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Sample records for plasmid transfer drives

  1. Plasmid and clonal interference during post horizontal gene transfer evolution.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, S; Perez Pantoja, D; Bravo, I G

    2017-02-16

    Plasmids are nucleic acid molecules that can drive their own replication in a living cell. They can be transmitted horizontally and can thrive in the host cell to high-copy numbers. Plasmid replication and gene expression consume cellular resources and cells carrying plasmids incur fitness costs. But many plasmids carry genes that can be beneficial under certain conditions, allowing the cell to endure in the presence of antibiotics, toxins, competitors or parasites. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded genes can thus instantaneously confer differential adaptation to local or transient selection conditions. This conflict between cellular fitness and plasmid spread sets the scene for multilevel selection processes. We have engineered a system to study the short-term evolutionary impact of different synonymous versions of a plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance gene. Applying experimental evolution under different selection conditions and deep sequencing allowed us to show rapid local adaptation to the presence of antibiotic and to the specific version of the resistance gene transferred. We describe the presence of clonal interference at two different levels: at the within-cell level, because a single cell can carry several plasmids, and at the between-cell level, because a bacterial population may contain several clones carrying different plasmids and displaying different fitness in the presence/absence of antibiotic. Understanding the within-cell and between-cell dynamics of plasmids after horizontal gene transfer is essential to unravel the dense network of mobile elements underlying the worldwide threat to public health of antibiotic resistance.

  2. Plasmid transfer systems in the rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hao; Hynes, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    Rhizobia are agriculturally important bacteria that can form nitrogen-fixing nodules on the roots of leguminous plants. Agricultural application of rhizobial inoculants can play an important role in increasing leguminous crop yields. In temperate rhizobia, genes involved in nodulation and nitrogen fixation are usually located on one or more large plasmids (pSyms) or on symbiotic islands. In addition, other large plasmids of rhizobia carry genes that are beneficial for survival and competition of rhizobia in the rhizosphere. Conjugative transfer of these large plasmids thus plays an important role in the evolution of rhizobia. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of conjugative transfer of large rhizobial plasmids provides foundations for maintaining, monitoring, and predicting the behaviour of these plasmids during field release events. In this minireview, we summarize two types of known rhizobial conjugative plasmids, including quorum sensing regulated plasmids and RctA-repressed plasmids. We provide evidence for the existence of a third type of conjugative plasmid, including pRleVF39c in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain VF39SM, and we provide a comparison of the different types of conjugation genes found in members of the rhizobia that have had their genomes sequenced so far.

  3. Therapeutic option of plasmid-DNA based gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Kunugiza, Yasuo; Iekushi, Kazuma; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common method in clinical cases because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. In this situation, more efficient plasmid DNA gene transfer is needed all over the world. This review focuses on plasmid DNA gene transfer and its enhancement, including ultrasound with microbubbles, electroporation, hydrodynamic method, gene gun, jet injection, cationic lipids and cationic polymers.

  4. Plasmid DNA-based gene transfer with ultrasound and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Azuma, Junya; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2011-12-01

    Gene therapy offers a novel approach for the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases, but it is not yet a common option in the real world because of various problems. Viral vectors show high efficiency of gene transfer, but they have some problems with toxicity and immunity. On the other hand, plasmid DNA-based gene transfer is very safe, but its efficiency is relatively low. Especially, plasmid DNA gene therapy is used for cardiovascular disease because plasmid DNA transfer is possible for cardiac or skeletal muscle. Clinical angiogenic gene therapy using plasmid DNA gene transfer has been attempted in patients with peripheral artery disease, but a Phase III clinical trial did not show sufficient efficiency. Recently, a Phase III clinical trial of hepatocyte growth factor gene therapy in peripheral artery disease (PAD) showed improvement of ischemic ulcers, but it could not salvage limbs from amputation. In addition, a Phase I/II clinical study of fibroblast growth factor gene therapy in PAD extended amputation-free survival, but it seemed to fail in Phase III. In this situation, we and others have developed plasmid DNA-based gene transfer using ultrasound with microbubbles to enhance its efficiency while maintaining safety. Ultrasound-mediated gene transfer has been reported to augment the gene transfer efficiency and select the target organ using cationic microbubble phospholipids which bind negatively charged DNA. Ultrasound with microbubblesis likely to create new therapeutic options inavariety of diseases.

  5. F'-plasmid transfer from Escherichia coli to Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Mergeay, M; Gerits, J

    1978-01-01

    Various F' plasmids of Escherichia coli K-12 could be transferred into mutants of the soil strain 6.2, classified herein as a Pseudomonas fluorescens biotype IV. This strain was previously found to receive Flac plasmid (N. Datta and R.W. Hedges, J. Gen Microbiol. 70:453-460, 1972). ilv, leu, met, arg, and his auxotrophs were complemented by plasmids carrying isofunctional genes; trp mutants were not complemented or were very poorly complemented. The frequency of transfer was 10(-5). Subsequent transfer into other P. fluorescens recipients was of the same order of magnitude. Some transconjugants were unable to act as donors, and these did not lose the received information if subcultured on nonselective media. Use of F' plasmids helped to discriminate metabolic blocks in P. fluorescens. In particular, metA, metB, and argH mutants were so distinguished. In addition, F131 plasmid carrying the his operon and a supD mutation could partially relieve the auxotrophy of thr, ilv, and metA13 mutants, suggesting functional expression of E. coli tRNA in P. fluorescens. In P. fluorescens metA Rifr mutants carrying the F110 plasmid, which carried the E. coli metA gene and the E. coli rifs allele, sensitivity to rifampin was found to be dominant at least temporarily over resistance. This suggests interaction of E. coli and P. fluorescens subunits of RNA polymerase. his mutations were also complemented by composite P plasmids containing the his-nif region of Klebsiella pneumoniae (plasmids FN68 and RP41). nif expression could be detected by acetylene reduction in some his+ transconjugants. The frequency of transfer of these P plasmids was 5 X 10(-4). PMID:97267

  6. Conjugative Plasmid Transfer in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Grohmann, Elisabeth; Muth, Günther; Espinosa, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of bacterial plasmids is the most efficient way of horizontal gene spread, and it is therefore considered one of the major reasons for the increase in the number of bacteria exhibiting multiple-antibiotic resistance. Thus, conjugation and spread of antibiotic resistance represents a severe problem in antibiotic treatment, especially of immunosuppressed patients and in intensive care units. While conjugation in gram-negative bacteria has been studied in great detail over the last decades, the transfer mechanisms of antibiotic resistance plasmids in gram-positive bacteria remained obscure. In the last few years, the entire nucleotide sequences of several large conjugative plasmids from gram-positive bacteria have been determined. Sequence analyses and data bank comparisons of their putative transfer (tra) regions have revealed significant similarities to tra regions of plasmids from gram-negative bacteria with regard to the respective DNA relaxases and their targets, the origins of transfer (oriT), and putative nucleoside triphosphatases NTP-ases with homologies to type IV secretion systems. In contrast, a single gene encoding a septal DNA translocator protein is involved in plasmid transfer between micelle-forming streptomycetes. Based on these clues, we propose the existence of two fundamentally different plasmid-mediated conjugative mechanisms in gram-positive microorganisms, namely, the mechanism taking place in unicellular gram-positive bacteria, which is functionally similar to that in gram-negative bacteria, and a second type that occurs in multicellular gram-positive bacteria, which seems to be characterized by double-stranded DNA transfer. PMID:12794193

  7. Modelling the spatial dynamics of plasmid transfer and persistence.

    PubMed

    Krone, Stephen M; Lu, Ruinan; Fox, Randal; Suzuki, Haruo; Top, Eva M

    2007-08-01

    Bacterial plasmids are extra-chromosomal genetic elements that code for a wide variety of phenotypes in their bacterial hosts and are maintained in bacterial communities through both vertical and horizontal transfer. Current mathematical models of plasmid-bacteria dynamics, based almost exclusively on mass-action differential equations that describe these interactions in completely mixed environments, fail to adequately explain phenomena such as the long-term persistence of plasmids in natural and clinical bacterial communities. This failure is, at least in part, due to the absence of any spatial structure in these models, whereas most bacterial populations are spatially structured in microcolonies and biofilms. To help bridge the gap between theoretical predictions and observed patterns of plasmid spread and persistence, an individual-based lattice model (interacting particle system) that provides a predictive framework for understanding the dynamics of plasmid-bacteria interactions in spatially structured populations is presented here. To assess the accuracy and flexibility of the model, a series of experiments that monitored plasmid loss and horizontal transfer of the IncP-1beta plasmid pB10 : : rfp in Escherichia coli K12 and other bacterial populations grown on agar surfaces were performed. The model-based visual patterns of plasmid loss and spread, as well as quantitative predictions of the effects of different initial parental strain densities and incubation time on densities of transconjugants formed on a 2D grid, were in agreement with this and previously published empirical data. These results include features of spatially structured populations that are not predicted by mass-action differential equation models.

  8. Conjugative transfer of cadmium resistance plasmids in Rhodococcus fascians strains.

    PubMed

    Desomer, J; Dhaese, P; Van Montagu, M

    1988-05-01

    The presence of a 138-kilobase plasmid (pD188) correlated with increased resistance to cadmium in Rhodococcus fascians D188. This plasmid could be transferred by a conjugation-like system in matings between R. fascians strains. Transconjugants expressed the cadmium resistance and could be used as donors in subsequent matings. Four other R. fascians strains (NCPPB 1488, NCPPB 1675, NCPPB 2551, and ATCC 12974) could also be used as donors for cadmium resistance in matings. Strain NCPPB 1675 showed a 100% cotransfer of cadmium and chloramphenicol resistance markers.

  9. Bacterial plasmid transfer under space flight conditions: The Mobilisatsia experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boever, P.; Ilyin, V.; Mahillon, J.; Mergeay, M.

    Background Microorganisms are subject to a genetic evolution which may lead to the capacity to colonize new environments and to cause infections Central players in this evolutionary process are mobile genetic elements phages plasmids and transposons The latter help to mobilize and reorganize genes be it within a given genome intragenomic mobility or between bacterial cells intercellular mobility Confined environment and space flight related factors such as microgravity and cosmic radiation may influence the frequency with which mobile genetic elements are exchanged between microorganisms Aim Within the frame of the Mobilisatsia experiment a triparental microbial plasmid transfer was promoted aboard the International Space Station ISS The efficiency of the plasmid exchange process was compared with a synchronously performed ground control experiment An experiment was carried out with well-characterized Gram-negative test strains and one experiment was done with Gram-positive test strains Results The experiment took place during the Soyouz Mission 8 to the ISS from April 19th until April 30th 2004 Liquid cultures of the bacterial strains Cupriavidus metallidurans AE815 final recipient Escherichia coli CM1962 carrying a mobilisable vector with a nickel-resistance marker and E coli CM140 carrying the Broad Host Range plasmid RP4 for the Gram-negative experiment and Bacillus thuringiensis Bti AND931 carrying the conjugative plasmid pXO16 Bti 4Q7 with mobilisable vector pC194 carrying a resistance to chloramphenicol and Bti GBJ002

  10. Synthetic Fatty Acids Prevent Plasmid-Mediated Horizontal Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Getino, María; Sanabria-Ríos, David J.; Fernández-López, Raúl; Campos-Gómez, Javier; Sánchez-López, José M.; Fernández, Antonio; Carballeira, Néstor M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial conjugation constitutes a major horizontal gene transfer mechanism for the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes among human pathogens. Antibiotic resistance spread could be halted or diminished by molecules that interfere with the conjugation process. In this work, synthetic 2-alkynoic fatty acids were identified as a novel class of conjugation inhibitors. Their chemical properties were investigated by using the prototype 2-hexadecynoic acid and its derivatives. Essential features of effective inhibitors were the carboxylic group, an optimal long aliphatic chain of 16 carbon atoms, and one unsaturation. Chemical modification of these groups led to inactive or less-active derivatives. Conjugation inhibitors were found to act on the donor cell, affecting a wide number of pathogenic bacterial hosts, including Escherichia, Salmonella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter spp. Conjugation inhibitors were active in inhibiting transfer of IncF, IncW, and IncH plasmids, moderately active against IncI, IncL/M, and IncX plasmids, and inactive against IncP and IncN plasmids. Importantly, the use of 2-hexadecynoic acid avoided the spread of a derepressed IncF plasmid into a recipient population, demonstrating the feasibility of abolishing the dissemination of antimicrobial resistances by blocking bacterial conjugation. PMID:26330514

  11. Plasmid transfer and genetic recombination by protoplast fusion in staphylococci.

    PubMed

    Götz, F; Ahrné, S; Lindberg, M

    1981-01-01

    The experimental conditions for plasmid transfer and genetic recombination in Staphylococcus aureus and some coagulase-negative staphylococci by protoplast fusion are described. Protoplasts were prepared by treatment with lysostaphin and lysozyme in a buffered medium with 0.7 to 0.8 M sucrose. Regeneration of cell walls was accomplished on a hypertonic agar medium containing succinate and bovine serum albumin. Transfer of plasmids occurred after treatment of the protoplast mixtures with polyethylene glycol (molecular weight, 6,000) not only between strains of the same species but also between parents of different species, although at approximately 100 times lower frequency in the latter case. Recombination of the chromosomal genes in fused protoplasts required simultaneous treatment of the mixed protoplasts with polyethylene glycol and CaCl2. A method was developed for isolation of recombinants after fusion between mutants of S. areus carrying unselectable markers. Antibiotic resistance plasmids were introduced into the parental strains and used as primary markers to detect protoplast fusion. Chromosomal recombinants were found among the clones with both parental plasmids at a high frequency. The method appears to have simple applications in the construction of strains with multiple mutant characters.

  12. Plasmid transfer and genetic recombination by protoplast fusion in staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Götz, F; Ahrné, S; Lindberg, M

    1981-01-01

    The experimental conditions for plasmid transfer and genetic recombination in Staphylococcus aureus and some coagulase-negative staphylococci by protoplast fusion are described. Protoplasts were prepared by treatment with lysostaphin and lysozyme in a buffered medium with 0.7 to 0.8 M sucrose. Regeneration of cell walls was accomplished on a hypertonic agar medium containing succinate and bovine serum albumin. Transfer of plasmids occurred after treatment of the protoplast mixtures with polyethylene glycol (molecular weight, 6,000) not only between strains of the same species but also between parents of different species, although at approximately 100 times lower frequency in the latter case. Recombination of the chromosomal genes in fused protoplasts required simultaneous treatment of the mixed protoplasts with polyethylene glycol and CaCl2. A method was developed for isolation of recombinants after fusion between mutants of S. areus carrying unselectable markers. Antibiotic resistance plasmids were introduced into the parental strains and used as primary markers to detect protoplast fusion. Chromosomal recombinants were found among the clones with both parental plasmids at a high frequency. The method appears to have simple applications in the construction of strains with multiple mutant characters. PMID:7007333

  13. Transfer of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance from Haemophilus to Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires an intervening organism.

    PubMed

    McNicol, P J; Albritton, W L; Ronald, A R

    1986-01-01

    Haemophilus species have been implicated as the source of plasmid-mediated ampicillin resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Previous attempts to transfer conjugally the resistance plasmids from Haemophilus species to N. gonorrhoeae have met with limited success. Using both biparental and triparental mating systems, it was found that transfer will occur if the commensal Neisseria species, Neisseria cinerea, is used as a transfer intermediate. This organism stably maintains resistance plasmids of Haemophilus and facilitates transfer of these plasmids to N. gonorrhoeae, in a triparental mating system, at a transfer frequency of 10(-8). Both Haemophilus ducreyi and N. gonorrhoeae carry mobilizing plasmids capable of mediating conjugal transfer of the same resistance plasmids. However, restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA hybridization studies indicate that the mobilizing plasmids are distinctly different molecules. Limited homology is present within the transfer region of these plasmids.

  14. Conjugative transfer of cadmium resistance plasmids in Rhodococcus fascians strains

    SciTech Connect

    Desomer, J.; Dhaese, P.; Montagu, M.V.

    1988-05-01

    The presence of a 138-kilobase plasmid (pD188) correlated with increased resistance to cadmium in Rhodococcus fascians D188. This plasmid could be transferred by a conjugation-like system in matings between R. fascians strains. To examine this correlation we used large /sup 32/P-labeled pD188 subclones as probes in hybridization analyses with Southern blots of restricted total DNAs of D188 and its derivative mutants. Transconjugants expressed the cadmium resistance and could be used as donors in subsequent matings. Four other R. fascians strains (NCPPB 1488, NCPPB 1675, NCPPB 2551, and ATCC 12974) could also be used as donors for cadmium resistance in matings. Strain NCPPB 1675 showed a 100% cotransfer of cadmium and chloramphenicol resistance markers.

  15. Factors That Affect Transfer of the IncI1 β-Lactam Resistance Plasmid pESBL-283 between E. coli Strains

    PubMed Central

    Händel, Nadine; Otte, Sarah; Jonker, Martijs; Brul, Stanley; ter Kuile, Benno H.

    2015-01-01

    The spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria worldwide presents a major health threat to human health care that results in therapy failure and increasing costs. The transfer of resistance conferring plasmids by conjugation is a major route by which resistance genes disseminate at the intra- and interspecies level. High similarities between resistance genes identified in foodborne and hospital-acquired pathogens suggest transmission of resistance conferring and transferrable mobile elements through the food chain, either as part of intact strains, or through transfer of plasmids from foodborne to human strains. To study the factors that affect the rate of plasmid transfer, the transmission of an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) plasmid from a foodborne Escherichia coli strain to the β-lactam sensitive E. coli MG1655 strain was documented as a function of simulated environmental factors. The foodborne E. coli isolate used as donor carried a CTX-M-1 harboring IncI1 plasmid that confers resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Cell density, energy availability and growth rate were identified as factors that affect plasmid transfer efficiency. Transfer rates were highest in the absence of the antibiotic, with almost every acceptor cell picking up the plasmid. Raising the antibiotic concentrations above the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) resulted in reduced transfer rates, but also selected for the plasmid carrying donor and recombinant strains. Based on the mutational pattern of transconjugant cells, a common mechanism is proposed which compensates for fitness costs due to plasmid carriage by reducing other cell functions. Reducing potential fitness costs due to maintenance and expression of the plasmid could contribute to persistence of resistance genes in the environment even without antibiotic pressure. Taken together, the results identify factors that drive the spread and persistence of resistance conferring plasmids in natural isolates and shows how these

  16. Serum resistance encoded by colicin V plasmids in Escherichia coli and its relationship to the plasmid transfer system.

    PubMed Central

    Nilius, A M; Savage, D C

    1984-01-01

    Eight colicin V plasmids were conjugated into a plasmidless Escherichia coli (K-12) strain that was susceptible to the bactericidal effects of normal rabbit serum. The resulting colicin V-positive strains were examined for their capacity to resist the lethal effects of serum. Serum resistance was assessed as growth of the bacterial strain in medium containing 5% normal rabbit serum inoculated from a culture in the early exponential phase. Only three of the eight colicin V plasmids were found to confer the serum resistance phenotype on the host strain. Derepression of the transfer system was associated with serum resistance in two of the plasmids. Two other derepressed plasmids did not confer serum resistance on the host bacterium. Therefore, such derepression alone was insufficient to produce serum resistance. The factor(s) encoded by colicin V plasmids and responsible for the serum resistance of the bacterial strains bearing the plasmids was shown to be a property associated with the cell and not an extracellular factor excreted into the growth medium. PMID:6365788

  17. Power transfer device for four wheel drive

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, N.

    1987-02-17

    This patent describes a power transfer device for four-wheel drive in combination with a power transmission having a transmission casing secured at one side thereof to a cylinder block of an internal combustion engine, an input shaft rotatably mounted within the transmission casing and arranged coaxially with a crank-shaft of the engine, and an output shaft rotatably mounted within the transmission casing in parallel with the input shaft. A change-speed gearing is mounted on the input and output shafts, and an output gear is integral with the output shaft. The power transfer device comprises: a transfer casing detachably secured at one side thereof to the transmission casing; a first inner casing positioned within the transmission casing and rotatably supported by a pair of axially spaced bearings which are supported by the transmission casing; a second inner casing positioned within the transfer casing coaxially with the first inner casing and rotatably supported by a pair of axially spaced bearings which are supported by the transfer casing; an output gearing assembled within the transfer casing; a first ring gear mounted on the first inner casing for rotation therewith and in mesh with the output gear on the output shaft; and a second ring gear mounted on the second inner casing for rotation therewith and drivingly connected to the output gearing.

  18. Transfer of Plasmids to an Antibiotic-Sensitive Mutant of Zymomonas mobilis†

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Steven E.; Eveleigh, Douglas E.

    1986-01-01

    Wild-type strains of Zymomonas mobilis exhibit multiple antibiotic resistance and thus restrict the use of many broad-host-range plasmids in them as cloning vehicles. Antibiotic-sensitive mutants of Z. mobilis were isolated and used as hosts for the conjugal transfer of broad-host-range plasmids from Escherichia coli. Such antibiotic-sensitive strains can facilitate the application of broad-host-range plasmids to the study of Z. mobilis. Images PMID:16347136

  19. Interspecific Transfer of Streptomyces Giant Linear Plasmids in Sterile Amended Soil Microcosms†

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Jacques; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Hill, Russell T.

    2000-01-01

    The interspecific transfer of two giant linear plasmids was investigated in sterile soil microcosms. Plasmids pRJ3L (322 kb) and pRJ28 (330 kb), both encoding mercury resistance, were successfully transferred in amended soil microcosms from their streptomycete hosts, the isolates CHR3 and CHR28, respectively, to a plasmidless and mercury-sensitive strain, Streptomyces lividans TK24. Transconjugants of S. lividans TK24 were first observed after 2 to 3 days of incubation at 30°C, which corresponded to the time taken for the formation of mycelia in soil. Transfer frequencies were 4.8 × 10−4 and 3.6 × 10−5 CFU/donor genome for pRJ3L and pRJ28, respectively. Transconjugants were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis for the presence of plasmids, and plasmid identity was confirmed by restriction digests. Total genomic DNA digests confirmed that transconjugants were S. lividans TK24. The mercury resistance genes were shown to be on the plasmid in the transconjugants by hybridization analysis and were still functional. This is the first demonstration of transfer of giant linear plasmids in sterile soil microcosms. Giant linear plasmids were detected in many Streptomyces spp. isolated from mercury-contaminated sediments from Boston Harbor (United States), Townsville Harbor (Australia), and the Sali River (Tucuman, Argentina). Mercury resistance genes were shown to be present on some of these plasmids. Our findings that giant linear plasmids can be transferred between Streptomyces spp. and are common in environmental Streptomyces isolates suggest that these plasmids are important in gene transfer between streptomycetes in the environment. PMID:10653714

  20. Potential of predominant activated sludge bacteria as recipients in conjugative plasmid transfer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Sei, Kazunari; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko; Fujita, Masanori

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of conjugative plasmid transfer to the predominant bacteria in activated sludge and the factors influencing the transfer frequency in the activated sludge process. We performed conjugative transfers of a self-transmissible, broad-host-range plasmid RP4 from Escherichia coli C600 to activated sludge bacteria by broth mating. Most of the activated sludge bacteria tested could acquire plasmid RP4, although the transfer frequencies varied from 8.8 x 10(-7) to 1.3 x 10(-2) transconjugants per recipient. The transfer frequencies in several strains were similar to, or higher than, that in intraspecific transfer to E. coli HB101. Matings under various environmental conditions showed that factors relevant to physiological activity, such as temperature and nutrient conditions, seemed to affect the transfer frequency. In addition, conjugative transfer was detected even in filtered raw and treated wastewaters. Thus, the predominant activated sludge bacteria seem to have sufficient potential as recipients in conjugative plasmid transfer under the conditions likely to occur in the activated sludge process. Transfer frequency was reduced by agitation in the presence of suspended solid. This may suggest that conjugative plasmid transfer is physically inhibited in aeration tanks.

  1. Experimental and Mathematical Models of Escherichia coli Plasmid Transfer In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Freter, Rolf; Freter, Rolf R.; Brickner, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Little is known about the factors that govern plasmid transfers in natural ecosystems such as the gut. The consistent finding by earlier workers that plasmid transfer in the normal gut can be detected only at very low rates, if at all, has given rise to numerous speculations concerning the presence in vivo of various inhibitors of plasmid transfer. Plasmids R1, R1drd-19, and pBR322 were studied in Escherichia coli K-12 and wild-type E. coli hosts in two experimental systems: (i) gnotobiotic mice carrying a synthetic indigenous microflora (F-strains) which resemble in their function the normal indigenous microflora of the mouse large intestine, and (ii) anaerobic continuous-flow cultures of indigenous large intestinal microflora of the mouse, which can simulate bacterial interactions observed in the mouse gut. Mathematical models were developed to estimate plasmid transfer rates as a measure of the “fertility,” i.e., of the intrinsic ability to transfer the plasmid under the environmental conditions of the gut. The models also evaluate the effects of plasmid segregation, reduction of the growth rates of plasmid-bearing bacterial hosts, repression of transfer functions, competition for nutrients, and bacterial attachment to the wall of the gut or culture vessel. Some confidence in the validity of these mathematical models was gained because they were able to reproduce a number of known phenomena such as the repression of fertility of the R1 plasmid, as well as known differences in the transmission and mobilization of the plasmids studied. Interpretation of the data obtained permitted a number of conclusions, some of which were rather unexpected. (i) Fertility of plasmid-bearing E. coli in the normal intestine was not impaired. The observed low rates of plasmid transfer in the normal gut can be explained on quantitative grounds alone and do not require hypothetical inhibitory mechanisms. (ii) Conditions for long-term spread and maintenance throughout human or

  2. Genomics of microbial plasmids: classification and identification based on replication and transfer systems and host taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe K.; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids are important “vehicles” for the communication of genetic information between bacteria. The exchange of plasmids transmits pathogenically and environmentally relevant traits to the host bacteria, promoting their rapid evolution and adaptation to various environments. Over the past six decades, a large number of plasmids have been identified and isolated from different microbes. With the revolution of sequencing technology, more than 4600 complete sequences of plasmids found in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes have been determined. The classification of a wide variety of plasmids is not only important to understand their features, host ranges, and microbial evolution but is also necessary to effectively use them as genetic tools for microbial engineering. This review summarizes the current situation of the classification of fully sequenced plasmids based on their host taxonomy and their features of replication and conjugative transfer. The majority of the fully sequenced plasmids are found in bacteria in the Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Spirochaetes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Euryarcheota phyla, and key features of each phylum are included. Recent advances in the identification of novel types of plasmids and plasmid transfer by culture-independent methods using samples from natural environments are also discussed. PMID:25873913

  3. Transfer case for multiple drive axle vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Batchelor, R.B.

    1987-07-07

    This patent describes a transfer case for a vehicle drive train having a transmission comprising: a housing; input means for receiving the torque output from the vehicle transmission; a first output shaft and first means for rotatably supporting the first output shaft in the housing; a second output shaft and second means for rotatably supporting the second output shaft in the housing; and means for selectively driving the first and second output shafts in response to actuation of the input means. The means for selectively driving comprises a planetary gear set having an annulus, a first set of first planet gears a second set of second planet gears, engaged with one of the first planet gear. A sun gear engages with the second planet gears, third means for rotatably mounting the sun gear in the housing and a planet carrier having means for rotatably supporting the first and second planet gears and co-axially secured to the first output shaft for rotation. A clutch means for selectively engages the sun gear with the planet carrier and the second output shaft, and the input means comprises means for rotatably driving the annulus.

  4. Frequency of horizontal gene transfer of a large catabolic plasmid (pJP4) in soil.

    PubMed

    Neilson, J W; Josephson, K L; Pepper, I L; Arnold, R B; Di Giovanni, G D; Sinclair, N A

    1994-11-01

    Limited work has been done to assess the bioremediation potential of transfer of plasmid-borne degradative genes from introduced to indigenous organisms in the environment. Here we demonstrate the transfer by conjugation of the catabolic plasmid pJP4, using a model system with donor and recipient organisms. The donor organism was Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 and the recipient organism was Variovorax paradoxus isolated from a toxic waste site. Plasmid pJP4 contains genes for mercury resistance and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic (2,4-D) acid degradation. A transfer frequency of approximately 1/10(3) donor and recipient cells (parent cells) was observed on solid agar media, decreasing to 1/10(5) parent cells in sterile soil and finally 1/10(6) parent cells in 2,4-D-amended, nonsterile soil. Presumptive transconjugants were confirmed to be resistant to Hg, to be capable of degrading 2,4-D, and to contain a plasmid of size comparable to that of pJP4. In addition, we confirmed the transfer through PCR amplifications of the tfdB gene. Although transfer of pJP4 did occur at a high frequency in pure culture, the rate was significantly decreased by the introduction of abiotic (sterile soil) and biotic (nonsterile soil) stresses. An evaluation of the data from this model system implies that the reliance on plasmid transfer from a donor organism as a remediative strategy has limited potential.

  5. Conjugative transferability of the A/C plasmids from Salmonella enterica isolates that possess or lack blaCMY in the A/C plasmid backbone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to gain a better understanding of the conjugative transfer of antimicrobial resistance plasmids from 205 Salmonella enterica strains, isolated from cattle to E. coli or Salmonella recipients. PCR-based replicon typing (PBRT) was used to type incompatibility plasmid r...

  6. Plasmid coding for transferable drug resistance in bacteria isolated from cultured rainbow trout.

    PubMed Central

    Toranzo, A E; Combarro, P; Lemos, M L; Barja, J L

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of drug resistance and plasmid-mediated transferability was investigated in 170 strains belonging to eight bacterial groups isolated from cultured rainbow trout. It was found that 87.6% of the strains were resistant to at least one drug, with the highest percentages of resistance being detected for ampicillin (54.7%), sulfadiazine (46.5%), nitrofurantoin (38.2%), and chloramphenicol (37.0%). Six enterobacteria, two Vibrio, and one Aeromonas isolate transferred resistance factors to Escherichia coli K-12. The most common transmissible R factor determined resistance to chloramphenicol and sulfadiazine, demonstrating an association between a specific plasmid and the resistance pattern transferred. The presence of chloramphenicol in fish food was detected by bioassay. In general, transfer frequencies were similar in primary and secondary matings, which indicate the potential water-borne dissemination of these R plasmids. Images PMID:6508296

  7. 13. DETAIL OF BEVEL GEAR TRANSFERRING HORIZONTAL DRIVE FROM MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF BEVEL GEAR TRANSFERRING HORIZONTAL DRIVE FROM MAIN WATERWHEEL SHAFT TO VERTICAL SHAFT DRIVING COFFEE HUSKING MILL ON SECOND FLOOR - Hacienda Cafetalera Santa Clara, Coffee Mill, KM 19, PR Route 372, Hacienda La Juanita, Yauco Municipio, PR

  8. Biofilm models for the food industry: hot spots for plasmid transfer?

    PubMed

    Van Meervenne, Eva; De Weirdt, Rosemarie; Van Coillie, Els; Devlieghere, Frank; Herman, Lieve; Boon, Nico

    2014-04-01

    Biofilms represent a substantial problem in the food industry, with food spoilage, equipment failure, and public health aspects to consider. Besides, biofilms may be a hot spot for plasmid transfer, by which antibiotic resistance can be disseminated to potential foodborne pathogens. This study investigated biomass and plasmid transfer in dual-species (Pseudomonas putida and Escherichia coli) biofilm models relevant to the food industry. Two different configurations (flow-through and drip-flow) and two different inoculation procedures (donor-recipient and recipient-donor) were tested. The drip-flow configuration integrated stainless steel coupons in the setup while the flow-through configuration included a glass flow cell and silicone tubing. The highest biomass density [10 log (cells cm-²)] was obtained in the silicone tubing when first the recipient strain was inoculated. High plasmid transfer ratios, up to 1/10 (transconjugants/total bacteria), were found. Depending on the order of inoculation, a difference in transfer efficiency between the biofilm models could be found. The ease by which the multiresistance plasmid was transferred highlights the importance of biofilms in the food industry as hot spots for the acquisition of multiresistance plasmids. This can impede the treatment of foodborne illnesses if pathogens acquire this multiresistance in or from the biofilm.

  9. Conjugative DNA Transfer Is Enhanced by Plasmid R1 Partitioning Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Christian J.; Lang, Silvia; Rajendra, Vinod K. H.; Nuk, Monika; Raffl, Sandra; Schildbach, Joel F.; Zechner, Ellen L.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is a form of type IV secretion used to transport protein and DNA directly to recipient bacteria. The process is cell contact-dependent, yet the mechanisms enabling extracellular events to trigger plasmid transfer to begin inside the cell remain obscure. In this study of plasmid R1 we investigated the role of plasmid proteins in the initiation of gene transfer. We find that TraI, the central regulator of conjugative DNA processing, interacts physically, and functionally with the plasmid partitioning proteins ParM and ParR. These interactions stimulate TraI catalyzed relaxation of plasmid DNA in vivo and in vitro and increase ParM ATPase activity. ParM also binds the coupling protein TraD and VirB4-like channel ATPase TraC. Together, these protein-protein interactions probably act to co-localize the transfer components intracellularly and promote assembly of the conjugation machinery. Importantly these data also indicate that the continued association of ParM and ParR at the conjugative pore is necessary for plasmid transfer to start efficiently. Moreover, the conjugative pilus and underlying secretion machinery assembled in the absence of Par proteins mediate poor biofilm formation and are completely dysfunctional for pilus specific R17 bacteriophage uptake. Thus, functional integration of Par components at the interface of relaxosome, coupling protein, and channel ATPases appears important for an optimal conformation and effective activation of the transfer machinery. We conclude that low copy plasmid R1 has evolved an active segregation system that optimizes both its vertical and lateral modes of dissemination. PMID:27486582

  10. Proteomic profiling of salivary gland after nonviral gene transfer mediated by conventional plasmids and minicircles

    PubMed Central

    Geguchadze, Ramaz; Wang, Zhimin; Zourelias, Lee; Perez-Riveros, Paola; Edwards, Paul C; Machen, Laurie; Passineau, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we compared gene transfer efficiency and host response to ultrasound-assisted, nonviral gene transfer with a conventional plasmid and a minicircle vector in the submandibular salivary glands of mice. Initially, we looked at gene transfer efficiency with equimolar amounts of the plasmid and minicircle vectors, corroborating an earlier report showing that minicircle is more efficient in the context of a physical method of gene transfer. We then sought to characterize the physiological response of the salivary gland to exogenous gene transfer using global proteomic profiling. Somewhat surprisingly, we found that sonoporation alone, without a gene transfer vector present, had virtually no effect on the salivary gland proteome. However, when a plasmid vector was used, we observed profound perturbations of the salivary gland proteome that compared in magnitude to that seen in a previous report after high doses of adeno-associated virus. Finally, we found that gene transfer with a minicircle induces only minor proteomic alterations that were similar to sonoporation alone. Using mass spectrometry, we assigned protein IDs to 218 gel spots that differed between plasmid and minicircle. Bioinformatic analysis of these proteins demonstrated convergence on 68 known protein interaction pathways, most notably those associated with innate immunity, cellular stress, and morphogenesis. PMID:25414909

  11. A New and Improved Host-Independent Plasmid System for RK2-Based Conjugal Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Trine Aakvik; Lale, Rahmi; Degnes, Kristin Fløgstad; Lando, Malin; Valla, Svein

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial conjugation is a process that is mediated either by a direct cell-to-cell junction or by formation of a bridge between the cells. It is often used to transfer DNA constructs designed in Escherichia coli to recipient bacteria, yeast, plants and mammalian cells. Plasmids bearing the RK2/RP4 origin of transfer (oriT) are mostly mobilized using the E. coli S17-1/SM10 donor strains, in which transfer helper functions are provided from a chromosomally integrated RP4::Mu. We have observed that large plasmids were occasionally modified after conjugal transfer when using E. coli S17-1 as a donor. All modified plasmids had increased in size, which most probably was a result of co-transfer of DNA from the chromosomally located oriT. It has earlier also been demonstrated that the bacteriophage Mu is silently transferred to recipient cells by these donor strains, and both occurrences are very likely to lead to mutations within the recipient DNA. Here we report the construction of a new biological system addressing both the above mentioned problems in which the transfer helper functions are provided by a plasmid lacking a functional oriT. This system is compatible with all other replicons commonly used in conjugation experiments and further enables the use of diverse bacterial strains as donors. Plasmids containing large inserts were successfully conjugated and the plasmid modifications observed when E. coli S17-1 was used as donor were eliminated by the use of the new host-independent vector system. PMID:24595202

  12. Transfer of plasmid-mediated resistance to tetracycline in pathogenic bacteria from fish and aquaculture environments.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Elena; Korhonen, Jenni M; Heikkinen, Jouni; Morelli, Lorenzo; von Wright, Atte

    2009-04-01

    The transferability of a large plasmid that harbors a tetracycline resistance gene tet(S), to fish and human pathogens was assessed using electrotransformation and conjugation. The plasmid, originally isolated from fish intestinal Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis KYA-7, has potent antagonistic activity against the selected recipients (Lactococcus garvieae and Listeria monocytogenes), preventing conjugation. Therefore the tetracycline resistance determinant was transferred via electroporation to L. garvieae. A transformant clone was used as the donor in conjugation experiments with three different L. monocytogenes strains. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing the transfer of an antibiotic resistance plasmid from fish-associated lactic bacteria to L. monocytogenes, even if the donor L. garvieae was not the original host of the tetracycline resistance but experimentally created by electroporation. These results demonstrate that the antibiotic resistance genes in the fish intestinal bacteria have the potential to spread both to fish and human pathogens, posing a risk to aquaculture and consumer safety.

  13. A genetic study of a Staphylococus aureus plasmid involving cure and transference.

    PubMed

    Darini, A L

    1996-01-01

    High frequency transfer and elimination of drug resistance may indicate an extrachromosomal inheritance of genetic determinants. This study shows the cure and transfer of a small plasmid and tetracycline resistance in Staphylococcus aureus 1030 (55)Tet strains. Several methods are available for plasmid elimination. We used ethidium bromide, an agent that binds to DNA, and thus inhibits DNA polymerase. This caused a high frequency of loss of the small plasmid and resistance to tetracycline. Transfer of tetracycline resistance was done in a mixed culture at a frequency of 10(-6). This type of study is very important to physicians and epidemiology investigators and provides better knowledge on antibiotic-resistance mechanisms that may occur in vivo in a hospital environment.

  14. Characterization of the endogenous plasmid from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867: DNA sequence and mechanism of transfer.

    PubMed

    Kwong, S M; Yeo, C C; Suwanto, A; Poh, C L

    2000-01-01

    The endogenous plasmid pRA2 from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 was determined to have 32,743 bp with a G+C content of 59.8%. Sequence analysis predicted a total of 29 open reading frames, with approximately half of them contributing towards the functions of plasmid replication, mobilization, and stability. The Pac25I restriction-modification system and two mobile elements, Tn5563 and IS1633, were physically localized. An additional eight open reading frames with unknown functions were also detected. pRA2 was genetically tagged with the OmegaStr(r)/Spc(r) gene cassette by homologous recombination. Intrastrain transfer of pRA2-encoded genetic markers between isogenic mutants of P. alcaligenes NCIB 9867 were observed at high frequencies (2.4 x 10(-4) per donor). This transfer was determined to be mediated by a natural transformation process that required cell-cell contact and was completely sensitive to DNase I (1 mg/ml). Efficient transformation was also observed when pRA2 DNA was applied directly onto the cells, while transformation with foreign plasmid DNAs was not observed. pRA2 could be conjugally transferred into Pseudomonas putida RA713 and KT2440 recipients only when plasmid RK2/RP4 transfer functions were provided in trans. Plasmid stability analysis demonstrated that pRA2 could be stably maintained in its original host, P. alcaligenes NCIB 9867, as well as in P. putida RA713 after 100 generations of nonselective growth. Disruption of the pRA2 pac25I restriction endonuclease gene did not alter plasmid stability, while the pRA2 minireplicon exhibited only partial stability. This indicates that other pRA2-encoded determinants could have significant roles in influencing plasmid stability.

  15. TOL plasmid transfer during bacterial conjugation in vitro and rhizoremediation of oil compounds in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jussila, Minna M; Zhao, Ji; Suominen, Leena; Lindström, Kristina

    2007-03-01

    Molecular profiling methods for horizontal transfer of aromatics-degrading plasmids were developed and applied during rhizoremediation in vivo and conjugations in vitro. pWW0 was conjugated from Pseudomonas to Rhizobium. The xylE gene was detected both in Rhizobium galegae bv. officinalis and bv. orientalis, but it was neither stably maintained in orientalis nor functional in officinalis. TOL plasmids were a major group of catabolic plasmids among the bacterial strains isolated from the oil-contaminated rhizosphere of Galega orientalis. A new finding was that some Pseudomonas migulae and Pseudomonas oryzihabitans strains harbored a TOL plasmid with both pWW0- and pDK1-type xylE gene. P. oryzihabitans 29 had received the archetypal TOL plasmid pWW0 from Pseudomonas putida PaW85. As an application for environmental biotechnology, the biodegradation potential of oil-polluted soil and the success of bioremediation could be estimated by monitoring changes not only in the type and amount but also in transfer of degradation plasmids.

  16. Construction of disarmed Ti plasmids transferable between Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium species.

    PubMed

    Kiyokawa, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Shinji; Sakuma, Kei; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Suzuki, Katsunori

    2009-04-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated plant transformation has been used widely, but there are plants that are recalcitrant to this type of transformation. This transformation method uses bacterial strains harboring a modified tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid that lacks the transfer DNA (T-DNA) region (disarmed Ti plasmid). It is desirable to develop strains that can broaden the host range. A large number of Agrobacterium strains have not been tested yet to determine whether they can be used in transformation. In order to improve the disarming method and to obtain strains disarmed and ready for the plant transformation test, we developed a simple scheme to make certain Ti plasmids disarmed and simultaneously maintainable in Escherichia coli and mobilizable between E. coli and Agrobacterium. To establish the scheme in nopaline-type Ti plasmids, a neighboring segment to the left of the left border sequence, a neighboring segment to the right of the right border sequence of pTi-SAKURA, a cassette harboring the pSC101 replication gene between these two segments, the broad-host-range IncP-type oriT, and the gentamicin resistance gene were inserted into a suicide-type sacB-containing vector. Replacement of T-DNA with the cassette in pTiC58 and pTi-SAKURA occurred at a high frequency and with high accuracy when the tool plasmid was used. We confirmed that there was stable maintenance of the modified Ti plasmids in E. coli strain S17-1lambdapir and conjugal transfer from E. coli to Ti-less Agrobacterium strains and that the reconstituted Agrobacterium strains were competent to transfer DNA into plant cells. As the modified plasmid delivery system was simple and efficient, conversion of strains to the disarmed type was easy and should be applicable in studies to screen for useful strains.

  17. TcpM: a novel relaxase that mediates transfer of large conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Jessica A; Traore, Daouda A; Bannam, Trudi L; Lyras, Dena; Whisstock, James C; Rood, Julian I

    2016-03-01

    Conjugative transfer of toxin and antibiotic resistance plasmids in Clostridium perfringens is mediated by the tcp conjugation locus. Surprisingly, neither a relaxase gene nor an origin of transfer (oriT) has been identified on these plasmids, which are typified by the 47 kb tetracycline resistance plasmid pCW3. The tcpM gene (previously called intP) encodes a potential tyrosine recombinase that was postulated to be an atypical relaxase. Mutagenesis and complementation studies showed that TcpM was required for wild-type transfer of pCW3 and that a tyrosine residue, Y259, was essential for TcpM activity, which was consistent with the need for a relaxase-mediated hydrophilic attack at the oriT site. Other catalytic residues conserved in tyrosine recombinases were not required for TcpM activity, suggesting that TcpM was not a site-specific recombinase. Mobilization studies led to the identification of the oriT site, which was located in the 391 bp intergenic region upstream of tcpM. The oriT site was localized to a 150 bp region, and gel mobility shift studies showed that TcpM could bind to this region. Based on these studies we postulate that conjugative transfer of pCW3 involves the atypical relaxase TcpM binding to and processing the oriT site to initiate plasmid transfer.

  18. Mobilizable Rolling-Circle Replicating Plasmids from Gram-Positive Bacteria: A Low-Cost Conjugative Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Cris; Bravo, Alicia; Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Garsin, Danielle A; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Espinosa, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Some plasmids are not self-transmissible but can be mobilized by functions encoded in trans provided by other auxiliary conjugative elements. Although the transfer efficiency of mobilizable plasmids is usually lower than that of conjugative elements, mobilizable plasmids are more frequently found in nature. In this sense, replication and mobilization can be considered important mechanisms influencing plasmid promiscuity. Here we review the currently available information on two families of small mobilizable plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. One of these families, represented by the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is an interesting model since it contains a specific mobilization module (MOBV) that is widely distributed among mobilizable plasmids. We discuss a mechanism in which the promiscuity of the pMV158 replicon is based on the presence of two origins of lagging strand synthesis. The current strategies to assess plasmid transfer efficiency as well as to inhibit conjugative plasmid transfer are presented. Some applications of these plasmids as biotechnological tools are also reviewed.

  19. Plasmid-mediated transfer of the bla(NDM-1) gene in Gram-negative rods.

    PubMed

    Potron, Anaïs; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-11-01

    The latest threat of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria corresponds to the emergence of carbapenemase NDM-1 (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase) producers, mostly in Enterobacteriacae. Five bla(NDM) (-1) -positive plasmids of different incompatibility groups (IncL/M, FII, A/C and two untypeable plasmids) from clinical Enterobacteriaceae were evaluated for conjugation properties and host specificity. Successful conjugative transfers were obtained using all tested enterobacterial species as recipients (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium and Proteus mirabilis) and all plasmid types. Conjugation frequencies varied from 1 × 10(-4) to 6 × 10(-8) transconjugants per donor. Higher conjugation rates were obtained for two plasmids at 30 °C compared with that observed at 25 and 37 °C. Carbapenems used as selector did not lead to higher conjugation frequencies. None of the five plasmids was transferable to Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa by conjugation. This work underlines how efficient the spread of the carbapenemase bla(NDM) (-1) gene could be among Enterobacteriaceae.

  20. Conjugative transfer of staphylococcal antibiotic resistance markers in the absence of detectable plasmid DNA.

    PubMed Central

    el Solh, N; Allignet, J; Bismuth, R; Buret, B; Fouace, J M

    1986-01-01

    Eleven Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates were tested for transfer of resistance markers by transduction and filter mating. The resistance markers of six of the strains could be transferred only by transduction; however, the five remaining strains transferred their resistance both by transduction and filter mating. The resistance markers that were cotransferred in filter matings (transfer of resistance to penicillin and streptogramin A was accompanied, in each case, by the transfer of one or more markers, i.e., resistance to aminoglycosides, cadmium, or tetracycline, depending on the donor) were not cotransduced. The filter mating transfers were recA independent and were observed with both Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis recipients. Experiments to elucidate the mechanism of transfer by filter mating suggested that conjugation requiring cell-to-cell contact may have been involved. These transfers occurred in the absence of detectable plasmid DNA. PMID:2944478

  1. Transfer of Large Contiguous DNA Fragments onto a Low Copy Plasmid or into the Bacterial Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Analise Z; Lesser, Cammie F

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity islands and other contiguous operons can be difficult to clone using conventional methods due to their large size. Here we describe a robust 3-step method to transfer large defined fragments of DNA from virulence plasmids or cosmids onto smaller autonomously replicating plasmids or directly into defined sites in the bacterial chromosome that incorporates endogenous yeast and λ Red homologous recombination systems. This methodology has been successfully used to isolate and integrate at least 31 kb of contiguous DNA and can be readily adapted for the recombineering of E. coli and its close relatives. PMID:28203614

  2. Increased transfer of a multidrug resistance plasmid in Escherichia coli biofilms at the air-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Król, Jaroslaw E; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Rogers, Linda M; Beyenal, Haluk; Krone, Stephen M; Top, Eva M

    2011-08-01

    Although biofilms represent a common bacterial lifestyle in clinically and environmentally important habitats, there is scant information on the extent of gene transfer in these spatially structured populations. The objective of this study was to gain insight into factors that affect transfer of the promiscuous multidrug resistance plasmid pB10 in Escherichia coli biofilms. Biofilms were grown in different experimental settings, and plasmid transfer was monitored using laser scanning confocal microscopy and plate counting. In closed flow cells, plasmid transfer in surface-attached submerged biofilms was negligible. In contrast, a high plasmid transfer efficiency was observed in a biofilm floating at the air-liquid interface in an open flow cell with low flow rates. A vertical flow cell and a batch culture biofilm reactor were then used to detect plasmid transfer at different depths away from the air-liquid interface. Extensive plasmid transfer occurred only in a narrow zone near that interface. The much lower transfer frequencies in the lower zones coincided with rapidly decreasing oxygen concentrations. However, when an E. coli csrA mutant was used as the recipient, a thick biofilm was obtained at all depths, and plasmid transfer occurred at similar frequencies throughout. These results and data from separate aerobic and anaerobic matings suggest that oxygen can affect IncP-1 plasmid transfer efficiency, not only directly but also indirectly, through influencing population densities and therefore colocalization of donors and recipients. In conclusion, the air-liquid interface can be a hot spot for plasmid-mediated gene transfer due to high densities of juxtaposed donor and recipient cells.

  3. Kinetics of plasmid transfer among Bacillus cereus group strains within lepidopteran larvae.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Y M; Hu, X M; Liu, H Z; Hansen, Bjarne Munk; Yan, J P; Yuan, Z M

    2007-06-01

    The cry toxin encoding plasmid pHT73 was transferred from Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies kurstaki KT0 to six B. cereus group strains in three lepidopteran (Spodoptera exigua, Plutella xyllostella and Helicoverpa armigera) larvae by conjugation. The conjugation kinetics of the plasmid was precisely studied during the larval infection using a new protocol. The infections were performed with both vegetative and sporulated strains. However, larval death only occurred when infections were made with spore and toxin preparations. Likewise, spore germinations of both donor and recipient strains were only observed in killed larvae, 44-56 h post-infection. Accordingly, kinetics showed that gene transfer between B. thuringiensis strain KT0 and other B. cereus strains only took place in dead larvae among vegetatively growing bacteria. The conjugational transfer ratios varied among different strain combinations and different larvae. The highest transfer ratio reached 5.83 x 10(-6) CFU/donor between the KT0 and the AW05R recipient in Helicoverpa armigera, and all transconjugants gained the ability to produce the insecticidal crystal. These results indicated that horizontal gene transfer among B. cereus group strains might play a key role for the acquisition of extra plasmids and evolution of these strains in toxin susceptible insect larvae.

  4. Mobilizable Rolling-Circle Replicating Plasmids from Gram-Positive Bacteria: A Low-Cost Conjugative Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-López, Cris; Bravo, Alicia; Ruiz-Cruz, Sofía; Solano-Collado, Virtu; Garsin, Danielle A.; Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Espinosa, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Chapter summary Conjugation is a key mechanism for horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Some plasmids are not self-transmissible but can be mobilized by functions encoded in trans provided by other auxiliary conjugative elements. Although the transfer efficiency of mobilizable plasmids is usually lower than that of conjugative elements, mobilizable plasmidsare more frequently found in nature. In this sense, replication and mobilization can be considered as important mechanisms influencing plasmid promiscuity. Here we review the present available information on two families of small mobilizable plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria that replicate via the rolling-circle mechanism. One of these families, represented by the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, is an interesting model since it contains a specific mobilization module (MOBV) that is widely distributed among mobilizable plasmids. We discuss a mechanism in which the promiscuity of the pMV158 replicon is based on the presence of two origins of lagging strand synthesis. The current strategies to assess plasmid transfer efficiency as well as to inhibit conjugative plasmid transfer are presented. Some applications of these plasmids as biotechnological tools are also reviewed. PMID:25606350

  5. Minimal and Contributing Sequence Determinants of the cis-Acting Locus of Transfer (clt) of Streptomycete Plasmid pIJ101 Occur within an Intrinsically Curved Plasmid Region

    PubMed Central

    Ducote, Matthew J.; Prakash, Shubha; Pettis, Gregg S.

    2000-01-01

    Efficient interbacterial transfer of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires the pIJ101 tra gene, as well as a cis-acting plasmid function known as clt. Here we show that the minimal pIJ101 clt locus consists of a sequence no greater than 54 bp in size that includes essential inverted-repeat and direct-repeat sequences and is located in close proximity to the 3′ end of the korB regulatory gene. Evidence that sequences extending beyond the minimal locus and into the korB open reading frame influence clt transfer function and demonstration that clt-korB sequences are intrinsically curved raise the possibility that higher-order structuring of DNA and protein within this plasmid region may be an inherent feature of efficient pIJ101 transfer. PMID:11073933

  6. Minimal and contributing sequence determinants of the cis-acting locus of transfer (clt) of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 occur within an intrinsically curved plasmid region.

    PubMed

    Ducote, M J; Prakash, S; Pettis, G S

    2000-12-01

    Efficient interbacterial transfer of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires the pIJ101 tra gene, as well as a cis-acting plasmid function known as clt. Here we show that the minimal pIJ101 clt locus consists of a sequence no greater than 54 bp in size that includes essential inverted-repeat and direct-repeat sequences and is located in close proximity to the 3' end of the korB regulatory gene. Evidence that sequences extending beyond the minimal locus and into the korB open reading frame influence clt transfer function and demonstration that clt-korB sequences are intrinsically curved raise the possibility that higher-order structuring of DNA and protein within this plasmid region may be an inherent feature of efficient pIJ101 transfer.

  7. Root growth and exudate production define the frequency of horizontal plasmid transfer in the Rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Mølbak, Lars; Molin, Søren; Kroer, Niels

    2007-01-01

    To identify the main drivers of plasmid transfer in the rhizosphere, conjugal transfer was studied in the rhizospheres of pea and barley. The donor Pseudomonas putida KT2442, containing plasmid pKJK5::gfp, was coated onto the seeds, while the recipient P. putida LM24, having a chromosomal insertion of dsRed, was inoculated into the growth medium. Mean transconjugant-to-donor ratios in vermiculite were 4.0+/-0.8 x 10(-2) in the pea and 5.9+/-1.4 x 10(-3) in the barley rhizospheres. In soil, transfer ratios were about 10 times lower. As a result of a 2-times higher root exudation rate in pea, donor densities in pea (1 x 10(6)-2 x 10(9) CFU g(-1) root) were about 10 times higher than in barley. No difference in recipient densities was observed. In situ visualization of single cells on the rhizoplane and macroscopic visualization of the colonization pattern showed that donors and transconjugants were ubiquitously distributed in the pea rhizosphere, while they were only located on the upper parts of the barley roots. Because the barley root elongated about 10 times faster than the pea root, donors were probably outgrown by the elongating barley root. Thus by affecting the cell density and distribution, exudation and root growth appear to be key parameters controlling plasmid transfer in the rhizosphere.

  8. The mechanism and control of DNA transfer by the conjugative relaxase of resistance plasmid pCU1

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Rebekah Potts; Habibi, Sohrab; Cheng, Yuan; Lujan, Scott A.; Redinbo, Matthew

    2010-11-15

    Bacteria expand their genetic diversity, spread antibiotic resistance genes, and obtain virulence factors through the highly coordinated process of conjugative plasmid transfer (CPT). A plasmid-encoded relaxase enzyme initiates and terminates CPT by nicking and religating the transferred plasmid in a sequence-specific manner. We solved the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the relaxase responsible for the spread of the resistance plasmid pCU1 and determined its DNA binding and nicking capabilities. The overall fold of the pCU1 relaxase is similar to that of the F plasmid and plasmid R388 relaxases. However, in the pCU1 structure, the conserved tyrosine residues (Y18,19,26,27) that are required for DNA nicking and religation were displaced up to 14 {angstrom} out of the relaxase active site, revealing a high degree of mobility in this region of the enzyme. In spite of this flexibility, the tyrosines still cleaved the nic site of the plasmid's origin of transfer, and did so in a sequence-specific, metal-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the pCU1 relaxase lacked the sequence-specific DNA binding previously reported for the homologous F and R388 relaxase enzymes, despite its high sequence and structural similarity with both proteins. In summary, our work outlines novel structural and functional aspects of the relaxase-mediated conjugative transfer of plasmid pCU1.

  9. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  10. Superinfection drives virulence evolution in experimental populations of bacteria and plasmids.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeff

    2011-03-01

    A prominent hypothesis proposes that pathogen virulence evolves in large part due to a trade-off between infectiousness and damage to hosts. Other explanations emphasize how virulence evolves in response to competition among pathogens within hosts. Given the proliferation of theoretical possibilities, what best predicts how virulence evolves in real biological systems? Here, I show that virulence evolution in experimental populations of bacteria and self-transmissible plasmids is best explained by within-host competition. Plasmids evolved to severely reduce the fitness of their hosts even in the absence of uninfected cells. This result is inconsistent with the trade-off hypothesis, which predicts that under these conditions vertically transmitted pathogens would evolve to be less virulent. Plasmid virulence was strongly correlated with the ability to superinfect cells containing competing plasmid genotypes, suggesting a key role for within-host competition. When virulent genotypes became common, hosts evolved resistance to plasmid infection. These results show that the trade-off hypothesis can incorrectly predict virulence evolution when within-host interactions are neglected. They also show that symbioses between bacteria and plasmids can evolve to be surprisingly antagonistic.

  11. Reduction in horizontal transfer of conjugative plasmid by UV irradiation and low-level chlorination.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenfang; Li, Shuai; Zhang, Shuting; Yu, Xin

    2016-03-15

    The widespread presence of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) in the drinking water system facilitates their horizontal gene transfer among microbiota. In this study, the conjugative gene transfer of RP4 plasmid after disinfection including ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and low-level chlorine treatment was investigated. It was found that both UV irradiation and low-level chlorine treatment reduced the conjugative gene transfer frequency. The transfer frequency gradually decreased from 2.75 × 10(-3) to 2.44 × 10(-5) after exposure to UV doses ranging from 5 to 20 mJ/cm(2). With higher UV dose of 50 and 100 mJ/cm(2), the transfer frequency was reduced to 1.77 × 10(-6) and 2.44 × 10(-8). The RP4 plasmid transfer frequency was not significantly affected by chlorine treatment at dosages ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 mg/l, but treatment with 0.3-0.5 mg/l chlorine induced a decrease in conjugative transfer to 4.40 × 10(-5) or below the detection limit. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena were also explored, and the results demonstrated that UV irradiation and chlorine treatment (0.3 and 0.5 mg/l) significantly reduced the viability of bacteria, thereby lowering the conjugative transfer frequency. Although the lower chlorine concentrations tested (0.05-0.2 mg/l) were not sufficient to damage the cells, exposure to these concentrations may still depress the expression of a flagellar gene (FlgC), an outer membrane porin gene (ompF), and a DNA transport-related gene (TraG). Additionally, fewer pili were scattered on the bacteria after chlorine treatment. These findings are important in assessing and controlling the risk of ARG transfer and dissemination in the drinking water system.

  12. Power transfer device for four-wheel drive

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, K.; Takimura, K.; Katayama, N.

    1987-10-06

    A power transfer device is described for four-wheel drive in combination with a power transmission having a transmission casing, an input shaft rotatably mounted, an output shaft rotatably mounted, a change-speed gearing mounted on the input and output shafts, and an output gear mounted on the output shaft for rotation therewith. The power transfer device comprises: a transfer casing detachably secured at one side to the transmission casing; a first differential gear unit including an input element in the form of a first gear casing rotatably mounted within the transmission casing and drivingly connected to the output gear, and an air of first output elements rotatably mounted within the first gear casing respectively for front-wheel drive and rear-wheel drive; a second differential gear unit arranged coaxially with the first differential gear unit and including a second input member in the form of a second gear casing; a carrier member rotatably mounted within the transfer casing and arranged coaxially with the first and second differential gear units; a first wheel axle drivingly connected at an inner end; a second wheel axle drivingly connected at an inner end with the other second output element of the second differential gear unit and extending outwardly from the transfer casing through the carrier member; a hollow shaft arranged with the second wheel axle; and a clutch sleeve; an output gearing assembled within the transfer casing and arranged to be driven by the carrier member; and means for axially slidably coupling an end of the clutch sleeve with one end of the carrier member in such a manner that the clutch sleeve is positioned relative to the carrier member in a predetermined radial and circumferential direction.

  13. Power transfer device for four-wheel drive

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, N.; Sasaki, K.; Koide, T.; Takimura, K.

    1989-02-07

    A power transfer device is described for four-wheel drive in combination with a power transmission, comprising: a first differential of the bevel gear type arranged to split the two driving torque from the power transmission into two torque delivery paths respectively for front-wheel drive and rear-wheel drive; a second differential of the bevel gear type arranged coaxially with the first differential at one side thereof to transfer the split driving torque from a first side gear of the first differential to one of front and rear-wheel axles; an output gear arranged coaxially with the first differential at the other side thereof to transfer the split driving torque from a second side gear of the first differential to the other of the rear and front-wheel axles; and a limited-slip differential assembled within a mounting case for the output gear to effect limited slip torque proportional to the difference in rotational speed between the side gears.

  14. Power transfer device for four-wheel drive vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, H.

    1986-10-21

    A power transfer device is described for a four-wheel drive vehicle having a transmission drivingly connected to a prime mover of the vehicle and having a set of front road wheels and a set of rear road wheels adapted to be driven from the transmission. The transfer device comprises: a first differential of the bevel gear type including a differential case arranged to be applied with drive torque from the transmission, a pinion gear rotatably mounted within the differential case, and a pair or side gears rotatably mounted within the differential case and in mesh with the pinion gear; a first output shaft connected to one of the side gears for driving the front or rear road wheels; a second output shaft connected to the other side gear for driving the rear or front road wheels; a second differential of the planetary gear type including a differential carrier formed to contain the differential case therein; and a selector mechanism arranged to selectively provide a drive connection between the second output shaft and the rear or front road wheels or a drive connection between the differential carrier and the rear or front road wheels.

  15. Demonstrating plasmid-based horizontal gene transfer in complex environmental matrices: a practical approach for a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, Xavier; Guilloteau, Hélène; Bonot, Sébastien; Merlin, Christophe

    2014-09-15

    Plasmid-based dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in environmental microbial communities is a matter of concern for public health, but it remains difficult to study for methodological reasons. In this study, we used the broad host range plasmid pB10 to compare and to point out the main drawbacks of the three different approaches currently used to evaluate plasmid transfer in natural communities. Culture-based selection of transconjugants appeared to be compromised by high prevalence of antibiotic resistances among natural communities, unless high loads of initial pB10-donor inocula were used. Fluorescence-based detection of transconjugants reached a dead-end consequently to the narrow host range of bacteria expressing fluorescent proteins from a genetically modified pB10 plasmid, in addition to the relatively high background level of fluorescence exhibited by some environmental matrices. The molecular-based approach was the only one to provide a mean to detect rare plasmid transfer events following a low but realistic initial pB10-donor inoculation. Whatever the method, culture-based or molecular-based, the detection of successful transfer events in a given environmental matrix seemed to be linked to the initial stability of the donor inoculum. Depending on the matrix considered, eukaryotic predation plays a significant role in either limiting or promoting the plasmid transfer events.

  16. 1. TRANSFER CONVEYOR AND DRIVE MECHANISM ON SOUTH SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. TRANSFER CONVEYOR AND DRIVE MECHANISM ON SOUTH SIDE OF LEVEL 4; LOOKING SOUTH; CONVEYORS WERE USED TO MOVE CARCASSES BETWEEN FLOORS FOR FURTHER PROCESSING - Rath Packing Company, Cooler Building-1929 Beef House, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  17. Plasmid Transfer between Spatially Separated Donor and Recipient Bacteria in Earthworm-Containing Soil Microcosms

    PubMed Central

    Daane, L. L.; Molina, J.; Sadowsky, M. J.

