, it includes both ends of the integrative element GIsul2, whereas only remnants of one end of this element are found in more recently isolated IncC plasmids. The sequence of pIP40a was determined and confirmed the assignment to type 1 and revealed the presence of a complete copy of GIsul2.

  6. Antibiotic-free segregational plasmid stabilization in Escherichia coli owing to the knockout of triosephosphate isomerase (tpiA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Segregational stability of plasmids is of major concern for recombinant bacterial production strains. One of the best strategies to counteract plasmid loss is the use of auxotrophic mutants which are complemented with the lacking gene along with the product-relevant ones. However, these knockout mutants often show unwanted growth in complex standard media or no growth at all under uncomplemented conditions. This led to the choice of a gene for knockout that only connects two essential arms of an essential metabolic pathway – the glycolysis. Results Triosephosphate isomerase was chosen because its knockout will have a tremendous effect on growth on glucose as well as on glycerol. On glycerol the effect is almost absolute whereas on glucose growth is still possible, but with considerably lower rate than usual. This feature is essential because it may render cloning easier. This enzymatic activity was successfully tested as an alternative to antibiotic-based plasmid selection. Expression of a model recombinant β-glucanase in continuous cultivation was possible with stable maintenance of the plasmid. In addition, the complementation of tpiA knockout strains by the corresponding plasmids and their growth characteristics were tested on a series of complex and synthetic media. The accumulation of methylglyoxal during the growth of tpiA-deficient strains was shown to be a possible cause for the growth disadvantage of these strains in comparison to the parent strain for the Keio Collection strain or the complemented knock-out strain. Conclusion Through the use of this new auxotrophic complementation system, antibiotic-free cloning and selection of recombinant plasmid were possible. Continuous cultivation and recombinant protein expression with high segregational stability over an extended time period was also demonstrated. PMID:24745552

  7. DNA-membrane association is necessary for initiation of chromosomal and plasmid replication in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Winston, S; Sueoka, N

    1980-05-01

    We examined the effect of the inhibition of initiation of DNA replication on the membrane association of the chromosomal origin of replication of Bacillus subtilis and the Staphylococcus aureus-Bacillus pumilus chimeric plasmid pSL103, using temperature-sensitive mutants of B. subtilis that have specifically affected initiation. Inhibition of initiation of the chromosome and pSL103 in the initiation mutant dna-1 results in a decrease in the membrane association of both a marker near the chromosomal origin, purA16, and the plasmid pSL103. The membrane association of both purA16 and pSL103 can be recovered by allowing initiation to resume at the permissive temperature. In another initiation mutant, dnaB19, only the initiation and membrane association of the host chromosome are affected at the nonpermissive temperature, whereas both initiation and membrane association are not affected in the plasmid pSL103. In experiments in vitro, DNA containing the purA16 marker and pSL103 DNA molecules are both selectively released during incubation of purified DNA-membrane complexes prepared from dna-1 cells at the nonpermissive temperature. On the other hand, only purA16 DNA is released in vitro from the DNA-membrane complex prepared from dnaB19 cells. This consistent coupling between initiation and membrane association indicates that DNA-membrane association is critical for the initiation of the B. subtilis chromosome and the plasmid pSL103.

  8. Selectivity of CO2 via pore space partition in zeolitic boron imidazolate frameworks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Xia; Liu, Min; Xu, Guilan; Liu, Liyang; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-28

    Reported here is a versatile method capable of generating pore space partition in zeolitic boron imidazolate frameworks (BIFs), which is based on the coexistence of presynthesized boron imidazolate complexes and charge balancing carboxylate ligands. Using this method, boron imidazolate complexes are used to form zeolitic nets, while the carboxylate serves to partition large channel spaces into multiple domains. The generality of this method is shown by two distinct boron imidazolate frameworks mimicking GIS (BIF-41) and ABW (BIF-42) zeotype topologies. BIF-41 shows high selectivity sorption of CO2 over N2.

  9. Merging Groups to Maximize Object Partition Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klastorin, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of objectively comparing two independently determined partitions of N objects or variables is discussed. A similarity measure based on the simple matching coefficient is defined and related to previously suggested measures. (Author/JKS)

  10. Cell Partition in Two Polymer Aqueous Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Partition of biological cells in two phase aqueous polymer systems is recognized as a powerful separation technique which is limited by gravity. The synthesis of new, selective polymer ligand conjugates to be used in affinity partition separations is of interest. The two most commonly used polymers in two phase partitioning are dextran and polyethylene glycol. A thorough review of the chemistry of these polymers was begun, particularly in the area of protein attachment. Preliminary studies indicate the importance in affinity partitioning of minimizing gravity induced randomizing forces in the phase separation process. The PEG-protein conjugates that were prepared appear to be ideally suited for achieving high quality purifications in a microgravity environment. An interesting spin-off of this synthetic work was the observation of catalytic activity for certain of our polymer derivatives.

  11. Synthesis on evaporation partitioning using stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenders-Gerrits, Miriam; Bogaard, Thom; Wenninger, Jochen; Jonson Sutanto, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Partitioning of evaporation into productive (transpiration) and non-productive evaporation (interception, soil evaporation) is of highest importance for water management practices, irrigation scheme design, and climate modeling. Despite this urge, the magnitude of the ratio of transpiration over total evaporation is still under debate and poorly understood due to measuring difficulties. However, with the current development in isotope measuring devices, new opportunities arise to untangle the partitioning of evaporation. In this paper we synthesize the opportunities and limitations using stable water isotopes in evaporation partitioning. We will analyze a set of field as well as laboratory studies to demonstrate the different evaporation components for various climate and vegetation conditions using stable isotopes 18O/16O and 2H/1H. Experimental data on evaporation partitioning of crops, grass, shrubs and trees are presented and we will discuss the specific experimental set-ups and data collection methods. The paper will be a synthesis of these studies.

  12. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  13. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maxwell, Reed M.; Condon, Laura E.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  14. Connections between groundwater flow and transpiration partitioning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Reed M; Condon, Laura E

    2016-07-22

    Understanding freshwater fluxes at continental scales will help us better predict hydrologic response and manage our terrestrial water resources. The partitioning of evapotranspiration into bare soil evaporation and plant transpiration remains a key uncertainty in the terrestrial water balance. We used integrated hydrologic simulations that couple vegetation and land-energy processes with surface and subsurface hydrology to study transpiration partitioning at the continental scale. Both latent heat flux and partitioning are connected to water table depth, and including lateral groundwater flow in the model increases transpiration partitioning from 47 ± 13 to 62 ± 12%. This suggests that lateral groundwater flow, which is generally simplified or excluded in Earth system models, may provide a missing link for reconciling observations and global models of terrestrial water fluxes.

  15. Plasmid incidence in bacteria from deep subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Hicks, R.J.; Li, S.W.; Brockman, F.J. )

    1988-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from deep terrestrial subsurface sediments underlying the coastal plain of South Carolina. A total of 163 isolates from deep sediments, surface soil, and return drill muds were examined for plasmid DNA content and resistance to the antibiotics penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. MICs of Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, and Hg{sup 2+} for each isolate were also determined. The overall frequency of plasmid occurrence in the subsurface bacteria was 33%. Resistance was most frequent to penicillin (70% of all isolates), ampicillin (49%), and carbenicillin (32%) and was concluded to be related to the concentrations of the individual antibiotics in the disks used for assaying resistance and to the production of low levels of {beta}-lactamase. The frequencies of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin were significantly greater for isolates bearing plasmids than for plasmidless isolates; however, resistance was not transferable to penicillin-sensitive Escherichia coli. Hybridization of subsurface bacterial plasmids and chromosomal DNA with a whole-TOL-plasmid (pWWO) probe revealed some homology of subsurface bacterial plasmid and chromosomal DNAs, indicating a potential for those bacterial to harbor catabolic genes on plasmids or chromosomes. The incidences of antibiotic resistance and MICs of metals for subsurface bacteria were significantly different from those drill mud bacteria, ruling out the possibility that bacteria from sediments were derived from drill muds.

  16. Identifying stabilizers of plasmid DNA for pharmaceutical use.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuhong; Ramsey, Joshua D; King, Robert; Leviten, Michael; Mcguire, Ruth; Volkin, David B; Joshi, Sangeeta B; Middaugh, C Russell

    2011-03-01

    To better address the need for developing stable formulations of plasmid DNA-based biopharmaceuticals, 37 compounds from a generally regarded as safe library were examined for their potential use as stabilizers. A plasmid DNA-based therapeutic vaccine, BHT-DNA, was used as a model system. Initial studies were performed to compare the biophysical properties of BHT-DNA plasmid from bulk drug substance and finished drug product. An agarose gel electrophoresis-based assay was then employed in excipient compatibility studies for the drug product by monitoring supercoiled plasmid DNA content in various formulations. After incubation at 40 °C for 30 days, eight out of the 37 excipients tested were able to better retain the supercoil content compared to the control. Sodium citrate appeared to be the most effective stabilizer and its protective capability plateaued at an ionic strength of about 0.4. Several other excipients including malic acid, ethanol, and Pluronic F-68 were also identified as promising stabilizers for BHT-DNA plasmid DNA. Additionally, compounds, including ferrous chloride, ascorbic acid, human serum albumin, and PEG 1000, which significantly destabilized the supercoiled plasmid DNA were identified. These data may also be applicable to other plasmid DNA-based pharmaceuticals for storage stability improvement, due to chemical and structural similarities of these macromolecules.

  17. Plasmid carriage can limit bacteria-phage coevolution.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Ellie; Truman, Julie; Wright, Rosanna; Spiers, Andrew J; Paterson, Steve; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Coevolution with bacteriophages is a major selective force shaping bacterial populations and communities. A variety of both environmental and genetic factors has been shown to influence the mode and tempo of bacteria-phage coevolution. Here, we test the effects that carriage of a large conjugative plasmid, pQBR103, had on antagonistic coevolution between the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens and its phage, SBW25ϕ2. Plasmid carriage limited bacteria-phage coevolution; bacteria evolved lower phage-resistance and phages evolved lower infectivity in plasmid-carrying compared with plasmid-free populations. These differences were not explained by effects of plasmid carriage on the costs of phage resistance mutations. Surprisingly, in the presence of phages, plasmid carriage resulted in the evolution of high frequencies of mucoid bacterial colonies. Mucoidy can provide weak partial resistance against SBW25ϕ2, which may have limited selection for qualitative resistance mutations in our experiments. Taken together, our results suggest that plasmids can have evolutionary consequences for bacteria that go beyond the direct phenotypic effects of their accessory gene cargo.

  18. Plasmid-associated sensitivity of Bacillus thuringiensis to UV light

    SciTech Connect

    Benoit, T.G.; Wilson, G.R.; Bull, D.L.; Aronson, A.I. )

    1990-08-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus thuringiensis were more sensitive to UV light than were spores or cells of plasmid-cured B. thuringiensis strains or of the closely related Bacillus cereus. Introduction of B. thuringiensis plasmids into B. cereus by cell mating increased the UV sensitivity of the cells and spores. Protoxins encoded by one or more B. thuringiensis plasmids were not involved in spore sensitivity, since a B. thuringiensis strain conditional for protoxin accumulation was equally sensitive at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. In addition, introduction of either a cloned protoxin gene, the cloning vector, or another plasmid not containing a protoxin gene into a plasmid-cured strain of B. thuringiensis all increased the UV sensitivity of the spores. Although the variety of small, acid-soluble proteins was the same in the spores of all strains examined, the quantity of dipicolinic acid was about twice as high in the plasmid-containing strains, and this may account for the differences in UV sensitivity of the spores. The cells of some strains harboring only B. thuringiensis plasmids were much more sensitive than cells of any of the other strains, and the differences were much greater than observed with spores.

  19. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene.

