Science.gov

Sample records for plasmid-encoded ceftazidime-hydrolyzing ctx-m-53

  1. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  2. Plasmid-encoded trimethoprim resistance in staphylococci.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, G L; Coughter, J P; Johnston, J L

    1986-01-01

    High-level (greater than 1,000 micrograms/ml) resistance to the antimicrobial agent trimethoprim was found in 17 of 101 (17%) coagulase-negative staphylococci and 5 of 51 (10%) Staphylococcus aureus from a number of different hospitals in the United States. Resistance was plasmid encoded and could be transferred by conjugation in 4 of the 17 (24%) Tpr coagulase-negative staphylococci and 3 of the 5 (60%) Tpr S. aureus. A 1.2-kilobase segment of plasmid DNA from one of the plasmids (pG01) was cloned on a high-copy-number vector in Escherichia coli and expressed high-level Tpr (MIC, 1,025 micrograms/ml) in the gram-negative host. In situ filter hybridization demonstrated homology between the cloned Tpr gene probe and plasmid DNA from each conjugative Tpr plasmid, a single nonconjugative plasmid from a United States Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate, a nonconjugative plasmid from an Australian methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolate, and chromosomal DNA from three Tpr S. epidermidis isolates that did not contain any plasmid DNA that was homologous with the probe. No homology was seen between the probe and staphylococcal plasmids not mediating Tpr, plasmid DNA from 12 Tpr S. epidermidis isolates not transferring Tpr by conjugation, or plasmid-encoded Tpr genes derived from gram-negative bacteria. Plasmid-encoded Tpr appears to be a relatively new gene in staphylococci and, because it can be transferred by conjugation, could become more prevalent in nonsocomial isolates. Images PMID:3729338

  3. Plasmid-Encoded Iron Uptake Systems.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Manuela; Stork, Michiel

    2014-12-01

    Plasmids confer genetic information that benefits the bacterial cells containing them. In pathogenic bacteria, plasmids often harbor virulence determinants that enhance the pathogenicity of the bacterium. The ability to acquire iron in environments where it is limited, for instance the eukaryotic host, is a critical factor for bacterial growth. To acquire iron, bacteria have evolved specific iron uptake mechanisms. These systems are often chromosomally encoded, while those that are plasmid-encoded are rare. Two main plasmid types, ColV and pJM1, have been shown to harbor determinants that increase virulence by providing the cell with essential iron for growth. It is clear that these two plasmid groups evolved independently from each other since they do not share similarities either in the plasmid backbones or in the iron uptake systems they harbor. The siderophores aerobactin and salmochelin that are found on ColV plasmids fall in the hydroxamate and catechol group, respectively, whereas both functional groups are present in the anguibactin siderophore, the only iron uptake system found on pJM1-type plasmids. Besides siderophore-mediated iron uptake, ColV plasmids carry additional genes involved in iron metabolism. These systems include ABC transporters, hemolysins, and a hemoglobin protease. ColV- and pJM1-like plasmids have been shown to confer virulence to their bacterial host, and this trait can be completely ascribed to their encoded iron uptake systems.

  4. Characterization of the nodulation plasmid encoded chemoreceptor gene mcpG from Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Christopher K; Clark, Kirsten T; Del Bel, Kate L; Hynes, Michael F

    2003-01-01

    Background In general, chemotaxis in Rhizobium has not been well characterized. Methyl accepting chemotaxis proteins are sensory proteins important in chemotaxis of numerous bacteria, but their involvement in Rhizobium chemotaxis is unclear and merits further investigation. Results A putative methyl accepting chemotaxis protein gene (mcpG) of Rhizobium leguminosarum VF39SM was isolated and characterized. The gene was found to reside on the nodulation plasmid, pRleVF39d. The predicted mcpG ORF displayed motifs common to known methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, such as two transmembrane domains and high homology to the conserved methylation and signaling domains of well-characterized MCPs. Phenotypic analysis of mcpG mutants using swarm plates did not identify ligands for this putative receptor. Additionally, gene knockouts of mcpG did not affect a mutant strain's ability to compete for nodulation with the wild type. Notably, mcpG was found to be plasmid-encoded in all strains of R. leguminosarum and R. etli examined, though it was found on the nodulation plasmid only in a minority of strains. Conclusions Based on sequence homology R. leguminosarum mcpG gene codes for a methyl accepting chemotaxis protein. The gene is plasmid localized in numerous Rhizobium spp. Although localized to the sym plasmid of VF39SM mcpG does not appear to participate in early nodulation events. A ligand for McpG remains to be found. Apparent McpG orthologs appear in a diverse range of proteobacteria. Identification and characterization of mcpG adds to the family of mcp genes already identified in this organism. PMID:12553885

  5. A Plasmid-Encoded Phosphatase Regulates Bacillus subtilis Biofilm Architecture, Sporulation, and Genetic Competence

    PubMed Central

    Parashar, Vijay; Konkol, Melissa A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis biofilm formation is tightly regulated by elaborate signaling pathways. In contrast to domesticated lab strains of B. subtilis which form smooth, essentially featureless colonies, undomesticated strains such as NCIB 3610 form architecturally complex biofilms. NCIB 3610 also contains an 80-kb plasmid absent from laboratory strains, and mutations in a plasmid-encoded homolog of a Rap protein, RapP, caused a hyperrugose biofilm phenotype. Here we explored the role of rapP phrP in biofilm formation. We found that RapP is a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the intermediate response regulator Spo0F. RapP appears to employ a catalytic glutamate to dephosphorylate the Spo0F aspartyl phosphate, and the implications of the RapP catalytic glutamate are discussed. In addition to regulating B. subtilis biofilm formation, we found that RapP regulates sporulation and genetic competence as a result of its ability to dephosphorylate Spo0F. Interestingly, while rap phr gene cassettes routinely form regulatory pairs; i.e., the mature phr gene product inhibits the activity of the rap gene product, the phrP gene product did not inhibit RapP activity in our assays. RapP activity was, however, inhibited by PhrH in vivo but not in vitro. Additional genetic analysis suggests that RapP is directly inhibited by peptide binding. We speculate that PhrH could be subject to posttranslational modification in vivo and directly inhibit RapP activity or, more likely, PhrH upregulates the expression of a peptide that, in turn, directly binds to RapP and inhibits its Spo0F phosphatase activity. PMID:23524609

  6. Bacteriophage selection against a plasmid-encoded sex apparatus leads to the loss of antibiotic-resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Jalasvuori, Matti; Friman, Ville-Petri; Nieminen, Anne; Bamford, Jaana K H; Buckling, Angus

    2011-12-23

    Antibiotic-resistance genes are often carried by conjugative plasmids, which spread within and between bacterial species. It has long been recognized that some viruses of bacteria (bacteriophage; phage) have evolved to infect and kill plasmid-harbouring cells. This raises a question: can phages cause the loss of plasmid-associated antibiotic resistance by selecting for plasmid-free bacteria, or can bacteria or plasmids evolve resistance to phages in other ways? Here, we show that multiple antibiotic-resistance genes containing plasmids are stably maintained in both Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica in the absence of phages, while plasmid-dependent phage PRD1 causes a dramatic reduction in the frequency of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The loss of antibiotic resistance in cells initially harbouring RP4 plasmid was shown to result from evolution of phage resistance where bacterial cells expelled their plasmid (and hence the suitable receptor for phages). Phages also selected for a low frequency of plasmid-containing, phage-resistant bacteria, presumably as a result of modification of the plasmid-encoded receptor. However, these double-resistant mutants had a growth cost compared with phage-resistant but antibiotic-susceptible mutants and were unable to conjugate. These results suggest that bacteriophages could play a significant role in restricting the spread of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance.

  7. Plasmid-Encoded AmpC (pAmpC) in Enterobacteriaceae: epidemiology of microorganisms and resistance markers.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Daniela; Fernández Canigia, Liliana; Quinteros, Mirta; Giovanakis, Marta; Vay, Carlos; Lascialandare, Silvana; Mutti, Daniel; Pagniez, Gastón; Almuzara, Marisa; Gutkind, Gabriel; Radice, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    CMY-2 Β-lactamase is an important cause of Β-lactam resistance in Enterobacteriaceae and constitutes the most widespread pAmpC. Although CMY-2 has been previously recognized in our region, the real prevalence and epidemiology of this resistance marker was uncertain. During August-October 2009, we conducted a multicenter, prospective study to determine pAmpC prevalence and to characterize CMY-2 producing Escherichia coli associated plasmids. Plasmid-encoded AmpC prevalence was 0.9 % in enterobacteria in this period, being CMY-2 prevalent and to a lesser extent DHA. Molecular typing of CMY-2- producing Escherichia coli isolates showed several lineages. Moreover, replicon typing of cmy-2- containing plasmids displayed a broad diversity in Inc/cmy-2 links. Therefore, association of cmy-2 with specific transposon elements may be responsible for the spread of this resistance marker in Enterobacteriaceae.