    1997-01-01

    Most gene transfer studies have been performed with relatively homogeneous soil systems in the absence of soil macrobiota, including invertebrates. In this study we examined the influence of earthworm activity (burrowing, casting, and feeding) on transfer of plasmid pJP4 between spatially separated donor (Alcaligenes eutrophus) and recipient (Pseudomonas fluorescens) bacteria in nonsterile soil columns. A model system was designed such that the activity of earthworms would act to mediate cell contact and gene transfer. Three different earthworm species (Aporrectodea trapezoides, Lumbricus rubellus, and Lumbricus terrestris), representing each of the major ecological categories (endogeic, epigeic, and anecic), were evaluated. Inoculated soil microcosms, with and without added earthworms, were analyzed for donor, recipient, and transconjugant bacteria at 5-cm-depth intervals by using selective plating techniques. Transconjugants were confirmed by colony hybridization with a mer gene probe. The presence of earthworms significantly increased dispersal of the donor and recipient strains. In situ gene transfer of plasmid pJP4 from A. eutrophus to P. fluorescens was detected only in earthworm-containing microcosms, at a frequency of (symbl)10(sup2) transconjugants per g of soil. The depth of recovery was dependent on the burrowing behavior of each earthworm species; however, there was no significant difference in the total number of transconjugants among the earthworm species. Donor and recipient bacteria were recovered from earthworm feces (casts) of all three earthworm species, with numbers up to 10(sup6) and 10(sup4) bacteria per g of cast, respectively. A. trapezoides egg capsules (cocoons) formed in the inoculated soil microcosms contained up to 10(sup7) donor and 10(sup6) recipient bacteria per g of cocoon. No transconjugant bacteria, however, were recovered from these microhabitats. To our knowledge, this is the first report of gene transfer between physically

  18. A comparison of the kinetics of plasmid transfer in the conjugation systems encoded by the F plasmid from Escherichia coli and plasmid pCF10 from Enterococcus faecalis.

    PubMed

    Andrup, L; Andersen, K

    1999-08-01

    Quantitative measurements of horizontal DNA transfer are critical if one wishes to address questions relating to ecology, evolution and the safe use of recombinant bacteria. Traditionally, the efficiency of a conjugation system has been described by its transfer frequency. However, transfer frequencies can be determined in many ways and may be sensitive to physical, chemical and biological conditions. In this study the authors have used the mechanistic similarity between bacterial conjugation and simple enzyme catalysis in order to calculate the maximal conjugation rate (Vmax) and the recipient concentration (K(m)) at which the conjugation rate is half its maximal value, for two different conjugation systems: the F plasmid from Escherichia coli and plasmid pCF10 from Enterococcus faecalis. The results are compared with the data obtained from the aggregation-mediated conjugation system encoded on pXO16 from Bacillus thuringiensis. The conjugation systems analysed are fundamentally different; however, they have some characteristics in common: they are able to sustain conjugative transfer in liquid medium and the transfer efficiencies are very high. Conjugation encoded by the F plasmid in E. coli involves the formation of small aggregates (2-20 cells), established by sex pili, and the plasmid's maximal conjugation rate was estimated to be approximately 0.15 transconjugants per donor per minute. Pheromone-induced conjugation in Ent. faecalis, which involves the formation of large aggregates, was found to proceed at a maximal conjugation rate of 0.29 transconjugants per donor per minute. Also, the K(m) value differed significantly between these conjugation systems; this may reflect the inherent differences in mating pair formation and transfer mechanisms. In these conjugation systems, the donors underwent a 'recovery period' between rounds of conjugative transfer and newly formed transconjugants required a period of about 40-80 min to mature into proficient donors.

  19. Measuring the Rate of Conjugal Plasmid Transfer and Phage Infection in a Bacterial Population Using Quantitative PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Zhenmao; Goddard, Noel

    2012-02-01

    Horizontal gene transfer between species is an important mechanism for bacterial genome evolution. In Escherichia coli, conjugation is the transfer from a donor(F^+) to a recipient(F^-) cell through cell-to-cell contact. We demonstrate a novel qPCR method for quantifying the transfer kinetics of the F plasmid in a population by enumerating the relative abundance of genetic loci unique to the plasmid and the chromosome. This approach allows us to query the plasmid transfer rate without the need for selective culturing with unprecedented single locus resolution. It also allows us to investigate the inhibition of conjugation in the presence of filamentous bacteriophages M13. Experimental data is then compared with numerical simulation using a mass action, resource limited model.

  20. Interference of Lactobacillus plantarum strains in the in vitro conjugative transfer of R-plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sabia, Carla; de Niederhäusern, Simona; Guerrieri, Elisa; Bondi, Moreno; Anacarso, Immacolata; Iseppi, Ramona; Messi, Patrizia

    2009-02-01

    Probiotic compounds, which are often constituted of lactobacilli, exert a number of health benefits through maintenance of the intestinal ecosystem balance. Among the important interactions that occur in the gut microbiota, plasmid transfer by mating is an increasing cause of concern, particularly when antibiotic-resistant genes are involved. Because lactobacilli seem to be able to influence this mechanism, the aim of the present work was to investigate the in vitro capability of two Lactobacillus plantarum strains (one bacteriocin producer and one nonproducer) to interfere with the conjugation processes. For this purpose different matings were performed adding to the donor and recipient cells L. plantarum 35d bac+ and L. plantarum 396/1 bac- as agents of interference. Conjugations added with a Staphylococcus aureus strain or without any agent of interference were used as controls. The results of our experiments demonstrated that both lactobacillus strains were able to decrease mating frequency. Statistically significant differences in the viable transconjugants were obtained in the presence and in the absence of the lactobacilli. The effect was almost the same with the two L. plantarum independent of bacteriocin production. In the trial performed with S. aureus, no decrease in mating frequency was observed, confirming that the capability to interfere with R-plasmid transfer ability could be a property of the tested L. plantarum strains.

  1. Selective ploidy ablation, a high-throughput plasmid transfer protocol, identifies new genes affecting topoisomerase I–induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Robert J.D.; González-Barrera, Sergio; Sunjevaric, Ivana; Alvaro, David; Ciccone, Samantha; Wagner, Marisa; Rothstein, Rodney

    2011-01-01

    We have streamlined the process of transferring plasmids into any yeast strain library by developing a novel mating-based, high-throughput method called selective ploidy ablation (SPA). SPA uses a universal plasmid donor strain that contains conditional centromeres on every chromosome. The plasmid-bearing donor is mated to a recipient, followed by removal of all donor-strain chromosomes, producing a haploid strain containing the transferred plasmid. As proof of principle, we used SPA to transfer plasmids containing wild-type and mutant alleles of DNA topoisomerase I (TOP1) into the haploid yeast gene-disruption library. Overexpression of Top1 identified only one sensitive mutation, rpa34, while overexpression of top1-T722A allele, a camptothecin mimetic, identified 190 sensitive gene-disruption strains along with rpa34. In addition to known camptothecin-sensitive strains, this set contained mutations in genes involved in the Rpd3 histone deacetylase complex, the kinetochore, and vesicle trafficking. We further show that mutations in several ESCRT vesicle trafficking components increase Top1 levels, which is dependent on SUMO modification. These findings demonstrate the utility of the SPA technique to introduce plasmids into the haploid gene-disruption library to discover new interacting pathways. PMID:21173034

  2. Conjugative transfer of an IncA/C plasmid-borne blaCMY-2 gene through genetic re-arrangements with an IncX1 plasmid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our observation that in the Mexican Salmonella Typhimurium population none of the ST19 and ST213 strains harbored both the Salmonella virulence plasmid (pSTV) and the prevalent IncA/C plasmid (pA/C) led us to hypothesize that restriction to horizontal transfer of these plasmids existed. We designed a conjugation scheme using ST213 strain YU39 as donor of the blaCMY-2 gene (conferring resistance to ceftriaxone; CRO) carried by pA/C, and two E. coli lab strains (DH5α and HB101) and two Typhimurium ST19 strains (SO1 and LT2) carrying pSTV as recipients. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the different recipient strains affected the transfer frequencies of pA/C. Results YU39 was able to transfer CRO resistance, via a novel conjugative mechanism, to all the recipient strains although at low frequencies (10-7 to 10-10). The presence of pSTV in the recipients had little effect on the conjugation frequency. The analysis of the transconjugants showed that three different phenomena were occurring associated to the transfer of blaCMY-2: 1) the co-integration of pA/C and pX1; 2) the transposition of the CMY region from pA/C to pX1; or 3) the rearrangement of pA/C. In addition, the co-lateral mobilization of a small (5 kb) ColE1-like plasmid was observed. The transconjugant plasmids involving pX1 re-arrangements (either via co-integration or ISEcp1-mediated transposition) obtained the capacity to conjugate at very high levels, similar to those found for pX1 (10-1). Two versions of the region containing blaCMY-2 were found to transpose to pX1: the large version was inserted into an intergenic region located where the “genetic load” operons are frequently inserted into pX1, while the short version was inserted into the stbDE operon involved in plasmid addiction system. This is the first study to report the acquisition of an extended spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistance gene by an IncX1 plasmid. Conclusions We showed that the

  3. Power transfer device for four-wheel drive vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, S.

    1989-02-21

    A power transfer device is described for four-wheel drive vehicles, comprising: a housing; an input shaft rotatable mounted within the housing for drive connection to an output shaft of a power transmission; a first output shaft rotatably mounted within the housing in a coaxial relationship with the input shaft; a second output shaft rotatable mounted within the housing in a concentric relationship with the input shaft; and a planetary gear unit including a sun gear, a carrier, a ring gear, and a plurality of planet gears journaled on the carrier and in mesh with the sun and ring gears and being axially slidably mounted on the input and output shafts.

  4. Transfer of mupirocin resistance from Staphylococcus haemolyticus clinical strains to Staphylococcus aureus through conjugative and mobilizable plasmids.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ciro C; Ferreira, Natália C; Coelho, Marcus L V; Schuenck, Ricardo P; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de F; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia

    2016-07-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci are thought to act as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes that can be transferred to Staphylococcus aureus, thus hindering the combat of this bacterium. In this work, we analyzed the presence of plasmids conferring resistance to the antibiotic mupirocin-widely used to treat and prevent S. aureus infections in hospital environments-in nosocomial S. haemolyticus strains. About 12% of the 75 strains tested were resistant to mupirocin, and this phenotype was correlated with the presence of plasmids. These plasmids were shown to be diverse, being either conjugative or mobilizable, and capable of transferring mupirocin resistance to S. aureus Our findings reinforce that S. haemolyticus, historically and mistakenly considered as a less important pathogen, is a reservoir of resistance genes which can be transferred to other bacteria, such as S. aureus, emphasizing the necessity of more effective strategies to detect and combat this emergent opportunistic pathogen.

  5. Power transfer mechanism for four-wheel drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, K.

    1989-02-21

    A power transfer mechanism is described comprising: an input member; an first output member; a second output member; a planetary gear assembly including a ring gear, a carrier, a plurality of first planet gears in mesh with aid ring gear and journalled on the carrier, a plurality of second planet gears, each in mesh with one of the first planet gears, journalled on the carrier, and a sun gear in mesh with the second planet gears; the ring gear being drivingly connected to the input member; the carrier being drivingly connected to the first output member; and means for shifting the power transfer mechanism to a plurality of operating modes, aid shifting means including first clutch means for selectively engaging the first output member with the second output member and second clutch means for selectively engaging the second output member with the sun gear.

  6. Genomic Sequence and Transcriptional Analysis of a 23-Kilobase Mycobacterial Linear Plasmid: Evidence for Horizontal Transfer and Identification of Plasmid Maintenance Systems

    PubMed Central

    Le Dantec, Corinne; Winter, Nathalie; Gicquel, Brigitte; Vincent, Véronique; Picardeau, Mathieu

    2001-01-01

    Linear plasmids were unknown in mycobacteria until recently. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of 23-kb linear plasmid pCLP from Mycobacterium celatum, an opportunistic pathogen. The sequence of pCLP revealed at least 19 putative open reading frames (ORFs). Expression of pCLP genes in exponential-phase cultures was determined by reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR). Twelve ORFs were expressed, whereas no transcription of the 7 other ORFs of pCLP was detected. Five of the 12 transcribed ORFs detected by RT-PCR are of unknown function. Sequence analysis revealed similar loci in both M. celatum pCLP and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis chromosome, including transposase-related sequences. This result suggests horizontal transfer between these two organisms. pCLP also contains ORFs that are similar to genes of bacterial circular plasmids involved in partition (par operon) and postsegregational (pem operon) mechanisms. Functional analysis of these ORFs suggests that they probably carry out similar maintenance roles in pCLP. PMID:11244052

  7. Identification and functional analysis of the transfer region of plasmid pMEA300 of the methylotrophic actinomycete Amycolatopsis methanolica.

    PubMed Central

    Vrijbloed, J W; van der Put, N M; Dijkhuizen, L

    1995-01-01

    Amycolatopsis methanolica contains a 13.3-kb plasmid (pMEA300) that is present either as an integrated element or as an autonomously replicating plasmid. Conjugational transfer of pMEA300 results in pock formation, zones of growth inhibition that become apparent when plasmid-carrying donor cells develop in a confluent lawn of plasmid-lacking recipient cells. A 6.2-kb pMEA300 DNA region specifying the functions of conjugation and pock formation was sequenced, revealing 10 open reading frames. This is the first sequence of the transfer region of a plasmid from a nonstreptomycete actinomycete. No clear similarities were found between the deduced sequences of the 10 putative Tra proteins of pMEA300 and those of Streptomyces plasmids. All Tra proteins of pMEA300 thus may represent unfamiliar types. A detailed mutational analysis showed that at least four individual proteins, TraG (9,488 Da), TraH (12,586 Da), TraI (40,468 Da), and TraJ (81,109 Da), are required for efficient transfer of pMEA300. Their disruption resulted in a clear reduction in the conjugational transfer frequencies, ranging from (5.2 x 10(1))-fold (TraG) to (2.3 x 10(6))-fold (TraJ), and in reduced pock sizes. At least two putative proteins, TraA (10,698 Da) and TraB (31,442 Da), were shown to be responsible for pock formation specifically. Specific binding of the pMEA300-encoded KorA protein to the traA-korA intragenic region was observed. PMID:7592426

  8. Transfer of the virulence-associated protein A-bearing plasmid between field strains of virulent and avirulent Rhodococcus equi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virulent and avirulent isolates coexist in equine feces and the environment and serve as a source of infection for foals. The extent to which conjugative plasmid transfer occurs between these strains is unknown and is important for understanding the epidemiology of Rhodococcus equi infections of fo...

  9. Expression Characteristics of the Transfer-Related kilB Gene Product of Streptomyces Plasmid pIJ101: Implications for the Plasmid Spread Function

    PubMed Central

    Pettis, Gregg S.; Ward, Naomi; Schully, Kevin L.

    2001-01-01

    Intermycelial transfer of Streptomyces plasmid pIJ101 occurs prior to cellular differentiation and is mediated by plasmid functions that are also required for production of zones of growth-inhibited recipient cells (i.e., pocks) that develop around individual donors during mating on agar medium. Several other pIJ101 functions, including that of the kilB gene, whose unregulated expression on pIJ101 is lethal, are required for normal pock size and so have been postulated to mediate intramycelial spread of the plasmid throughout recipient cells. Using antibodies raised against a KilB fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, native KilB protein was detected throughout development of pIJ101-containing Streptomyces lividans cells, with the concentration of KilB increasing dramatically and reaching a maximum during the final stages (i.e., sporulation and secondary metabolism) of cellular differentiation. Insertion of the kilB gene of pIJ101 into the S. lividans chromosome in cells lacking the pIJ101 KorB protein, which normally represses kilB gene transcription, resulted in elevated but still temporally increasing amounts of KilB. The increased expression or accumulation of the KilB spread protein throughout cellular differentiation of S. lividans, which leads to maximum KilB concentrations during developmental stages that occur far later than when intermycelial transfer of pIJ101 is mediated, supports the existence of a subsequent intramycelial component to the pIJ101 spread function. The results also suggest that intramycelial spread of pIJ101 molecules within the recipient extends beyond intercompartmental movements within the substrate mycelia and includes undetermined steps within the spore-yielding aerial hyphae as well. PMID:11157947

  10. Plasmid Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Prazeres, Duarte Miguel F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids are currently an indispensable molecular tool in life science research and a central asset for the modern biotechnology industry, supporting its mission to produce pharmaceutical proteins, antibodies, vaccines, industrial enzymes, and molecular diagnostics, to name a few key products. Furthermore, plasmids have gradually stepped up in the past 20 years as useful biopharmaceuticals in the context of gene therapy and DNA vaccination interventions. This review provides a concise coverage of the scientific progress that has been made since the emergence of what are called today plasmid biopharmaceuticals. The most relevant topics are discussed to provide researchers with an updated overview of the field. A brief outline of the initial breakthroughs and innovations is followed by a discussion of the motivation behind the medical uses of plasmids in the context of therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. The molecular characteristics and rationale underlying the design of plasmid vectors as gene transfer agents are described and a description of the most important methods used to deliver plasmid biopharmaceuticals in vivo (gene gun, electroporation, cationic lipids and polymers, and micro- and nanoparticles) is provided. The major safety issues (integration and autoimmunity) surrounding the use of plasmid biopharmaceuticals is discussed next. Aspects related to the large-scale manufacturing are also covered, and reference is made to the plasmid products that have received marketing authorization as of today.

  11. Plasmids in the driving seat: The regulatory RNA Rcd gives plasmid ColE1 control over division and growth of its E. coli host.

    PubMed

    Gaimster, Hannah; Summers, David

    2015-03-01

    Regulation by non-coding RNAs was found to be widespread among plasmids and other mobile elements of bacteria well before its ubiquity in the eukaryotic world was suspected. As an increasing number of examples was characterised, a common mechanism began to emerge. Non-coding RNAs, such as CopA and Sok from plasmid R1, or RNAI from ColE1, exerted regulation by refolding the secondary structures of their target RNAs or modifying their translation. One regulatory RNA that seemed to swim against the tide was Rcd, encoded within the multimer resolution site of ColE1. Required for high fidelity maintenance of the plasmid in recombination-proficient hosts, Rcd was found to have a protein target, elevating indole production by stimulating tryptophanase. Rcd production is up-regulated in dimer-containing cells and the consequent increase in indole is part of the response to the rapid accumulation of dimers by over-replication (known as the dimer catastrophe). It is proposed that indole simultaneously inhibits cell division and plasmid replication, stopping the catastrophe and allowing time for the resolution of dimers to monomers. The idea of a plasmid-mediated cell division checkpoint, proposed but then discarded in the 1980s, appears to be enjoying a revival.

  12. Power transfer device for four-wheel drive vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ida, S.

    1988-10-04

    This patent describes a power transfer device for four-wheel drive vehicles, comprising: a housing an input shaft rotatably mounted within the housing for drive connection to an output shaft of a power transmission; a first output shaft rotatably mounted within the housing in a coaxial relationship with the input shaft; a second output shaft rotatably within the housing in a concentric relationship with the input shaft; and a planetary gear unit including a sun gear, a carrier, a ring gear, and planet gears journaled on the carrier and in mesh with the sun and ring gears and being axially slidably mounted on the input and output shafts, wherein the planetary gear unit is shiftable between first, second and third positions to establish a high speed drive mode in the first position wherein the carrier is engaged with the input shaft, and the sun and ring gears are each engaged with the output shafts to permit differential action between the output shafts. The planetary gear unit being arranged to establish a high speed drive mode in the second position wherein the carrier is engaged with the input shaft and the first output shaft, and the sun gear is engaged with the input shaft and the second output shaft to restrict the differential action between the output shafts and being further arranged to establish a low speed drive mode in the third position wherein the sun gear is engaged with the input shaft, the carrier is engaged with the output shafts, and the ring gear is locked by engagement with the housing to restrict the differential action between the output shafts.

  13. Plasmid-mediated gene transfer in neurons using the biolistics technique.

    PubMed

    Biewenga, J E; Destrée, O H; Schrama, L H

    1997-01-01

    Biolistics has been developed as a system for gene delivery into plant cells, but has recently been introduced for transfection into mammalian tissue, including few attempts in neural cells. Basically, in this system the plasmid DNA of interest is coated onto small particles, that are accelerated by a particular driving force. The combination of several so-called 'ballistic' parameters and tissue parameters determine the transfection efficiency. The main advantage of the system is that it is, unlike other available transfection methods, a mechanical way to cross the plasma membrane and therefore less dependent on target cell characteristics. In terms of transfection efficiency, biolistics seems favorable above conventional techniques, like calcium phosphate precipitation and lipofection. Compared to viral techniques biolistics may be less efficient, but is quicker and easier to handle and seems to produce fewer complications for in vivo gene delivery. Therefore, although the technique is only in a developmental stage, preliminary results seem promising, and optimalization of the method may prove useful in scientific research and/or clinical use.

  14. Identifying changes in EEG information transfer during drowsy driving by transfer entropy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chih-Sheng; Pal, Nikhil R.; Chuang, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Chin-Teng

    2015-01-01

    Drowsy driving is a major cause of automobile accidents. Previous studies used neuroimaging based approaches such as analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) activities to understand the brain dynamics of different cortical regions during drowsy driving. However, the coupling between brain regions responding to this vigilance change is still unclear. To have a comprehensive understanding of neural mechanisms underlying drowsy driving, in this study we use transfer entropy, a model-free measure of effective connectivity based on information theory. We investigate the pattern of information transfer between brain regions when the vigilance level, which is derived from the driving performance, changes from alertness to drowsiness. Results show that the couplings between pairs of frontal, central, and parietal areas increased at the intermediate level of vigilance, which suggests that an enhancement of the cortico-cortical interaction is necessary to maintain the task performance and prevent behavioral lapses. Additionally, the occipital-related connectivity magnitudes monotonically decreases as the vigilance level declines, which further supports the cortical gating of sensory stimuli during drowsiness. Neurophysiological evidence of mutual relationships between brain regions measured by transfer entropy might enhance the understanding of cortico-cortical communication during drowsy driving. PMID:26557069

  15. Novel R-plasmid conjugal transfer inhibitory and antibacterial activities of phenolic compounds from Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Mull. Arg.

    PubMed

    Oyedemi, Blessing O M; Shinde, Vaibhav; Shinde, Kamlesh; Kakalou, Dionysia; Stapleton, Paul D; Gibbons, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Antimicrobial resistance severely limits the therapeutic options for many clinically important bacteria. In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug resistance is commonly facilitated by plasmids that have the ability to accumulate and transfer refractory genes amongst bacterial populations. The aim of this study was to isolate and identify bioactive compounds from the medicinal plant Mallotus philippensis (Lam.) Mull. Arg. with both direct antibacterial properties and the capacity to inhibit plasmid conjugal transfer. A chloroform-soluble extract of M. philippensis was subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation using chromatographic and spectrometric techniques that led to the isolation of the known compounds rottlerin [5,7-dihydroxy-2,2-dimethyl-6-(2,4,6-trihydroxy-3-methyl-5-acetylbenzyl)-8-cinnamoyl-1,2-chromene] and the red compound (8-cinnamoyl-5,7-dihydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylchromene). Both compounds were characterised and elucidated using one-dimensional and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Rottlerin and the red compound showed potent activities against a panel of clinically relevant Gram-positive bacteria, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). No significant direct activities were observed against Gram-negative bacteria. However, both rottlerin and the red compound strongly inhibited conjugal transfer of the plasmids pKM101, TP114, pUB307 and R6K amongst Escherichia coli at a subinhibitory concentration of 100mg/L. Interestingly, despite the planar nature of the compounds, binding to plasmid DNA could not be demonstrated by a DNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay. These results show that rottlerin and the red compound are potential candidates for antibacterial drug lead development. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mode of inhibition of the conjugal transfer of plasmids.

  16. Development of plasmid vector and electroporation condition for gene transfer in sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Mun Su; Kim, Jin-Woo; Qian, Yilei; Ingram, L O; Shanmugam, K T

    2007-07-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a sporogenic lactic acid bacterium that ferments glucose and xylose, major components of plant biomass, a potential feedstock for cellulosic ethanol. The temperature and pH for optimum rate of growth of B. coagulans (50 to 55 degrees C, pH 5.0) are very similar to that of commercially developed fungal cellulases (50 degrees C; pH 4.8). Due to this match, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of cellulose to products by B. coagulans is expected to require less cellulase than needed if the SSF is conducted at a sub-optimal temperature, such as 30 degrees C, the optimum for yeast, the main biocatalyst used by the ethanol industry. To fully exploit B. coagulans as a platform organism, we have developed an electroporation method to transfer plasmid DNA into this genetically recalcitrant bacterium. We also constructed a B. coagulans/E. coli shuttle vector, plasmid pMSR10 that contains the rep region from a native plasmid (pMSR0) present in B. coagulans strain P4-102B. The native plasmid, pMSR0 (6823bp), has 9 ORFs, and replicates by rolling-circle mode of replication. Plasmid pNW33N, developed for Geobacillus stearothermophilus, was also transformed into this host and stably maintained while several other Bacillus/Escherichia coli shuttle vector plasmids were not transformed into B. coagulans. The transformation efficiency of B. coagulans strain P4-102B using the plasmids pNW33N or pMSR10 was about 1.5x10(16) per mole of DNA. The availability of shuttle vectors and an electroporation method is expected to aid in genetic and metabolic engineering of B. coagulans.

  17. Nucleotide sequence and characterization of the trbABC region of the IncI1 Plasmid R64: existence of the pnd gene for plasmid maintenance within the transfer region.

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, N; Komano, T

    1996-01-01

    A 6.72-kb DNA sequence between the exc gene and the oriT operon within the transfer region of IncI1 plasmid R64 was sequenced and characterized. Three novel transfer genes, trbA, trbB, and trbC, were found in this region, along with the pnd gene responsible for plasmid maintenance. The trbABC genes appear to be organized into an operon located adjacent to the oriT operon in the opposite orientation. The trbA and trbC genes were shown to be indispensable for R64 plasmid transfer, while residual transfer activity was detected in the case of R64 derivatives carrying the trbB++ deletion mutation. The T7 RNA polymerase-promoter system revealed that the trbB gene produced a 43-kDa protein and the trbC gene produced an 85-kDa protein. The nucleotide sequence of the pnd gene is nearly identical to that of plasmid R483, indicating a function in plasmid maintenance. The plasmid stability test indicated that the mini-R64 derivatives with the pnd gene are more stably maintained in Escherichia coli cells under nonselective conditions than the mini-R64 derivatives without the pnd gene. It was also shown that the R64 transfer system itself is involved in plasmid stability to a certain degree. Deletion of the pnd gene from the tra+ mini-R64 derivative did not affect transfer frequency. DNA segments between the exc and trbA genes for IncI1 plasmids R64, Colb-P9, and R144 were compared in terms of their physical and genetic organization. PMID:8626273

  18. Transfer of plasmid DNA to clinical coagulase-negative staphylococcal pathogens by using a unique bacteriophage.

    PubMed

    Winstel, Volker; Kühner, Petra; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas; Rohde, Holger

    2015-04-01

    Genetic manipulation of emerging bacterial pathogens, such as coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), is a major hurdle in clinical and basic microbiological research. Strong genetic barriers, such as restriction modification systems or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), usually interfere with available techniques for DNA transformation and therefore complicate manipulation of CoNS or render it impossible. Thus, current knowledge of pathogenicity and virulence determinants of CoNS is very limited. Here, a rapid, efficient, and highly reliable technique is presented to transfer plasmid DNA essential for genetic engineering to important CoNS pathogens from a unique Staphylococcus aureus strain via a specific S. aureus bacteriophage, Φ187. Even strains refractory to electroporation can be transduced by this technique once donor and recipient strains share similar Φ187 receptor properties. As a proof of principle, this technique was used to delete the alternative transcription factor sigma B (SigB) via allelic replacement in nasal and clinical Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates at high efficiencies. The described approach will allow the genetic manipulation of a wide range of CoNS pathogens and might inspire research activities to manipulate other important pathogens in a similar fashion.

  19. Transferable cefoxitin resistance in enterobacteria from Greek hospitals and characterization of a plasmid-mediated group 1 beta-lactamase (LAT-2).

    PubMed Central

    Gazouli, M; Tzouvelekis, L S; Prinarakis, E; Miriagou, V; Tzelepi, E

    1996-01-01

    Cefoxitin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae from Escherichia coli strains isolated in Greek hospitals was found to be due to the acquisition of similar plasmids coding for group 1 beta-lactamases. The plasmids were not self-transferable but were mobilized by conjugative plasmids. These elements have also been spread to Enterobacter aerogenes. The most common enzyme was a Citrobacter freundii-derived cephalosporinase (LAT-2) which differed from LAT-1 by three amino acids. PMID:8807075

  20. Effect of chromosomal homology on plasmid transfer and transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.; Stassi, D.L.; Lopez, P.; Espinosa, M.; Greenberg, B.

    1982-01-01

    The obvious rarity of simultanaeous uptake of two recombinant plasmids bearing the same chromosomal segment militated against the likelihood of cloning such segments by the conventional approach. However, it was possible to clone chromosomal genes in S. pneumoniae, and clones of two well-studied pneumococcal genes, malM, which codes for the amylomaltase essential for maltose utilization, and sul-d, which confers sulfonamide resistance, were obtained. The availability of recombinant plasmids carrying DNA segments homologous to the chromosome allowed investigation of the effects of such homology on plasmid establishment. In addition to facilitation of plasmid establishment, evidence was obtained for a subsequent process, in which alleles were equilibrated between the chromosome and the plasmid pool.

  1. Plasmid transfer in Streptomyces lividans: identification of a kil-kor system associated with the transfer region of pIJ101.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, K J; Cohen, S N

    1987-01-01

    The 8.9-kilobase Streptomyces plasmid pIJ101 is self-transmissible at high frequency into recipient strains. By genetic analysis of the transfer region of the plasmid, we identified six plasmid-encoded loci involved in gene transfer and the associated pocking phenomenon. Two loci, kilA and kilB, could not be cloned into Streptomyces lividans on a minimal pIJ101-based replicon unless suitable kil-override (kor) genes were present, either in cis or in trans. korA could control the lethal effects of both kilA and kilB, whereas korB could control only the effects of kilB. KilB mutants were defective in their pocking reaction; kilA mutants produced no visible pocks whatsoever. Mutations in two other loci, tra and spd, produced no pocks and defective pocks, respectively. These results suggest that kilA, kilB, tra, and spd are intimately involved in plasmid transfer and that the actions of kilA and kilB are regulated by the products of the korA and korB genes. PMID:3040681

  2. The animal food supplement sepiolite promotes a direct horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids between bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Yubero, Elva; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-06-01

    Animal fodder is routinely complemented with antibiotics together with other food supplements to improve growth. For instance, sepiolite is currently used as a dietary coadjuvant in animal feed, as it increases animal growth parameters and improves meat and derived final product quality. This type of food additive has so far been considered innocuous for the development and spread of antibiotic resistance. In this study, we demonstrate that sepiolite promotes the direct horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmids between bacterial species. The conditions needed for plasmid transfer (sepiolite and friction forces) occur in the digestive tracts of farm animals, which routinely receive sepiolite as a food additive. Furthermore, this effect may be aggravated by the use of antibiotics supplied as growth promoters.

  3. Crossed-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Seka, W; Edgell, D H; Michel, D T; Froula, D H; Goncharov, V N; Craxton, R S; Divol, L; Epstein, R; Follett, R; Kelly, J H; Kosc, T Z; Maximov, A V; McCrory, R L; Meyerhofer, D D; Michel, P; Myatt, J F; Sangster, T C; Shvydky, A; Skupsky, S; Stoeckl, C

    2012-05-22

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] have showed discrepancies between simulations of the scattered (non-absorbed) light levels and measured ones that indicate the presence of a mechanism that reduces laser coupling efficiency by 10%-20%. This appears to be due to crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) that involves electromagnetic-seeded, low-gain stimulated Brillouin scattering. CBET scatters energy from the central portion of the incoming light beam to outgoing light, reducing the laser absorption and hydrodynamic efficiency of implosions. One-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations including CBET show good agreement with all observables in implosion experiments on OMEGA. Three strategies to mitigate CBET and improve laser coupling are considered: the use of narrow beams, multicolor lasers, and higher-Z ablators. Experiments on OMEGA using narrow beams have demonstrated improvements in implosion performance.

  4. Lubrication mechanism in power transfer device for four wheel drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hamano, H.; Funato, Y.; Ida, S.

    1989-06-27

    A power transfer device for automotive vehicles is described, comprising: a housing, an input shaft rotatably mounted within the housing; an output shaft rotatably mounted with the housing and arranged coaxially with the input shaft for relative rotation thereto; an ancillary change-speed mechanism arranged within the housing and mounted on the input shaft, the change-speed mechanism having an input element mounted on the input shaft for rotation therewith and an output element connectable to the output shaft; a clutch sleeve axially slidably mounted on the output shaft and shiftable between a first position in which it is retained to effect a drive connection between the input and output shafts and a second position in which it is retained to effect a drive connection between the output element of the change-speed mechanism and the output shaft; and an oil pump assembly arranged within the housing to pump lubricating oil stored in the housing and supply it into an axial bore in the input shaft for lubrication of components of the change-speed mechanism.

  5. Mapping of transfer and H pilus coding regions of the IncHII plasmid pHH1508a.

    PubMed

    Yan, W; Taylor, D E

    1989-02-01

    The IncHII plasmid pHH1508a (208 kilobases) encodes resistance to potassium tellurite, trimethoprim, and streptomycin. Conjugative pili encoded by pHH1508a were isolated, purified, and used for preparation of anti-H pilus antiserum. Immuno-gold labelling experiments using H pilus specific antiserum showed that antigenic determinants were located along the entire length of the H pilus. Immuno-gold labelling and lysis studies using pilH alpha, a bacteriophage specific for H pili, were used to investigate transfer-deficient mutants of pHH1508a obtained by Tn5 mutagenesis and an in vitro constructed derivative of 96 kilobases, pDT1178, which also conferred resistance to potassium tellurite, trimethoprim, and streptomycin. The transfer-deficient mutants did not specify H pili, whereas pDT1178, which transferred at low frequency (1 x 10(-4) transconjugants per recipient), specified a small number of H pili. A naturally occurring plasmid, pMG110, was found to encode the production of H pili, but was completely transfer deficient (less than 1 x 10(-7) transconjugants per recipient). This study suggests that genes required for H pilus production and assembly as well as low level transfer are located separately within the 96-kilobase fragment of pDT1178 and that other genes, located outside this region, are essential for the regulation and full expression of conjugative transfer.

  6. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart; Raymann, Kasie; Soler, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Many plasmids have been described in Euryarchaeota, one of the three major archaeal phyla, most of them in salt-loving haloarchaea and hyperthermophilic Thermococcales. These plasmids resemble bacterial plasmids in terms of size (from small plasmids encoding only one gene up to large megaplasmids) and replication mechanisms (rolling circle or theta). Some of them are related to viral genomes and form a more or less continuous sequence space including many integrated elements. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota have been useful for designing efficient genetic tools for these microorganisms. In addition, they have also been used to probe the topological state of plasmids in species with or without DNA gyrase and/or reverse gyrase. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota encode both DNA replication proteins recruited from their hosts and novel families of DNA replication proteins. Euryarchaeota form an interesting playground to test evolutionary hypotheses on the origin and evolution of viruses and plasmids, since a robust phylogeny is available for this phylum. Preliminary studies have shown that for different plasmid families, plasmids share a common gene pool and coevolve with their hosts. They are involved in gene transfer, mostly between plasmids and viruses present in closely related species, but rarely between cells from distantly related archaeal lineages. With few exceptions (e.g., plasmids carrying gas vesicle genes), most archaeal plasmids seem to be cryptic. Interestingly, plasmids and viral genomes have been detected in extracellular membrane vesicles produced by Thermococcales, suggesting that these vesicles could be involved in the transfer of viruses and plasmids between cells.

  7. Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation for Polar Direct Drive and Symmetric Direct Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Radha, P. B.; Hohenberger, M.; Rosenberg, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) results from two-beam energy exchange via stimulated Brillouin scattering, which reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed and scattered light. These effects reduce target performance in polar direct drive (PDD) and symmetric direct drive (SDD) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and on the OMEGA Laser System. The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with other mitigation domains (e.g., spatial and temporal). Recent PDD experiments on the NIF explored this option using a cone-swapping technique with dλ0 = +/- 2.34 Å UV, which are compared with DRACO simulations. DRACO simulations of wavelength detuning in SDD on OMEGA predict the expected mitigation using OMEGA's three main amplifier chains in both near-term dλ0 = { - 3 , 0 , + 3 } -Å and long-term dλ0 = { - 6 , 0 , + 6 } -Å UV configurations. The detuning simulations predict improved performance and changes in 2-D and 3-D morphology in both PDD and SDD. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  8. Mercury Resistance Is Encoded by Transferable Giant Linear Plasmids in Two Chesapeake Bay Streptomyces Strains†

    PubMed Central

    Ravel, Jacques; Schrempf, Hildgund; Hill, Russell T.

    1998-01-01

    The Streptomyces strains CHR3 and CHR28, isolated from the Baltimore Inner Harbor, contained two and one, respectively, giant linear plasmids which carry terminally bound proteins. The plasmids pRJ3L (322 kb), from CHR3, and pRJ28 (330 kb), from CHR28, carry genes homologous to the previously characterized chromosomal Streptomyces lividans 66 operon encoding resistance against mercuric compounds. Both plasmids are transmissible (without any detectable rearrangement) to the chloramphenicol-resistant S. lividans TK24 strain lacking plasmids and carrying a chromosomal deletion of the mer operon. S. lividans TK24 conjugants harboring pRJ3L or pRJ28 exhibited profiles of mercury resistance to mercuric compounds similar to those of Streptomyces strains CHR3 and CHR28. PMID:9726886

  9. Transferable Multiresistance Plasmids Carrying cfr in Enterococcus spp. from Swine and Farm Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Schwarz, Stefan; Li, Yun; Shen, Zhangqi; Zhang, Qijing; Wu, Congming

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-seven porcine Enterococcus isolates with florfenicol MICs of ≥16 μg of were/ml screened for the presence of the multiresistance gene cfr, its location on plasmids, and its genetic environment. Three isolates—Enterococcus thailandicus 3-38 (from a porcine rectal swab collected at a pig farm), Enterococcus thailandicus W3, and Enterococcus faecalis W9-2 (the latter two from sewage at a different farm), carried the cfr gene. The SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of the three isolates differed distinctly. In addition, E. faecalis W9-2 was assigned to a new multilocus sequence type ST469. Mating experiments and Southern blot analysis indicated that cfr is located on conjugative plasmids pW3 (∼75 kb) from E. thailandicus W3, p3-38 (∼72 kb) from E. thailandicus 3-38, and pW9-2 (∼55 kb) from E. faecalis W9-2; these plasmids differed in their sizes, additional resistance genes, and the analysis of the segments encompassing the cfr gene. Sequence analysis revealed that all plasmids harbored a 4,447-bp central region, in which cfr was bracketed by two copies of the novel insertion sequence ISEnfa4 located in the same orientation. The sequences flanking the central regions of these plasmids, including the partial tra gene regions and a ω-ε-ζ toxin-antitoxin module, exhibited >95% nucleotide sequence identity to the conjugative plasmid pAMβ1 from E. faecalis. Conjugative plasmids carrying cfr appear to play an important role in the dissemination and maintenance of the multiresistance gene cfr among enterococcal isolates and possibly other species of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23070165

  10. Transferable multiresistance plasmids carrying cfr in Enterococcus spp. from swine and farm environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yang; Schwarz, Stefan; Li, Yun; Shen, Zhangqi; Zhang, Qijing; Wu, Congming; Shen, Jianzhong

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-seven porcine Enterococcus isolates with florfenicol MICs of ≥16 μg of were/ml screened for the presence of the multiresistance gene cfr, its location on plasmids, and its genetic environment. Three isolates-Enterococcus thailandicus 3-38 (from a porcine rectal swab collected at a pig farm), Enterococcus thailandicus W3, and Enterococcus faecalis W9-2 (the latter two from sewage at a different farm), carried the cfr gene. The SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns of the three isolates differed distinctly. In addition, E. faecalis W9-2 was assigned to a new multilocus sequence type ST469. Mating experiments and Southern blot analysis indicated that cfr is located on conjugative plasmids pW3 (∼75 kb) from E. thailandicus W3, p3-38 (∼72 kb) from E. thailandicus 3-38, and pW9-2 (∼55 kb) from E. faecalis W9-2; these plasmids differed in their sizes, additional resistance genes, and the analysis of the segments encompassing the cfr gene. Sequence analysis revealed that all plasmids harbored a 4,447-bp central region, in which cfr was bracketed by two copies of the novel insertion sequence ISEnfa4 located in the same orientation. The sequences flanking the central regions of these plasmids, including the partial tra gene regions and a ω-ε-ζ toxin-antitoxin module, exhibited >95% nucleotide sequence identity to the conjugative plasmid pAMβ1 from E. faecalis. Conjugative plasmids carrying cfr appear to play an important role in the dissemination and maintenance of the multiresistance gene cfr among enterococcal isolates and possibly other species of Gram-positive bacteria.

  11. Essential motifs of relaxase (TraI) and TraG proteins involved in conjugative transfer of plasmid RP4.

    PubMed Central

    Balzer, D.; Pansegrau, W.; Lanka, E.

    1994-01-01

    Two essential transfer genes of the conjugative plasmid RP4 were altered by site-directed mutagenesis: traG of the primase operon and traI of the relaxase operon. To evaluate effects on the transfer phenotype of the point mutations, we have reconstituted the RP4 transfer system by fusion of the transfer regions Tra1 and Tra2 to the small multicopy replicon ColD. Deletions in traG or traI served to determine the Tra phenotype of mutant plasmids by trans complementation. Two motifs of TraG which are highly conserved among TraG-like proteins in several other conjugative DNA transfer systems were found to be essential for TraG function. One of the motifs resembles that of a nucleotide binding fold of type B. The relaxase (TraI) catalyzes the specific cleaving-joining reaction at the transfer origin needed to initiate and terminate conjugative DNA transfer (W. Pansegrau, W. Schröder, and E. Lanka, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:2925-2929, 1993). Phenotypes of mutations in three motifs that belong to the active center of the relaxase confirmed previously obtained biochemical evidence for the contributions of the motifs to the catalytic activity of TraI. Expression of the relaxase operon is greatly increased in the absence of an intact TraI protein. This finding suggests that the relaxosome which assembles only in the presence of the TraI in addition to its enzymatic activity plays a role in gene regulation. Images PMID:8021214

  12. Osa Protein Constitutes a Strong Oncogenic Suppression System That Can Block vir-Dependent Transfer of IncQ Plasmids between Agrobacterium Cells and the Establishment of IncQ Plasmids in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lan-Ying; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2004-01-01

    The osa (oncogenic suppressive activity) gene of the IncW group plasmid pSa is sufficient to suppress tumorigenesis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. osa confers oncogenic suppression by inhibiting VirE2 protein export. This result is similar, but not identical, to that of oncogenic suppression by the IncQ plasmid RSF1010. We conducted a series of experiments to compare oncogenic suppression by these two systems. Agrobacterium strains harboring plasmids containing osa are more able to effect oncogenic suppression than are similar strains containing various RSF1010 derivatives. When osa is present within a donor Agrobacterium strain that also carries a derivative of RSF1010, the transfer of RSF1010 derivatives to recipient bacteria and their establishment in plants are blocked. Oncogenic suppression is still effected when the osa gene is integrated into the Agrobacterium chromosome, suggesting that it is the osa gene product that is active in suppression and that suppression does not require a protein-nucleic acid intermediate like that described for IncQ plasmids. Extracellular complementation experiments with tobacco leaf disks indicated that Osa blocks stable transfer of RSF1010 to plant cells by inhibiting transfer of VirE2, which is essential for the transfer of RSF1010 into plant cells, and not by inhibiting the actual transfer of RSF1010 itself. Our results suggest that Osa and RSF1010 cause oncogenic suppression by using different mechanisms. PMID:15489437

  13. A novel peptide delivers plasmids across blood-brain barrier into neuronal cells as a single-component transfer vector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ailing; Zhang, Miaomiao; Gao, Feiyan; Xu, Xingran; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    There is no data up to now to show that peptide can deliver plasmid into brain as a single-component transfer vector. Here we show that a novel peptide, RDP (consisted of 39 amino acids), can be exploited as an efficient plasmid vector for brain-targeting delivery. The plasmids containing Lac Z reporter gene (pVAX-Lac Z) and BDNF gene (pVAX-BDNF) are complexed with RDP and intravenously injected into mice. The results of gel retardation assay show that RDP enables to bind DNA in a dose-dependent manner, and the X-Gal staining identity that Lac Z is specifically expressed in the brain. Also, the results of Western blot and immunofluorescence staining of BDNF indicate that pVAX-BDNF complexed with RDP can be delivered into brain, and show neuroprotective properties in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) model. The results demonstrate that RDP enables to bind and deliver DNA into the brain, resulting in specific gene expression in the neuronal cells. This strategy provides a novel, simple and effective approach for non-viral gene therapy of brain diseases.

  14. The repABC Plasmids with Quorum-Regulated Transfer Systems in Members of the Rhizobiales Divide into Two Structurally and Separately Evolving Groups

    PubMed Central

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from those coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. We conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function. PMID:26590210

  15. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    DOE PAGES

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; ...

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from thosemore » coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.« less

  16. The repABC plasmids with quorum-regulated transfer systems in members of the Rhizobiales divide into two structurally and separately evolving groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, Margaret E.; Olsen, Gary J.; Chakravartty, Vandana; Farrand, Stephen K.

    2015-11-19

    The large repABC plasmids of the order Rhizobiales with Class I quorum-regulated conjugative transfer systems often define the nature of the bacterium that harbors them. These otherwise diverse plasmids contain a core of highly conserved genes for replication and conjugation raising the question of their evolutionary relationships. In an analysis of 18 such plasmids these elements fall into two organizational classes, Group I and Group II, based on the sites at which cargo DNA is located. Cladograms constructed from proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing components indicated that those of the Group I plasmids, while coevolving, have diverged from those coevolving proteins of the Group II plasmids. Moreover, within these groups the phylogenies of the proteins usually occupy similar, if not identical, tree topologies. Remarkably, such relationships were not seen among proteins of the replication system; although RepA and RepB coevolve, RepC does not. Nor do the replication proteins coevolve with the proteins of the transfer and quorum-sensing systems. Functional analysis was mostly consistent with phylogenies. TraR activated promoters from plasmids within its group, but not between groups and dimerized with TraR proteins from within but not between groups. However, oriT sequences, which are highly conserved, were processed by the transfer system of plasmids regardless of group. Here, we conclude that these plasmids diverged into two classes based on the locations at which cargo DNA is inserted, that the quorum-sensing and transfer functions are coevolving within but not between the two groups, and that this divergent evolution extends to function.

  17. Differences in the carriage and the ability to utilize the serotype associated virulence plasmid in strains of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium investigated by use of a self-transferable virulence plasmid, pOG669.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John E; Brown, Derek J; Thomsen, Line E; Platt, David J; Chadfield, Mark S

    2004-06-01

    Most strains of Salmonella enterica subspecies enterica serotype typhimurium (S. typhimurium) naturally harbour a virulence plasmid which carries the salmonella plasmid virulence (spv) genes. However, isolates belonging to certain phage types are generally found without the plasmid. We have utilized a self-transferable virulence plasmid, pOG669 to investigate the effect of introduction of spv genes into strains of such phage types. The use of the co-integrate plasmid, pOG669, was validated on a diverse collection of strains. pOG669 was transferred into strains of serotypes that are normally associated with the possession of virulence plasmids. All strains maintained the wild type level of virulence in a mouse model, except that introduction of pOG669 restored normal virulence levels in an avirulent, plasmid free strain of S. dublin and resulted in a decrease in virulence in a strain of S. dublin from clonal line Du3. S. gallinarum did not become virulent in mice, but pOG669 was functionally interchangeable with the wild type plasmid when strains were tested in a chicken model. Strains of serotypes not normally associated with the carriage of a virulence plasmid did not increase in virulence upon the introduction of pOG669. An IncX plasmid pOG670 that was included as control was incompatible with the virulence plasmid in a strain of S. dublin, demonstrating that the common virulence plasmid of this serotype is of a different incompatibility group than other virulence plasmids. Strains of S. typhimurium from phage types that do not normally carry a virulence plasmid responded differently to attempts to introduce pOG669. No transconjugants were observed with the strains of DT5 and DT21. The introduction of pOG669 did not alter the virulence of JEO3942(DT10), DT35 and JEO3949(DT66) significantly, while DT1 and DT27 became more virulent. DT27 became as virulent as wild type C5, while logVC(10) of DT1 only increased from 4.1 to 5.7. The ability to express spv-genes was

  18. Plasmid diversity in neisseriae.

    PubMed

    van Passel, Mark W J; van der Ende, Arie; Bart, Aldert

    2006-08-01

    Horizontal gene transfer constitutes an important force in prokaryotic genome evolution, and it is well-known that plasmids are vehicles for DNA transfer. Chromosomal DNA is frequently exchanged between pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, but relatively little is known about plasmid diversity and prevalence among these nasopharyngeal inhabitants. We investigated the plasmid contents of 18 Neisseria lactamica isolates and 20 nasopharyngeal Neisseria meningitidis isolates. Of 18 N. lactamica strains, 9 harbored one or more plasmids, whereas only one N. meningitidis isolate contained a plasmid. Twelve plasmids were completely sequenced, while five plasmid sequences from the public databases were also included in the analyses. On the basis of nucleic acid sequences, mobilization, and replicase protein alignments, we distinguish six different plasmid groups (I to VI). Three plasmids from N. lactamica appeared to be highly similar on the nucleotide level to the meningococcal plasmids pJS-A (>99%) and pJS-B (>75%). The genetic organizations of two plasmids show a striking resemblance with that of the recently identified meningococcal disease-associated (MDA) phage, while four putative proteins encoded by these plasmids show 25% to 39% protein identity to those encoded by the MDA phage. The putative promoter of the gene encoding the replicase on these plasmids contains a polycytidine tract, suggesting that replication is subjected to phase variation. In conclusion, extensive plasmid diversity is encountered among commensal neisseriae. Members of three plasmid groups are found in both pathogenic and commensal neisseriae, indicating plasmid exchange between these species. Resemblance between plasmids and MDA phage may be indicative of dissemination of phage-related sequences among pathogenic and commensal neisseriae.

  19. Energy transfer in strained graphene assisted by discrete breathers excited by external ac driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evazzade, Iman; Lobzenko, Ivan P.; Korznikova, Elena A.; Ovid'ko, Ilya A.; Roknabadi, Mahmood Rezaee; Dmitriev, Sergey V.

    2017-01-01

    In the present molecular-dynamics study, external ac driving is used at frequencies outside the phonon spectrum to excite gap DBs in uniformly strained graphene nanoribbon. Harmonic displacement or harmonic force is applied to a zigzag atomic chain of graphene. In the former case, nonpropagating DBs are excited on the atoms next to the driven atoms, while in the latter case the excited DBs propagate along the nanoribbon. The energy transfer along the nanoribbon assisted by the DBs is investigated in detail, and the differences between harmonic displacement driving and harmonic force driving are discussed. It is concluded that the amplitude of external driving at out-of-phonon spectrum frequencies should not necessarily be large to obtain a noticeable energy transfer to the system. Overall, our results suggest that external harmonic driving even at relatively small driving amplitudes can be used to control excitation of DBs and consequently the energy transfer to the system.

  20. Novel Conjugative Transferable Multiple Drug Resistance Plasmid pAQU1 from Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Isolated from Marine Aquaculture Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Lisa; Maruyama, Fumito; Miyamoto, Manabu; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Kurokawa, Ken; Masuda, Michiaki

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria is a severe problem in aquaculture. The ability of drug resistance genes to transfer from a bacterial cell to another is thought to be responsible for the wide dissemination of these genes in the aquaculture environment; however, little is known about the gene transfer mechanisms in marine bacteria. In this study, we show that a tetracycline-resistant strain of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, isolated from seawater at a coastal aquaculture site in Japan, harbors a novel multiple drug resistance plasmid. This plasmid named pAQU1 can be transferred to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Nucleotide sequencing showed that the plasmid was 204,052 base pairs and contained 235 predicted coding sequences. Annotation showed that pAQU1 did not have known repA, suggesting a new replicon, and contained seven drug resistance genes: blaCARB-9-like, floR, mph(A)-like, mef(A)-like, sul2, tet(M) and tet(B). The plasmid has a complete set of genes encoding the apparatus for the type IV secretion system with a unique duplication of traA. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of relaxase encoded by traI in pAQU1 demonstrated that the conjugative transfer system of the plasmid belongs to MOBH12, a sub-group of the MOBH plasmid family, closely related to the IncA/C type of plasmids and SXT/R391 widely distributed among species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. Our data suggest that conjugative transfer is involved in horizontal gene transfer among marine bacteria and provide useful insights into the molecular basis for the dissemination of drug resistance genes among bacteria in the aquaculture environment. PMID:22446310

  1. Successful gene transfer into dendritic cells with cationized gelatin and plasmid DNA complexes via a phagocytosis-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Inada, Satoshi; Fujiwara, Hitoshi; Atsuji, Kiyoto; Takashima, Kazuhiro; Araki, Yasunobu; Kubota, Takeshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Yamagishi, Hisakazu

    2006-01-01

    The use of gene-modified dendritic cells (DC) is a powerful tool to enhance antitumor immune responses stimulated by these cells in cancer immunotherapy. Cationized gelatin is preferably incorporated via phagocytosis and is gradually degraded by proteolysis while buffering lysosomal activity. This may be appropriate for gene transfer into phagocytic cells, such as immature DC. In the present study, successful transfection into monocyte-derived immature DC was demonstrated using cationized gelatin and plasmid DNA complexes. A high transfection efficiency, approaching 16%, was obtained upon transfection of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene as evaluated by flow cytometry. Transgene expression of EGFP and murine interleukin 12 were also detected by RT-PCR. The antigen-presenting capacity of the transfected DC was equal to that of untransfected DC as evaluated by the allogeneic mixed lymphocyte reaction. Cationized gelatin has the potential to be a unique non-viral vector for gene transfer into DC.

  2. Crossed-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igumenshchev, I. V.

    2011-10-01

    Direct-drive-implosion experiments on OMEGA have revealed the importance of crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET), which is caused by stimulated Brillouin scattering. The CBET reduces the laser absorption in a target corona by ~10% to 20% and, therefore, decreases the implosion performance. The signature of CBET is observed in time-resolved, reflected-light spectra as a suppression of red-shifted light during the main laser pulse. Simulations without CBET typically predict an earlier bang time and overestimate the laser absorption in high-compression, low-adiabat implosions. Simulations using a CBET model and a nonlocal heat-transport model explain well the scattered-light and bang-timing measurements. This talk will summarize the possible mitigation strategies for CBET required for robust ignition designs. CBET most effectively scatters incoming light that interacts with outgoing light originated from laser beam edges. This makes it possible to mitigate CBET by reducing the beam diameter with respect to the target diameter. Implosion experiments using large 1400- μm-diam plastic shells and in-focus and defocus laser beams have demonstrated the reduction of CBET in implosions with a smaller ratio of the beam-to-target diameters. Simulations predict the optimum range of this ratio to be 0.7 to 0.8. Another mitigation strategy involves splitting the incident light into two or more colors. This reduces CBET by shifting and suppressing the coupling resonances. The reduction in scattered light caused by CBET is predicted to be up to a factor of 2 when incident light colors are separated by δλ > 6 Ã. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302. In collaboration with W. Seka, D. H. Edgell, D. H. Froula, V. N. Goncharov, R. S. Craxton, R. L. McCrory, A. V. Maximov, D. D. Meyerhofer, J. F. Myatt, T. C. Sangster, A. Shvydky, S. Skupsky, and C. Stoeckl. I. V. Igumenshchevet

  3. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  4. Characterization of a transferable bcrABC and cadAC genes-harboring plasmid in Listeria monocytogenes strain isolated from food products of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyang; Nie, Qing; Wang, Wenyan; Shi, Lei; Yan, He

    2016-01-18

    In this study, we characterized a bcrABC cassette and its genetic environment harbored by a plasmid in Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes) 11GZL18, a strain isolated from raw meat in 2011. The bcrABC cassette and its genetic environment were characterized, with a total of 33,727 nt nucleotide sequence obtained. The nucleotide sequences of the bcrABC cassette in strain 11GZL18 exhibited 100% identity to that on plasmid pLM80, which is harbored by L. monocytogenes strain H7550 and H7858, and the neighboring 21,678 nt nucleotide sequence of bcrABC cassette showed 99% identity with plasmid pLM80. The plasmid curing experiment demonstrated the role of the plasmid in conferring benzalkonium chloride (BC) and cadmium (Cd) tolerance in this strain. The bcrABC cassette and cadAC genes from the L. monocytogenes 11GZL18 were harbored by plasmid, functional and transmissible, and led to the acquired tolerance in Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) DH5α by chemical and natural transformation. Besides, the efflux pump activity that is conferring tolerance to BC and Cd was observed in strain 11GZL18, while not in a plasmid-cured strain 11GZL18-C, confirming that efflux pumps play a role in plasmid-mediated tolerance to BC and Cd in L. monocytogenes 11GZL18. In this study we characterized the genetic organization of a novel BC and Cd tolerance determinants-harboring plasmid in a L. monocytogenes strain isolated from raw meat of animal origin, and demonstrated the potential horizontal transferability of this bcrABC cassette-harboring plasmid to E. coli. The findings will further improve our understanding of the adaptations of this organism to disinfectants such as BC and may contribute to elucidating possible dissemination of BC tolerance in foodborne L. monocytogenes.

  5. Horizontal Gene Transfer of a ColV Plasmid Has Resulted in a Dominant Avian Clonal Type of Salmonella enterica Serovar Kentucky

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Thorsness, Jessica L.; Anderson, Cole P.; Lynne, Aaron M.; Foley, Steven L.; Han, Jing; Fricke, W. Florian; McDermott, Patrick F.; White, David G.; Khatri, Mahesh; Stell, Adam L.; Flores, Cristian; Singer, Randall S.

    2010-01-01

    Salmonella enterica continues to be a significant cause of foodborne gastrointestinal illness in humans. A wide variety of Salmonella serovars have been isolated from production birds and from retail poultry meat. Recently, though, S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky has emerged as one of the prominent Salmonella serovars isolated from broiler chickens. Recent work suggests that its emergence apparently coincides with its acquisition of a ColV virulence plasmid. In the present study, we examined 902 Salmonella isolates belonging to 59 different serovars for the presence of this plasmid. Of the serovars examined, the ColV plasmid was found only among isolates belonging to the serovars Kentucky (72.9%), Typhimurium (15.0%) and Heidelberg (1.7%). We demonstrated that a single PFGE clonal type of S. Kentucky harbors this plasmid, and acquisition of this plasmid by S. Kentucky significantly increased its ability to colonize the chicken cecum and cause extraintestinal disease. Comparison of the completed sequences of three ColV plasmids from S. Kentucky isolated from different geographical locales, timepoints and sources revealed a nearly identical genetic structure with few single nucleotide changes or insertions/deletions. Overall, it appears that the ColV plasmid was recently acquired by a single clonal type S. Kentucky and confers to its host enhanced colonization and fitness capabilities. Thus, the potential for horizontal gene transfer of virulence and fitness factors to Salmonella from other enteric bacteria exists in poultry, representing a potential human health hazard. PMID:21203520

  6. Evidence for the Role of Horizontal Transfer in Generating pVT1, a Large Mosaic Conjugative Plasmid from the Clam Pathogen, Vibrio tapetis

    PubMed Central

    Bidault-Toffin, Adeline; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Bouloc, Philippe; Paillard, Christine; Jacq, Annick

    2011-01-01

    The marine bacterium Vibrio tapetis is the causative agent of the brown ring disease, which affects the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and causes heavy economic losses in North of Europe and in Eastern Asia. Further characterization of V. tapetis isolates showed that all the investigated strains harbored at least one large plasmid. We determined the sequence of the 82,266 bp plasmid pVT1 from the CECT4600T reference strain and analyzed its genetic content. pVT1 is a mosaic plasmid closely related to several conjugative plasmids isolated from Vibrio vulnificus strains and was shown to be itself conjugative in Vibrios. In addition, it contains DNA regions that have similarity with several other plasmids from marine bacteria (Vibrio sp., Shewanella sp., Listonella anguillarum and Photobacterium profundum). pVT1 contains a number of mobile elements, including twelve Insertion Sequences or inactivated IS genes and an RS1 phage element related to the CTXphi phage of V. cholerae. The genetic organization of pVT1 underscores an important role of horizontal gene transfer through conjugative plasmid shuffling and transposition events in the acquisition of new genetic resources and in generating the pVT1 modular organization. In addition, pVT1 presents a copy number of 9, relatively high for a conjugative plasmid, and appears to belong to a new type of replicon, which may be specific to Vibrionaceae and Shewanelleacae. PMID:21326607

  7. A Silenced vanA Gene Cluster on a Transferable Plasmid Caused an Outbreak of Vancomycin-Variable Enterococci

    PubMed Central

    Sivertsen, Audun; Pedersen, Torunn; Larssen, Kjersti Wik; Bergh, Kåre; Rønning, Torunn Gresdal; Radtke, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of vancomycin-variable vanA+ enterococci (VVE) able to escape phenotypic detection by current guidelines and demonstrate the molecular mechanisms for in vivo switching into vancomycin resistance and horizontal spread of the vanA cluster. Forty-eight vanA+ Enterococcus faecium isolates and one Enterococcus faecalis isolate were analyzed for clonality with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and their vanA gene cluster compositions were assessed by PCR and whole-genome sequencing of six isolates. The susceptible VVE strains were cultivated in brain heart infusion broth containing vancomycin at 8 μg/ml for in vitro development of resistant VVE. The transcription profiles of susceptible VVE and their resistant revertants were assessed using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Plasmid content was analyzed with S1 nuclease PFGE and hybridizations. Conjugative transfer of vanA was assessed by filter mating. The only genetic difference between the vanA clusters of susceptible and resistant VVE was an ISL3-family element upstream of vanHAX, which silenced vanHAX gene transcription in susceptible VVE. Furthermore, the VVE had an insertion of IS1542 between orf2 and vanR that attenuated the expression of vanHAX. Growth of susceptible VVE occurred after 24 to 72 h of exposure to vancomycin due to excision of the ISL3-family element. The vanA gene cluster was located on a transferable broad-host-range plasmid also detected in outbreak isolates with different pulsotypes, including one E. faecalis isolate. Horizontally transferable silenced vanA able to escape detection and revert into resistance during vancomycin therapy represents a new challenge in the clinic. Genotypic testing of invasive vancomycin-susceptible enterococci by vanA-PCR is advised. PMID:27139479

  8. Production of Fibronectin Binding Protein A at the surface of Lactococcus lactis increases plasmid transfer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Daniela; Innocentin, Silvia; Del Carmen, Silvina; Almeida, Juliana Franco; Leblanc, Jean-Guy; de Moreno de Leblanc, Alejandra; Blugeon, Sébastien; Cherbuy, Claire; Lefèvre, François; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Langella, Philippe; Chatel, Jean-Marc

    2012-01-01

    Lactococci are noninvasive lactic acid bacteria frequently used as protein delivery vectors and, more recently, as DNA delivery vehicles. We previously showed that Lactococcus lactis (LL) expressing the Fibronectin-Binding Protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (LL-FnBPA+) showed higher internalization rates in vitro in Caco-2 cells than the native (wt) lactococci and were able to deliver a eukaryotic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) expression plasmid in 1% of human Caco-2 cells. Here, using the bovine beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), one of the major cow's milk allergen, and GFP we characterized the potential of LL-FnBPA+ as an in vivo DNA vaccine delivery vehicle. We first showed that the invasive strain LL-FnBPA+ carrying the plasmid pValac:BLG (LL-FnBPA+ BLG) was more invasive than LL-BLG and showed the same invasivity as LL-FnBPA+. Then we demonstrated that the Caco-2 cells, co-incubated with LL-FnBPA+ BLG produced up to 30 times more BLG than the Caco-2 cells co-incubated with the non invasive LL-BLG. Using two different gene reporters, BLG and GFP, and two different methods of detection, EIA and fluorescence microscopy, we showed in vivo that: i) in order to be effective, LL-FnBPA+ required a pre-coating with Fetal Calf Serum before oral administration; ii) plasmid transfer occurred in enterocytes without regard to the strains used (invasive or not); iii) the use of LL-FnBPA+ increased the number of mice producing BLG, but not the level of BLG produced. We thus confirmed the good potential of invasive recombinant lactic acid bacteria as DNA delivery vector in vivo.