    PubMed Central

    Sanseverino, J; Applegate, B M; King, J M; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    The well-characterized plasmid-encoded naphthalene degradation pathway in Pseudomonas putida PpG7(NAH7) was used to investigate the role of the NAH plasmid-encoded pathway in mineralizing phenanthrene and anthracene. Three Pseudomonas strains, designated 5R, DFC49, and DFC50, were recovered from a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading inoculum developed from a manufactured gas plant soil slurry reactor. Plasmids pKA1, pKA2, and pKA3, approximately 100 kb in size, were isolated from these strains and characterized. These plasmids have homologous regions of upper and lower NAH7 plasmid catabolic genes. By conjugation experiments, these plasmids, including NAH7, have been shown to encode the genotype for mineralization of [9-14C]phenanthrene and [U-14C]anthracene, as well as [1-14C]naphthalene. One strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL, which has the complete lower pathway inactivated by transposon insertion in nahG, accumulated a metabolite from phenanthrene and anthracene degradation. This is the first direct evidence to indicate that the NAH plasmid-encoded catabolic genes are involved in degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons other than naphthalene. Images PMID:8328809

  20. General method for plasmid construction using homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Raymond, C K; Pownder, T A; Sexson, S L

    1999-01-01

    We describe a general method for plasmid assembly that uses yeast and extends beyond yeast-specific research applications. This technology exploits the homologous recombination, double-stranded break repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to join DNA fragments. Synthetic, double-stranded "recombination linkers" were used to "subclone" a DNA fragment into a plasmid with > 80% efficiency. Quantitative data on the influence of DNA concentration and overlap length on the efficiency of recombination are presented. Using a simple procedure, plasmids were shuttled from yeast into E. coli for subsequent screening and large-scale plasmid preps. This simple method for plasmid construction has several advantages. (i) It bypasses the need for extensive PCR amplification and for purification, modification and/or ligation techniques routinely used for plasmid constructions. (ii) The method does not rely on available restriction sites, thus fragment and vector DNA can be joined within any DNA sequence. This enables the use of multifunctional cloning vectors for protein expression in mammalian cells, other yeast species, E. coli and other expression systems as discussed. (iii) Finally, the technology exploits yeast strains, plasmids and microbial techniques that are inexpensive and readily available.

  1. Analysis of chromosomal integration and deletions of yeast plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, J R; Philippsen, P; Davis, R W

    1977-01-01

    Plasmid DNAs from six strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared. Three different plasmids were found, designated Scp 1, Scp 2 and Scp 3, with monomer lengths of 6.19, 6.06 and 5.97 kilobases as referenced to sequenced phiX174 DNA. DNA from each of the plasmids was inserted into a lambda vector DNA. Hybrid phage containing inserted DNA of the desired size were enriched by genetic selection and their DNAs analysed by rapid techniques. All three plasmids share the same organization, two unique sequences separated by two inverted repeats, and share basically the same DNA sequences. Scp 2 and Scp 3 differ from Scp 1 by missing a unique HpaI site and by having small overlapping deletions in the same region. The HpaI site in Scp 1 is, therefore, in a nonessential region and suitable for insertion of foreign DNA in the potential use of the yeast plasmid as a vector. Hybridization of labelled cloned plasmid DNA to restriction fragments of linear yeast DNA separated on agarose gels showed that the plasmid DNA was not stably integrated into the yeast chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:331256

  2. Development of a microfluidic chip-based plasmid miniprep.

    PubMed

    Northrup, Victoria A; Backhouse, Christopher J; Glerum, D Moira

    2010-07-15

    Plasmids are the workhorse of contemporary molecular biology, serving as vectors in the multitude of molecular cloning approaches now available. Plasmid minipreps are a routine and essential means of extracting plasmid DNA from bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, for identification, characterization, and further manipulation. Although there have been many approaches described and miniprep kits are commercially available, traditional minipreps typically require more than 16h, including the time needed for bacterial cell culture. Here we describe the development of a microfluidic chip (MFC)-based miniprep that uses on-chip lysis and trapping of large DNA in agarose to differentially separate plasmid DNA from the bacterial chromosome. Our approach greatly decreases both the time required for the miniprep itself and the time required for growth of the bacterial cultures because our on-chip miniprep uses 10(5) times fewer E. coli cells. Because the quality of the isolated plasmid is comparable to that obtained using conventional miniprep protocols, this approach allows growth of E. coli and isolation of plasmid within hours, thereby making it ideal for rapid screening approaches. This MFC-based miniprep, coupled with recently demonstrated on-chip transfection capabilities, lays the groundwork for seamless manipulation of plasmids on MFC platforms.

  3. An updated view of plasmid conjugation and mobilization in Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Yui Eto, Karina; Price, Karina J.; Nguyen, Quang T.; O'Brien, Frances G.; Grubb, Warren B.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The horizontal gene transfer facilitated by mobile genetic elements impacts almost all areas of bacterial evolution, including the accretion and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistance genes in the human and animal pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Genome surveys of staphylococcal plasmids have revealed an unexpected paucity of conjugation and mobilization loci, perhaps suggesting that conjugation plays only a minor role in the evolution of this genus. In this letter we present the DNA sequences of historically documented staphylococcal conjugative plasmids and highlight that at least 3 distinct and widely distributed families of conjugative plasmids currently contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus. We also review the recently documented “relaxase-in trans” mechanism of conjugative mobilization facilitated by conjugative plasmids pWBG749 and pSK41, and discuss how this may facilitate the horizontal transmission of around 90% of plasmids that were previously considered non-mobilizable. Finally, we enumerate unique sequenced S. aureus plasmids with a potential mechanism of mobilization and predict that at least 80% of all non-conjugative S. aureus plasmids are mobilizable by at least one mechanism. We suggest that a greater research focus on the molecular biology of conjugation is essential if we are to recognize gene-transfer mechanisms from our increasingly in silico analyses. PMID:27583185

  4. Deriving the Hirshfeld partitioning using distance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Heidar-Zadeh, Farnaz; Ayers, Paul W.; Bultinck, Patrick

    2014-09-07

    The atoms in molecules associated with the Hirshfeld partitioning minimize the generalized Hellinger-Bhattacharya distance to the reference pro-atom densities. Moreover, the reference pro-atoms can be chosen by minimizing the distance between the pro-molecule density and the true molecular density. This provides an alternative to both the heuristic “stockholder” and the mathematical information-theoretic interpretations of the Hirshfeld partitioning. These results extend to any member of the family of f-divergences.

  5. F'-plasmid transfer from Escherichia coli to Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Mergeay, M; Gerits, J

    1978-01-01

    Various F' plasmids of Escherichia coli K-12 could be transferred into mutants of the soil strain 6.2, classified herein as a Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype IV. This strain was previously found to receive Flac plasmid (N. Datta and R.W. Hedges, J. Gen Microbiol. 70:453-460, 1972). ilv, leu, met, arg, and his auxotrophs were complemented by plasmids carrying isofunctional genes; trp mutants were not complemented or were very poorly complemented. The frequency of transfer was 10(-5). Subsequent transfer into other P. fluorescens recipients was of the same order of magnitude. Some transconjugants were unable to act as donors, and these did not lose the received information if subcultured on nonselective media. Use of F' plasmids helped to discriminate metabolic blocks in P. fluorescens. In particular, metA, metB, and argH mutants were so distinguished. In addition, F131 plasmid carrying the his operon and a supD mutation could partially relieve the auxotrophy of thr, ilv, and metA13 mutants, suggesting functional expression of E. coli tRNA in P. fluorescens. In P. fluorescens metA Rifr mutants carrying the F110 plasmid, which carried the E. coli metA gene and the E. coli rifs allele, sensitivity to rifampin was found to be dominant at least temporarily over resistance. This suggests interaction of E. coli and P. fluorescens subunits of RNA polymerase. his mutations were also complemented by composite P plasmids containing the his-nif region of Klebsiella pneumoniae (plasmids FN68 and RP41). nif expression could be detected by acetylene reduction in some his+ transconjugants. The frequency of transfer of these P plasmids was 5 X 10(-4). PMID:97267

  6. Complete Sequence of Four Multidrug-Resistant MOBQ1 Plasmids Harboring blaGES-5 Isolated from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens Persisting in a Hospital in Canada.

    PubMed

    Boyd, David; Taylor, Geoffrey; Fuller, Jeff; Bryce, Elizabeth; Embree, Joanne; Gravel, Denise; Katz, Kevin; Kibsey, Pamela; Kuhn, Magdalena; Langley, Joanne; Mataseje, Laura; Mitchell, Robyn; Roscoe, Diane; Simor, Andrew; Thomas, Eva; Turgeon, Nathalie; Mulvey, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The usefulness of carbapenems for gram-negative infections is becoming compromised by organisms harboring carbapenemases, enzymes which can hydrolyze the drug. Currently KPC (class A), NDM (class B), and OXA-48 types (class D) are the most globally widespread carbapenemases. However, among the GES-type class A extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) there are variants that hydrolyze carbapenems, with blaGES-5 being the most common. Two Escherichia coli and two Serratia marcescens harboring blaGES-5 on plasmids were isolated by the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP) from four different patients in a single hospital over a 2-year period. Complete sequencing of the blaGES-5 plasmids indicated that all four had nearly identical backbones consisting of genes for replication, partitioning, and stability, but contained variant accessory regions consisting of mobile elements and antimicrobial resistance genes. The plasmids were of a novel replicon type, but belonged to the MOBQ1 group based on relaxase sequences, and appeared to be mobilizable, but not self-transmissible. Considering the time periods of bacterial isolation, it would appear the blaGES-5 plasmid has persisted in an environmental niche for at least 2 years in the hospital. This has implications for infection control and clinical care when it is transferred to clinically relevant gram-negative organisms.

  7. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance: a Multifaceted Threat

    PubMed Central

    Strahilevitz, Jacob; Jacoby, George A.; Hooper, David C.; Robicsek, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Although plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) was thought not to exist before its discovery in 1998, the past decade has seen an explosion of research characterizing this phenomenon. The best-described form of PMQR is determined by the qnr group of genes. These genes, likely originating in aquatic organisms, code for pentapeptide repeat proteins. These proteins reduce susceptibility to quinolones by protecting the complex of DNA and DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV enzymes from the inhibitory effect of quinolones. Two additional PMQR mechanisms were recently described. aac(6′)-Ib-cr encodes a variant aminoglycoside acetyltransferase with two amino acid alterations allowing it to inactivate ciprofloxacin through the acetylation of its piperazinyl substituent. oqxAB and qepA encode efflux pumps that extrude quinolones. All of these genes determine relatively small increases in the MICs of quinolones, but these changes are sufficient to facilitate the selection of mutants with higher levels of resistance. The contribution of these genes to the emergence of quinolone resistance is being actively investigated. Several factors suggest their importance in this process, including their increasing ubiquity, their association with other resistance elements, and their emergence simultaneous with the expansion of clinical quinolone resistance. Of concern, these genes are not yet being taken into account in resistance screening by clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:19822894

  8. [Epidemiologic study of 2 S. typhimurium outbreaks using plasmid fingerprints].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, A; Breer, C; Schopfer, K

    1989-04-05

    An outbreak of salmonellosis in an old people's home is reported. The infectious agent, S. typhi-murium, was isolated not only from several inmates but also from sick cows of the farm belonging to the home, in animal feed, from employees of the local butcher's shop, and finally in sludge from the local sewage plant. Plasmid analysis provided evidence of a common origin for the isolated S. typhi-murium strains. The incriminated strains harboured, together with two low-molecular-weight plasmids, a plasmid of approximately 50 Mdal, which was also demonstrated in some other S. typhi-murium strains isolated from clinical cases in the area around St. Gallen.