  8. Plasmid-Encoded Tetracycline Efflux Pump Protein Alters Bacterial Stress Responses and Ecological Fitness of Acinetobacter oleivorans

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hyerim; Jung, Jaejoon; Park, Woojun

    2014-01-01

    Acquisition of the extracellular tetracycline (TC) resistance plasmid pAST2 affected host gene expression and phenotype in the oil-degrading soil bacterium, Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1. Whole-transcriptome profiling of DR1 cells harboring pAST2 revealed that all the plasmid genes were highly expressed under TC conditions, and the expression levels of many host chromosomal genes were modulated by the presence of pAST2. The host energy burden imposed by replication of pAST2 led to (i) lowered ATP concentrations, (ii) downregulated expression of many genes involved in cellular growth, and (iii) reduced growth rate. Interestingly, some phenotypes were restored by deleting the plasmid-encoded efflux pump gene tetH, suggesting that the membrane integrity changes resulting from the incorporation of efflux pump proteins also resulted in altered host response under the tested conditions. Alteration of membrane integrity by tetH deletion was shown by measuring permeability of fluorescent probe and membrane hydrophobicity. The presence of the plasmid conferred peroxide and superoxide resistance to cells, but only peroxide resistance was diminished by tetH gene deletion, suggesting that the plasmid-encoded membrane-bound efflux pump protein provided peroxide resistance. The downregulation of fimbriae-related genes presumably led to reduced swimming motility, but this phenotype was recovered by tetH gene deletion. Our data suggest that not only the plasmid replication burden, but also its encoded efflux pump protein altered host chromosomal gene expression and phenotype, which also alters the ecological fitness of the host in the environment. PMID:25229538

  9. Plasmid-Encoded Pgp3 Is a Major Virulence Factor for Chlamydia muridarum To Induce Hydrosalpinx in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanjun; Huang, Yumeng; Yang, Zhangsheng; Sun, Yina; Gong, Siqi; Hou, Shuping; Chen, Chaoqun; Li, Zhongyu; Liu, Quanzhong; Wu, Yimou; Baseman, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Hydrosalpinx induction in mice by Chlamydia muridarum infection, a model that has been used to study C. trachomatis pathogenesis in women, is known to depend on the cryptic plasmid that encodes eight genes designated pgp1 to pgp8. To identify the plasmid-encoded pathogenic determinants, we evaluated C. muridarum transformants deficient in the plasmid-borne gene pgp3, -4, or -7 for induction of hydrosalpinx. C. muridarum transformants with an in-frame deletion of either pgp3 or -4 but not -7 failed to induce hydrosalpinx. The deletion mutant phenotype was reproduced by using transformants with premature termination codon insertions in the corresponding pgp genes (to minimize polar effects inherent in the deletion mutants). Pgp4 is known to regulate pgp3 expression, while lack of Pgp3 does not significantly affect Pgp4 function. Thus, we conclude that Pgp3 is an effector virulence factor and that lack of Pgp3 may be responsible for the attenuation in C. muridarum pathogenicity described above. This attenuated pathogenicity was further correlated with a rapid decrease in chlamydial survival in the lower genital tract and reduced ascension to the upper genital tract in mice infected with C. muridarum deficient in Pgp3 but not Pgp7. The Pgp3-deficient C. muridarum organisms were also less invasive when delivered directly to the oviduct on day 7 after inoculation. These observations demonstrate that plasmid-encoded Pgp3 is required for C. muridarum survival in the mouse genital tract and represents a major virulence factor in C. muridarum pathogenesis in mice. PMID:25287930

  10. The multidrug resistance IncA/C transferable plasmid encodes a novel domain-swapped dimeric protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Lakshmanane; Kurth, Fabian; Neyer, Simon; Schembri, Mark A; Martin, Jennifer L

    2014-01-31

    The multidrug resistance-encoding IncA/C conjugative plasmids disseminate antibiotic resistance genes among clinically relevant enteric bacteria. A plasmid-encoded disulfide isomerase is associated with conjugation. Sequence analysis of several IncA/C plasmids and IncA/C-related integrative and conjugative elements (ICE) from commensal and pathogenic bacteria identified a conserved DsbC/DsbG homolog (DsbP). The crystal structure of DsbP reveals an N-terminal domain, a linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain. A DsbP homodimer is formed through domain swapping of two DsbP N-terminal domains. The catalytic domain incorporates a thioredoxin-fold with characteristic CXXC and cis-Pro motifs. Overall, the structure and redox properties of DsbP diverge from the Escherichia coli DsbC and DsbG disulfide isomerases. Specifically, the V-shaped dimer of DsbP is inverted compared with EcDsbC and EcDsbG. In addition, the redox potential of DsbP (-161 mV) is more reducing than EcDsbC (-130 mV) and EcDsbG (-126 mV). Other catalytic properties of DsbP more closely resemble those of EcDsbG than EcDsbC. These catalytic differences are in part a consequence of the unusual active site motif of DsbP (CAVC); substitution to the EcDsbC-like (CGYC) motif converts the catalytic properties to those of EcDsbC. Structural comparison of the 12 independent subunit structures of DsbP that we determined revealed that conformational changes in the linker region contribute to mobility of the catalytic domain, providing mechanistic insight into DsbP function. In summary, our data reveal that the conserved plasmid-encoded DsbP protein is a bona fide disulfide isomerase and suggest that a dedicated oxidative folding enzyme is important for conjugative plasmid transfer.

  11. Skin Electroporation of a Plasmid Encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 Host Defense Peptide Promotes Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Lam, Martin C; Jacobsen, Frank; Porporato, Paolo E; Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Becerikli, Mustafa; Stricker, Ingo; Hancock, Robert EW; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Sonveaux, Pierre; Préat, Véronique; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides, in particular LL-37, are emerging as potential therapeutics for promoting wound healing and inhibiting bacterial growth. However, effective delivery of the LL-37 peptide remains limiting. We hypothesized that skin-targeted electroporation of a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 would promote the healing of wounds. The plasmid was efficiently delivered to full-thickness skin wounds by electroporation and it induced expression of LL-37 in the epithelium. It significantly accelerated reepithelialization of nondiabetic and diabetic wounds and caused a significant VEGFa and interleukin (IL)-6 induction. IL-6 was involved in LL-37–mediated keratinocyte migration in vitro and IL-6 neutralizing antibodies delivered to mice were able to suppress the wound healing activity of the hCAP-18/LL-37 plasmid. In a hindlimb ischemia model, electroporation of the hCAP-18/LL-37 plasmid increased blood perfusion, reduced muscular atrophy, and upregulated the angiogenic chemokines VEGFa and SDF-1a, and their receptors VEGF-R and CXCR-4. These findings demonstrate that a localized gene therapy with LL-37 is a promising approach for the treatment of wounds. PMID:24394186

  12. Regulation of plasmid-encoded isoprene metabolism in Rhodococcus, a representative of an important link in the global isoprene cycle

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, Andrew T; Khawand, Myriam El; Rhodius, Virgil A; Fengler, Kevin A; Miller, Michael C; Whited, Gregg M; McGenity, Terry J; Murrell, J Colin

    2015-01-01

    Emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) form an important part of the global carbon cycle, comprising a significant proportion of net ecosystem productivity. They impact atmospheric chemistry and contribute directly and indirectly to greenhouse gases. Isoprene, emitted largely from plants, comprises one third of total VOCs, yet in contrast to methane, which is released in similar quantities, we know little of its biodegradation. Here, we report the genome of an isoprene degrading isolate, Rhodococcus sp. AD45, and, using mutagenesis shows that a plasmid-encoded soluble di-iron centre isoprene monooxygenase (IsoMO) is essential for isoprene metabolism. Using RNA sequencing (RNAseq) to analyse cells exposed to isoprene or epoxyisoprene in a substrate-switch time-course experiment, we show that transcripts from 22 contiguous genes, including those encoding IsoMO, were highly upregulated, becoming among the most abundant in the cell and comprising over 25% of the entire transcriptome. Analysis of gene transcription in the wild type and an IsoMO-disrupted mutant strain showed that epoxyisoprene, or a subsequent product of isoprene metabolism, rather than isoprene itself, was the inducing molecule. We provide a foundation of molecular data for future research on the environmental biological consumption of this important, climate-active compound. PMID:25727256

  13. Cloning and characterization of a novel, plasmid-encoded trimethoprim-resistant dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus haemolyticus MUR313.

    PubMed

    Dale, G E; Langen, H; Page, M G; Then, R L; Stüber, D

    1995-09-01

    In recent years resistance to the antibacterial agent trimethoprim (Tmp) has become more widespread, and several trimethoprim-resistant (Tmpr) dihydrofolate reductases (DHFRs) have been described from gram-negative bacteria. In staphylococci, only one Tmpr DHFR has been described, the type S1 DHFR, which is encoded by the dfrA gene found on transposon Tn4003. In order to investigate the coincidence of high-level Tmp resistance and the presence of dfrA, we analyzed the DNAs from various Tmpr staphylococci for the presence of dfrA sequences by PCR with primers specific for the thyE-dfrA genes from Tn4003. We found that 30 or 33 isolates highly resistant to Tmp (MICs, > or = 512 micrograms/ml) contained dfrA sequences, whereas among the Tmpr (MICs, < or = 256 micrograms/ml) and Tmps isolates only the Staphylococcus epidermidis isolates (both Tmpr and Tmps) seemed to contain the dfrA gene. Furthermore, we have cloned and characterized a novel, plasmid-encoded Tmpr DHFR from Staphylococcus haemolyticus MUR313. The dfrD gene of plasmid pABU17 is preceded by two putative Shine-Dalgarno sequences potentially allowing for the start of translation at two triplets separated by nine nucleotides. The predicted protein of 166 amino acids, designated S2DHFR, encoded by the longer open reading frame was overproduced in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. The molecular size of the recombinant S2DHFR was determined by ion spray mass spectrometry to be 19,821.2 +/- 2 Da, which is in agreement with the theoretical value of 19,822 Da. In addition, the recombinant S2DHFR was shown to exhibit DHFR activity and to be highly resistant to Tmp.