  9. Genetic and physical characterization of recombinant plasmids associated with cell aggregation and high-frequency conjugal transfer in Streptococcus lactis ML3.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D G; McKay, L L

    1984-06-01

    Restriction mapping was employed to characterize the 104-kilobase (kb) cointegrate lactose plasmids from 15 independent transconjugants derived from Streptococcus lactis ML3 as well as the 55-kb lactose plasmid ( pSK08 ) and a previously uncharacterized 48.4-kb plasmid ( pRS01 ) from S. lactis ML3. The data revealed that the 104-kb plasmids were cointegrates of pSK08 and pRS01 and were structurally distinct. The replicon fusion event occurred within adjacent 13.8- or 7.3-kb PvuII fragments of pSK08 and interrupted apparently random regions of pRS01 . Correlation of the transconjugants' clumping and conjugal transfer capabilities with the interrupted region of pRS01 identified pRS01 regions coding for these properties. In the 104-kb plasmids, the pRS01 region was present in both orientations with respect to the pSK08 region. The replicon fusion occurred in recombination-deficient (Rec-) strains and appeared to introduce a 0.8 to 1.0-kb segment of DNA within the junction fragments. The degeneration of the cointegrate plasmids was monitored by examining the lactose plasmids from nonclumping derivatives of clumping transconjugants. These plasmids displayed either precise or imprecise excision of pRS01 sequences or had dramatically reduced copy numbers. Both alterations occurred by rec-independent mechanisms. Alterations of a transconjugant 's clumping phenotype also occurred by rec-independent inversion of a 4.3-kb KpnI-PvuII fragment within the pRS01 sequences of the cointegrate plasmid.

  10. Transfer of the pheromone-inducible plasmid pCF10 among Enterococcus faecalis microorganisms colonizing the intestine of mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Licht, Tine Rask; Laugesen, Dorthe; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Jacobsen, Bodil Lund

    2002-01-01

    A new animal model, the streptomycin-treated mini-pig, was developed in order to allow colonization of defined strains of Enterococcus faecalis in numbers sufficient to study plasmid transfer. Transfer of the pheromone-inducible pCF10 plasmid between streptomycin-resistant strains of E. faecalis OG1 was investigated in the model. The plasmid encodes resistance to tetracycline. Numbers of recipient, donor, and transconjugant bacteria were monitored by selective plating of fecal samples, and transconjugants were subsequently verified by PCR. After being ingested by the mini-pigs, the recipient strain persisted in the intestine at levels between 10(6) and 10(7) CFU per g of feces throughout the experiment. The donor strain, which carried different resistance markers but was otherwise chromosomally isogenic to the recipient strain, was given to the pigs 3 weeks after the recipient strain. The donor cells were initially present in high numbers (10(6) CFU per g) in feces, but they did not persist in the intestine at detectable levels. Immediately after introduction of the donor bacteria, transconjugant cells appeared and persisted in fecal samples at levels between 10(3) and 10(4) CFU per g until the end of the experiment. These observations showed that even in the absence of selective tetracycline pressure, plasmid pCF10 was transferred from ingested E. faecalis cells to other E. faecalis organisms already present in the intestinal environment and that the plasmid subsequently persisted in the intestine.

  11. Interspecies Dissemination of a Mobilizable Plasmid Harboring blaIMP-19 and the Possibility of Horizontal Gene Transfer in a Single Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Tanaka, Michio; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Uemoto, Shinji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacilli have been a global concern over the past 2 decades because these organisms can cause severe infections with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase genes are often carried by mobile genetic elements, and resistance plasmids can be transferred through conjugation. We conducted whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to demonstrate that the same plasmid harboring a metallo-β-lactamase gene was detected in two different species isolated from a single patient. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing Achromobacter xylosoxidans (KUN4507), non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KUN4843), and metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae (KUN5033) were sequentially isolated from a single patient and then analyzed in this study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, molecular typing (pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing), and conjugation analyses were performed by conventional methods. Phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis of K. pneumoniae isolates were performed with WGS, and the nucleotide sequences of plasmids detected from these isolates were determined using WGS. Conventional molecular typing revealed that KUN4843 and KUN5033 were identical, whereas the phylogenetic tree analysis revealed a slight difference. These two isolates were separated from the most recent common ancestor 0.74 years before they were isolated. The same resistance plasmid harboring blaIMP-19 was detected in metallo-β-lactamase-producing A. xylosoxidans and K. pneumoniae. Although this plasmid was not self-transferable, the conjugation of this plasmid from A. xylosoxidans to non-metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae was successfully performed. The susceptibility patterns for metallo-β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae and the transconjugant were similar. These findings supported the possibility of the horizontal transfer of plasmid-borne blaIMP-19 from A. xylosoxidans to K. pneumoniae in a single patient. PMID

  12. Efficient in vivo gene transfer by intraperitoneal injection of plasmid DNA and calcium carbonate microflowers in mice.

    PubMed

    Fumoto, Shintaro; Nakajima, Sayuri; Mine, Toyoharu; Yoshikawa, Naoki; Kitahara, Takashi; Sasaki, Hitoshi; Miyamoto, Hirotaka; Nishida, Koyo

    2012-07-02

    Gene transfer to intraperitoneal organs is thought to be a promising approach to treat such conditions as peritoneal fibrosis and peritoneal dissemination of cancers. We previously discovered that simple instillation of naked plasmid DNA (pDNA) onto intraperitoneal organs such as the liver and stomach could effectively transfer foreign genes in mice. In this study, we developed a novel nonviral method to enhance transfection efficiency of naked pDNA to intraperitoneal organs using a calcium carbonate suspension containing pDNA. Using commercially available calcium carbonate, we successfully transfected pDNA to the stomach. Handling of commercially available calcium carbonate, however, was troublesome owing to rapid precipitation and caking. To obtain slowly settling particles of calcium carbonate, we tried to synthesize novel versions of such particles and succeeded in creating flower-shaped particles, named calcium carbonate microflowers. Sedimentation of calcium carbonate microflowers was sufficiently slow for in vivo experiments. Moreover, the transfection efficiency of the suspension of calcium carbonate microflowers to the stomach was more effective than that of commercially available calcium carbonate, especially at low concentrations. Intraperitoneal injection of the suspension of calcium carbonate microflowers containing pDNA greatly enhanced naked pDNA transfer to whole intraperitoneal organs in mice. Furthermore, lactate dehydrogenase activities in intraperitoneal fluid and plasma were not raised by the suspension of calcium carbonate microflowers.

  13. R-plasmid transfer in Salmonella spp. isolated from wastewater and sewage-contaminated surface waters.

    PubMed Central

    Alcaide, E; Garay, E

    1984-01-01

    A total of 865 Salmonella isolates from wastewaters and sewage-contaminated natural waters were tested for antimicrobial resistance by using NR10 medium and incubation at 43 degrees C. Of the strains, 12.7% were resistant to one or more of the compounds tested, and 30% transferred resistance to an Escherichia coli recipient. The highest minimal inhibitory concentrations were ca. 1,000 micrograms/ml. Transfer frequencies ranged from 10(-3) to 10(-7). PMID:6486785

  14. Comparison of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid Degradation and Plasmid Transfer in Soil Resulting from Bioaugmentation with Two Different pJP4 Donors

    PubMed Central

    Newby, D. T.; Gentry, T. J.; Pepper, I. L.

    2000-01-01

    A pilot field study was conducted to assess the impact of bioaugmentation with two plasmid pJP4-bearing microorganisms: the natural host, Ralstonia eutropha JMP134, and a laboratory-generated strain amenable to donor counterselection, Escherichia coli D11. The R. eutropha strain contained chromosomal genes necessary for mineralization of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), while the E. coli strain did not. The soil system was contaminated with 2,4-D alone or was cocontaminated with 2,4-D and Cd. Plasmid transfer to indigenous populations, plasmid persistence in soil, and degradation of 2,4-D were monitored over a 63-day period in the bioreactors. To assess the impact of contaminant reexposure, aliquots of bioreactor soil were reamended with additional 2,4-D. Both introduced donors remained culturable and transferred plasmid pJP4 to indigenous recipients, although to different extents. Isolated transconjugants were members of the Burkholderia and Ralstonia genera, suggesting multiple, if not successive, plasmid transfers. Upon a second exposure to 2,4-D, enhanced degradation was observed for all treatments, suggesting microbial adaptation to 2,4-D. Upon reexposure, degradation was most rapid for the E. coli D11-inoculated treatments. Cd did not significantly impact 2,4-D degradation or transconjugant formation. This study demonstrated that the choice of donor microorganism might be a key factor to consider for bioaugmentation efforts. In addition, the establishment of an array of stable indigenous plasmid hosts at sites with potential for reexposure or long-term contamination may be particularly useful. PMID:10919798

  15. Plasmid transfer by conjugation as a possible route of horizontal gene transfer and recombination in Xylella fastidiosa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Horizontal gene transfer is an important component of evolution and adaptation of bacterial species. Xylella fastidiosa has the ability to incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome by homologous recombination at relatively high rates. This genetic recombination is believed to play a role in adaptati...

  16. Plasmid partitioning systems of conjugative plasmids from Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Watts, Thomas D; Bulach, Dieter M; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2015-07-01

    Many pathogenic strains of Clostridium perfringens carry several highly similar toxin or antibiotic resistance plasmids that have 35 to 40 kb of very closely related syntenous sequences, including regions that carry the genes encoding conjugative transfer, plasmid replication and plasmid maintenance functions. Key questions are how are these closely related plasmids stably maintained in the same cell and what is the basis for plasmid incompatibility in C. perfringens. Comparative analysis of the Rep proteins encoded by these plasmids suggested that this protein was not the basis for plasmid incompatibility since plasmids carried in a single strain often encoded an almost identical Rep protein. These plasmids all carried a similar, but not identical, parMRC plasmid partitioning locus. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced ParM proteins revealed that these proteins could be divided into ten separate groups. Importantly, in every strain that carried more than one of these plasmids, the respective ParM proteins were from different phylogenetic groups. Similar observations were made from the analysis of phylogenetic trees of the ParR proteins and the parC loci. These findings provide evidence that the basis for plasmid incompatibility in the conjugative toxin and resistance plasmid family from C. perfringens resides in subtle differences in the parMRC plasmid partitioning loci carried by these plasmids.

  17. Degradative plasmids from sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Stolz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Large plasmids ('megaplasmids') are commonly found in members of the Alphaproteobacterial family Sphingomonadaceae ('sphingomonads'). These plasmids contribute to the extraordinary catabolic flexibility of this group of organisms, which degrade a broad range of recalcitrant xenobiotic compounds. The genomes of several sphingomonads have been sequenced during the last years. In the course of these studies, also the sequences of several plasmids have been determined. The analysis of the published information and the sequences deposited in the public databases allowed a first classification of these plasmids into a restricted number of groups according to the proteins involved in the initiation of replication, plasmid partition and conjugation. The sequence comparisons demonstrated that the plasmids from sphingomonads encode for four main groups of replication initiation (Rep) proteins. These Rep proteins belong to the protein superfamilies RepA_C (Pfam 04796), Rep_3 (Pfam 01051), RPA (Pfam 10134) and HTH-36 (Pfam 13730). The 'degradative megaplasmids' pNL2, pCAR3, pSWIT02, pCHQ1, pISP0, and pISP1, which code for genes involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, carbazole, dibenzo-p-dioxin and γ-hexachlorocyclohexane, carry Rep proteins which either belong to the RepA_C- (plasmids pNL2, pCAR3, pSWIT02), Rep-3- (plasmids pCHQ1, pISP0) or RPA-superfamily (pISP1). The classification of these 'degradative megaplasmids' into three groups is also supported by sequence comparisons of the proteins involved in plasmid partition (ParAB) and the organization of the three genes on the respective plasmids. All analysed 'degradative megaplasmids' carry genes, which might allow a conjugative transfer of the plasmids. Sequence comparisons of these genes suggest the presence of at least two types of transfer functions, which either are closer related to the tra- or vir-genes previously described for plasmids from other sources.

  18. The qacC Gene Has Recently Spread between Rolling Circle Plasmids of Staphylococcus, Indicative of a Novel Gene Transfer Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Ussery, David W.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of Staphylococcus species to quaternary ammonium compounds, frequently used as disinfectants and biocides, can be attributed to qac genes. Most qac gene products belong to the Small Multidrug Resistant (SMR) protein family, and are often encoded by rolling-circle (RC) replicating plasmids. Four classes of SMR-type qac gene families have been described in Staphylococcus species: qacC, qacG, qacJ, and qacH. Within their class, these genes are highly conserved, but qacC genes are extremely conserved, although they are found in variable plasmid backgrounds. The lower degree of sequence identity of these plasmids compared to the strict nucleotide conservation of their qacC means that this gene has recently spread. In the absence of insertion sequences or other genetic elements explaining the mobility, we sought for an explanation of mobilization by sequence comparison. Publically available sequences of qac genes, their flanking genes and the replication gene that is invariably present in RC-plasmids were compared to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and to explain the recent spread of qacC. Here we propose a new model that explains how qacC is mobilized and transferred to acceptor RC-plasmids without assistance of other genes, by means of its location in between the Double Strand replication Origin (DSO) and the Single-Strand replication Origin (SSO). The proposed mobilization model of this DSO-qacC-SSO element represents a novel mechanism of gene mobilization in RC-plasmids, which has also been employed by other genes, such as lnuA (conferring lincomycin resistance). The proposed gene mobility has aided to the wide spread of clinically relevant resistance genes in Staphylococcus populations. PMID:27729906

  19. Sequence-based analysis of pQBR103; a representative of a unique, transfer-proficient mega plasmid resident in the microbial community of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Tett, Adrian; Spiers, Andrew J; Crossman, Lisa C; Ager, Duane; Ciric, Lena; Dow, J Maxwell; Fry, John C; Harris, David; Lilley, Andrew; Oliver, Anna; Parkhill, Julian; Quail, Michael A; Rainey, Paul B; Saunders, Nigel J; Seeger, Kathy; Snyder, Lori A S; Squares, Rob; Thomas, Christopher M; Turner, Sarah L; Zhang, Xue-Xian; Field, Dawn; Bailey, Mark J

    2007-08-01

    The plasmid pQBR103 was found within Pseudomonas populations colonizing the leaf and root surfaces of sugar beet plants growing at Wytham, Oxfordshire, UK. At 425 kb it is the largest self-transmissible plasmid yet sequenced from the phytosphere. It is known to enhance the competitive fitness of its host, and parts of the plasmid are known to be actively transcribed in the plant environment. Analysis of the complete sequence of this plasmid predicts a coding sequence (CDS)-rich genome containing 478 CDSs and an exceptional degree of genetic novelty; 80% of predicted coding sequences cannot be ascribed a function and 60% are orphans. Of those to which function could be assigned, 40% bore greatest similarity to sequences from Pseudomonas spp, and the majority of the remainder showed similarity to other gamma-proteobacterial genera and plasmids. pQBR103 has identifiable regions presumed responsible for replication and partitioning, but despite being tra+ lacks the full complement of any previously described conjugal transfer functions. The DNA sequence provided few insights into the functional significance of plant-induced transcriptional regions, but suggests that 14% of CDSs may be expressed (11 CDSs with functional annotation and 54 without), further highlighting the ecological importance of these novel CDSs. Comparative analysis indicates that pQBR103 shares significant regions of sequence with other plasmids isolated from sugar beet plants grown at the same geographic location. These plasmid sequences indicate there is more novelty in the mobile DNA pool accessible to phytosphere pseudomonas than is currently appreciated or understood.

  20. Design of a 7kW power transfer solar array drive mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheppard, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    With the availability of the Shuttle and the European launcher, Ariane, there will be a continuing trend towards large payload satellite missions requiring high-power, high-inertia, flexible solar arrays. The need arises for a solar array drive with a large power transfer capability which can rotate these solar arrays without disturbing the satellite body pointing. The modular design of such a Solar Array Drive Mechanism (SADM) which is capable of transferring 7kW of power or more is described. Total design flexibility has been achieved, enabling different spacecraft power requirements to be accommodated within the SADM design.

  1. Methanosarcina spp. Drive Vinyl Chloride Dechlorination via Interspecies Hydrogen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Axel C.; Batstone, Damien J.; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Two highly enriched cultures containing Dehalococcoides spp. were used to study the effect of aceticlastic methanogens on reductive vinyl chloride (VC) dechlorination. In terms of aceticlastic methanogens, one culture was dominated by Methanosaeta, while the other culture was dominated by Methanosarcina, as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cultures amended with 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), an efficient inhibitor of methanogens, exhibited slow VC dechlorination when grown on acetate and VC. Methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosaeta had no impact on dechlorination rates, compared to BES-amended controls. In contrast, methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosarcina displayed up to sevenfold-higher rates of VC dechlorination than their BES-amended counterparts. Methanosarcina-dominated cultures converted a higher percentage of [2-14C]acetate to 14CO2 when concomitant VC dechlorination took place, compared to nondechlorinating controls. Respiratory indices increased from 0.12 in nondechlorinating cultures to 0.51 in actively dechlorinating cultures. During VC dechlorination, aqueous hydrogen (H2) concentrations dropped to 0.3 to 0.5 nM. However, upon complete VC consumption, H2 levels increased by a factor of 10 to 100, indicating active hydrogen production from acetate oxidation. This process was thermodynamically favorable by means of the extremely low H2 levels during dechlorination. VC degradation in nonmethanogenic cultures was not inhibited by BES but was limited by the availability of H2 as electron donor, in cultures both with and without BES. These findings all indicate that Methanosarcina (but not Methanosaeta), while cleaving acetate to methane, simultaneously oxidizes acetate to CO2 plus H2, driving hydrogenotrophic dehalorespiration of VC to ethene by Dehalococcoides. PMID:16598001

  2. Methanosarcina spp. drive vinyl chloride dechlorination via interspecies hydrogen transfer.

    PubMed

    Heimann, Axel C; Batstone, Damien J; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2006-04-01

    Two highly enriched cultures containing Dehalococcoides spp. were used to study the effect of aceticlastic methanogens on reductive vinyl chloride (VC) dechlorination. In terms of aceticlastic methanogens, one culture was dominated by Methanosaeta, while the other culture was dominated by Methanosarcina, as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cultures amended with 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES), an efficient inhibitor of methanogens, exhibited slow VC dechlorination when grown on acetate and VC. Methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosaeta had no impact on dechlorination rates, compared to BES-amended controls. In contrast, methanogenic cultures dominated by Methanosarcina displayed up to sevenfold-higher rates of VC dechlorination than their BES-amended counterparts. Methanosarcina-dominated cultures converted a higher percentage of [2-(14)C]acetate to (14)CO(2) when concomitant VC dechlorination took place, compared to nondechlorinating controls. Respiratory indices increased from 0.12 in nondechlorinating cultures to 0.51 in actively dechlorinating cultures. During VC dechlorination, aqueous hydrogen (H(2)) concentrations dropped to 0.3 to 0.5 nM. However, upon complete VC consumption, H(2) levels increased by a factor of 10 to 100, indicating active hydrogen production from acetate oxidation. This process was thermodynamically favorable by means of the extremely low H(2) levels during dechlorination. VC degradation in nonmethanogenic cultures was not inhibited by BES but was limited by the availability of H(2) as electron donor, in cultures both with and without BES. These findings all indicate that Methanosarcina (but not Methanosaeta), while cleaving acetate to methane, simultaneously oxidizes acetate to CO(2) plus H(2), driving hydrogenotrophic dehalorespiration of VC to ethene by Dehalococcoides.

  3. Iteron Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Igor; Bury, Katarzyna; Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Iteron-containing plasmids are model systems for studying the metabolism of extrachromosomal genetic elements in bacterial cells. Here we describe the current knowledge and understanding of the structure of iteron-containing replicons, the structure of the iteron plasmid encoded replication initiation proteins, and the molecular mechanisms for iteron plasmid DNA replication initiation. We also discuss the current understanding of control mechanisms affecting the plasmid copy number and how host chaperone proteins and proteases can affect plasmid maintenance in bacterial cells.

  4. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  5. Plasmid Partition Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Jamie C; Funnell, Barbara E

    2014-12-01

    The stable maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids in bacteria is actively driven by partition mechanisms that are responsible for the positioning of plasmids inside the cell. Partition systems are ubiquitous in the microbial world and are encoded by many bacterial chromosomes as well as plasmids. These systems, although different in sequence and mechanism, typically consist of two proteins and a DNA partition site, or prokaryotic centromere, on the plasmid or chromosome. One protein binds site-specifically to the centromere to form a partition complex, and the other protein uses the energy of nucleotide binding and hydrolysis to transport the plasmid, via interactions with this partition complex inside the cell. For plasmids, this minimal cassette is sufficient to direct proper segregation in bacterial cells. There has been significant progress in the last several years in our understanding of partition mechanisms. Two general areas that have developed are (i) the structural biology of partition proteins and their interactions with DNA and (ii) the action and dynamics of the partition ATPases that drive the process. In addition, systems that use tubulin-like GTPases to partition plasmids have recently been identified. In this chapter, we concentrate on these recent developments and the molecular details of plasmid partition mechanisms.

  6. CRISPR-Cas and Restriction-Modification Act Additively against Conjugative Antibiotic Resistance Plasmid Transfer in Enterococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Price, Valerie J.; Huo, Wenwen; Sharifi, Ardalan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Enterococcus faecalis is an opportunistic pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial infections. Conjugative pheromone-responsive plasmids are narrow-host-range mobile genetic elements (MGEs) that are rapid disseminators of antibiotic resistance in the faecalis species. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas and restriction-modification confer acquired and innate immunity, respectively, against MGE acquisition in bacteria. Most multidrug-resistant E. faecalis isolates lack CRISPR-Cas and possess an orphan locus lacking cas genes, CRISPR2, that is of unknown function. Little is known about restriction-modification defense in E. faecalis. Here, we explore the hypothesis that multidrug-resistant E. faecalis strains are immunocompromised. We assessed MGE acquisition by E. faecalis T11, a strain closely related to the multidrug-resistant hospital isolate V583 but which lacks the ~620 kb of horizontally acquired genome content that characterizes V583. T11 possesses the E. faecalis CRISPR3-cas locus and a predicted restriction-modification system, neither of which occurs in V583. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas and restriction-modification together confer a 4-log reduction in acquisition of the pheromone-responsive plasmid pAM714 in biofilm matings. Additionally, we show that the orphan CRISPR2 locus is functional for genome defense against another pheromone-responsive plasmid, pCF10, only in the presence of cas9 derived from the E. faecalis CRISPR1-cas locus, which most multidrug-resistant E. faecalis isolates lack. Overall, our work demonstrated that the loss of only two loci led to a dramatic reduction in genome defense against a clinically relevant MGE, highlighting the critical importance of the E. faecalis accessory genome in modulating horizontal gene transfer. Our results rationalize the development of antimicrobial strategies that capitalize upon the immunocompromised status of multidrug-resistant E

  7. In vivo Acquisition of Carbapenemase Gene blaKPC-2 in Multiple Species of Enterobacteriaceae through Horizontal Transfer of Insertion Sequence or Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Baixing; Shen, Zhen; Hu, Fupin; Ye, Meiping; Xu, Xiaogang; Guo, Qinglan; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Current worldwide spread of carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae constitutes a critical public health threat. This study aims to investigate how carbapenem resistance is acquired in Enterobacteriaceae in patients during antimicrobial therapy. Methods: Clinical strains from the same anatomical site of the same patients that converted from carbapenem-susceptible to resistant during antimicrobial therapy and showed identical or similar PFGE patterns were identified. The similarly sized plasmids carried by the susceptible and resistant strains, the latter containing the carbapenemase genes, were sequenced and analyzed. Results: Paired strains were identified from four patients: three had neurosurgical conditions while the other had acute exacerbation of COPD. Two pairs of Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP1-S/R and KP2-S/R, S and R indicating susceptible and resistant strains, respectively), one pair of Morganella morganii (MM-S/R) and one pair of Enterobacter aerogenes (EA-S/R) were collected. All four carbapenem-resistant strains carried plasmids harboring blaKPC−2. Compared with the similarly sized plasmids in KP1-S and KP2-S, an insertion sequence that includes ISKpn6-like, blaKPC−2 and ISKpn8 was noted in pKP1-R and pKP2-R. Strains MM-R and EA-R had blaKPC−2-carrying plasmids not resembling plasmids in strains MM-S and EA-S suggesting their new acquisition while on therapy. Conclusions: Enterobacteriaceae can acquire carbapenem resistance during antimicrobial therapy through horizontal transfer of an insertion sequence or plasmid. PMID:27818649

  8. In vivo Acquisition of Carbapenemase Gene blaKPC-2 in Multiple Species of Enterobacteriaceae through Horizontal Transfer of Insertion Sequence or Plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ding, Baixing; Shen, Zhen; Hu, Fupin; Ye, Meiping; Xu, Xiaogang; Guo, Qinglan; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Current worldwide spread of carbapenem resistance in Enterobacteriaceae constitutes a critical public health threat. This study aims to investigate how carbapenem resistance is acquired in Enterobacteriaceae in patients during antimicrobial therapy. Methods: Clinical strains from the same anatomical site of the same patients that converted from carbapenem-susceptible to resistant during antimicrobial therapy and showed identical or similar PFGE patterns were identified. The similarly sized plasmids carried by the susceptible and resistant strains, the latter containing the carbapenemase genes, were sequenced and analyzed. Results: Paired strains were identified from four patients: three had neurosurgical conditions while the other had acute exacerbation of COPD. Two pairs of Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP1-S/R and KP2-S/R, S and R indicating susceptible and resistant strains, respectively), one pair of Morganella morganii (MM-S/R) and one pair of Enterobacter aerogenes (EA-S/R) were collected. All four carbapenem-resistant strains carried plasmids harboring blaKPC-2. Compared with the similarly sized plasmids in KP1-S and KP2-S, an insertion sequence that includes ISKpn6-like, blaKPC-2 and ISKpn8 was noted in pKP1-R and pKP2-R. Strains MM-R and EA-R had blaKPC-2-carrying plasmids not resembling plasmids in strains MM-S and EA-S suggesting their new acquisition while on therapy. Conclusions: Enterobacteriaceae can acquire carbapenem resistance during antimicrobial therapy through horizontal transfer of an insertion sequence or plasmid.

  9. In vivo transfer of plasmid-encoded ACC-1 AmpC from Klebsiella pneumoniae to Escherichia coli in an infant and selection of impermeability to imipenem in K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Philippe; Burghoffer, Béatrice; Gautier, Valérie; Brahimi, Naïma; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Bingen, Edouard; Arlet, Guillaume

    2005-08-01

    We describe in vivo selection of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain with diminished imipenem susceptibility attributable to plasmid-encoded ACC-1 beta-lactamase production and loss of a 36-kDa major outer membrane protein, together with transfer of this plasmid from K. pneumoniae to Escherichia coli in a Tunisian infant.

  10. The master regulator of IncA/C plasmids is recognized by the Salmonella Genomic island SGI1 as a signal for excision and conjugal transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, János; Papp, Péter Pál; Szabó, Mónika; Farkas, Tibor; Murányi, Gábor; Szakállas, Erik; Olasz, Ferenc

    2015-01-01

    The genomic island SGI1 and its variants, the important vehicles of multi-resistance in Salmonella strains, are integrative elements mobilized exclusively by the conjugative IncA/C plasmids. Integration and excision of the island are carried out by the SGI1-encoded site-specific recombinase Int and the recombination directionality factor Xis. Chromosomal integration ensures the stable maintenance and vertical transmission of SGI1, while excision is the initial step of horizontal transfer, followed by conjugation and integration into the recipient. We report here that SGI1 not only exploits the conjugal apparatus of the IncA/C plasmids but also utilizes the regulatory mechanisms of the conjugation system for the exact timing and activation of excision to ensure efficient horizontal transfer. This study demonstrates that the FlhDC-family activator AcaCD, which regulates the conjugation machinery of the IncA/C plasmids, serves as a signal of helper entry through binding to SGI1 xis promoter and activating SGI1 excision. Promoters of int and xis genes have been identified and the binding site of the activator has been located by footprinting and deletion analyses. We prove that expression of xis is activator-dependent while int is constitutively expressed, and this regulatory mechanism is presumably responsible for the efficient transfer and stable maintenance of SGI1. PMID:26209134

  11. The master regulator of IncA/C plasmids is recognized by the Salmonella Genomic island SGI1 as a signal for excision and conjugal transfer.

    PubMed

    Kiss, János; Papp, Péter Pál; Szabó, Mónika; Farkas, Tibor; Murányi, Gábor; Szakállas, Erik; Olasz, Ferenc

    2015-10-15

    The genomic island SGI1 and its variants, the important vehicles of multi-resistance in Salmonella strains, are integrative elements mobilized exclusively by the conjugative IncA/C plasmids. Integration and excision of the island are carried out by the SGI1-encoded site-specific recombinase Int and the recombination directionality factor Xis. Chromosomal integration ensures the stable maintenance and vertical transmission of SGI1, while excision is the initial step of horizontal transfer, followed by conjugation and integration into the recipient. We report here that SGI1 not only exploits the conjugal apparatus of the IncA/C plasmids but also utilizes the regulatory mechanisms of the conjugation system for the exact timing and activation of excision to ensure efficient horizontal transfer. This study demonstrates that the FlhDC-family activator AcaCD, which regulates the conjugation machinery of the IncA/C plasmids, serves as a signal of helper entry through binding to SGI1 xis promoter and activating SGI1 excision. Promoters of int and xis genes have been identified and the binding site of the activator has been located by footprinting and deletion analyses. We prove that expression of xis is activator-dependent while int is constitutively expressed, and this regulatory mechanism is presumably responsible for the efficient transfer and stable maintenance of SGI1.

  12. Conjugative Transfer of Insecticidal Plasmid pHT73 from Bacillus thuringiensis to B. anthracis and Compatibility of This Plasmid with pXO1 and pXO2 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yongming; Zheng, Dasheng; Hu, Xiaomin; Cai, Quanxin; Yuan, Zhiming

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of anthrax, is genetically close to and commonly shares a giant gene pool with B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. In view of the human pathogenicity and the long persistence in the environment of B. anthracis, there is growing concern about the effects of genetic exchange with B. anthracis on public health. In this work, we demonstrate that an insecticidal plasmid, pHT73, from B. thuringiensis strain KT0 could be efficiently transferred into two attenuated B. anthracis strains, Ba63002R (pXO1+ pXO2−) and Ba63605R (pXO1− pXO2+), by conjugation in liquid medium in the laboratory, with transfer rates of 2.3 × 10−4 and 1.6 × 10−4 CFU/donor, respectively. The B. anthracis transconjugants containing both pHT73 and pXO1 or pXO2 could produce crystal protein Cry1Ac encoded by plasmid pHT73 and had high toxicity to Helicoverpa armigera larvae. Furthermore, the compatibility and stability of pHT73 with pXO1/pXO2 were demonstrated. The data are informative for further investigation of the safety of B. thuringiensis and closely related strains in food and in the environment. PMID:19948871

  13. Plasmid Detection, Characterization, and Ecology.

    PubMed

    Smalla, Kornelia; Jechalke, Sven; Top, Eva M

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are important vehicles for rapid adaptation of bacterial populations to changing environmental conditions. It is thought that to reduce the cost of plasmid carriage, only a fraction of a local population carries plasmids or is permissive to plasmid uptake. Plasmids provide various accessory traits which might be beneficial under particular conditions. The genetic variation generated by plasmid carriage within populations ensures the robustness toward environmental changes. Plasmid-mediated gene transfer plays an important role not only in the mobilization and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes but also in the spread of degradative pathways and pathogenicity determinants of pathogens. Here we summarize the state-of-the-art methods to study the occurrence, abundance, and diversity of plasmids in environmental bacteria. Increasingly, cultivation-independent total-community DNA-based methods are being used to characterize and quantify the diversity and abundance of plasmids in relation to various biotic and abiotic factors. An improved understanding of the ecology of plasmids and their hosts is crucial in the development of intervention strategies for antibiotic-resistance-gene spread. We discuss the potentials and limitations of methods used to determine the host range of plasmids, as the ecology of plasmids is tightly linked to their hosts. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide an enormous potential for plasmid classification, diversity, and evolution studies, but numerous challenges still exist.

  14. Transfer of a gonococcal beta-lactamase plasmid to conjugation-deficient Neisseria cinerea strains by transformation.

    PubMed

    Genco, C A; Clark, V L

    1988-12-01

    We have previously shown that some strains of Neisseria cinerea can serve as recipients in conjugation (Con+) with Neisseria gonorrhoeae while others cannot (Con-). To determine if a replication defect contributes to the inability of certain strains of N. cinerea to serve as recipients in conjugation, we attempted to introduce a naturally occurring gonococcal beta-lactamase plasmid into N. cinerea by transformation. Various methods were employed, and all proved unsuccessful. Since specific sequences are required for DNA uptake in transformation of N. gonorrhoeae, we constructed a number of hybrid plasmids containing N. cinerea chromosomal DNA inserted into the N. gonorrhoeae/Escherichia coli beta-lactamase shuttle vector, pLES2. When nine randomly selected plasmids with inserts were used to transform an N. cinerea strain which did not accept the gonococcal beta-lactamase plasmid by conjugation, transformants were observed with four of the hybrid plasmids. The presence of one of the hybrid plasmids, pCAG9, in transformants was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis, Southern hybridization, and beta-lactamase production. When an N. gonorrhoeae donor strain containing pCAG9 was used in conjugation with several N. cinerea strains, only those strains that were previously shown to act as recipients could accept and maintain pCAG9. The ability of pCAG9 and the other three hybrid plasmids to transform Con- strains demonstrates that the beta-lactamase plasmid can replicate in Con- strains, and, therefore, the Con- phenotype is due to a block in some other stage of the conjugation process.

  15. Characterization of IntA, a bidirectional site-specific recombinase required for conjugative transfer of the symbiotic plasmid of Rhizobium etli CFN42.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Tamayo, Rogelio; Sohlenkamp, Christian; Puente, José Luis; Brom, Susana; Romero, David

    2013-10-01

    Site-specific recombination occurs at short specific sequences, mediated by the cognate recombinases. IntA is a recombinase from Rhizobium etli CFN42 and belongs to the tyrosine recombinase family. It allows cointegration of plasmid p42a and the symbiotic plasmid via site-specific recombination between attachment regions (attA and attD) located in each replicon. Cointegration is needed for conjugative transfer of the symbiotic plasmid. To characterize this system, two plasmids harboring the corresponding attachment sites and intA were constructed. Introduction of these plasmids into R. etli revealed IntA-dependent recombination events occurring at high frequency. Interestingly, IntA promotes not only integration, but also excision events, albeit at a lower frequency. Thus, R. etli IntA appears to be a bidirectional recombinase. IntA was purified and used to set up electrophoretic mobility shift assays with linear fragments containing attA and attD. IntA-dependent retarded complexes were observed only with fragments containing either attA or attD. Specific retarded complexes, as well as normal in vivo recombination abilities, were seen even in derivatives harboring only a minimal attachment region (comprising the 5-bp central region flanked by 9- to 11-bp inverted repeats). DNase I-footprinting assays with IntA revealed specific protection of these zones. Mutations that disrupt the integrity of the 9- to 11-bp inverted repeats abolish both specific binding and recombination ability, while mutations in the 5-bp central region severely reduce both binding and recombination. These results show that IntA is a bidirectional recombinase that binds to att regions without requiring neighboring sequences as enhancers of recombination.

  16. Large IncHI2-plasmids encode extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Enterobacter spp. bloodstream isolates, and support ESBL-transfer to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, E; Haldorsen, B C; Sundsfjord, A; Simonsen, G S; Ingebretsen, A; Naseer, U; Samuelsen, O

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Enterobacter spp. bloodstream isolates from 19 hospital laboratories in Norway during 2011. A total of 62/230 (27%) isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and four (1.7%) were ESBL-positive; blaCTX -M-15 (n = 3) and blaSHV -12 (n = 1). This is comparable to the prevalence of ESBLs in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Norway during the same period. All ESBL-positive isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) and harboured plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Three isolates supported transfer of large IncHI2-plasmids harbouring ESBL- and MDR-encoding genes to E. coli recipients by in vitro conjugation.

  17. Mobility of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Smillie, Chris; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Francia, M Victoria; Rocha, Eduardo P C; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Plasmids are key vectors of horizontal gene transfer and essential genetic engineering tools. They code for genes involved in many aspects of microbial biology, including detoxication, virulence, ecological interactions, and antibiotic resistance. While many studies have decorticated the mechanisms of mobility in model plasmids, the identification and characterization of plasmid mobility from genome data are unexplored. By reviewing the available data and literature, we established a computational protocol to identify and classify conjugation and mobilization genetic modules in 1,730 plasmids. This allowed the accurate classification of proteobacterial conjugative or mobilizable systems in a combination of four mating pair formation and six relaxase families. The available evidence suggests that half of the plasmids are nonmobilizable and that half of the remaining plasmids are conjugative. Some conjugative systems are much more abundant than others and preferably associated with some clades or plasmid sizes. Most very large plasmids are nonmobilizable, with evidence of ongoing domestication into secondary chromosomes. The evolution of conjugation elements shows ancient divergence between mobility systems, with relaxases and type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) often following separate paths from type IV secretion systems. Phylogenetic patterns of mobility proteins are consistent with the phylogeny of the host prokaryotes, suggesting that plasmid mobility is in general circumscribed within large clades. Our survey suggests the existence of unsuspected new relaxases in archaea and new conjugation systems in cyanobacteria and actinobacteria. Few genes, e.g., T4CPs, relaxases, and VirB4, are at the core of plasmid conjugation, and together with accessory genes, they have evolved into specific systems adapted to specific physiological and ecological contexts.

  18. Genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins localized in the conjugative transfer region of plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 participate in modulating transfer and affect conjugation from different donors

    PubMed Central

    López-Fuentes, Eunice; Torres-Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Cervantes, Laura; Brom, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Among sequenced genomes, it is common to find a high proportion of genes encoding proteins that cannot be assigned a known function. In bacterial genomes, genes related to a similar function are often located in contiguous regions. The presence of genes encoding conserved hypothetical proteins (chp) in such a region may suggest that they are related to that particular function. Plasmid pRet42a from Rhizobium etli CFN42 is a conjugative plasmid containing a segment of approximately 30 Kb encoding genes involved in conjugative transfer. In addition to genes responsible for Dtr (DNA transfer and replication), Mpf (Mating pair formation) and regulation, it has two chp-encoding genes (RHE_PA00163 and RHE_PA00164) and a transcriptional regulator (RHE_PA00165). RHE_PA00163 encodes an uncharacterized protein conserved in bacteria that presents a COG4634 conserved domain, and RHE_PA00164 encodes an uncharacterized conserved protein with a DUF433 domain of unknown function. RHE_PA00165 presents a HTH_XRE domain, characteristic of DNA-binding proteins belonging to the xenobiotic response element family of transcriptional regulators. Interestingly, genes similar to these are also present in transfer regions of plasmids from other bacteria. To determine if these genes participate in conjugative transfer, we mutagenized them and analyzed their conjugative phenotype. A mutant in RHE_PA00163 showed a slight (10 times) but reproducible increase in transfer frequency from Rhizobium donors, while mutants in RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 lost their ability to transfer the plasmid from some Agrobacterium donors. Our results indicate that the chp-encoding genes located among conjugation genes are indeed related to this function. However, the participation of RHE_PA00164 and RHE_PA00165 is only revealed under very specific circumstances, and is not perceived when the plasmid is transferred from the original host. RHE_PA00163 seems to be a fine-tuning modulator for conjugative transfer

  19. Escherichia coli DNA helicase I catalyzes a sequence-specific cleavage/ligation reaction at the F plasmid origin of transfer.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J A; Matson, S W

    1994-10-21

    Recent studies have shown that the Escherichia coli F plasmid-encoded traI gene product (TraIp), also known as DNA helicase I, catalyzes the formation of the site- and strand-specific nick that initiates F plasmid DNA transfer. Scission of the phosphodiester bond at the nic site within the origin of transfer (oriT) is accompanied by the covalent attachment of TraIp to the 5'-phosphate of the nicked DNA strand. This mechanism suggests that TraIp may also be capable of catalyzing a DNA ligation reaction using the energy stored in the protein-DNA intermediate. To test this possibility, an in vitro assay was designed that utilized short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides of different lengths derived from the region within oriT that spanned the nic site. Purified TraIp was capable of efficiently cleaving single-stranded DNA that contained a nic site, and upon cleavage, the protein became covalently linked to the 5'-end of the nic site. When TraIp was incubated with two oligonucleotides of different length that contained the nic site, there was formation of novel recombinant products resulting from a TraIp-catalyzed cleavage/ligation reaction. Furthermore, the cleavage and ligation reactions were both sequence-specific. These data suggest that TraIp plays an important role in the initiation and termination of conjugative DNA transfer.

  20. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  1. Regulation of the transfer genes of Streptomyces plasmid pSN22: in vivo and in vitro study of the interaction of TraR with promoter regions.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, M; Kosono, S; Seki, T; Yoshida, T

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the tra operon, essential for conjugative transfer of the 11-kb Streptomyces nigrifaciens plasmid pSN22, is negatively regulated by traR, which is located upstream of the tra operon and transcribed in the opposite orientation. The transcriptional start points for the tra and traR mRNAs were determined by primer extension; they are 72 bp apart and have identical -10 promoter sequences. The TraR protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli and used for gel retardation and DNase I protection experiments. It bound specifically to the bidirectional tra-traR promoter region and protected four DNA regions, each of which contains a similar 12-bp sequence. The binding was strongest to the region downstream of the tra promoter, probably ensuring that expression of the potentially lethal traB gene is turned off before traR. The efficiency of intramycelial plasmid transfer was decreased by the mutation at the downstream region. Images PMID:7961501

  2. Conjugal transfer of the Sinorhizobium meliloti 1021 symbiotic plasmid is governed through the concerted action of one- and two-component signal transduction regulators.

    PubMed

    Nogales, Joaquina; Blanca-Ordóñez, Helena; Olivares, José; Sanjuán, Juan

    2013-03-01

    Conjugal transfer of Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmids are repressed by the transcriptional regulator RctA. Here we report on new key players in the signal transduction cascade towards S. meliloti pSym conjugation. We have identified S. meliloti pSymA gene SMa0974 as an orthologue of the R. etli rctB gene which is required to antagonize repression by RctA. In S. meliloti two additional genes, rctR and rctC participate in control of rctB expression. rctR (SMa0955) encodes a protein of the GntR family of transcriptional regulators involved in repression of rctB. A rctR mutant promotes pSymA conjugal transfer and displays increased transcription of tra, virB and rctB genes even in presence of wild-type rctA gene. Among genes repressed by RctR, rctC (SMa0961) encodes a response regulator required to activate rctB transcription and therefore for derepression of plasmid conjugative functions. We conclude that in both R. etli and S. meliloti pSym conjugal transfer is derepressed via rctB, however the regulatory cascades to achieve activation of rctB are probably different. Upstream of rctB, the S. meliloti pSym conjugal transfer is regulated through the concerted action of genes representing one- (rctR) and two-component (rctC) signal transduction systems in response to yet unidentified signals.

  3. In Vivo Transmission of an IncA/C Plasmid in Escherichia coli Depends on Tetracycline Concentration, and Acquisition of the Plasmid Results in a Variable Cost of Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Randall S.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Lang, Kevin; Kobluk, Kristi; Rivet, Bernadette; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Frye, Jonathan G.; Englen, Mark; Anderson, Janet; Davies, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    IncA/C plasmids are broad-host-range plasmids enabling multidrug resistance that have emerged worldwide among bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. Although antibiotic usage is suspected to be a driving force in the emergence of such strains, few studies have examined the impact of different types of antibiotic administration on the selection of plasmid-containing multidrug resistant isolates. In this study, chlortetracycline treatment at different concentrations in pig feed was examined for its impact on selection and dissemination of an IncA/C plasmid introduced orally via a commensal Escherichia coli host. Continuous low-dose administration of chlortetracycline at 50 g per ton had no observable impact on the proportions of IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli from pig feces over the course of 35 days. In contrast, high-dose administration of chlortetracycline at 350 g per ton significantly increased IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli in pig feces (P < 0.001) and increased movement of the IncA/C plasmid to other indigenous E. coli hosts. There was no evidence of conjugal transfer of the IncA/C plasmid to bacterial species other than E. coli. In vitro competition assays demonstrated that bacterial host background substantially impacted the cost of IncA/C plasmid carriage in E. coli and Salmonella. In vitro transfer and selection experiments demonstrated that tetracycline at 32 μg/ml was necessary to enhance IncA/C plasmid conjugative transfer, while subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline in vitro strongly selected for IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli. Together, these experiments improve our knowledge on the impact of differing concentrations of tetracycline on the selection of IncA/C-type plasmids. PMID:25769824

  4. In Vivo Transmission of an IncA/C Plasmid in Escherichia coli Depends on Tetracycline Concentration, and Acquisition of the Plasmid Results in a Variable Cost of Fitness.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy J; Singer, Randall S; Isaacson, Richard E; Danzeisen, Jessica L; Lang, Kevin; Kobluk, Kristi; Rivet, Bernadette; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Frye, Jonathan G; Englen, Mark; Anderson, Janet; Davies, Peter R

    2015-05-15

    IncA/C plasmids are broad-host-range plasmids enabling multidrug resistance that have emerged worldwide among bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. Although antibiotic usage is suspected to be a driving force in the emergence of such strains, few studies have examined the impact of different types of antibiotic administration on the selection of plasmid-containing multidrug resistant isolates. In this study, chlortetracycline treatment at different concentrations in pig feed was examined for its impact on selection and dissemination of an IncA/C plasmid introduced orally via a commensal Escherichia coli host. Continuous low-dose administration of chlortetracycline at 50 g per ton had no observable impact on the proportions of IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli from pig feces over the course of 35 days. In contrast, high-dose administration of chlortetracycline at 350 g per ton significantly increased IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli in pig feces (P < 0.001) and increased movement of the IncA/C plasmid to other indigenous E. coli hosts. There was no evidence of conjugal transfer of the IncA/C plasmid to bacterial species other than E. coli. In vitro competition assays demonstrated that bacterial host background substantially impacted the cost of IncA/C plasmid carriage in E. coli and Salmonella. In vitro transfer and selection experiments demonstrated that tetracycline at 32 μg/ml was necessary to enhance IncA/C plasmid conjugative transfer, while subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline in vitro strongly selected for IncA/C plasmid-containing E. coli. Together, these experiments improve our knowledge on the impact of differing concentrations of tetracycline on the selection of IncA/C-type plasmids.

  5. Production of Plasmid DNA as Pharmaceutical.

    PubMed

    Schmeer, Marco; Schleef, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Pharmaceutical applications of plasmid DNA require certain quality standards, depending on the intended use of the plasmids. That is, for direct gene transfer into human, GMP Grade is mandatory, however, for GMP production of for example viral vectors (AAV or mRNA etc.), the plasmid DNA used has not to be produced under GMP necessarily. Here we summarize important features of producing plasmid DNA, ensuring the required quality for the intended (pharmaceutical) application.

  6. Transfer of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase synthesized in bacteria by a high-expression plasmid to tissue culture cells by protoplast fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Waldman, A.S.; Milman, G.

    1984-08-01

    The introduction of a protein into living tissue culture cells may permit the in vivo study of functions of the protein. The authors have previously described a high-efficiency-expression plasmid, pHETK2, containing the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (TK) gene which, upon temperature induction, causes TK to be synthesized as greater than 4% of the bacterial protein. In this report it is shown that enzymatically active TK was transferred to mouse Ltk- cells by polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion with protoplasts prepared from bacteria containing induced levels of TK. The presence of TK in the Ltk- cells was detected by the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)thymidine into cell nuclei as measured by autoradiography.

  7. Drive-Response Analysis of Global Ice Volume, CO2, and Insolation using Information Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brendryen, J.; Hannisdal, B.

    2014-12-01

    The processes and interactions that drive global ice volume variability and deglaciations are a topic of considerable debate. Here we analyze the drive-response relationships between data sets representing global ice volume, CO2 and insolation over the past 800 000 years using an information theoretic approach. Specifically, we use a non-parametric measure of directional information transfer (IT) based on the construct of transfer entropy to detect the relative strength and directionality of interactions in the potentially chaotic and non-linear glacial-interglacial climate system. Analyses of unfiltered data suggest a tight coupling between CO2 and ice volume, detected as strong, symmetric information flow consistent with a two-way interaction. In contrast, IT from Northern Hemisphere (NH) summer insolation to CO2 is highly asymmetric, suggesting that insolation is an important driver of CO2. Conditional analysis further suggests that CO2 is a dominant influence on ice volume, with the effect of insolation also being significant but limited to smaller-scale variability. However, the strong correlation between CO2 and ice volume renders them information redundant with respect to insolation, confounding further drive-response attribution. We expect this information redundancy to be partly explained by the shared glacial-interglacial "sawtooth" pattern and its overwhelming influence on the transition probability distributions over the target interval. To test this, we filtered out the abrupt glacial terminations from the ice volume and CO2 records to focus on the residual variability. Preliminary results from this analysis confirm insolation as a driver of CO2 and two-way interactions between CO2 and ice volume. However, insolation is reduced to a weak influence on ice volume. Conditional analyses support CO2 as a dominant driver of ice volume, while ice volume and insolation both have a strong influence on CO2. These findings suggest that the effect of orbital

  8. Genetic Analysis of the Role of the Transfer Gene, traN, of the F and R100-1 Plasmids in Mating Pair Stabilization during Conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Klimke, William A.; Frost, Laura S.

    1998-01-01

    Mating pair stabilization occurs during conjugative DNA transfer whereby the donor and recipient cells form a tight junction which requires pili as well as TraN and TraG in the donor cell. The role of the outer membrane protein, TraN, during conjugative transfer was examined by introduction of a chloramphenicol resistance cassette into the traN gene on an F plasmid derivative, pOX38, to produce pOX38N1::CAT. pOX38N1::CAT was greatly reduced in its ability to transfer DNA, indicating that TraN plays a greater role in conjugation than previously thought. F and R100-1 traN were capable of complementing pOX38N1::CAT transfer equally well when wild-type recipients were used. F traN, but not R100-1 traN, supported a much lower level of transfer when there was an ompA mutation or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) deficiency in the recipient cell, suggesting receptor specificity. The R100-1 traN gene was sequenced, and the gene product was found to exhibit 82.3% overall similarity with F TraN. The differences were mainly located within a central region of the proteins (amino acids 162 to 333 of F and 162 to 348 of R100-1). Deletion analysis of F traN suggested that this central portion might be responsible for the receptor specificity displayed by TraN. TraN was not responsible for TraT-dependent surface exclusion. Thus, TraN, and not the F pilus, appears to interact with OmpA and LPS moieties during conjugation, resulting in mating pair stabilization, the first step in efficient mobilization of DNA. PMID:9696748

  9. Clostridium perfringens type A-E toxin plasmids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Theoret, James R; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell.

  10. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  11. Origin and Evolution of Rickettsial Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    El Karkouri, Khalid; Pontarotti, Pierre; Raoult, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard

    2016-01-01

    Background Rickettsia species are strictly intracellular bacteria that have undergone a reductive genomic evolution. Despite their allopatric lifestyle, almost half of the 26 currently validated Rickettsia species have plasmids. In order to study the origin, evolutionary history and putative roles of rickettsial plasmids, we investigated the evolutionary processes that have shaped 20 plasmids belonging to 11 species, using comparative genomics and phylogenetic analysis between rickettsial, microbial and non-microbial genomes. Results Plasmids were differentially present among Rickettsia species. The 11 species had 1 to 4 plasmid (s) with a size ranging from 12 kb to 83 kb. We reconstructed pRICO, the last common ancestor of the current rickettsial plasmids. pRICO was vertically inherited mainly from Rickettsia/Orientia chromosomes and diverged vertically into a single or multiple plasmid(s) in each species. These plasmids also underwent a reductive evolution by progressive gene loss, similar to that observed in rickettsial chromosomes, possibly leading to cryptic plasmids or complete plasmid loss. Moreover, rickettsial plasmids exhibited ORFans, recent gene duplications and evidence of horizontal gene transfer events with rickettsial and non-rickettsial genomes mainly from the α/γ-proteobacteria lineages. Genes related to maintenance and plasticity of plasmids, and to adaptation and resistance to stress mostly evolved under vertical and/or horizontal processes. Those involved in nucleotide/carbohydrate transport and metabolism were under the influence of vertical evolution only, whereas genes involved in cell wall/membrane/envelope biogenesis, cycle control, amino acid/lipid/coenzyme and secondary metabolites biosynthesis, transport and metabolism underwent mainly horizontal transfer events. Conclusion Rickettsial plasmids had a complex evolution, starting with a vertical inheritance followed by a reductive evolution associated with increased complexity via

  12. Feline neural progenitor cells II: use of novel plasmid vector and hybrid promoter to drive expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor transgene.

    PubMed

    You, X Joann; Yang, Jing; Gu, Ping; Liew, Chee Gee; Klassen, Henry J

    2012-01-01

    Sustained transgene expression is required for the success of cell transplant-based gene therapy. Most widely used are lentiviral-based vectors which integrate into the host genome and thereby maintain sustained transgene expression. This requires integration into the nuclear genome, and potential risks include activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. Plasmids have been used; however lack of sustained expression presents an additional challenge. Here we used the pCAG-PyF101-eGFP plasmid to deliver the human GDNF gene to cat neural progenitor cells (cNPCs). This vector consists of a CAGG composite promoter linked to the polyoma virus mutant enhancer PyF101. Expression of an episomal eGFP reporter and GDNF transgene were stably maintained by the cells, even following induction of differentiation. These genetically modified cells appear suitable for use in allogeneic models of cell-based delivery of GDNF in the cat and may find veterinary applications should such strategies prove clinically beneficial.

  13. Conjugative Plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Pachulec, Emilia; van der Does, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Many clinical isolates of the human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae contain conjugative plasmids. The host range of these plasmids is limited to Neisseria species, but presence of a tetracycline (tetM) determinant inserted in several of these plasmids is an important cause of the rapid spread of tetracycline resistance. Previously plasmids with different backbones (Dutch and American type backbones) and with and without different tetM determinants (Dutch and American type tetM determinants) have been identified. Within the isolates tested, all plasmids with American or Dutch type tetM determinants contained a Dutch type plasmid backbone. This demonstrated that tetM determinants should not be used to differentiate between conjugal plasmid backbones. The nucleotide sequences of conjugative plasmids with Dutch type plasmid backbones either not containing the tetM determinant (pEP5233) or containing Dutch (pEP5289) or American (pEP5050) type tetM determinants were determined. Analysis of the backbone sequences showed that they belong to a novel IncP1 subfamily divergent from the IncP1α, β, γ, δ and ε subfamilies. The tetM determinants were inserted in a genetic load region found in all these plasmids. Insertion was accompanied by the insertion of a gene with an unknown function, and rearrangement of a toxin/antitoxin gene cluster. The genetic load region contains two toxin/antitoxins of the Zeta/Epsilon toxin/antitoxin family previously only found in Gram positive organisms and the virulence associated protein D of the VapD/VapX toxin/antitoxin family. Remarkably, presence of VapX of pJD1, a small cryptic neisserial plasmid, in the acceptor strain strongly increased the conjugation efficiency, suggesting that it functions as an antitoxin for the conjugative plasmid. The presence of the toxin and antitoxin on different plasmids might explain why the host range of this IncP1 plasmid is limited to Neisseria species. The isolated plasmids conjugated efficiently between

  14. mcr-1.2, a New mcr Variant Carried on a Transferable Plasmid from a Colistin-Resistant KPC Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain of Sequence Type 512

    PubMed Central

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Arena, Fabio; Tascini, Carlo; Cannatelli, Antonio; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Fortunato, Simona; Giani, Tommaso; Menichetti, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    A novel mcr variant, named mcr-1.2, encoding a Gln3-to-Leu functional variant of MCR-1, was detected in a KPC-3-producing ST512 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate collected in Italy from a surveillance rectal swab from a leukemic child. The mcr-1.2 gene was carried on a transferable IncX4 plasmid whose structure was very similar to that of mcr-1-bearing plasmids previously found in Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae strains from geographically distant sites (Estonia, China, and South Africa). PMID:27401575

  15. mcr-1.2, a New mcr Variant Carried on a Transferable Plasmid from a Colistin-Resistant KPC Carbapenemase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain of Sequence Type 512.

    PubMed

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Arena, Fabio; Tascini, Carlo; Cannatelli, Antonio; Henrici De Angelis, Lucia; Fortunato, Simona; Giani, Tommaso; Menichetti, Francesco; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2016-09-01

    A novel mcr variant, named mcr-1.2, encoding a Gln3-to-Leu functional variant of MCR-1, was detected in a KPC-3-producing ST512 Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate collected in Italy from a surveillance rectal swab from a leukemic child. The mcr-1.2 gene was carried on a transferable IncX4 plasmid whose structure was very similar to that of mcr-1-bearing plasmids previously found in Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae strains from geographically distant sites (Estonia, China, and South Africa).

  16. Evolutionary Thrift: Mycobacteria Repurpose Plasmid Diversity during Adaptation of Type VII Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mortimer, Tatum D.; Weber, Alexandra M.

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacteria have a distinct secretion system, termed type VII (T7SS), which is encoded by paralogous chromosomal loci (ESX) and associated with pathogenesis, conjugation, and metal homeostasis. Evolution of paralogous gene families is of interest because duplication is an important mechanism by which novel genes evolve, but there are potential conflicts between adaptive forces that stabilize duplications and those that enable evolution of new functions. Our objective was to delineate the adaptive forces underlying diversification of T7SS. Plasmid-borne ESX were described recently, and we found evidence that the initial duplication and divergence of ESX systems occurred on plasmids and was driven by selection for advantageous mutations. Plasmid conjugation has been linked to T7SS and type IV secretion systems (T4SS) in mycobacteria, and we discovered that T7SS and T4SS genes evolved in concert on the plasmids. We hypothesize that differentiation of plasmid ESX helps to prevent conjugation among cells harboring incompatible plasmids. Plasmid ESX appear to have been repurposed following migration to the chromosome, and there is evidence of positive selection driving further differentiation of chromosomal ESX. We hypothesize that ESX loci were initially stabilized on the chromosome by mediating their own transfer. These results emphasize the diverse adaptive paths underlying evolution of novelty, which in this case involved plasmid duplications, selection for advantageous mutations in the mobile and core genomes, migration of the loci between plasmids and chromosomes, and lateral transfer among chromosomes. We discuss further implications for the choice of model organism to study ESX functions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:28391322

  17. Horizontal gene transfer drives adaptive colonization of apple trees by the fungal pathogen Valsa mali

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Baitao; Feng, Hao; Huang, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) often has strong benefits for fungi. In a study of samples from apple canker in Shaanxi Province, China, diverse microbes, along with the necrotrophic pathogen Valsa mali, were found to colonize the apple bark, thus providing ample opportunity for HGT to occur. In the present study, we identified 32 HGT events in V. mali by combining phyletic distribution-based methods with phylogenetic analyses. Most of these HGTs were from bacteria, whereas several others were from eukaryotes. Three HGTs putatively functioned in competition with actinomycetes, some of which showed a significant inhibitory effect on V. mali. Three HGTs that were probably involved in nitrogen uptake were also identified. Ten HGTs were thought to be involved in pathogenicity because they were related to known virulence factors, including cell wall-degrading enzymes and candidate effector proteins. HGT14, together with HGT32, was shown to contribute to bleomycin resistance of V. mali.These results suggest that HGT drives the adaptive evolution of V. mali. The HGTs identified here provide new clues for unveiling the adaptation mechanisms and virulence determinants of V. mali. PMID:27634406

  18. Building mosaics of therapeutic plasmid gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg E

    2011-12-01

    Plasmids are circular or linear DNA molecules propagated extra-chromosomally in bacteria. Evolution shaped plasmids are inherently mosaic structures with individual functional units represented by distinct segments in the plasmid genome. The patchwork of plasmid genetic modules is a convenient template and a model for the generation of artificial plasmids used as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells. Plasmid gene vectors are an important tool in gene therapy and in basic biomedical research, where these vectors offer efficient transgene expression in many settings in vitro and in vivo. Plasmid vectors can be attached to nuclear directing ligands or transferred by electroporation as naked DNA to deliver the payload genes to the nuclei of the target cells. Transgene expression silencing by plasmid sequences of bacterial origin and immune stimulation by bacterial unmethylated CpG motifs can be avoided by the generation of plasmid-based minimized DNA vectors, such as minicircles. Systems of efficient site-specific integration into human chromosomes and stable episomal maintenance in human cells are being developed for further reduction of the chances for transgene silencing. The successful generation of plasmid vectors is governed by a number of vector design rules, some of which are common to all gene vectors, while others are specific to plasmid vectors. This review is focused both on the guiding principles and on the technical know-how of plasmid gene vector design.

  19. The mechanism of plasmid curing in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Spengler, Gabriella; Molnár, Annamária; Schelz, Zsuzsanna; Amaral, Leonard; Sharples, Derek; Molnár, Joseph

    2006-07-01

    plasmids. The inhibition of conjugational transfer of antibiotic resistance plasmid can be exploited to reduce the spread of antibiotic resistance plasmid in the ecosystem. Inhibition of plasmid replication at various stages, as shown in the "rolling circle" model (replication, partition, conjugal transfer) may also be the theoretical basis for the elimination of bacterial virulence in the case of plasmid mediated pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance. The large number of compounds tested for antiplasmid effects provides opportunities for QSAR studies in order to find a correlation between the antiplasmid effect and the supramolecular chemistry of these plasmid curing compounds. Plasmid elimination in vitro provides a method of isolating plasmid free bacteria for biotechnology without any risk of inducing mutations.

  20. Plasmids in diatom species.

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, M; Corey, D K; Ludwig, J R; Kukel, A; Feng, T Y; Volcani, B E

    1991-01-01

    We have discovered plasmids in 5 of 18 diatom species surveyed. In several species, more than one type of plasmid is present. Several of the plasmids show similarity by hybridization previously characterized plasmids in Cylindrotheca fusiformis (J. D. Jacobs et al., unpublished data). Additionally, there is similarity between the plasmids found in C. fusiformis and chloroplast DNA in three diatom species. These results add to the evidence that the plasmids have features of mobile genetic elements. Images PMID:1885558

  1. Autotransmissible resident plasmid of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Olivares, J

    1980-01-01

    A resident plasmid of wild-type strains of Rhizobium meliloti of 59.6 megadaltons has been shown to be transferred at a high frequency to "cured" strains of this bacterial species. This plasmid, named pEZ1, that confers phage-sensitivity to cells carrying it is also transmissible to Escherichia coli and from it to "cured" R. meliloti strains.