  9. Plasmid-determined resistance to fosfomycin in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, C; Garcia, J M; Llaneza, J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C; Ortiz, J M

    1980-01-01

    Multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains of Serratia marcescens isolated from hospitalized patients were examined for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Two different patterns of linked transferable resistance were found among the transconjugants. The first comprised resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin; the second, and more common, pattern included resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, and fosfomycin. The two types of transconjugant strains carried a single plasmid of either 57 or 97 megadaltons in size. Both of these plasmids are present in parental S. marcescens strains resistant to fosfomycin. The 57-megadalton plasmid was transformed into E. coli. Images PMID:7004337

  10. A nonalkaline method for isolating sequencing-ready plasmids.

    PubMed

    Paul, Bonnie; Cloninger, Cheri; Felton, Marilyn; Khachatoorian, Ronik; Metzenberg, Stan

    2008-06-15

    We describe a simple method of isolating plasmid DNA directly from Escherichia coli culture medium by addition of lithium acetate and Sodium dodecyl sulphate, followed by centrifugation and alcohol precipitation. The plasmid is sufficiently pure that it can be used in many enzyme-based reactions, including DNA sequencing and restriction analysis. Chromosomal DNA contamination is significantly reduced by pretreatment of the culture with DNase I, suggesting that much of the contaminant is associated with permeable dead cells. Chromosomal DNA contaminant can also be selectively denatured without damage to the supercoiled plasmid by alkaline denaturation in an arginine buffer or heat treatment in the presence of urea or N,N-dimethylformamide.

  11. Erythromycin Resistance-Conferring Plasmid pRSB105, Isolated from a Sewage Treatment Plant, Harbors a New Macrolide Resistance Determinant, an Integron-Containing Tn402-Like Element, and a Large Region of Unknown Function▿

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, A.; Szczepanowski, R.; Kurz, N.; Schneiker, S.; Krahn, I.; Pühler, A.

    2007-01-01

    The erythromycin resistance plasmid pRSB105 was previously isolated from an activated sludge bacterial community of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Compilation of the complete pRSB105 nucleotide sequence revealed that the plasmid is 57,137 bp in size and has a mean G+C content of 56.66 mol%. The pRSB105 backbone is composed of two different replication and/or partitioning modules and a functional mobilization region encoding the mobilization genes mobCDE and mobBA. The first replicon (Rep1) is nearly identical to the corresponding replication module of the multiresistance plasmid pRSB101 isolated from an unknown activated sludge bacterium. Accordingly, pRSB101 and pRSB105 are sister plasmids belonging to a new plasmid family. The second replicon (Rep2) of pRSB105 was classified as a member of the IncP-6 group. While Rep1 confers replication ability only in γ-proteobacteria, Rep2 extents the host range of the plasmid since it is also functional in the β-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha. Plasmid pRSB105 harbors the macrolide resistance genes mel and mph, encoding, respectively, a predicted ABC-type efflux permease and a macrolide-2′-phosphotransferase. Erythromycin resistance is mainly attributed to mel, whereas mph contributes to erythromycin resistance to a lesser extent. The second resistance region, represented by an integron-containing Tn402-like element, includes a β-lactam (oxa10) and a trimethoprim (dfrB2) resistance gene cassette. In addition to antibiotic resistance modules, pRSB105 encodes a functional restriction/modification system and two nonresistance regions of unknown function. The presence of different mobile genetic elements that flank resistance and nonresistance modules on pRSB105 indicates that these elements were involved in acquisition of accessory plasmid modules. Comparative genomics of pRSB105 and related plasmids elucidated that pRSB105 evolved by integration of distinct modules from different plasmid sources, including

  12. Certificate Revocation Using Fine Grained Certificate Space Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Vipul

    A new certificate revocation system is presented. The basic idea is to divide the certificate space into several partitions, the number of partitions being dependent on the PKI environment. Each partition contains the status of a set of certificates. A partition may either expire or be renewed at the end of a time slot. This is done efficiently using hash chains.

  13. Large partition coefficients for trace elements in high-silica rhyolites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahood, G.; Hildreth, W.

    1983-01-01

    The partitioning of 25 trace elements between high-silica rhyolitic glass and unzoned phenocrysts of potassic and sodic sanidine, biotite, augite, ferrohedenbergite, hypersthene, fayalite, titanomagnetite, ilmenite, zircon, and allanite has been determined by INAA on suites of samples from the mildly peralkaline lavas and tuff of the Sierra La Primavera, Mexico, and the metaluminous, compo. sitionally zoned, Bishop Tuff, California. The partition coefficients are much larger than published values for less silicic compositions; the range of values among Primavera samples that differ only slightly in temperature or bulk composition approaches that previously reported from basalts to rhyodacites. Intrinsic temperature dependence of the crystal/liquid partitioning is apparently small. The high values of partition coefficients reflect principally the strongly polymerized nature of the alkali-aluminosilicate liquid, whereas the marked variability of values for partition coefficients is attributed to differences in the concentrations of complexing ligands and/or different degrees of melt polymerization. Great variation in the values of partition coefficients that are potentially applicable to early stages in the partial melting of crustal rocks complicates assessment of 1. (1) source regions for granitic melts and 2. (2) contributions by crustal-melt increments to andesites. ?? 1983.

  14. Large partition coefficients for trace elements in high-silica rhyolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail; Hildreth, Wes

    1983-01-01

    The partitioning of 25 trace elements between high-silica rhyolitic glass and unzoned phenocrysts of potassic and sodic sanidine, biotite, augite, ferrohedenbergite, hypersthene, fayalite, titanomagnetite, ilmenite, zircon, and allanite has been determined by INAA on suites of samples from the mildly peralkaline lavas and tuff of the Sierra La Primavera, Mexico, and the metaluminous, compo. sitionally zoned, Bishop Tuff, California. The partition coefficients are much larger than published values for less silicic compositions; the range of values among Primavera samples that differ only slightly in temperature or bulk composition approaches that previously reported from basalts to rhyodacites. Intrinsic temperature dependence of the crystal/liquid partitioning is apparently small. The high values of partition coefficients reflect principally the strongly polymerized nature of the alkali-aluminosilicate liquid, whereas the marked variability of values for partition coefficients is attributed to differences in the concentrations of complexing ligands and/or different degrees of melt polymerization. Great variation in the values of partition coefficients that are potentially applicable to early stages in the partial melting of crustal rocks complicates assessment of (1) source regions for granitic melts and (2) contributions by crustal-melt increments to andesites.

  15. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    PubMed

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  16. Construction and characterization of gelonin and saporin plasmids for toxic gene-based cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoung Ah; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C; Shin, Meong Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Toxic gene therapy (or suicidal gene therapy) is gaining enormous interest, specifically for the treatment of cancer. The success of this therapy lies in several crucial factors, including the potency of gene products to kill the transfected tumor cells and the transfection ability of the transfection vehicles. To address the potency problem, in the present study, we engineered two separate mammalian transfection plasmids (pSAP and pGEL) containing genes encoding ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs), gelonin and saporin. After the successful preparation and amplification of the plasmids, they were tested on various cancer cell lines (HeLa, U87, 9L, and MDA-MB-435) and a noncancerous cell line (293 HEK) using polyethyleneimine (PEI) as the transfection agent. Transfection studies performed under varying gene concentration, incubation time, and gene-to-PEI ratios revealed that, compared to the treatment of pGFP (GFP expression plasmid)/PEI, both pGEL/PEI and pSAP/PEI complexes could induce significantly augmented cytotoxic effects at only 2 μg/mL gene concentration. Importantly, these cytotoxic effects were observed universally in all tested cancer cell lines. Overall, this study demonstrated the potential of pGEL and pSAP as effective gene candidates for the toxic gene-based cancer therapy.

  17. A simple and immediate method for simultaneously evaluating expression level and plasmid maintenance in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Jun; Izawa, Keiko; Matsumura, Shizuka; Wakamura, Kanako; Tanino, Takanori; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-06-01

    To allow the comprehensive assessments of yeast expression systems, a simple and immediate method for simultaneously evaluating the expression level and plasmid maintenance in yeast was demonstrated. This method uses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and flow cytometry (FCM) and is characterized by a dual analysis of the average intensity of GFP fluorescence and the population of GFP-expressing cells. The FCM analysis of GFP fluorescence intensity rapidly quantifies the expression level without complex manipulations, such as the enzymatic reaction of a lacZ reporter assay. Moreover, the single-cell analysis revealed that the proportion of cells expressing GFP in the cell cluster reflects the plasmid retention rate; therefore, the FCM analysis of the GFP-expressing population allows the immediate estimation of the plasmid retention rate without the 2- or 3-day incubation required for colony counting. We show that the FCM analysis with GFP reporter is a suitable method to explore the hopeful expression vector and host strain or establish the several expression systems exhibiting the characteristic properties in yeast.

  18. DKK1 eukaryotic expression plasmid and expression product identification.

    PubMed

    Bao, G Y; Lu, K Y; Cui, S F; Xu, L

    2015-06-11

    We constructed the human dickkopf 1 (DKK1) eukaryotic expression plasmid and expressed, purified, and identified its expression product. We extracted cancer cells from cervical cancer tissue, followed by extraction of mRNA. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was conducted to obtain DKK1 gene fragments. Using these fragments, we prepared the recombinant plasmid pCMV-HA2/DKK1. The recombinant plasmid was restriction enzyme-digested and sequenced, and using liposome vectors, was transiently transfected into Free-Style 293-F cells (serum-free medium). DKK1 protein was detected by western blotting. The amplification product showed the expected size. Restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analysis showed that the recombinant plasmid was PCMV-HA2/DKK1. The expression product was verified properly by western blotting using an anti-DKKI antibody. The successful cloning of the DKKI gene and expression of DKKI protein will be useful for studying the biological activity of tumorigenesis.

  19. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    He, Susu; Chandler, Michael; Varani, Alessandro M.; Hickman, Alison B.; Dekker, John P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content) of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27923922

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of a native plasmid from Brevibacterium linens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Mathew; Svenson, Charles; Bowling, David; Glenn, Dianne

    2003-03-01

    Brevibacterium linens has commercial significance in the dairy industry and potential application in the production of bacteriocins and carotenoids. Strain development of these industrially significant organisms would be facilitated by the use of vectors, yet few are available. In this study we report the isolation of four novel plasmids from the Gram-positive coryneform B. linens, and determine the first complete nucleotide sequence of a native plasmid of B. linens. The cryptic plasmid pLIM is 7610 bp in length, and belongs to a subfamily of theta replicating ColE2-related plasmids. Initial investigation suggests that replication in pLIM requires two replicases, a primase (RepA) and a DNA binding protein (RepB), encoded by a single operon repAB. The origin of replication is located upstream of repAB transcription.

  1. New Domain Block Partitioning Based on Complexity Measure of ECG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    power law (2) where is the Hurst exponent . By setting and , the exponent can be cal- culated from (3) For the embedding Euclidean dimension DE (i.e., the...a polynomial line fitting method, with careful attention given to outliers [9]. The Hurst exponent is obtained from (7) If the time series is

  2. The A to Z of A/C plasmids.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2015-07-01

    Plasmids belonging to incompatibility groups A and C (now A/C) were among the earliest to be associated with antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. A/C plasmids are large, conjugative plasmids with a broad host range. The prevalence of A/C plasmids in collections of clinical isolates has revealed their importance in the dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases. They also mobilize SGI1-type resistance islands. Revived interest in the family has yielded many complete A/C plasmid sequences, revealing that RA1, designated A/C1, is different from the remainder, designated A/C2. There are two distinct A/C2 lineages. Backbones of 128-130 kb include over 120 genes or ORFs encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids, but very few have been characterized. Genes potentially required for replication, stability and transfer have been identified, but only the replication system of RA1 and the regulation of transfer have been studied. There is enormous variety in the antibiotic resistance genes carried by A/C2 plasmids but they are usually clustered in larger regions at various locations in the backbone. The ARI-A and ARI-B resistance islands are always at a specific location but have variable content. ARI-A is only found in type 1 A/C2 plasmids, which disseminate blaCMY-2 and blaNDM-1 genes, whereas ARI-B, carrying the sul2 gene, is found in both type 1 and type 2. This review summarizes current knowledge of A/C plasmids, and highlights areas of research to be considered in the future.