  14. Virulence plasmid-encoded YopK is essential for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis to cause systemic infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Holmström, A; Rosqvist, R; Wolf-Watz, H; Forsberg, A

    1995-01-01

    The virulence plasmid common to pathogenic Yersinia species encodes a number of secreted proteins denoted Yops (Yersinia outer proteins). Here, we identify and characterize a novel plasmid-encoded virulence determinant of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, YopK. The yopK gene was found to be conserved among the three pathogenic Yersinia species and to be homologous to the previously described yopQ and yopK genes of Y. enterocolitica and Y. pestis, respectively. Similar to the other Yops, YopK expression and secretion were shown to be regulated by temperature and by the extracellular Ca2+ concentration; thus, yopK is part of the yop regulon. In addition, YopK secretion was mediated by the specific Yop secretion system. In Y. pseudotuberculosis, YopK was shown neither to have a role in this bacterium's ability to resist phagocytosis by macrophages nor to cause cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. YopK was, however, shown to be required for the bacterium to cause a systemic infection in both intraperitoneally and orally infected mice. Characterization of the infection kinetics showed that, similarly to the wild-type strain, the yopK mutant strain colonized and persisted in the Peyer's patches of orally infected mice. A yopE mutant which is impaired in cytotoxicity and in antiphagocytosis was, however, found to be rapidly cleared from these lymphoid organs. Neither the yopK nor the yopE mutant strain could overcome the primary host defense and reach the spleen. This finding implies that YopK acts at a different level during the infections process than the antiphagocytic YopE cytotoxin does. PMID:7768608

  15. Compatibility of plasmids encoding bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1 and type 2 E2 in a single DNA vaccine formulation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rong; Babiuk, Lorne A; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2007-08-10

    Type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has become increasingly prevalent worldwide, and currently the ratio of type 2 to type 1 strains in the USA approaches 50%. Although there is cross-reactivity between BVDV type 1 and type 2 strains, BVDV1 vaccine strains poorly protect from type 2 infection, so vaccines against BVDV should contain antigens from both BVDV types. Previously we demonstrated efficacy of a BVDV1 E2 DNA vaccine, and in this study we optimized a BVDV2 E2 DNA vaccine. Furthermore, as an approach to vaccinate with a DNA vaccine against both BVDV types, we compared two strategies, mixing of plasmids encoding type 1 and type 2 E2, and co-expression of type 1 and type 2 E2 from one plasmid with an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES). An evaluation of the IRES-containing plasmids demonstrated that the C-terminally expressed protein is produced at lower levels and induces weaker immune responses than the N-terminally expressed protein, regardless of the position of the type 1 and type 2 E2 genes. In contrast, when both plasmids encoding type 1 and type 2 E2 were administered to mice, the immune responses were similar to those induced by the individual plasmids. Thus, a mixture of plasmids encoding type 1 and type 2 E2 could be a potential DNA vaccine candidate against both BVDV1 and BVDV2.

  16. X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an autotransporter enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo Meza-Aguilar, J.; Fromme, Petra; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises; Arreguin-Espinosa de los Monteros, Roberto A.; and others

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of Plasmid encoded toxin at 2.3 Å. • Structural differences between Pet passenger domain and EspP protein are described. • High flexibility of the C-terminal beta helix is structurally assigned. - Abstract: Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50% compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181–190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135 and 143 compared to the structure of EspP.

  17. Gene therapy with plasmids encoding IFN-β or IFN-α14 confers long-term resistance to HIV-1 in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Ortega, Nora M.; Zhang, Junli; Shankar, Premlata; Swamy, N. Manjunath

    2016-01-01

    Because endogenous interferon type I (IFN-I) produced by HIV-1 infection might complicate the analysis of therapeutically administered IFN-I, we tested different humanized mouse models for induction of IFN-I during HIV-1 infection. While HIV-1 induced high levels of IFN-α in BLT mice, IFN-I was undetectable following infection in the Hu-PBL mouse model, in which only T cells expand. We therefore tested the effect of treatment with Pegylated IFN-2 (pegasys), in Hu-PBL mice. Pegasys prevented CD4 T cell depletion and reduced the viral load for 10 days, but the effect waned thereafter. We next expressed IFN-I subsets (IFN-α2, −α6, −α8, −α14, and −β) in Hu-PBL mice by hydrodynamic injection of plasmids encoding them and 2 days later infected the mice with HIV-1. CD4 T cell depletion was prevented in all subtypes of IFN-I-expressing mice by day 10. However, at day 40 post-infection, protection was seen in IFN-β- and IFN-α14-expressing mice, but not the others. The viral load followed an inverse pattern and was highest in control mice and lowest in IFN-β- and IFN-α14-expressing mice until day 40 after infection. These results show that gene therapy with plasmids encoding IFN-β and −α14, but not the commonly used −α2, confers long-term suppression of HIV-1 replication. PMID:27729616

  18. In vivo transfer of plasmid-encoded ACC-1 AmpC from Klebsiella pneumoniae to Escherichia coli in an infant and selection of impermeability to imipenem in K. pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Bidet, Philippe; Burghoffer, Béatrice; Gautier, Valérie; Brahimi, Naïma; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; El-Ghoneimi, Alaa; Bingen, Edouard; Arlet, Guillaume

    2005-08-01

    We describe in vivo selection of a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain with diminished imipenem susceptibility attributable to plasmid-encoded ACC-1 beta-lactamase production and loss of a 36-kDa major outer membrane protein, together with transfer of this plasmid from K. pneumoniae to Escherichia coli in a Tunisian infant.

  19. Diversity of plasmids encoding virulence and resistance functions in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- strains circulating in Europe.

    PubMed

    García, Patricia; Hopkins, Katie L; García, Vanesa; Beutlich, Janine; Mendoza, M Carmen; Threlfall, John; Mevius, Dik; Helmuth, Reiner; Rodicio, M Rosario; Guerra, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Plasmids encoding resistance and virulence properties in multidrug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica (S.) serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- isolates recovered from pigs and humans (2006-2008) in Europe were characterised. The isolates were selected based on the detection by PCR-amplification of S. Typhimurium virulence plasmid pSLT genes and were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The resistance genes present in the isolates and the association of these genes with integrons, transposons and insertion sequences were characterised by PCR-sequencing, and their plasmid location was determined by alkaline lysis and by S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) Southern-blot hybridisation. Plasmids were further analysed by replicon typing, plasmid MLST and conjugation experiments. The 10 S. 4,[5],12,i:- selected isolates belonged to ST19. Each isolate carried a large plasmid in which MDR with pSLT-associated virulence genes were located. After analysis, eight different plasmids of three incompatibility groups (IncA/C, IncR and IncF) were detected. Two IncA/C plasmids represented novel variants within the plasmid family of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- Spanish clone, and carried an empty class 1 integron with a conventional qacEΔ1-sul1 3' conserved segment or an In-sul3 type III with estX-psp-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH variable region linked to tnpA440-sul3, part of Tn2, Tn21 and Tn1721 transposons, and ISCR2. Four newly described IncR plasmids contained the resistance genes within In-sul3 type I (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH/tnpA440-sul3) and part of Tn10 [tet(B)]. Two pSLT-derivatives with FIIs-ST1+FIB-ST17 replicons carried cmlA1-[aadA1-aadA2]-sul3-dfrA12 and blaTEM-1 genes linked to an In-sul3 type I integron and to Tn2, respectively. In conclusion, three emerging European clones of S. 4,[5],12:i:- harboured MDR plasmids encoding additional virulence functions that could contribute significantly to their evolutionary success.