  2. Plasmid-encoded trimethoprim resistance in staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Coughter, J P; Johnston, J L

    1986-01-01

    High-level (greater than 1,000 micrograms/ml) resistance to the antimicrobial agent trimethoprim was found in 17 of 101 (17%) coagulase-negative staphylococci and 5 of 51 (10%) Staphylococcus aureus from a number of different hospitals in the United States. Resistance was plasmid encoded and could be transferred by conjugation in 4 of the 17 (24%) Tpr coagulase-negative staphylococci and 3 of the 5 (60%) Tpr S. aureus. A 1.2-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA from one of the plasmids (pG01) was cloned on a high-copy-number vector in Escherichia coli and expressed high-level Tpr (MIC, 1,025 micrograms/ml) in the gram-negative host. In situ filter hybridization demonstrated homology between the cloned Tpr gene probe and plasmid DNA from each conjugative Tpr plasmid, a single nonconjugative plasmid from a United States Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate, a nonconjugative plasmid from an Australian methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, and chromosomal DNA from three Tpr S. epidermidis isolates that did not contain any plasmid DNA that was homologous with the probe. No homology was seen between the probe and staphylococcal plasmids not mediating Tpr, plasmid DNA from 12 Tpr S. epidermidis isolates not transferring Tpr by conjugation, or plasmid-encoded Tpr genes derived from gram-negative bacteria. Plasmid-encoded Tpr appears to be a relatively new gene in staphylococci and, because it can be transferred by conjugation, could become more prevalent in nonsocomial isolates. Images PMID:3729338

  3. Goals, Family, and Community: What Drives Tribal College Transfer Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makomenaw, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    This article examines success factors for American Indian tribal college students who transfer to 4-year predominantly White institutions. The study examined the experiences of 8 tribal college transfer students to Midwest universities. Using an indigenous methodology, 3 themes were found to help American Indian tribal college transfer students…

  4. Genetic and functional characterization of a yet-unclassified rhizobial Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region from a ubiquitous plasmid conjugal system present in Sinorhizobium meliloti, in Sinorhizobium medicae, and in other nonrhizobial Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Giusti, María de los Ángeles; Pistorio, Mariano; Lozano, Mauricio J; Tejerizo, Gonzalo A Torres; Salas, María Eugenia; Martini, María Carla; López, José Luis; Draghi, Walter O; Del Papa, María Florencia; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Sanjuán, Juan; Lagares, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative bacteria that live in soils and associate with leguminous plants to establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses. The ability of these bacteria to undergo horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is thought to be one of the main features to explain both the origin of their symbiotic life-style and the plasticity and dynamics of their genomes. In our laboratory we have previously characterized at the species level the non-pSym plasmid mobilome in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the symbiont of Medicago spp., and have found a high incidence of conjugal activity in many plasmids (Pistorio et al., 2008). In this work we characterized the Dtr (DNA-transfer-and-replication) region of one of those plasmids, pSmeLPU88b. This mobilization region was found to represent a previously unclassified Dtr type in rhizobia (hereafter type-IV), highly ubiquitous in S. meliloti and found in other genera of Gram-negative bacteria as well; including Agrobacterium, Ochrobactrum, and Chelativorans. The oriT of the type-IV Dtr described here could be located by function within a DNA fragment of 278 bp, between the divergent genes parA and mobC. The phylogenetic analysis of the cognate relaxase MobZ indicated that this protein groups close to the previously defined MOB(P3) and MOB(P4) type of enzymes, but is located in a separate and novel cluster that we have designated MOB(P0). Noteworthy, MOB(P0) and MOB(P4) relaxases were frequently associated with plasmids present in rhizospheric soil bacteria. A comparison of the nod-gene locations with the phylogenetic topology of the rhizobial relaxases revealed that the symbiotic genes are found on diverse plasmids bearing any of the four Dtr types, thus indicating that pSym plasmids are not specifically associated with any particular mobilization system. Finally, we demonstrated that the type-IV Dtr promoted the mobilization of plasmids from S. meliloti to Sinorhizobium medicae as well as from these rhizobia to other bacteria by means of their own

  5. Solvent fluctuations drive the hole transfer in DNA: a mixed quantum-classical study.

    PubMed

    Kubar, Tomás; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich; Elstner, Marcus

    2009-10-01

    We studied the hole transfer across adenine bridges in double-stranded DNA by means of a multiscale approach, propagating the hole in the framework of time-dependent DFT coupled to classical molecular dynamics simulation using a QM/MM scheme. The hole transfer in DNA is codetermined by the large fluctuations of site energies on the order of 0.4 eV, induced by the solvent degrees of freedom. These fluctuations lead to charge-transfer active conformations with large transfer efficiency, which are characterized by a favorable alignment of site energies along the DNA strand. This reduces the barrier for the hole transfer dramatically. Consequently, we find that a charge hopping mechanism is operative already for short bridges with fewer than four adenines, in contrast to the charge-transfer models assuming static DNA structures, where only tunneling occurs. The solvent fluctuations introduce a significant correlation between neighboring sites, enhancing the charge-transfer rate, while the fluctuation of electronic couplings has only a minor impact on the charge-transfer characteristics. Our results emphasize the importance of an accurate description of solvent effects as well as proper sampling, and it is suggested that charge transfer in DNA is gated by the dynamics of solvent.

  6. F33: A-: B-, IncHI2/ST3, and IncI1/ST71 plasmids drive the dissemination of fosA3 and blaCTX−M−55/−14/−65 in Escherichia coli from chickens in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoyun; Liu, Wuling; Liu, Yiyun; Wang, Jing; Lv, Luchao; Chen, Xiaojie; He, Dandan; Yang, Tong; Hou, Jianxia; Tan, Yinjuan; Xing, Li; Zeng, Zhenling; Liu, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the occurrence of fosfomycin-resistant Escherichia coli from chickens and to characterize the plasmids carrying fosA3. A total of 661 E. coli isolates of chicken origin collected from 2009 to 2011 were screened for plasmid-mediated fosfomycin resistance determinants by PCR. Plasmids were characterized using PCR-based replicon typing, plasmid multilocus sequence typing, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Associated addiction systems and resistance genes were identified by PCR. PCR-mapping was used for analysis of the genetic context of fosA3. Fosfomycin resistance was detected in 58 isolates that also carried the fosA3 gene. Fifty-seven, 17, and 52 FosA3-producers also harbored blaCTX−M, rmtB, and floR genes, respectively. Most of the 58 fosA3-carrying isolates were clonally unrelated, and all fosA3 genes were located on plasmids belonged to F33:A-:B- (n = 18), IncN-F33:A-:B- (n = 7), IncHI2/ST3 (n = 10), IncI1/ST71 (n = 3), IncI1/ST108 (n = 3), and others. The genetic structures, IS26-ISEcp1-blaCTX−M−55-orf477-blaTEM-1-IS26-fosA3-1758bp-IS26 and ISEcp1-blaCTX−M−65-IS903-iroN-IS26-fosA3-536bp-IS26 were located on highly similar F33:A-:B- plasmids. In addition, blaCTX−M−14-fosA3-IS26 was frequently present on similar IncHI2/ST3 plasmids. IncFII plasmids had a significantly higher frequency of addiction systems (mean 3.5) than other plasmids. Our results showed a surprisingly high prevalence of fosA3 gene in E. coli isolates recovered from chicken in China. The spread of fosA3 can be attributed to horizontal dissemination of several epidemic plasmids, especially F33:A-:B- plasmids. Since coselection by other antimicrobials is the major driving force for the diffusion of the fosA3 gene, a strict antibiotic use policy is urgently needed in China. PMID:25566207

  7. Shortcut to adiabatic population transfer in quantum three-level systems: Effective two-level problems and feasible counterdiabatic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Chao; Chen, Xi

    2016-12-01

    Shortcuts to adiabaticity in various quantum systems have attracted much attention with their wide applications in quantum information processing and quantum control. In this paper, we concentrate on a stimulated Raman shortcut-to-adiabatic passage in quantum three-level systems. To implement counterdiabatic driving but without additional coupling, we first reduce the quantum three-level systems to effective two-level problems at large intermediate-level detuning, or on resonance, apply counterdiabatic driving along with the unitary transformation and eventually modify the pump and Stokes pulses for achieving fast and high-fidelity population transfer. The required laser intensity and stability against parameter variation are further discussed, to demonstrate the advantage of shortcuts to adiabaticity.

  8. Plasmid DNA manufacturing technology.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Aaron E; Williams, James A

    2007-01-01

    Today, plasmid DNA is becoming increasingly important as the next generation of biotechnology products (gene medicines and DNA vaccines) make their way into clinical trials, and eventually into the pharmaceutical marketplace. This review summarizes recent patents and patent applications relating to plasmid manufacturing, in the context of a comprehensive description of the plasmid manufacturing intellectual property landscape. Strategies for plasmid manufacturers to develop or in-license key plasmid manufacturing technologies are described with the endpoint of efficiently producing kg quantities of plasmid DNA of a quality that meets anticipated European and FDA quality specifications for commercial plasmid products.

  9. Adiabatic quantum state transfer in tight-binding chains using periodic driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2014-09-01

    A method for high-fidelity coherent adiabatic transport in a zig-zag tight-binding chain, based on application of two external periodic driving fields, is theoretically proposed. The method turns out to be robust against imperfections and disorder of the static lattice Hamiltonian, is tolerant to next-nearest neighborhood interactions, and enables coherent transport in long chains without the need for a local control and timing of the trapping potential.

  10. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; Hohenberger, M.; Edgell, D. H.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hu, S. X.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Myatt, J. F.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-04-20

    The angularly-resolved mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration was used, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped from a symmetric direct-drive configuration to suppress CBET at the pole, while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions in the same implosion allowed the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be decoupled from the other physics effects that influence laser-coupling. Hydrodynamic simulations performed without CBET reproduced the measured ablation rate and ablation front trajectory at the pole of the target, verifying that the other laser-coupling physics effects are well-modeled when CBET effects are negligible. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall’s equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with an optimized multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. Furthermore, the presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations due to diffraction, shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, or polarization effects, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.

  11. Isolating and quantifying cross-beam energy transfer in direct-drive implosions on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Davis, A. K.; Cao, D.; Michel, D. T.; ...

    2016-04-20

    The angularly-resolved mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories for Si-coated CH targets were measured in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments to quantify crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) while constraining the hydrodynamic coupling. A polar-direct-drive laser configuration was used, where the equatorial laser beams were dropped from a symmetric direct-drive configuration to suppress CBET at the pole, while allowing it to persist at the equator. The combination of low- and high-CBET conditions in the same implosion allowed the effects of CBET on the ablation rate and ablation pressure to be decoupled from the other physics effects that influence laser-coupling. Hydrodynamic simulationsmore » performed without CBET reproduced the measured ablation rate and ablation front trajectory at the pole of the target, verifying that the other laser-coupling physics effects are well-modeled when CBET effects are negligible. The simulated mass ablation rates and ablation front trajectories were in excellent agreement with the measurements at all angles when a CBET model based on Randall’s equations [C. J. Randall et al., Phys. Fluids 24, 1474 (1981)] was included into the simulations with an optimized multiplier on the CBET gain factor. These measurements were performed on both OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility to access a wide range of plasma conditions, laser intensities, and laser beam geometries. Furthermore, the presence of the CBET gain multiplier required to match the data in all of the configurations tested suggests that additional physics effects, such as intensity variations due to diffraction, shortcomings of extending the 1-D Randall model to 3-D, or polarization effects, should be explored to explain the differences in observed and predicted drive.« less

  12. The Influence of Biofilms in the Biology of Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laura C C; Dunny, Gary M

    2014-10-01

    The field of plasmid biology has historically focused on bacteria growing in liquid culture. Surface-attached communities of bacterial biofilms have recently been understood to be the normal environment of bacteria in the natural world. Thus, studies examining plasmid replication, maintenance, and transfer in biofilms are essential for a true understanding of bacterial plasmid biology. This article reviews the current knowledge of the interplay between bacterial biofilms and plasmids, focusing on the role of plasmids in biofilm development and the role of biofilms in plasmid maintenance, copy-number control, and transfer. The studies examined herein highlight the importance of biofilms as an important ecological niche in which bacterial plasmids play an essential role.

  13. Designing plasmid vectors.

    PubMed

    Tolmachov, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy vectors are commonly based on recombinant bacterial plasmids or their derivatives. The plasmids are propagated in bacteria, so, in addition to their therapeutic cargo, they necessarily contain a bacterial replication origin and a selection marker, usually a gene conferring antibiotic resistance. Structural and maintenance plasmid stability in bacteria is required for the plasmid DNA production and can be achieved by carefully choosing a combination of the therapeutic DNA sequences, replication origin, selection marker, and bacterial strain. The use of appropriate promoters, other regulatory elements, and mammalian maintenance devices ensures that the therapeutic gene or genes are adequately expressed in target human cells. Optimal immune response to the plasmid vectors can be modulated via inclusion or exclusion of DNA sequences containing immunostimulatory CpG sequence motifs. DNA fragments facilitating construction of plasmid vectors should also be considered for inclusion in the design of plasmid vectors. Techniques relying on site-specific or homologous recombination are preferred for construction of large plasmids (>15 kb), while digestion of DNA by restriction enzymes with subsequent ligation of the resulting DNA fragments continues to be the mainstream approach for generation of small- and medium-size plasmids. Rapid selection of a desired recombinant plasmid against a background of other plasmids continues to be a challenge. In this chapter, the emphasis is placed on efficient and flexible versions of DNA cloning protocols using selection of recombinant plasmids by restriction endonucleases directly in the ligation mixture.

  14. Spread of CTX-M-15 Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates through Household Contact and Plasmid Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Yasuko; Harada, Sohei; Aoki, Kotaro; Sawa, Tomoka; Hasegawa, Kei; Saji, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We document the household spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. One isolate belonged to sequence type 1193 and caused urinary tract infection in a 4-month-old female, and the other isolate belonged to sequence type 131 and colonized three family members, including the index patient. These isolates carried similar Inc-I1-Iγ plasmids, harboring blaCTX-M-15. PMID:24554749

  15. Spread of CTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates through household contact and plasmid transfer.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Yasuko; Harada, Sohei; Aoki, Kotaro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Sawa, Tomoka; Hasegawa, Kei; Saji, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    We document the household spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. One isolate belonged to sequence type 1193 and caused urinary tract infection in a 4-month-old female, and the other isolate belonged to sequence type 131 and colonized three family members, including the index patient. These isolates carried similar Inc-I1-Iγ plasmids, harboring blaCTX-M-15.

  16. Evaluation of the Effects of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in NIF Polar-Drive Exploding-Pusher Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenty, P. W.; Marshall, F. J.; Hohenberger, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Marozas, J. A.; Delettrez, J. A.; Shvydky, A.; Froula, D. H.; Michel, D. T.; Edgell, D. H.; Seka, W.; Olson, P. A.; To, S.; Cao, D.; Moses, G.; Le Pape, S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Ma, T.

    2013-10-01

    Polar-drive (PD) target implosions have been designed and fielded for neutron diagnostic development on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental results evaluating the overall hydrodynamic assembly have previously indicated a significant discrepancy with DRACO predictions of the in-flight shell evolution. New physics models, addressing nonlocal electron thermal transport and cross-beam energy transfer within the incoming laser light, have been implemented into DRACO. Results detailing comparisons of experiments with simulations using these models will be presented that indicate significantly better agreement and may provide insight into the application of these models in other inertial confinement fusion experiments. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. A. M. Cok, R. S. Craxton, and P. W. McKenty, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082705 (2008).

  17. Mutagenesis of dimeric plasmids by the transposon. gamma. delta. (Tn1000)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Berg, C.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The Escherichia coli F factor mediates conjugal transfer of a plasmid such as pBR322 primarily by replicative transposition of transposon {gamma}{delta} (Tn1000) from F to that plasmid to form a cointegrate intermediate. Although resolution of this cointegrate always yields a plasmid containing a single {gamma}{delta} insertion, the occasional recovery of transposon-free plasmids after connuugal transfer has led to alternative hypotheses for F mobilization. The authors show here that {gamma}{delta}-free plasmids are found after F-mediated conjugal transfer only when the donor plasmid is a dimer and the recipient is Rec{sup +}.

  18. Broad host range plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aayushi; Srivastava, Preeti

    2013-11-01

    Plasmids are and will remain important cloning vehicles for biotechnology. They have also been associated with the spread of a number of diseases and therefore are a subject of environmental concern. With the advent of sequencing technologies, the database of plasmids is increasing. It will be of immense importance to identify the various bacterial hosts in which the plasmid can replicate. The present review article describes the features that confer broad host range to the plasmids, the molecular basis of plasmid host range evolution, and applications in recombinant DNA technology and environment.

  19. Improved Wavelength Detuning Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Mitigation Strategy for Polar Direct Drive at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marozas, J. A.; Collins, T. J. B.; McKenty, P. W.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) reduces absorbed light and implosion velocity, alters time-resolved scattered-light spectra, and redistributes absorbed and scattered light. These effects reduce target performance in both symmetric direct-drive and polar-direct-drive (PDD) experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The CBET package (Adaawam) incorporated into the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO is an integral part of the 3-D ray-trace package (Mazinisin). The CBET exchange occurs primarily over the equatorial region in PDD, where successful mitigation strategies concentrate. Detuning the initial laser wavelength (dλ0) reduces the CBET interaction volume, which can be combined with other mitigation domains (e.g., spatial and temporal). By judiciously selecting the ring and/or port +/-dλ0 in each hemisphere, using new DRACO diagnostic abilities, improved wavelength detuning strategies trade-off overall energy absorption for improved hemispherical energy balance control. These balanced-wavelength detuning strategies improve performance for high-convergence implosions. Simulations (2-D DRACO) predict improved implosion performance and control in both the shell trajectory and morphology for planned intermediate PDD experiments on the NIF. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  20. Rapid Stress System Drives Chemical Transfer of Fear from Sender to Receiver

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Jasper H. B.; Smeets, Monique A. M.; Semin, Gün R.

    2015-01-01

    Humans can register another person’s fear not only with their eyes and ears, but also with their nose. Previous research has demonstrated that exposure to body odors from fearful individuals elicited implicit fear in others. The odor of fearful individuals appears to have a distinctive signature that can be produced relatively rapidly, driven by a physiological mechanism that has remained unexplored in earlier research. The apocrine sweat glands in the armpit that are responsible for chemosignal production contain receptors for adrenalin. We therefore expected that the release of adrenalin through activation of the rapid stress response system (i.e., the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system) is what drives the release of fear sweat, as opposed to activation of the slower stress response system (i.e., hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis). To test this assumption, sweat was sampled while eight participants prepared for a speech. Participants had higher heart rates and produced more armpit sweat in the fast stress condition, compared to baseline and the slow stress condition. Importantly, exposure to sweat from participants in the fast stress condition induced in receivers (N = 31) a simulacrum of the state of the sender, evidenced by the emergence of a fearful facial expression (facial electromyography) and vigilant behavior (i.e., faster classification of emotional facial expressions). PMID:25723720

  1. Horizontal gene transfer and gene dosage drives adaptation to wood colonization in a tree pathogen

    DOE PAGES

    Dhillon, Braham; Feau, Nicolas; Aerts, Andrea L.; ...

    2015-03-02

    Some of the most damaging tree diseases are caused by pathogens that induce cankers, a stem deformation often lethal. To investigate the cause of this adaptation, we sequenced the genomes of poplar pathogens that do and do not cause cankers. We found a unique cluster of genes that produce secondary metabolites and are co-activated when the canker pathogen is grown on poplar wood and leaves. The gene genealogy is discordant with the species phylogeny, showing a signature of horizontal transfer from fungi associated with wood decay. Furthermore, genes encoding hemicellulose-degrading enzymes are up-regulated on poplar wood chips, with some havingmore » been acquired horizontally. In conclusion, we propose that adaptation to colonize poplar woody stems is the result of acquisition of these genes.« less

  2. Horizontal gene transfer and gene dosage drives adaptation to wood colonization in a tree pathogen

    SciTech Connect

    Dhillon, Braham; Feau, Nicolas; Aerts, Andrea L.; Beauseigle, Stéphanie; Bernier, Louis; Copeland, Alex; Foster, Adam; Gill, Navdeep; Henrissat, Bernard; Herath, Padmini; LaButti, Kurt M.; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A.; Majoor, Eline; Ohm, Robin A.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Pribowo, Amadeus; Saddler, John N.; Sakalidis, Monique L.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Tanguay, Philippe; Hamelin, Richard C.

    2015-03-02

    Some of the most damaging tree diseases are caused by pathogens that induce cankers, a stem deformation often lethal. To investigate the cause of this adaptation, we sequenced the genomes of poplar pathogens that do and do not cause cankers. We found a unique cluster of genes that produce secondary metabolites and are co-activated when the canker pathogen is grown on poplar wood and leaves. The gene genealogy is discordant with the species phylogeny, showing a signature of horizontal transfer from fungi associated with wood decay. Furthermore, genes encoding hemicellulose-degrading enzymes are up-regulated on poplar wood chips, with some having been acquired horizontally. In conclusion, we propose that adaptation to colonize poplar woody stems is the result of acquisition of these genes.

  3. Radiative transfer and radiative driving of outflows in active galactic nuclei and starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, G. S.; Ostriker, J. P.; Ciotti, L.

    2012-12-01

    To facilitate the study of black hole fuelling, star formation and feedback in galaxies, we outline a method for treating the radial forces on interstellar gas due to absorption of photons by dust grains. The method gives the correct behaviour in all of the relevant limits [dominated by the central point source; dominated by the distributed isotropic source; optically thin; optically thick to ultraviolet (UV)/optical; optically thick to infrared (IR)] and reasonably interpolates between the limits when necessary. The method is explicitly energy conserving so that UV/optical photons that are absorbed are not lost, but are rather redistributed to the IR where they may scatter out of the galaxy. We implement the radiative transfer algorithm in a two-dimensional hydrodynamical code designed to study feedback processes in the context of early-type galaxies. We find that the dynamics and final state of simulations are measurably but only moderately affected by radiative forces on dust, even when assumptions about the dust-to-gas ratio are varied from zero to a value appropriate for the Milky Way. In simulations with high gas densities designed to mimic ultraluminous IR galaxies with a star formation rate of several hundred solar masses per year, dust makes a more substantial contribution to the dynamics and outcome of the simulation. We find that, despite the large opacity of dust to UV radiation, the momentum input to the flow from radiation very rarely exceeds L/c due to two factors: the low opacity of dust to the re-radiated IR and the tendency for dust to be destroyed by sputtering in hot gas environments. We also develop a simplification of our radiative transfer algorithm that respects the essential physics but is much easier to implement and requires a fraction of the computational cost.

  4. Horizontal gene transfer and gene dosage drives adaptation to wood colonization in a tree pathogen.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Braham; Feau, Nicolas; Aerts, Andrea L; Beauseigle, Stéphanie; Bernier, Louis; Copeland, Alex; Foster, Adam; Gill, Navdeep; Henrissat, Bernard; Herath, Padmini; LaButti, Kurt M; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A; Majoor, Eline; Ohm, Robin A; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L; Pribowo, Amadeus; Saddler, John N; Sakalidis, Monique L; de Vries, Ronald P; Grigoriev, Igor V; Goodwin, Stephen B; Tanguay, Philippe; Hamelin, Richard C

    2015-03-17

    Some of the most damaging tree pathogens can attack woody stems, causing lesions (cankers) that may be lethal. To identify the genomic determinants of wood colonization leading to canker formation, we sequenced the genomes of the poplar canker pathogen, Mycosphaerella populorum, and the closely related poplar leaf pathogen, M. populicola. A secondary metabolite cluster unique to M. populorum is fully activated following induction by poplar wood and leaves. In addition, genes encoding hemicellulose-degrading enzymes, peptidases, and metabolite transporters were more abundant and were up-regulated in M. populorum growing on poplar wood-chip medium compared with M. populicola. The secondary gene cluster and several of the carbohydrate degradation genes have the signature of horizontal transfer from ascomycete fungi associated with wood decay and from prokaryotes. Acquisition and maintenance of the gene battery necessary for growth in woody tissues and gene dosage resulting in gene expression reconfiguration appear to be responsible for the adaptation of M. populorum to infect, colonize, and cause mortality on poplar woody stems.

  5. Horizontal gene transfer and gene dosage drives adaptation to wood colonization in a tree pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Braham; Feau, Nicolas; Aerts, Andrea L.; Beauseigle, Stéphanie; Bernier, Louis; Copeland, Alex; Foster, Adam; Gill, Navdeep; Henrissat, Bernard; Herath, Padmini; LaButti, Kurt M.; Levasseur, Anthony; Lindquist, Erika A.; Majoor, Eline; Ohm, Robin A.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn L.; Pribowo, Amadeus; Saddler, John N.; Sakalidis, Monique L.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Tanguay, Philippe; Hamelin, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Some of the most damaging tree pathogens can attack woody stems, causing lesions (cankers) that may be lethal. To identify the genomic determinants of wood colonization leading to canker formation, we sequenced the genomes of the poplar canker pathogen, Mycosphaerella populorum, and the closely related poplar leaf pathogen, M. populicola. A secondary metabolite cluster unique to M. populorum is fully activated following induction by poplar wood and leaves. In addition, genes encoding hemicellulose-degrading enzymes, peptidases, and metabolite transporters were more abundant and were up-regulated in M. populorum growing on poplar wood-chip medium compared with M. populicola. The secondary gene cluster and several of the carbohydrate degradation genes have the signature of horizontal transfer from ascomycete fungi associated with wood decay and from prokaryotes. Acquisition and maintenance of the gene battery necessary for growth in woody tissues and gene dosage resulting in gene expression reconfiguration appear to be responsible for the adaptation of M. populorum to infect, colonize, and cause mortality on poplar woody stems. PMID:25733908

  6. Diagnosing Cross-Beam Energy Transfer Using Beamlets of Unabsorbed Light from Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Seka, W.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-11-01

    A new diagnostic is now being fielded to record the unabsorbed laser light from implosions on OMEGA. Unabsorbed light from each OMEGA beam is imaged as a distinct ``spot'' in time-integrated images. Each spot is, in essence, the end point of a beamlet of light that originates from a specific region of a beam profile and follows a path determined by refraction. The intensity of light in the beamlet varies along that path because of absorption and cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) with other beamlets. This diagnostic allows for the detailed investigation of the effects of CBET on specific locations of the beam profile. A pinhole can be used to isolate specific spots, allowing the time-resolved spectrum of the beamlet to be measured. A fully 3-D CBET hydrodynamics code postprocessor is used to model the intensity and wavelength of each beamlet as it traverses the coronal plasma to the diagnostic. The model predicts that if a single beam in a symmetric implosion is turned off, the recorded intensity of nearby spots will decrease by ~ 15% as a result of loss of CBET from the dropped beam. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  7. [Isolation of the R'his plasmids of Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Rusina, O Iu; Tiganova, I G; Aleshkin, G I; Andreeva, I V; Skavronskaia, A G

    1987-06-01

    V. cholerae strain VT5104 capable of donor activity in conjugation has been constructed by the genetic technique based on plasmid RP4::Mucts62 integration into V. cholerae chromosome due to plasmid homology with Mucts62 inserted into the chromosome. The gene for histidine synthesis has been mobilized and transferred into the recipient cells from VT5104 donor. The conjugants obtained are able to efficiently transfer his+ gene included into the plasmid structure in conjugation with eltor recipient. Thus, the constructed strain VT5104 generates R' plasmids carrying V. cholerae chromosomal genes.

  8. Activity of the Agrobacterium Ti plasmid conjugal transfer regulator TraR is inhibited by the product of the traM gene.

    PubMed Central

    Fuqua, C; Burbea, M; Winans, S C

    1995-01-01

    The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid tra regulon was previously found to be positively regulated by the TraR protein in the presence of a diffusible N-acyl homoserine lactone designated Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). TraR and AAI are similar to LuxR from Vibrio fischeri and the Vibrio autoinducer (VAI), which regulate target bioluminescence (lux) genes in a cell density-dependent manner. We now show that tra genes are also regulated by a second protein, designated TraM, which acts to antagonize TraR-dependent activation. The traM gene is closely linked to traR, and the two genes are transcribed convergently. The predicted TraM proteins of two different Ti plasmids are 77% identical but are not significantly similar to other protein sequences in the database, and thus TraM may represent a novel regulatory protein. Null mutations in traM cause strongly increased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI production. A functional copy of traM introduced into traM mutants decreased conjugation, tra gene transcription, and AAI synthesis. TraM inhibits transcription of traA, traI, and traM. Although traM was first identified by its octopine-inducible promoter, we now show that induction by octopine requires traR, strongly suggesting that TraR is the direct traM activator. PMID:7868612

  9. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica.

  10. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. PMID:26347724

  11. Reduction of electron deficient guanine radical species in plasmid DNA by tyrosine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Tsoi, Mandi; Do, Trinh T; Tang, Vicky J; Aguilera, Joseph A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2010-06-07

    Guanine bases are the most easily oxidized sites in DNA and therefore electron deficient guanine radical species are major intermediates in the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself) on DNA as a consequence of hole migration to guanine. As a model for this process we have used gamma-irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions to generate single electron oxidized guanine radicals in a plasmid target in aqueous solution. The stable species formed from these radicals can be detected and quantified by the formation of strand breaks in the plasmid after a post-irradiation incubation using a suitable enzyme. If a tyrosine derivative is also present during irradiation, the production of guanine oxidation products is decreased by electron transfer from tyrosine to the intermediate guanyl radical species. By using cationic tyrosine containing ligands we are able to observe this process when the tyrosine is electrostatically bound to the plasmid. The driving force dependence of this reaction was determined by comparing the reactivity of tyrosine with its 3-nitro analog. The results imply that the electron transfer reaction is coupled to a proton transfer. The experimental conditions used in this model system provide a reasonable approximation to those involved in the radioprotection of DNA by tightly bound proteins in chromatin.

  12. The Effect of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer on Two-Plasmon Decay in Direct-Drive Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Henchen, R. J.; Davis, A. K.; Goncharov, V. N.; Edgell, D. H.; Solodov, A. A.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J. G.; Stoeckl, C.

    2016-10-01

    Mitigation of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) in direct-drive implosions was shown to increase the hot electrons generated by two-plasmon decay. Reducing the diameter of the laser spots by 30% significantly reduces CBET and the laser absorption was measured to increase from 75% to nearly 90%. The reduced CBET leads to higher intensity at the quarter-critical density surface, increasing the hot-electron production by a factor of 7 . Adding a thin layer (0.6 to 1.1 μm) of Si to the target ablator reduced the hot-electron fraction by a factor of 2 . Spatially resolved Thomson-scattering measurements show an 15 % increase in the electron temperature and an increase in the Si fraction at the quarter-critical surface when the Si layer is added. Three-dimensional laser-plasma interaction simulations of hot-electron production using the code LPSE show that in addition to the reduced gain (smaller ILn Te), the observed reduction in hot electrons results from increased electron-ion collision frequencies and reduced Landau damping of ion-acoustic waves. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Yeast DNA plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gunge, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of yeast DNA plasmids has been initiated with the discovery of the 2-micron DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This multiple copy plasmid, organized into chromatin structure in vivo, probably exists in the nucleus and provides a good system to obtain information on eukaryotic DNA replication. Yeast transformation with the 2-micron DNA or artificially constructed chimeric plasmids had contributed significantly to the study of the molecular biology of yeast and eukaryotes, allowing the isolation and characterization of various genes, ars, centromeres, and telomeres, and also serving as a tool to study the expression of various heterologous genes. Encouraged by these fruitful results, new yeast plasmids have been screened among phylogenetically distant yeasts. The linear DNA plasmids (pGKl1 and pGKl2) from Kluyveromyces lactis are the first case of yeast plasmids associated with biological function (killer phenotype). This plasmid system would be ideal as a model to study the structure and function of eukaryotic linear chromosomes. The extracellular secretion of protein toxin suggests the plasmids to be an excellent candidate for a secretion vector. The importance of yeasts as suitable materials for the study of eukaryotic cell biology would be much enhanced by the advent of new transformation systems with diverse host yeasts of genetically and phylogenetically distinct properties.

  14. Parameters controlling interbacterial plasmid spreading in a gnotoxenic chicken gut system: influence of plasmid and bacterial mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Sansonetti, P; Lafont, J P; Jaffé-Brachet, A; Guillot, J F; Chaslus-Dancla, E

    1980-01-01

    Conjugative transfer of R plasmids R64 and R64drd-11 has been compared in vitro and in vivo without selective pressure by antibiotics in a simplified experimental system; the ecosystem was the bowel of germfree chickens, with the host bacteria almost isogenic, and the plasmids differing only in their conjugative transfer frequency. The spread of repressed and derepressed (drd) R plasmids in recipient bacterial populations was very extensive. The repressed phenotype had only a transient effect during the first 4 h. The level of implantation of the donor bacterial population seems to be of minor importance. Only with a poor recipient (con strain) could the spread of R plasmids be reduced and a steady state with a predominantly sensitive bacterial population be established. It is suggested that this steady state results from an equilibrium between the frequencies of R plasmid transfer and loss. PMID:6999980

  15. The Agrobacterium Ti Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Christie, Peter J; Gordon, Jay E

    2014-12-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a plant pathogen with the capacity to deliver a segment of oncogenic DNA carried on a large plasmid called the tumor-inducing or Ti plasmid to susceptible plant cells. A. tumefaciens belongs to the class Alphaproteobacteria, whose members include other plant pathogens (Agrobacterium rhizogenes), plant and insect symbionts (Rhizobium spp. and Wolbachia spp., respectively), human pathogens (Brucella spp., Bartonella spp., Rickettsia spp.), and nonpathogens (Caulobacter crescentus, Rhodobacter sphaeroides). Many species of Alphaproteobacteria carry large plasmids ranging in size from ∼100 kb to nearly 2 Mb. These large replicons typically code for functions essential for cell physiology, pathogenesis, or symbiosis. Most of these elements rely on a conserved gene cassette termed repABC for replication and partitioning, and maintenance at only one or a few copies per cell. The subject of this review is the ∼200-kb Ti plasmids carried by infectious strains of A. tumefaciens. We will summarize the features of this plasmid as a representative of the repABC family of megaplasmids. We will also describe novel features of this plasmid that enable A. tumefaciens cells to incite tumor formation in plants, sense and respond to an array of plant host and bacterial signal molecules, and maintain and disseminate the plasmid among populations of agrobacteria. At the end of this review, we will describe how this natural genetic engineer has been adapted to spawn an entire industry of plant biotechnology and review its potential for use in future therapeutic applications of plant and nonplant species.

  16. A Wave-Based Model for Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myatt, J. F.

    2016-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) is thought to be responsible for an 30 % reduction in hydrodynamic coupling efficiency on OMEGA and up to 50% at the ignition scale for direct-drive (DD) implosions. These numbers are determined by ray-based models that have been developed and integrated within the radiation-hydrodynamics codes LILAC (1-D) and DRACO (2-D). However, ray-based modeling of CBET in an inhomogeneous plasma assumes a steady-state plasma response, does not include the effects of beam speckle, and ray caustics are treated in an ad hoc manner. Nevertheless, simulation results are in good qualitative agreement with implosion experiments on OMEGA (when combined with a model for nonlocal heat transport). The validity of the modeling for ignition-scale implosions has not yet been determined. To address the physics shortcomings, which have important implications for DD inertial confinement fusion, a new wave-based model has been constructed. It solves the time-enveloped Maxwell equations in three-dimensions, including polarization effects, plasma inhomogeneity, and open-boundary conditions with the ability to prescribe beams incident at arbitrary angles. Beams can be made realistic with respect to laser speckle, polarization smoothing, and laser bandwidth. This, coupled to a linearized low-frequency plasma response that does not assume a steady state, represents the most-complete model of CBET to date. New results will be presented and the implications for CBET modeling and mitigation will be described. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DENA0001944, in collaboration with J. G. Shaw, R. K. Follett, and D. H. Edgell (LLE).

  17. Domain Wall Displacement Detection Magnetooptical Drive for Mobile Use, with 15 Gbit/inch2 Recording Density and 24 Mbps Data Transfer Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagura, Chihiro; Torii, Shinnosuke; Ishii, Kazuyoshi; Nagatsuka, Osamu; Nishikawa, Koichiro; Miyaoka, Yasuyuki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Koyama, Osamu

    2004-07-01

    We have developed a domain wall displacement detection (DWDD) magnetooptical drive for the 2-inch-diameter disc with 3 GB capacity. The newly developed magnetic head and the drive circuit realize the high efficiency of 1.84 Oe/mA and the high speed switching of 13.5 ns. An optical pickup (OPU) with wavelength of 660 nm and numerical aperture (NA) of 0.6 is sufficiently compact to approach the innermost disc radius of 11 mm, and the overall weight is 3.2 g. The volume and power consumption of the entire drive system are 35.5 cc and 0.78 W respectively, and they are adequate for use in mobile storage devices. Furthermore, we have confirmed a complete read/write performance with 15 Gbit/inch2 recording density and 24 Mbps data transfer rate.

  18. Chlamydial plasmids and bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Warych, Małgorzata; Śliwa-Dominiak, Joanna; Deptuła, Wiesław

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are absolute pathogens of humans and animals; despite being rather well recognised, they are still open for discovery. One such discovery is the occurrence of extrachromosomal carriers of genetic information. In prokaryotes, such carriers include plasmids and bacteriophages, which are present only among some Chlamydia species. Plasmids were found exclusively in Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis, C. psittaci, C. pneumoniae, C. suis, C. felis, C. muridarum and C. caviae. In prokaryotic organisms, plasmids usually code for genes that facilitate survival of the bacteria in the environment (although they are not essential). In chlamydia, their role has not been definitely recognised, apart from the fact that they participate in the synthesis of glycogen and encode proteins responsible for their virulence. Furthermore, in C. suis it was evidenced that the plasmid is integrated in a genomic island and contains the tetracycline-resistance gene. Bacteriophages specific for chlamydia (chlamydiaphages) were detected only in six species: C. psittaci, C. abortus, C. felis, C. caviae C. pecorum and C. pneumoniae. These chlamydiaphages cause inhibition of the developmental cycle, and delay transformation of reticulate bodies (RBs) into elementary bodies (EBs), thus reducing the possibility of infecting other cells in time. Plasmids and bacteriophages can be used in the diagnostics of chlamydioses; although especially in the case of plasmids, they are already used for detection of chlamydial infections. In addition, bacteriophages could be used as therapeutic agents to replace antibiotics, potentially addressing the problem of increasing antibiotic-resistance among chlamydia.

  19. Characterisation of a mobilisable plasmid conferring florfenicol and chloramphenicol resistance in Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bossé, Janine T; Li, Yanwen; Atherton, Tom G; Walker, Stephanie; Williamson, Susanna M; Rogers, Jon; Chaudhuri, Roy R; Weinert, Lucy A; Holden, Matthew T G; Maskell, Duncan J; Tucker, Alexander W; Wren, Brendan W; Rycroft, Andrew N; Langford, Paul R

    2015-08-05

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a 7.7kb mobilisable plasmid (pM3446F), isolated from a florfenicol resistant isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, showed extended similarity to plasmids found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae containing the floR gene as well as replication and mobilisation genes. Mobilisation into other Pasteurellaceae species confirmed that this plasmid can be transferred horizontally.

  20. Plasmid-determined silver resistance in Pseudomonas stutzeri isolated from a silver mine.

    PubMed Central

    Haefeli, C; Franklin, C; Hardy, K

    1984-01-01

    A silver-resistant strain of Pseudomonas stutzeri was isolated from a silver mine. It harbored three plasmids, the largest of which (pKK1; molecular weight, 49.4 X 10(6)) specified silver resistance. Plasmid pKK1 was apparently nonconjugative but could be transferred to Pseudomonas putida by mobilization with plasmid R68.45. Images PMID:6715284

  1. Prevalence of ColE1-like plasmids and kanamycinr resistance genes in Salmonella enterica serotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Multi-antibiotic resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes are increasing in prevalence and concern in human and animal health. Many strains carry resistance determinants on plasmids; current practices focus heavily on large plasmids, and the role that small plasmids play in resistance gene transfer ...

  2. Occurrence and persistence of indigenous transconjugants carrying conjugative plasmids in soil.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Soda, Satoshi; Tsutsui, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Yuji; Murashige, Katsushi; Sei, Kazunari; Fujita, Masanori; Ike, Michihiko

    2009-09-01

    The transfer of the self-transmissible plasmids, RP4 and pJP4, from introduced bacteria to indigenous bacteria was examined in soil and slurry microcosms. The introduced plasmids persisted in indigenous transconjugants despite the low survival of introduced donors. The potential of the transconjugants for growth and conjugation affects the persistence of introduced plasmids in soil.

  3. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.E.; Weightman, A.J.; Fry, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} per recipient at 20C. The sizes of the mobilizing plasmids isolated ranged from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was also found but not resistance to UV light or various heavy metals. Eight plasmids of epilithic bacteria, analyzed by comparing restriction fragmentation patterns, showed significant differences between those isolated from different independent matings. Optimal temperatures for mobilization of pD10 were between 15 and 25C. Four mercury resistance plasmids were found to be broad host range, transferring mercury resistance and mobilizing pD10 readily to representative species of {beta}- and {gamma}-purple bacteria. In general, frequencies of pD10 mobilization by plasmids of epilithic bacteria were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than conjugal transfer frequencies. Thus, there is a high potential for exchange of recombinant genes introduced into the epilithon by mobilization between a variety of bacterial species.

  4. Plasmid-determined resistance to fosfomycin in Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, C; Garcia, J M; Llaneza, J; Mendez, F J; Hardisson, C; Ortiz, J M

    1980-01-01

    Multiple-antibiotic-resistant strains of Serratia marcescens isolated from hospitalized patients were examined for their ability to transfer antibiotic resistance to Escherichia coli by conjugation. Two different patterns of linked transferable resistance were found among the transconjugants. The first comprised resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, and fosfomycin; the second, and more common, pattern included resistance to carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, gentamicin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, sulfonamide, and fosfomycin. The two types of transconjugant strains carried a single plasmid of either 57 or 97 megadaltons in size. Both of these plasmids are present in parental S. marcescens strains resistant to fosfomycin. The 57-megadalton plasmid was transformed into E. coli. Images PMID:7004337

  5. Plasmid Introduction in Metal-Stressed, Subsurface-Derived Microcosms: Plasmid Fate and Community Response

    PubMed Central

    Smets, Barth F.; Morrow, Jayne B.; Arango Pinedo, Catalina

    2003-01-01

    The nonconjugal IncQ plasmids pMOL187 and pMOL222, which contain the metal resistance-encoding genes czc and ncc, were introduced by using Escherichia coli as a transitory delivery strain into microcosms containing subsurface-derived parent materials. The microcosms were semicontinuously dosed with an artificial groundwater to set a low-carbon flux and a target metal stress (0, 10, 100, and 1,000 μM CdCl2), permitting long-term community monitoring. The broad-host-range IncPα plasmid RP4 was also transitorily introduced into a subset of microcosms. No novel community phenotype was detected after plasmid delivery, due to the high background resistances to Cd and Ni. At fixed Cd doses, however, small but consistent increases in Cdr or Nir density were measured due to the introduction of a single pMOL plasmid, and this effect was enhanced by the joint introduction of RP4; the effects were most significant at the highest Cd doses. The pMOL plasmids introduced could, however, be monitored via czc- and ncc-targeted infinite-dilution PCR (ID-PCR) methods, because these genes were absent from the indigenous community: long-term presence of czc (after 14 or 27 weeks) was contingent on the joint introduction of RP4, although RP4 cointroduction was not yet required to ensure retention of ncc after 8 weeks. Plasmids isolated from Nir transconjugants further confirmed the presence and retention of a pMOL222-sized plasmid. ID-PCR targeting the RP4-specific trafA gene revealed retention of RP4 for at least 8 weeks. Our findings confirm plasmid transfer and long-term retention in low-carbon-flux, metal-stressed subsurface communities but indicate that the subsurface community examined has limited mobilization potential for the IncQ plasmids employed. PMID:12839785

  6. Plasmid-mediate transfer of FLO1 into industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 strain creates a strain useful for repeat-batch fermentations involving flocculation-sedimentation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Daniel G; Guimarães, Pedro M R; Pereira, Francisco B; Teixeira, José A; Domingues, Lucília

    2012-03-01

    The flocculation gene FLO1 was transferred into the robust industrial strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 by the lithium acetate method. The recombinant strain showed a fermentation performance similar to that of the parental strain. In 10 repeat-batch cultivations in VHG medium with 345 g glucose/L and cell recycling by flocculation-sedimentation, an average final ethanol concentration of 142 g/L and an ethanol productivity of 2.86 g/L/h were achieved. Due to the flocculent nature of the recombinant strain it is possible to reduce the ethanol production cost because of lower centrifugation and distillation costs.

  7. Electrotransfer of Plasmid Vector DNA into Muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Satsuki; Miyazaki, Jun-Ichi

    Wolff et al. (1990) first reported that plasmid DNA injected into skeletal muscle is taken up by muscle cells and the genes in the plasmid are expressed for more than two months thereafter, although the transfected DNA does not usually undergo chromosomal integration (Wolff et al., 1991, 1992). However, the relatively low expression levels attained by this method have hampered its applications for uses other than as a DNA vaccine (Davis et al., 1995). There are a number of reports analyzing the conditions that affect the efficiency of gene transfer by intramuscular DNA injection and assessing the fine structures of expression plasmid vectors that may affect expression levels (Davis et al., 1993; Liang et al., 1996; Norman et al., 1997). Furthermore, various attempts were done to improve the efficiency of gene transfer by intramus cular DNA injection. Consequently, regenerating muscle was shown to produce 80-fold or more protein than did normal muscle, following injection of an expression plas-mid. Muscle regeneration was induced by treatment with cardiotoxin or bupivacaine (Wells, 1993; Vitadello et al., 1994). We previously demonstrated that by combining a strong promoter and bupivacaine pretreatment intramuscular injection of an IL-5 expression plasmid results in IL-5 production in muscle at a level sufficient to induce marked proliferation of eosinophils in the bone marrow and eosinophil infiltration of various organs (Tokui et al., 1997). It was also reported that a single intramuscular injection of an erythropoietin expression plasmid produced physiologically significant elevations in serum erythropoietin levels and increased hematocrits in adult mice (Tripathy et al., 1996). Hematocrits in these animals remained elevated at >60% for at least 90 days after a single injection. However, improvements to this method have not been sufficient to extend its applications including clinical use.

  8. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  9. Horizontal Transfer of the Salmonella enterica Serovar Infantis Resistance and Virulence Plasmid pESI to the Gut Microbiota of Warm-Blooded Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Aviv, Gili; Rahav, Galia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis is one of the prevalent salmonellae worldwide. Recently, we showed that the emergence of S. Infantis in Israel was facilitated by the acquisition of a unique megaplasmid (pESI) conferring multidrug resistance and increased virulence phenotypes. Here we elucidate the ecology, transmission properties, and regulation of pESI. We show that despite its large size (~280 kb), pESI does not impose a significant metabolic burden in vitro and that it has been recently fixed in the domestic S. Infantis population. pESI conjugation and the transcription of its pilus (pil) genes are inhibited at the ambient temperature (27°C) and by ≥1% bile but increased under temperatures of 37 to 41°C, oxidative stress, moderate osmolarity, and the microaerobic conditions characterizing the intestinal environment of warm-blooded animals. The pESI-encoded protein TraB and the oxygen homeostasis regulator Fnr were identified as transcriptional regulators of pESI conjugation. Using the mouse model, we show that following S. Infantis infection, pESI can be horizontally transferred to the gut microbiota, including to commensal Escherichia coli strains. Possible transfer, but not persistence, of pESI was also observed into Gram-positive mouse microbiota species, especially Lactobacillus reuteri. Moreover, pESI was demonstrated to further disseminate from gut microbiota to S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, in the context of gastrointestinal infection. These findings exhibit the ability of a selfish clinically relevant megaplasmid to distribute to and from the microbiota and suggest an overlooked role of the microbiota as a reservoir of mobile genetic elements and intermediator in the spread of resistance and virulence genes between commensals and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27601577

  10. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-04-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication.

  11. Physical and genetic analysis of the ColD plasmid.

    PubMed Central

    Frey, J; Ghersa, P; Palacios, P G; Belet, M

    1986-01-01

    The plasmid ColD-CA23, a high-copy-number plasmid of 5.12 kilobases, encodes colicin D, a protein of approximately 87,000 daltons which inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. Colicin D production is under the control of the Escherichia coli SOS regulatory system and is released to the growth medium via the action of the lysis gene product(s). A detailed map of the ColD plasmid was established for 10 restriction enzymes. Using in vitro insertional omega mutagenesis and in vivo insertional Tn5 mutagenesis, we localized the regions of the plasmid responsible for colicin D activity (cda), for mitomycin C-induced lysis (cdl), and for colicin D immunity (cdi). These genes were all located contiguously on a 2,400-base-pair fragment similar to a large number of other Col plasmids (A, E1, E2, E3, E8, N, and CloDF). The ColD plasmid was mobilizable by conjugative transfer by helper plasmids of the IncFII incompatibility group, but not by plasmids belonging to the groups IncI-alpha or IncP. The location of the mobilization functions was determined by deletion analysis. The plasmid needs a segment of 400 base pairs, which is located between the mob genes and the gene for autolysis, for its replication. Images PMID:3007432

  12. Community-wide plasmid gene mobilization and selection

    PubMed Central

    Sentchilo, Vladimir; Mayer, Antonia P; Guy, Lionel; Miyazaki, Ryo; Green Tringe, Susannah; Barry, Kerrie; Malfatti, Stephanie; Goessmann, Alexander; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc; van der Meer, Jan R

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids have long been recognized as an important driver of DNA exchange and genetic innovation in prokaryotes. The success of plasmids has been attributed to their independent replication from the host's chromosome and their frequent self-transfer. It is thought that plasmids accumulate, rearrange and distribute nonessential genes, which may provide an advantage for host proliferation under selective conditions. In order to test this hypothesis independently of biases from culture selection, we study the plasmid metagenome from microbial communities in two activated sludge systems, one of which receives mostly household and the other chemical industry wastewater. We find that plasmids from activated sludge microbial communities carry among the largest proportion of unknown gene pools so far detected in metagenomic DNA, confirming their presumed role of DNA innovators. At a system level both plasmid metagenomes were dominated by functions associated with replication and transposition, and contained a wide variety of antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. Plasmid families were very different in the two metagenomes and grouped in deep-branching new families compared with known plasmid replicons. A number of abundant plasmid replicons could be completely assembled directly from the metagenome, providing insight in plasmid composition without culturing bias. Functionally, the two metagenomes strongly differed in several ways, including a greater abundance of genes for carbohydrate metabolism in the industrial and of general defense factors in the household activated sludge plasmid metagenome. This suggests that plasmids not only contribute to the adaptation of single individual prokaryotic species, but of the prokaryotic community as a whole under local selective conditions. PMID:23407308

  13. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA.

  14. Restriction endonuclease analysis of the lactose plasmid in Streptococcus lactis ML3 and two recombinant lactose plasmids.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P M; McKay, L L

    1982-05-01

    We investigated the molecular relationship between the 60-megadalton (Mdal) recombinant lactose plasmids in ML 3 x LM2301 lactose-positive (Lac+) transconjugants and the genetic material of Streptococcus lactis ML3. Lactose metabolism is linked to the 33-Mdal plasmid pSK08 in ML3, and the recipient LM2301 is cured of plasmid DNA. The plasmids were analyzed with a series of restriction enzymes. We found that the 60-Mdal plasmids of Lac+ transconjugants contained pSK08 DNA, but were not simply dimers of pSK08. The 60-Mdal plasmids contained a segment of DNA not apparent in pSK08. The restriction patterns of the 60-Mdal plasmid in a Lac+ nonclumping transconjugant and that in a Lac+ clumping transconjugant were different. This suggested that there was a molecular differences between these two recombinant plasmids. We conclude that the segment of DNA in the 60-Mdal plasmids that was not present in pSK08 was the proposed transfer factor responsible for cell aggregation and high-frequency conjugation.

  15. Broad host range plasmids can invade an unexpectedly diverse fraction of a soil bacterial community

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, Uli; Riber, Leise; Dechesne, Arnaud; Sannazzarro, Analia; Hansen, Lars H; Sørensen, Søren J; Smets, Barth F

    2015-01-01

    Conjugal plasmids can provide microbes with full complements of new genes and constitute potent vehicles for horizontal gene transfer. Conjugal plasmid transfer is deemed responsible for the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among microbes. While broad host range plasmids are known to transfer to diverse hosts in pure culture, the extent of their ability to transfer in the complex bacterial communities present in most habitats has not been comprehensively studied. Here, we isolated and characterized transconjugants with a degree of sensitivity not previously realized to investigate the transfer range of IncP- and IncPromA-type broad host range plasmids from three proteobacterial donors to a soil bacterial community. We identified transfer to many different recipients belonging to 11 different bacterial phyla. The prevalence of transconjugants belonging to diverse Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria suggests that inter-Gram plasmid transfer of IncP-1 and IncPromA-type plasmids is a frequent phenomenon. While the plasmid receiving fractions of the community were both plasmid- and donor- dependent, we identified a core super-permissive fraction that could take up different plasmids from diverse donor strains. This fraction, comprising 80% of the identified transconjugants, thus has the potential to dominate IncP- and IncPromA-type plasmid transfer in soil. Our results demonstrate that these broad host range plasmids have a hitherto unrecognized potential to transfer readily to very diverse bacteria and can, therefore, directly connect large proportions of the soil bacterial gene pool. This finding reinforces the evolutionary and medical significances of these plasmids. PMID:25333461

  16. Plasmids in different strains of Streptomyces ambofaciens: free and integrated form of plasmid pSAM2.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Simonet, J M; Guérineau, M

    1984-01-01

    Five strains of Streptomyces ambofaciens were examined for their plasmid content. Among these strains, four belong to the same lineage (strains B) and the other was isolated independently (strain A). A large plasmid (ca. 80 kb), called pSAM1 in this paper and already described, was present in all B strains, and absent in strain A. A second plasmid, not described before, was found as covalently closed circular DNA in two of the four B strains. This plasmid with a size of 11.1 kb was called pSAM2. A restriction map for 14 enzymes was established. Hybridization experiments showed that a unique sequence homologous to this plasmid is integrated in a larger replicon, which is not pSAM1 and is probably the chromosome, in all B strains and not in strain A. It seems probable that the integrated sequence is the origin of the free plasmid found in two strains of the B family. It is noteworthy that the integrated form and the free plasmid may be found together. Transformation experiments proved that pSAM2 may be maintained autonomously in S. ambofaciens strain A and in S. lividans. pSAM2 is a self-transmissible plasmid, able to elicit the lethal zygosis reaction. pSAM2 was compared to the plasmids SLP1, pIJ110 and pIJ408, which all come from integrated sequences in three Streptomyces species and are found as autonomous plasmids after transfer to S. lividans. If pSAM2 resembles these plasmids in its origin, it does not appear to be related directly to them. Concerning their plasmid content, the two isolates of S. ambofaciens are very different.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Mechanisms of plasmid segregation: have multicopy plasmids been overlooked?

    PubMed

    Million-Weaver, Samuel; Camps, Manel

    2014-09-01

    Plasmids are self-replicating pieces of DNA typically bearing non-essential genes. Given that plasmids represent a metabolic burden to the host, mechanisms ensuring plasmid transmission to daughter cells are critical for their stable maintenance in the population. Here we review these mechanisms, focusing on two active partition strategies common to low-copy plasmids: par systems type I and type II. Both involve three components: an adaptor protein, a motor protein, and a centromere, which is a sequence area in the plasmid that is recognized by the adaptor protein. The centromere-bound adaptor nucleates polymerization of the motor, leading to filament formation, which can pull plasmids apart (par I) or push them towards opposite poles of the cell (par II). No such active partition mechanisms are known to occur in high copy number plasmids. In this case, vertical transmission is generally considered stochastic, due to the random distribution of plasmids in the cytoplasm. We discuss conceptual and experimental lines of evidence questioning the random distribution model and posit the existence of a mechanism for segregation in high copy number plasmids that moves plasmids to cell poles to facilitate transmission to daughter cells. This mechanism would involve chromosomally-encoded proteins and the plasmid origin of replication. Modulation of this proposed mechanism of segregation could provide new ways to enhance plasmid stability in the context of recombinant gene expression, which is limiting for large-scale protein production and for bioremediation.

  18. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M; Partridge, Sally R; Iredell, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing ('addiction') systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative 'interference plasmids' were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored.

  19. Chemotherapy of Bacterial Plasmids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-29

    multiresistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, mediated drug resistance are the emergence of strains determined by R-plasmids, causes treatment failures of Haemophilus ... influenzae , resistant to ampicillin [8] of hospital infections, foremost in patients with a or chloramphenicol [9] and of Neisseria gonorrhoeae

  20. Plasmids as Tools for Containment.

    PubMed

    García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2014-10-01

    Active containment systems are a major tool for reducing the uncertainty associated with the introduction of monocultures, genetically engineered or not, into target habitats for a large number of biotechnological applications (e.g., bioremediation, bioleaching, biopesticides, biofuels, biotransformations, live vaccines, etc.). While biological containment reduces the survival of the introduced organism outside the target habitat and/or upon completion of the projected task, gene containment strategies reduce the lateral spread of the key genetic determinants to indigenous microorganisms. In fundamental research, suicide circuits become relevant tools to address the role of gene transfer, mainly plasmid transfer, in evolution and how this transfer contributes to genome plasticity and to the rapid adaptation of microbial communities to environmental changes. Many lethal functions and regulatory circuits have been used and combined to design efficient containment systems. As many new genomes are being sequenced, novel lethal genes and regulatory elements are available, e.g., new toxin-antitoxin modules, and they could be used to increase further the current containment efficiencies and to expand containment to other organisms. Although the current containment systems can increase the predictability of genetically modified organisms in the environment, containment will never be absolute, due to the existence of mutations that lead to the appearance of surviving subpopulations. In this sense, orthogonal systems (xenobiology) appear to be the solution for setting a functional genetic firewall that will allow absolute containment of recombinant organisms.

  1. Plasmid interference for curing antibiotic resistance plasmids in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kamruzzaman, Muhammad; Shoma, Shereen; Thomas, Christopher M.; Partridge, Sally R.

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood of death from infection by common pathogens such as Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in developed and developing countries alike. Most important modern antibiotic resistance genes spread between such species on self-transmissible (conjugative) plasmids. These plasmids are traditionally grouped on the basis of replicon incompatibility (Inc), which prevents coexistence of related plasmids in the same cell. These plasmids also use post-segregational killing (‘addiction’) systems, which poison any bacterial cells that lose the addictive plasmid, to guarantee their own survival. This study demonstrates that plasmid incompatibilities and addiction systems can be exploited to achieve the safe and complete eradication of antibiotic resistance from bacteria in vitro and in the mouse gut. Conjugative ‘interference plasmids’ were constructed by specifically deleting toxin and antibiotic resistance genes from target plasmids. These interference plasmids efficiently cured the corresponding antibiotic resistant target plasmid from different Enterobacteriaceae in vitro and restored antibiotic susceptibility in vivo to all bacterial populations into which plasmid-mediated resistance had spread. This approach might allow eradication of emergent or established populations of resistance plasmids in individuals at risk of severe sepsis, enabling subsequent use of less toxic and/or more effective antibiotics than would otherwise be possible, if sepsis develops. The generalisability of this approach and its potential applications in bioremediation of animal and environmental microbiomes should now be systematically explored. PMID:28245276

  2. Plasmid-Mediated Antimicrobial Resistance in Staphylococci and Other Firmicutes.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Stefan; Shen, Jianzhong; Wendlandt, Sarah; Fessler, Andrea T; Wang, Yang; Kadlec, Kristina; Wu, Cong-Ming

    2014-12-01

    In staphylococci and other Firmicutes, resistance to numerous classes of antimicrobial agents, which are commonly used in human and veterinary medicine, is mediated by genes that are associated with mobile genetic elements. The gene products of some of these antimicrobial resistance genes confer resistance to only specific members of a certain class of antimicrobial agents, whereas others confer resistance to the entire class or even to members of different classes of antimicrobial agents. The resistance mechanisms specified by the resistance genes fall into any of three major categories: active efflux, enzymatic inactivation, and modification/replacement/protection of the target sites of the antimicrobial agents. Among the mobile genetic elements that carry such resistance genes, plasmids play an important role as carriers of primarily plasmid-borne resistance genes, but also as vectors for nonconjugative and conjugative transposons that harbor resistance genes. Plasmids can be exchanged by horizontal gene transfer between members of the same species but also between bacteria belonging to different species and genera. Plasmids are highly flexible elements, and various mechanisms exist by which plasmids can recombine, form cointegrates, or become integrated in part or in toto into the chromosomal DNA or into other plasmids. As such, plasmids play a key role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes within the gene pool to which staphylococci and other Firmicutes have access. This chapter is intended to provide an overview of the current knowledge of plasmid-mediated antimicrobial resistance in staphylococci and other Firmicutes.

  3. An updated view of plasmid conjugation and mobilization in Staphylococcus

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Joshua P.; Kwong, Stephen M.; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Yui Eto, Karina; Price, Karina J.; Nguyen, Quang T.; O'Brien, Frances G.; Grubb, Warren B.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The horizontal gene transfer facilitated by mobile genetic elements impacts almost all areas of bacterial evolution, including the accretion and dissemination of antimicrobial-resistance genes in the human and animal pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Genome surveys of staphylococcal plasmids have revealed an unexpected paucity of conjugation and mobilization loci, perhaps suggesting that conjugation plays only a minor role in the evolution of this genus. In this letter we present the DNA sequences of historically documented staphylococcal conjugative plasmids and highlight that at least 3 distinct and widely distributed families of conjugative plasmids currently contribute to the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus. We also review the recently documented “relaxase-in trans” mechanism of conjugative mobilization facilitated by conjugative plasmids pWBG749 and pSK41, and discuss how this may facilitate the horizontal transmission of around 90% of plasmids that were previously considered non-mobilizable. Finally, we enumerate unique sequenced S. aureus plasmids with a potential mechanism of mobilization and predict that at least 80% of all non-conjugative S. aureus plasmids are mobilizable by at least one mechanism. We suggest that a greater research focus on the molecular biology of conjugation is essential if we are to recognize gene-transfer mechanisms from our increasingly in silico analyses. PMID:27583185

  4. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    He, Susu; Chandler, Michael; Varani, Alessandro M.; Hickman, Alison B.; Dekker, John P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content) of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance. PMID:27923922

  5. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, Yijing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  6. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-06-23

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis.

  7. Dynamic protein conformations preferentially drive energy transfer along the active chain of the photosystem II reaction centre

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Zhang, Houdao; Yue, Alexander; Yan, YiJing; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    One longstanding puzzle concerning photosystem II, a core component of photosynthesis, is that only one of the two symmetric branches in its reaction centre is active in electron transfer. To investigate the effect of the photosystem II environment on the preferential selection of the energy transfer pathway (a prerequisite for electron transfer), we have constructed an exciton model via extensive molecular dynamics simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations based on a recent X-ray structure. Our results suggest that it is essential to take into account an ensemble of protein conformations to accurately compute the site energies. We identify the cofactor CLA606 of active chain as the most probable site for the energy excitation. We further pinpoint a number of charged protein residues that collectively lower the CLA606 site energy. Our work provides insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms of the core machinery of the green-plant photosynthesis. PMID:24954746

  8. Detection and Characterization of Conjugative Degradative Plasmids in Xenobiotic-Degrading Sphingomonas Strains

    PubMed Central

    Basta, Tamara; Keck, Andreas; Klein, Joachim; Stolz, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    A systematic survey for the presence of plasmids in 17 different xenobiotic-degrading Sphingomonas strains was performed. In almost all analyzed strains, two to five plasmids with sizes of about 50 to 500 kb were detected by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A comparison of plasmid preparations untreated or treated with S1 nuclease suggested that, in general, Sphingomonas plasmids are circular. Hybridization experiments with labeled gene probes suggested that large plasmids are involved in the degradation of dibenzo-p-dioxin, dibenzofuran, and naphthalenesulfonates in S. wittichii RW1, Sphingomonas sp. HH69, and S. xenophaga BN6, respectively. The plasmids which are responsible for the degradation of naphthalene, biphenyl, and toluene by S. aromaticivorans F199 (pNL1) and of naphthalenesulfonates by S. xenophaga BN6 (pBN6) were site-specifically labeled with a kanamycin resistance cassette. The conjugative transfer of these labeled plasmids was attempted with various bacterial strains as putative recipient strains. Thus, a conjugative transfer of plasmid pBN6 from S. xenophaga BN6 to a cured mutant of strain BN6 and to Sphingomonas sp. SS3 was observed. The conjugation experiments with plasmid pNL1 suggested a broader host range of this plasmid, because it was transferred without any obvious structural changes to S. yanoikuyae B1, Sphingomonas sp. SS3, and S. herbicidovorans. In contrast, major plasmid rearrangements were observed in the transconjugants after the transfer of plasmid pNL1 to Sphingomonas sp. HH69 and of pBN6 to Sphingomonas sp. SS3. No indications for the transfer of a Sphingomonas plasmid to bacteria outside of the Sphingomonadaceae were obtained. PMID:15175300

  9. Detection and characterization of conjugative degradative plasmids in xenobiotic-degrading Sphingomonas strains.

    PubMed

    Basta, Tamara; Keck, Andreas; Klein, Joachim; Stolz, Andreas

    2004-06-01

    A systematic survey for the presence of plasmids in 17 different xenobiotic-degrading Sphingomonas strains was performed. In almost all analyzed strains, two to five plasmids with sizes of about 50 to 500 kb were detected by using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A comparison of plasmid preparations untreated or treated with S1 nuclease suggested that, in general, Sphingomonas plasmids are circular. Hybridization experiments with labeled gene probes suggested that large plasmids are involved in the degradation of dibenzo-p-dioxin, dibenzofuran, and naphthalenesulfonates in S. wittichii RW1, Sphingomonas sp. HH69, and S. xenophaga BN6, respectively. The plasmids which are responsible for the degradation of naphthalene, biphenyl, and toluene by S. aromaticivorans F199 (pNL1) and of naphthalenesulfonates by S. xenophaga BN6 (pBN6) were site-specifically labeled with a kanamycin resistance cassette. The conjugative transfer of these labeled plasmids was attempted with various bacterial strains as putative recipient strains. Thus, a conjugative transfer of plasmid pBN6 from S. xenophaga BN6 to a cured mutant of strain BN6 and to Sphingomonas sp. SS3 was observed. The conjugation experiments with plasmid pNL1 suggested a broader host range of this plasmid, because it was transferred without any obvious structural changes to S. yanoikuyae B1, Sphingomonas sp. SS3, and S. herbicidovorans. In contrast, major plasmid rearrangements were observed in the transconjugants after the transfer of plasmid pNL1 to Sphingomonas sp. HH69 and of pBN6 to Sphingomonas sp. SS3. No indications for the transfer of a Sphingomonas plasmid to bacteria outside of the Sphingomonadaceae were obtained.