  3. Modelling the spatial dynamics of plasmid transfer and persistence.

    PubMed

    Krone, Stephen M; Lu, Ruinan; Fox, Randal; Suzuki, Haruo; Top, Eva M

    2007-08-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extra-chromosomal genetic elements that code for a wide variety of phenotypes in their bacterial hosts and are maintained in bacterial communities through both vertical and horizontal transfer. Current mathematical models of plasmid-bacteria dynamics, based almost exclusively on mass-action differential equations that describe these interactions in completely mixed environments, fail to adequately explain phenomena such as the long-term persistence of plasmids in natural and clinical bacterial communities. This failure is, at least in part, due to the absence of any spatial structure in these models, whereas most bacterial populations are spatially structured in microcolonies and biofilms. To help bridge the gap between theoretical predictions and observed patterns of plasmid spread and persistence, an individual-based lattice model (interacting particle system) that provides a predictive framework for understanding the dynamics of plasmid-bacteria interactions in spatially structured populations is presented here. To assess the accuracy and flexibility of the model, a series of experiments that monitored plasmid loss and horizontal transfer of the IncP-1beta plasmid pB10 : : rfp in Escherichia coli K12 and other bacterial populations grown on agar surfaces were performed. The model-based visual patterns of plasmid loss and spread, as well as quantitative predictions of the effects of different initial parental strain densities and incubation time on densities of transconjugants formed on a 2D grid, were in agreement with this and previously published empirical data. These results include features of spatially structured populations that are not predicted by mass-action differential equation models.

  4. Antibacterial effect of cationic porphyrazines and anionic phthalocyanine and their interaction with plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassani, Leila; Hakimian, Fatemeh; Safaei, Elham; Fazeli, Zahra

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to antibiotics is a public health issue and identification of new antibacterial agents is one of the most important goals of pharmacological research. Among the novel developed antibacterial agents, porphyrin complexes and their derivatives are ideal candidates for use in medical applications. Phthalocyanines differ from porphyrins by having nitrogen atoms link the individual pyrrol units. The aza analogues of the phthalocyanines (azaPcs) such as tetramethylmetalloporphyrazines are heterocyclic Pc analogues. In this investigation, interaction of an anionic phthalocyanine (Cu(PcTs)) and two cationic tetrapyridinoporphyrazines including [Cu(2,3-tmtppa)]4+ and [Cu(3,4-tmtppa)]4+ complexes with plasmid DNA was studied using spectroscopic and gel electrophoresis methods. In addition, antibacterial effect of the complexes against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria was investigated using dilution test method. The results indicated that both porphyrazines have significant antibacterial properties, but Cu(PcTs) has weak antibacterial effect. Compairing the binding of the phthalocyanine and the porphyrazines to DNA demonstrated that the interaction of cationic porphyrazines is stronger than the anionic phthalocyanine remarkably. The extent of hypochromicity and red shift of absorption spectra indicated preferential intercalation of the two porphyrazine into the base pairs of DNA helix. Gel electrophoresis result implied Cu(2,3-tmtppa) and Cu(3,4-tmtppa) are able to perform cleavage of the plasmid DNA. Consequently, DNA binding and cleavage might be one of the antibacterial mechanisms of the complexes.

  5. Application of New Partition Coefficients to Modeling Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagan, A. L.; Neal, C. R.; Rapp, J. F.; Draper, D. S.; Lapen, T. J.

    2017-01-01

    suggests a complex evolution. In order to investigate this sample further, we can calculate the equilibrium liquids, but with An contents distinct from previous experimental studies, we must calculate the appropriate partition coefficients for each trace element analysis.

  6. The Native Plasmid pML21 Plays a Role in Stress Tolerance in Enterococcus faecalis ML21, as Analyzed by Plasmid Curing Using Plasmid Incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Fang-Lei; Chen, Li-Li; Zeng, Zhu; Feng, Xiu-Juan; Yu, Rui; Lu, Xiao-Ming; Ma, Hui-Qin; Chen, Shang-Wu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the role of the native plasmid pML21 in Enterococcus faecalis ML21's response to abiotic stresses, the plasmid pML21 was cured based on the principle of plasmid incompatibility and segregational instability, generating E. faecalis mutant strain ML0. The mutant and the wild strains were exposed to abiotic stresses: bile salts, low pH, H2O2, ethanol, heat, and NaCl, and their survival rate was measured. We found that curing of pML21 lead to reduced tolerance to stress in E. faecalis ML0, especially oxidative and osmotic stress. Complementation analysis suggested that the genes from pML21 played different role in stress tolerance. The result indicated that pML21 plays a role in E. faecalis ML21's response to abiotic stresses.

  7. Biomedical application of plasmid DNA in gene therapy: a new challenge for chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sousa, F; Passarinha, L; Queiroz, J A

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy and DNA vaccination are clinical fields gradually emerging in the last few decades, in particular after the discovery of some gene-related diseases. The increased relevance of biomedical applications of plasmid DNA (pDNA) to induce therapeutic effects has had a great impact on biopharmaceutical research and industry. Although there are several steps involved in the pDNA manufacturing process, the several unit operations must be designed and integrated into a global process. After the plasmid has been designed according to the requirements for clinical administeration to humans, it is biosynthesised mainly by an E. coli host. The overriding priority of the production process is to improve plasmid quantity - the production conditions need to be optimised to guarantee pDNA stability and biological activity. The complexity and diversity of biomolecules present on the pDNA-containing extracts represent the main concern and limitation to achieve pure and biologically active pDNA. There has been a recent intenstification of the improvement of existing purification procedures or the establishment of novel schemes for plasmid purification. This review focuses on the progress and relevance of chromatographic methodologies in the purification of pDNA-based therapeutic products. The review will attempt to assemble their different contributions of the different chromatographic procedures that are being used in the pDNA purification area. The advantages and disadvantages of the different chromatographic techniques, as well as the most significant improvements in response to the challenge of purifying pDNA will be discussed, emphasizing the future directions in this field.

  8. Plasmid-mediated susceptibility to intestinal microbial antagonisms in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Andremont, A; Gerbaud, G; Tancrède, C; Courvalin, P

    1985-09-01

    Self-transferable plasmid pIP1100 confers to Escherichia coli an unusually high level of resistance (1 to 2 mg/ml) to erythromycin by production of an erythromycin esterase. The effect of pIP1100 on the destiny of E. coli strains in the intestines of gnotobiotic mice was studied. In germfree mice, pIP1100 was efficiently transferred to a plasmid-free E. coli recipient. Intestinal counts of the donor, the recipient, and the transconjugants were greater than 8.5 log CFU/g of feces. When erythromycin was added to the diet of the mice, counts of the plasmid-bearing strains were only slightly lowered and partial inactivation of erythromycin was observed in the feces. Transfer of pIP1100 also occurred in human-flora-associated mice. In this model all the E. coli strains were subject to microbial antagonisms caused by the anaerobic components of the flora. However, strains harboring pIP1100 were strongly inhibited (less than 2.5 log CFU/g of feces), whereas their plasmid-free counterparts persisted at much higher population levels (greater than 5.2 log CFU/g of feces). The ecological disadvantage conferred by pIP1100 to E. coli when a complex human flora was concomitantly present in the intestine of the mice persisted during erythromycin administration. These results provide an explanation for the low incidence of isolation of highly erythromycin-resistant E. coli strains despite the extensive use of the antibiotic.

  9. Diversity of plasmids and Tn1546-type transposons among VanA Enterococcus faecium in Poland.

    PubMed

    Wardal, E; Kuch, A; Gawryszewska, I; Żabicka, D; Hryniewicz, W; Sadowy, E

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance, Tn1546 transposon variability and plasmid diversity among Polish vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREfm) isolates of VanA phenotype in the context of their clonal structure. Two hundred sixteen clinical VREfm isolates collected between 1997 and 2010 were studied by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, MLST, MLVA and detection of IS16, esp Efm, pilA, intA and plasmid-specific genes by PCR. Tn1546 structure was revealed by overlapping PCR and sequencing. Selected isolates were subjected to PFGE-S1 and Southern hybridization analyses. The vast majority of the isolates (95.8 %) belonged to lineages 17/18 (during the whole study period 1997-2010) and 78 (mostly in 2006-2010) of hospital-adapted meroclone of E. faecium. All isolates displayed a multi-drug resistance phenotype. Twenty-eight Tn1546 types (including 26 novel ones) were associated with eight different ISs (IS1216, IS1251, ISEfa4, ISEfa5, ISEfm2, ISEf1, IS3-like, ISEfm1-like). The vanA-determinant was typically located on plasmids, which most commonly carried rep2pRE25, rep17pRUM, rep18pEF418, rep1pIP501, ω-ε-ζ and axe-txe genes. VanA isolates from 1997-2005 to 2006-2010 differed in clonal composition, prevalence of gentamicin- and tetracycline-resistance and plasmidome. Our analysis revealed high complexity of Tn1546-type transposons and vanA-plasmids, and suggested that diverse genetic events, such as conjugation transfer, recombination, chromosomal integration and DNA mutations shaped the structure of these elements among Polish VREfm.

  10. Transformation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by electroporation, utilizing constructed shuttle plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; LeBlanc, D J; Lee, L N; Fives-Taylor, P

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, has been strongly implicated in human periodontal disease. Advances in the molecular analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans virulence factors have been limited due to the unavailability of systems for genetic transfer, transposon mutagenesis, and gene complementation. Slow progress can be traced almost exclusively to the lack of gene vector systems and methods for the introduction of DNA into A. actinomycetemcomitans. An electrotransformation system that allowed at least five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans to be transformed with stable shuttle plasmids which efficiently replicated in both Escherichia coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans was developed. One plasmid, a potential shuttle vector designated pDL282, is 5.7 kb in size, has several unique restriction enzyme sites, and codes for resistance to spectinomycin and ampicillin. E. coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans were transformed with equal efficiencies of approximately 10(5) transformants per micrograms of DNA. Similar transformation efficiencies were obtained whether the plasmid DNA was isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans or E. coli. In addition, frozen competent cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans yielded comparable efficiencies of transformation. Restriction enzyme analysis of pDL282 isolated after transformation confirmed the presence of intact donor plasmids. A plasmid isolated from A. pleuropneumoniae was also capable of transforming some isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, although generally at a lower frequency. The availability of these shuttle plasmids and an efficient transformation procedure should significantly facilitate the molecular analysis of virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:1937823

  11. The Addgene repository: an international nonprofit plasmid and data resource

    PubMed Central

    Kamens, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    The Addgene Repository (http://www.addgene.org) was founded to accelerate research and discovery by improving access to useful, high-quality research materials and information. The repository archives plasmids generated by scientists, conducts quality control, annotates the associated data and makes the plasmids and their data available to the scientific community. Plasmid associated data undergoes ongoing curation by members of the scientific community and by Addgene scientists. The growing database contains information on >31 000 unique plasmids spanning most experimental biological systems and organisms. The library includes a large number of plasmid tools for use in a wide variety of research areas, such as empty backbones, lentiviral resources, fluorescent protein vectors and genome engineering tools. The Addgene Repository database is always evolving with new plasmid deposits so it contains currently pertinent resources while ensuring the information on earlier deposits is still available. Custom search and browse features are available to access information on the diverse collection. Extensive educational materials and information are provided by the database curators to support the scientists that are accessing the repository's materials and data. PMID:25392412

  12. Homologous Recombination between Autonomously Replicating Plasmids in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ayares, David; Spencer, James; Schwartz, Faina; Morse, Brian; Kucherlapati, Raju

    1985-01-01

    The ability of autonomously replicating plasmids to recombine in mammalian cells was investigated. Two deletion plasmids of the eukaryotic-prokaryotic shuttle vector pSV2neo were cotransfected into transformed monkey COS cells. Examination of the low molecular weight DNA isolated after 48 hr of incubation revealed that recombination between the plasmids had occurred. The DNA was also used to transform recA- E. coli. Yield of neo R colonies signified homologous recombination. Examination of the plasmid DNA from these colonies confirmed this view. Double-strand breaks in one or both of the input plasmids at the sites of deletion resulted in an enhancement of recombination frequency. The recombination process yielded monomeric and dimeric molecules. Examination of these molecules revealed that reciprocal recombination as well as gene conversion events were involved in the generation of plasmids bearing an intact neo gene. The COS cell system we describe is analogous to study of bacteriophage recombination and yeast random-spore analysis. PMID:2996980

  13. Screening of pesticides for environmental partitioning tendency.

    PubMed

    Gramatica, Paola; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2002-06-01

    The partitioning tendency of chemicals, in this study pesticides in particular, into different environmental compartments depends mainly on the concurrent relevance of the physico-chemical properties of the chemical itself. To rank the pesticides according to their distribution tendencies in the different environmental compartments we propose a multivariate approach: the combination, by principal component analysis, of those physico-chemical properties like organic carbon partition coefficient (Koc), n-octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow), water solubility (Sw), vapour pressure and Henry's law constant (H) that are more relevant to the determination of environmental partitioning. The resultant macrovariables, the PC1 and PC2 scores here named leaching index (LIN) and volatality index (VIN), are proposed as preliminary environmental partitioning indexes in different media. These two indexes are modeled by theoretical molecular descriptors with satisfactory predictive power. Such an approach allows a rapid pre-determination and screening of the environmental distribution of pesticides starting only from the molecular structure of the pesticide, without any a priori knowledge of the physico-chemical properties.