  20. Diversity of Plasmids Encoding Virulence and Resistance Functions in Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Typhimurium Monophasic Variant 4,[5],12:i:- Strains Circulating in Europe

    PubMed Central

    García, Patricia; Hopkins, Katie L.; García, Vanesa; Beutlich, Janine; Mendoza, M. Carmen; Threlfall, John; Mevius, Dik; Helmuth, Reiner; Rodicio, M. Rosario; Guerra, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Plasmids encoding resistance and virulence properties in multidrug resistant (MDR) Salmonella enterica (S.) serovar Typhimurium monophasic variant 4,[5],12:i:- isolates recovered from pigs and humans (2006-2008) in Europe were characterised. The isolates were selected based on the detection by PCR-amplification of S. Typhimurium virulence plasmid pSLT genes and were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). The resistance genes present in the isolates and the association of these genes with integrons, transposons and insertion sequences were characterised by PCR-sequencing, and their plasmid location was determined by alkaline lysis and by S1-nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) Southern-blot hybridisation. Plasmids were further analysed by replicon typing, plasmid MLST and conjugation experiments. The 10 S. 4,[5],12,i:- selected isolates belonged to ST19. Each isolate carried a large plasmid in which MDR with pSLT-associated virulence genes were located. After analysis, eight different plasmids of three incompatibility groups (IncA/C, IncR and IncF) were detected. Two IncA/C plasmids represented novel variants within the plasmid family of the S. 4,[5],12:i:- Spanish clone, and carried an empty class 1 integron with a conventional qacEΔ1-sul1 3′ conserved segment or an In-sul3 type III with estX-psp-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH variable region linked to tnpA440-sul3, part of Tn2, Tn21 and Tn1721 transposons, and ISCR2. Four newly described IncR plasmids contained the resistance genes within In-sul3 type I (dfrA12-orfF-aadA2-cmlA1-aadA1-qacH/tnpA440-sul3) and part of Tn10 [tet(B)]. Two pSLT-derivatives with FIIs-ST1+FIB-ST17 replicons carried cmlA1-[aadA1-aadA2]-sul3-dfrA12 and blaTEM-1 genes linked to an In-sul3 type I integron and to Tn2, respectively. In conclusion, three emerging European clones of S. 4,[5],12:i:- harboured MDR plasmids encoding additional virulence functions that could contribute significantly to their evolutionary success. PMID

  1. Limited Dissemination of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase– and Plasmid-Encoded AmpC–Producing Escherichia coli from Food and Farm Animals, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Ny, Sofia; Egervärn, Maria; Bergström, Jakob; Rosengren, Åsa; Englund, Stina; Löfmark, Sonja; Byfors, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)– and plasmid-encoded ampC (pAmpC)–producing Enterobacteriaceae might spread from farm animals to humans through food. However, most studies have been limited in number of isolates tested and areas studied. We examined genetic relatedness of 716 isolates from 4,854 samples collected from humans, farm animals, and foods in Sweden to determine whether foods and farm animals might act as reservoirs and dissemination routes for ESBL/pAmpC-producing Escherichia coli. Results showed that clonal spread to humans appears unlikely. However, we found limited dissemination of genes encoding ESBL/pAmpC and plasmids carrying these genes from foods and farm animals to healthy humans and patients. Poultry and chicken meat might be a reservoir and dissemination route to humans. Although we found no evidence of clonal spread of ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli from farm animals or foods to humans, ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli with identical genes and plasmids were present in farm animals, foods, and humans. PMID:26982890

  2. Identification of a new plasmid-encoded cytochrome P450 CYP107DY1 from Bacillus megaterium with a catalytic activity towards mevastatin.

    PubMed

    Milhim, Mohammed; Putkaradze, Natalia; Abdulmughni, Ammar; Kern, Fredy; Hartz, Philip; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-12-20

    In the current work, we describe the identification and characterization of the first plasmid-encoded P450 (CYP107DY1) from a Bacillus species. The recombinant CYP107DY1 exhibits characteristic P450 absolute and reduced CO-bound difference spectra. Reconstitution with different redox systems revealed the autologous one, consisting of BmCPR and Fdx2, as the most effective one. Screening of a library of 18 pharmaceutically relevant compounds displayed activity towards mevastatin to produce pravastatin. Pravastatin is an important therapeutic drug to treat hypercholesterolemia, which was described to be produced by oxyfunctionlization of mevastatin (compactin) by members of CYP105 family. The hydroxylation at C6 of mevastatin was also suggested by docking this compound into a computer model created for CYP107DY1. Moreover, in view of the biotechnological application, CYP107DY1 as well as its redox partners (BmCPR and Fdx2) were successfully utilized to establish an E. coli based whole-cell system for an efficient biotransformation of mevastatin. The in vitro and in vivo application of the CYP07DY1 also offers the possibility for the screening of more substrates, which could open up further biotechnological usage of this enzyme.

  3. X-ray crystal structure of the passenger domain of plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an autotransporter enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC).

    PubMed

    Domingo Meza-Aguilar, J; Fromme, Petra; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises; Arreguin-Espinosa de Los Monteros, Roberto A; Eslava Campos, Carlos A; Fromme, Raimund

    2014-03-07

    Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50% compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181-190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135 and 143 compared to the structure of EspP.

  4. X-Ray Crystal Structure of the passenger domain of Plasmid encoded toxin(Pet), an Autotransporter Enterotoxin from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC)

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Aguilar, J. Domingo; Fromme, Petra; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Hernandez-Chiñas, Ulises; Monteros, Roberto A. Arreguin-Espinosa de los; Campos, Carlos A. Eslava; Fromme, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) represent a superfamily of proteins produced by a variety of pathogenic bacteria, which include the pathogenic groups of Escherichia coli (E. coli) associated with gastrointestinal and urinary tract infections. We present the first X-ray structure of the passenger domain from the Plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) a 100 kDa protein at 2.3 Å resolution which is a cause of acute diarrhea in both developing and industrialized countries. Pet is a cytoskeleton-altering toxin that induces loss of actin stress fibers. While Pet (pdb code: 4OM9) shows only a sequence identity of 50 % compared to the closest related protein sequence, extracellular serine protease plasmid (EspP) the structural features of both proteins are conserved. A closer structural look reveals that Pet contains a β-pleaded sheet at the sequence region of residues 181-190, the corresponding structural domain in EspP consists of a coiled loop. Secondary, the Pet passenger domain features a more pronounced beta sheet between residues 135-143 compared to the structure of EspP. PMID:24530907

  5. Limited Dissemination of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase- and Plasmid-Encoded AmpC-Producing Escherichia coli from Food and Farm Animals, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Börjesson, Stefan; Ny, Sofia; Egervärn, Maria; Bergström, Jakob; Rosengren, Åsa; Englund, Stina; Löfmark, Sonja; Byfors, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- and plasmid-encoded ampC (pAmpC)-producing Enterobacteriaceae might spread from farm animals to humans through food. However, most studies have been limited in number of isolates tested and areas studied. We examined genetic relatedness of 716 isolates from 4,854 samples collected from humans, farm animals, and foods in Sweden to determine whether foods and farm animals might act as reservoirs and dissemination routes for ESBL/pAmpC-producing Escherichia coli. Results showed that clonal spread to humans appears unlikely. However, we found limited dissemination of genes encoding ESBL/pAmpC and plasmids carrying these genes from foods and farm animals to healthy humans and patients. Poultry and chicken meat might be a reservoir and dissemination route to humans. Although we found no evidence of clonal spread of ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli from farm animals or foods to humans, ESBL/pAmpC-producing E. coli with identical genes and plasmids were present in farm animals, foods, and humans.

  6. Effects of DDA, CpG-ODN, and plasmid-encoded chicken IFN-γ on protective immunity by a DNA vaccine against IBDV in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Ha Jung; Sung, Haan Woo

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the adjuvant effects of dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA), CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), and chicken interferon-γ (ChIFN-γ) on a DNA vaccine (pcDNA-VP243) against the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). A plasmid encoding chicken IFN-ã was constructed. Twice at 2-week intervals, two-week-old chickens were injected intramuscularly and intraperitoneally with either a DNA vaccine alone or a DNA vaccine together with the respective adjuvants. On week 2 after the second immunization, the chickens were orally challenged with the highly virulent IBDV. The groups that received the DNA vaccines plus either DDA or CpG-ODN showed significantly lower survival rates than the group that received the DNA vaccine alone. However, the survival rates for the DNA vaccine alone and for the DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-γ were similar. The chickens had no detectable antibodies to the IBDV before the challenge but all the surviving chickens in all groups except for the normal control group showed the induction of antibodies to the IBDV at day 10 after the challenge. As judged by the lymphocyte proliferation assays using the a WST-8 solution performed on the peripheral blood and splenic lymphocytes, the stimulation indices (SI) of the peripheral blood lymphocytes in all groups except for the normal control group were similar immediately before the challenge. At 10 days post-challenge, the SI for DNA vaccine plus either CpG-ODN or ChIFN-γ was similar to that of the DNA vaccine control group. For splenic lymphocytes, the SI in the DNA vaccine plus CpG-ODN and DNA vaccine plus ChIFN-γ groups were higher than for the DNA vaccine control. These results suggest that DDA actually compromises the protection against the IBDV by DNA vaccine, and CpG-ODN and IFN-γ had no significant effect. PMID:17106228

  7. The secretome of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978 type II secretion system reveals a novel plasmid encoded phospholipase that could be implicated in lung colonization.

    PubMed

    Elhosseiny, Noha M; El-Tayeb, Ossama M; Yassin, Aymen S; Lory, Stephen; Attia, Ahmed S

    2016-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections are compounded with a striking lack of treatment options. In many Gram-negative bacteria, secreted proteins play an important early role in avoiding host defences. Typically, these proteins are targeted to the external environment or into host cells using dedicated transport systems. Despite the fact that medically relevant species of Acinetobacter possess a type II secretion system (T2SS), only recently, its significance as an important pathway for delivering virulence factors has gained attention. Using in silico analysis to characterize the genetic determinants of the T2SS, which are found clustered in other organisms, in Acinetobacter species, they appear to have a unique genetic organization and are distributed throughout the genome. When compared to other T2SS orthologs, individual components of the T2SS apparatus showed the highest similarity to those of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A mutant of Acinetobacter baumannii strain ATCC 17978 lacking the secretin component of the T2SS (ΔgspD), together with a trans-complemented mutant, were tested in a series of in vitro and in vivo assays to determine the role of T2SS in pathogenicity. The ΔgspD mutant displayed decreased lipolytic activity, associated with attenuated colonization ability in a murine pneumonia model. These phenotypes are linked to LipAN, a novel plasmid-encoded phospholipase, identified through mass spectroscopy as a T2SS substrate. Recombinant LipAN showed specific phospholipase activity in vitro. Proteomics on the T2-dependent secretome of ATCC 17978 strain revealed its potential dedication to the secretion of a number of lipolytic enzymes, among others which could contribute to its virulence. This study highlights the role of T2SS as an active contributor to the virulence of A. baumannii potentially through secretion of a newly identified phospholipase.