  10. Horizontal transfer and gene conversion as an important driving force in shaping the landscape of mitochondrial introns.

    PubMed

    Wu, Baojun; Hao, Weilong

    2014-04-16

    Group I introns are highly dynamic and mobile, featuring extensive presence-absence variation and widespread horizontal transfer. Group I introns can invade intron-lacking alleles via intron homing powered by their own encoded homing endonuclease gene (HEG) after horizontal transfer or via reverse splicing through an RNA intermediate. After successful invasion, the intron and HEG are subject to degeneration and sequential loss. It remains unclear whether these mechanisms can fully address the high dynamics and mobility of group I introns. Here, we found that HEGs undergo a fast gain-and-loss turnover comparable with introns in the yeast mitochondrial 21S-rRNA gene, which is unexpected, as the intron and HEG are generally believed to move together as a unit. We further observed extensively mosaic sequences in both the introns and HEGs, and evidence of gene conversion between HEG-containing and HEG-lacking introns. Our findings suggest horizontal transfer and gene conversion can accelerate HEG/intron degeneration and loss, or rescue and propagate HEG/introns, and ultimately result in high HEG/intron turnover rate. Given that up to 25% of the yeast mitochondrial genome is composed of introns and most mitochondrial introns are group I introns, horizontal transfer and gene conversion could have served as an important mechanism in introducing mitochondrial intron diversity, promoting intron mobility and consequently shaping mitochondrial genome architecture.

  11. Small RNA-based feedforward loop with AND-gate logic regulates extrachromosomal DNA transfer in Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Espinosa, Elena; Casadesús, Josep; Vogel, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer via plasmid conjugation is a major driving force in microbial evolution but constitutes a complex process that requires synchronization with the physiological state of the host bacteria. Although several host transcription factors are known to regulate plasmid-borne transfer genes, RNA-based regulatory circuits for host–plasmid communication remain unknown. We describe a posttranscriptional mechanism whereby the Hfq-dependent small RNA, RprA, inhibits transfer of pSLT, the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica. RprA employs two separate seed-pairing domains to activate the mRNAs of both the sigma-factor σS and the RicI protein, a previously uncharacterized membrane protein here shown to inhibit conjugation. Transcription of ricI requires σS and, together, RprA and σS orchestrate a coherent feedforward loop with AND-gate logic to tightly control the activation of RicI synthesis. RicI interacts with the conjugation apparatus protein TraV and limits plasmid transfer under membrane-damaging conditions. To our knowledge, this study reports the first small RNA-controlled feedforward loop relying on posttranscriptional activation of two independent targets and an unexpected role of the conserved RprA small RNA in controlling extrachromosomal DNA transfer. PMID:26307765

  12. Proposed model for the high rate of rearrangement and rapid migration observed in some IncA/C plasmid lineages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IncA/C plasmids are a class of plasmids from Enterobacteraciae that are relatively large (49 to >180 kbp), are readily transferred by conjugation, and carry multiple antimicrobial resistance genes. Reconstruction of the phylogeny of these plasmids has been difficult because of the high rate of remo...

  13. blaCMY-2-positive IncA/C plasmids from Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are a distinct component of a larger lineage of plasmids.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas R; Singer, Randall S; Meng, Da; Broschat, Shira L; Orfe, Lisa H; Anderson, Janet M; Herndon, David R; Kappmeyer, Lowell S; Daniels, Joshua B; Besser, Thomas E

    2010-02-01

    Large multidrug resistance plasmids of the A/C incompatibility complex (IncA/C) have been found in a diverse group of Gram-negative commensal and pathogenic bacteria. We present three completed sequences from IncA/C plasmids that originated from Escherichia coli (cattle) and Salmonella enterica serovar Newport (human) and that carry the cephamycinase gene blaCMY-2. These large plasmids (148 to 166 kbp) share extensive sequence identity and synteny. The most divergent plasmid, peH4H, has lost several conjugation-related genes and has gained a kanamycin resistance region. Two of the plasmids (pAM04528 and peH4H) harbor two copies of blaCMY-2, while the third plasmid (pAR060302) harbors a single copy of the gene. The majority of single-nucleotide polymorphisms comprise nonsynonymous mutations in floR. A comparative analysis of these plasmids with five other published IncA/C plasmids showed that the blaCMY-2 plasmids from E. coli and S. enterica are genetically distinct from those originating from Yersinia pestis and Photobacterium damselae and distal to one originating from Yersinia ruckeri. While the overall similarity of these plasmids supports the likelihood of recent movements among E. coli and S. enterica hosts, their greater divergence from Y. pestis or Y. ruckeri suggests less recent plasmid transfer among these pathogen groups.

  14. Complementation of Conjugation Functions of Streptomyces lividans Plasmid pIJ101 by the Related Streptomyces Plasmid pSB24.2

    PubMed Central

    Pettis, Gregg S.; Prakash, Shubha

    1999-01-01

    A database search revealed extensive sequence similarity between Streptomyces lividans plasmid pIJ101 and Streptomyces plasmid pSB24.2, which is a deletion derivative of Streptomyces cyanogenus plasmid pSB24.1. The high degree of relatedness between the two plasmids allowed the construction of a genetic map of pSB24.2, consisting of putative transfer and replication loci. Two pSB24.2 loci, namely, the cis-acting locus for transfer (clt) and the transfer-associated korB gene, were shown to be capable of complementing the pIJ101 clt and korB functions, respectively, a result that is consistent with the notion that pIJ101 and the parental plasmid pSB24.1 encode highly similar, if not identical, conjugation systems. PMID:10419972

  15. Single molecule sequencing to track plasmid diversity of hospital-associated carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, Sean; Thomas, Pamela J.; Deming, Clayton; Park, Morgan; Lau, Anna F.; Dekker, John P.; Snitkin, Evan S.; Clark, Tyson A.; Luong, Khai; Song, Yi; Tsai, Yu-Chih; Boitano, Matthew; Gupta, Jyoti; Brooks, Shelise Y.; Schmidt, Brian; Young, Alice C.; Thomas, James W.; Bouffard, Gerard G.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Mullikin, James C.; Korlach, Jonas; Henderson, David K.; Frank, Karen M.; Palmore, Tara N.; Segre, Julia A.

    2014-01-01

    Public health officials have raised concerns that plasmid transfer between Enterobacteriaceae species may spread resistance to carbapenems, an antibiotic class of last resort, thereby rendering common healthcare-associated infections nearly impossible to treat. We performed comprehensive surveillance and genomic sequencing to identify carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the NIH Clinical Center patient population and hospital environment in order to to articulate the diversity of carbapenemase-encoding plasmids and survey the mobility of and assess the mobility of these plasmids between bacterial species. We isolated a repertoire of carbapenemase-encoding Enterobacteriaceae, including multiple strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Klebsiella oxytoca, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Pantoea species. Long-read genome sequencing with full end-to-end assembly revealed that these organisms carry the carbapenem-resistance genes on a wide array of plasmids. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae isolated simultaneously from a single patient harbored two different carbapenemase-encoding plasmids, overriding the epidemiological scenario of plasmid transfer between organisms within this patient. We did, however, find evidence supporting horizontal transfer of carbapenemase-encoding plasmids between Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Citrobacter freundii in the hospital environment. Our comprehensive sequence data, with full plasmid identification, challenges assumptions about horizontal gene transfer events within patients and identified wider possible connections between patients and the hospital environment. In addition, we identified a new carbapenemase-encoding plasmid of potentially high clinical impact carried by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae and Pantoea species, from unrelated patients and the hospital environment. PMID:25232178

  16. Driving forces for metamorphic vein filling during bauxite dehydration: insights from Li and Al transfer illustrated by LIBS compositional profiles (Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlaguet, Anne; Brunet, Fabrice; Goffé, Bruno; Menut, Denis; Findling, Nathaniel; Poinssot, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    In subduction zones, the significant amounts of aqueous fluid released in the course of the successive dehydration reactions occurring during prograde metamorphism are expected to strongly influence the rock rheology, as well as kinetics of metamorphic reactions and mass transfer efficiency. Mineralized veins, ubiquitous in metamorphic rocks, can be seen as preserved witnesses of fluid and mass redistribution that partly accommodate the rock deformation (lateral segregation). However, the driving forces and mechanisms of mass transfer towards fluid-filled open spaces remain somewhat unclear. The aim of this study is to investigate the vein-forming processes and the modalities of mass transfer during local fluid-rock interactions, and their links with fluid production and rock deformation, with new insights from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) profiles. This study focuses on karstic pockets (metre scale) of Triassic metabauxites embedded in thick carbonate units, that have been isolated from large-scale fluid flow during HP-LT Alpine metamorphism (W. Vanoise, French Alps). These rocks display several generations of metamorphic veins containing various Al-bearing minerals, which give particular insights into mass transfer processes. It is proposed that the internally-derived fluid (~13 vol% produced by successive dehydration reactions) has promoted the opening of fluid-filled open spaces (euhedral habits of vein minerals) and served as medium for diffusive mass transfer from rock to vein. Based on mineralogical and textural features, two vein types can be distinguished: (1) some veins are filled with newly formed products of either prograde (chloritoid) or retrograde (chlorite) metamorphic reactions; in this case, fluid-filled open spaces seem to offer energetically favourable nucleation/growth sites; (2) the second vein type is filled with cookeite (Li-Al-rich chlorite) or pyrophyllite, which were present in the host-rock prior to the vein formation. In

  17. Plasmid incidence in bacteria from deep subsurface sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, J.K.; Hicks, R.J.; Li, S.W.; Brockman, F.J. )

    1988-12-01

    Bacteria were isolated from deep terrestrial subsurface sediments underlying the coastal plain of South Carolina. A total of 163 isolates from deep sediments, surface soil, and return drill muds were examined for plasmid DNA content and resistance to the antibiotics penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin, and tetracycline. MICs of Cu{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, and Hg{sup 2+} for each isolate were also determined. The overall frequency of plasmid occurrence in the subsurface bacteria was 33%. Resistance was most frequent to penicillin (70% of all isolates), ampicillin (49%), and carbenicillin (32%) and was concluded to be related to the concentrations of the individual antibiotics in the disks used for assaying resistance and to the production of low levels of {beta}-lactamase. The frequencies of resistance to penicillin and ampicillin were significantly greater for isolates bearing plasmids than for plasmidless isolates; however, resistance was not transferable to penicillin-sensitive Escherichia coli. Hybridization of subsurface bacterial plasmids and chromosomal DNA with a whole-TOL-plasmid (pWWO) probe revealed some homology of subsurface bacterial plasmid and chromosomal DNAs, indicating a potential for those bacterial to harbor catabolic genes on plasmids or chromosomes. The incidences of antibiotic resistance and MICs of metals for subsurface bacteria were significantly different from those drill mud bacteria, ruling out the possibility that bacteria from sediments were derived from drill muds.

  18. Tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels as local reservoirs for plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    San Juan, Aurélie; Ducrocq, Grégory; Hlawaty, Hanna; Bataille, Isabelle; Guénin, Erwann; Letourneur, Didier; Feldman, Laurent J

    2007-12-01

    In the present study, we measured the ability of various cationized pullulan tubular hydrogels to retain plasmid DNA, and tested the ability of retained plasmid DNA to transfect vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Cationized pullulans were obtained by grafting at different charge densities ethylamine (EA) or diethylaminoethylamine (DEAE) on the pullulan backbone. Polymers were characterized by elemental analysis, acid-base titration, size exclusion chromatography, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The complexation of cationized pullulans in solution with plasmid DNA was evidenced by fluorescence quenching with PicoGreen. Cationized pullulans were then chemically crosslinked with phosphorus oxychloride to obtain tubular cationized pullulan hydrogels. Native pullulan tubes did not retain loaded plasmid DNA. In contrast, the ability of cationized pullulan tubes to retain plasmid DNA was dependent on both the amine content and the type of amine. The functional integrity of plasmid DNA in cationized pullulan tubes was demonstrated by in vitro transfection of VSMCs. Hence, cationized pullulan hydrogels can be designed as tubular structures with high affinity for plasmid DNA, which may provide new biomaterials to enhance the efficiency of local arterial gene transfer strategies.

  19. Comparison between plasmids of Salmonella and other enterobacteria isolated from the same patients.

    PubMed

    Palomares, J C; Perea, E J

    1982-01-01

    The ecology of R plasmids was studied in the intestinal flora of 19 patients with salmonellosis without antibiotic treatment. The plasmids found in the Salmonella strains and the accompanying non-pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae were characterized in each patient. We determined the transferability by conjugation, the fi character and the incompatibility group and did enzyme restriction analysis of these plasmids. The results obtained showed that S. typhimurium is the species of this genus with the highest incidence of R plasmids, and Escherichia coli among the non-pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae. The plasmids found in Salmonella are different from the plasmids found in the other Enterobacteriaceae in fi character (50% fi+ in Salmonella and 5% in the other Enterobacteriaceae) and incompatibility group (33% belong to the FII group in Salmonella plasmids and none on the other Enterobacteriaceae), thereby expressing a different origin.

  20. Comparative genomics of the IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid family.

    PubMed

    Fricke, W Florian; Welch, Timothy J; McDermott, Patrick F; Mammel, Mark K; LeClerc, J Eugene; White, David G; Cebula, Thomas A; Ravel, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) plasmids belonging to the IncA/C plasmid family are widely distributed among Salmonella and other enterobacterial isolates from agricultural sources and have, at least once, also been identified in a drug-resistant Yersinia pestis isolate (IP275) from Madagascar. Here, we present the complete plasmid sequences of the IncA/C reference plasmid pRA1 (143,963 bp), isolated in 1971 from the fish pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila, and of the cryptic IncA/C plasmid pRAx (49,763 bp), isolated from Escherichia coli transconjugant D7-3, which was obtained through pRA1 transfer in 1980. Using comparative sequence analysis of pRA1 and pRAx with recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family, we show that both plasmids provide novel insights into the evolution of the IncA/C MDR plasmid family and the minimal machinery necessary for stable IncA/C plasmid maintenance. Our results indicate that recent members of the IncA/C plasmid family evolved from a common ancestor, similar in composition to pRA1, through stepwise integration of horizontally acquired resistance gene arrays into a conserved plasmid backbone. Phylogenetic comparisons predict type IV secretion-like conjugative transfer operons encoded on the shared plasmid backbones to be closely related to a group of integrating conjugative elements, which use conjugative transfer for horizontal propagation but stably integrate into the host chromosome during vegetative growth. A hipAB toxin-antitoxin gene cluster found on pRA1, which in Escherichia coli is involved in the formation of persister cell subpopulations, suggests persistence as an early broad-spectrum antimicrobial resistance mechanism in the evolution of IncA/C resistance plasmids.

  1. High Emigration Propensity and Low Mortality on Transfer Drives Female-Biased Dispersal of Pyriglena leucoptera in Fragmented Landscapes

    PubMed Central

    Awade, Marcelo; Candia-Gallardo, Carlos; Cornelius, Cintia; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Dispersal is a biological process performed in three stages: emigration, transfer and immigration. Intra-specific variation on dispersal behavior, such as sex-bias, is very common in nature, particularly in birds and mammals. However, dispersal is difficult to measure in the field and many hypotheses concerning the causes of sex-biased dispersal remain without empirical confirmation. An important limitation of most empirical studies is that inferences about sex-biased dispersal are based only on emigration proneness or immigration success data. Thus, we still do not know whether sex-biased immigration in fragmented landscapes occurs during emigration, transfer or in both stages. We conducted translocation and radiotracking experiments to assess i) whether inter-patch dispersal movements of a rainforest bird (Pyriglena leucoptera) is sex-biased and ii) how dispersal stages and the perceptual range of the individuals are integrated to generate dispersal patterns. Our results showed that inter-patch dispersal is sex-biased at all stages for P. leucoptera, as females not only exhibit a higher emigration propensity but are subjected to a lower risk of predation when moving through the matrix. Moreover, our data support a perceptual range of 80 m and our results showed that dispersal success decreases considerably when inter-patch distances exceeds this perceptual range. In this case, birds have a higher probability of travelling over longer routes and, as a consequence, the risk of predation increases, specially for males. Overall, results supported that assuming dispersal as a single-stage process to describe dispersal behavior may be misleading. In this way, our study advanced our understanding of processes and patterns related to inter-patch dispersal of neotropical forest birds, shedding light on potential implications for population dynamics and for the management of fragmented landscapes. PMID:28107517

  2. Characterization of plasmids that encode streptomycin-resistance in bacterial epiphytes of apple.

    PubMed

    Huang, T C; Burr, T J

    1999-05-01

    Streptomycin resistance in strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, Pantoea agglomerans and a yellow-pigmented, non-fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. (Py), isolated from apple orchards in New York and Washington states, is predominantly associated with strA-strB genes carried on conjugal plasmids (R plasmids). None of 128 resistant Erwinia amylovora strains from the eastern and western USA hybridized with a strA-strB probe, SMP3. Resistant Py strains transfered R plasmids to Ps. syringae pv. papulans and to Py in vitro at frequencies of 10(-1)-10(-2) per recipient cell whereas Ps. syringae pv. papulans transferred its plasmids at frequencies of 10(-2) to below detectable levels. Transfer of R plasmids to P. agglomerans was not detected and resistant P. agglomerans did not transfer their R plasmids to any recipients. R plasmids were found to be highly diverse as measured by DNA fingerprint analysis. Transfer-deficient transposon mutants of R plasmid pCPP519 were generated, and 3.9 kb EcoRI and 3.0 kb SmaI fragments that hybridized with a Tn5 probe were cloned and sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences of the 3.9 kb fragment were similar to proteins involved in replication, nicking at oriT, and piliation in other bacteria.

  3. The A to Z of A/C plasmids.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hall, Ruth M

    2015-07-01

    Plasmids belonging to incompatibility groups A and C (now A/C) were among the earliest to be associated with antibiotic resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. A/C plasmids are large, conjugative plasmids with a broad host range. The prevalence of A/C plasmids in collections of clinical isolates has revealed their importance in the dissemination of extended-spectrum β-lactamases and carbapenemases. They also mobilize SGI1-type resistance islands. Revived interest in the family has yielded many complete A/C plasmid sequences, revealing that RA1, designated A/C1, is different from the remainder, designated A/C2. There are two distinct A/C2 lineages. Backbones of 128-130 kb include over 120 genes or ORFs encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids, but very few have been characterized. Genes potentially required for replication, stability and transfer have been identified, but only the replication system of RA1 and the regulation of transfer have been studied. There is enormous variety in the antibiotic resistance genes carried by A/C2 plasmids but they are usually clustered in larger regions at various locations in the backbone. The ARI-A and ARI-B resistance islands are always at a specific location but have variable content. ARI-A is only found in type 1 A/C2 plasmids, which disseminate blaCMY-2 and blaNDM-1 genes, whereas ARI-B, carrying the sul2 gene, is found in both type 1 and type 2. This review summarizes current knowledge of A/C plasmids, and highlights areas of research to be considered in the future.

  4. Cloning in Streptococcus lactis of plasmid-mediated UV resistance and effect on prophage stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chopin, M.C.; Chopin, A.; Rouault, A.; Simon, D.

    1986-02-01

    Plasmid pIL7 (33 kilobases) from Streptococcus lactis enhances UV resistance and prophage stability. A 5.4-kilobase pIL7 fragment carrying genes coding for both characters was cloned into S. lactis, using plasmid pHV1301 as the cloning vector. The recombinant plasmid was subsequently transferred to three other S. lactis strains by transformation or protoplast fusion. Cloned genes were expressed in all tested strains.

  5. Quantifying the Growth of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in Polar-Direct-Drive Implosions at the Omega Laser and National Ignition Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion requires multiple overlapping laser beams that can drive the cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) instability. This instability is of primary concern because it can reduce the laser energy coupling and can affect the symmetry in a polar-direct-drive (PDD) configuration. An experiment was designed to determine the CBET growth by measuring the angularly resolved mass ablation rate and ablation-front trajectory in a PDD configuration. Adding a thin layer of Si over a CH shell generates two peaks in x-ray self-emission images that are measured with a time-resolved pinhole imager. The inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak is used to measure the time for the laser to burn through the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material. The mass ablation rate was measured by varying the thickness of the outer silicon layer. The shell trajectory and mass ablation rate measured in PDD on the pole, where CBET has little effect, were compared with simulations to validate the electron thermal-transport model. Excellent agreement was obtained when using a 2-D nonlocal transport model, and these observables could not be reproduced with flux-limited models. A similar comparison was performed on the equator where the CBET growth is large. Without the CBET model, the shell velocity and mass ablation rate were significantly overestimated by the simulation. Adding the CBET model reduced the drive on the equator and reproduced the experimental results. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. In collaboration with, D. Cao, D. T. Michel, M. Hohenberger, R. Epstein, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, I. V. Igumenshchev, J. A. Marozas, D. D. Meyerhofer, P. B. Radha, S. P. Regan, T. C

  6. Plasmid-Chromosome Recombination of Irradiated Shuttle Vector DNA in African Green Monkey Kidney Cells.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudgett, John Stuart

    1987-09-01

    An autonomously replicating shuttle vector was used to investigate the enhancement of plasmid-chromosome recombination in mammalian host cells by ultraviolet light and gamma radiation. Sequences homologous to the shuttle vector were stably inserted into the genome of African Green Monkey kidney cells to act as the target substrate for these recombination events. The SV40- and pBR322-derived plasmid DNA was irradiated with various doses of radiation before transfection into the transformed mammalian host cells. The successful homologous transfer of the bacterial ampicillin resistance (amp^{rm r}) gene from the inserted sequences to replace a mutant amp^->=ne on the shuttle vector was identified by plasmid extraction and transformation into E. coli host cells. Ultraviolet light (UV) was found not to induce homologous plasmid-chromosome recombination, while gamma radiation increased the frequency of recombinant plasmids detected. The introduction of specific double -strand breaks in the plasmid or prolonging the time of plasmid residence in the mammalian host cells also enhanced plasmid-chromosome recombination. In contrast, plasmid mutagenesis was found to be increased by plasmid UV irradiation, but not to change with time. Plasmid survival, recombination, and mutagenesis were not affected by treating the mammalian host cells with UV light prior to plasmid transfection. The amp^{rm r} recombinant plasmid molecules analyzed were found to be mostly the result of nonconservative exchanges which appeared to involve both homologous and possibly nonhomologous interactions with the host chromosome. The observation that these recombinant structures were obtained from all of the plasmid alterations investigated suggests a common mechanistic origin for plasmid -chromosome recombination in these mammalian cells.

  7. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  8. Mechanisms of Theta Plasmid Replication.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating pieces of DNA. This article discusses theta plasmid replication, which is a class of circular plasmid replication that includes ColE1-like origins of replication popular with expression vectors. All modalities of theta plasmid replication initiate synthesis with the leading strand at a predetermined site and complete replication through recruitment of the host's replisome, which extends the leading strand continuously while synthesizing the lagging strand discontinuously. There are clear differences between different modalities of theta plasmid replication in mechanisms of DNA duplex melting and in priming of leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. In some replicons duplex melting depends on transcription, while other replicons rely on plasmid-encoded trans-acting proteins (Reps); primers for leading-strand synthesis can be generated through processing of a transcript or in other replicons by the action of host- or plasmid-encoded primases. None of these processes require DNA breaks. The frequency of replication initiation is tightly regulated to facilitate establishment in permissive hosts and to achieve a steady state. The last section of the article reviews how plasmid copy number is sensed and how this feedback modulates the frequency of replication.

  9. Quantification of plasmid DNA copies in the nucleus after lipoplex and polyplex transfection.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Richard N; van der Aa, Marieke A E M; Macaraeg, Nichole; Lee, Ai Ping; Szoka, Francis C

    2009-04-17

    Nuclear uptake of plasmid DNA is one of the many cellular barriers that limit the efficiency of non-viral gene delivery systems. We have determined the number of plasmids that reach the nucleus of a transfected cell using an internally standardized quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay. We isolated nuclei using two different protocols: a density gradient technique and a detergent-based method. The density gradient procedure yielded nuclei with substantially less adhering plasmids on the outside of the nuclei. Using the density gradient protocol we determined that cells transfected with Lipofectamine lipoplexes or polyethylenimine polyplexes contained between 75 and 50,000 plasmids/nucleus, depending on the applied plasmid dose. Any increase above 3000 plasmids/nucleus resulted in only marginal increases in transgene expression. Furthermore, lipoplex-delivered plasmids were more efficiently expressed, on the basis of protein expression per plasmid number in the nucleus, than polyplex-delivered plasmids. This indicates that polymer may remain bound to some plasmids in the nucleus. Lastly, by sorting transfected cells into high- and low-expressing sub-populations, we observe that a sub-population of cells contain 3x greater plasmids/nucleus but express nearly 100x more transgene than other cells within a single transfection reaction. Taken together these results suggest the importance of considering the processes downstream from nuclear entry for strategies to improve the efficiency of gene transfer reagents.

  10. Dynamics of the IncW genetic backbone imply general trends in conjugative plasmid evolution.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Raúl; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Revilla, Carlos; Lázaro, Miguel; Vielva, Luis; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2006-11-01

    Plasmids cannot be understood as mere tools for genetic exchange: they are themselves subject to the forces of evolution. Their genomic and phylogenetic features have been less studied in this respect. Focusing on the IncW incompatibility group, which includes the smallest known conjugative plasmids, we attempt to unveil some common trends in plasmid evolution. The functional modules of IncW genetic backbone are described, with emphasis on their architecture and relationships to other plasmid groups. Some plasmid regions exhibit strong phylogenetic mosaicism, in striking contrast to others of unusual synteny conservation. The presence of genes of unknown function that are widely distributed in plasmid genomes is also emphasized, exposing the existence of ill-defined yet conserved plasmid functions. Conjugation is an essential hallmark of IncW plasmid biology and special attention is given to the organization and evolution of its transfer modules. Genetic exchange between plasmids and their hosts is analysed by following the evolution of the type IV secretion system. Adaptation of the trw conjugative machinery to pathogenicity functions in Bartonella is discussed as an example of how plasmids can change their host modus vivendi. Starting from the phage paradigm, our analysis articulates novel concepts that apply to plasmid evolution.

  11. Plasmid acquisition in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juergensmeyer, Margaret A.; Juergensmeyer, Elizabeth A.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    In microgravity, bacteria often show an increased resistance to antibiotics. Bacteria can develop resistance to an antibiotic after transformation, the acquisition of DNA, usually in the form of a plasmid containing a gene for resistance to one or more antibiotics. In order to study the capacity of bacteria to become resistant to antibiotics in microgravity, we have modified the standard protocol for transformation of Escherichia coli for use in the NASA-flight-certified hardware package, The Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). Here we report on the ability of E. coli to remain competent for long periods of time at temperatures that are readily available on the Space Shuttle, and present some preliminary flight results.

  12. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans.

  13. Plasmid Classification in an Era of Whole-Genome Sequencing: Application in Studies of Antibiotic Resistance Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Orlek, Alex; Stoesser, Nicole; Anjum, Muna F; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew J; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Woodford, Neil; Walker, A Sarah; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E

    2017-01-01

    Plasmids are extra-chromosomal genetic elements ubiquitous in bacteria, and commonly transmissible between host cells. Their genomes include variable repertoires of 'accessory genes,' such as antibiotic resistance genes, as well as 'backbone' loci which are largely conserved within plasmid families, and often involved in key plasmid-specific functions (e.g., replication, stable inheritance, mobility). Classifying plasmids into different types according to their phylogenetic relatedness provides insight into the epidemiology of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. Current typing schemes exploit backbone loci associated with replication (replicon typing), or plasmid mobility (MOB typing). Conventional PCR-based methods for plasmid typing remain widely used. With the emergence of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), large datasets can be analyzed using in silico plasmid typing methods. However, short reads from popular high-throughput sequencers can be challenging to assemble, so complete plasmid sequences may not be accurately reconstructed. Therefore, localizing resistance genes to specific plasmids may be difficult, limiting epidemiological insight. Long-read sequencing will become increasingly popular as costs decline, especially when resolving accurate plasmid structures is the primary goal. This review discusses the application of plasmid classification in WGS-based studies of antibiotic resistance epidemiology; novel in silico plasmid analysis tools are highlighted. Due to the diverse and plastic nature of plasmid genomes, current typing schemes do not classify all plasmids, and identifying conserved, phylogenetically concordant genes for subtyping and phylogenetics is challenging. Analyzing plasmids as nodes in a network that represents gene-sharing relationships between plasmids provides a complementary way to assess plasmid diversity, and allows inferences about horizontal gene transfer to be made.

  14. Plasmid Classification in an Era of Whole-Genome Sequencing: Application in Studies of Antibiotic Resistance Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Orlek, Alex; Stoesser, Nicole; Anjum, Muna F.; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew J.; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Woodford, Neil; Walker, A. Sarah; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E.

    2017-01-01

    Plasmids are extra-chromosomal genetic elements ubiquitous in bacteria, and commonly transmissible between host cells. Their genomes include variable repertoires of ‘accessory genes,’ such as antibiotic resistance genes, as well as ‘backbone’ loci which are largely conserved within plasmid families, and often involved in key plasmid-specific functions (e.g., replication, stable inheritance, mobility). Classifying plasmids into different types according to their phylogenetic relatedness provides insight into the epidemiology of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. Current typing schemes exploit backbone loci associated with replication (replicon typing), or plasmid mobility (MOB typing). Conventional PCR-based methods for plasmid typing remain widely used. With the emergence of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), large datasets can be analyzed using in silico plasmid typing methods. However, short reads from popular high-throughput sequencers can be challenging to assemble, so complete plasmid sequences may not be accurately reconstructed. Therefore, localizing resistance genes to specific plasmids may be difficult, limiting epidemiological insight. Long-read sequencing will become increasingly popular as costs decline, especially when resolving accurate plasmid structures is the primary goal. This review discusses the application of plasmid classification in WGS-based studies of antibiotic resistance epidemiology; novel in silico plasmid analysis tools are highlighted. Due to the diverse and plastic nature of plasmid genomes, current typing schemes do not classify all plasmids, and identifying conserved, phylogenetically concordant genes for subtyping and phylogenetics is challenging. Analyzing plasmids as nodes in a network that represents gene-sharing relationships between plasmids provides a complementary way to assess plasmid diversity, and allows inferences about horizontal gene transfer to be made. PMID:28232822

  15. Effect of Plasmid pIJ1008 from Rhizobium leguminosarum on Symbiotic Function of Rhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, E J; Brewin, N J; Phillips, D A

    1984-04-01

    Plasmid pIJ1008, which carries determinants for uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity, was transferred from Rhizobium leguminosarum to Rhizobium meliloti without impairing the capacity of the latter species to form root nodules on alfalfa. The plasmid was still present in rhizobia reisolated from the root nodules of 12 different alfalfa cultivars, but only low levels of Hup activity were detected in alfalfa.

  16. Application of a plasmid classification system to determine prevalence of replicon families among multidrug resistant enterococci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence and transfer of plasmids from commensal bacteria to more pathogenic bacteria may contribute to dissemination of antimicrobial resistance. However, prevalence of plasmids from commensal bacteria in food animals such as the enterococci remains largely unknown. In this study, the prevale...

  17. Pocket-size solid-state iPOD and flash drives for gigabyte storage, display and transfer of digital medical images: Review and work initiated.

    PubMed

    Sankaran, A

    2009-07-01

    A locally assembled image viewer system with pocket-size iPOD (80 GB) and flash (2 GB) drives for gigabyte storage, display and transfer of digital medical images, oriented towards training purposes, is described. Both the iPOD and flash drive enable storage of thousands of images from diverse medical-imaging equipments. The iPOD, in addition, can display with sufficient resolution any of these images and serves as a transportable preview device. Through the use of a computer, these devices can access/ store/ display the images/ photos from a CD, digital camera or the internet. A TV image viewing unit is also provided. The operational features and the advantages of these devices are discussed in detail. The quality assurance (QA) of the displays has been successfully carried out with standard test patterns. The image quality has been tested with dynamic and static medical images. The system will be highly useful for storage and remote display of multitude of images from several modalities in the hospital, as well as other images, from the point of view of education and training. It has good potential for use in clinical diagnosis as well. Other recent advancements using iPHONE and improved but expensive computers, integrated with picture archiving and communication system (PACS) as well as radiology and hospital information system (RHIS) for versatile applications in modern radiology, are also highlighted.This system, assembled with indigenous equipments, is much less expensive and specially suited for teaching radiologists, physicists and technologists, particularly in developing countries.

  18. An in vivo assay for conjugation-mediated recombination yields novel results for Streptomyces plasmid pIJ101.

    PubMed

    Ducote, Matthew J; Pettis, Gregg S

    2006-05-01

    Efficient transmission of circular plasmids in Streptomyces spp. proceeds by an uncharacterized mechanism that requires a cis-acting locus of transfer (clt) and often only a single plasmid-encoded protein. For circular plasmids from other bacteria, site- and strand-specific nicking takes place at the cis-acting oriT locus via the plasmid-encoded relaxase protein prior to single-strand transfer. Using an assay originally designed to demonstrate that conjugative transfer of plasmids containing tandem oriT loci results in the formation of a single composite oriT locus, we show here that an analogous construct involving the pIJ101 clt locus apparently does not undergo such a conjugation-mediated event during plasmid transfer. Our results, which imply that streptomycete plasmids are transferred by a functionally distinct mechanism compared to oriT-containing plasmids, are complementary to other recent evidences that support a novel double-stranded model for streptomycete circular plasmid transfer.

  19. Transformation of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by electroporation, utilizing constructed shuttle plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sreenivasan, P K; LeBlanc, D J; Lee, L N; Fives-Taylor, P

    1991-01-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, has been strongly implicated in human periodontal disease. Advances in the molecular analysis of A. actinomycetemcomitans virulence factors have been limited due to the unavailability of systems for genetic transfer, transposon mutagenesis, and gene complementation. Slow progress can be traced almost exclusively to the lack of gene vector systems and methods for the introduction of DNA into A. actinomycetemcomitans. An electrotransformation system that allowed at least five strains of A. actinomycetemcomitans to be transformed with stable shuttle plasmids which efficiently replicated in both Escherichia coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans was developed. One plasmid, a potential shuttle vector designated pDL282, is 5.7 kb in size, has several unique restriction enzyme sites, and codes for resistance to spectinomycin and ampicillin. E. coli and A. actinomycetemcomitans were transformed with equal efficiencies of approximately 10(5) transformants per micrograms of DNA. Similar transformation efficiencies were obtained whether the plasmid DNA was isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans or E. coli. In addition, frozen competent cells of A. actinomycetemcomitans yielded comparable efficiencies of transformation. Restriction enzyme analysis of pDL282 isolated after transformation confirmed the presence of intact donor plasmids. A plasmid isolated from A. pleuropneumoniae was also capable of transforming some isolates of A. actinomycetemcomitans, although generally at a lower frequency. The availability of these shuttle plasmids and an efficient transformation procedure should significantly facilitate the molecular analysis of virulence factors of A. actinomycetemcomitans. PMID:1937823

  20. War Wound Treatment Complications Due to Transfer of an IncN Plasmid Harboring blaOXA-181 from Morganella morganii to CTX-M-27-Producing Sequence Type 131 Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Snesrud, Erik; Ong, Ana C.; Appalla, Lakshmi; Koren, Michael; Kwak, Yoon I.; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old male developed a recurrent sacral abscess associated with embedded shrapnel following a blast injury. Cultures grew extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing, carbapenem-susceptible Escherichia coli. Ertapenem was administered, but the infection recurred after each course of antibiotics. Initial surgical interventions were unsuccessful, and subsequent cultures yielded E. coli and Morganella morganii, both nonsusceptible to carbapenems. The isolates were Carba NP test negative, gave ambiguous results with the modified Hodge test, and amplified the blaOXA48-like gene by real-time PCR. All E. coli isolates were sequence type 131 (ST131), carried nine resistance genes (including blaCTX-M-27) on an IncF plasmid, and were identical by genome sequencing, except for 150 kb of plasmid DNA in carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates only. Sixty kilobases of this was shared by M. morganii and represented an IncN plasmid harboring blaOXA-181. In M. morganii, the gene was flanked by IS3000 and ISKpn19, but in all but one of the E. coli isolates containing blaOXA-181, a second copy of ISKpn19 had inserted adjacent to IS3000. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of blaOXA-181 in the virulent ST131 clonal group and carried by the promiscuous IncN family of plasmids. The tendency of M. morganii to have high MICs of imipenem, a blaOXA-181 substrate profile that includes penicillins but not extended-spectrum cephalosporins, and weak carbapenemase activity almost resulted in the presence of blaOXA-181 being overlooked. We highlight the importance of surveillance for carbapenem resistance in all species, even those with intrinsic resistances, and the value of advanced molecular techniques in detecting subtle genetic changes. PMID:25870058

  1. Previously undescribed plasmids recovered from activated sludge confer tetracycline resistance and phenotypic changes to Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyerim; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2014-02-01

    We used culture-dependent and culture-independent methods to extract previously undescribed plasmids harboring tetracycline (TC) resistance genes from activated sludge. The extracted plasmids were transformed into naturally competent Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1 to recover a non-Escherichia coli-based plasmid. The transformed cells showed 80-100-fold higher TC resistance than the wild-type strain. Restriction length polymorphism performed using 30 transformed cells showed four different types of plasmids. Illumina-based whole sequencing of the four plasmids identified three previously unreported plasmids and one previously reported plasmid. All plasmids carried TC resistance-related genes (tetL, tetH), tetracycline transcriptional regulators (tetR), and mobilization-related genes. As per expression analysis, TC resistance genes were functional in the presence of TC. The recovered plasmids showed mosaic gene acquisition through horizontal gene transfer. Membrane fluidity, hydrophobicity, biofilm formation, motility, growth rate, sensitivity to stresses, and quorum sensing signals of the transformed cells were different from those of the wild-type cells. Plasmid-bearing cells seemed to have an energy burden for maintaining and expressing plasmid genes. Our data showed that acquisition of TC resistance through plasmid uptake is related to loss of biological fitness. Thus, cells acquiring antibiotic resistance plasmids can survive in the presence of antibiotics, but must pay ecological costs.

  2. Thioredoxin-like proteins in F and other plasmid systems.

    PubMed

    Hemmis, Casey W; Schildbach, Joel F

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial conjugation is the process by which a conjugative plasmid transfers from donor to recipient bacterium. During this process, single-stranded plasmid DNA is actively and specifically transported from the cytoplasm of the donor, through a large membrane-spanning assembly known as the pore complex, and into the cytoplasm of the recipient. In Gram negative bacteria, construction of the pore requires localization of a subset of structural and catalytically active proteins to the bacterial periplasm. Unlike the cytoplasm, the periplasm contains proteins that promote disulfide bond formation within or between cysteine-containing proteins. To ensure proper protein folding and assembly, bacteria employ periplasmic redox systems for thiol oxidation, disulfide bond/sulfenic acid reduction, and disulfide bond isomerization. Recent data suggest that plasmid-based proteins belonging to the disulfide bond formation family play an integral role in the conjugative process by serving as mediators in folding and/or assembly of pore complex proteins. Here we report the identification of 165 thioredoxin-like family members across 89 different plasmid systems. Using phylogenetic analysis, all but nine family members were categorized into thioredoxin-like subfamilies. In addition, we discuss the diversity, conservation, and putative roles of thioredoxin-like proteins in plasmid systems, which include homologs of DsbA, DsbB, DsbC, DsbD, DsbG, and CcmG from Escherichia coli, TlpA from Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Com1 from Coxiella burnetii, as well as TrbB and TraF from plasmid F, and the absolute conservation of a disulfide isomerase in plasmids containing homologs of the transfer proteins TraH, TraN, and TraU.

  3. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  4. In vivo transmission of an IncA/C plasmid in Escherichia coli depends on tetracycline concentration, and acquisition of the plasmid results in a variable cost of fitness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    IncA/C plasmids are broad-host-range plasmids enabling multidrug resistance that have emerged worldwide among bacterial pathogens of humans and animals. While antibiotic usage is suspected to be a driving force in the emergence of such strains, few studies have examined the impact of different types...

  5. The broad-host-range plasmid pSFA231 isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment represents a new member of the PromA plasmid family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M.; Wang, Yafei; Brown, Celeste J.; Yao, Fei; Yang, Shan; Jiang, Yong; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    A self-transmissible broad-host-range (BHR) plasmid pSFA231 was isolated from petroleum-contaminated sediment in Shen-fu wastewater irrigation zone, China, using the triparental mating exogenous plasmid capture method. Based on its complete sequence the plasmid has a size of 41.5 kb and codes for 50 putative open reading frames (orfs), 29 of which represent genes involved in replication, partitioning and transfer functions of the plasmid. Phylogenetic analysis grouped pSFA231 into the newly defined PromA plasmid family, which currently includes five members. Further comparative genomic analysis shows that pSFA231 shares the common backbone regions with the other PromA plasmids, i.e., genes involved in replication, maintenance and control, and conjugative transfer. Nevertheless, phylogenetic divergence was found in specific gene products. We propose to divide the PromA group into two subgroups, PromA-α (pMRAD02, pSB102) and PromA-β (pMOL98, pIPO2T, pSFA231, pTer331), based on the splits network analysis of the RepA protein. Interestingly, a cluster of hypothetical orfs located between parA and traA of pSFA231 shows high similarity with the corresponding regions on pMOL98, pIPO2T, and pTer331, suggesting these hypothetical orfs may represent “essential” plasmid backbone genes for the PromA-β subgroup. Alternatively, they may also be accessory genes that were first acquired and then stayed as the plasmid diverged. Our study increases the available collection of complete genome sequences of BHR plasmids, and since pSFA231 is the only characterized PromA plasmid from China, our findings also enhance our understanding of the genetic diversity of this plasmid group in different parts of the world. PMID:25628616

  6. Combined IL-15 and IL-12 drives the generation of CD34(+)-derived natural killer cells with superior maturation and alloreactivity potential following adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Cany, Jeannette; van der Waart, Anniek B; Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Jansen, Joop H; van der Voort, Robbert; Schaap, Nicolaas M; Dolstra, Harry

    2015-07-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells represents a promising treatment approach against cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previously, we reported a cytokine-based culture method for the generation of NK cell products with high cell number and purity. In this system, CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) were expanded and differentiated into NK cells under stroma-free conditions in the presence of IL-15 and IL-2. We show that combining IL-15 with IL-12 drives the generation of more mature and highly functional NK cells. In particular, replacement of IL-2 by IL-12 enhanced the cytolytic activity and IFNγ production of HPC-NK cells toward cultured and primary AML cells in vitro, and improved antileukemic responses in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice bearing human AML cells. Phenotypically, IL-12 increased the frequency of HPC-NK cells expressing NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR), which were more responsive to target cell stimulation. In addition, NK15/12 cell products demonstrated superior maturation potential, resulting in >70% positivity for CD16 and/or KIR within 2 weeks after infusion into NSG mice. We predict that higher functionality and faster in vivo maturation will favor HPC-NK cell alloreactivity toward malignant cells in patients, making this cytokine combination an attractive strategy to generate clinical HPC-NK cell products for cancer adoptive immunotherapy.

  7. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  8. Insights into Dynamics of Mobile Genetic Elements in Hyperthermophilic Environments from Five New Thermococcus Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles. PMID:23326305

  9. Prevalence of ColE1-like plasmids and kanamycin resistance genes in Salmonella enterica serovars.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Yi; Lindsey, Rebecca L; Strobaugh, Terence P; Frye, Jonathan G; Meinersmann, Richard J

    2010-10-01

    Multi-antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella enterica strains frequently carry resistance genes on plasmids. Recent studies focus heavily on large conjugative plasmids, and the role that small plasmids play in resistance gene transfer is largely unknown. To expand our previous studies in assessing the prevalence of the isolates harboring ColE1-like plasmids carrying the aph gene responsible for kanamycin resistance (Kan(r)) phenotypes, 102 Kan(r) Salmonella isolates collected through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) in 2005 were screened by PCR using ColE1 primer sets. Thirty isolates were found to be positive for ColE1-like replicon. Plasmids from 23 isolates were able to propagate in Escherichia coli and were subjected to further characterization. Restriction mapping revealed three major plasmid groups found in three or more isolates, with each group consisting of two to three subtypes. The aph genes from the Kan(r) Salmonella isolates were amplified by PCR, sequenced, and showed four different aph(3')-I genes. The distribution of the ColE1 plasmid groups in association with the aph gene, Salmonella serovar, and isolate source demonstrated a strong linkage of the plasmid with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104. Due to their high copy number and mobility, the ColE1-like plasmids may play a critical role in transmission of antibiotic resistance genes among enteric pathogens, and these findings warrant a close monitoring of this plasmid incompatibility group.

  10. Molecular survey of the dissemination of two blaKPC-harboring IncFIA plasmids in New Jersey and New York hospitals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Chavda, Kalyan D; Melano, Roberto G; Hong, Tao; Rojtman, Albert D; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae strains have spread worldwide and become a major threat in health care facilities. Transmission of blaKPC, the plasmid-borne KPC gene, can be mediated by clonal spread and horizontal transfer. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequences of two novel blaKPC-3-harboring IncFIA plasmids, pBK30661 and pBK30683. pBK30661 is 74 kb in length, with a mosaic plasmid structure; it exhibits homologies to several other plasmids but lacks the plasmid transfer operon (tra) and the origin of transfer (oriT) that are required for plasmid transfer. pBK30683 is a conjugative plasmid with a cointegrated plasmid structure, comprising a 72-kb element that highly resembles pBK30661 (>99.9% nucleotide identities) and an extra 68-kb element that harbors tra and oriT. A PCR scheme was designed to detect the distribution of blaKPC-harboring IncFIA (pBK30661-like and pBK30683-like) plasmids in a collection of clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates from 10 hospitals in New Jersey and New York. KPC-harboring IncFIA plasmids were found in 20% of 491 K. pneumoniae isolates, and all carried blaKPC-3. pBK30661-like plasmids were identified mainly in the epidemic sequence type 258 (ST258) K. pneumoniae clone, while pBK30683-like plasmids were widely distributed in ST258 and other K. pneumoniae sequence types and among non-K. pneumoniae Enterobacteriaceae species. This suggests that both clonal spread and horizontal plasmid transfer contributed to the dissemination of blaKPC-harboring IncFIA plasmids in our area. Further studies are needed to understand the distribution of this plasmid group in other health care regions and to decipher the origins of pBK30661-like and pBK30683-like plasmids.

  11. The Tra2 core of the IncP(alpha) plasmid RP4 is required for intergeneric mating between Escherichia coli and Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed Central

    Giebelhaus, L A; Frost, L; Lanka, E; Gormley, E P; Davies, J E; Leskiw, B

    1996-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells and Streptomyces mycelia are able to form close contacts in the absence of a conjugative system which might facilitate intergeneric plasmid transfer without the genes required for mating pair formation (Tra2) of the RP4 plasmid. The same Tra2 genes found to be essential for RP4 plasmid transfer, RSF1010 mobilization, and donor-specific phage propagation in E. coli were also required for intergeneric transfer between E. coli and Streptomyces lividans. PMID:8892846

  12. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, George A; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C

    2014-10-01

    Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6')-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat.

  13. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  14. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  15. Chemical adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Greenland, John R; Letvin, Norman L

    2007-05-10

    Plasmid DNA vaccines are a promising modality for immunization against a variety of human pathogens. Immunization via multiple routes with plasmid DNA can elicit potent cellular immune responses, and these immunogens can be administered repeatedly without inducing anti-vector immunity. Nonetheless, the immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines has been limited by problems associated with delivery. A number of adjuvants have been designed to improve plasmid DNA immunogenicity, either by directly stimulating the immune system or by enhancing plasmid DNA expression. Chemical adjuvants for enhancing plasmid DNA expression include liposomes, polymers, and microparticles, all of which have shown promise for enhancing the expression and immunogenicity of plasmid DNA vaccines in animal models. Micro- and nanoparticles have not been shown to enhance immune responses to plasmid DNA vaccines. However, formulation of plasmid DNA with some non-particulate polymeric adjuvants has led to a statistically significant enhancement of immune responses. Further development of these technologies will significantly improve the utility of plasmid DNA vaccination.

  16. Vibrio cholerae conjugative plasmid pSJ15 contains transposable prophage dVcA1.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, S R; Romig, W R

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented that defective prophage dVcA1 in Vibrio cholerae strain 162 was transposed to the hybrid P::Tn1 plasmid pSJ5. Properties of the resulting conjugative plasmid, pSJ15, indicated that bacteriophage VcA1, like coliphage Mu, can insert at many sites. By analogy with other Hfr-like donors, the high-frequency, polarized chromosomal transfer mediated by plasmid pSJ15 in strain 162 appeared to depend on plasmid integration through the homologous dVcA1 sequences in both replicons. When strain 162(pSJ15) donors were mated to the nonlysogenic El Tor strain RJ1, many potential ampicillin-resistant transconjugants were zygotically induced. However, surviving transconjugants (i) were immune to phage VcA1, (ii) cotransferred immunity and ampicillin resistance to nonlysogenic recipients, and (iii) did not preferentially transfer any chromosomal markers. Recombinant plasmids that transferred wild-type VcA1 prophages were readily isolated from strain RJ1 (VcA1+) lysogens that contained plasmid pSJ15. Physical measurements revealed that plasmid pSJ15 and the recombinant plasmids were about one VcA1 genome (22 to 24 megadaltons) larger than the 51-megadalton pSJ5 plasmid. Similar Hfr-like donors were constructed by introducing plasmid pSJ15 into different strain RJ1 (VcA1+) lysogens. Transfer properties of these donors indicated that the VcA1 prophage was integrated at several sites in the strain RJ1 chromosome. Images PMID:6260754

  17. Complete sequence of three plasmids from Bacillus thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4 environmental isolate and comparison with related plasmids from the Bacillus cereus group.

    PubMed

    Amadio, Ariel F; Benintende, Graciela B; Zandomeni, Rubén O

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen used worldwide as a bioinsecticide. It belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group as well as Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus. Plasmids from this group of organisms have been implicated in pathogenicity as they carry the genes responsible for different types of diseases that affect mammals and insects. Some plasmids, like pAW63 and pBT9727, encode a functional conjugation machinery allowing them to be transferred to a recipient cell. They also share extensive homology with the non-functional conjugation apparatus of pXO2 from B. anthracis. In this study we report the complete sequence of three plasmids from an environmental B. thuringiensis isolate from Argentina, obtained by a shotgun sequencing method. We obtained the complete nucleotide sequence of plasmids pFR12 (12,095bp), pFR12.5 (12,459bp) and pFR55 (55,712bp) from B. thuringiensis INTA-FR7-4. pFR12 and pFR12.5 were classified as cryptic as they do not code for any obvious functions besides replication and mobilization. Both small plasmids were classified as RCR plasmids due to similarities with the replicases they encode. Plasmid pFR55 showed a structural organization similar to that observed for plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. pFR55 also shares a tra region with these plasmids, containing genes related to T4SS and conjugation. A comparison between pFR55 and conjugative plasmids led to the postulation that pFR55 is a conjugative plasmid. Genes related to replication functions in pFR55 are different to those described for plasmids with known complete sequences. pFR55 is the first completely sequenced plasmid with a replication machinery related to that of ori44. The analysis of the complete sequence of plasmids from an environmental isolate of B. thuringiensis permitted the identification of a near complete conjugation apparatus in pFR55, resembling those of plasmids pAW63, pBT9727 and pXO2. The availability of this sequence is a step forward in the study

  18. High Throughput Analyses of Budding Yeast ARSs Reveal New DNA Elements Capable of Conferring Centromere-Independent Plasmid Propagation.

    PubMed

    Hoggard, Timothy; Liachko, Ivan; Burt, Cassaundra; Meikle, Troy; Jiang, Katherine; Craciun, Gheorghe; Dunham, Maitreya J; Fox, Catherine A

    2016-04-07

    The ability of plasmids to propagate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been instrumental in defining eukaryotic chromosomal control elements. Stable propagation demands both plasmid replication, which requires a chromosomal replication origin (i.e., an ARS), and plasmid distribution to dividing cells, which requires either a chromosomal centromere for segregation or a plasmid-partitioning element. While our knowledge of yeast ARSs and centromeres is relatively advanced, we know less about chromosomal regions that can function as plasmid partitioning elements. The Rap1 protein-binding site (RAP1) present in transcriptional silencers and telomeres of budding yeast is a known plasmid-partitioning element that functions to anchor a plasmid to the inner nuclear membrane (INM), which in turn facilitates plasmid distribution to daughter cells. This Rap1-dependent INM-anchoring also has an important chromosomal role in higher-order chromosomal structures that enhance transcriptional silencing and telomere stability. Thus, plasmid partitioning can reflect fundamental features of chromosome structure and biology, yet a systematic screen for plasmid partitioning elements has not been reported. Here, we couple deep sequencing with competitive growth experiments of a plasmid library containing thousands of short ARS fragments to identify new plasmid partitioning elements. Competitive growth experiments were performed with libraries that differed only in terms of the presence or absence of a centromere. Comparisons of the behavior of ARS fragments in the two experiments allowed us to identify sequences that were likely to drive plasmid partitioning. In addition to the silencer RAP1 site, we identified 74 new putative plasmid-partitioning motifs predicted to act as binding sites for DNA binding proteins enriched for roles in negative regulation of gene expression and G2/M-phase associated biology. These data expand our knowledge of chromosomal elements that may function in plasmid

  19. iDriving (Intelligent Driving)

    SciTech Connect

    Malikopoulos, Andreas

    2012-09-17

    iDriving identifies the driving style factors that have a major impact on fuel economy. An optimization framework is used with the aim of optimizing a driving style with respect to these driving factors. A set of polynomial metamodels is constructed to reflect the responses produced in fuel economy by changing the driving factors. The optimization framework is used to develop a real-time feedback system, including visual instructions, to enable drivers to alter their driving styles in responses to actual driving conditions to improve fuel efficiency.

  20. Pheromone-responsive conjugative vancomycin resistance plasmids in Enterococcus faecalis isolates from humans and chicken feces.

    PubMed

    Lim, Suk-Kyung; Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2006-10-01

    The drug resistances and plasmid contents of a total of 85 vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE) strains that had been isolated in Korea were examined. Fifty-four of the strains originated from samples of chicken feces, and 31 were isolated from hospital patients in Korea. Enterococcus faecalis KV1 and KV2, which had been isolated from a patient and a sample of chicken feces, respectively, were found to carry the plasmids pSL1 and pSL2, respectively. The plasmids transferred resistances to vancomycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and erythromycin to E. faecalis strains at a high frequency of about 10(-3) per donor cell during 4 hours of broth mating. E. faecalis strains containing each of the pSL plasmids formed clumps after 2 hours of incubation in broth containing E. faecalis FA2-2 culture filtrate (i.e., the E. faecalis sex pheromone), and the plasmid subsequently transferred to the recipient strain in a 10-min short mating in broth, indicating that the plasmids are responsive to E. faecalis pheromones. The pSL plasmids did not respond to any of synthetic pheromones for the previously characterized plasmids. The pheromone specific for pSL plasmids has been designated cSL1. Southern hybridization analysis showed that specific FspI fragments from each of the pSL plasmids hybridized with the aggregation substance gene (asa1) of the pheromone-responsive plasmid pAD1, indicating that the plasmids had a gene homologous to asa1. The restriction maps of the plasmids were identical, and the size of the plasmids was estimated to be 128.1 kb. The plasmids carried five drug resistance determinants for vanA, ermB, aph(3'), aph(6'), and aac(6')/aph(2'), which encode resistance to vancomycin, erythromycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and gentamicin/kanamycin, respectively. Nucleotide sequence analyses of the drug resistance determinants and their flanking regions are described in this report. The results described provide evidence for the exchange of genetic information

  1. Transcription of ColE1Ap mbeC induced by conjugative plasmids from twelve different incompatibility groups.

    PubMed Central

    Selvaratnam, S; Gealt, M A

    1993-01-01

    Although nonconjugative mobilizable plasmids require helping functions of conjugative plasmids in order to be mobilized into recipients, at least some genes from the nonconjugative plasmids may be induced to assist in the DNA transfer process. Conjugative plasmids from 12 different incompatibility groups mobilized the nonconjugative plasmid ColE1Ap between Escherichia coli strains. Introduction of any of the conjugative plasmids into the ColE1Ap-containing strain resulted in an induction of mbeC, the product of which is a component of the mobilization relaxation complex. Each of the conjugative plasmids caused protein to bind specifically to mbe promoter DNA, suggesting a direct regulatory interaction. Images PMID:8226641

  2. sRNA-Xcc1, an integron-encoded transposon- and plasmid-transferred trans-acting sRNA, is under the positive control of the key virulence regulators HrpG and HrpX of Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Lin; Tang, Dong-Jie; Jiang, Rui-Ping; He, Yong-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Le; Lu, Guang-Tao; Tang, Ji-Liang

    2011-01-01

    sRNA-Xcc1 is a trans-acting sRNA recently identified from the plant pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pathovar campestris (Xcc). Here, the phylogenetic distribution, predicted secondary structure and regulation of expression of sRNA-Xcc1 were analyzed. The analysis showed (1) a total 81 sRNA-Xcc1 homologs that are found in some bacterial strains that are taxonomically unrelated, belonging to the α-, β-, γ- and δ-proteobacteria (2) that some sRNA-Xcc1 homologs are located in a plasmid-borne transposon or near a transposase coding gene, (3) that sRNA-Xcc1 is encoded by a integron gene cassette in Xcc and sRNA-Xcc1 homologs occur in integron gene cassettes of some uncultured bacteria and (4) that sRNA-Xcc1 homologs have a highly conserved sequence motif and a stable consensus secondary structure. These findings strongly support the idea that sRNA-Xcc1 represents a novel family of sRNAs which may be originally captured by integrons from natural environments and then spread among different bacterial species via horizontal gene transfer, possibly by means of transposons and plasmids. The expression analysis results demonstrated that the transcription of sRNA-Xcc1 is under the positive control of the key virulence regulators HrpG and HrpX, indicating that sRNA-Xcc1 may be involved in the virulence regulation of Xcc.

  3. Recombinant plasmid associated cell aggregation and high-frequency conjugation of Streptococcus lactis ML3.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P M; McKay, L L

    1981-06-01

    Lactose-positive (Lac+) transconjugants resulting from matings between Streptococcus lactic ML3 and S. lactis LM2301 possess a single plasmid of approximately 60 megadaltons (Mdal) which is nearly twice the size of the lactose plasmid of the donor. The majority of these Lac+ transconjugants aggregated in broth and were able to transfer lactose-fermenting ability at a frequency higher than 10(-1) per donor on milk agar plates or in broth. Lac+ transconjugants which did not clump conjugated at a much lower frequency. Lactose-negative derivatives of Lac+ clumping transconjugants did not aggregate in broth and were missing the 60-Mdal plasmid. The ability to aggregates in broth was very unstable. Strains could lose the ability to clump but retain lactose-fermenting ability. The majority of these Lac+ nonclumping derivatives of clumping transconjugants contained a plasmid of approximately 33 Mdal, the size of the lactose plasmid of the original donor ML3. These strains transferred lactose-fermenting ability at a frequency of approximately 10(-6) per donor, resulting in both Lac+ clumping transconjugants which contained a 60-Mdal plasmid and Lac+ nonclumping transconjugants which possessed a 33-Mdal plasmid. Our results suggest that the genes responsible for cell aggregation and high-frequency conjugation are on the segment of deoxyribonucleic acid which recombined with the 33-Mdal lactose plasmid in S. lactis ML3.

  4. Characterization of Plasmids in Extensively Drug-Resistant Acinetobacter Strains Isolated in India and Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Maria J.; Toleman, Mark A.; White, P. Lewis; Connor, Thomas R.; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L.; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Raven, Katherine E.; Török, M. Estée; Peacock, Sharon J.; Howe, Robin A.; Walsh, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:25421466

  5. Characterization of plasmids in extensively drug-resistant acinetobacter strains isolated in India and Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lim S; Carvalho, Maria J; Toleman, Mark A; White, P Lewis; Connor, Thomas R; Mushtaq, Ammara; Weeks, Janis L; Kumarasamy, Karthikeyan K; Raven, Katherine E; Török, M Estée; Peacock, Sharon J; Howe, Robin A; Walsh, Timothy R

    2015-02-01

    The blaNDM-1 gene is associated with extensive drug resistance in Gram-negative bacteria. This probably spread to Enterobacteriaceae from Acinetobacter spp., and we characterized plasmids associated with blaNDM-1 in Acinetobacter spp. to gain insight into their role in this dissemination. Four clinical NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter species strains from India and Pakistan were investigated. A plasmid harboring blaNDM-1, pNDM-40-1, was characterized by whole-genome sequencing of Acinetobacter bereziniae CHI-40-1 and comparison with related plasmids. The presence of similar plasmids in strains from Pakistan was sought by PCR and sequencing of amplicons. Conjugation frequency was tested and stability of pNDM-40-1 investigated by real-time PCR of isolates passaged with and without antimicrobial selection pressure. A. bereziniae and Acinetobacter haemolyticus strains contained plasmids similar to the pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids identified in Acinetobacter spp. in China. The backbone of pNDM-40-1 was almost identical to that of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids, but the transposon harboring blaNDM-1, Tn125, contained two short deletions. Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter pittii transconjugants were readily obtained. Transconjugants retained pNDM-40-1 after a 14-day passage experiment, although stability was greater with meropenem selection. Fragments of pNDM-BJ01-like plasmid backbones are found near blaNDM-1 in some genetic contexts from Enterobacteriaceae, suggesting that cross-genus transfer has occurred. pNDM-BJ01-like plasmids have been described in isolates originating from a wide geographical region in southern Asia. In vitro data on plasmid transfer and stability suggest that these plasmids could have contributed to the spread of blaNDM-1 into Enterobacteriaceae.

  6. Conjugative multi-resistant plasmids in Haihe River and their impacts on the abundance and spatial distribution of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Xu, Yan; Luo, Yi

    2017-03-15

    In this study, five classes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were quantified in sediment samples of Haihe River, China, with abundance ranging from 1.39 × 10(4) to 1.58 × 10(10) copies/g dry weight. Meanwhile, antibiotic resistant conjugative plasmids were also isolated from these samples through filter mating assays. In total, 202 transconjugants were isolated and tested for their antibiotic resistance phenotypes, among which 26 different types of conjugative plasmids were observed. The majority of these plasmids showed a multi-resistant phenotype and the most prevalent resistance was tetracycline resistance and sulfonamide resistance. Furthermore, we tested the transfer frequencies of these plasmids, determined their genotypes and then compared the plasmid-borne ARGs with their corresponding abundance in Haihe River. Most of the isolated plasmids exhibited high transfer frequencies to the recipient strain Escherichia coli J53. Plasmids isolated from the urban areas of Haihe River have higher transfer frequencies than the rural areas. Results from comprehensive analysis of plasmid genotypes, ARG abundance and plasmid sequencing confirmed that most of the plasmid-borne ARGs were the dominant genes in the Haihe River. Therefore, conjugative plasmids isolated from the Haihe River plays a crucial role in the dissemination, abundance and spatial distribution of ARGs in Haihe River, especially some unfrequent ARGs like blaGES-1. This study will help to increase the knowledge on the conjugative plasmid-mediated ARG propagation in the environment.

  7. Postsymbiotic plasmid acquisition and evolution of the repA1-replicon in Buchnera aphidicola

    PubMed Central

    Van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; González-Candelas, Fernando; Silva, Francisco J.; Sabater, Beatriz; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Buchnera aphidicola is an obligate, strictly vertically transmitted, bacterial symbiont of aphids. It supplies its host with essential amino acids, nutrients required by aphids but deficient in their diet of plant phloem sap. Several lineages of Buchnera show adaptation to their nutritional role in the form of plasmid-mediated amplification of key-genes involved in the biosynthesis of tryptophan (trpEG) and leucine (leuABCD). Phylogenetic analyses of these plasmid-encoded functions have thus far suggested the absence of horizontal plasmid exchange among lineages of Buchnera. Here, we describe three new Buchnera plasmids, obtained from species of the aphid host families Lachnidae and Pemphigidae. All three plasmids belong to the repA1 family of Buchnera plasmids, which is characterized by the presence of a repA1-replicon responsible for replication initiation. A comprehensive analysis of this family of plasmids unexpectedly revealed significantly incongruent phylogenies for different plasmid and chromosomally encoded loci. We infer from these incongruencies a case of horizontal plasmid transfer in Buchnera. This process may have been mediated by secondary endosymbionts, which occasionally undergo horizontal transmission in aphids. PMID:10984505

  8. Structural plasmid evolution as a result of coupled recombinations at bom and cer sites.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, M V; Beletskaya, I V; Bolovin, D V; Yurkova, T V; Semenova, L M; Solonin, A S

    2003-12-01

    We have studied the recombination of plasmids bearing bom and cer sites. The bom ( basis of mobilization) site is required for conjugative transfer, while the cer ( Col E1 resolution) site is involved in the resolution of plasmid multimers, which increases plasmid stability. We constructed a pair of parent plasmids in such a way as to allow us select clones containing recombinant plasmids directly. Clone selection was based on the McrA sensitivity of recipient host DNA modified by M. Ecl18kI, which is encoded by one of the parent plasmids. The recombinant plasmid contains segments originating from both parental DNAs, which are bounded by bom and cer sites. Its structure is in accordance with our previously proposed model for recombination mediated by bom and cer sequences. The frequency of recombinant plasmid formation coincided with the frequency of recombination at the bom site. We also show that bom-mediated recombination in trans, unlike in cis, is independent of other genetic determinants on the conjugative plasmids.