  14. A biologically motivated partitioning of mortality.

    PubMed

    Carnes, B A; Olshansky, S J

    1997-01-01

    For over a century, actuaries and biologists working independently of each other have presented arguments for why total mortality needs to be partitioned into biologically meaningful subcomponents. These mortality partitions tended to overlook genetic diseases that are inherited because the partitions were motivated by a paradigm focused on aging. In this article, we combine and extend the concepts from these disciplines to develop a conceptual partitioning of total mortality into extrinsic and intrinsic causes of death. An extrinsic death is either caused or initiated by something that orginates outside the body of an individual, while an intrinsic death is either caused or initiated by processes that originate within the body. It is argued that extrinsic mortality has been a driving force in determining why we die when we do from intrinsic causes of death. This biologically motivated partitioning of mortality provides a useful perspective for researchers interested in comparative mortality analyses, the consequences of population aging, limits to human life expectancy, the progress made by the biomedical sciences against lethal diseases, and demographic models that predict the life expectancy of future populations.

  15. Octanol/air partitioning of polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Komp, P.; McLachlan, M.S.

    1997-12-01

    The partitioning of 16 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) between air and 1-octanol was investigated using a fugacity meter. The measurements were conducted over an environmentally relevant temperature range (10--43 C). For a given congener the measured 1-octanol/air partition coefficient K{sub OA} was exponentially proportional to the reciprocal temperature. The enthalpy of phase change (octanol to air) {Delta}H{sub OA} ranged from 71 to 93 kJ/mol. Up to log K{sub OA} values of 9.37 (corresponding to 2,2{prime},3,4{prime},5{prime},6-hexachlorobiphenyl), the enthalpy of phase change was similar to the enthalpy of vaporization of the subcooled liquid PCB. For the less volatile congeners (log K{sub OA} > 9.37), the enthalpies of vaporization exceeded the enthalpies of phase change, the difference increasing with increasing log K{sub OA}. Solubilities of the PCBs in 1-octanol were calculated from the data, and the results were in excellent agreement with octanol solubilities calculated using the OCTASOL fragment method. A very good correlation between the measured octanol/air partition coefficients and values calculated from octanol/water and air/water partition coefficients was obtained. This yielded a method to estimate reliably the octanol/air partitioning of all PCB congeners.

  16. Plasmid content of isolates of Erwinia amylovora from orchards in Washington and Oregon in the USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nearly all strains of Erwinia amylovora carry plasmid pEA29, which has not been found in other species of bacteria. Additional plasmids have been reported in the pathogen isolates from Western states, such as a plasmid in strain CA11 that carries streptomycin-resistance genes and the plasmid pEU30,...

  17. Allelopathy of plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free organisms competing for two complementary resources in a chemostat.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Joydeb; Smith, Hal L; Pal, Samares

    2012-01-01

    We consider a model of competition between plasmid-bearing and plasmid-free organisms for two complementary nutrients in a chemostat. We assume that the plasmid-bearing organism produces an allelopathic agent at the cost of its reproductive abilities which is lethal to plasmid-free organism. Our analysis leads to different thresholds in terms of the model parameters acting as conditions under which the organisms associated with the system cannot thrive even in the absence of competition. Local stability of the system is obtained in the absence of one or both the organisms. Also, global stability of the system is obtained in the presence of both the organisms. Computer simulations have been carried out to illustrate various analytical results.

  18. Biology of the staphylococcal conjugative multiresistance plasmid pSK41.

    PubMed

    Liu, Michael A; Kwong, Stephen M; Jensen, Slade O; Brzoska, Anthony J; Firth, Neville

    2013-07-01

    Plasmid pSK41 is a large, low-copy-number, conjugative plasmid from Staphylococcus aureus that is representative of a family of staphylococcal plasmids that confer multiple resistances to a wide range of antimicrobial agents. The plasmid consists of a conserved plasmid backbone containing the genes for plasmid housekeeping functions, which is punctuated by copies of IS257 that flank a Tn4001-hybrid structure and cointegrated plasmids that harbour resistance genes. This review summarises the current understanding of the biology of pSK41, focussing on the systems responsible for its replication, maintenance and transmission, and their regulation.

  19. Exposing Plasmids as the Achilles’ Heel of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Julia J.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Many multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens harbor large plasmids that encode proteins conferring resistance to antibiotics. While the acquisition of these plasmids often enables bacteria to survive in the presence of antibiotics, it is possible that plasmids also represent a vulnerability that can be exploited in tailored antibacterial therapy. This review highlights three recently described strategies designed to specifically combat bacteria harboring such plasmids: Inhibition of plasmid conjugation, inhibition of plasmid replication, and exploitation of plasmid-encoded toxin-antitoxin systems. PMID:18625335

  20. Partition functions. I. Improved partition functions and thermodynamic quantities for normal, equilibrium, and ortho and para molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popovas, A.; Jørgensen, U. G.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. Its thermodynamic quantities dominate the physical conditions in molecular clouds, protoplanetary disks, etc. It is also of high interest in plasma physics. Therefore thermodynamic data for molecular hydrogen have to be as accurate as possible in a wide temperature range. Aims: We here rigorously show the shortcomings of various simplifications that are used to calculate the total internal partition function. These shortcomings can lead to errors of up to 40 percent or more in the estimated partition function. These errors carry on to calculations of thermodynamic quantities. Therefore a more complicated approach has to be taken. Methods: Seven possible simplifications of various complexity are described, together with advantages and disadvantages of direct summation of experimental values. These were compared to what we consider the most accurate and most complete treatment (case 8). Dunham coefficients were determined from experimental and theoretical energy levels of a number of electronically excited states of H2. Both equilibrium and normal hydrogen was taken into consideration. Results: Various shortcomings in existing calculations are demonstrated, and the reasons for them are explained. New partition functions for equilibrium, normal, and ortho and para hydrogen are calculated and thermodynamic quantities are reported for the temperature range 1-20 000 K. Our results are compared to previous estimates in the literature. The calculations are not limited to the ground electronic state, but include all bound and quasi-bound levels of excited electronic states. Dunham coefficients of these states of H2 are also reported. Conclusions: For most of the relevant astrophysical cases it is strongly advised to avoid using simplifications, such as a harmonic oscillator and rigid rotor or ad hoc summation limits of the eigenstates to estimate accurate partition functions and to be particularly careful when

  1. Peoples, Resources, and Lifestyles: The Hopi-Navajo Land Partition Act of 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, James M.

    The Hopi and Navajo tribes have been engaged in a long and complex land dispute within the 1882 Executive Order Area (Joint Use Area) of Arizona, an area recently redefined via the Partition Act of 1974 which calls for the relocation of 5 to 10,000 Navajos. This rearrangement of political domain threatens to influence the future management and…

  2. Surfing biological surfaces: exploiting the nucleoid for partition and transport in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi; Funnell, Barbara E

    2012-11-01

    The ParA family of ATPases is responsible for transporting bacterial chromosomes, plasmids and large protein machineries. ParAs pattern the nucleoid in vivo, but how patterning functions or is exploited in transport is of considerable debate. Here we discuss the process of self-organization into patterns on the bacterial nucleoid and explore how it relates to the molecular mechanism of ParA action. We review ParA-mediated DNA partition as a general mechanism of how ATP-driven protein gradients on biological surfaces can result in spatial organization on a mesoscale. We also discuss how the nucleoid acts as a formidable diffusion barrier for large bodies in the cell, and make the case that the ParA family evolved to overcome the barrier by exploiting the nucleoid as a matrix for movement.

  3. The EPRL intertwiners and corrected partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Kisielowski, Marcin; Lewandowski, Jerzy

    2010-08-01

    Do the SU(2) intertwiners parametrize the space of the Engle, Pereira, Rovelli, Livine (EPRL) solutions to the simplicity constraint? What is the complete form of the partition function written in terms of this parametrization? We prove that the EPRL map is injective in the general n-valent vertex case for the Barbero-Immirzi parameter less than 1. We find, however, that the EPRL map is not isometric. In the consequence, a partition function can be defined either using the EPRL intertwiners Hilbert product or the SU(2) intertwiners Hilbert product. We use the EPRL one and derive a new, complete formula for the partition function. Next, we view it in terms of the SU(2) intertwiners. The result, however, goes beyond the SU(2) spin-foam models' framework and the original EPRL proposal.

  4. New parallel SOR method by domain partitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, D.; Adams, L.

    1999-07-01

    In this paper the authors propose and analyze a new parallel SOR method, the PSOR method, formulated by using domain partitioning and interprocessor data communication techniques. They prove that the PSOR method has the same asymptotic rate of convergence as the Red/Black (R/B) SOR method for the five-point stencil on both strip and block partitions, and as the four-color (R/B/G/O) SOR method for the nine-point stencil on strip partitions. They also demonstrate the parallel performance of the PSOR method on four different MIMD multiprocessors (a KSR1, an Intel Delta, a Paragon, and an IBM SP2). Finally, they compare the parallel performance of PSOR, R/B SOR, and R/B/G/O SOR. Numerical results on the Paragon indicate that PSOR is more efficient than R/B SOR and R/B/G/O SOR in both computation and interprocessor data communication.

  5. Factorization of the bosonic partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsharafat, Ayed; Chair, Noureddine

    2017-04-01

    The factorization formula in the non-interacting quantum field theories that relates the fermionic partition function to the bosonic partition function considered recently by Chair (2013) [3] is obtained for the harmonic oscillator using the path integral formulation. By using the latter, the fermionic partition function turns out to be the ratio of two determinants of the same operator (∂τ + ω), whose eigenmodes being both periodic on the imaginary time intervals [ 0 , 2 β ], [ 0 , β ]. The natural generalization of the factorization formula when β →2m β is derived, such a factorization implies that the bosonic oscillator at temperature β can be seen as a non-interacting mixture of a bosonic oscillator at temperature 2m β and m-fermionic oscillators at different temperatures 2 m - k β, k = 1 , 2 , … , m. As a consequence, a general relationship between the bosonic and fermionic thermal zeta functions is deduced.

  6. Parallel algorithms for dynamically partitioning unstructured grids

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, P.; Plimpton, S.; Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1994-10-01

    Grid partitioning is the method of choice for decomposing a wide variety of computational problems into naturally parallel pieces. In problems where computational load on the grid or the grid itself changes as the simulation progresses, the ability to repartition dynamically and in parallel is attractive for achieving higher performance. We describe three algorithms suitable for parallel dynamic load-balancing which attempt to partition unstructured grids so that computational load is balanced and communication is minimized. The execution time of algorithms and the quality of the partitions they generate are compared to results from serial partitioners for two large grids. The integration of the algorithms into a parallel particle simulation is also briefly discussed.

  7. Radiosensitivity of plasmid DNA: role of topology and concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giustranti, C.; Pérez, C.; Rousset, S.; Balanzat, E.; Sage, E.