  8. Dissemination of plasmid-encoded AmpC β-lactamases in antimicrobial resistant Salmonella serotypes originating from humans, pigs and the swine environment.

    PubMed

    Keelara, Shivaramu; Thakur, Siddhartha

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to characterize and determine the inter-serovar exchange of AmpC β-lactamase conferring plasmids isolated from humans, pigs and the swine environment. Plasmids isolated from a total of 21 antimicrobial resistant (AMR) Salmonella isolates representing human clinical cases (n=6), pigs (n=6) and the swine farm environment (n=9) were characterized by replicon typing and restriction digestion, inter-serovar transferability by conjugation, and presence of AmpC β-lactamase enzyme encoding gene blaCMY-2 by southern hybridization. Based on replicon typing, the majority (17/21, 81%) of the plasmids belonged to the I1-Iγ Inc group and were between 70 and 103kb. The potential for inter-serovar plasmid transfer was further confirmed by the PCR detection of AMR genes on the plasmids isolated from trans-conjugants. Plasmids from Salmonella serovars Anatum, Ouakam, Johannesburg and Typhimurium isolated from the same cohort of pigs and their environment and S. Heidelberg from a single human clinical isolate had identical plasmids based on digestion with multiple restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HindIII and PstI) and southern blotting. We demonstrated likely horizontal inter-serovar exchange of plasmid-encoding AmpC β-lactamases resistance among MDR Salmonella serotypes isolated from pigs, swine farm environment and clinical human cases. This study provides valuable information on the role of the swine farm environment and by extension other livestock farm environments, as a potential reservoir of resistant bacterial strains that potentially transmit resistance determinants to livestock, in this case, swine, humans and possibly other hosts by horizontal exchange of plasmids.

  9. Synergistic and Additive Effects of Chromosomal and Plasmid-Encoded Hemolysins Contribute to Hemolysis and Virulence in Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Balado, Miguel; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2013-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae causes infections and fatal disease in marine animals and in humans. Highly hemolytic strains produce damselysin (Dly) and plasmid-encoded HlyA (HlyApl). These hemolysins are encoded by plasmid pPHDD1 and contribute to hemolysis and virulence for fish and mice. In this study, we report that all the hemolytic strains produce a hitherto uncharacterized chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch). Hemolysis was completely abolished in a single hlyAch mutant of a plasmidless strain and in a dly hlyApl hlyAch triple mutant. We found that Dly, HlyApl, and HlyAch are needed for full hemolytic values in strains harboring pPHDD1, and these values are the result of the additive effects between HlyApl and HlyAch, on the one hand, and of the synergistic effect of Dly with HlyApl and HlyAch, on the other hand. Interestingly, Dly-producing strains produced synergistic effects with strains lacking Dly production but secreting HlyA, constituting a case of the CAMP (Christie, Atkins, and Munch-Petersen) reaction. Environmental factors such as iron starvation and salt concentration were found to regulate the expression of the three hemolysins. We found that the contributions, in terms of the individual and combined effects, of the three hemolysins to hemolysis and virulence varied depending on the animal species tested. While Dly and HlyApl were found to be main contributors in the virulence for mice, we observed that the contribution of hemolysins to virulence for fish was mainly based on the synergistic effects between Dly and either of the two HlyA hemolysins rather than on their individual effects. PMID:23798530

  10. Increasing versatility of the DNA vaccines through modification of the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, Alicia; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizan, María Del Mar; Chico, Verónica; Medina-Gali, Regla María; Perez, Luis; Coll, Julio; Estepa, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    The route of administration of DNA vaccines can play a key role in the magnitude and quality of the immune response triggered after their administration. DNA vaccines containing the gene of the membrane-anchored glycoprotein (gpG) of the fish rhabdoviruses infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral haematopoietic septicaemia virus (VHSV), perhaps the most effective DNA vaccines generated so far, confer maximum protection when injected intramuscularly in contrast to their low efficacy when injected intraperitoneally. In this work, taking as a model the DNA vaccine against VHSV, we focused on developing a more versatile DNA vaccine capable of inducing protective immunity regardless of the administration route used. For that, we designed two alternative constructs to gpG₁₋₅₀₇ (the wild type membrane-anchored gpG of VHSV) encoding either a soluble (gpG₁₋₄₆₂) or a secreted soluble (gpG(LmPle20-462)) form of the VHSV-gpG. In vivo immunisation/challenge assays showed that only gpG(LmPle20-462) (the secreted soluble form) conferred protective immunity against VHSV lethal challenge via both intramuscular and intraperitoneal injection, being this the first description of a fish viral DNA vaccine that confers protection when administered intraperitoneally. Moreover, this new DNA vaccine construct also conferred protection when administered in the presence of an oil adjuvant suggesting that DNA vaccines against rhabdoviruses could be included in the formulation of current multicomponent-intaperitoneally injectable fish vaccines formulated with an oil adjuvant. On the other hand, a strong recruitment of membrane immunoglobulin expressing B cells, mainly membrane IgT, as well as t-bet expressing T cells, at early times post-immunisation, was specifically observed in the fish immunised with the secreted soluble form of the VHSV-gpG protein; this may indicate that the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo

  11. Effect of naked eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding rat augmenter of liver regeneration on acute hepatic injury and hepatic failure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Liu, Dian-Wu; Liu, Jian-Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tang, Long-Mei; Wang, Li-Qin

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the protective effect of eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding augmenter of liver regeneration (ALR) on acute hepatic injury and hepatic failure in rats. METHODS: The PCR-amplified ALR gene was recombined with pcDNA3 plasmid, and used to treat rats with acute hepatic injury. The rats with acute hepatic injury induced by intraperitoneal injection of 2 mL/kg 50% carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) were randomly divided into saline control group and recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid treatment groups. Recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid DNA (50 or 200 μg/kg) was injected into the rats with acute hepatic injury intraven-ously, intraperitoneally, or intravenously and intraperitoneally in combination 4 h after CCl4 administration, respectively. The recombinant plasmid was injected once per 12 h into all treatment groups four times, and the rats were decapitated 12 h after the last injection. Hepatic histopathological alterations were observed after HE staining, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in liver tissue was detected by immunohistochemical staining, and the level of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) was determined by biochemical method. The recombinant plasmid DNA (200 μg/kg) and saline were intraperitoneally injected into the rats with acute hepatic failure induced by intraperitoneal injection of 4 mL/kg 50% CCl4 after 4 h of CCl4 administration, respectively. Rats living over 96 h were considered as survivals. RESULTS: The sequence of ALR cDNA of recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid was accordant with the reported sequence of rat ALR cDNA. After the rats with acute hepatic injury were treated with recombinant pcDNA3-ALR plasmid, the degree of liver histopathological injury markedly decreased. The pathologic liver tissues, in which hepatic degeneration and necrosis of a small amount of hepatocytes and a large amount of infiltrating inflammatory cells were observed, and they became basically normal in the

  12. Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Major Virulence Factors Dly, Plasmid-Encoded HlyA, and Chromosome-Encoded HlyA Are Secreted via the Type II Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Amable J.; Vences, Ana; Husmann, Matthias; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2015-01-01

    Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae is a marine bacterium that causes septicemia in marine animals and in humans. Previously, we had determined a major role of pPHDD1 plasmid-encoded Dly (damselysin) and HlyA (HlyApl) and the chromosome-encoded HlyA (HlyAch) hemolysins in virulence. However, the mechanisms by which these toxins are secreted remain unknown. In this study, we found that a mini-Tn10 transposon mutant in a plasmidless strain showing an impaired hemolytic phenotype contained an insertion in epsL, a component of a type II secretion system (T2SS). Reconstruction of the mutant by allelic exchange confirmed the specific involvement of epsL in HlyAch secretion. In addition, mutation of epsL in a pPHDD1-harboring strain caused an almost complete abolition of hemolytic activity against sheep erythrocytes, indicating that epsL plays a major role in secretion of the plasmid-encoded HlyApl and Dly. This was further demonstrated by analysis of different combinations of hemolysin gene mutants and by strain-strain complementation assays. We also found that mutation of the putative prepilin peptidase gene pilD severely affected hemolysis, which dropped at levels inferior to those of epsL mutants. Promoter expression analyses suggested that impairment of hemolysin secretion in epsL and pilD mutants might constitute a signal that affects hemolysin and T2SS gene expression at the transcriptional level. In addition, single epsL and pilD mutations caused a drastic decrease in virulence for mice, demonstrating a major role of T2SS and pilD in P. damselae subsp. damselae virulence. PMID:25583529