  9. Drugged Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alerts Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Hallucinogens Heroin Inhalants Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Prescription Drugs & Cold ... in the past year. Middle Figure: Driving after marijuana use is more common than driving after alcohol ...

  10. Impaired Driving

    MedlinePlus

    Impaired driving is dangerous. It's the cause of more than half of all car crashes. It means operating a ... texting Having a medical condition which affects your driving For your safety and the safety of others, ...

  11. Modular architecture of the conjugative plasmid pSVH1 from Streptomyces venezuelae.

    PubMed

    Reuther, Jens; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Muth, Günther

    2006-05-01

    The conjugative rolling circle replication (RCR) type plasmid pSVH1 from the chloramphenicol producer Streptomyces venezuelae was characterized by DNA sequence analysis and insertion/deletion analysis. Nucleotide sequence of the 12,652 bp pSVH1 revealed 11 open reading frames with high coding probability for which putative functions could be assigned. Beside the replication initiator gene rep for RCR, pSVH1 contained only genes involved in conjugative transfer. The transfer gene traB encoding the septal DNA translocator TraB is regulated by the GntR-type transcriptional regulator TraR. Six spd genes involved in intra-mycelial plasmid spreading are organized in two operons, consisting of two and three translationally coupled genes. Subcloning experiments demonstrated that the transfer gene traB represents a kill function and localized the pSVH1 minimal replicon consisting of rep and the dso origin to a 2072-bp fragment. Plasmid pSVH1 showed a modular architecture. Its replication region resembled that of the Streptomyces natalensis plasmid pSNA1, while the transfer and spread regions involved in conjugative plasmid transfer were highly similar to the corresponding regions of the Streptomyces ghanaensis plasmid pSG5.

  12. Conjugation of plasmids of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to other Neisseria species: potential reservoirs for the beta-lactamase plasmid.

    PubMed

    Genco, C A; Knapp, J S; Clark, V L

    1984-09-01

    The discovery that penicillinase production in Neisseria gonorrhoeae was plasmid mediated and the spread of the beta-lactamase encoding plasmids in gonococcal isolates since 1976, raise the possibility that a nonpathogenic indigenous bacterium could serve as a reservoir for these plasmids. We initiated studies to define the ability of commensal Neisseria species and Branhamella catarrhalis strains, as well as strains of the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, to serve as recipients in conjugation with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. We found that with N. gonorrhoeae as the donor, 3 of 5 Neisseria cinerea, 2 of 5 Neisseria flava, 0 of 1 Neisseria flavescens, 1 of 3 Neisseria subflava, 0 of 6 B. catarrhalis, 0 of 7 Neisseria lactamica, 1 of 5 Neisseria mucosa, 1 of 7 Neisseria perflava/sicca, and 0 of 13 N. meningitidis strains gave detectable conjugation frequencies (greater than 10(-8). N. cinerea was the only species found to maintain the gonococcal conjugal plasmid (pLE2451). A N. cinerea transconjugant containing pLE2451 was observed to transfer both the beta-lactamase plasmid and pLE2451 to N. gonorrhoeae at high frequency.

  13. Linear Plasmids and the Rate of Sequence Evolution in Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jessica M.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang; Sloan, Daniel B.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial genomes of flowering plants experience frequent insertions of foreign sequences, including linear plasmids that also exist in standalone forms within mitochondria, but the history and phylogenetic distribution of plasmid insertions is not well known. Taking advantage of the increased availability of plant mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the evolutionary history of these plasmids and plasmid-derived insertions. Mitochondrial genomes from multiple land plant lineages (including liverworts, lycophytes, ferns, and gymnosperms) include fragmented remnants from ancient plasmid insertions. Such insertions are much more recent and widespread in angiosperms, in which approximately 75% of sequenced mitochondrial genomes contain identifiable plasmid insertions. Although conflicts between plasmid and angiosperm phylogenies provide clear evidence of repeated horizontal transfers, we were still able to detect significant phylogenetic concordance, indicating that mitochondrial plasmids have also experienced sustained periods of (effectively) vertical transmission in angiosperms. The observed levels of sequence divergence in plasmid-derived genes suggest that nucleotide substitution rates in these plasmids, which often encode their own viral-like DNA polymerases, are orders of magnitude higher than in mitochondrial chromosomes. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the periodic incorporation of mitochondrial genes into plasmids contributes to the remarkable heterogeneity in substitution rates among genes that has recently been discovered in some angiosperm mitochondrial genomes. In support of this hypothesis, we show that the recently acquired ψtrnP-trnW gene region in a maize linear plasmid is evolving significantly faster than homologous sequences that have been retained in the mitochondrial chromosome in closely related grasses. PMID:26759362

  14. IncHI2 Plasmids Are Predominant in Antibiotic-Resistant Salmonella Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenyao; Fang, Tingzi; Zhou, Xiujuan; Zhang, Daofeng; Shi, Xianming; Shi, Chunlei

    2016-01-01

    The wide usage of antibiotics contributes to the increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Salmonella. Plasmids play a critical role in horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance markers in Salmonella. This study aimed to screen and characterize plasmid profiles responsible for antibiotic resistance in Salmonella and ultimately to clarify the molecular mechanism of transferable plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. A total of 226 Salmonella isolates were examined for antimicrobial susceptibility by a disk diffusion method. Thirty-two isolates (14.2%) were resistant to at least one antibiotic. The presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and β-lactamase genes were established by PCR amplification. PCR-based replicon typing revealed that these 32 isolates represented seven plasmid incompatibility groups (IncP, HI2, A/C, FIIs, FIA, FIB, and I1), and the IncHI2 (59.4%) was predominant. Antibiotic resistance markers located on plasmids were identified through plasmid curing. Fifteen phenotypic variants were obtained with the curing efficiency of 46.9% (15/32). The cured plasmids mainly belong to the HI2 incompatibility group. The elimination of IncHI2 plasmids correlated with the loss of β-lactamase genes (blaOXA-1 and blaTEM-1) and PMQR genes (qnrA and aac(6′)-Ib-cr). Both IncHI2 and IncI1 plasmids in a S. enterica serovar Indiana isolate SJTUF 10584 were lost by curing. The blaCMY -2-carrying plasmid pS10584 from SJTUF 10584 was fully sequenced. Sequence analysis revealed that it possessed a plasmid scaffold typical for IncI1 plasmids with the unique genetic arrangement of IS1294-ΔISEcp1-blaCMY -2-blc-sugE-ΔecnR inserted into the colicin gene cia. These data suggested that IncHI2 was the major plasmid lineage contributing to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in Salmonella and the activity of multiple mobile genetic elements may contribute to antibiotic resistance evolution and dissemination between different plasmid

  15. Homology of cryptic plasmid of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with plasmids from Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica.

    PubMed

    Ison, C A; Bellinger, C M; Walker, J

    1986-10-01

    DNA probe hybridisation was used to examine the relation between the cryptic plasmid from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and plasmids carried by pharyngeal isolates of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica. The complete gonococcal cryptic plasmid and HinfI derived digestion fragments subcloned into Escherichia coli were used to probe Southern blots of plasmid extracts. Homology was found to a plasmid of approximate molecular weight 4.5 kilobase pairs (Kb) but not to plasmids of less than 3.2 Kb or 6.5 Kb. Eleven of 16 strains of N meningitidis and two of six strains of N lactamica carried plasmids that showed strong hybridisation with the 4.2 Kb gonococcal plasmid. Hybridisation of plasmids from non-gonococcal species of neisseria with the gonococcal cryptic plasmid indicates that caution should be taken when using the cryptic plasmid as a diagnostic probe for gonorrhoea.

  16. Environmentally co-occurring mercury resistance plasmids are genetically and phenotypically diverse and confer variable context-dependent fitness effects.

    PubMed

    Hall, James P J; Harrison, Ellie; Lilley, Andrew K; Paterson, Steve; Spiers, Andrew J; Brockhurst, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Plasmids are important mobile elements that can facilitate genetic exchange and local adaptation within microbial communities. We compared the sequences of four co-occurring pQBR family environmental mercury resistance plasmids and measured their effects on competitive fitness of a Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 host, which was isolated at the same field site. Fitness effects of carriage differed between plasmids and were strongly context dependent, varying with medium, plasmid status of competitor and levels of environmental mercury. The plasmids also varied widely in their rates of conjugation and segregational loss. We found that few of the plasmid-borne accessory genes could be ascribed functions, although we identified a putative chemotaxis operon, a type IV pilus-encoding cluster and a region encoding putative arylsulfatase enzymes, which were conserved across geographically distant isolates. One plasmid, pQBR55, conferred the ability to catabolize sucrose. Transposons, including the mercury resistance Tn5042, appeared to have been acquired by different pQBR plasmids by recombination, indicating an important role for horizontal gene transfer in the recent evolution of pQBR plasmids. Our findings demonstrate extensive genetic and phenotypic diversity among co-occurring members of a plasmid community and suggest a role for environmental heterogeneity in the maintenance of plasmid diversity.

  17. Mobilization of Bacillus thuringiensis plasmid pTX14-3.

    PubMed

    Andrup, L; Bendixen, H H; Jensen, G B

    1995-05-01

    The Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) plasmid pTX14-3 has been reported to contain a gene, mob14-3, with considerable homology to genes encoding mobilization proteins from other gram-positive bacteria. We have used the aggregation-mediated conjugation system recently discovered in Bti to compare the mobilization kinetics of different derivatives of plasmid pTX14-3. Plasmid pTX14-3 has been found to replicate by the rolling-circle mechanism and to contain a locus suppressing the formation of high-molecular-weight DNA. We found that deleting a DNA fragment containing this locus increased the transfer frequency about twofold. The mobilization frequency of the plasmid containing the intact mob14-3 gene did not indicate a mobilization-enhancing activity of the encoded polypeptide. However, the presence of the mob14-3 gene seemed to increase the stability of the plasmid in exponential growth.

  18. Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Plasmid pLM-C-273 Carrying Genes Related to Stress Resistance.

    PubMed

    Liang, Lindsay; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Garduño, Rafael A; Mallo, Gustavo V

    2016-10-13

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria, such as plasmids, act as important vectors for the transfer of antibiotic resistance, virulence, and metal resistance genes. Here, we report the genome sequence of a new plasmid pLM-C-273, identified in a Listeria monocytogenes strain isolated from a clinical sample in Ontario, Canada.

  19. Genome Sequence of Listeria monocytogenes Plasmid pLM-C-273 Carrying Genes Related to Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Lindsay; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Garduño, Rafael A.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile genetic elements in bacteria, such as plasmids, act as important vectors for the transfer of antibiotic resistance, virulence, and metal resistance genes. Here, we report the genome sequence of a new plasmid pLM-C-273, identified in a Listeria monocytogenes strain isolated from a clinical sample in Ontario, Canada. PMID:27738039

  20. Transformation of Shewanella baltica with ColE1-like and P1 plasmids and their maintenance during bacterial growth in cultures.

    PubMed

    Milewska, Klaudia; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka

    2015-09-01

    The presence of natural plasmids has been reported for many Shewanella isolates. However, knowledge about plasmid replication origin and segregation mechanisms is not extensive for this genus. Shewanella baltica is an important species in the marine environment due to its denitrification ability in oxygen-deficient zones and the potential role in bioremediation processes. However, no information about possible use of plasmid vectors in this species has been reported to date. Here we report that plasmids with ColE1-type and plasmid P1 origin can transform S. baltica and replicate in this bacterium. Without the antibiotic selection pressure plasmid maintenance is less efficient than in Escherichia coli. Nevertheless, cultivation of S. baltica in the presence of appropriate antibiotics caused relatively stable maintenance of ColE1-like and P1-derived plasmids. This indicates that plasmid-based genetic manipulations and gene transfer in S. baltica are possible.

  1. Prevalence and significance of plasmid maintenance functions in the virulence plasmids of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Manjistha; Austin, Stuart

    2011-07-01

    Virulence functions of pathogenic bacteria are often encoded on large extrachromosomal plasmids. These plasmids are maintained at low copy number to reduce the metabolic burden on their host. Low-copy-number plasmids risk loss during cell division. This is countered by plasmid-encoded systems that ensure that each cell receives at least one plasmid copy. Plasmid replication and recombination can produce plasmid multimers that hinder plasmid segregation. These are removed by multimer resolution systems. Equitable distribution of the resulting monomers to daughter cells is ensured by plasmid partition systems that actively segregate plasmid copies to daughter cells in a process akin to mitosis in higher organisms. Any plasmid-free cells that still arise due to occasional failures of replication, multimer resolution, or partition are eliminated by plasmid-encoded postsegregational killing systems. Here we argue that all of these three systems are essential for the stable maintenance of large low-copy-number plasmids. Thus, they should be found on all large virulence plasmids. Where available, well-annotated sequences of virulence plasmids confirm this. Indeed, virulence plasmids often appear to contain more than one example conforming to each of the three system classes. Since these systems are essential for virulence, they can be regarded as ubiquitous virulence factors. As such, they should be informative in the search for new antibacterial agents and drug targets.

  2. Separate F-Type Plasmids Have Shaped the Evolution of the H30 Subclone of Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Youmans, Bonnie; Case, Kyle; Llop, Katharine; Munoz-Aguayo, Jeannette; Flores-Figueroa, Cristian; Aziz, Maliha; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Price, Lance B.; Johnson, James R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) H30 subclone of sequence type 131 (ST131-H30) has emerged abruptly as a dominant lineage of ExPEC responsible for human disease. The ST131-H30 lineage has been well described phylogenetically, yet its plasmid complement is not fully understood. Here, single-molecule, real-time sequencing was used to generate the complete plasmid sequences of ST131-H30 isolates and those belonging to other ST131 clades. Comparative analyses revealed separate F-type plasmids that have shaped the evolution of the main fluoroquinolone-resistant ST131-H30 clades. Specifically, an F1:A2:B20 plasmid is strongly associated with the H30R/C1 clade, whereas an F2:A1:B− plasmid is associated with the H30Rx/C2 clade. A series of plasmid gene losses, gains, and rearrangements involving IS26 likely led to the current plasmid complements within each ST131-H30 sublineage, which contain several overlapping gene clusters with putative functions in virulence and fitness, suggesting plasmid-mediated convergent evolution. Evidence suggests that the H30Rx/C2-associated F2:A1:B− plasmid type was present in strains ancestral to the acquisition of fluoroquinolone resistance and prior to the introduction of a multidrug resistance-encoding gene cassette harboring blaCTX-M-15. In vitro experiments indicated a host strain-independent low frequency of plasmid transfer, differential levels of plasmid stability even between closely related ST131-H30 strains, and possible epistasis for carriage of these plasmids within the H30R/Rx lineages. IMPORTANCE A clonal lineage of Escherichia coli known as ST131 has emerged as a dominating strain type causing extraintestinal infections in humans. The evolutionary history of ST131 E. coli is now well understood. However, the role of plasmids in ST131’s evolutionary history is poorly defined. This study utilized real-time, single-molecule sequencing to compare plasmids from various current and historical

  3. Effect of lipopolysaccharide mutations on recipient ability of Salmonella typhimurium for incompatibility group H plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Sherburne, C; Taylor, D E

    1997-01-01

    Previous investigations of the incompatibility group F, P, and I plasmid systems revealed the important role of the outer membrane components in the conjugal transfer of these plasmids. We have observed variability in transfer frequency of three incompatibility group H plasmids (IncHI1 plasmid R27, IncHI2 plasmid R478, and a Tn7 derivative of R27, pDT2454) upon transfer into various Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mutants derived from a common parental strain, SL1027. Recipients with truncated outer core via the rfaF LPS mutation increased the transfer frequency of the IncH plasmids by up to a factor of 10(3). Mutations which resulted in the truncation of the residues following 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid, such as the rfaE and rfaD mutations, decreased the transfer frequency to undetectable levels. Addition of phosphorylethanolamine, a component of wild-type LPS, to the media decreased the frequency of transfer of R27 into wild-type and rfaF LPS mutant recipients tested. Reversing the direction of transfer, by mating LPS mutant donors with wild-type recipients, did not affect the frequency of transfer compared to the standard matings of wild-type donor with LPS mutant recipient. These findings demonstrate that conjugation interactions affected by LPS mutation are not specific for the recipient cell. Our results suggest that LPS mutation does not affect conjugation via altered pilus binding but affects some later steps in the conjugative process, and alteration of transfer frequency by O-phosphorylethanolamine and LPS truncation is due to charge-related interactions between the donor and recipient cell. PMID:9006054

  4. Characterization and comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance plasmids isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Rahube, Teddie O; Viana, Laia S; Koraimann, Günther; Yost, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is an environment high in nutrient concentration with diverse bacterial populations and can provide an ideal environment for the proliferation of mobile elements such as plasmids. WWTPs have also been identified as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes that are associated with human pathogens. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize self-transmissible or mobilizable resistance plasmids associated with effluent from WWTP. An enrichment culture approach designed to capture plasmids conferring resistance to high concentrations of erythromycin was used to capture plasmids from an urban WWTP servicing a population of ca. 210,000. DNA sequencing of the plasmids revealed diversity of plasmids represented by incompatibility groups IncU, col-E, IncFII and IncP-1β. Genes coding resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics (macrolide, tetracycline, beta-lactam, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, sulphonamide), quaternary ammonium compounds and heavy metals were co-located on these plasmids, often within transposable and integrative mobile elements. Several of the plasmids were self-transmissible or mobilizable and could be maintained in the absence of antibiotic selection. The IncFII plasmid pEFC36a showed the highest degree of sequence identity to plasmid R1 which has been isolated in England more than 50 years ago from a patient suffering from a Salmonella infection. Functional conservation of key regulatory features of this F-like conjugation module were demonstrated by the finding that the conjugation frequency of pEFC36a could be stimulated by the positive regulator of plasmid R1 DNA transfer genes, TraJ.

  5. Plasmid profiling of bacterial isolates from confined environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houdt, Rob; Provoost, Ann; Coninx, Ilse; Leys, Natalie; Mergeay, Max

    Plasmid profiling of bacterial isolates from confined environments R. Van Houdt, I. Coninx, A. Provoost, N. Leys, and M. Mergeay Expertise group for Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK•CEN), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol, Belgium. Human exploration of extreme and isolated hostile environments such as space requires special confined small volume habitats to protect and house the crew. However, human confinement in such small volume habitats has restrictions on waste disposal and personal hygiene and inevitably generates a particular community of microorganisms within the habitat. These microorganisms are mainly originating from the crew (skin, mucous membranes, upper respiratory tract, mouth, and gastrointestinal tract) but also include the residing environmental microorganisms. Earth-based confined habitats such as the Antarctic Research Station Concordia are used as test beds for long-duration spaceflights to study the physiologic and psychological adaptation to isolated environments. The dynamics of the environmental microbial population in such a test bed could render additional insights in assessing the potential health risks in long-duration space missions. Not only total bacterial contamination levels are important, but it is essential to identify also the predominant microbial taxa and their mobile genetic elements (MGE). These MGEs could be exchanged between bacteria by horizontal gene transfer and may alter the pathogenic potential since they often carry antibiotic resistance or more in general adaptation-enhancing traits. In this study several bacterial strains isolated in the Concordia research station were examined for their plasmid content. An optimized protocol for extraction of large plasmids showed the present of at least one plasmid in 50% of the strains. For all strains the minimal inhibitory concentration of a range of antibiotics was determined indicating resistance to

  6. Pile Driving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Machine-oriented structural engineering firm TERA, Inc. is engaged in a project to evaluate the reliability of offshore pile driving prediction methods to eventually predict the best pile driving technique for each new offshore oil platform. Phase I Pile driving records of 48 offshore platforms including such information as blow counts, soil composition and pertinent construction details were digitized. In Phase II, pile driving records were statistically compared with current methods of prediction. Result was development of modular software, the CRIPS80 Software Design Analyzer System, that companies can use to evaluate other prediction procedures or other data bases.

  7. Plasmid diversity in Vibrio vulnificus biotypes.

    PubMed

    Roig, Francisco J; Amaro, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a heterogeneous bacterial species that can be virulent for humans and fish. Virulence in fish seems to rely on a recently described plasmid that can be transmitted between strains, aided by a conjugative plasmid. The main objective of this work was to analyse the plasmid content of a wide collection of strains from the three biotypes of the species, as well as to identify putative conjugative and virulence plasmids by means of Southern hybridization with specific probes and sequence analysis of selected gene markers. We found 28 different plasmid profiles in a total of 112 strains, which were relatively biotype- or serovar-specific. Biotype 1 lacked high-molecular-mass plasmids, with the exception of a putative conjugative plasmid of 48 kb that was present in 42.8% of clinical and environmental strains isolated worldwide. All biotype 2 strains possessed the virulence plasmid, whose molecular mass ranged between 68 and 70 kb, and 89.65% of these strains also had a putative conjugative plasmid with a molecular size of 52-56 kb. Finally, a 48 kb putative conjugative plasmid was present in all biotype 3 strains. Data from partial sequencing of traD, traI and the whole vep07 (a recently described plasmid-borne virulence gene) from a selection of strains suggest that the plasmids of 48-56 kb probably belong to the same family of F-plasmids as pYJ016 and that the gene vep07 is absolutely essential for fish virulence. Additional cryptic plasmids of low molecular mass were present in the three biotypes. In conclusion, plasmids are widespread among V. vulnificus species and could contribute substantially to genetic plasticity of the species.

  8. Microbial degradation of pyridine using Pseudomonas sp. and isolation of plasmid responsible for degradation.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S Venkata; Sistla, Srinivas; Guru, R Kumar; Prasad, K Krishna; Kumar, C Suresh; Ramakrishna, S V; Sarma, P N

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas (PI2) capable of degrading pyridine was isolated from the mixed population of the activated sludge unit which was being used for treating complex effluents, the strain was characterized. Aerobic degradation of pyridine was studied with the isolated strain and the growth parameters were evaluated. Pyridine degradation was further conformed by chromatography (HPLC) analysis. The process parameters like biomass growth and dissolved oxygen consumption were monitored during pyridine degradation. In order to conform with the plasmid capability to degrade pyridine, the requisite plasmid was isolated and transferred to DH 5alpha Escherichia coli. The subsequent biodegradation studies revealed the ability of the transformed plasmid capability to degrade the pyridine.

  9. Effect of Plasmid pIJ1008 from Rhizobium leguminosarum on Symbiotic Function of Rhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Bedmar, E. J.; Brewin, N. J.; Phillips, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Plasmid pIJ1008, which carries determinants for uptake hydrogenase (Hup) activity, was transferred from Rhizobium leguminosarum to Rhizobium meliloti without impairing the capacity of the latter species to form root nodules on alfalfa. The plasmid was still present in rhizobia reisolated from the root nodules of 12 different alfalfa cultivars, but only low levels of Hup activity were detected in alfalfa. PMID:16346527

  10. Distracted driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... the road Your hands on the wheel Your mind on driving Distracted driving occurs when something gets in the way of you doing all 3 things. Examples include: Talking on a cell phone Reading or sending text messages Eating and drinking Grooming ( ...

  11. Quinolone resistance in bacteria: emphasis on plasmid-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Zhi

    2005-06-01

    Bacterial resistance to quinolones/fluoroquinolones has emerged rapidly and such resistance has traditionally been attributed to the chromosomally mediated mechanisms that alter the quinolone targets (i.e. DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV) and/or overproduce multidrug resistance efflux pumps. However, the discovery of the plasmid-borne quinolone resistance determinant, named qnr, has substantially broadened our horizon on the molecular mechanisms of quinolone resistance. Several recent reports of Qnr or its homologues encoded by transferable plasmids in Gram-negative bacteria isolated worldwide highlight the significance of the emerging plasmid-mediated mechanism(s). This also alerts us to the potential rapid dissemination of quinolone resistance determinants. Qnr belongs to the pentapeptide repeat family and protects DNA gyrase from the action of quinolone agents including the newer fluoroquinolones. This protection interplays with chromosomal mechanisms to raise significantly the resistance levels. The qnr-bearing strains generate quinolone-resistant mutants at a much higher frequency than those qnr-free strains. Furthermore, the qnr-plasmids are integron-associated and carry multiple resistance determinants providing resistance to several classes of antimicrobials including beta-lactams and aminoglycosides. The high quinolone resistance rates in Escherichia coli are used to address issues of quinolone resistance, and possible strategies for minimising quinolone resistance are discussed.

  12. Natural Escherichia coli strains undergo cell-to-cell plasmid transformation.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Sekoguchi, Ayuka; Imai, Junko; Kondo, Kumiko; Shibata, Yuka; Maeda, Sumio

    2016-12-02

    Horizontal gene transfer is a strong tool that allows bacteria to adapt to various environments. Although three conventional mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer (transformation, transduction, and conjugation) are well known, new variations of these mechanisms have also been observed. We recently reported that DNase-sensitive cell-to-cell transfer of nonconjugative plasmids occurs between laboratory strains of Escherichia coli in co-culture. We termed this phenomenon "cell-to-cell transformation." In this report, we found that several combinations of Escherichia coli collection of reference (ECOR) strains, which were co-cultured in liquid media, resulted in DNase-sensitive cell-to-cell transfer of antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmid isolation of these new transformants demonstrated cell-to-cell plasmid transfer between the ECOR strains. Natural transformation experiments, using a combination of purified plasmid DNA and the same ECOR strains, revealed that cell-to-cell transformation occurs much more frequently than natural transformation under the same culture conditions. Thus, cell-to-cell transformation is both unique and effective. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate cell-to-cell plasmid transformation in natural E. coli strains.

  13. Plasmid curing of Oenococcus oeni.

    PubMed

    Mesas, Juan M; Rodríguez, M Carmen; Alegre, M Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Two strains of Oenococcus oeni, RS1 (which carries the plasmid pRS1) and RS2 (which carries the plasmids pRS2 and pRS3), were grown in the presence of different curing agents and at different temperatures. Sublethal temperature together with acriflavine generated all possible types of cured strains, i.e., lacking pRS1 (from strain RS1), and lacking pRS2, pRS3, or both (from strain RS2). Sublethal temperature together with acridine orange only generated cured strains lacking pRS3. These results suggest that acriflavine is a better curing agent than acridine orange for O. oeni, and that pRS3 is the most sensitive to these curing agents. We also observed spontaneous loss of pRS2 or both pRS2 and pRS3 by electroporation. The ability to cure O. oeni strains of plasmids provides a critical new tool for the genetic analysis and engineering of this commercially important bacterium.

  14. DNA Sequence and Comparative Genomics of pAPEC-O2-R, an Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Transmissible R Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Siek, Kylie E.; Johnson, Sara J.; Nolan, Lisa K.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, a 101-kb IncF plasmid from an avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) strain (APEC O2) was sequenced and analyzed, providing the first completed APEC plasmid sequence. This plasmid, pAPEC-O2-R, has functional transfer and antimicrobial resistance-encoding regions. The resistance-encoding region encodes resistance to eight groups of antimicrobial agents, including silver and other heavy metals, quaternary ammonium compounds, tetracycline, sulfonamides, aminoglycosides, trimethoprim, and beta-lactam antimicrobial agents. This region of the plasmid is unique among previously described IncF plasmids in that it possesses a class 1 integron that harbors three gene cassettes and a heavy metal resistance operon. This region spans 33 kb and is flanked by the RepFII plasmid replicon and an assortment of plasmid maintenance genes. pAPEC-O2-R also contains a 32-kb transfer region that is nearly identical to that found in the E. coli F plasmid, rendering it transferable by conjugation to plasmid-less strains of bacteria, including an APEC strain, a fecal E. coli strain from an apparently healthy bird, a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain, and a uropathogenic E. coli strain from humans. Differences in the G+C contents of individual open reading frames suggest that various regions of pAPEC-O2-R had dissimilar origins. The presence of pAPEC-O2-R-like plasmids that encode resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents and that are readily transmissible from APEC to other bacteria suggests the possibility that such plasmids may serve as a reservoir of resistance genes for other bacteria of animal and human health significance. PMID:16251312

  15. Plasmid Diversity and Adaptation Analyzed by Massive Sequencing of Escherichia coli Plasmids.

    PubMed

    de Toro, María; Garcilláon-Barcia, M Pilar; De La Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is revolutionizing the analysis of bacterial genomes. It leads to a massive increase in the amount of available data to be analyzed. Bacterial genomes are usually composed of one main chromosome and a number of accessory chromosomes, called plasmids. A recently developed methodology called PLACNET (for plasmid constellation networks) allows the reconstruction of the plasmids of a given genome. Thus, it opens an avenue for plasmidome analysis on a global scale. This work reviews our knowledge of the genetic determinants for plasmid propagation (conjugation and related functions), their diversity, and their prevalence in the variety of plasmids found by whole-genome sequencing. It focuses on the results obtained from a collection of 255 Escherichia coli plasmids reconstructed by PLACNET. The plasmids found in E. coli represent a nonaleatory subset of the plasmids found in proteobacteria. Potential reasons for the prevalence of some specific plasmid groups will be discussed and, more importantly, additional questions will be posed.

  16. An extranuclear expression system for analysis of cytoplasmic promoters of yeast linear killer plasmids.

    PubMed

    Schründer, J; Meinhardt, F

    1995-03-01

    Based on the cytoplasmically localized killer plasmids pGKL1 and pGKL2 of Kluyveromyces lactis two new linear hybrid plasmids were constructed which consist of pGKL1, into which in addition to the previously developed cytoplasmically expressible LEU2* selectable marker a glucose dehydrogenase-encoding bacterial gene (gdh A) has been integrated. One of the hybrid plasmids carries the bacterial gene preceded by an arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter (upstream conserved sequence) in front of the coding region (pRKL121). The other plasmid was constructed in such a way that the ATG start codon of the gdh A gene was fused in frame to the ATG start codon of the killer plasmid's open reading frame 5 (pRKL122). The structures of both linear hybrid plasmids were confirmed by restriction analysis, Southern hybridization, and sequencing of the junction sites. Yeast strains carrying either of the plasmids expressed the glucose dehydrogenase gene; however, expression of the in phase fused gene was 40-fold higher compared to the arbitrarily placed cytoplasmic promoter. In general, an in phase fusion was not required for expression, but efficiency is dramatically enhanced when the 5' noncoding sequences in front of the heterologous genes are the same as those found on the native killer plasmids. The developed system can serve as a reporter for determining the efficiency of the different cytoplasmic promoters present on both linear plasmids. Hybrid plasmids were stably maintained without selective pressure in K. lactis and they were transferred and expressed also in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  17. Plasmid-Encoded Iron Uptake Systems.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids confer genetic information that benefits the bacterial cells containing them. In pathogenic bacteria, plasmids often harbor virulence determinants that enhance the pathogenicity of the bacterium. The ability to acquire iron in environments where it is limited, for instance the eukaryotic host, is a critical factor for bacterial growth. To acquire iron, bacteria have evolved specific iron uptake mechanisms. These systems are often chromosomally encoded, while those that are plasmid-encoded are rare. Two main plasmid types, ColV and pJM1, have been shown to harbor determinants that increase virulence by providing the cell with essential iron for growth. It is clear that these two plasmid groups evolved independently from each other since they do not share similarities either in the plasmid backbones or in the iron uptake systems they harbor. The siderophores aerobactin and salmochelin that are found on ColV plasmids fall in the hydroxamate and catechol group, respectively, whereas both functional groups are present in the anguibactin siderophore, the only iron uptake system found on pJM1-type plasmids. Besides siderophore-mediated iron uptake, ColV plasmids carry additional genes involved in iron metabolism. These systems include ABC transporters, hemolysins, and a hemoglobin protease. ColV- and pJM1-like plasmids have been shown to confer virulence to their bacterial host, and this trait can be completely ascribed to their encoded iron uptake systems.

  18. Complete nucleotide sequence of the self-transmissible TOL plasmid pD2RT provides new insight into arrangement of toluene catabolic plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jutkina, Jekaterina; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Li, Lili; Heinaru, Eeva; Vedler, Eve; Jõesaar, Merike; Heinaru, Ain

    2013-11-01

    In the present study we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the toluene catabolic plasmid pD2RT of Pseudomonas migulae strain D2RT isolated from Baltic Sea water. The pD2RT is 129,894 base pairs in size with an average G+C content of 53.75%. A total of 135 open reading frames (ORFs) were predicted to encode proteins, among them genes for catabolism of toluene, plasmid replication, maintenance and conjugative transfer. ORFs encoding proteins with putative functions in stress response, transposition and site-specific recombination were also predicted. Analysis of the organization and nucleotide sequence of pD2RT backbone region revealed high degree of similarity to the draft genome sequence data of the plant-pathogenic pseudomonad Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea strain B076, exhibiting relatedness to pPT23A plasmid family. The pD2RT backbone is also closely related to that of pGRT1 of Pseudomonas putida strain DOT-T1E and pBVIE04 of Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain G4, both plasmids are associated with resistance to toluene. The ability of pD2RT to self-transfer by conjugation to P. putida recipient strain PaW340 was experimentally determined. Genetic organization of toluene-degrading (xyl) genes and flanking DNA segments resembles the structure of Tn1721-related class II transposon Tn4656 of TOL plasmid pWW53 of P. putida strain MT53. The complete sequence of the plasmid pD2RT extends the known range of xyl genes carriers, being the first completely sequenced TOL plasmid, which is not related to well-studied IncP plasmid groups. We also verified the functionality of the catabolic route encoded by pD2RT by monitoring the expression of the xylE gene in pD2RT bearing hosts along with bacterial strains containing TOL plasmid of IncP-9 group. The growth kinetics of plasmid-bearing strains was found to be affected by particular TOL plasmid.

  19. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins.

  20. Genomic and Functional Characterization of qnr-Encoding Plasmids from Municipal Wastewater Biosolid Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Ella; Sela, Noa; Doron-Faigenboim, Adi; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Cytryn, Eddie

    2015-01-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment facilities are considered to be “hotspots” for antibiotic resistance, since they conjoin high densities of environmental and fecal bacteria with selective pressure in the form of sub-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics. Discharged effluents and biosolids from these facilities can disseminate antibiotic resistant genes to terrestrial and aquatic environments, potentially contributing to the increasing global trend in antibiotic resistance. This phenomenon is especially pertinent when resistance genes are associated with mobile genetic elements such as conjugative plasmids, which can be transferred between bacterial phyla. Fluoroquinolones are among the most abundant antibiotic compounds detected in wastewater treatment facilities, especially in biosolids, where due to their hydrophobic properties they accumulate to concentrations that may exceed 40 mg/L. Although fluoroquinolone resistance is traditionally associated with mutations in the gyrA/topoisomerase IV genes, there is increasing evidence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance, which is primarily encoded on qnr genes. In this study, we sequenced seven qnr-harboring plasmids from a diverse collection of Klebsiella strains, isolated from dewatered biosolids from a large wastewater treatment facility in Israel. One of the plasmids, termed pKPSH-11XL was a large (185.4 kbp), multi-drug resistance, IncF-type plasmid that harbored qnrB and 10 additional antibiotic resistance genes that conferred resistance to five different antibiotic families. It was highly similar to the pKPN3-like plasmid family that has been detected in multidrug resistant clinical Klebsiella isolates. In contrast, the six additional plasmids were much smaller (7–9 Kbp) and harbored a qnrS -type gene. These plasmids were highly similar to each other and closely resembled pGNB2, a plasmid isolated from a German wastewater treatment facility. Comparative genome analyses of pKPSH-11XL and other pKPN3

  1. Dementia & Driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caregiver Resource Center Family Care Navigator Research Registry Support Groups Caregiver Stories Connections e-Newsletter FCA+(plus) Services ... be like if you could no longer drive. Support groups provide a good venue for both the caregivers ...

  2. Bioaugmentation of DDT-contaminated soil by dissemination of the catabolic plasmid pDOD.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunming; Jin, Xiangxiang; Ren, Jingbei; Fang, Hua; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    A plasmid transfer-mediated bioaugmentation method for the enhancement of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) degradation in soil was developed using the catabolic plasmid pDOD from Sphingobacterium sp. D-6. The pDOD plasmid could be transferred to soil bacteria, such as members of Cellulomonas, to form DDT degraders and thus accelerate DDT degradation. The transfer efficiency of pDOD was affected by the donor, temperature, moisture, and soil type. Approximately 50.7% of the DDT in the contaminated field was removed 210 days after the application of Escherichia coli TG I (pDOD-gfp). The results suggested that seeding pDOD into soil is an effective bioaugmentation method for enhancing the degradation of DDT.

  3. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    13). which they were isolated and the number of the isolate The Legionnaires disease bacterium, L. pneu. from that city. The following 16... Legionnaires disease bacterium. .1. (un. Micro. biol. 8:320-:t25. appears reasonable that this organism could sup- 1:l. Fraser, D5. W., and J. F. McI~ade. 1979...INFECTION AND IMMUNITY, Sept. 1980, p. 1(92-1095 Vol. 29, No. :1 0I 9-9567/A)/- 1092/14$02.00/0. A Plasmid in Legionella pneumophila_ ( (/’ )GREGORY

  4. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Sagripanti, J L; Swicord, M L; Davis, C C

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  5. Microwave effects on plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sagripanti, J.L.; Swicord, M.L.; Davis, C.C.

    1987-05-01

    The exposure of purified plasmid DNA to microwave radiation at nonthermal levels in the frequency range from 2.00 to 8.75 GHz produces single- and double-strand breaks that are detected by agarose gel electrophoresis. Microwave-induced damage to DNA depends on the presence of small amounts of copper. This effect is dependent upon both the microwave power and the duration of the exposure. Cuprous, but not cupric, ions were able to mimic the effects produced by microwaves on DNA.

  6. Processing of Nonconjugative Resistance Plasmids by Conjugation Nicking Enzyme of Staphylococci

    SciTech Connect

    Pollet, Rebecca M.; Ingle, James D.; Hymes, Jeff P.; Eakes, Thomas C.; Eto, Karina Yui; Kwong, Stephen M.; Ramsay, Joshua P.; Firth, Neville; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Christie, P. J.

    2016-01-04

    Antimicrobial resistance inStaphylococcus aureuspresents an increasing threat to human health. This resistance is often encoded on mobile plasmids, such as pSK41; however, the mechanism of transfer of these plasmids is not well understood. In this study, we first examine key protein-DNA interactions formed by the relaxase enzyme, NES, which initiates and terminates the transfer of the multidrug resistance plasmid pSK41. Two loops on the NES protein, hairpin loops 1 and 2, form extensive contacts with the DNA hairpin formed at theoriTregion of pSK41, and here we establish that these contacts are essential for proper DNA cleavage and religation by the full 665-residue NES proteinin vitro. Second, pSK156 and pCA347 are nonconjugativeStaphylococcus aureusplasmids that contain sequences similar to theoriTregion of pSK41 but differ in the sequence predicted to form a DNA hairpin. We show that pSK41-encoded NES is able to bind, cleave, and religate theoriTsequences of these nonconjugative plasmidsin vitro. Although pSK41 could mobilize a coresident plasmid harboring its cognateoriT, it was unable to mobilize plasmids containing the pSK156 and pCA347 variantoriTmimics, suggesting that an accessory protein like that previously shown to confer specificity in the pWBG749 system may also be involved in transmission of plasmids containing a pSK41-likeoriT. These data indicate that the conjugative relaxase intransmechanism recently described for the pWBG749 family of plasmids also applies to the pSK41 family of plasmids, further heightening the potential significance of this mechanism in the horizontal transfer of staphylococcal plasmids.

    IMPORTANCEUnderstanding the mechanism of

  7. Association of Mu-containing plasmids with the Escherichia coli chromosome upon prophage induction

    PubMed Central

    Chaconas, George; Harshey, Rasika M.; Bukhari, Ahmad I.

    1980-01-01

    To determine the structure of a prophage-containing plasmid during Mu transposition, we have monitored the physical state of pSC101[unk]Mucts after thermoinduction. We have also examined the fate of a mini Mu plasmid constructed in vitro by deleting 27 kilobases from the center of the Mu prophage in pSC101[unk]Mucts. At various times after prophage induction, DNA was extracted from Mu or mini Mu plasmid-containing strains and subjected to electrophoresis in low concentration agarose gels followed by transfer of the DNA to nitrocellulose paper. Separate hybridization with 32P-labeled pSC101 and Mu DNA revealed the position of the plasmids and the replication of Mu DNA. At times after induction when Mu replication was clearly visible, Mu and mini Mu plasmids were found to migrate with Escherchia coli DNA. This Mu-specific association requires the phage coded A and B proteins. Electron microscopy has shown that some of the associated DNA is comprised of circular plasmid molecules which appear to be in contact with the chromosomal DNA. These structures may represent intermediates or end products of the replication-integration process. The finding that Mu and mini Mu plasmids do not give rise to any detectable excision products and apparently remain intact during Mu transposition supports our proposal that the predominant event after Mu induction is the replication of Mu DNA in situ to generate integrative intermediates. Images PMID:6246503

  8. Characterization of Mobile Staphylococcus equorum Plasmids Isolated from Fermented Seafood That Confer Lincomycin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Hoon; Jeong, Do-Won

    2015-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of lincomycin-resistance gene (lnuA)-containing plasmids in Staphylococcus equorum strains isolated from the high-salt-fermented seafood jeotgal were determined. These plasmids, designated pSELNU1–3, are 2638-bp long, have two polymorphic sites, and encode typical elements found in plasmids that replicate via a rolling-circle mechanism including the replication protein gene (rep), a double-stranded origin of replication, a single-stranded origin of replication, and counter-transcribed RNA sequence, as well as lnuA. Plasmid sequences exhibit over 83% identity to other Staphylococcus plasmids that harbor rep and lnuA genes. Further, three pairs of identified direct repeats may be involved in inter-plasmid recombination. One plasmid, pSELNU1, was successfully transferred to other Staphylococcus species, Enterococcus faecalis, and Tetragenococcus halophilus in vitro. Antibiotic susceptibility of the transconjugants was host-dependent, and transconjugants maintained a lincomycin resistance phenotype in the absence of selective pressure over 60 generations. PMID:26448648

  9. Multiresistant Plasmids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Highly Resistant to Either or Both Gentamicin and Carbenicillin

    PubMed Central

    Kontomichalou, Polyxeni; Papachristou, Efstathia; Angelatou, Fevronia

    1976-01-01

    High-level resistance to gentamicin and carbenicillin was found in 30 and 10.7%, respectively, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, especially in isolates from urine. In 23 out of 25 strains tested, these resistances were R mediated and linked to multiresistant plasmids, carrying genes for resistances to five other aminoglycosides, tobramycin, kanamycin, neomycin, streptomycin, and spectinomycin, and for resistances to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, sulfonamides, and mercury chloride. Carbenicillin resistance was unstable in Pseudomonas, and in its presence the multiresistant plasmids had a host range extended to the Enterobacteriaceae (group I plasmids). Otherwise they were transferable intragenerically only (group II plasmids). The extended host range plasmids were, as a rule, in fi− incompatibility class A–C. Segregants incompatible with both class A–C and P plasmids were detected. The β-lactamase specified by the carbenicillin marker was of the TEM-like type. Multiple linkages of resistance determinants to the aminoglycosides were concomitantly present in most of the plasmids. Results from the bioassay indicated the presence of at least two aminoglycoside-inactivating enzymes. PMID:820245

  10. Reconstructing the complex evolutionary history of mobile plasmids in red algal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, JunMo; Kim, Kyeong Mi; Yang, Eun Chan; Miller, Kathy Ann; Boo, Sung Min; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2016-01-01

    The integration of foreign DNA into algal and plant plastid genomes is a rare event, with only a few known examples of horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Plasmids, which are well-studied drivers of HGT in prokaryotes, have been reported previously in red algae (Rhodophyta). However, the distribution of these mobile DNA elements and their sites of integration into the plastid (ptDNA), mitochondrial (mtDNA), and nuclear genomes of Rhodophyta remain unknown. Here we reconstructed the complex evolutionary history of plasmid-derived DNAs in red algae. Comparative analysis of 21 rhodophyte ptDNAs, including new genome data for 5 species, turned up 22 plasmid-derived open reading frames (ORFs) that showed syntenic and copy number variation among species, but were conserved within different individuals in three lineages. Several plasmid-derived homologs were found not only in ptDNA but also in mtDNA and in the nuclear genome of green plants, stramenopiles, and rhizarians. Phylogenetic and plasmid-derived ORF analyses showed that the majority of plasmid DNAs originated within red algae, whereas others were derived from cyanobacteria, other bacteria, and viruses. Our results elucidate the evolution of plasmid DNAs in red algae and suggest that they spread as parasitic genetic elements. This hypothesis is consistent with their sporadic distribution within Rhodophyta. PMID:27030297

  11. Survey of plasmids in various mycoplasmas.

    PubMed Central

    Harasawa, R.; Barile, M. F.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-three strains representing 15 distinct Mycoplasma, Acholeplasma, and Spiroplasma species were examined for the presence of plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic patterns of the DNAs of three strains, Mycoplasma sp. strain 747, Spiroplasma mirum strain SMCA, and M. hominis strain 1257, suggested the presence of a plasmid with molecular weights of approximately 70, 10, and 9 megadaltons, respectively. The functions of these plasmids are currently unknown. Images FIG. 1 PMID:6679154

  12. Biofilms and the plasmid maintenance question.

    PubMed

    Imran, Mudassar; Jones, Don; Smith, Hal

    2005-02-01

    Can a conjugative plasmid encoding enhanced biofilm forming abilities for its bacterial host facilitate the persistence of the plasmid in a bacterial population despite conferring diminished growth rate and segregative plasmid loss on its bearers? We construct a mathematical model in a chemostat and in a plug flow environment to answer this question. Explicit conditions for an affirmative answer are derived. Numerical simulations support the conclusion.

  13. Variable reluctance drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Lipo, T.A.; Liang, F.

    1995-10-17

    A variable reluctance drive system including a motor and corresponding converter for improved current commutation is described. The motor incorporates a salient pole rotor and a salient pole stator having one or more full pitch windings which operate by mutual inductance to transfer the current from the active short pitch winding following phase alignment. This increases output torque and/or speed and permits a number of simple and economical converter circuits. 17 figs.

  14. pLS101 plasmid vector

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.; Balganesh, T.S.

    1985-02-19

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb ma1M gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb Tcr DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. pLS010 plasmid vector

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, Sanford A.; Balganesh, Tanjore S.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is recombinant plasmid pLS101, consisting essentially of a 2.0 Kb malM gene fragment ligated to a 4.4 Kb T.sub.c r DNA fragment, which is particularly useful for transforming Gram-positive bacteria. This plasmid contains at least four restriction sites suitable for inserting exogeneous gene sequences. Also disclosed is a method for plasmid isolation by penicillin selection, as well as processes for enrichment of recombinant plasmids in Gram-positive bacterial systems.

  16. Persistence of Antibiotic Resistance Plasmids in Biofilms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    model  broad-­‐host-­‐range  MDR  plasmids  pRGM1  and... model   plasmids,   the   IncU   plasmid   pRGM1   and   the   IncP-­‐1   plasmid   pB10,   with   mini-­‐Tn5-­‐PA1-­‐ 04/03...we  have  focused  on  this   strain   as   our   main   model   host   (from   here   on   often  

  17. Bringing them together: plasmid pMV158 rolling circle replication and conjugation under an evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Díaz, Fabián; Fernández-López, Cris; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Espinosa, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    Rolling circle-replicating plasmids constitute a vast family that is particularly abundant in, but not exclusive of, Gram-positive bacteria. These plasmids are constructed as cassettes that harbor genes involved in replication and its control, mobilization, resistance determinants and one or two origins of lagging strand synthesis. Any given plasmid may contain all, some, or just only the replication cassette. We discuss here the family of the promiscuous streptococcal plasmid pMV158, with emphasis on its mobilization functions: the product of the mobM gene, prototype of the MOBV relaxase family, and its cognate origin of transfer, oriT. Amongst the subfamily of MOBV1 plasmids, three groups of oriT sequences, represented by plasmids pMV158, pT181, and p1414 were identified. In the same subfamily, we found four types of single-strand origins, namely ssoA, ssoU, ssoW, and ssoT. We found that plasmids of the rolling-circle Rep_2 family (to which pMV158 belongs) are more frequently found in Lactobacillales than in any other bacterial order, whereas Rep_1 initiators seemed to prefer hosts included in the Bacillales order. In parallel, MOBV1 relaxases associated with Rep_2 initiators tended to cluster separately from those linked to Rep_1 plasmids. The updated inventory of MOBV1 plasmids still contains exclusively mobilizable elements, since no genes associated with conjugative transfer (other than the relaxase) were detected. These plasmids proved to have a great plasticity at using a wide variety of conjugative apparatuses. The promiscuous recognition of non-cognate oriT sequences and the role of replication origins for lagging-strand origin in the host range of these plasmids are also discussed.

  18. Facile Recovery of Individual High-Molecular-Weight, Low-Copy-Number Natural Plasmids for Genomic Sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L.E.; Detter, C,; Barrie, K.; Lapidus, A.; Summers, A.O.

    2006-06-01

    Sequencing of the large (>50 kb), low-copy-number (<5 per cell) plasmids that mediate horizontal gene transfer has been hindered by the difficulty and expense of isolating DNA from individual plasmids of this class. We report here that a kit method previously devised for purification of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) can be adapted for effective preparation of individual plasmids up to 220 kb from wild gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Individual plasmid DNA recovered from less than 10 ml of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus, and Corynebacterium cultures was of sufficient quantity and quality for construction of highcoverage libraries, as shown by sequencing five native plasmids ranging in size from 30 kb to 94 kb. We also report recommendations for vector screening to optimize plasmid sequence assembly, preliminary annotation of novel plasmid genomes, and insights on mobile genetic element biology derived from these sequences. Adaptation of this BAC method for large plasmid isolation removes one major technical hurdle to expanding our knowledge of the natural plasmid gene pool.

  19. Plasmid-Mediated Bioaugmentation of Wastewater Microbial Communities in a Laboratory-Scale Bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bathe, Stephan; Hausner, Martina

    Xenobiotic degradation during biological wastewater treatment can be established or enhanced by bioaugmentation - the addition of biological agents carrying biodegradation genes required to perform the task. Whereas the addition of microbial cells carrying chromosomally encoded catabolic genes can be impaired by limited survival of the added microorganisms, the addition of donor organisms carrying a transmissible catabolic plasmid is a promising alternative. This plasmid can spread within the indigenous microbial community of the system, circumventing the need for extended survival of the introduced bacterial strain. Here we discuss how the catabolic plasmid pNB2 can be evaluated towards its potential to facilitate the degradation of a xenobiotic compound, 3-chloroaniline, and demonstrate the applicability of this plasmid to accomplish 3-chloroaniline degradation in a bioreactor setting after in situ transfer to suitable recipient strains.

  20. Mutational Analysis of the tra Locus of the Broad-Host-Range Streptomyces Plasmid pIJ101

    PubMed Central

    Pettis, Gregg S.; Cohen, Stanley N.

    2000-01-01

    The tra gene of Streptomyces lividans plasmid pIJ101 encodes a 621-amino-acid protein that can mediate both plasmid transfer and the interbacterial transfer of chromosomal genes (i.e., chromosome-mobilizing ability [Cma]) during mating. Here we report the results of in-frame insertional mutagenesis studies aimed at defining regions of Tra required for these functions. While hexameric linker insertions throughout the tra gene affected plasmid and chromosomal gene transfer, insertions in a 200-amino-acid region of the Tra protein that contains presumed nucleotide-binding motifs and that is widely conserved among a functionally diverse family of bacterial and plasmid proteins (K. J. Begg, S. J. Dewar, and W. D. Donachie, J. Bacteriol. 177:6211–6222, 1995) had especially prominent effects on both functions. Insertions near the N terminus of Tra reduced Cma for either circular or linear host chromosomes to a much greater extent than pIJ101 plasmid transfer. Our results suggest that Cma involves Tra functions incremental to those needed for plasmid DNA transfer. PMID:10913083

  1. Functional Characterization of the Multidomain F Plasmid TraI Relaxase-Helicase

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yuan; McNamara, Dan E.; Miley, Michael J.; Nash, Rebekah P.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2011-09-06

    TraI, a bifunctional enzyme containing relaxase and helicase activities, initiates and drives the conjugative transfer of the Escherichia coli F plasmid. Here, we examined the structure and function of the TraI helicase. We show that TraI binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) with a site size of {approx}25 nucleotides, which is significantly longer than the site size of other known superfamily I helicases. Low cooperativity was observed with the binding of TraI to ssDNA, and a double-stranded DNA-binding site was identified within the N-terminal region of TraI 1-858, outside the core helicase motifs of TraI. We have revealed that the affinity of TraI for DNA is negatively correlated with the ionic strength of the solution. The binding of AMPPNP or ADP results in a 3-fold increase in the affinity of TraI for ssDNA. Moreover, TraI prefers to bind ssDNA oligomers containing a single type of base. Finally, we elucidated the solution structure of TraI using small angle x-ray scattering. TraI exhibits an ellipsoidal shape in solution with four domains aligning along one axis. Taken together, these data result in the assembly of a model for the multidomain helicase activity of TraI.

  2. Disk Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A new material known as AlBeMet, developed by Brush Wellman for research applications in the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) program, is now used for high performance disk drives. AlBeMet is a compression of aluminum, beryllium metal matrix composite. It reduces system weight and its high thermal conductivity can effectively remove heat and increase an electrical system's lifetime. The lighter, stiffer AlBeMet (AlBeMet 160) used in the disk drive means heads can be moved faster, improving disk performance.

  3. Mobilization of Chimeric oriT Plasmids by F and R100-1: Role of Relaxosome Formation in Defining Plasmid Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Fekete, Richard A.; Frost, Laura S.

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage at the F plasmid nic site within the origin of transfer (oriT) requires the F-encoded proteins TraY and TraI and the host-encoded protein integration host factor in vitro. We confirm that F TraY, but not F TraM, is required for cleavage at nic in vivo. Chimeric plasmids were constructed which contained either the entire F or R100-1 oriT regions or various combinations of nic, TraY, and TraM binding sites, in addition to the traM gene. The efficiency of cleavage at nic and the frequency of mobilization were assayed in the presence of F or R100-1 plasmids. The ability of these chimeric plasmids to complement an F traM mutant or affect F transfer via negative dominance was also measured using transfer efficiency assays. In cases where cleavage at nic was detected, R100-1 TraI was not sensitive to the two-base difference in sequence immediately downstream of nic, while F TraI was specific for the F sequence. Plasmid transfer was detected only when TraM was able to bind to its cognate sites within oriT. High-affinity binding of TraY in cis to oriT allowed detection of cleavage at nic but was not required for efficient mobilization. Taken together, our results suggest that stable relaxosomes, consisting of TraI, -M, and -Y bound to oriT are preferentially targeted to the transfer apparatus (transferosome). PMID:10869081

  4. Reactive oxygen species controllable non-thermal helium plasmas for evaluation of plasmid DNA strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young Kim, Jae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Ballato, John; Cao, Weiguo; Kim, Sung-O.

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, oxygen-rich helium plasmas were investigated to achieve an enhanced reactive oxygen species concentration at low voltage driving conditions. A non-thermal plasma device was fabricated based on a theta-shaped tube, and its potential was investigated for use in topological alteration of plasmid DNA. The optical emission spectra of the plasma showed that the oxygen flow affected the plasma properties, even though an oxygen plasma was not produced. The plasmid DNA strand breaks became more significant with the addition of oxygen flow to the helium in a single hollow, theta-shaped tube with other experimental conditions being unchanged.

  5. Nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA: a perilous journey from the cytoplasm to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lechardeur, Delphine; Lukacs, Gergely L

    2006-09-01

    Nonviral vectors represent a promising approach for the safe delivery of therapeutic DNA in genetic and acquired human diseases. Before synthetic vector systems can be used for clinical applications, their limited efficacy must be addressed. At the cellular level, successful gene transfer is dependent on several additional factors including DNA uptake, release from the DNA-vector complex, and nucleocytoplasmic transport. This paper reviews the major metabolic and physical impediments that plasmid DNA vectorized by synthetic vectors encounters between the cytosol and the nucleus. Plasmid DNA that escapes the endolysosomal compartment encounters the diffusional and metabolic barriers of the cytoplasm, reducing the number of intact plasmids that reach the nuclear envelope. Nuclear translocation of DNA requires either the disassembly of the nuclear envelope during cell division or active nuclear transport via the nuclear pore complex. In the nucleus, plasmid DNA is relatively stable, but its transcription and its fate during cell division are still debated. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular basis of nonviral gene transfer during nucleocytoplasmic trafficking may provide strategies to overcome those obstacles that limit the efficiency of nonviral gene delivery. We review some of the current methods of gene transfer mediated by synthetic vectors, highlighting systems that exploit our actual knowledge of the nucleocytoplasmic transport of plasmid DNA.

  6. Further characterization of the F fertility inhibition systems of "unusual" Fin+ plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Gasson, M J; Willetts, N S

    1977-01-01

    Flac mutants insensitive to transfer inhibition by R factors. JR66a and R485 were isolated and characterized. Representative mutations were cis dominant and are therefore presumed to be at the sites of action, fisU and fisV, respectively, of the FinU and FinV transfer inhibition systems encoded by JR66a and R485. The mutants were used to confirm that the FinU and FinV fertility inhibition systems are different from each other and from the FinOP, FinQ, and FinW systems of R100, R62, and R455, respectively. Together with traO and fisQ mutants of Flac, the new mutants were also used to investigate the nature of the F fertility inhibition systems encoded by a further group of "unusual" Fin+ plasmids. Of these, two incompatibility group X plasmids were found to carry finO+ genes, and of five incompatibility group I plasmids, three encoded FinQ systems, one the FinU system, and one a new system (FinR). Transfer of a variety of derepressed F-like plasmids was inhibited by the FinQ, FinU, and FinV systems, but a quantitatively very different levels; this emphasizes the differences as well as the similarities between the conjugation systems of F-like plasmids. PMID:328480

  7. Further characterization of the F fertility inhibition systems of "unusual" Fin+ plasmids.

    PubMed

    Gasson, M J; Willetts, N S

    1977-08-01

    Flac mutants insensitive to transfer inhibition by R factors. JR66a and R485 were isolated and characterized. Representative mutations were cis dominant and are therefore presumed to be at the sites of action, fisU and fisV, respectively, of the FinU and FinV transfer inhibition systems encoded by JR66a and R485. The mutants were used to confirm that the FinU and FinV fertility inhibition systems are different from each other and from the FinOP, FinQ, and FinW systems of R100, R62, and R455, respectively. Together with traO and fisQ mutants of Flac, the new mutants were also used to investigate the nature of the F fertility inhibition systems encoded by a further group of "unusual" Fin+ plasmids. Of these, two incompatibility group X plasmids were found to carry finO+ genes, and of five incompatibility group I plasmids, three encoded FinQ systems, one the FinU system, and one a new system (FinR). Transfer of a variety of derepressed F-like plasmids was inhibited by the FinQ, FinU, and FinV systems, but a quantitatively very different levels; this emphasizes the differences as well as the similarities between the conjugation systems of F-like plasmids.

  8. Swapping single-stranded DNA sequence specificities of relaxases from conjugative plasmids F and R100

    PubMed Central

    Harley, Matthew J.; Schildbach, Joel F.

    2003-01-01

    Conjugative plasmid transfer is an important mechanism for diversifying prokaryotic genomes and disseminating antibiotic resistance. Relaxases are conjugative plasmid-encoded proteins essential for plasmid transfer. Relaxases bind and cleave one plasmid strand site- and sequence-specifically before transfer of the cleaved strand. TraI36, a domain of F plasmid TraI that contains relaxase activity, binds a plasmid sequence in single-stranded form with subnanomolar KD and high sequence specificity. Despite 91% amino acid sequence identity, TraI36 domains from plasmids F and R100 discriminate between binding sites. The binding sites differ by 2 of 11 bases, but both proteins bind their cognate site with three orders of magnitude higher affinity than the other site. To identify specificity determinants, we generated variants having R100 amino acids in the F TraI36 background. Although most retain F specificity, the Q193R/R201Q variant binds the R100 site with 10-fold greater affinity than the F site. The reverse switch (R193Q/Q201R) in R100 TraI36 confers a wild-type F specificity on the variant. Nonadditivity of individual amino acid and base contributions to recognition suggests that the specificity difference derives from multiple interactions. The F TraI36 crystal structure shows positions 193 and 201 form opposite sides of a pocket within the binding cleft, suggesting binding involves knob-into-hole interactions. Specificity is presumably modulated by altering the composition of the pocket. Our results demonstrate that F-like relaxases can switch between highly sequence-specific recognition of different sequences with minimal amino acid substitution. PMID:14504391

  9. Characterization of a cfr-Carrying Plasmid from Porcine Escherichia coli That Closely Resembles Plasmid pEA3 from the Plant Pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rongmin; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yang; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The multiresistance gene cfr was found in two porcine Escherichia coli isolates, one harboring it on the conjugative 33,885-bp plasmid pFSEC-01, the other harboring it in the chromosomal DNA. Sequence analysis of pFSEC-01 revealed that a 6,769-bp fragment containing the cfr gene bracketed by two IS26 elements was inserted into a plasmid closely related to pEA3 from the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora, suggesting that pFSEC-01 may be transferred between different bacterial genera of both animal and plant origin. PMID:26525796

  10. Characterization of a cfr-Carrying Plasmid from Porcine Escherichia coli That Closely Resembles Plasmid pEA3 from the Plant Pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rongmin; Sun, Bin; Wang, Yang; Lei, Lei; Schwarz, Stefan; Wu, Congming

    2015-11-02

    The multiresistance gene cfr was found in two porcine Escherichia coli isolates, one harboring it on the conjugative 33,885-bp plasmid pFSEC-01, the other harboring it in the chromosomal DNA. Sequence analysis of pFSEC-01 revealed that a 6,769-bp fragment containing the cfr gene bracketed by two IS26 elements was inserted into a plasmid closely related to pEA3 from the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora, suggesting that pFSEC-01 may be transferred between different bacterial genera of both animal and plant origin.

  11. Large-scale preparation of plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Heilig, J S; Elbing, K L; Brent, R

    2001-05-01

    Although the need for large quantities of plasmid DNA has diminished as techniques for manipulating small quantities of DNA have improved, occasionally large amounts of high-quality plasmid DNA are desired. This unit describes the preparation of milligram quantities of highly purified plasmid DNA. The first part of the unit describes three methods for preparing crude lysates enriched in plasmid DNA from bacterial cells grown in liquid culture: alkaline lysis, boiling, and Triton lysis. The second part describes four methods for purifying plasmid DNA in such lysates away from contaminating RNA and protein: CsCl/ethidium bromide density gradient centrifugation, polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation, anion-exchange chromatography, and size-exclusion chromatography.

  12. The ABCs of plasmid replication and segregation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Uelinton M; Pappas, Katherine M; Winans, Stephen C

    2012-11-01

    To ensure faithful transmission of low-copy plasmids to daughter cells, these plasmids must replicate once per cell cycle and distribute the replicated DNA to the nascent daughter cells. RepABC family plasmids are found exclusively in alphaproteobacteria and carry a combined replication and partitioning locus, the repABC cassette, which is also found on secondary chromosomes in this group. RepC and a replication origin are essential for plasmid replication, and RepA, RepB and the partitioning sites distribute the replicons to predivisional cells. Here, we review our current understanding of the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the Rep proteins and of their functions in plasmid replication and partitioning.

  13. Novel plasmid conferring kanamycin and tetracycline resistance in the turkey-derived Campylobacter jejuni strain 11601MD.