    1999-01-01

    Using the plasmid relaxation assay, the induction of single strand breaks (SSB) by ionizing radiation was investigated in two plasmids of different length, pBS and pSP189. The dose-response was linear for both plasmids but pSP189 exhibited a three times higher sensitivity than pBS. This disparity may be explained by a reduced accessibility to hydroxyl radicals due to a different topology of each plasmid, i.e. degree of compaction, as observed with electron microscopy. pBS plasmid was also exposed at various DNA concentrations to rays. The yield of SSB decreased with increasing concentration, suggesting a diminution in the amount of hydroxyl radicals efficient for radiolytic attack. This effect of concentration was also observed with densely ionizing radiation. In conclusion, the accessibility of DNA is a key-parameter in the formation of damage in vitro and in vivo as well. En utilisant la technique de relaxation de plasmide, l'induction de cassures simple brin (SSB) par les radiations ? a été comparée dans deux plasmides de taille différente, pSP189 et pBS. La relation dose-effet est linéaire pour les deux plasmides, mais il se forme trois fois plus de SSB dans pSP189 que dans pBS. Cette disparité semble pouvoir être reliée au degré de compaction différent des plasmides, observé en microscopie électronique. Elle s'expliquerait en terme d'accessibilité aux espèces radicalaires formées lors de la radiolyse de l'eau. Le plasmide pBS, à différentes concentrations, a été ensuite exposé aux radiations γ. Le taux de cassures décroit lorsque la concentration en ADN croit, suggérant une diminution du nombre de radicaux pouvant efficacement réagir avec l'ADN. Cet effet a également été mis en évidence lors d'une irradiation avec des particules de TEL élevé. En conclusion, l'accessibilité de l'ADN est un paramètre- clé dans la formation des dommages, tant in vitro que in vivo.

  8. Integration of pT181-like tetracycline resistance plasmids into large staphylococcal plasmids involves IS257.

    PubMed Central

    Werckenthin, C; Schwarz, S; Roberts, M C

    1996-01-01

    Four large staphylococcal plasmids ranging in size from 31 to 82 kbp have been shown to mediate tetracycline resistance via an integrated copy of the tet(K)-encoding plasmid pT181 which was flanked by copies of the insertion element IS257. In two cases, IS257 elements interrupted the repC reading frame of pT181 and an 8-bp sequence from within the repC gene was duplicated at the interrupted site. In the third plasmid, the IS257 elements interrupted the pT181 DNA immediately upstream of the repC coding sequence with an 8-bp duplication. In the fourth case, the IS257 elements flanked a pT181-like plasmid with one IS257 in the repC coding sequence and the other within the recombinase (pre) coding sequence, so that a section of the pT181 sequence was deleted. All four integration sites detected in this study differ from those previously described for the IS257-mediated integration of pT181-like plasmids into large plasmids or into the chromosomal DNA. PMID:8913460

  9. Serum resistance encoded by colicin V plasmids in Escherichia coli and its relationship to the plasmid transfer system.

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, A M; Savage, D C

    1984-01-01

    Eight colicin V plasmids were conjugated into a plasmidless Escherichia coli (K-12) strain that was susceptible to the bactericidal effects of normal rabbit serum. The resulting colicin V-positive strains were examined for their capacity to resist the lethal effects of serum. Serum resistance was assessed as growth of the bacterial strain in medium containing 5% normal rabbit serum inoculated from a culture in the early exponential phase. Only three of the eight colicin V plasmids were found to confer the serum resistance phenotype on the host strain. Derepression of the transfer system was associated with serum resistance in two of the plasmids. Two other derepressed plasmids did not confer serum resistance on the host bacterium. Therefore, such derepression alone was insufficient to produce serum resistance. The factor(s) encoded by colicin V plasmids and responsible for the serum resistance of the bacterial strains bearing the plasmids was shown to be a property associated with the cell and not an extracellular factor excreted into the growth medium. PMID:6365788

  10. Partition coefficients for calcic plagioclase - Implications for Archean anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phinney, W. C.; Morrison, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    In most Archean cratons, cumulates of equant plagioclase megacrysts form anorthositic complexes, including those at Bad Vermilion Lake (Ontario). In this paper, partition coefficients (Ds) of REEs between natural high-Ca plagioclase megacrysts and their basaltic matrices were determined, using a multiple aliquot techique, and megacrystic plagioclases occurring in anorthosites were analyzed for the same components which, in conjunction with their Ds, were applied to calculations of melts in equilibrium with anorthosites. The REE's Ds were found to agree well with experimentally determined values and to predict equilibrium melts for Archean anorthosites that agree well with coeval basaltic flows and dikes. The Ds also appear to be valid for both the tholeiitic and alkali basalts over a wide range of mg numbers and REE concentrations. It is suggested that the moderately Fe-rich tholeiites that are hosts to plagioclase megacrysts in greenstone belts form the parental melts for megacrysts which make up the Bad Vermilion Lake Archean anorthositic complex.

  11. Partitioning SAT Instances for Distributed Solving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyvärinen, Antti E. J.; Junttila, Tommi; Niemelä, Ilkka

    In this paper we study the problem of solving hard propositional satisfiability problem (SAT) instances in a computing grid or cloud, where run times and communication between parallel running computations are limited.We study analytically an approach where the instance is partitioned iteratively into a tree of subproblems and each node in the tree is solved in parallel.We present new methods for constructing partitions which combine clause learning and lookahead. The methods are incorporated into the iterative approach and its performance is demonstrated with an extensive comparison against the best sequential solvers in the SAT competition 2009 as well as against two efficient parallel solvers.

  12. Chiral partition functions of quantum Hall droplets

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelli, Andrea Viola, Giovanni; Zemba, Guillermo R.

    2010-02-15

    Chiral partition functions of conformal field theory describe the edge excitations of isolated Hall droplets. They are characterized by an index specifying the quasiparticle sector and transform among themselves by a finite-dimensional representation of the modular group. The partition functions are derived and used to describe electron transitions leading to Coulomb blockade conductance peaks. We find the peak patterns for Abelian hierarchical states and non-Abelian Read-Rezayi states, and compare them. Experimental observation of these features can check the qualitative properties of the conformal field theory description, such as the decomposition of the Hilbert space into sectors, involving charged and neutral parts, and the fusion rules.

  13. Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pAD1-encoded Fst toxin affects membrane permeability and alters cellular responses to lantibiotics.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Keith E; Weaver, Dariel M; Wells, Carol L; Waters, Christopher M; Gardner, Marshall E; Ehli, Erik A

    2003-04-01

    Fst is a peptide toxin encoded by the par toxin-antitoxin stability determinant of Enterococcus faecalis plasmid pAD1. Intracellular overproduction of Fst resulted in simultaneous inhibition of all cellular macromolecular synthesis concomitant with cell growth inhibition and compromised the integrity of the cell membrane. Cells did not lyse or noticeably leak intracellular contents but had specific defects in chromosome partitioning and cell division. Extracellular addition of synthetic Fst had no effect on cell growth. Spontaneous Fst-resistant mutants had a phenotype consistent with changes in membrane composition. Interestingly, overproduction of Fst sensitized cells to the lantibiotic nisin, and Fst-resistant mutants were cross-resistant to nisin and the pAD1-encoded cytolysin.

  14. Plasmid replication initiator interactions with origin 13-mers and polymerase subunits contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Gross, Marta; Wasaznik, Anna; Konieczny, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Although the molecular basis for replisome activity has been extensively investigated, it is not clear what the exact mechanism for de novo assembly of the replication complex at the replication origin is, or how the directionality of replication is determined. Here, using the plasmid RK2 replicon, we analyze the protein interactions required for Escherichia coli polymerase III (Pol III) holoenzyme association at the replication origin. Our investigations revealed that in E. coli, replisome formation at the plasmid origin involves interactions of the RK2 plasmid replication initiation protein (TrfA) with both the polymerase β- and α-subunits. In the presence of other replication proteins, including DnaA, helicase, primase and the clamp loader, TrfA interaction with the β-clamp contributes to the formation of the β-clamp nucleoprotein complex on origin DNA. By reconstituting in vitro the replication reaction on ssDNA templates, we demonstrate that TrfA interaction with the β-clamp and sequence-specific TrfA interaction with one strand of the plasmid origin DNA unwinding element (DUE) contribute to strand-specific replisome assembly. Wild-type TrfA, but not the TrfA QLSLF mutant (which does not interact with the β-clamp), in the presence of primase, helicase, Pol III core, clamp loader, and β-clamp initiates DNA synthesis on ssDNA template containing 13-mers of the bottom strand, but not the top strand, of DUE. Results presented in this work uncovered requirements for anchoring polymerase at the plasmid replication origin and bring insights of how the directionality of DNA replication is determined. PMID:26195759

  15. Plasmids and Rickettsial Evolution: Insight from Rickettsia felis

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Joseph J.; Beier, Magda S.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Shallom, Joshua M.; Purkayastha, Anjan; Sobral, Bruno S.; Azad, Abdu F.

    2007-01-01

    Background The genome sequence of Rickettsia felis revealed a number of rickettsial genetic anomalies that likely contribute not only to a large genome size relative to other rickettsiae, but also to phenotypic oddities that have confounded the categorization of R. felis as either typhus group (TG) or spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae. Most intriguing was the first report from rickettsiae of a conjugative plasmid (pRF) that contains 68 putative open reading frames, several of which are predicted to encode proteins with high similarity to conjugative machinery in other plasmid-containing bacteria. Methodology/Principal Findings Using phylogeny estimation, we determined the mode of inheritance of pRF genes relative to conserved rickettsial chromosomal genes. Phylogenies of chromosomal genes were in agreement with other published rickettsial trees. However, phylogenies including pRF genes yielded different topologies and suggest a close relationship between pRF and ancestral group (AG) rickettsiae, including the recently completed genome of R. bellii str. RML369-C. This relatedness is further supported by the distribution of pRF genes across other rickettsiae, as 10 pRF genes (or inactive derivatives) also occur in AG (but not SFG) rickettsiae, with five of these genes characteristic of typical plasmids. Detailed characterization of pRF genes resulted in two novel findings: the identification of oriV and replication termination regions, and the likelihood that a second proposed plasmid, pRFδ, is an artifact of the original genome assembly. Conclusion/Significance Altogether, we propose a new rickettsial classification scheme with the addition of a fourth lineage, transitional group (TRG) rickettsiae, that is unique from TG and SFG rickettsiae and harbors genes from possible exchanges with AG rickettsiae via conjugation. We offer insight into the evolution of a plastic plasmid system in rickettsiae, including the role plasmids may have played in the acquirement of

  16. Experimental geochemistry of Pu and Sm and the thermodynamics of trace element partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, John H.; Burnett, Donald S.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study of the partitioning of Pu and Sm between diopside/liquid and whitlockite/liquid supports the hypothesis that Pu behaves as a light rare earth element during igneous processes in reducing environments. D-Pu/D-Sm is found to be about 2 for both diopsidic pyroxene and whitlockite, and the amount of fractionation would be decreased further if Pu were compared to Ce or Nd. Data indicate that temperature, rather than melt composition, is the most important control on elemental partitioning, and that P2O5 in aluminosilicate melts serves as a complexing agent for the actinides and lanthanides.

  17. Genomic and functional characterization of the modular broad-host-range RA3 plasmid, the archetype of the IncU group.

    PubMed

    Kulinska, Anna; Czeredys, Magdalena; Hayes, Finbarr; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2008-07-01

    IncU plasmids are a distinctive group of mobile elements with highly conserved backbone functions and variable antibiotic resistance gene cassettes. The IncU archetype is conjugative plasmid RA3, whose sequence (45,909 bp) shows it to be a mosaic, modular replicon with a class I integron different from that of other IncU replicons. Functional analysis demonstrated that RA3 possesses a broad host range and can efficiently self-transfer, replicate, and be maintained stably in alpha-, beta-, and gammaproteobacteria. RA3 contains 50 open reading frames clustered in distinct functional modules. The replication module encompasses the repA and repB genes embedded in long repetitive sequences. RepA, which is homologous to antitoxin proteins from alpha- and gammaproteobacteria, contains a Cro/cI-type DNA-binding domain present in the XRE family of transcriptional regulators. The repA promoter is repressed by RepA and RepB. The minireplicon encompasses repB and the downstream repetitive sequence r1/r2. RepB shows up to 80% similarity to putative replication initiation proteins from environmental plasmids of beta- and gammaproteobacteria, as well as similarity to replication proteins from alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes. Stable maintenance functions of RA3 are most like those of IncP-1 broad-host-range plasmids and comprise the active partitioning apparatus formed by IncC (ParA) and KorB (ParB), the antirestriction protein KlcA, and accessory stability components KfrA and KfrC. The RA3 origin of transfer was localized experimentally between the maintenance and conjugative-transfer operons. The putative conjugative-transfer module is highly similar in organization and in its products to transfer regions of certain broad-host-range environmental plasmids.