  13. Gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma using non-viral vectors composed of bis guanidinium-tren-cholesterol and plasmids encoding the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-2 and TIMP-3.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong-Lan; Vigneron, Jean-Pierre; Pericat, David; Dubois, Sylvie; Cazals, Dominique; Hervy, Martial; DeClerck, Yves A; Degott, Claude; Auclair, Christian

    2003-06-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their natural inhibitors (TIMPs) contribute to the regulation of tumor microenvironment. Their expressions are deregulated in almost all human cancers. We report a novel approach to gene therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), using repeated injections of DNA plasmids encoding the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) TIMP-2 or TIMP-3, and a novel competent formulation of gene transfer based on nontoxic cationic cholesterol derivatives. The new gene delivery system was efficient in demonstrating the antitumor efficiency of TIMP-2 or TIMP-3 in inhibiting tumor growth of human HuH7 HCC cells xenografted into nude mice. We show, for the first time, an in vivo effect of TIMP-3 in delaying HCC tumor growth. No treatment-related toxicity was noted. An inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor necrosis accompanied the inhibitory effects of TIMP-2 or TIMP-3 on tumor expansion and invasion. We also report a bystander effect produced by transfected HuH7 tumor cells mixed with untransfected cells in 1:1 ratio in culture that resulted in killing 98% of cells within 96 h. In addition, the soluble forms of TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 expressed by transfected cells exerted a cytotoxic effect on untransfected HuH7 cell cultures. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential efficacy of repeated treatment of secreted TIMP-2 and TIMP-3 for the design of nonviral gene therapy for hepatocarcinoma.

  14. Novel mechanisms of controlling the activities of the transcription factors Spo0A and ComA by the plasmid-encoded quorum sensing regulators Rap60-Phr60 in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Boguslawski, Kristina M.; Hill, Patrick A.; Griffith, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacillus subtilis and its closest relatives have multiple rap-phr quorum sensing gene pairs that coordinate a variety of physiological processes with population density. Extra-chromosomal rap-phr genes are also present on mobile genetic elements, yet relatively little is known about their function. In this work, we demonstrate that Rap60-Phr60 from plasmid pTA1060 coordinates a variety of biological processes with population density including sporulation, cannibalism, biofilm formation and genetic competence. Similar to other Rap proteins that control sporulation, Rap60 modulates phosphorylation of the transcription factor Spo0A by acting as a phosphatase of Spo0F~P, an intermediate of the sporulation phosphorelay system. Additionally, Rap60 plays a noncanonical role in regulating the autophosphorylation of the sporulation-specific kinase KinA, a novel activity for Rap proteins. In contrast, Rap proteins that modulate genetic competence interfere with DNA binding by the transcription factor ComA. Rap60 regulates the activity of ComA in a unique manner by forming a Rap60–ComA–DNA ternary complex that inhibits transcription of target genes. Taken together, this work provides new insight into two novel mechanisms of regulating Spo0A and ComA by Rap60 and expands our general understanding of how plasmid-encoded quorum sensing pairs regulate important biological processes. PMID:25598361

  15. Host-Specific Patterns of Genetic Diversity among IncI1-Iγ and IncK Plasmids Encoding CMY-2 β-Lactamase in Escherichia coli Isolates from Humans, Poultry Meat, Poultry, and Dogs in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrine Hartung; Bortolaia, Valeria; Nielsen, Christine Ahl; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Agersø, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    -lactamase in Escherichia coli. This β-lactamase is poorly inhibited by clavulanic acid and confers resistance to cephamycins, third-generation cephalosporins, and aztreonam. Furthermore, resistance to carbapenems has been reported in E. coli as a result of production of plasmid-encoded CMY-2 β-lactamase in combination with decreased outer membrane permeability. The gene encoding CMY-2 generally resides on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility groups. The prevalence of CMY-2-mediated cephalosporin resistance in E. coli varies significantly depending on the geographical region and host. This study demonstrates that the epidemiology of CMY-2 can be understood only by thorough plasmid characterization. To date, the spread of this β-lactam resistance determinant in Denmark is mainly associated with IncK and IncI1-Iγ plasmids, which are generally distributed according to host-specific patterns. These data will be useful to assess the consequences of the increasing human exposure to CMY-2-producing E. coli via animal sources. PMID:27235431

  16. Plasmid-encoded copper resistance and precipitation by Mycobacterium scrofulaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Erardi, F X; Failla, M L; Falkinham, J O

    1987-01-01

    A copper-tolerant Mycobacterium scrofulaceum strain was able to remove copper from culture medium by sulfate-dependent precipitation as copper sulfide. Such precipitation of copper sulfide was not observed in a derivative that lacks a 173-kilobase plasmid. In addition, the plasmid-carrying strain has a sulfate-independent copper resistance mechanism. PMID:3662522

  17. Plasmid-Encoded Phthalate Catabolic Pathway in Arthrobacter keyseri 12B†

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri (formerly Micrococcus sp.) 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates). Because these products lack a carboxyl group at the 2 position, they were not substrates for the next enzyme of the phthalate catabolic pathway, 3,4-dihydroxyphthalate 2-decarboxylase, and accumulated. When these incubations were carried out in iron-containing minimal medium, the products formed colored chelates. This chromogenic response was subsequently used to identify recombinant Escherichia coli strains carrying genes encoding the responsible enzymes, phthalate 3,4-dioxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrophthalate dehydrogenase, from the 130-kbp plasmid pRE1 of strain 12B. Beginning with the initially cloned 8.14-kbp PstI fragment of pRE824 as a probe to identify recombinant plasmids carrying overlapping fragments, a DNA segment of 33.5 kbp was cloned from pRE1 on several plasmids and mapped using restriction endonucleases. From these plasmids, the sequence of 26,274 contiguous bp was determined. Sequenced DNA included several genetic units: tnpR, pcm operon, ptr genes, pehA, norA fragment, and pht operon, encoding a transposon resolvase, catabolism of protocatechuate (3,4-dihydroxybenzoate), a putative ATP-binding cassette transporter, a possible phthalate ester hydrolase, a fragment of a norfloxacin resistance-like transporter, and the conversion of phthalate to protocatechuate, respectively. Activities of the eight enzymes involved in the catabolism of phthalate through protocatechuate to pyruvate and oxaloacetate were demonstrated in cells or cell extracts of recombinant E. coli strains. PMID:11371533

  18. Production of plasmid-encoding NDM-1 in clinical Raoultella ornithinolytica and Leclercia adecarboxylata from China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fengjun; Yin, Zhe; Feng, Jiao; Qiu, Yefeng; Zhang, Defu; Luo, Wenbo; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Jie; Chen, Weijun; Xia, Peiyuan; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Raoultella ornithinolytica YNKP001 and Leclercia adecarboxylata P10164, which harbor conjugative plasmids pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM, respectively, were isolated from two different Chinese patients, and their complete nucleotide sequences were determined. Production of NDM-1 enzyme by these plasmids accounts for the carbapenem resistance of these two strains. This is the first report of bla NDM in L. adecarboxylata and third report of this gene in R. ornithinolytica. pYNKP001-NDM is very similar to the IncN2 NDM-1-encoding plasmids pTR3, pNDM-ECS01, and p271A, whereas pP10164-NDM is similar to the IncFIIY bla NDM-1-carrying plasmid pKOX_NDM1. The bla NDM-1 genes of pYNKP001-NDM and pP10164-NDM are embedded in Tn125-like elements, which represent two distinct truncated versions of the NDM-1-encoding Tn125 prototype observed in pNDM-BJ01. Flanking of these two Tn125-like elements by miniature inverted repeat element (MITE) or its remnant indicates that MITE facilitates transposition and mobilization of bla NDM-1 gene contexts.

  19. Conservation of Plasmid-Encoded Traits among Bean-Nodulating Rhizobium Species

    PubMed Central

    Brom, Susana; Girard, Lourdes; García-de los Santos, Alejandro; Sanjuan-Pinilla, Julio M.; Olivares, José; Sanjuan, Juan

    2002-01-01

    Rhizobium etli type strain CFN42 contains six plasmids. We analyzed the distribution of genetic markers from some of these plasmids in bean-nodulating strains belonging to different species (Rhizobium etli, Rhizobium gallicum, Rhizobium giardinii, Rhizobium leguminosarum, and Sinorhizobium fredii). Our results indicate that independent of geographic origin, R. etli strains usually share not only the pSym plasmid but also other plasmids containing symbiosis-related genes, with a similar organization. In contrast, strains belonging to other bean-nodulating species seem to have acquired only the pSym plasmid from R. etli. PMID:11976134

  20. Plasmid-encoded genes influence exosporium assembly and morphology in Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 spores.

    PubMed

    Manetsberger, Julia; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Christie, Graham

    2015-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 are encased in a morphologically distinctive exosporium. We demonstrate here that genes encoded on the indigenous pBM500 and pBM600 plasmids are required for exosporium assembly and or stability in spores of this strain. Bioinformatic analyses identified genes encoding orthologues of the B. cereus-family exosporium nap and basal layer proteins within the B. megaterium genome. Transcriptional analyses, supported by electron and fluorescent microscopy, indicate that the pole-localized nap, identified here for the first time in B. megaterium QM B1551 spores, is comprised of the BclA1 protein. The role of the BxpB protein, which forms the basal layer of the exosporium in B. cereus spores, is less clear since spores of a null mutant strain display an apparently normal morphology. Retention of the localized nap in bxpB null spores suggests that B. megaterium employs an alternative mechanism to that used by B. cereus spores in anchoring the nap to the spore surface.