    PubMed

    Crespo, M D; Altermann, E; Olson, J; Miller, W G; Chandrashekhar, K; Kathariou, S

    2016-07-01

    In Campylobacter spp., resistance to the antimicrobials kanamycin and tetracycline is frequently associated with plasmid-borne genes. However, relatively few plasmids of Campylobacter jejuni have been fully characterized to date. A novel plasmid (p11601MD; 44,095nt) harboring tet(O) was identified in C. jejuni strain 11601MD, which was isolated from the jejunum of a turkey produced conventionally in North Carolina. Analysis of the p11601MD sequence revealed the presence of a high-GC content cassette with four genes that included tet(O) and a putative aminoglycoside transferase gene (aphA-3) highly similar to kanamycin resistance determinants. Several genes putatively involved in conjugative transfer were also identified on the plasmid. These findings will contribute to a better understanding of the distribution of potentially self-mobilizing plasmids harboring antibiotic resistance determinants in Campylobacter spp. from turkeys and other sources.

  14. Broad-host-range plasmid pRK340 delivers Tn5 into the Legionella pneumophila chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Keen, M G; Street, E D; Hoffman, P S

    1985-01-01

    Transposon Tn5 was introduced into Legionella pneumophila on plasmid pRK340, which is temperature sensitive for plasmid maintenance. The presence of plasmid DNA was confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis and by conjugal transfer of the plasmid to Escherichia coli. Tn5 insertions were obtained by culturing L. pneumophila at the nonpermissive temperature (43 degrees C) on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar containing kanamycin. Of the 260 kanamycin-resistant colonies picked, 220 failed to conjugate pRK340 to E. coli. Plasmid DNA was not visualized from eight randomly picked Tn5-containing strains, and Southern hybridizations indicated that Tn5, but not pRK340, inserted into multiple sites in the Legionella chromosome. In addition, the streptomycin resistance determinant on Tn5 was expressed in L. pneumophila. Images PMID:2987191

  15. Yeast telomere repeat sequence (TRS) improves circular plasmid segregation, and TRS plasmid segregation involves the RAP1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Longtine, M S; Enomoto, S; Finstad, S L; Berman, J

    1992-01-01

    Telomere repeat sequences (TRSs) can dramatically improve the segregation of unstable circular autonomously replicating sequence (ARS) plasmids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletion analysis demonstrated that yeast TRSs, which conform to the general sequence (C(1-3)A)n, are able to stabilize circular ARS plasmids. A number of TRS clones of different primary sequence and C(1-3)A tract length confer the plasmid stabilization phenotype. TRS sequences do not appear to improve plasmid replication efficiency, as determined by plasmid copy number analysis and functional assays for ARS activity. Pedigree analysis confirms that TRS-containing plasmids are missegregated at low frequency and that missegregated TRS-containing plasmids, like ARS plasmids, are preferentially retained by the mother cell. Plasmids stabilized by TRSs have properties that distinguish them from centromere-containing plasmids and 2 microns-based recombinant plasmids. Linear ARS plasmids, which include two TRS tracts at their termini, segregate inefficiently, while circular plasmids with one or two TRS tracts segregate efficiently, suggesting that plasmid topology or TRS accessibility interferes with TRS segregation function on linear plasmids. In strains carrying the temperature-sensitive mutant alleles rap1grc4 and rap1-5, TRS plasmids are not stable at the semipermissive temperature, suggesting that RAP1 protein is involved in TRS plasmid stability. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, an ARS plasmid was stabilized by the addition of S. pombe telomere sequence, suggesting that the ability to improve the segregation of ARS plasmids is a general property of telomere repeats. PMID:1569937

  16. Arthritogenic T cells drive the recovery of autoantibody-producing B cell homeostasis and the adoptive transfer of arthritis in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Radacs, Marianna; Olasz, Katalin; van Eden, Willem; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T

    2012-08-01

    T cells orchestrate joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but B cells/B cell-derived factors are also involved in disease pathogenesis. The goal of this study was to understand the role of antigen-specific T and B cells in the pathological events of arthritis, which is impossible to study in humans due to the small number of antigen-specific cells. To determine the significance of antigen-specific lymphocytes and antibodies in the development of an autoimmune mouse model of RA, we generated TCR transgenic (TCR-Tg) mice specific for the dominant arthritogenic epitope of cartilage proteoglycan (PG) and performed a series of combined transfers of T cells, B cells and autoantibodies into BALB/c.Scid mice. The adoptive transfer of highly purified T cells from naive TCR-Tg, arthritic TCR-Tg or arthritic wild-type mice induced arthritis in SCID recipients, but the onset and severity of the disease were dependent on the sequential events of the T cell-supported reconstitution of PG-specific B cells and autoantibodies. The presence of activated PG-specific T cells was critical for disease induction, establishing a unique milieu for the selective homeostasis of autoantibody-producing B cells. In this permissive environment, anti-PG autoantibodies bound to cartilage and induced activation of the complement cascade, leading to irreversible cartilage destruction in affected joints. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the complex molecular and cellular mechanisms of RA.

  17. Three classes of plasmid (47-63 kb) carry the type B neurotoxin gene cluster of group II Clostridium botulinum.

    PubMed

    Carter, Andrew T; Austin, John W; Weedmark, Kelly A; Corbett, Cindi; Peck, Michael W

    2014-08-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA sequence analysis of 26 strains of Group II (nonproteolytic) Clostridium botulinum type B4 showed that 23 strains carried their neurotoxin gene cluster on a 47-63 kb plasmid (three strains lacked any hybridization signal for the neurotoxin gene, presumably having lost their plasmid). Unexpectedly, no neurotoxin genes were found on the chromosome. This apparent constraint on neurotoxin gene transfer to the chromosome stands in marked contrast to Group I C. botulinum, in which neurotoxin gene clusters are routinely found in both locations. The three main classes of type B4 plasmid identified in this study shared different regions of homology, but were unrelated to any Group I or Group III plasmid. An important evolutionary aspect firmly links plasmid class to geographical origin, with one class apparently dominant in marine environments, whereas a second class is dominant in European terrestrial environments. A third class of plasmid is a hybrid between the other two other classes, providing evidence for contact between these seemingly geographically separated populations. Mobility via conjugation has been previously demonstrated for the type B4 plasmid of strain Eklund 17B, and similar genes associated with conjugation are present in all type B4 plasmids now described. A plasmid toxin-antitoxin system pemI gene located close to the neurotoxin gene cluster and conserved in each type B4 plasmid class may be important in understanding the mechanism which regulates this unique and unexpected bias toward plasmid-borne neurotoxin genes in Group II C. botulinum type B4.

  18. Integration host factor is required for replication of pYGK-derived plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Escobar, Ascención; Juárez-Rodríguez, María D; Demuth, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we show that integration host factor protein (IHF) is required for replication of pYGK plasmids in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans. YGK plasmids were not replicated in A. actinomycetemcomitans strains lacking either the α- or β- subunit of IHF. However, the deletion mutants were complemented, and plasmid replication was restored when the promoter region and gene for either ihfA or ihfB was cloned into pYGK. We also identified two motifs that resemble the consensus IHF-binding site in a 813-bp fragment containing the pYGK origin of replication. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, purified IHFα-IHFβ protein complex was shown to bind to probes containing either of these motifs. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that plasmid replication is IHF-dependent in the family Pasteurellaceae. In addition, using site-direct mutagenesis, the XbaI and KpnI restriction sites in the suicide vector pJT1 were modified to generate plasmid pJT10. The introduction of these new unique sites in pJT10 facilitates the transfer of transcriptional or translational lacZ fusion constructs for the generation of single-copy chromosomal insertion of the reporter construct. Plasmid pJT10 and its derivatives will be useful for genetic studies in Aggregatibacter (Actinobacillus) and probably other genera of Pasteurellaceae, including Haemophilus, Pasteurella, and Mannheimia.

  19. Sequence characterization and comparative analysis of three plasmids isolated from environmental Vibrio spp.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Sobecky, Patricia A

    2007-12-01

    The horizontal transfer of genes by mobile genetic elements such as plasmids and phages can accelerate genome diversification of Vibrio spp., affecting their physiology, pathogenicity, and ecological character. In this study, sequence analysis of three plasmids from Vibrio spp. previously isolated from salt marsh sediment revealed the remarkable diversity of these elements. Plasmids p0908 (81.4 kb), p23023 (52.5 kb), and p09022 (31.0 kb) had a predicted 99, 64, and 32 protein-coding sequences and G+C contents of 49.2%, 44.7%, and 42.4%, respectively. A phylogenetic tree based on concatenation of the host 16S rRNA and rpoA nucleotide sequences indicated p23023 and p09022 were isolated from strains most closely related to V. mediterranei and V. campbellii, respectively, while the host of p0908 forms a clade with V. fluvialis and V. furnissii. Many predicted proteins had amino acid identities to proteins of previously characterized phages and plasmids (24 to 94%). Predicted proteins with similarity to chromosomally encoded proteins included RecA, a nucleoid-associated protein (NdpA), a type IV helicase (UvrD), and multiple hypothetical proteins. Plasmid p0908 had striking similarity to enterobacteria phage P1, sharing genetic organization and amino acid identity for 23 predicted proteins. This study provides evidence of genetic exchange between Vibrio plasmids, phages, and chromosomes among diverse Vibrio spp.

  20. pFiD188, the linear virulence plasmid of Rhodococcus fascians D188.

    PubMed

    Francis, Isolde; De Keyser, Annick; De Backer, Philippe; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; Kalkus, Jutta; Pertry, Ine; Ardiles-Diaz, Wilson; De Rycke, Riet; Vandeputte, Olivier M; El Jaziri, Mondher; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2012-05-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is currently the only phytopathogen of which the virulence genes occur on a linear plasmid. To get insight into the origin of this replicon and into the virulence strategy of this broad-spectrum phytopathogen, the sequence of the linear plasmid of strain D188, pFiD188, was determined. Analysis of the 198,917 bp revealed four syntenic regions with linear plasmids of R. erythropolis, R. jostii, and R. opacus, suggesting a common origin of these replicons. Mutational analysis of pFi_086 and pFi_102, similar to cutinases and type IV peptidases, respectively, showed that conserved region R2 was involved in plasmid dispersal and pointed toward a novel function for actinobacterial cutinases in conjugation. Additionally, pFiD188 had three regions that were unique for R. fascians. Functional analysis of the stk and nrp loci of regions U2 and U3, respectively, indicated that their role in symptom development was limited compared with that of the previously identified fas, att, and hyp virulence loci situated in region U1. Thus, pFiD188 is a typical rhodococcal linear plasmid with a composite structure that encodes core functions involved in plasmid maintenance and accessory functions, some possibly acquired through horizontal gene transfer, implicated in virulence and the interaction with the host.

  1. Genomics of high molecular weight plasmids isolated from an on-farm biopurification system.

    PubMed

    Martini, María C; Wibberg, Daniel; Lozano, Mauricio; Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Albicoro, Francisco J; Jaenicke, Sebastian; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Petroni, Alejandro; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Del Papa, María F

    2016-06-20

    The use of biopurification systems (BPS) constitutes an efficient strategy to eliminate pesticides from polluted wastewaters from farm activities. BPS environments contain a high microbial density and diversity facilitating the exchange of information among bacteria, mediated by mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which play a key role in bacterial adaptation and evolution in such environments. Here we sequenced and characterized high-molecular-weight plasmids from a bacterial collection of an on-farm BPS. The high-throughput-sequencing of the plasmid pool yielded a total of several Mb sequence information. Assembly of the sequence data resulted in six complete replicons. Using in silico analyses we identified plasmid replication genes whose encoding proteins represent 13 different Pfam families, as well as proteins involved in plasmid conjugation, indicating a large diversity of plasmid replicons and suggesting the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events within the habitat analyzed. In addition, genes conferring resistance to 10 classes of antimicrobial compounds and those encoding enzymes potentially involved in pesticide and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were found. Global analysis of the plasmid pool suggest that the analyzed BPS represents a key environment for further studies addressing the dissemination of MGEs carrying catabolic genes and pathway assembly regarding degradation capabilities.

  2. Genomics of high molecular weight plasmids isolated from an on-farm biopurification system

    PubMed Central

    Martini, María C.; Wibberg, Daniel; Lozano, Mauricio; Torres Tejerizo, Gonzalo; Albicoro, Francisco J.; Jaenicke, Sebastian; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Petroni, Alejandro; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando; Schlüter, Andreas; Pühler, Alfred; Pistorio, Mariano; Lagares, Antonio; Del Papa, María F.

    2016-01-01

    The use of biopurification systems (BPS) constitutes an efficient strategy to eliminate pesticides from polluted wastewaters from farm activities. BPS environments contain a high microbial density and diversity facilitating the exchange of information among bacteria, mediated by mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which play a key role in bacterial adaptation and evolution in such environments. Here we sequenced and characterized high-molecular-weight plasmids from a bacterial collection of an on-farm BPS. The high-throughput-sequencing of the plasmid pool yielded a total of several Mb sequence information. Assembly of the sequence data resulted in six complete replicons. Using in silico analyses we identified plasmid replication genes whose encoding proteins represent 13 different Pfam families, as well as proteins involved in plasmid conjugation, indicating a large diversity of plasmid replicons and suggesting the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events within the habitat analyzed. In addition, genes conferring resistance to 10 classes of antimicrobial compounds and those encoding enzymes potentially involved in pesticide and aromatic hydrocarbon degradation were found. Global analysis of the plasmid pool suggest that the analyzed BPS represents a key environment for further studies addressing the dissemination of MGEs carrying catabolic genes and pathway assembly regarding degradation capabilities. PMID:27321040

  3. Rolling-circle replication of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, S A

    1997-01-01

    Many bacterial plasmids replicate by a rolling-circle (RC) mechanism. Their replication properties have many similarities to as well as significant differences from those of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) coliphages, which also replicate by an RC mechanism. Studies on a large number of RC plasmids have revealed that they fall into several families based on homology in their initiator proteins and leading-strand origins. The leading-strand origins contain distinct sequences that are required for binding and nicking by the Rep proteins. Leading-strand origins also contain domains that are required for the initiation and termination of replication. RC plasmids generate ssDNA intermediates during replication, since their lagging-strand synthesis does not usually initiate until the leading strand has been almost fully synthesized. The leading- and lagging-strand origins are distinct, and the displaced leading-strand DNA is converted to the double-stranded form by using solely the host proteins. The Rep proteins encoded by RC plasmids contain specific domains that are involved in their origin binding and nicking activities. The replication and copy number of RC plasmids, in general, are regulated at the level of synthesis of their Rep proteins, which are usually rate limiting for replication. Some RC Rep proteins are known to be inactivated after supporting one round of replication. A number of in vitro replication systems have been developed for RC plasmids and have provided insight into the mechanism of plasmid RC replication. PMID:9409148

  4. Sequencing of IncX-plasmids suggests ubiquity of mobile forms of a biofilm-promoting gene cassette recruited from Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Burmølle, Mette; Norman, Anders; Sørensen, Søren J; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids are a highly effective means with which genetic traits that influence human health, such as virulence and antibiotic resistance, are disseminated through bacterial populations. The IncX-family is a hitherto sparsely populated group of plasmids that are able to thrive within Enterobacteriaceae. In this study, a replicon-centric screening method was used to locate strains from wastewater sludge containing plasmids belonging to the IncX-family. A transposon aided plasmid capture method was then employed to transport IncX-plasmids from their original hosts (and co-hosted plasmids) into a laboratory strain (Escherichia coli Genehogs®) for further study. The nucleotide sequences of the three newly isolated IncX-plasmids (pLN126_33, pMO17_54, pMO440_54) and the hitherto un-sequenced type-plasmid R485 revealed a remarkable occurrence of whole or partial gene cassettes that promote biofilm-formation in Klebsiella pneumonia or E. coli, in all four instances. Two of the plasmids (R485 and pLN126_33) were shown to directly induce biofilm formation in a crystal violet retention assay in E. coli. Sequence comparison revealed that all plasmid-borne forms of the type 3 fimbriae encoding gene cassette mrkABCDF were variations of a composite transposon Tn6011 first described in the E. coli IncX plasmid pOLA52. In conclusion, IncX-plasmids isolated from Enterobacteriaceae over almost 40 years and on three different continents have all been shown to carry a type 3 fimbriae gene cassette mrkABCDF stemming from pathogenic K. pneumoniae. Apart from contributing general knowledge about IncX-plasmids, this study also suggests an apparent ubiquity of a mobile form of an important virulence factor and is an illuminating example of the recruitment, evolution and dissemination of genetic traits through plasmid-mediated horizontal gene transfer.

  5. Complete Sequences of IncU Plasmids Harboring Quinolone Resistance Genes qnrS2 and aac(6′)-Ib-cr in Aeromonas spp. from Ornamental Fish

    PubMed Central

    Dobiasova, Hana; Videnska, Petra

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of three IncU plasmids from Aeromonas spp. isolated from ornamental fish are described. They had a typical IncU backbone for plasmid replication and maintenance functions, but conjugative transfer modules were disrupted. The gene qnrS2 was inserted into mpR as a mobile insertion cassette. Novel Tn3 family transposons carrying putative toxin-antitoxin and plasmid stability genes were identified. The study demonstrates high plasticity of IncU plasmids from aquatic environments. PMID:26525788

  6. Mechanistic basis of plasmid-specific DNA binding of the F plasmid regulatory protein, TraM.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun; Lu, Jun; Wong, Joyce J W; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Mark Glover, J N

    2014-11-11

    The conjugative transfer of bacterial F plasmids relies on TraM, a plasmid-encoded protein that recognizes multiple DNA sites to recruit the plasmid to the conjugative pore. In spite of the high degree of amino acid sequence conservation between TraM proteins, many of these proteins have markedly different DNA binding specificities that ensure the selective recruitment of a plasmid to its cognate pore. Here we present the structure of F TraM RHH (ribbon-helix-helix) domain bound to its sbmA site. The structure indicates that a pair of TraM tetramers cooperatively binds an underwound sbmA site containing 12 base pairs per turn. The sbmA is composed of 4 copies of a 5-base-pair motif, each of which is recognized by an RHH domain. The structure reveals that a single conservative amino acid difference in the RHH β-ribbon between F and pED208 TraM changes its specificity for its cognate 5-base-pair sequence motif. Specificity is also dictated by the positioning of 2-base-pair spacer elements within sbmA; in F sbmA, the spacers are positioned between motifs 1 and 2 and between motifs 3 and 4, whereas in pED208 sbmA, there is a single spacer between motifs 2 and 3. We also demonstrate that a pair of F TraM tetramers can cooperatively bind its sbmC site with an affinity similar to that of sbmA in spite of a lack of sequence similarity between these DNA elements. These results provide a basis for the prediction of the DNA binding properties of the family of TraM proteins.

  7. Evaluating metabolic stress and plasmid stability in plasmid DNA production by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2012-01-01

    In the context of recombinant DNA technology, the development of feasible and high-yielding plasmid DNA production processes has regained attention as more evidence for its efficacy as vectors for gene therapy and DNA vaccination arise. When producing plasmid DNA in Escherichia coli, a number of biological restraints, triggered by plasmid maintenance and replication as well as culture conditions are responsible for limiting final biomass and product yields. This termed "metabolic burden" can also cause detrimental effects on plasmid stability and quality, since the cell machinery is no longer capable of maintaining an active metabolism towards plasmid synthesis and the stress responses elicited by plasmid maintenance can also cause increased plasmid instability. The optimization of plasmid DNA production bioprocesses is still hindered by the lack of information on the host metabolic responses as well as information on plasmid instability. Therefore, systematic and on-line approaches are required not only to characterise this "metabolic burden" and plasmid stability but also for the design of appropriate metabolic engineering and culture strategies. The monitoring tools described to date rapidly evolve from laborious, off-line and at-line monitoring to online monitoring, at a time-scale that enables researchers to solve these bioprocessing problems as they occur. This review highlights major E. coli biological alterations caused by plasmid maintenance and replication, possible causes for plasmid instability and discusses the ability of currently employed bioprocess monitoring techniques to provide information in order to circumvent metabolic burden and plasmid instability, pointing out the possible evolution of these methods towards online bioprocess monitoring.

  8. Choosing and using Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasmids.

    PubMed

    Siam, Rania; Dolan, William P; Forsburg, Susan L

    2004-07-01

    A wide range of plasmids has been developed for molecular studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This includes general purpose episomes, expression vectors, epitope tagging plasmids, and integration vectors. This review describes the typical features of S. pombe vectors, including replication origins, positive and negative selection markers, and constitutive and inducible promoter systems. We will also discuss vectors with epitope tags and how these can be used to modify episomal or endogenous gene sequences. Considerations for choosing and using a plasmid are presented and specialized methods are described.

  9. TEM-1-encoding small plasmids impose dissimilar fitness costs on Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae.

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Annette; Lund, Marianne; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-12-01

    Only two beta-lactamases, TEM-1 and ROB-1, have been observed in Haemophilus influenzae, while four different TEM but no ROB enzymes have been found in Haemophilus parainfluenzae. In order to investigate the mechanisms behind the dissemination of small beta-lactamase-encoding plasmids in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae, we assessed the fitness cost of three TEM-1- (pPN223, pA1209, pA1606), one TEM-15- (pSF3) and one ROB-1-bearing (pB1000) plasmid when expressed in either bacterial species. All plasmids were stable in H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae except pB1000, which showed on average (sample mean) 76% curing in H. parainfluenzae after 5  days of subculture. Competition assays between isogenic strains with and without plasmid showed no competitive disadvantage of pPN223 and pA1606 in H. influenzae, or of pA1209 in H. parainfluenzae. In contrast, pSF3 and pB1000 were associated with significant competitive disadvantages in both species. Some of the competitive disadvantages may be related to differences in plasmid copy number and mRNA expression of the beta-lactamase genes, as revealed by quantitative PCR analysis. In conclusion, plasmids encoding TEM beta-lactamases isolated from H. influenzae and H. parainfluenzae can be stably transferred between species. The fast curing of pB1000 in H. parainfluenzae observed in this study correlates to the fact that ROB-1 has never been reported for this species. TEM-1-encoding plasmids are associated with the lowest level of fitness cost, but different TEM-1 plasmids confer different levels of fitness cost on the two hosts.

  10. R plasmid in Escherichia coli O103 coding for colonization of the rabbit intestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Reynaud, A; Federighi, M; Licois, D; Guillot, J F; Joly, B

    1991-01-01

    One rabbit pathogenic Escherichia coli strain, belonging to serogroup O103, harbors a self-transferable 117-kb plasmid (pREC-1) encoding resistance to several antibiotics. The role of this R plasmid in the colonization of the digestive tract in specific-pathogen-free (E. coli O103-free) rabbits was studied. Five-week-old rabbits were inoculated with the wild-type strain, with its variant cured of the plasmid, with an E. coli K-12 strain, or with an untypeable E. coli strain from a healthy rabbit. No symptoms and no mortality were observed in animals inoculated with strains without the plasmid pREC-1, but 87.5% of the rabbits infected by the wild strain died, generally with bloody diarrhea, between days 5 and 15 postinfection. The weight gain of animals was strongly reduced. Transfer of the plasmid to the cured strain or to nonvirulent strains led these strains to induce the same pathology but with a lower mortality. Colonization of the gut by the O103 strain and symptoms of bloody diarrhea are thus related to the presence of the pREC-1 plasmid. The GV strain, which does not produce classical heat-labile enterotoxin or heat-stable enterotoxin and is not invasive, could be considered an enteropathogenic E. coli-like strain. The presence of a conjugative plasmid such as pREC-1 encoding both antibiotic resistance and virulence determinants in O103 E. coli from rabbits could represent a prominent epidemiological hazard under selective pressure by antibiotic therapy. Images PMID:2037350

  11. Replication and gene functions of the bacteriocinogenic plasmid CloDF13.

    PubMed

    Veltkamp, E; van de Pol, H; Stuitje, A R; van den Elzen, P J; Nijkamp, H J

    1979-01-01

    The replication and genetic constitution of plasmid CloDF13 was studied using mutants of CloDF13 obtained by NTG mutagenesis, insertion of the ampicillin transposon Tn901, or deletion of particular CloDF13 DNA regions. Analysis of the polypeptides encoded by these mutant plasmids enabled us to locate six genes on the CloDF13 physical map. These genes cover about 60% of the coding capacity of CloDF13. A large part of the CloDF13 genome (about 30%) is involved in the conjugal transfer of this plasmid. This transfer region codes for at least two polypeptides, polypeptide B (61,000 daltons) and C (24,000 daltons). Those CloDF13 DNA regions responsible for the synthesis of the cloacin protein and immunity protein were also mapped on the plasmid genome. In addition we were able, using a copy mutant of CloDF13, CloDF13-cop3, to locate those DNA sequences involved in interaction with male-specific RNA phages and bacteriophage P1. For replication of CloDF13, two regions are essential. One region, from 43% to 64%, affects the stability of CloDF13-cop3 plasmids. In the case of the CloDF13-cop3 mutant, deletion of this region results in the generation of multimeric plasmid molecules accompanied by an impaired segregation of plasmid DNA molecules to daughter cells. The second region, from about 1.8% to 11.5%, contains an origin of replication as well as well as DNA sequences involved in the control of CloDF13 replication. The replication of CloDF13 starts at about 3% on the CloDF13 physical map and proceeds unidirectionally counter-clockwise.

  12. Plasmid Conjugation from Proteobacteria as Evidence for the Origin of Xenologous Genes in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Encinas, David; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Santos-Merino, María; Delaye, Luis; Moya, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Comparative genomics have shown that 5% of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 genes are of probable proteobacterial origin. To investigate the role of interphylum conjugation in cyanobacterial gene acquisition, we tested the ability of a set of prototype proteobacterial conjugative plasmids (RP4, pKM101, R388, R64, and F) to transfer DNA from Escherichia coli to S. elongatus. A series of BioBrick-compatible, mobilizable shuttle vectors was developed. These vectors were based on the putative origin of replication of the Synechococcus resident plasmid pANL. Not only broad-host-range plasmids, such as RP4 and R388, but also narrower-host-range plasmids, such as pKM101, all encoding MPFT-type IV secretion systems, were able to transfer plasmid DNA from E. coli to S. elongatus by conjugation. Neither MPFF nor MPFI could be used as interphylum DNA delivery agents. Reciprocally, pANL-derived cointegrates could be introduced in E. coli by electroporation, where they conferred a functional phenotype. These results suggest the existence of potentially ample channels of gene flow between proteobacteria and cyanobacteria and point to MPFT-based interphylum conjugation as a potential mechanism to explain the proteobacterial origin of a majority of S. elongatus xenologous genes. PMID:24509315

  13. Metal stressors consistently modulate bacterial conjugal plasmid uptake potential in a phylogenetically conserved manner

    PubMed Central

    Klümper, U.; Dechesne, A.; Riber, L.; Brandt, K.K.; Gülay, A.; Sørensen, S.J.; Smets, B.F.

    2016-01-01

    The environmental stimulants and inhibitors of conjugal plasmid transfer in microbial communities are poorly understood. Specifically, it is not known whether exposure to stressors may cause a community to alter its plasmid uptake ability. We assessed whether metals (Cu, Cd, Ni, Zn) and one metalloid (As), at concentrations causing partial growth inhibition, modulate community permissiveness (i.e. uptake ability) against a broad-host-range IncP-type plasmid (pKJK5). Cells were extracted from an agricultural soil as recipient community and a previously described cultivation-minimal filter mating assay was conducted with an exogenous E. coli donor strain. The donor hosted a gfp-tagged pKJK5 derivative from which conjugation events could be microscopically quantified and transconjugants isolated and phylogenetically described at high resolution via FACS and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Metal stress consistently decreased plasmid transfer frequencies to the community, while the transconjugal pool richness remained unaffected with OTUs belonging to 12 bacterial phyla. The taxonomic composition of the transconjugal pools was distinct from their respective recipient communities and clustered dependent on the stress type and dose. However, for certain OTUs, stress in- or decreased plasmid permissiveness by more than 1000-fold and this response was typically correlated across different metals and doses. The response to some stresses was, in addition, phylogenetically conserved. This is the first demonstration that community permissiveness is sensitive to metal(loid) stress in a manner that is both partially consistent across stressors and phylogenetically conserved. PMID:27482924

  14. Proposed model for the high rate of rearrangement and rapid migration observed in some IncA/C plasmid lineages.

    PubMed

    Meinersmann, R J; Lindsey, R L; Bono, J L; Smith, T P; Oakley, B B

    2013-08-01

    IncA/C plasmids are a class of plasmids from the Enterobacteriaceae that are relatively large (49 to >180 kbp), that are readily transferred by conjugation, and that carry multiple antimicrobial resistance genes. Reconstruction of the phylogeny of these plasmids has been difficult because of the high rate of remodeling by recombination-mediated horizontal gene transfer (HGT). We hypothesized that evaluation of nucleotide polymorphisms relative to the rate of HGT would help to develop a clock to show whether anthropic practices have had significant influences on the lineages of the plasmid. A system was developed to rapidly sequence up to 191 known open reading frames from each of 39 recently isolated IncA/C plasmids from a diverse panel of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli strains. With these data plus sequences from GenBank, we were able to distinguish six distinct lineages that had extremely low numbers of polymorphisms within each lineage, especially among the largest group designated as group 1. Two regions, each about half the plasmid in size, could be distinguished with a separate lineal pattern. The distribution of group 1 showed that it has migrated extremely rapidly with fewer polymorphisms than can be expected in 2,000 years. Remodeling by frequent HGT was evident, with a pattern that appeared to have the highest rate just upstream of the putative conjugation origin of transfer (oriT). It seems likely that when an IncA/C plasmid is transferred by conjugation there is an opportunity for plasmid remodeling adjacent to the oriT, which was also adjacent to a multiple antimicrobial resistance gene cassette.

  15. Topological Behavior of Plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Higgins, N Patrick; Vologodskii, Alexander V

    2015-04-01

    The discovery of the B-form structure of DNA by Watson and Crick led to an explosion of research on nucleic acids in the fields of biochemistry, biophysics, and genetics. Powerful techniques were developed to reveal a myriad of different structural conformations that change B-DNA as it is transcribed, replicated, and recombined and as sister chromosomes are moved into new daughter cell compartments during cell division. This article links the original discoveries of superhelical structure and molecular topology to non-B form DNA structure and contemporary biochemical and biophysical techniques. The emphasis is on the power of plasmids for studying DNA structure and function. The conditions that trigger the formation of alternative DNA structures such as left-handed Z-DNA, inter- and intra-molecular triplexes, triple-stranded DNA, and linked catenanes and hemicatenanes are explained. The DNA dynamics and topological issues are detailed for stalled replication forks and for torsional and structural changes on DNA in front of and behind a transcription complex and a replisome. The complex and interconnected roles of topoisomerases and abundant small nucleoid association proteins are explained. And methods are described for comparing in vivo and in vitro reactions to probe and understand the temporal pathways of DNA and chromosome chemistry that occur inside living cells.

  16. Destabilization of IncA and IncC plasmids by SGI1 and SGI2 type Salmonella genomic islands.

    PubMed

    Harmer, Christopher J; Hamidian, Mohammad; Ambrose, Stephanie J; Hall, Ruth M

    Both the Salmonella genomic islands (SGI) and the conjugative IncC plasmids are known to contribute substantially to the acquisition of resistance to multiple antibiotics, and plasmids in the A/C group are known to mobilize the Salmonella genomic island SGI1, which also carries multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmid pRMH760 (IncC; A/C2) was shown to mobilize SGI1 variants SGI1-I, SGI1-F, SGI1-K and SGI2 from Salmonella enterica to Escherichia coli where it was integrated at the preferred location, at the end of the trmE (thdF) gene. The plasmid was transferred at a similar frequency. However, we observed that co-transfer of the SGI and the plasmid was rarer. In E. coli to E. coli transfer, the frequency of transfer of the IncC plasmid pRMH760 was at least 1000-fold lower when the donor carried SGI1-I or SGI1-K, indicating that the SGI suppresses transfer of the plasmid. In addition, pRMH760 was rapidly lost from both E. coli and S. enterica strains that also carried SGI1-I, SGI1-F or SGI2. However, plasmid loss was not seen when the SGI1 variant was SGI1-K, which lacks two segments of the SGI1 backbone. The complete sequence of the SGI1-I and SGI1-F were determined and SGI1-K also carries two single base substitutions relative to SGI1-I. The IncA (A/C1) plasmid RA1 was also shown to mobilize SGI2-A and though there are significant differences between the backbones of IncA and IncC plasmids, RA1 was also rapidly lost when SGI2-A was present in the same cell. We conclude that there are multiple interactions, both cooperative and antagonistic, between an IncA or IncC plasmid and the SGI1 and SGI2 family genomic islands.

  17. Plasmids coding for drug resistance and localized adherence to HeLa cells in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O55:H- and O55:H6.

    PubMed Central

    Laporta, M Z; Silva, M L; Scaletsky, I C; Trabulsi, L R

    1986-01-01

    Plasmids coding for drug resistance and localized adherence (LA) to HeLa cells were found in two enteropathogenic Escherichia coli strains belonging to serotypes O55:H- and O55:H6. Strain 49-81 HSJ (O55:H-) carries two plasmids, one coding for both ampicillin resistance (Apr) and LA (pMS49). Strain 71-82 HSJ (O55:H6) harbors only one plasmid, coding for resistance to sulfadiazine, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, ampicillin, and LA (pMS71). Plasmids pMS49 and pMS71 were transferred to E. coli K-12 711 and from this strain to E. coli K-12 J53. Curing with acridine orange of an Apr LA+ transconjugant showed that both characteristics were lost simultaneously. The plasmids have a molecular weight of approximately 55 X 10(6) and are the first naturally recombinant plasmids coding for adherence and drug resistance described in enteropathogenic E. coli. Images PMID:3510986

  18. Increased maintenance and persistence of transgenes by excision of expression cassettes from plasmid sequences in vivo.

    PubMed

    Riu, Efren; Grimm, Dirk; Huang, Zan; Kay, Mark A

    2005-05-01

    Persistence of transgene expression is a major limitation for nonvirus-mediated gene therapy approaches. We have suggested that covalent linkage of bacterial DNA to the expression cassette plays a critical role in transcriptional silencing of transgenes in vivo. To gain insight into the role of the covalent linkage of plasmid DNA to the expression cassette and transcriptional repression, and whether this silencing effect could be alleviated by altering the molecular structure of vector DNAs in vivo, we generated a scheme for converting routine plasmids into a purified expression cassette, free of bacterial DNA after gene transfer in vivo. To do this, the human alpha-1-antitrypsin (hAAT) and human clotting factor IX (hfIX) reporter genes were flanked by two ISceI endonuclease recognition sites, and coinjected together with a plasmid encoding the I-SceI cDNA or a control plasmid into mouse liver. Two weeks after DNA administration, mice injected with the reporter gene alone or with the irrelevant control plasmid showed low serum levels of hAAT or hFIX, which remained low throughout the length of the experiment. However, animals that expressed I-SceI had a 5- to 10-fold increase in serum hAAT or hFIX that persisted for at least 8 months (length of study). Expression of I-SceI resulted in cleavage and excision of the expression cassettes from the plasmid backbone, forming mostly circles devoid of bacterial DNA sequences, as established by a battery of different Southern blot and polymerase chain reaction analyses in both C57BL/6 and scid treated mice. In contrast, only the input parental circular plasmid DNA band was detected in mice injected with the reporter gene alone, or an I-SceI plasmid together with the hAAT reporter plasmid lacking the I-SceI sites. Similar results were obtained when the Flp recombinase system was used to make mini-plasmids in mouse liver in vivo. This study presents further independent evidence that removing the covalent linkage between

  19. Isolation and physical characterization of streptomycete plasmids.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Guerineau, M

    1981-01-01

    Covalently closed circular DNA was isolated from a strain of Streptomyces coelicolor ATCC 10147 and from a strain of Streptomyces coelicolor subspecies flavus ATCC 19894, using two different methods. The two plasmids were of uniform monomer size: 8.9 kb for pS 10147, the plasmid from S. coelicolor ATCC 10147, and around 125 kb for the plasmid from S. coelicolor ATCC 19894. A restriction enzyme map was constructed for pS 10147, using seven enzymes. Four of the enzymes, (BamHI, Bgl,II, PvuII, and XhoI) cut pS 10147 once while PstI made two cuts. The GC content of this plasmid was calculated to be 72%. The possible utilisation of pS 10147 as a cloning vector in Streptomyces is discussed.

  20. The impact of the conjugative IncP-1 plasmid pKJK5 on multispecies biofilm formation is dependent on the plasmid host.

    PubMed

    Røder, Henriette Lyng; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Burmølle, Mette

    2013-07-01

    Horizontal gene transfer by conjugation has been reported to increase overall biofilm formation. Biofilm is considered a hot spot for plasmid transfer, and it has been found that social interactions during biofilm formation can increase the biomass. In this study, we demonstrate a contrast to previous studies by showing that the conjugative IncP-1 plasmid pKJK5 influences biofilm formation negatively. The results showed that a co-culture (Pseudomonas putida, Kluyvera sp., and Escherichia coli) formed significantly more biofilm than the strains did individually. When pKJK5 was inserted into P. putida, biofilm formation was significantly reduced compared with the co-culture without plasmid. A nonconjugative version of pKJK5 was also used, and the biofilm formation was restored. Visualization with the BioFlux 1000 facility showed that the presence of pKJK5-containing P. putida in the co-culture led to a changed biofilm structure, where the cells showed a higher tendency to attach to other cells rather than surfaces. This study thus indicates that the presence of conjugative plasmids in some species may decrease the surface-associated biofilm formation of a mixed co-culture by facilitating cell-cell attachment with reduced surface attachment as the consequence.

  1. Characterization and plasmid elimination of NDM-1-producing Acinetobacter calcoaceticus from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Liu, Qi; Chen, Shuo; Song, Yang; Liu, Jun; Guo, Xuejun; Zhu, Lingwei; Ji, Xue; Xu, Lizhi; Zhou, Wei; Qian, Jun; Feng, Shuzhang

    2014-01-01

    The presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial pathogens in the environment poses a serious threat to public health. The opportunistic Acinetobacter spp. are among the most prevalent causes of nosocomial infections. Here, we performed complete genome sequencing of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus strain XM1570, which was originally cultivated from the sputum of a patient diagnosed with pneumonia in Xiamen in 2010. We identified carbapenem resistance associated gene bla(NDM-1) located on a 47.3-kb plasmid. Three methods--natural reproduction, sodium dodecyl sulfate treatment and nalidixic acid treatment--were used to eliminate the bla(NDM-1)-encoding plasmid, which achieved elimination rates of 3.32% (10/301), 83.78% (278/332), and 84.17% (298/354), respectively. Plasmid elimination dramatically increased antibiotic sensitivity, reducing the minimum bacteriostatic concentration of meropenem from 256 µg/ml in the clinical strain to 0.125 µg/ml in the plasmid-eliminated strain. Conjugation transfer assays showed that the bla(NDM-1)-containing plasmid could be transferred into Escherichia coli DH5α:pBR322 in vitro as well as in vivo in mice. The bla(NDM-1) genetic environment was in accordance with that of other bla(NDM-1) genes identified from India, Japan, and Hong-Kong. The multilocus sequence type of the isolate was identified as ST-70. Two novel genes encoding intrinsic OXA and ADC were identified and named as OXA-417 and ADC-72. The finding of bla(NDM-1) in species like A. calcoaceticus demonstrates the wide spread of this gene in gram-negative bacteria which is possible by conjugative plasmid transfer. The results of this study may help in the development of a treatment strategy for controlling NDM-1 bacterial infection and transmission.

  2. Plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria and their role in adaptation to cold environments

    PubMed Central

    Dziewit, Lukasz; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    Extremely cold environments are a challenge for all organisms. They are mostly inhabited by psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria, which employ various strategies to cope with the cold. Such harsh environments are often highly vulnerable to the influence of external factors and may undergo frequent dynamic changes. The rapid adjustment of bacteria to changing environmental conditions is crucial for their survival. Such “short-term” evolution is often enabled by plasmids—extrachromosomal replicons that represent major players in horizontal gene transfer. The genomic sequences of thousands of microorganisms, including those of many cold-active bacteria have been obtained over the last decade, but the collected data have yet to be thoroughly analyzed. This report describes the results of a meta-analysis of the NCBI sequence databases to identify and characterize plasmids of psychrophilic and psychrotolerant bacteria. We have performed in-depth analyses of 66 plasmids, almost half of which are cryptic replicons not exceeding 10 kb in size. Our analyses of the larger plasmids revealed the presence of numerous genes, which may increase the phenotypic flexibility of their host strains. These genes encode enzymes possibly involved in (i) protection against cold and ultraviolet radiation, (ii) scavenging of reactive oxygen species, (iii) metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleotides and lipids, (iv) energy production and conversion, (v) utilization of toxic organic compounds (e.g., naphthalene), and (vi) resistance to heavy metals, metalloids and antibiotics. Some of the plasmids also contain type II restriction-modification systems, which are involved in both plasmid stabilization and protection against foreign DNA. Moreover, approx. 50% of the analyzed plasmids carry genetic modules responsible for conjugal transfer or mobilization for transfer, which may facilitate the spread of these replicons among various bacteria, including across species

  3. Polar solvent fluctuations drive proton transfer in hydrogen bonded complexes of carboxylic acid with pyridines: NMR, IR and ab initio MD study.

    PubMed

    Koeppe, B; Pylaeva, S A; Allolio, C; Sebastiani, D; Nibbering, E T J; Denisov, G S; Limbach, H-H; Tolstoy, P M

    2017-01-04

    We study a series of intermolecular hydrogen-bonded 1 : 1 complexes formed by chloroacetic acid with 19 substituted pyridines and one aliphatic amine dissolved in CD2Cl2 at low temperature by (1)H and (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. The hydrogen bond geometries in these complexes vary from molecular (O-HN) to zwitterionic (O(-)H-N(+)) ones, while NMR spectra show the formation of short strong hydrogen bonds in intermediate cases. Analysis of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching and asymmetric CO2(-) stretching bands in FTIR spectra reveal the presence of proton tautomerism. On the basis of these data, we construct the overall proton transfer pathway. In addition to that, we also study by use of ab initio molecular dynamics the complex formed by chloroacetic acid with 2-methylpyridine, surrounded by 71 CD2Cl2 molecules, revealing a dual-maximum distribution of hydrogen bond geometries in solution. The analysis of the calculated trajectory shows that the proton jumps between molecular and zwitterionic forms are indeed driven by dipole-dipole solvent-solute interactions, but the primary cause of the jumps is the formation/breaking of weak CHO bonds from solvent molecules to oxygen atoms of the carboxylate group.

  4. Marine Diatom Plasmids and their Biotechnological Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-27

    plasmid is homologous to the Tn21-type transposable elements. The element carries an open reading frame encoding a DNA invertase gene. Sequence comparisons...of regions upstream and downstream of the invertase gene indicate that the diatom plasmid is most similar to the Staphylococcus aureus transposon...the highly prokaryotic nature (i.e., codon usage bias, promoter sequences, etc.) of the invertase gene we have sequenced, we have tentatively

  5. Plasmid Replication Control by Antisense RNAs.

    PubMed

    Brantl, Sabine

    2014-08-01

    Plasmids are selfish genetic elements that normally constitute a burden for the bacterial host cell. This burden is expected to favor plasmid loss. Therefore, plasmids have evolved mechanisms to control their replication and ensure their stable maintenance. Replication control can be either mediated by iterons or by antisense RNAs. Antisense RNAs work through a negative control circuit. They are constitutively synthesized and metabolically unstable. They act both as a measuring device and a regulator, and regulation occurs by inhibition. Increased plasmid copy numbers lead to increasing antisense-RNA concentrations, which, in turn, result in the inhibition of a function essential for replication. On the other hand, decreased plasmid copy numbers entail decreasing concentrations of the inhibiting antisense RNA, thereby increasing the replication frequency. Inhibition is achieved by a variety of mechanisms, which are discussed in detail. The most trivial case is the inhibition of translation of an essential replication initiator protein (Rep) by blockage of the rep-ribosome binding site. Alternatively, ribosome binding to a leader peptide mRNA whose translation is required for efficient Rep translation can be prevented by antisense-RNA binding. In 2004, translational attenuation was discovered. Antisense-RNA-mediated transcriptional attenuation is another mechanism that has, so far, only been detected in plasmids of Gram-positive bacteria. ColE1, a plasmid that does not need a plasmid-encoded replication initiator protein, uses the inhibition of primer formation. In other cases, antisense RNAs inhibit the formation of an activator pseudoknot that is required for efficient Rep translation.

  6. Protein Diversity Confers Specificity in Plasmid Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Fothergill, Timothy J. G.; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-01-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation. PMID:15805511

  7. Protein diversity confers specificity in plasmid segregation.

    PubMed

    Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2005-04-01

    The ParG segregation protein (8.6 kDa) of multidrug resistance plasmid TP228 is a homodimeric DNA-binding factor. The ParG dimer consists of intertwined C-terminal domains that adopt a ribbon-helix-helix architecture and a pair of flexible, unstructured N-terminal tails. A variety of plasmids possess partition loci with similar organizations to that of TP228, but instead of ParG homologs, these plasmids specify a diversity of unrelated, but similarly sized, partition proteins. These include the proteobacterial pTAR, pVT745, and pB171 plasmids. The ParG analogs of these plasmids were characterized in parallel with the ParG homolog encoded by the pseudomonal plasmid pVS1. Like ParG, the four proteins are dimeric. No heterodimerization was detectable in vivo among the proteins nor with the prototypical ParG protein, suggesting that monomer-monomer interactions are specific among the five proteins. Nevertheless, as with ParG, the ParG analogs all possess significant amounts of unordered amino acid residues, potentially highlighting a common structural link among the proteins. Furthermore, the ParG analogs bind specifically to the DNA regions located upstream of their homologous parF-like genes. These nucleoprotein interactions are largely restricted to cognate protein-DNA pairs. The results reveal that the partition complexes of these and related plasmids have recruited disparate DNA-binding factors that provide a layer of specificity to the macromolecular interactions that mediate plasmid segregation.

  8. Polynucleotide sequence relationships among Ent plasmids and the relationship between Ent and other plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    So, M; Crosa, J H; Falkow, S

    1975-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid-deoxyribonucleic acid hybridization studies reveal that the plasmids coding for the production of heat stable and heat labile enteroxtoxins of Escherichia coli, regardless of their origin, have a majority of their polynucleotide sequences in common, but are not related in any significant way to those plasmids coding for the synthesis of only ST toxin. The heat stable and heat labile plasmids also share a significant degree of their polynucleotide sequences with plasmids of the FI and FII incompatibility groups, but not with R factors belonging to the I, N, W, P, or X incompatibility groups. PMID:1090570

  9. Global Transcriptional Regulation of Backbone Genes in Broad-Host-Range Plasmid RA3 from the IncU Group Involves Segregation Protein KorB (ParB Family)

    PubMed Central

    Godziszewska, Jolanta; Wojciechowska, Anna; Ludwiczak, Marta; Jagura-Burdzy, Grazyna

    2016-01-01

    The KorB protein of the broad-host-range conjugative plasmid RA3 from the IncU group belongs to the ParB family of plasmid and chromosomal segregation proteins. As a partitioning DNA-binding factor, KorB specifically recognizes a 16-bp palindrome which is an essential motif in the centromere-like sequence parSRA3, forms a segrosome, and together with its partner IncC (ParA family) participates in active DNA segregation ensuring stable plasmid maintenance. Here we show that by binding to this palindromic sequence, KorB also acts as a repressor for the adjacent mobC promoter driving expression of the mobC-nic operon, which is involved in DNA processing during conjugation. Three other promoters, one buried in the conjugative transfer module and two divergent promoters located at the border between the replication and stability regions, are regulated by KorB binding to additional KorB operators (OBs). KorB acts as a repressor at a distance, binding to OBs separated from their cognate promoters by between 46 and 1,317 nucleotides. This repressor activity is facilitated by KorB spreading along DNA, since a polymerization-deficient KorB variant with its dimerization and DNA-binding abilities intact is inactive in transcriptional repression. KorB may act as a global regulator of RA3 plasmid functions in Escherichia coli, since its overexpression in trans negatively interferes with mini-RA3 replication and stable maintenance of RA3. PMID:26850301

  10. Recombination-dependent concatemeric plasmid replication.

    PubMed Central

    Viret, J F; Bravo, A; Alonso, J C

    1991-01-01

    The replication of covalently closed circular supercoiled (form I) DNA in prokaryotes is generally controlled at the initiation level by a rate-limiting effector. Once initiated, replication proceeds via one of two possible modes (theta or sigma replication) which do not rely on functions involved in DNA repair and general recombination. Recently, a novel plasmid replication mode, leading to the accumulation of linear multigenome-length plasmid concatemers in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, has been described. Unlike form I DNA replication, an intermediate recombination step is most probably involved in the initiation of concatemeric plasmid DNA replication. On the basis of structural and functional studies, we infer that recombination-dependent plasmid replication shares important features with phage late replication modes and, in several aspects, parallels the synthesis of plasmid concatemers in phage-infected cells. The characterization of the concatemeric plasmid replication mode has allowed new insights into the mechanisms of DNA replication and recombination in prokaryotes. PMID:1779931

  11. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of 4-chlorobiphenyl.

    PubMed Central

    Shields, M S; Hooper, S W; Sayler, G S

    1985-01-01

    Strains of Alcaligenes and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from a mixed culture already proven to be proficient at complete mineralization of monohalogenated biphenyls. These strains were shown to harbor a 35 X 10(6)-dalton plasmid mediating a complete pathway for 4-chlorobiphenyl (4CB) oxidation. Subsequent plasmid curing of these bacteria resulted in the abolishment of the 4CB mineralization phenotype and loss of even early 4CB metabolism by Acinetobacter spp. Reestablishment of the Alcaligenes plasmid, denoted pSS50, in the cured Acinetobacter spp. via filter surface mating resulted in the restoration of 4CB mineralization abilities. 4CB mineralization, however, proved to be an unstable characteristic in some subcultured strains. Such loss was not found to coincide with any detectable alteration in plasmid size. Cultures capable of complete mineralization, as well as those limited to partial metabolism of 4CB, produced 4-chlorobenzoate as a metabolite. Demonstration of mineralization of a purified 14C-labeled chlorobenzoate showed it to be a true intermediate in 4CB mineralization. Unlike the mineralization capability, the ability to produce a metabolite has proven to be stable on subculture. These results indicate the occurrence of a novel plasmid, or evolved catabolic plasmid, that mediates the complete mineralization of 4CB. Images PMID:2993249

  12. [Progress in endogenous plasmid curing of bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun; Zhang, Wei; Song, Cunjiang

    2013-11-04

    To investigate the functions of the bacteria endogenous plasmid, which include bacterial drug resistance, symbiosis, capsular formation and heavy metal resistance, the endogenous plasmid needs to be cured first. We reviewed physical, chemical and molecular biological methods of endogenous plasmid curing, clarified the curing principles. The prospective of research on plasmid curing was also discussed, based on our own studies.

  13. An abyssal mobilome: viruses, plasmids and vesicles from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    PubMed

    Lossouarn, Julien; Dupont, Samuel; Gorlas, Aurore; Mercier, Coraline; Bienvenu, Nadege; Marguet, Evelyne; Forterre, Patrick; Geslin, Claire

    2015-12-01

    Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as viruses, plasmids, vesicles, gene transfer agents (GTAs), transposons and transpovirions, which collectively represent the mobilome, interact with cellular organisms from all three domains of life, including those thriving in the most extreme environments. While efforts have been made to better understand deep-sea vent microbial ecology, our knowledge of the mobilome associated with prokaryotes inhabiting deep-sea hydrothermal vents remains limited. Here we focus on the abyssal mobilome by reviewing accumulating data on viruses, plasmids and vesicles associated with thermophilic and hyperthermophilic Bacteria and Archaea present in deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

  14. Historical Events That Spawned the Field of Plasmid Biology.

    PubMed

    Kado, Clarence I

    2014-10-01

    This chapter revisits the historical development and outcome of studies focused on the transmissible, extrachromosomal genetic elements called plasmids. Early work on plasmids involved structural and genetic mapping of these molecules, followed by the development of an understanding of how plasmids replicate and segregate during cell division. The intriguing property of plasmid transmission between bacteria and between bacteria and higher cells has received considerable attention. The utilitarian aspects of plasmids are described, including examples of various plasmid vector systems. This chapter also discusses the functional attributes of plasmids needed for their persistence and survival in nature and in man-made environments. The term plasmid biology was first conceived at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference on Promiscuous Plasmids, 1990, Lake Tahoe, California. The International Society for Plasmid Biology was established in 2004 (www.ISPB.org).

  15. Enhancement of bacterial competitive fitness by apramycin resistance plasmids from non-pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Yates, C M; Shaw, D J; Roe, A J; Woolhouse, M E J; Amyes, S G B

    2006-09-22

    The study of antibiotic resistance has in the past focused on organisms that are pathogenic to humans or animals. However, the development of resistance in commensal organisms is of concern because of possible transfer of resistance genes to zoonotic pathogens. Conjugative plasmids are genetic elements capable of such transfer and are traditionally thought to engender a fitness burden on host bacteria. In this study, conjugative apramycin resistance plasmids isolated from newborn calves were characterized. Calves were raised on a farm that had not used apramycin or related aminoglycoside antibiotics for at least 20 months prior to sampling. Of three apramycin resistance plasmids, one was capable of transfer at very high rates and two were found to confer fitness advantages on new Escherichia coli hosts. This is the first identification of natural plasmids isolated from commensal organisms that are able to confer a fitness advantage on a new host. This work indicates that reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in commensal organisms might not decrease if antibiotic usage is halted.

  16. Development of molecular tools to monitor conjugative transfer in rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Tejerizo, Gonzalo Torres; Bañuelos, Luis Alfredo; Cervantes, Laura; Gaytán, Paul; Pistorio, Mariano; Romero, David; Brom, Susana

    2015-10-01

    Evolution of bacterial populations has been extensively driven by horizontal transfer events. Conjugative plasmid transfer is considered the principal contributor to gene exchange among bacteria. Several conjugative and mobilizable plasmids have been identified in rhizobia, and two major molecular mechanisms that regulate their transfer have been described, under laboratory conditions. The knowledge of rhizobial plasmid transfer regulation in natural environments is very poor. In this work we developed molecular tools to easily monitor the conjugative plasmid transfer in rhizobia by flow cytometry (FC) or microscopy. 24 cassettes were constructed by combining a variety of promotors, fluorescent proteins and antibiotic resistance genes, and used to tag plasmids and chromosome of donor strains. We were able to detect plasmid transfer after conversion of non-fluorescent recipients into fluorescent transconjugants. Flow cytometry (FC) was optimized to count donor, recipient and transconjugant strains to determine conjugative transfer frequencies. Results were similar, when determined either by FC or by viable counts. Our constructions also allowed the visualization of transconjugants in crosses performed on bean roots. The tools presented here may also be used for other purposes, such as analysis of transcriptional fusions or single-cell tagging. Application of the system will allow the survey of how different environmental conditions or other regulators modulate plasmid transfer in rhizobia.

  17. A Functional oriT in the Ptw Plasmid of Burkholderia cenocepacia Can Be Recognized by the R388 Relaxase TrwC

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-González, Esther; Bakioui, Sawsane; Gomes, Margarida C.; O'Callaghan, David; Vergunst, Annette C.; Sangari, Félix J.; Llosa, Matxalen

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is both a plant pathogen and the cause of serious opportunistic infections, particularly in cystic fibrosis patients. B. cenocepacia K56-2 harbors a native plasmid named Ptw for its involvement in the Plant Tissue Watersoaking phenotype. Ptw has also been reported to be important for survival in human cells. Interestingly, the presence of PtwC, a homolog of the conjugative relaxase TrwC of plasmid R388, suggests a possible function for Ptw in conjugative DNA transfer. The ptw region includes Type IV Secretion System genes related to those of the F plasmid. However, genes in the adjacent region shared stronger homology with the R388 genes involved in conjugative DNA metabolism. This region included the putative relaxase ptwC, a putative coupling protein and accessory nicking protein, and a DNA segment with high number of inverted repeats and elevated AT content, suggesting a possible oriT. Although we were unable to detect conjugative transfer of the Ptw resident plasmid, we detected conjugal mobilization of a co-resident plasmid containing the ptw region homologous to R388, demonstrating the cloned ptw region contains an oriT. A similar plasmid lacking ptwC could not be mobilized, suggesting that the putative relaxase PtwC must act in cis on its oriT. Remarkably, we also detected mobilization of a plasmid containing the Ptw oriT by the R388 relaxase TrwC, yet we could not detect PtwC-mediated mobilization of an R388 oriT-containing plasmid. Our data unambiguously show that the Ptw plasmid harbors DNA transfer functions, and suggests the Ptw plasmid may play a dual role in horizontal DNA transfer and eukaryotic infection. PMID:27200362

  18. Identification of bacterial plasmids based on mobility and plasmid population biology.

    PubMed

    Garcillán-Barcia, Maria Pilar; Alvarado, Andrés; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2011-09-01

    Plasmids contain a backbone of core genes that remains relatively stable for long evolutionary periods, making sense to speak about plasmid species. The identification and characterization of the core genes of a plasmid species has a special relevance in the study of its epidemiology and modes of transmission. Besides, this knowledge will help to unveil the main routes that genes, for example antibiotic resistance (AbR) genes, use to travel from environmental reservoirs to human pathogens. Global dissemination of multiple antibiotic resistances and virulence traits by plasmids is an increasing threat for the treatment of many bacterial infectious diseases. To follow the dissemination of virulence and AbR genes, we need to identify the causative plasmids and follow their path from reservoirs to pathogens. In this review, we discuss how the existing diversity in plasmid genetic structures gives rise to a large diversity in propagation strategies. We would like to propose that, using an identification methodology based on plasmid mobility types, we can follow the propagation routes of most plasmids in Gammaproteobacteria, as well as their cargo genes, in complex ecosystems. Once the dissemination routes are known, designing antidissemination drugs and testing their efficacy will become feasible. We discuss in this review how the existing diversity in plasmid genetic structures gives rise to a large diversity in propagation strategies. We would like to propose that, by using an identification methodology based on plasmid mobility types, we can follow the propagation routes of most plasmids in ?-proteobacteria, as well as their cargo genes, in complex ecosystems.

  19. The ability of soil bacteria to receive the conjugative IncP1 plasmid, pKJK10, is different in a mixed community compared to single strains.

    PubMed

    de la Cruz-Perera, Claudia I; Ren, Dawei; Blanchet, Marine; Dendooven, Luc; Marsch, Rodolfo; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer by conjugation is common among bacterial populations in soil. It is well known that the host range of plasmids depends on several factors, including the identity of the plasmid host cell. In the present study, however, we demonstrate that the composition of the recipient community is also determining for the dissemination of a conjugative plasmid. We isolated 15 different bacterial strains from soil and assessed the conjugation frequencies of the IncP1 plasmid, pKJK10, by flow cytometry, from two different donors, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida, to either 15 different bacterial strains or to the mixed community composed of all the 15 strains. We detected transfer of pKJK10 from P. putida to Stenotrophomonas rhizophila in a diparental mating, but no transfer was observed to the mixed community. In contrast, for E. coli, transfer was observed only to the mixed community, where Ochrobactrum rhizosphaerae was identified as the dominating plasmid recipient. Our results indicate that the presence of a bacterial community impacts the plasmid permissiveness by affecting the ability of strains to receive the conjugative plasmid.

  20. N15: the linear phage-plasmid.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V

    2011-03-01

    The lambdoid phage N15 of Escherichia coli is very unusual among temperate phages in that its prophage is not integrated into chromosome but is a linear plasmid molecule with covalently closed ends. Upon infection the phage DNA circularises via cohesive ends, then phage-encoded enzyme, protelomerase, cuts at an inverted repeat site and forms hairpin ends (telomeres) of the linear plasmid prophage. Replication of the N15 prophage is initiated at an internally located ori site and proceeds bidirectionally resulting in formation of duplicated telomeres. Then the N15 protelomerase cuts duplicated telomeres generating two linear plasmid molecules with hairpin telomeres. Stable inheritance of the plasmid prophage is ensured by partitioning operon similar to the F factor sop operon. Unlike F sop, the N15 centromere consists of four inverted repeats dispersed in the genome. The multiplicity and dispersion of centromeres are required for efficient partitioning of a linear plasmid. The centromeres are located in N15 genome regions involved in phage replication and control of lysogeny, and binding of partition proteins at these sites regulates these processes. Two N15-related lambdoid Siphoviridae phages, φKO2 in Klebsiella oxytoca and pY54 in Yersinia enterocolitica, also lysogenize their hosts as linear plasmids, as well as Myoviridae marine phages VP882 and VP58.5 in Vibrio parahaemolyticus and ΦHAP-1 in Halomonas aquamarina. The genomes of all these phages contain similar protelomerase genes, lysogeny modules and replication genes, as well as plasmid-partitioning genes, suggesting that these phages may belong to a group diverged from a common ancestor.

  1. Involvement of Two Plasmids in the Degradation of Carbaryl by Arthrobacter sp. Strain RC100

    PubMed Central

    Hayatsu, Masahito; Hirano, Motoko; Nagata, Tadahiro

    1999-01-01

    A bacterium capable of utilizing carbaryl (1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate) as the sole carbon source was isolated from carbaryl-treated soil. This bacterium was characterized taxonomically as Arthrobacter and was designated strain RC100. RC100 hydrolyzes the N-methylcarbamate linkage to 1-naphthol, which was further metabolized via salicylate and gentisate. Strain RC100 harbored three plasmids (designated pRC1, pRC2, and pRC3). Mutants unable to degrade carbaryl arose at a high frequency after treating the culture with mitomycin C. All carbaryl-hydrolysis-deficient mutants (Cah−) lacked pRC1, and all 1-naphthol-utilization-deficient mutants (Nat−) lacked pRC2. The plasmid-free strain RC107 grew on gentisate as a carbon source. These two plasmids could be transferred to Cah− mutants or Nat− mutants by conjugation, resulting in the restoration of the Cah and Nah phenotypes. PMID:10049857

  2. Plasmid regulation and temperature-sensitive behavior of the Yersinia pestis penicillin-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, R C; Park, J T; Ferreira, L C

    1994-01-01

    Six major bands corresponding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) with molecular weights ranging from 43,000 to 97,000 were detected in cell envelopes of Yersinia pestis EV76 grown at 28 degrees C. When cells were transferred to 37 degrees C and incubated for extended periods of time, the amounts of all PBPs, except for PBP2, were gradually reduced in cell envelopes of a strain carrying a 75-kb virulence-associated plasmid (as measured by penicillin-binding capacity), whereas in a strain cured of the plasmid, all PBPs were stable. The results indicated that the stability and/or the expression of Y. pestis PBPs is affected by a temperature-inducible pathway associated with the virulence-associated plasmid. Images PMID:8188365

  3. Molecular Diversity and Plasmid Analysis of KPC-Producing Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Chavda, Kalyan D; Chen, Liang; Jacobs, Michael R; Bonomo, Robert A; Kreiswirth, Barry N

    2016-07-01

    The emergence and spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among Enterobacteriaceae presents a major public health threat to the world. Although not as common as in K. pneumoniae, KPC is also found in Escherichia coli strains. Here, we genetically characterized 9 carbapenem-resistant E. coli strains isolated from six hospitals in the United States and completely sequenced their blaKPC-harboring plasmids. The nine strains were isolated from different geographical locations and belonged to 8 different E. coli sequence types. Seven blaKPC-harboring plasmids belonged to four different known incompatibility groups (IncN, -FIA, -FIIK2, and -FIIK1) and ranged in size from ∼16 kb to ∼241 kb. In this analysis, we also identified two plasmids that have novel replicons: (i) pBK28610, which is similar to p34978-3 with an insertion of Tn4401b, and (ii) pBK31611, which does not have an apparent homologue in the GenBank database. Moreover, we report the emergence of a pKP048-like plasmid, pBK34397, in E. coli in the United States. Meanwhile, we also found examples of interspecies spread of blaKPC plasmids, as pBK34592 is identical to pBK30683, isolated from K. pneumoniae In addition, we discovered examples of acquisition (pBK32602 acquired an ∼46-kb fragment including a novel replication gene, along with Tn4401b and other resistance genes) and/or loss (pKpQIL-Ec has a 14.5-kb deletion compared to pKpQIL-10 and pBK33689) of DNA, demonstrating the plasticity of these plasmids and their rapid evolution in the clinic. Overall, our study shows that the spread of blaKPC-producing E. coli is largely due to horizontal transfer of blaKPC-harboring plasmids and related mobile elements into diverse genetic backgrounds.