  18. Structural analysis of the 6 kb cryptic plasmid pFAJ2600 from Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 and construction of Escherichia coli-Rhodococcus shuttle vectors.

    PubMed

    De Mot, R; Nagy, I; De Schrijver, A; Pattanapipitpaisal, P; Schoofs, G; Vanderleyden, J

    1997-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 5936 bp cryptic plasmid pFAJ2600 from Rhodococcus erythropolis NI86/21 was determined. Based on the characteristics of its putative replication genes, repA and repB, pFAJ2600 was assigned to the family of pAL5000-related small replicons identified in Mycobacterium (pAL5000), Corynebacterium (pXZ10142), Brevibacterium (pRBL1), Bifidobacterium (pMB1) and Neisseria (pJD1). The replication systems of these plasmids show striking similarities to the ones used by the ColE2 family of plasmids from Enterobacteria with respect to both trans-acting factors and ori sequences. Two possible plasmid stabilization systems are encoded on pFAJ2600: a site-specific recombinase (PmrA) related to the Escherichia coli Xer proteins for plasmid multimer resolution and an ATPase (ParA) related to the A-type of proteins in sop/par partitioning systems. The proposed replication termination region of pFAJ2600 has features in common with the Ter loci of Bacillus subtilis. Chimeras composed of a pUC18-Cmr derivative inserted in the parA-repA intergenic region of vector pFAJ2600 produced vectors that could be shuttled between Escherichia coli and several Rhodococcus species (R. erythropolis, R. fascians, R. rhodochrous, R. ruber). The pFAJ2600-based shuttle vector pFAJ2574 was stably maintained in R. erythropolis and R. fascians growing under non-selective conditions.

  19. Partition function zeros and finite size scaling for polymer adsorption

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Mark P.; Luettmer-Strathmann, Jutta

    2014-11-28

    The zeros of the canonical partition functions for a flexible polymer chain tethered to an attractive flat surface are computed for chains up to length N = 1536. We use a bond-fluctuation model for the polymer and obtain the density of states for the tethered chain by Wang-Landau sampling. The partition function zeros in the complex e{sup β}-plane are symmetric about the real axis and densest in a boundary region that has the shape of a nearly closed circle, centered at the origin, terminated by two flaring tails. This structure defines a root-free zone about the positive real axis and follows Yang-Lee theory. As the chain length increases, the base of each tail moves toward the real axis, converging on the phase-transition point in the thermodynamic limit. We apply finite-size scaling theory of partition-function zeros and show that the crossover exponent defined through the leading zero is identical to the standard polymer adsorption crossover exponent ϕ. Scaling analysis of the leading zeros locates the polymer adsorption transition in the thermodynamic (N → ∞) limit at reduced temperature T{sub c}{sup *}=1.027(3) [β{sub c}=1/T{sub c}{sup *}=0.974(3)] with crossover exponent ϕ = 0.515(25). Critical exponents for the order parameter and specific heat are determined to be β{sup ~}=0.97(5) and α = 0.03(4), respectively. A universal scaling function for the average number of surface contacts is also constructed.

  20. Robust and efficient overset grid assembly for partitioned unstructured meshes

    SciTech Connect

    Roget, Beatrice Sitaraman, Jayanarayanan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a method to perform efficient and automated Overset Grid Assembly (OGA) on a system of overlapping unstructured meshes in a parallel computing environment where all meshes are partitioned into multiple mesh-blocks and processed on multiple cores. The main task of the overset grid assembler is to identify, in parallel, among all points in the overlapping mesh system, at which points the flow solution should be computed (field points), interpolated (receptor points), or ignored (hole points). Point containment search or donor search, an algorithm to efficiently determine the cell that contains a given point, is the core procedure necessary for accomplishing this task. Donor search is particularly challenging for partitioned unstructured meshes because of the complex irregular boundaries that are often created during partitioning. Another challenge arises because of the large variation in the type of mesh-block overlap and the resulting large load imbalance on multiple processors. Desirable traits for the grid assembly method are efficiency (requiring only a small fraction of the solver time), robustness (correct identification of all point types), and full automation (no user input required other than the mesh system). Additionally, the method should be scalable, which is an important challenge due to the inherent load imbalance. This paper describes a fully-automated grid assembly method, which can use two different donor search algorithms. One is based on the use of auxiliary grids and Exact Inverse Maps (EIM), and the other is based on the use of Alternating Digital Trees (ADT). The EIM method is demonstrated to be more efficient than the ADT method, while retaining robustness. An adaptive load re-balance algorithm is also designed and implemented, which considerably improves the scalability of the method.

  1. Predicting blood:air partition coefficients using basic physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Buist, Harrie E; Wit-Bos, Lianne de; Bouwman, Tialda; Vaes, Wouter H J

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative Property Property Relationships (QPPRs) for human and rat blood:air partition coefficients (PBAs) have been derived, based on vapour pressure (Log(VP)), the octanol:water partition coefficient (Log(K(OW))) and molecular weight (MW), using partial least squares multilinear modelling. These parameters are all included in the standard data to be submitted under REACH. The chemical dataset consisted of volatile organic chemicals, principally aliphatic hydrocarbons, benzene derivatives with one aromatic ring, and ethers, with and without halogen atoms. Other chemicals represented were cyclic hydrocarbons and carbonic acid esters. Separate rat and human models were derived, as well as mixed ones. Log(VP) and Log(K(OW)) contributed most to the prediction of Log(PBA) in the three-parameter model, while the contribution of MW was relatively small. Still, the three-parameter model differed significantly from the two-parameter model and performed better. Its performance was comparable to that of models published in public literature, which are based on more complex molecular parameters or on measured olive:oil air and saline/water:air partition coefficients. Since, based on the available data for humans, rats, mice, dogs and rabbits, existence of interspecies differences of PBAs cannot be clearly excluded, the use of separate models for each species is advisable. Concluding, the three-parameter human model Log(PBA)=6.96-1.04 Log(VP)-0.533 Log(K(OW))-0.00495MW and the three-parameter rat model 6.16-0.888 Log(VP)-0.521 Log(K(OW))-0.00201MW provide robust and reliable models for predicting PBA values of volatile organic chemicals using commonly available chemical properties of molecules.

  2. Assessing the effects of architectural variations on light partitioning within virtual wheat–pea mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Barillot, Romain; Escobar-Gutiérrez, Abraham J.; Fournier, Christian; Huynh, Pierre; Combes, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Predicting light partitioning in crop mixtures is a critical step in improving the productivity of such complex systems, and light interception has been shown to be closely linked to plant architecture. The aim of the present work was to analyse the relationships between plant architecture and light partitioning within wheat–pea (Triticum aestivum–Pisum sativum) mixtures. An existing model for wheat was utilized and a new model for pea morphogenesis was developed. Both models were then used to assess the effects of architectural variations in light partitioning. Methods First, a deterministic model (L-Pea) was developed in order to obtain dynamic reconstructions of pea architecture. The L-Pea model is based on L-systems formalism and consists of modules for ‘vegetative development’ and ‘organ extension’. A tripartite simulator was then built up from pea and wheat models interfaced with a radiative transfer model. Architectural parameters from both plant models, selected on the basis of their contribution to leaf area index (LAI), height and leaf geometry, were then modified in order to generate contrasting architectures of wheat and pea. Key results By scaling down the analysis to the organ level, it could be shown that the number of branches/tillers and length of internodes significantly determined the partitioning of light within mixtures. Temporal relationships between light partitioning and the LAI and height of the different species showed that light capture was mainly related to the architectural traits involved in plant LAI during the early stages of development, and in plant height during the onset of interspecific competition. Conclusions In silico experiments enabled the study of the intrinsic effects of architectural parameters on the partitioning of light in crop mixtures of wheat and pea. The findings show that plant architecture is an important criterion for the identification/breeding of plant ideotypes, particularly

  3. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica.

  4. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. PMID:26347724

  5. Partitioning and lipophilicity in quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, J C

    1985-01-01

    The history of the relationship of biological activity to partition coefficient and related properties is briefly reviewed. The dominance of partition coefficient in quantitation of structure-activity relationships is emphasized, although the importance of other factors is also demonstrated. Various mathematical models of in vivo transport and binding are discussed; most of these involve partitioning as the primary mechanism of transport. The models describe observed quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) well on the whole, confirming that partitioning is of key importance in in vivo behavior of a xenobiotic. The partition coefficient is shown to correlate with numerous other parameters representing bulk, such as molecular weight, volume and surface area, parachor and calculated indices such as molecular connectivity; this is especially so for apolar molecules, because for polar molecules lipophilicity factors into both bulk and polar or hydrogen bonding components. The relationship of partition coefficient to chromatographic parameters is discussed, and it is shown that such parameters, which are often readily obtainable experimentally, can successfully supplant partition coefficient in QSARs. The relationship of aqueous solubility with partition coefficient is examined in detail. Correlations are observed, even with solid compounds, and these can be used to predict solubility. The additive/constitutive nature of partition coefficient is discussed extensively, as are the available schemes for the calculation of partition coefficient. Finally the use of partition coefficient to provide structural information is considered. It is shown that partition coefficient can be a valuable structural tool, especially if the enthalpy and entropy of partitioning are available. PMID:3905374

  6. Bacterial plasmid transfer under space flight conditions: The Mobilisatsia experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boever, P.; Ilyin, V.; Mahillon, J.; Mergeay, M.

    Background Microorganisms are subject to a genetic evolution which may lead to the capacity to colonize new environments and to cause infections Central players in this evolutionary process are mobile genetic elements phages plasmids and transposons The latter help to mobilize and reorganize genes be it within a given genome intragenomic mobility or between bacterial cells intercellular mobility Confined environment and space flight related factors such as microgravity and cosmic radiation may influence the frequency with which mobile genetic elements are exchanged between microorganisms Aim Within the frame of the Mobilisatsia experiment a triparental microbial plasmid transfer was promoted aboard the International Space Station ISS The efficiency of the plasmid exchange process was compared with a synchronously performed ground control experiment An experiment was carried out with well-characterized Gram-negative test strains and one experiment was done with Gram-positive test strains Results The experiment took place during the Soyouz Mission 8 to the ISS from April 19th until April 30th 2004 Liquid cultures of the bacterial strains Cupriavidus metallidurans AE815 final recipient Escherichia coli CM1962 carrying a mobilisable vector with a nickel-resistance marker and E coli CM140 carrying the Broad Host Range plasmid RP4 for the Gram-negative experiment and Bacillus thuringiensis Bti AND931 carrying the conjugative plasmid pXO16 Bti 4Q7 with mobilisable vector pC194 carrying a resistance to chloramphenicol and Bti GBJ002

  7. Plasmid DNA-based gene transfer with ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common option in the real world because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid DNA-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a Phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. Recently, a Phase III clinical trial of hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) showed improvement of ischemic ulcers, but it could not salvage limbs from amputation. In addition, a Phase I/II clinical study of fibroblast growth factor gene therapy in PAD extended amputation-free survival, but it seemed to fail in Phase III. In this situation, we and others have developed plasmid DNA-based gene transfer using ultrasound with microbubbles to enhance its efficiency while maintaining safety. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer has been reported to augment the gene transfer efficiency and select the target organ using cationic microbubble phospholipids which bind negatively charged DNA. Ultrasound with microbubblesis likely to create new therapeutic options inavariety of diseases.