  1. Plasmid-encoded genes influence exosporium assembly and morphology in Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 spores

    PubMed Central

    Manetsberger, Julia; Hall, Elizabeth A. H.; Christie, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus megaterium QM B1551 are encased in a morphologically distinctive exosporium. We demonstrate here that genes encoded on the indigenous pBM500 and pBM600 plasmids are required for exosporium assembly and or stability in spores of this strain. Bioinformatic analyses identified genes encoding orthologues of the B. cereus-family exosporium nap and basal layer proteins within the B. megaterium genome. Transcriptional analyses, supported by electron and fluorescent microscopy, indicate that the pole-localized nap, identified here for the first time in B. megaterium QM B1551 spores, is comprised of the BclA1 protein. The role of the BxpB protein, which forms the basal layer of the exosporium in B. cereus spores, is less clear since spores of a null mutant strain display an apparently normal morphology. Retention of the localized nap in bxpB null spores suggests that B. megaterium employs an alternative mechanism to that used by B. cereus spores in anchoring the nap to the spore surface. PMID:26316548

  2. Xylella fastidiosa plasmid-encoded PemK toxin is an endoribonuclease.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stable inheritance of pXF-RIV11 in Xylella fastidiosa is conferred by the pemI/pemK plasmid addiction system. PemK serves as a toxin inhibiting bacterial growth; PemI is the corresponding antitoxin that blocks activity of PemK toxin by direct binding. PemK toxin and PemI antitoxin were over-expre...

  3. Genetic analysis of a novel plasmid encoded durancin locus in Enterococcus durans 41D

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enterococcus durans is commonly found in the intestinal tract in humans and animals and several strains are known to produce bacteriocins. Durancin GL, a novel bacteriocin of Enterococcus durans 41D with antilisterial activity was isolated from artisanal cheese samples and its genetic determinants ...

  4. Nucleotide sequence of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens octopine Ti plasmid-encoded tmr gene.

    PubMed Central

    Heidekamp, F; Dirkse, W G; Hille, J; van Ormondt, H

    1983-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the tmr gene, encoded by the octopine Ti plasmid from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (pTiAch5), was determined. The T-DNA, which encompasses this gene, is involved in tumor formation and maintenance, and probably mediates the cytokinin-independent growth of transformed plant cells. The nucleotide sequence of the tmr gene displays a continuous open reading frame specifying a polypeptide chain of 240 amino acids. The 5'- terminus of the polyadenylated tmr mRNA isolated from octopine tobacco tumor cell lines was determined by nuclease S1 mapping. The nucleotide sequence 5'-TATAAAA-3', which sequence is identical to the canonical "TATA" box, was found 29 nucleotides upstream from the major initiation site for RNA synthesis. Two potential polyadenylation signals 5'-AATAAA-3' were found at 207 and 275 nucleotides downstream from the TAG stopcodon of the tmr gene. A comparison was made of nucleotide stretches, involved in transcription control of T-DNA genes. Images PMID:6312414

  5. Characterization of a Plasmid-Encoded Type IV Secretion System in Campylobacter jejuni 81-176

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    jejuni 81-176, pTet, is a conjugative R factor encoding tetracycline resistance (Batchelor et al., 2004), and is likely related to the tetO...chloramphenicol per ml, 25 µg of kanamycin per ml, 20 µg of streptomycin per ml, 20 µg of tetracycline per ml, and 10 µg of trimethoprim per ml. Plasmids...shows the qualitative results from a yeast 2- hybrid screen using Cjp5/VirB11 as both bait and prey. Colonies were subcloned on 54 minimal

  6. Replicon Typing of Plasmids Encoding Resistance to Newer β-Lactams

    PubMed Central

    Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M.; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction–based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems. PMID:16836838

  7. Replicon typing of plasmids encoding resistance to newer beta-lactams.

    PubMed

    Carattoli, Alessandra; Miriagou, Vivi; Bertini, Alessia; Loli, Alexandra; Colinon, Celine; Villa, Laura; Whichard, Jean M; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2006-07-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based replicon typing represents a novel method to describe the dissemination and follow the evolution of resistance plasmids. We used this approach to study 26 epidemiologically unrelated Enterobacteriaceae and demonstrate the dominance of incompatibility (Inc) A/C or Inc N-related plasmids carrying some emerging resistance determinants to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems.

  8. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines incorporating plasmid-encoded cytokines against Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Young, Sarah L; Slobbe, Lynn J; Peacey, Matthew; Gilbert, Sarah C; Buddle, Bryce M; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Buchan, Glenn S

    2010-08-01

    DNA-based vaccines, alone or in combination with other sub-unit vaccination regimes, represent an alternative to live mycobacterial vaccines for protective immunization against tuberculosis. Here, we have used a murine immunization or Mycobacterium bovis aerosol challenge model to assess the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of mycobacterial DNA vaccines. Mice that received immunization with DNA constructs encoding M. bovis antigen 85A (Ag85-A) and arget(ESAT-6) produced measurable interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses to CD4(+) T-cell epitope-peptide recall antigens in vitro. The magnitude of these responses was enhanced by co-delivery of a construct encoding murine cytokines (macrophage inhibitory protein (MIP)-1 alpha or interleukin(IL)-7), although they did not the match responses observed in mice that received Bacille Calmette-Guerin(BCG) immunisation. In contrast, DNA priming followed by boosting with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vaccine (expressing M. tuberculosis Ag85-A) invoked higher IFN-gamma levels, with the most immunogenic regime of Ag85 or ESAT or IL-7 prime followed by MVA boost being of commensurate immunogenicity to BCG. Despite this, neither DNA alone nor DNA-prime or MVA boost regimes conferred measurable protection against aerosol challenge with virulent M. bovis. These data highlight both the promise and the shortcomings of new generation subunit tuberculosis vaccines, with particular emphasis on their potential as vaccines against M. bovis.

  9. Xylella fastidiosa plasmid-encoded PemK toxin is an endoribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Woo; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2012-01-01

    Stable inheritance of pXF-RIV11 in Xylella fastidiosa is conferred by the pemI/pemK toxin-antitoxin (TA) system. PemK toxin inhibits bacterial growth; PemI is the corresponding antitoxin that blocks activity of PemK by direct binding. PemK and PemI were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and activities of each were assessed. Purified PemK toxin specifically degraded single-stranded RNA but not double-stranded RNA, double-stranded DNA, or single-stranded DNA. Addition of PemI antitoxin inhibited nuclease activity of PemK toxin. Purified complexes of PemI bound to PemK exhibited minimal nuclease activity; removal of PemI antitoxin from the complex restored nuclease activity of PemK toxin. Sequencing of 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends products of RNA targets digested with PemK revealed a preference for cleavage between U and A residues of the sequence UACU and UACG. Nine single amino-acid substitution mutants of PemK toxin were constructed and evaluated for growth inhibition, ribonuclease activity, and PemI binding. Three PemK point-substitution mutants (R3A, G16E, and D79V) that lacked nuclease activity did not inhibit growth. All nine PemK mutants retained the ability to bind PemI. Collectively, the results indicate that the mechanism of stable inheritance conferred by pXF-RIV11 pemI/pemK is similar to that of the R100 pemI/pemK TA system of E. coli.

  10. Construction and expression of recombinant plasmids encoding type 1 fimbriae of a urinary Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate.

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, B K; Clegg, S

    1983-01-01

    The type 1 fimbriae of Klebsiella pneumoniae have been implicated as important virulence factors in mediating Klebsiella urinary infections. The chromosomally encoded fimbrial genes were cloned by a cosmid cloning technique. Further subcloning was performed with the cloning vehicles pBR322 and pACYC184, and a recombinant plasmid containing the fimbrial genes was constructed. After transformation by this plasmid, both Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium were shown to express fimbriae which reacted with Klebsiella fimbrial antiserum. The approximate location of the relevant genes on the chimeric plasmid was determined by insertion of the transposable element Tn5. Hemagglutination-negative phenotypes were used to estimate the minimum size of the DNA fragment necessary to encode fimbrial biosynthesis and expression. The size of the coding region of this fragment was found to be 5.5 kilobase pairs. PMID:6132874

  11. A detailed kinetic study of Mox-1, a plasmid-encoded class C beta-lactamase.

    PubMed

    Alba, Jimena; Bauvois, Cedric; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Galleni, Moreno; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Ishiguro, Masaji; Ito, Masahiko; Frere, Jean-Marie; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2003-08-29

    Surveys of beta-lactamases in different parts of the world show an important increase in class C beta-lactamases, thus the study of these enzymes is becoming an important issue. We created an overproduction system for Mox-1, a plasmid class C beta-lactamase, by cloning the gene encoding this enzyme, and placing it under the control of a T7 promoter, using vector pET 28a. The enzyme, purified by ion exchange chromatography, was used to obtain the molecular mass (38246), the N-terminal sequence (GEASPVDPLRPVV), and pI (8.9), and to perform a detailed kinetic study. Cephalotin was used as reporter substrate in the case of poor substrates. The kinetic study showed that benzylpenicillin, cephalotin, cefcapene and moxalactam were good substrates for Mox-1 (k(cat)/K(m) values >2.5 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). On the other hand, ceftazidime and cefepime were poor substrates for this enzyme (K(m) values >200 microM). Clavulanic acid had no inhibitory effect on Mox-1 (K(m)=30.2 mM), however aztreonam behaved as an inhibitor of Mox-1 (K(i)=2.85 microM).