  4. Molecular Diversity and Plasmid Analysis of KPC-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Chavda, Kalyan D.; Chen, Liang; Jacobs, Michael R.; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence and spread of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) among Enterobacteriaceae presents a major public health threat to the world. Although not as common as in K. pneumoniae, KPC is also found in Escherichia coli strains. Here, we genetically characterized 9 carbapenem-resistant E. coli strains isolated from six hospitals in the United States and completely sequenced their blaKPC-harboring plasmids. The nine strains were isolated from different geographical locations and belonged to 8 different E. coli sequence types. Seven blaKPC-harboring plasmids belonged to four different known incompatibility groups (IncN, -FIA, -FIIK2, and -FIIK1) and ranged in size from ∼16 kb to ∼241 kb. In this analysis, we also identified two plasmids that have novel replicons: (i) pBK28610, which is similar to p34978-3 with an insertion of Tn4401b, and (ii) pBK31611, which does not have an apparent homologue in the GenBank database. Moreover, we report the emergence of a pKP048-like plasmid, pBK34397, in E. coli in the United States. Meanwhile, we also found examples of interspecies spread of blaKPC plasmids, as pBK34592 is identical to pBK30683, isolated from K. pneumoniae. In addition, we discovered examples of acquisition (pBK32602 acquired an ∼46-kb fragment including a novel replication gene, along with Tn4401b and other resistance genes) and/or loss (pKpQIL-Ec has a 14.5-kb deletion compared to pKpQIL-10 and pBK33689) of DNA, demonstrating the plasticity of these plasmids and their rapid evolution in the clinic. Overall, our study shows that the spread of blaKPC-producing E. coli is largely due to horizontal transfer of blaKPC-harboring plasmids and related mobile elements into diverse genetic backgrounds. PMID:27114279

  5. A Mini-intronic Plasmid (MIP): A Novel Robust Transgene Expression Vector In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiamiao; Zhang, Feijie; Kay, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial backbone (BB) sequences contained within a canonical plasmid DNA dampen exogenous transgene expression by tenfold to 1,000-fold over a period of a few weeks following transfection into quiescent tissues such as the liver. Minicircle DNA vectors devoid of bacterial plasmid backbone sequences overcome transgene silencing providing persistent transgene expression. Because, we recently established that the length rather than sequence of the DNA flanking the transgene expression cassette is the major parameter affecting transgene silencing, we developed an alternative plasmid propagation process in which the essential bacterial elements for plasmid replication and selection are placed within an engineered intron contained within the eukaryotic expression cassette. As with the minicircle vector, the mini-intronic plasmid (MIP) vector system overcomes transgene silencing observed with plasmids but in addition provides between 2 and often 10 times or higher levels of transgene expression compared with minicircle vectors containing the same expression cassette in vivo and in vitro. These improved plasmids will benefit all studies involving gene transfer/therapy approaches. PMID:23459514

  6. pB264, a small, mobilizable, temperature sensitive plasmid from Rhodococcus

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Philip A; O'Brien, Xian M; Currie, Devin H; Sinskey, Anthony J

    2004-01-01

    Background Gram-positive bacteria of the genus Rhodococcus have shown an extraordinary capacity for metabolizing recalcitrant organic compounds. One hindrance to the full exploitation of Rhodococcus is the dearth of genetic tools available for strain manipulation. To address this issue, we sought to develop a plasmid-based system for genetic manipulation of a variety of Rhodococcus strains. Results We isolated and sequenced pB264, a 4,970 bp cryptic plasmid from Rhodococcus sp. B264-1 with features of a theta-type replication mechanism. pB264 was nearly identical to pKA22, a previously sequenced but uncharacterized cryptic plasmid. Derivatives of pB264 replicate in a diverse range of Rhodococcus species, showing that this plasmid does not bear the same host range restrictions that have been exhibited by other theta replicating plasmids. Replication or maintenance of pB264 is inhibited at 37°C, making pB264 useful as a suicide vector for genetic manipulation of Rhodococcus. A series of deletions revealed that ca. 1.3 kb from pB264 was sufficient to support replication and stable inheritance of the plasmid. This region includes two open reading frames that encode functions (RepAB) that can support replication of pB264 derivatives in trans. Rhodococcus sp. B264-1 will mobilize pB264 into other Rhodococcus species via conjugation, making it possible to genetically modify bacterial strains that are otherwise difficult to transform. The cis-acting element (oriT) required for conjugal transfer of pB264 resides within a ca. 0.7 kb region that is distinct from the regions responsible for replication. Conclusion Shuttle vectors derived from pB264 will be useful for genetic studies and strain improvement in Rhodococcus, and will also be useful for studying the processes of theta replication and conjugal transfer among actinomycetes. PMID:15084226

  7. Characterization of plasmid-mediated aphA-3 kanamycin resistance in Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Gibreel, Amera; Sköld, Ola; Taylor, Diane E

    2004-01-01

    A total of 254 isolates of Campylobacter jejuni and three isolates of Campylobacter coli, isolated from Sweden, Canada, and Egypt, were screened for kanamycin resistance. Eight strains of C. jejuni contained large plasmids that carried the aphA-3 kanamycin-resistance marker. In six plasmids, the aphA-3 gene was located downstream of an apparent insertion sequence, designated IS607*, which showed a considerable similarity to IS607, characterized on the chromosome of some Helicobacter pylori strains. In contrast, the other plasmids carried the aphA-3 gene as a part of a resistance cluster. This included three resistance markers encoding 6'-adenylyltransferase (aadE), streptothricin acetyltransferase (sat), and 3'-aminoglycoside phosphotransferase type III (aphA-3). The genetic organization of this resistance cluster suggests that it has been acquired by C. jejuni from a Gram-positive organism. The IS607* element was also observed in kanamycin-susceptible strains of C. jejuni on plasmids mediating tetracycline resistance. The kanamycin-resistance phenotype transferred along with tetracycline resistance by conjugation from four representative C. jejuni strains to a recipient strain of C. jejuni. The kanamycin-resistance determinant (aphA-3) was stably transferred from one of the four C. jejuni strains to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli. However, the C. jejuni plasmid, which also carries the tetO gene, was not maintained in E. coli. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed the integration of approximately 50 kb of the plasmid into the chromosome of the E. coli recipient.

  8. Electrotransformation of Yersinia ruckeri by plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Cutrín, J M; Conchas, R F; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1994-01-01

    Yersinia ruckeri, a fish pathogenic bacterium in aquaculture, was used to evaluate the electroporation as a new transformation method for this species. DNA used for the electrotransformation were plasmids of molecular mass ranging from 2.3 kb to 33 kb, and diverse replicons. To optimize this method we used Y. ruckeri 11.29 strain (from serotype 02) and pSU2718 DNA. The best transformation efficiency (6.0 x 10(5) transformants/micrograms DNA) was obtained with 12.5 kV/cm, 25 microF, 400 omega and 2 hours of incubation after pulse. When these conditions were applied to other strains belonging to different serotypes and other plasmids, we obtained transformants in all strains assayed, but only when using low molecular weight plasmids. Plasmid vectors and resident plasmid were not modified in host strains after electrotransformation. In studies of conformation we confirmed that only circular DNA was able for transformation. The utilization of this technique for direct cloning in Y. ruckeri makes possible further studies on recombinant DNA.

  9. Complete nucleotide sequence of plasmid pNA6 reveals the high plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingjun; Xu, Yan; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-10-10

    Antibiotic resistance is a serious problem in health care and is of widespread public concern. Conjugative plasmids are the most important vectors in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. In this study, we determined the complete sequence of plasmid pNA6, a plasmid which was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to ampicillin, erythromycin and sulfamethoxazole. The complete sequence of plasmid pNA6 was 52,210bp in length with an average G+C content of 52.70%. Plasmid pNA6 belongs to the IncU group by sequence queries against the GenBank database. This plasmid has a typical IncU backbone and shows the highest similarities with plasmid RA3 and plasmid pFBAOT6. Plasmid pNA6 carries a class 1 integron consisting of aacA4, ereA and dfrA1 genes. Moreover, plasmid pNA6 also harbors a blaTEM-1-containing complex structure which inserted into the replication region and maintenance region. This insertion site has never been found on other IncU plasmids. The sequencing of plasmid pNA6 will add new sequence information to IncU family plasmids and enhance our understanding of the plasticity of IncU family plasmids.

  10. GFP plasmid-induced defects in Salmonella invasion depend on plasmid architecture, not protein expression.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leann; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Humphrey, Tom J; Jepson, Mark A

    2009-02-01

    We have investigated the impact of plasmids and GFP expression on invasion of cultured epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica Typhimurium strain SL1344. The invasiveness of SL1344 carrying plasmids derived from pBR322, encoding promoterless GFP or constitutively expressed rpsM-GFP, was compared under optimal growth conditions with that of SL1344(pBR322), unmodified SL1344 and a strain with chromosome-integrated rpsM-GFP. The strain carrying pBR322 exhibited normal invasion, but the presence of modified plasmids impaired invasiveness, and impairment was exacerbated by plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol resistance (CmR). Using a different antibiotic resistance marker, kanamycin (KmR), did not impair invasiveness. Despite the effect of plasmid-encoded CmR, the strain containing chromosomally encoded GFP, also carrying a CmR gene, was as invasive as the wild-type. To investigate the mechanism by which plasmid carriage decreases invasion, we monitored SPI-1 gene expression using prgH promoter activity as an index of SPI-1 activity. An SL1344 strain with a chromosome-integrated prgH::gfp reporter construct exhibited lower GFP expression during exponential phase when carrying plasmids incorporating CmR or gfp, mirroring invasion data. These data provide evidence that suppression of SPI-1 gene expression is a major factor in the loss of invasiveness associated with plasmid carriage. Our findings also indicate that some plasmids, especially those carrying CmR, should be used with caution, as virulence traits and gene expression may be affected by their presence. Integration of reporter proteins into the bacterial chromosome, however, appears to circumvent the adverse effects observed with plasmids.

  11. Development of safe and effective nonviral gene therapy by eliminating CpG motifs from plasmid DNA vector.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2012-01-01

    Nonviral gene therapy is expected to become a regular treatment for a variety of difficult-to-treat diseases, such as cancer and virus infection. Plasmid DNA, which is used in most nonviral gene delivery systems, usually contains, unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotides, so called CpG motifs. CpG motifs are recognized by immune cells as a danger signal, leading to an inflammatory response. Such inflammatory responses could affect the safety and effectiveness of nonviral gene therapy. Therefore, reducing the number of CpG motifs in plasmid DNA has been used to increase the potency of plasmid DNA-based gene therapy. Previous studies have demonstrated that CpG reduction can extend the time period of transgene expression from plasmid DNA after in vivo gene transfer. In this review, the biological functions of the CpG motif are briefly summarized. Then, safety issues of nonviral gene therapy are discussed from the viewpoint of the inflammatory response to the CpG motif in plasmid DNA, and the effects of the CpG motif in plasmid DNA on the transgene expression profile of nonviral gene transfer are reviewed.

  12. Plasmid-Mediated Dimethoate Degradation by Bacillus licheniformis Isolated From a Fresh Water Fish Labeo rohita

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The Bacillus licheniformis strain isolated from the intestine of Labeo rohita by an enrichment technique showed capability of utilizing dimethoate as the sole source of carbon. The bacterium rapidly utilized dimethoate beyond 0.6 mg/mL and showed prolific growth in a mineral salts medium containing 0.45 mg/mL dimethoate. The isolated B licheniformis exhibited high level of tolerance of dimethoate (3.5 mg/mL) in nutrient broth, while its cured mutant did not tolerate dimethoate beyond 0.45 mg/mL and it was unable to utilize dimethoate. The wild B licheniformis strain transferred dimethoate degradation property to E coli C600 (Nar, F−) strain. The transconjugant harbored a plasmid of the same molecular size (approximately 54 kb) as that of the donor plasmid; the cured strain was plasmid less. Thus a single plasmid of approximately 54 kb was involved in dimethoate degradation. Genes encoding resistance to antibiotic and heavy metal were also located on the plasmid. PMID:16192686

  13. Generation of Small Colony Variants in Biofilms by Escherichia coli Harboring a Conjugative F Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Eida, Hiroaki; Ishii, Satoshi; Futamata, Hiroyuki; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    A conjugative F plasmid induces mature biofilm formation by Escherichia coli by promoting F-pili-mediated cell-cell interactions and increasing the expression of biofilm-related genes. We herein demonstrated another function for the F plasmid in E. coli biofilms; it contributes to the emergence of genetic and phenotypic variations by spontaneous mutations. Small colony variants (SCVs) were more frequently generated in a continuous flow-cell biofilm than in the planktonic state of E. coli harboring the F plasmid. E. coli SCVs represented typical phenotypic changes such as slower growth, less biofilm formation, and greater resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics than the parent strain. Genomic and complementation analyses indicated that the small colony phenotype was caused by the insertion of Tn1000, which was originally localized in the F plasmid, into the hemB gene. Furthermore, the Tn1000 insertion was removed from hemB in the revertant, which showed a normal colony phenotype. This study revealed that the F plasmid has the potential to increase genetic variations not only by horizontal gene transfer via F pili, but also by site-specific recombination within a single cell. PMID:28302951

  14. Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34 is a facultative chemolithotroph with plasmid-bound resistance to heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Mergeay, M.; Nies, D.; Schlegel, H.G.; Gerits, J.; Charles, P.; Van Gijsegem, F.

    1985-04-01

    Alcaligenes eutrophus strain CH34, which was isolated as a bacterium resistant to cobalt, zinc, and cadmium ions, shares with A. eutrophus strain H16 the ability to grow lithoautotrophically on molecular hydrocarbon, to form a cytoplasmic NAD-reducing and a membrane-bound hydrogenase, and most metabolic attributes; however, it does not grow on fructose. Strain CH34 contains two plasmids, pMOL28 (163 kilobases) specifying nickel, mercury, and cobalt resistance and pMOL30 (238 kilobases) specifying zinc, cadmium, mercury, and cobalt resistance. The plasmids are self-transmissible in homologous matings, but at low frequencies. The transfer frequency was strongly increased with IncP1 plasmids RP4 and pUZ8 as helper plasmids. The phenotypes of the wild type, cured strains, and transconjugants are characterized by the following MICs (Micromolar) in strains with the indicated phenotypes: Nic/sup +/, 2.5; Nic/sup -/, 0.6; Cob/sup +/A, 5.0; Cob/sup +/B, 20.0; Cob/sup -/, < 0.07; Zin/sup +/, 12.0; Zin/sup -/, 0.6; Cad/sup +/, 2.5; and Cad/sup -/, 0.6. Plasmid-free cells of strain CH34 are still able to grow lithoautotrophically and to form both hydrogenases, indicating that the hydrogenase genes are located on the chromosome, in contrast to the Hox structural genes of strain H16, which are located on the megaplasmid pHG1 (450 kilobases).

  15. Characteristics of Plasmids in Multi-Drug-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae Isolated during Prospective Surveillance of a Newly Opened Hospital in Iraq

    PubMed Central

    Chahine, Mohamad A.; Glenn, LaShanda M.; Ake, Julie A.; Su, Wanwen; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.; Lesho, Emil P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Gram-negative multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria are major causes of nosocomial infections, and antibiotic resistance in these organisms is often plasmid mediated. Data are scarce pertaining to molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance in resource constrained areas such as Iraq. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, all MDR Enterobacteriaceae (n = 38) and randomly selected non-MDR counterparts (n = 41) isolated from patients, healthcare workers and environmental surfaces in a newly opened hospital in Iraq were investigated to characterize plasmids found in these isolates and determine their contribution to antibiotic resistance. Our results demonstrated that MDR E. coli and K. pneumoniae isolates harbored significantly more (≥3) plasmids compared to their non-MDR counterparts, which carried ≤2 plasmids (p<0.01). Various large plasmids (∼52 to 100 kb) from representative isolates were confirmed to contain multiple resistance genes by DNA microarray analysis. Aminoglycoside (acc, aadA, aph, strA/B, and ksgA), β-lactam (blaTEM1, blaAMPC, blaCTX-M-15, blaOXA-1, blaVIM-2 and blaSHV), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (sul/dfr), tetracycline (tet) and chloramphenicol (cat) resistance genes were detected on these plasmids. Additionally, multiple plasmids carrying multiple antibiotic resistance genes were found in the same host strain. Genetic transfer-associated genes were identified on the plasmids from both MDR and non-MDR isolates. Seven plasmid replicon types (FII, FIA, FIB, B/O, K, I1 and N) were detected in the isolates, while globally disseminated IncA/C and IncHI1 plasmids were not detected in these isolates. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of the characteristics of the plasmids found in Enterobacteriaceae isolated following the opening of a new hospital in Iraq. The information provided here furthers our understanding of the mechanisms of drug resistance in this specific region and their evolutionary

  16. Horizontol dissemination of TEM- and SHV-typr beta-lactamase genes-carrying resistance plasmids amongst clonical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Ozgumus, Osman Birol; Tosun, Ilknur; Aydin, Faruk; Kilic, Ali Osman

    2008-01-01

    The extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria have been isolated at increasing frequency worldwide. Expression of ESBL is often associated with multidrug resistance and dissemination by resistance plasmids. During a two-month period in 2000, 133 clinical isolates of enterobacterial strains were randomly collected from outpatients and inpatients at a university hospital in Turkey. The ESBL producing strains were determined by double-disk synergy (DDS) testing. Twenty ESBL producing strains (15%) including Escherichia coli (n = 9), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 7), Klebsiella oxytoca (n = 2) and Enterobacter aerogenes (n = 2) were detected and further analyzed for their resistance transfer features, plasmid profile and nature of the resistance genes. Plasmid transfer assays were performed using broth mating techniques. TEM- and SHV- genes were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hybridization using specific probes. EcoRI restriction enzyme analyses of R plasmids were used in the detection of epidemic plasmids. Fourteen plasmid profiles (A, B1, B2, C1, and C2 to L) were obtained with EcoRI restriction enzyme analysis. Most of these plasmids were detected to carry both TEM- and SHV-derived genes by PCR, and confirmed by localizing each gene by hybridization assay. Epidemiological evidence indicated that there was an apparent horizontal dissemination of conjugative R plasmids among multidrug-resistant enterobacterial genera and species in this hospital. PMID:24031280

  17. Proteolysis in plasmid DNA stable maintenance in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Karlowicz, Anna; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Dubiel, Andrzej; Ropelewska, Malgorzata; Konieczny, Igor

    2016-07-01

    Plasmids, as extrachromosomal genetic elements, need to work out strategies that promote independent replication and stable maintenance in host bacterial cells. Their maintenance depends on constant formation and dissociation of nucleoprotein complexes formed on plasmid DNA. Plasmid replication initiation proteins (Rep) form specific complexes on direct repeats (iterons) localized within the plasmid replication origin. Formation of these complexes along with a strict control of Rep protein cellular concentration, quaternary structure, and activity, is essential for plasmid maintenance. Another important mechanism for maintenance of low-copy-number plasmids are the toxin-antitoxin (TA) post-segregational killing (psk) systems, which prevent plasmid loss from the bacterial cell population. In this mini review we discuss the importance of nucleoprotein complex processing by energy-dependent host proteases in plasmid DNA replication and plasmid type II toxin-antitoxin psk systems, and draw attention to the elusive role of DNA in this process.

  18. Genetic characterization of pPHDP60, a novel conjugative plasmid from the marine fish pathogen Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida.

    PubMed

    Balado, Miguel; Lemos, Manuel L; Osorio, Carlos R

    2013-07-01

    A new plasmid designated pPHDP60 from a strain of the marine bacterium Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida isolated from diseased seabream has been characterised. pPHDP60 consists of 59,731bp, has a G+C content of 37.2% and encodes 63 predicted open-reading frames (ORFs). The plasmid backbone sequence includes, among other genes, 15 ORFs homologous to proteins of type IV conjugation systems described in IncP-type plasmids. Two modules could be distinguished within pPHDP60 sequence. One module included 10 genes of a putative type II secretion system with homologues in other Photobacterium and Vibrio plasmids. A second module exhibiting a transposon structure included a functional haloalkane dehalogenase gene linB as well as a toxin/antitoxin system. Additional interesting features of pPHDP60 include its ability to be conjugally transferred to several Gram negative bacteria.

  19. Comparative genomics of multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C plasmids from commensal and pathogenic Escherichia coli from multiple animal sources.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alarcón, Claudia; Singer, Randall S; Johnson, Timothy J

    2011-01-01

    Incompatibility group A/C (IncA/C) plasmids have received recent attention for their broad host range and ability to confer resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents. Due to the potential spread of multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotypes from foodborne pathogens to human pathogens, the dissemination of these plasmids represents a public health risk. In this study, four animal-source IncA/C plasmids isolated from Escherichia coli were sequenced and analyzed, including isolates from commercial dairy cows, pigs and turkeys in the U.S. and Chile. These plasmids were initially selected because they either contained the floR and tetA genes encoding for florfenicol and tetracycline resistance, respectively, and/or the bla(CMY-2) gene encoding for extended spectrum β-lactamase resistance. Overall, sequence analysis revealed that each of the four plasmids retained a remarkably stable and conserved backbone sequence, with differences observed primarily within their accessory regions, which presumably have evolved via horizontal gene transfer events involving multiple modules. Comparison of these plasmids with other available IncA/C plasmid sequences further defined the core and accessory elements of these plasmids in E. coli and Salmonella. Our results suggest that the bla(CMY-2) plasmid lineage appears to have derived from an ancestral IncA/C plasmid type harboring floR-tetAR-strAB and Tn21-like accessory modules. Evidence is mounting that IncA/C plasmids are widespread among enteric bacteria of production animals and these emergent plasmids have flexibility in their acquisition of MDR-encoding modules, necessitating further study to understand the evolutionary mechanisms involved in their dissemination and stability in bacterial populations.

  20. IncP-1ε Plasmids are Important Vectors of Antibiotic Resistance Genes in Agricultural Systems: Diversification Driven by Class 1 Integron Gene Cassettes

    PubMed Central

    Heuer, Holger; Binh, Chu T. T.; Jechalke, Sven; Kopmann, Christoph; Zimmerling, Ute; Krögerrecklenfort, Ellen; Ledger, Thomas; González, Bernardo; Top, Eva; Smalla, Kornelia

    2011-01-01

    The role of broad-host range IncP-1ε plasmids in the dissemination of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems has not yet been investigated. These plasmids were detected in total DNA from all of 16 manure samples and in arable soil based on a novel 5′-nuclease assay for real-time PCR. A correlation between IncP-1ε plasmid abundance and antibiotic usage was revealed. In a soil microcosm experiment the abundance of IncP-1ε plasmids was significantly increased even 127 days after application of manure containing the antibiotic compound sulfadiazine, compared to soil receiving only manure, only sulfadiazine, or water. Fifty IncP-1ε plasmids that were captured in E. coli CV601gfp from bacterial communities of manure and arable soil were characterized by PCR and hybridization. All plasmids carried class 1 integrons with highly varying sizes of the gene cassette region and the sul1 gene. Three IncP-1ε plasmids captured from soil bacteria and one from manure were completely sequenced. The backbones were nearly identical to that of the previously described IncP-1ε plasmid pKJK5. The plasmids differed mainly in the composition of a Tn402-like transposon carrying a class 1 integron with varying gene cassettes, IS1326, and in three of the plasmids the tetracycline resistance transposon Tn1721 with various truncations. Diverse Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria were revealed as hosts of one of the IncP-1ε plasmids in soil microcosms. Our data suggest that IncP-1ε plasmids are important vectors for horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance in agricultural systems. PMID:22279444

  1. Conjugative DNA-transfer in Streptomyces, a mycelial organism.

    PubMed

    Thoma, L; Muth, G

    Conjugative DNA-transfer in the Gram-positive mycelial soil bacterium Streptomyces, well known for the production of numerous antibiotics, is a unique process involving the transfer of a double-stranded DNA molecule. Apparently it does not depend on a type IV secretion system but resembles the segregation of chromosomes during bacterial cell division. A single plasmid-encoded protein, TraB, directs the transfer from the plasmid-carrying donor to the recipient. TraB is a FtsK-like DNA-translocase, which recognizes a specific plasmid sequence, clt, via interaction with specific 8-bp repeats. Chromosomal markers are mobilized by the recognition of clt-like sequences randomly distributed all over the Streptomyces chromosomes. Fluorescence microcopy with conjugative reporter plasmids and differentially labelled recipient strains revealed conjugative plasmid transfer at the lateral walls of the hyphae, when getting in contact. Subsequently, the newly transferred plasmids cross septal cross walls, which occur at irregular distances in the mycelium and invade the neighboring compartments, thus efficiently colonizing the recipient mycelium. This intramycelial plasmid spreading requires the DNA-translocase TraB and a complex of several Spd proteins. Inactivation of a single spd gene interferes with intramycelial plasmid spreading. The molecular function of the Spd proteins is widely unknown. Spd proteins of different plasmids are highly diverse, none showing sequence similarity to a functionally characterized protein. The integral membrane protein SpdB2 binds DNA, peptidoglycan and forms membrane pores in vivo and in vitro. Intramycelial plasmid spreading is an adaptation to the mycelial growth characteristics of Streptomyces and ensures the rapid dissemination of the plasmid within the recipient colony before the onset of sporulation.

  2. Antibiotic Resistance, Core-Genome and Protein Expression in IncHI1 Plasmids in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Kubasova, Tereza; Cejkova, Darina; Matiasovicova, Jitka; Sekelova, Zuzana; Polansky, Ondrej; Medvecky, Matej; Rychlik, Ivan; Juricova, Helena

    2016-06-13

    Conjugative plasmids from the IncHI1 incompatibility group play an important role in transferring antibiotic resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium. However, knowledge of their genome structure or gene expression is limited. In this study, we determined the complete nucleotide sequences of four IncHI1 plasmids transferring resistance to antibiotics by two different next generation sequencing protocols and protein expression by mass spectrometry. Sequence data including additional 11 IncHI1 plasmids from GenBank were used for the definition of the IncHI1 plasmid core-genome and pan-genome. The core-genome consisted of approximately 123 kbp and 122 genes while the total pan-genome represented approximately 600 kbp. When the core-genome sequences were used for multiple alignments, the 15 tested IncHI1 plasmids were separated into two main lineages. GC content in core-genome genes was around 46% and 50% in accessory genome genes. A multidrug resistance region present in all 4 sequenced plasmids extended over 20 kbp and, except for tet(B), the genes responsible for antibiotic resistance were those with the highest GC content. IncHI1 plasmids therefore represent replicons that evolved in low GC content bacteria. From their original host, they spread to Salmonella and during this spread these plasmids acquired multiple accessory genes including those coding for antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic-resistance genes belonged to genes with the highest level of expression and were constitutively expressed even in the absence of antibiotics. This is the likely mechanism that facilitates host cell survival when antibiotics suddenly emerge in the environment.

  3. Mutation detection in plasmid-based biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pedro H; Prather, Kristala L J; Prazeres, Duarte M F; Monteiro, Gabriel A

    2011-04-01

    As the number of applications involving therapeutic plasmid DNA (pDNA) increases worldwide, there is a growing concern over maintaining rigorous quality control through a panel of high-quality assays. For this reason, efficient, cost-effective and sensitive technologies enabling the identification of genetic variants and unwanted side products are needed to successfully establish the identity and stability of a plasmid-based biopharmaceutical. This review highlights several bioinformatic tools for ab initio detection of potentially unstable DNA regions, as well as techniques used for mutation detection in nucleic acids, with particular emphasis on pDNA.

  4. Plasmid IL-12 electroporation in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Edward; Daud, Adil

    2012-01-01

    Intratumoral gene electroporation uses electric charges to facilitate entry of plasmid DNA into cells in a reproducible and highly efficient manner, especially to accessible sites such as cutaneous and subcutaneous melanomas. Effective for locally treated disease, electroporation of plasmid DNA encoding interleukin-12 can also induce responses in untreated distant disease, suggesting that adaptive immune responses are being elicited that can target melanoma-associated antigens. In vivo electroporation with immunomodulatory cytokine DNA is a promising approach that can trigger systemic anti-tumor immune responses without the systemic toxicity associated with intravenous cytokine delivery and potentially offer complete long-term tumor regression. PMID:23151447

  5. Dealing with the evolutionary downside of CRISPR immunity: bacteria and beneficial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenyan; Maniv, Inbal; Arain, Fawaz; Wang, Yaying; Levin, Bruce R; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2013-01-01

    The immune systems that protect organisms from infectious agents invariably have a cost for the host. In bacteria and archaea CRISPR-Cas loci can serve as adaptive immune systems that protect these microbes from infectiously transmitted DNAs. When those DNAs are borne by lytic viruses (phages), this protection can provide a considerable advantage. CRISPR-Cas immunity can also prevent cells from acquiring plasmids and free DNA bearing genes that increase their fitness. Here, we use a combination of experiments and mathematical-computer simulation models to explore this downside of CRISPR-Cas immunity and its implications for the maintenance of CRISPR-Cas loci in microbial populations. We analyzed the conjugational transfer of the staphylococcal plasmid pG0400 into Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62a recipients that bear a CRISPR-Cas locus targeting this plasmid. Contrary to what is anticipated for lytic phages, which evade CRISPR by mutations in the target region, the evasion of CRISPR immunity by plasmids occurs at the level of the host through loss of functional CRISPR-Cas immunity. The results of our experiments and models indicate that more than 10(-4) of the cells in CRISPR-Cas positive populations are defective or deleted for the CRISPR-Cas region and thereby able to receive and carry the plasmid. Most intriguingly, the loss of CRISPR function even by large deletions can have little or no fitness cost in vitro. These theoretical and experimental results can account for the considerable variation in the existence, number and function of CRISPR-Cas loci within and between bacterial species. We postulate that as a consequence of the opposing positive and negative selection for immunity, CRISPR-Cas systems are in a continuous state of flux. They are lost when they bear immunity to laterally transferred beneficial genes, re-acquired by horizontal gene transfer, and ascend in environments where phage are a major source of mortality.

  6. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  7. Escherichia coli genes affecting recipient ability in plasmid conjugation: Are there any?

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Background How does the recipient cell contribute to bacterial conjugation? To answer this question we systematically analyzed the individual contribution of each Escherichia coli gene in matings using plasmid R388 as a conjugative plasmid. We used an automated conjugation assay and two sets of E. coli mutant collections: the Keio collection (3,908 E. coli single-gene deletion mutants) and a collection of 20,000 random mini-Tn10::Km insertion mutants in E. coli strain DH5α. The combined use of both collections assured that we screened > 99% of the E. coli non-essential genes in our survey. Results Results indicate that no non-essential recipient E. coli genes exist that play an essential role in conjugation. Mutations in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis pathway had a modest effect on R388 plasmid transfer (6 – 32% of wild type). The same mutations showed a drastic inhibition effect on F-plasmid transfer, but only in liquid matings, suggesting that previously isolated conjugation-defective mutants do in fact impair mating pair formation in liquid mating, but not conjugative DNA processing or transport per se. Conclusion We conclude from our genome-wide screen that recipient bacterial cells cannot avoid being used as recipients in bacterial conjugation. This is relevant as an indication of the problems in curbing the dissemination of antibiotic resistance and suggests that conjugation acts as a pure drilling machine, with little regard to the constitution of the recipient cell. PMID:19203375

  8. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Sidjabat, Hanna E.; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K.; Sartor, Anna L.; Williamson, Deborah A.; Forde, Brian M.; Beatson, Scott A.; Paterson, David L.; Walsh, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family. PMID:27114281

  9. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Wailan, Alexander M; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K; Sartor, Anna L; Williamson, Deborah A; Forde, Brian M; Schembri, Mark A; Beatson, Scott A; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Partridge, Sally R

    2016-07-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family.

  10. Small-plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance is enhanced by increases in plasmid copy number and bacterial fitness.

    PubMed

    San Millan, Alvaro; Santos-Lopez, Alfonso; Ortega-Huedo, Rafael; Bernabe-Balas, Cristina; Kennedy, Sean P; Gonzalez-Zorn, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Plasmids play a key role in the horizontal spread of antibiotic resistance determinants among bacterial pathogens. When an antibiotic resistance plasmid arrives in a new bacterial host, it produces a fitness cost, causing a competitive disadvantage for the plasmid-bearing bacterium in the absence of antibiotics. On the other hand, in the presence of antibiotics, the plasmid promotes the survival of the clone. The adaptations experienced by plasmid and bacterium in the presence of antibiotics during the first generations of coexistence will be crucial for the progress of the infection and the maintenance of plasmid-mediated resistance once the treatment is over. Here we developed a model system using the human pathogen Haemophilus influenzae carrying the small plasmid pB1000 conferring resistance to β-lactam antibiotics to investigate host and plasmid adaptations in the course of a simulated ampicillin therapy. Our results proved that plasmid-bearing clones compensated for the fitness disadvantage during the first 100 generations of plasmid-host adaptation. In addition, ampicillin treatment was associated with an increase in pB1000 copy number. The augmentation in both bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number gave rise to H. influenzae populations with higher ampicillin resistance levels. In conclusion, we show here that the modulations in bacterial fitness and plasmid copy number help a plasmid-bearing bacterium to adapt during antibiotic therapy, promoting both the survival of the host and the spread of the plasmid.

  11. Maintenance of a Pseudomonas fluorescens plasmid in heterologous hosts: metabolic burden as a more reliable variable to predict plasmid instability.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, S; Lalithakumari, D

    1998-07-01

    The stability of a large, multiresistance plasmid, pSCL of P. fluorescens CAS102 was studied in Pseudomonas putida and E. coli under various non-stress conditions. Both the strains lost the plasmid within 25 days when repeatedly subcultured in LB broth without any antibiotic. The transformants survived in sterile soil and water without any marked reduction in the viability. In sterile soil, P. putida lost 93% and E. coli, 98% of their plasmid containing population in 30 days, while in sterile water the plasmid loss was 92.5% and 97% respectively. The two variables, viz. the efficiency of plasmid-partitioning during cell division and measurement of relative specific growth rates of plasmid-plus and plasmid-minus cells which are used to predict plasmid instability cannot be used to predict plasmid loss during starvation. The utility of a third variable, viz. the metabolic burden due to plasmid maintenance in predicting plasmid instability in different hosts is discussed. The rate of plasmid loss was found to be comparatively faster in E. coli than in P. putida. The biosynthetic burden due to plasmid maintenance was also more in E. coli than in P. putida when compared to the plasmid-plus and plasmid-minus cells of the two strains which was evident from the increased nutrient uptake rates (glucose, O2, and amino acid) and increased protein content of the plasmid-plus cells of E. coli. From the results, a correlation could be found between the degree of metabolic burden and the rate of plasmid loss. The reliability of metabolic burden, to predict plasmid instability versus the relative specific growth rates is discussed.

  12. Momentum transfer in indirect explosive drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.E.; Warnes, R.H.; Cherry, C.R.; Cherry, C.R. Jr.; Fischer, S.H.

    1996-07-01

    Material which is not in direct contact with detonating explosives may still be driven by the explosion through impact by driven material or by attachment to driven material. In such circumstances the assumption of inelastic collision permits estimation of the final velocity of an assemblage. Examples of the utility of this assumption are demonstrated through use of Gurney equations. The inelastic collision calculation may also be used for metal parts which are driven by explosives partially covering the metal. We offer a new discounting angle to account for side energy losses from laterally unconfined explosive charges in cases where the detonation wave travels parallel to the surface which is driven.

  13. Evolution of an incompatibility group IncA/C plasmid harboring blaCMY-16 and qnrA6 genes and its transfer through three clones of Providencia stuartii during a two-year outbreak in a Tunisian burn unit.

    PubMed

    Arpin, C; Thabet, L; Yassine, H; Messadi, A A; Boukadida, J; Dubois, V; Coulange-Mayonnove, L; Andre, C; Quentin, C

    2012-03-01

    During a 2-year period in 2005 and 2006, 64 multidrug-resistant Providencia stuartii isolates, including 58 strains from 58 patients and 6 strains obtained from the same tracheal aspirator, were collected in a burn unit of a Tunisian hospital. They divided into four antibiotypes (ATB1 to ATB4) and three SmaI pulsotypes (PsA to PsC), including 49 strains belonging to clone PsA (48 of ATB1 and 1 of ATB4), 11 strains to clone PsB (7 of ATB2 and 4 of ATB3), and 4 strains to clone PsC (ATB3). All strains, except for the PsA/ATB4 isolate, were highly resistant to broad-spectrum cephalosporins due to the production of the plasmid-mediated CMY-16 β-lactamase. In addition, the 15 strains of ATB2 and ATB3 exhibited decreased quinolone susceptibility associated with QnrA6. Most strains (ATB1 and ATB3) were gentamicin resistant, related to an AAC(6')-Ib' enzyme. All these genes were located on a conjugative plasmid belonging to the incompatibility group IncA/C(2) of 195, 175, or 100 kb. Despite differences in size and in number of resistance determinants, they derived from the same plasmid, as demonstrated by similar profiles in plasmid restriction analysis and strictly homologous sequences of repAIncA/C(2), unusual antibiotic resistance genes (e.g., aphA-6), and their genetic environments. Further investigation suggested that deletions, acquisition of the ISCR1 insertion sequence, and integron cassette mobility accounted for these variations. Thus, this outbreak was due to both the spread of three clonal strains and the dissemination of a single IncA/C(2) plasmid which underwent a remarkable evolution during the epidemic period.

  14. Evolution of an Incompatibility Group IncA/C Plasmid Harboring blaCMY-16 and qnrA6 Genes and Its Transfer through Three Clones of Providencia stuartii during a Two-Year Outbreak in a Tunisian Burn Unit

    PubMed Central

    Thabet, L.; Yassine, H.; Messadi, A. A.; Boukadida, J.; Dubois, V.; Coulange-Mayonnove, L.; Andre, C.; Quentin, C.

    2012-01-01

    During a 2-year period in 2005 and 2006, 64 multidrug-resistant Providencia stuartii isolates, including 58 strains from 58 patients and 6 strains obtained from the same tracheal aspirator, were collected in a burn unit of a Tunisian hospital. They divided into four antibiotypes (ATB1 to ATB4) and three SmaI pulsotypes (PsA to PsC), including 49 strains belonging to clone PsA (48 of ATB1 and 1 of ATB4), 11 strains to clone PsB (7 of ATB2 and 4 of ATB3), and 4 strains to clone PsC (ATB3). All strains, except for the PsA/ATB4 isolate, were highly resistant to broad-spectrum cephalosporins due to the production of the plasmid-mediated CMY-16 β-lactamase. In addition, the 15 strains of ATB2 and ATB3 exhibited decreased quinolone susceptibility associated with QnrA6. Most strains (ATB1 and ATB3) were gentamicin resistant, related to an AAC(6′)-Ib′ enzyme. All these genes were located on a conjugative plasmid belonging to the incompatibility group IncA/C2 of 195, 175, or 100 kb. Despite differences in size and in number of resistance determinants, they derived from the same plasmid, as demonstrated by similar profiles in plasmid restriction analysis and strictly homologous sequences of repAIncA/C2, unusual antibiotic resistance genes (e.g., aphA-6), and their genetic environments. Further investigation suggested that deletions, acquisition of the ISCR1 insertion sequence, and integron cassette mobility accounted for these variations. Thus, this outbreak was due to both the spread of three clonal strains and the dissemination of a single IncA/C2 plasmid which underwent a remarkable evolution during the epidemic period. PMID:22155825

  15. Sex drives intracellular conflict in yeast.

    PubMed

    Harrison, E; MacLean, R C; Koufopanou, V; Burt, A

    2014-08-01

    Theory predicts that sex can drive the evolution of conflict within the cell. During asexual reproduction, genetic material within the cell is inherited as a single unit, selecting for cooperation both within the genome as well as between the extra-genomic elements within the cell (e.g. plasmids and endosymbionts). Under sexual reproduction, this unity is broken down as parental genomes are distributed between meiotic progeny. Genetic elements able to transmit to more than 50% of meiotic progeny have a transmission advantage over the rest of the genome and are able to spread, even where they reduce the fitness of the individual as a whole. Sexual reproduction is therefore expected to drive the evolution of selfish genetic elements (SGEs). Here, we directly test this hypothesis by studying the evolution of two independent SGEs, the 2-μm plasmid and selfish mitochondria, in populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following 22 rounds of sexual reproduction, 2-μm copy number increased by approximately 13.2 (±5.6) copies per cell, whereas in asexual populations copy number decreased by approximately 5.1 (±1.5) copies per cell. Given that the burden imposed by this parasite increases with copy number, these results support the idea that sex drives the evolution of increased SGE virulence. Moreover, we found that mitochondria that are respiratory-deficient rapidly invaded sexual but not asexual populations, demonstrating that frequent outcrossed sex can drive the de novo evolution of genetic parasites. Our study highlights the genomic perils of sex and suggests that SGEs may play a key role in driving major evolutionary transitions, such as uniparental inheritance.

  16. Molecular delivery of plasmids for genetic vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mazid, Romiza; Tan, Melvin X; Danquah, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Plasmid vaccination is a smart gene delivery application mostly achieved through the utilisation of viral or copolymeric systems as surrogated carriers in micro or nano formulations. A common polymeric protocol for plasmid vaccine formulation, which as somewhat been successful, is via the complexation of the DNA molecules with a cationic polymer, and encapsulating in a vehicular carrier polymer. Even though plasmid vaccination research has not witnessed the much anticipated success, due a number of cellular and physicochemical reasons, application of copolymeric carriers with tight functionalities is a promising strategy to optimally deliver the DNA molecules; in view of the available chemistries and physical properties that could be tuned to enable enhanced targeted delivery, uptake and specific transfection. This also enables the targeting of specific epitopes and antigen presenting cells for the treatment of many pathogenic infections and cancer. This paper provides a brief critical review of the current state of plasmid vaccines formulation and molecular delivery with analysis of performance data obtained from clinical trials.

  17. Microevolutionary Events Involving Narrow Host Plasmids Influences Local Fixation of Vancomycin-Resistance in Enterococcus Populations

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Ana R.; Novais, Carla; Tedim, Ana P.; Francia, María Victoria; Baquero, Fernando; Peixe, Luísa; Coque, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    Vancomycin-resistance in enterococci (VRE) is associated with isolates within ST18, ST17, ST78 Enterococcus faecium (Efm) and ST6 Enterococcus faecalis (Efs) human adapted lineages. Despite of its global spread, vancomycin resistance rates in enterococcal populations greatly vary temporally and geographically. Portugal is one of the European countries where Tn1546 (vanA) is consistently found in a variety of environments. A comprehensive multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE isolates (75 Efm and 29 Efs) from Portuguese hospitals and aquatic surroundings (1996–2008) was performed to clarify the local dynamics of VRE. Clonal relatedness was established by PFGE and MLST while plasmid characterization comprised the analysis of known relaxases, rep initiator proteins and toxin-antitoxin systems (TA) by PCR-based typing schemes, RFLP comparison, hybridization and sequencing. Tn1546 variants were characterized by PCR overlapping/sequencing. Intra- and inter-hospital dissemination of Efm ST18, ST132 and ST280 and Efs ST6 clones, carrying rolling-circle (pEFNP1/pRI1) and theta-replicating (pCIZ2-like, Inc18, pHTβ-like, two pRUM-variants, pLG1-like, and pheromone-responsive) plasmids was documented. Tn1546 variants, mostly containing ISEf1 or IS1216, were located on plasmids (30–150 kb) with a high degree of mosaicism and heterogeneous RFLP patterns that seem to have resulted from the interplay between broad host Inc18 plasmids (pIP501, pRE25, pEF1), and narrow host RepA_N plasmids (pRUM, pAD1-like). TAs of Inc18 (ω-ε-ζ) and pRUM (Axe-Txe) plasmids were infrequently detected. Some plasmid chimeras were persistently recovered over years from different clonal lineages. This work represents the first multi-hierarchical analysis of VRE, revealing a frequent recombinatorial diversification of a limited number of interacting clonal backgrounds, plasmids and transposons at local scale. These interactions provide a continuous process of parapatric clonalization driving a full

  18. Diversity, biology and evolution of IncQ-family plasmids.

    PubMed

    Loftie-Eaton, Wesley; Rawlings, Douglas E

    2012-01-01

    Plasmids of IncQ-family are distinguished by having a unique strand-displacement mechanism of replication that is capable of functioning in a wide variety of bacterial hosts. In addition, these plasmids are highly mobilizable and therefore very promiscuous. Common features of the replicons have been used to identify IncQ-family plasmids in DNA sequence databases and in this way several unstudied plasmids have been compared to more well-studied IncQ plasmids. We propose that IncQ plasmids can be divided into four subgroups based on a number of mutually supportive criteria. The most important of these are the amino acid sequences of their three essential replication proteins and the observation that the replicon of each subgroup has become fused to four different lineages of mobilization genes. This review of IncQ-family plasmid diversity has highlighted several events in the evolution of these plasmids and raised several questions for further research.

  19. A novel method of plasmid isolation using laundry detergent.

    PubMed

    Yadav, P; Yadav, A; Garg, V; Datta, T K; Goswami, S L; De, S

    2011-07-01

    Since the discovery of plasmid, various methods have been developed to isolate plasmid DNA. All the methods have one common and important target of isolating plasmid DNA of high quality and quantity in less time. These methods are not completely safe because of use of toxic chemicals compounds. The developed protocol for plasmid extraction is based on the alkaline lysis method of plasmid preparation (extraction atpH 8.0) with slight modifications. Cell lysis reagent sodium dodecyl sulfate is replaced by lipase enzyme present in laundry detergent. A good plasmid preparation can be made, which is well suited for subsequent molecular biology applications. By taking safety measures on count, contaminants like, RNA and protein can be completely avoided with maximized plasmid yield. The resultant plasmid quality and quantity can be well comparable to other prevalent methods.

  20. Antibiotic resistance and R-plasmids in food chain Salmonella: evidence of plasmid relatedness.

    PubMed Central

    Bezanson, G S; Pauzé, M; Lior, H

    1981-01-01

    A large number of strains (1,783) belonging to 15 Salmonella serovars isolated, in Canada, from the three major links of the human food chain were screened for multiple antibiotic resistance and the presence of R-plasmids. Multiresistant strains occurred among animal feed, livestock, and human isolates at frequencies of 4, 22, and 14%, respectively. Conjugation analysis revealed that 58% of the isolates from feeds, 87% of those from livestock, and 89% of the human strains carried all or part of their resistance determinants extrachromosomally on R-plasmids. Conjugative plasmids representing nine different incompatibility groups were detected, with the Inc I alpha group being predominant. Within the limits of the parameters measured, certain of these plasmids show a degree of relatedness suggestive of a common ancestry. PMID:7013704

  1. Endogenous mutagenesis in recombinant sulfolobus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Sakofsky, Cynthia J; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-06-01

    Low rates of replication errors in chromosomal genes of Sulfolobus spp. demonstrate that these extreme thermoacidophiles can maintain genome integrity in environments with high temperature and low pH. In contrast to this genetic stability, we observed unusually frequent mutation of the β-D-glycosidase gene (lacS) of a shuttle plasmid (pJlacS) propagated in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The resulting Lac(-) mutants also grew faster than the Lac(+) parent, thereby amplifying the impact of the frequent lacS mutations on the population. We developed a mutant accumulation assay and corrections for the effects of copy number and differential growth for this system; the resulting measurements and calculations yielded a corrected rate of 5.1 × 10(-4) mutational events at the lacS gene per plasmid replication. Analysis of independent lacS mutants revealed three types of mutations: (i) G · C-to-A · T transitions, (ii) slipped-strand events, and (iii) deletions. These mutations were frequent in plasmid-borne lacS expressed at a high level but not in single-copy lacS in the chromosome or at lower levels of expression in a plasmid. Substitution mutations arose at only two of 12 potential priming sites of the DNA primase of the pRN1 replicon, but nearly all these mutations created nonsense (chain termination) codons. The spontaneous mutation rate of plasmid-borne lacS was 175-fold higher under high-expression than under low-expression conditions. The results suggest that important DNA repair or replication fidelity functions are impaired or overwhelmed in pJlacS, with results analogous to those of the "transcription-associated mutagenesis" seen in bacteria and eukaryotes.

  2. Plasmid DNA gene therapy by electroporation: principles and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2011-12-01

    Simple plasmid DNA injection is a safe and feasible gene transfer method, but it confers low transfection efficiency and transgene expression. This non-viral gene transfer method is enhanced by physical delivery methods, such as electroporation and the use of a gene gun. In vivo electroporation has been rapidly developed over the last two decades to deliver DNA to various tissues or organs. It is generally considered that membrane permeabilization and DNA electrophoresis play important roles in electro-gene transfer. Skeletal muscle is a well characterized target tissue for electroporation, because it is accessible and allows for long-lasting gene expression ( > one year). Skin is also a target tissue because of its accessibility and immunogenicity. Numerous studies have been performed using in vivo electroporation in animal models of disease. Clinical trials of DNA vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment using in vivo electroporation have been initiated in patients with melanoma and prostate cancer. Furthermore, electroporation has been applied to DNA vaccines for infectious diseases to enhance immunogenicity, and the relevant clinical trials have been initiated. The gene gun approach is also being applied for the delivery of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases to the skin. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanism of in vivo electroporation, and summarize the findings of recent preclinical and clinical studies using this technology.

  3. Photoreactivation of Ultraviolet-Irradiated, Plasmid-Bearing and Plasmid-Free Strains of Bacillus anthracis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-19

    NUMBER __ vation Bacillus anthracis) ś 7. AUTHOR(’a) B.KusnShD . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(a) PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT... Bacillus anthracis, anthrax, photoreactivation, DNA repair, plasmid A6SSTACT (Cinvt ass,.yme eEb ir "mease wy f dentif by block nlmbaw) Iee. he...effects of toxin- a’nd capsule-encoding plasmids on the kinetics of UIV inactivation of various strains of Bacillus anthracis were investigated. :Z

  4. Regulation of the L-arabinose operon in strains of Escherichia coli containing ColE1-ara hybrid plasmids.

    PubMed

    Wallace, L J; Wilcox, G

    1979-06-20

    Hybrid plasmids were constructed from fragments of F'ara episomes formed by the restriction endonuclease EcoRI and a linear form of the plasmid ColE1 created by cleavage with EcoRI. Hybrid plasmids were constructed containing the entire ara region or the ara region with various parts deleted. E. coli K12 host strains were constructed which contained different deletions of the ara region. The hybrid plasmids were transferred to those strains whose ara deletion complemented that of the plasmid. The initial differential rates of synthesis of L-arabinose isomerase, the product of the araA gene, were determined for the Ara+, plasmid containing strains. These studies demonstrated that strains containing delta(araOIBA)718 produce elevated levels of araC protein, suggesting the araC promoter has been altered by this deletion. Evidence is also presented which suggests that araC protein activates the ara-BAD operon to higher levels when it is present in cis rather than trans. Amplification of the products of the cloned genes is observed when compared to haploid levels in some cases.

  5. IncA/C plasmids harboured in serious multidrug-resistant Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 strains in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruibai; Yu, Dong; Zhu, Lianhui; Li, Jie; Yue, Junjie; Kan, Biao

    2015-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae serogroup O139 emerged in 1992 and is one of two major serogroups to have caused cholera epidemics. After 1998, serious multidrug-resistant (MDR) O139 strains quickly became common in China, showing a multidrug resistance profile to eight antibiotics. It is a great threat to public health, and elucidation of its mechanisms of resistance will provide a helpful guide for the clinical treatment and prevention of cholera. In this study, mega-plasmids from MDR V. cholerae O139 strains were identified by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) without enzyme digestion. One plasmid was isolated and sequenced, belonging to the IncA/C family. Ten antibiotic resistance genes were found in the MDR regions, including a blaTEM-20 gene, and these genes endowed the host with resistance to seven antibiotics. This kind of plasmid was positive in 71.2% (198/278) of toxigenic O139 strains, and the rate of plasmid positivity was consistent with the yearly change in MDR rates of these strains. This study reveals an important role of the IncA/C family plasmid in the spread of multiple antibiotic resistance of epidemic V. cholerae serogroup O139 strains, which has recombined with plasmids from different bacterial species and transferred among V. cholerae strains.

  6. Transposition of a duplicate antibiotic resistance gene and generation of deletions in plasmid R6K.

    PubMed Central

    Holmans, P L; Clowes, R C

    1979-01-01

    Transformation experiments showed that spontaneous deletions which result in loss of streptomycin resistance and an increase in conjugal transfer efficiency are present at a frequency of about 10(-4) in plasmid molecules of R6K. Similar deletions were thus readily selected by conjugal transfer of R6K, and their appearance was dependent upon recA+ activity in either donor or recipient host. The deoxyribonucleic acid segment deleted in four mutants examined was concluded to extend from the same terminus of the transposon, TnA, in the same direction, but to different extents, and to retain the TnA region intact. Insertions of a duplicate TnA element were found in R6K plasmids isolated from strains selected for increased ampicillin resistance, which were unstable in recA+ strains. In four plasmids examined after transfer to a recA host, an inverted repeat of the preexisting TnA element was shown to have been inserted at a similar location and was in two instances associated with deletions which extended from the same direction as those described above. The deletions are ascribed to the result of recA+-dependent recombination between direct repeats of TnA. Images PMID:370107

  7. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  8. The Plasmid Mobilome of the Model Plant-Symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti: Coming up with New Questions and Answers.

    PubMed

    Lagares, Antonio; Sanjuán, Juan; Pistorio, Mariano

    2014-10-01

    Rhizobia are Gram-negative Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria living in the underground which have the ability to associate with legumes for the establishment of nitrogen-fixing symbioses. Sinorhizobium meliloti in particular-the symbiont of Medicago, Melilotus, and Trigonella spp.-has for the past decades served as a model organism for investigating, at the molecular level, the biology, biochemistry, and genetics of a free-living and symbiotic soil bacterium of agricultural relevance. To date, the genomes of seven different S. meliloti strains have been fully sequenced and annotated, and several other draft genomic sequences are also available. The vast amount of plasmid DNA that S. meliloti frequently bears (up to 45% of its total genome), the conjugative ability of some of those plasmids, and the extent of the plasmid diversity has provided researchers with an extraordinary system to investigate functional and structural plasmid molecular biology within the evolutionary context surrounding a plant-associated model bacterium. Current evidence indicates that the plasmid mobilome in S. meliloti is composed of replicons varying greatly in size and having diverse conjugative systems and properties along with different evolutionary stabilities and biological roles. While plasmids carrying symbiotic functions (pSyms) are known to have high structural stability (approaching that of chromosomes), the remaining plasmid mobilome (referred to as the non-pSym, functionally cryptic, or accessory compartment) has been shown to possess remarkable diversity and to be highly active in conjugation. In light of the modern genomic and current biochemical data on the plasmids of S. meliloti, the current article revises their main structural components, their transfer and regulatory mechanisms, and their potential as vehicles in shaping the evolution of the rhizobial genome.

  9. The Master Activator of IncA/C Conjugative Plasmids Stimulates Genomic Islands and Multidrug Resistance Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands. PMID:25340549

  10. The master activator of IncA/C conjugative plasmids stimulates genomic islands and multidrug resistance dissemination.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Nicolas; Matteau, Dominick; Luo, Peng; Rodrigue, Sébastien; Burrus, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes occurs mostly by conjugation, which mediates DNA transfer between cells in direct contact. Conjugative plasmids of the IncA/C incompatibility group have become a substantial threat due to their broad host-range, the extended spectrum of antimicrobial resistance they confer, their prevalence in enteric bacteria and their very efficient spread by conjugation. However, their biology remains largely unexplored. Using the IncA/C conjugative plasmid pVCR94ΔX as a prototype, we have investigated the regulatory circuitry that governs IncA/C plasmids dissemination and found that the transcriptional activator complex AcaCD is essential for the expression of plasmid transfer genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with exonuclease digestion (ChIP-exo) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) approaches, we have identified the sequences recognized by AcaCD and characterized the AcaCD regulon. Data mining using the DNA motif recognized by AcaCD revealed potential AcaCD-binding sites upstream of genes involved in the intracellular mobility functions (recombination directionality factor and mobilization genes) in two widespread classes of genomic islands (GIs) phylogenetically unrelated to IncA/C plasmids. The first class, SGI1, confers and propagates multidrug resistance in Salmonella enterica and Proteus mirabilis, whereas MGIVmi1 in Vibrio mimicus belongs to a previously uncharacterized class of GIs. We have demonstrated that through expression of AcaCD, IncA/C plasmids specifically trigger the excision and mobilization of the GIs at high frequencies. This study provides new evidence of the considerable impact of IncA/C plasmids on bacterial genome plasticity through their own mobility and the mobilization of genomic islands.

  11. Tetracycline-resistance encoding plasmids from Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood disease, isolated from commercial honeys.

    PubMed

    Alippi, Adriana M; León, Ignacio E; López, Ana C

    2014-03-01

    Paenibacillus larvae, the causal agent of American foulbrood disease in honeybees, acquires tetracycline-resistance via native plasmids carrying known tetracycline-resistance determinants. From three P. larvae tetracycline-resistant strains isolated from honeys, 5-kb-circular plasmids with almost identical sequences, designated pPL373 in strain PL373, pPL374 in strain PL374, and pPL395 in strain PL395, were isolated. These plasmids were highly similar (99%) to small tetracycline-encoding plasmids (pMA67, pBHS24, pBSDMV46A, pDMV2, pSU1, pAST4, and pLS55) that replicate by the rolling circle mechanism. Nucleotide sequences comparisons showed that pPL373, pPL374, and pPL395 mainly differed from the previously reported P. larvae plasmid pMA67 in the oriT region and mob genes. These differences suggest alternative mobilization and/or conjugation capacities. Plasmids pPL373, pPL374, and pPL395 were individually transferred by electroporation and stably maintained in tetracycline-susceptible P. larvae NRRL B-14154, in which they autonomously replicated. The presence of nearly identical plasmids in five different genera of gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Bhargavaea, Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Paenibacillus, and Sporosarcina, inhabiting diverse ecological niches provides further evidence of the genetic transfer of tetracycline resistance among environmental bacteria from soils, food, and marine habitats and from pathogenic bacteria such as P. larvae.

  12. Coaxial Redundant Drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brissette, R.

    1983-01-01

    Harmonic drives allow redundancy and high out put torque in small package. If main drive fails, standby drive takes over and produces torque along same axis as main drive. Uses include power units in robot for internal pipeline inspection, manipulators in deep submersible probes or other applications in which redundancy protects against costly failures.

  13. Plasmids of Distinct IncK Lineages Show Compatible Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rozwandowicz, Marta; Brouwer, Michael S. M.; Zomer, Aldert L.; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Mevius, Dik J.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT IncK plasmids are some of the main carriers of blaCTX-M-14 and blaCMY-2 genes and show high similarity to other plasmids belonging to the I complex, including IncB/O plasmids. Here, we studied the phylogenetic relationship of 37 newly sequenced IncK and IncB/O plasmids. We show that IncK plasmids can be divided into two compatible lineages named IncK1 and IncK2. PMID:28052854

  14. Dynamics and control of instrumented harmonic drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazerooni, H.; Ellis, S. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Since torque in harmonic drives is transmitted by a pure couple, harmonic drives do not generate radial forces and therefore can be instrumented with torque sensors without interference from radial forces. The installation of torque sensors on the stationary component of harmonic drives (the Flexipline cup in this research work) produce backdrivability needed for robotic and telerobotic compliant maneuvers. Backdrivability of a harmonic drive, when used as torque increaser, means that the output shaft can be rotated via finite amount of torque. A high ratio harmonic drive is non-backdrivable because its output shaft cannot be turned by applying a torque on it. This article first develops the dynamic behavior of a harmonic drive, in particular the non-backdrivability, in terms of a sensitivity transfer function. The instrumentation of the harmonic drive with torque sensor is then described. This leads to a description of the control architecture which allows modulation of the sensitivity transfer function within the limits established by the closed-loop stability. A set of experiments on an active hand controller, powered by a DC motor coupled to an instrumented harmonic drive, is given to exhibit this method's limitations.

  15. Plasmid flux in Escherichia coli ST131 sublineages, analyzed by plasmid constellation network (PLACNET), a new method for plasmid reconstruction from whole genome sequences.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Val F; de Toro, María; Garcillán-Barcia, M Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ-proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages.

  16. Plasmid Flux in Escherichia coli ST131 Sublineages, Analyzed by Plasmid Constellation Network (PLACNET), a New Method for Plasmid Reconstruction from Whole Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; Mora, Azucena; Blanco, Jorge; Coque, Teresa M.; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial whole genome sequence (WGS) methods are rapidly overtaking classical sequence analysis. Many bacterial sequencing projects focus on mobilome changes, since macroevolutionary events, such as the acquisition or loss of mobile genetic elements, mainly plasmids, play essential roles in adaptive evolution. Existing WGS analysis protocols do not assort contigs between plasmids and the main chromosome, thus hampering full analysis of plasmid sequences. We developed a method (called plasmid constellation networks or PLACNET) that identifies, visualizes and analyzes plasmids in WGS projects by creating a network of contig interactions, thus allowing comprehensive plasmid analysis within WGS datasets. The workflow of the method is based on three types of data: assembly information (including scaffold links and coverage), comparison to reference sequences and plasmid-diagnostic sequence features. The resulting network is pruned by expert analysis, to eliminate confounding data, and implemented in a Cytoscape-based graphic representation. To demonstrate PLACNET sensitivity and efficacy, the plasmidome of the Escherichia coli lineage ST131 was analyzed. ST131 is a globally spread clonal group of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), comprising different sublineages with ability to acquire and spread antibiotic resistance and virulence genes via plasmids. Results show that plasmids flux in the evolution of this lineage, which is wide open for plasmid exchange. MOBF12/IncF plasmids were pervasive, adding just by themselves more than 350 protein families to the ST131 pangenome. Nearly 50% of the most frequent γ–proteobacterial plasmid groups were found to be present in our limited sample of ten analyzed ST131 genomes, which represent the main ST131 sublineages. PMID:25522143

  17. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli strains].

    PubMed

    Aktepe, Orhan Cem; Aşık, Gülşah; Cetinkol, Yeliz; Biçmen, Meral; Gülay, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Quinolones are widely used antimicrobial agents, particularly for the treatment of infections caused by gram-negative bacilli such as E.coli. As a consequence, quinolone resistance has been increasing among this species in recent years. Bacterial resistance to quinolones usually results from mutations in the chromosomal genes which encode topoisomerases and also the expression of efflux pumps and loss of porines contributed to development of quinolone resistance. However, recent studies have shown that the spread and increase of quinolone resistance may be due to the transfer of plasmid-mediated genes. To date, three groups of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes, namely qnr, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA, have been described. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in E.coli clinical isolates. A total of 112 quinolone-resistant E.coli strains isolated from different clinical specimens (84 urine, 16 blood, 10 wound, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage) of which 78 (69.6%) were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positive, in Afyon Kocatepe University Hospital, Microbiology Laboratory were included in the study. In the isolates, qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC, qepA, and aac(6')-1b-cr plasmid genes were analysed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). After aac(6')- 1b determinant was amplified by PCR, all aac(6')-1b positive amplicons were analyzed by digestion with BseGI restriction enzyme to identify aac(6')-1b-cr variant. It was found that, none of the strains horboured qnrA, qnrB, qnrS, qnrC and qepA genes, however, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene aac(6')-1b-cr was found positive in 59.8% (67/112) of the strains. It was notable that 86.6% (58/67) of those isolates were ESBL producers. The rates of quinolone resistance among E.coli isolates infections were high in our region and an increasing trend has been observed in recent years. Our data indicated that the presence of plasmid- mediated resistance genes

  18. Analysis of cache for streaming tape drive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinnaswamy, V.

    1993-01-01

    A tape subsystem consists of a controller and a tape drive. Tapes are used for backup, data interchange, and software distribution. The backup operation is addressed. During a backup operation, data is read from disk, processed in CPU, and then sent to tape. The processing speeds of a disk subsystem, CPU, and a tape subsystem are likely to be different. A powerful CPU can read data from a fast disk, process it, and supply the data to the tape subsystem at a faster rate than the tape subsystem can handle. On the other hand, a slow disk drive and a slow CPU may not be able to supply data fast enough to keep a tape drive busy all the time. The backup process may supply data to tape drive in bursts. Each burst may be followed by an idle period. Depending on the nature of the file distribution in the disk, the input stream to the tape subsystem may vary significantly during backup. To compensate for these differences and optimize the utilization of a tape subsystem, a cache or buffer is introduced in the tape controller. Most of the tape drives today are streaming tape drives. A streaming tape drive goes into reposition when there is no data from the controller. Once the drive goes into reposition, the controller can receive data, but it cannot supply data to the tape drive until the drive completes its reposition. A controller can also receive data from the host and send data to the tape drive at the same time. The relationship of cache siz