  8. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  9. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  10. Dcm methylation is detrimental to plasmid transformation in Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, Adam M; Olson, Daniel G.; Caiazza, Nicky; Lynd, Lee R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Industrial production of biofuels and other products by cellulolytic microorganisms is of interest but hindered by the nascent state of genetic tools. Although a genetic system for Clostridium thermocellum DSM1313 has recently been developed, available methods achieve relatively low efficiency and similar plasmids can transform C. thermocellum at dramatically different efficiencies. RESULTS: We report an increase in transformation efficiency of C. thermocellum for a variety of plasmids by using DNA that has been methylated by Escherichia coli Dam but not Dcm methylases. When isolated from a dam+ dcm+ E. coli strain, pAMG206 transforms C. thermocellum 100-fold better than the similar plasmid pAMG205, which contains an additional Dcm methylation site in the pyrF gene. Upon removal of Dcm methylation, transformation with pAMG206 showed a four- to seven-fold increase in efficiency; however, transformation efficiency of pAMG205 increased 500-fold. Removal of the Dcm methylation site from the pAM205 pyrF gene via silent mutation resulted in increased transformation efficiencies equivalent to that of pAMG206. Upon proper methylation, transformation efficiency of plasmids bearing the pMK3 and pB6A origins of replication increased ca. three orders of magnitude. CONCLUSION: E. coli Dcm methylation decreases transformation efficiency in C. thermocellum DSM1313. The use of properly methylated plasmid DNA should facilitate genetic manipulation of this industrially relevant bacterium.

  11. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  12. Equivalence of partition properties and determinacy

    PubMed Central

    Kechris, Alexander S.; Woodin, W. Hugh

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that, within L(ℝ), the smallest inner model of set theory containing the reals, the axiom of determinacy is equivalent to the existence of arbitrarily large cardinals below Θ with the strong partition property κ → (κ)κ. PMID:16593299

  13. Mapping Pesticide Partition Coefficients By Electromagnetic Induction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A potential method for reducing pesticide leaching is to base application rates on the leaching potential of a specific chemical and soil combination. However, leaching is determined in part by the partitioning of the chemical between the soil and soil solution, which varies across a field. Standard...

  14. Solute partitioning and filtration by extracellular matrices

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Christina L.; Ferrell, Nicholas; Schnell, Lisa; Dubnisheva, Anna; Zydney, Andrew L.; Yurchenco, Peter D.; Roy, Shuvo

    2009-01-01

    The physiology of glomerular filtration remains mechanistically obscure despite its importance in disease. The correspondence between proteinuria and foot process effacement suggests podocytes as the locus of the filtration barrier. If so, retained macromolecules ought to accumulate at the filtration barrier, an effect called concentration polarization. Literature data indicate macromolecule concentrations decrease from subendothelial to subepithelial glomerular basement membrane (GBM), as would be expected if the GBM were itself the filter. The objective of this study was to obtain insights into the possible role of the GBM in protein retention by performing fundamental experimental and theoretical studies on the properties of three model gels. Solute partitioning and filtration through thin gels of a commercially available laminin-rich extracellular matrix, Matrigel, were measured using a polydisperse polysaccharide tracer molecule, Ficoll 70. Solute partitioning into laminin gels and lens basement membrane (LBM) were measured using Ficoll 70. A novel model of a laminin gel was numerically simulated, as well as a mixed structure-random-fiber model for LBM. Experimental partitioning was predicted by numerical simulations. Sieving coefficients through thin gels of Matrigel were size dependent and strongly flux dependent. The observed flux dependence arose from compression of the gel in response to the applied pressure. Gel compression may alter solute partitioning into extracellular matrix at physiologic pressures present in the glomerular capillary. This suggests a physical mechanism coupling podocyte structure to permeability characteristics of the GBM. PMID:19587146

  15. A review of approaches for evapotranspiration partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Partitioning of evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation from the soil surface (E) and transpiration (T) is challenging but important in order to assess biomass production and the allocation of increasingly scarce water resources. Generally T is the desired component with the water being used to enh...

  16. A Partition Formula for Fibonacci Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahr, Philipp; Ringerl, Claus Michael

    2008-02-01

    We present a partition formula for the even index Fibonacci numbers. The formula is motivated by the appearance of these Fibonacci numbers in the representation theory of the socalled 3-Kronecker quiver, i.e., the oriented graph with two vertices and three arrows in the same direction.

  17. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  18. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  19. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  20. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  1. 25 CFR 152.33 - Partition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER ISSUANCE OF PATENTS IN FEE, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY, REMOVAL OF RESTRICTIONS, AND SALE OF CERTAIN INDIAN LANDS Partitions in Kind of Inherited Allotments § 152..., regardless of their competency, patents in fee to be issued to the competent heirs for their shares and...

  2. Set Partitions and the Multiplication Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockwood, Elise; Caughman, John S., IV

    2016-01-01

    To further understand student thinking in the context of combinatorial enumeration, we examine student work on a problem involving set partitions. In this context, we note some key features of the multiplication principle that were often not attended to by students. We also share a productive way of thinking that emerged for several students who…

  3. Zr partitioning and kinetics and mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    The results of investigations concerning the cooling histories of lunar rocks are reported. Publications resulting from this research are listed. Studies discussed include the partitioning of Zr between FeTi03 and Fe2Ti04 in the presence of Fe + Zr02, and ulvospinel reduction.

  4. Application of partition technology to particle electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Alstine, James M.; Harris, J. Milton; Karr, Laurel J.; Bamberger, Stephan; Matsos, Helen C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of polymer-ligand concentration on particle electrophoretic mobility and partition in aqueous polymer two-phase systems are investigated. Polymer coating chemistry and affinity ligand synthesis, purification, and analysis are conducted. It is observed that poly (ethylene glycol)-ligands are effective for controlling particle electrophoretic mobility.

  5. First experimentally determined thermodynamic values of francium: hydration energy, energy of partitioning, and thermodynamic radius.

    PubMed

    Delmau, Lætitia H; Moine, Jérôme; Mirzadeh, Saed; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-08-08

    The Gibbs energy of partitioning of Fr(+) ion between water and nitrobenzene has been determined to be 14.5 ± 0.6 kJ/mol at 25 °C, the first ever Gibbs energy of partitioning for francium in particular and the first ever solution thermodynamic quantity for francium in general. This value enabled the ionic radius and standard Gibbs energy of hydration for Fr(+) to be estimated as 173 pm and -251 kJ/mol, respectively, the former value being significantly smaller than previously thought. A new experimental method was established using a cesium dicarbollide as a cation-exchange agent, overcoming problems inherent to the trace-level concentrations of francium. The methodology opens the door to the study of the partitioning behavior of francium to other water-immiscible solvents and the determination of complexation constants for francium binding by receptor molecules.

  6. Strainrange partitioning behavior of the nickel-base superalloys, Rene' 80 and in 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, G. R.; Nachtigall, A. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study was made to assess the ability of the method of Strainrange Partitioning (SRP) to both correlate and predict high-temperature, low cycle fatigue lives of nickel base superalloys for gas turbine applications. The partitioned strainrange versus life relationships for uncoated Rene' 80 and cast IN 100 were also determined from the ductility normalized-Strainrange Partitioning equations. These were used to predict the cyclic lives of the baseline tests. The life predictability of the method was verified for cast IN 100 by applying the baseline results to the cyclic life prediction of a series of complex strain cycling tests with multiple hold periods at constant strain. It was concluded that the method of SRP can correlate and predict the cyclic lives of laboratory specimens of the nickel base superalloys evaluated in this program.

  7. Effect of fuzzy partitioning in Crohn's disease classification: a neuro-fuzzy-based approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sk Saddam; Dey, Nilanjan; Ashour, Amira S; Sifaki-Pistolla, Dimitra; Bălas-Timar, Dana; Balas, Valentina E; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2017-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) diagnosis is a tremendously serious health problem due to its ultimately effect on the gastrointestinal tract that leads to the need of complex medical assistance. In this study, the backpropagation neural network fuzzy classifier and a neuro-fuzzy model are combined for diagnosing the CD. Factor analysis is used for data dimension reduction. The effect on the system performance has been investigated when using fuzzy partitioning and dimension reduction. Additionally, further comparison is done between the different levels of the fuzzy partition to reach the optimal performance accuracy level. The performance evaluation of the proposed system is estimated using the classification accuracy and other metrics. The experimental results revealed that the classification with level-8 partitioning provides a classification accuracy of 97.67 %, with a sensitivity and specificity of 96.07 and 100 %, respectively.

  8. Why the partition coefficient of ionic liquids is concentration-dependent.

    PubMed

    Köddermann, Thorsten; Reith, Dirk; Arnold, A

    2013-09-19

    The partition coefficient of a substance measures its solubility in octanol compared with water and is widely used to estimate toxicity. If a substance is hardly soluble in octanol, then it is practically impossible for it to enter (human) cells and therefore is less likely to be toxic. For novel drugs it might be important to penetrate the cell through the membrane or even integrate into it. While for most simple substances the partition coefficient is concentration-independent at low concentrations, this is not true for a few important classes of complex molecules, such as ionic liquids or tensides. We present a simple association-dissociation model for concentration dependence of the partition coefficient of ionic liquids. Atomistic computer simulations serve to parametrize our model by calculating solvation free energies in water and octanol using thermodynamic integration. We demonstrate the validity of the method by reproducing the concentration-independent partition coefficients of small alcohols and the concentration-dependent partition coefficient of a commonly used ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [C4MIM][NTf2]. The concentration dependence is accurately predicted in a concentration range of several orders of magnitude.

  9. Isotope fractionation of benzene during partitioning - Revisited.

    PubMed

    Kopinke, F-D; Georgi, A; Imfeld, G; Richnow, H-H

    2017-02-01

    Isotope fractionation between benzene-D0 and benzene-D6 caused by multi-step partitioning of the benzenes between water and two organic solvents, n-octane and 1-octanol, as well as between water and the gas phase, was measured. The obtained fractionation factors αH = KH/KD are αH = 1.080 ± 0.015 and αH = 1.074 ± 0.015 for extraction into n-octane and 1-octanol, respectively, and αH = 1.049 ± 0.010 for evaporation from aqueous solution. The comparison of solvent- and gas-phase partitioning reveals that about 2/3 of the driving force of fractionation is due to different interactions in the aqueous phase, whereas 1/3 is due to different interactions in the organic phase. The heavy benzene isotopologue behaves more 'hydrophilically' and the light one more 'hydrophobically'. This synergistic alignment gives rise to relatively large fractionation effects in partitioning between water and non-polar organic matter. In contrast to a previous study, there is no indication of strong fractionation by specific interactions between benzene and octanol. Partitioning under non-equilibrium conditions yields smaller apparent fractionation effects due to opposite trends of thermodynamic and kinetic fractionation parameters, i.e. partition and diffusion coefficients of the isotopologues. This may have consequences which should be taken into account when considering isotope fractionation due to sorption in environmental compartments.

  10. Open software tools for eddy covariance flux partitioning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agro-ecosystem management and assessment will benefit greatly from the development of reliable techniques for partitioning evapotranspiration (ET) into evaporation (E) and transpiration (T). Among other activities, flux partitioning can aid in evaluating consumptive vs. non-consumptive agricultural...

  11. [Plasmid P85 from Azospirillum brasilense SP245: study of the circle of possible hosts and incompatibility with plasmids from Azospirillum brasilense SP7].

    PubMed

    Katsy, E I

    1992-01-01

    The possibility of the stable inheritance of the plasmid p85 mobilized derivatives from Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 in the cells of the bacterial genera Rizobiaceae (Agrobacterium tumfaciens) and Pseudomonadaceae (Pseudomonas putida) has been shown. The plasmid p85 participates in coding for the physiologically active products (the plant hormones). It is not inherited by the Escherichia coli strains. For the first time the incompatibility of azospirillium plasmids has been demonstrated on the example of the plasmid p85 from Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 and the plasmid p115 from Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.