  12. Novel plasmid-encoded class C beta-lactamase (MOX-2) in Klebsiella pneumoniae from Greece.

    PubMed

    Raskine, Laurent; Borrel, Isabelle; Barnaud, Guilène; Boyer, Sophie; Hanau-Berçot, Béatrice; Gravisse, Jérome; Labia, Roger; Arlet, Guillaume; Sanson-Le-Pors, Marie-José

    2002-07-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae KOL, a clinical strain resistant to various beta-lactams, was isolated from the stools of a patient from Greece. This strain harbored a new pI 9.1 plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase with unusually high levels of hydrolytic activity for cefoxitin and cefotetan that we named MOX-2. Sequencing of bla(MOX-2) revealed 93.2, 92.9, 92.7, and 73.1% identities with the deduced amino acid sequences of CMY-8, MOX-1, CMY-1, and the AmpC beta-lactamase of Aeromonas sobria, respectively.

  13. Plasmid encoded antibiotics inhibit protozoan predation of Escherichia coli K12.

    PubMed

    Ahmetagic, Adnan; Philip, Daniel S; Sarovich, Derek S; Kluver, Daniel W; Pemberton, John M

    2011-09-01

    Bacterial plasmids and phages encode the synthesis of toxic molecules that inhibit protozoan predation. One such toxic molecule is violacein, a purple pigmented, anti-tumour antibiotic produced by the Gram-negative soil bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum. In the current experiments a range of Escherichia coli K12 strains were genetically engineered to produce violacein and a number of its coloured, biosynthetic intermediates. A bactivorous predatory protozoan isolate, Colpoda sp.A4, was isolated from soil and tested for its ability to 'graze' on various violacein producing strains of E. coli K12. A grazing assay was developed based on protozoan "plaque" formation. Using this assay, E. coli K12 strains producing violacein were highly resistant to protozoan predation. However E. coli K12 strains producing violacein intermediates, showed low or no resistance to predation. In separate experiments, when either erythromycin or pentachlorophenol were added to the plaque assay medium, protozoan predation of E. coli K12 was markedly reduced. The inhibitory effects of these two molecules were removed if E. coli K12 strains were genetically engineered to inactivate the toxic molecules. In the case of erythromycin, the E. coli K12 assay strain was engineered to produce an erythromycin inactivating esterase, PlpA. For pentachlorophenol, the E. coli K12 assay strain was engineered to produce a PCP inactivating enzyme pentachlorophenol-4-monooxygenase (PcpB). This study indicates that in environments containing large numbers of protozoa, bacteria which use efflux pumps to remove toxins unchanged from the cell may have an evolutionary advantage over bacteria which enzymatically inactivate toxins.

  14. Metamobilomics--expanding our knowledge on the pool of plasmid encoded traits in natural environments using high-throughput sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, L L; Norman, A; Hansen, L H; Sørensen, S J

    2012-07-01

    A metamobilome is defined as a metagenome of circular genetic elements within a certain community. Metagenomic analyses of plasmids provide insights into the composition and structure of environmental plasmid communities. It is a promising method that will provide information about the types of plasmids that are present within environmental samples, and will give overviews about occurrences of plasmids as well as accessory genetic elements carried on these plasmids. A metamobilome library was constructed by combining multiple displacement amplification with pyrosequencing. This method provided a fast, efficient and unbiased strategy to investigate the communal gene pool of circular genetic elements (the metamobilome). We compared our wastewater metamobilome library with a wastewater metagenome library, against chromosomes, plasmids, phages and IS element databases, respectively. This showed that very few strictly chromosomal reads were present in our metamobilome library. Furthermore, data analysis showed that our library was strongly enriched for genes encoding plasmid-selfish traits, such as stability and conjugation, and most strikingly several hundred new putative plasmid replicases have been recovered.

  15. Inhibition of phagocytosis in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis: a virulence plasmid-encoded ability involving the Yop2b protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rosqvist, R; Bölin, I; Wolf-Watz, H

    1988-01-01

    Virulence plasmid-containing cells of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis had the ability to inhibit phagocytosis by mouse peritoneal macrophages cultured in vitro, but cells of its plasmid-cured derivative did not. Inhibition was most pronounced when the pathogen was incubated under Ca2+-deficient conditions, which allowed a high level of expression of outer membrane proteins (Yops). The addition of 2.5 mM Ca2+ to the growth medium reduced the degree of inhibition by the pathogen, but it was still significantly higher than that of the plasmid-cured strain. An avirulent mutant strain, from which the entire yopH gene was deleted, was impaired in its phagocytosis inhibition ability. This mutant could be trans-complemented by the yopH+ gene back to the wild-type phenotype with respect to virulence, as well as the ability to inhibit phagocytosis, demonstrating that the ability to inhibit phagocytosis is an important virulence function. The mutant strain was still cytotoxic for HeLa cells, indicating that inhibition of phagocytosis can be genetically separated from the ability to cause a cytotoxic effect. Images PMID:3294185

  16. Modulation of pPS10 Host Range by Plasmid-Encoded RepA Initiator Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M.; Díaz-Orejas, Ramón; Fernández-Tresguerres, Elena

    2003-01-01

    We report here the isolation and analysis of novel repA host range mutants of pPS10, a plasmid originally found in Pseudomonas savastanoi. Upon hydroxylamine treatment, five plasmid mutants were selected for their establishment in Escherichia coli at 37°C, a temperature at which the wild-type form cannot be established. The mutations were located in different functional regions of the plasmid RepA initiation protein, and the mutants differ in their stable maintenance, copy number, and ability to interact with sequences of the basic replicon. Four of them have broadened their host range, and one of them, unable to replicate in Pseudomonas, has therefore changed its host range. Moreover, the mutants also have increased their replication efficiency in strains other than E. coli such as Pseudomonas putida and Alcaligenes faecalis. None of these mutations drastically changed the structure or thermal stability of the wild-type RepA protein, but in all cases an enhanced interaction with host-encoded DnaA protein was detected by gel filtration chromatography. The effects of the mutations on the functionality of RepA protein are discussed in the framework of a three-dimensional model of the protein. We propose possible explanations for the host range effect of the different repA mutants, including the enhancement of limiting interactions of RepA with specific host replication factors such as DnaA. PMID:12562807

  17. Plasmid-Encoded asp Operon Confers a Proton Motive Metabolic Cycle Catalyzed by an Aspartate-Alanine Exchange Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I.; Maloney, Peter C.

    2002-01-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of l-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of l-alanine and CO2. This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter → aspD → aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known l-aspartate-β-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of l-aspartate-β-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high. PMID:12003930

  18. Plasmid-encoded asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle catalyzed by an aspartate-alanine exchange reaction.

    PubMed

    Abe, Keietsu; Ohnishi, Fumito; Yagi, Kyoko; Nakajima, Tasuku; Higuchi, Takeshi; Sano, Motoaki; Machida, Masayuki; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Maloney, Peter C

    2002-06-01

    Tetragenococcus halophila D10 catalyzes the decarboxylation of L-aspartate with nearly stoichiometric release of L-alanine and CO(2). This trait is encoded on a 25-kb plasmid, pD1. We found in this plasmid a putative asp operon consisting of two genes, which we designated aspD and aspT, encoding an L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase (AspD) and an aspartate-alanine antiporter (AspT), respectively, and determined the nucleotide sequences. The sequence analysis revealed that the genes of the asp operon in pD1 were in the following order: promoter --> aspD --> aspT. The deduced amino acid sequence of AspD showed similarity to the sequences of two known L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylases from Pseudomonas dacunhae and Alcaligenes faecalis. Hydropathy analyses suggested that the aspT gene product encodes a hydrophobic protein with multiple membrane-spanning regions. The operon was subcloned into the Escherichia coli expression vector pTrc99A, and the two genes were cotranscribed in the resulting plasmid, pTrcAsp. Expression of the asp operon in E. coli coincided with appearance of the capacity to catalyze the decarboxylation of aspartate to alanine. Histidine-tagged AspD (AspDHis) was also expressed in E. coli and purified from cell extracts. The purified AspDHis clearly exhibited activity of L-aspartate-beta-decarboxylase. Recombinant AspT was solubilized from E. coli membranes and reconstituted in proteoliposomes. The reconstituted AspT catalyzed self-exchange of aspartate and electrogenic heterologous exchange of aspartate with alanine. Thus, the asp operon confers a proton motive metabolic cycle consisting of the electrogenic aspartate-alanine antiporter and the aspartate decarboxylase, which keeps intracellular levels of alanine, the countersubstrate for aspartate, high.

  19. Development of electrochemical reporter assay using HeLa cells transfected with vector plasmids encoding various responsive elements.

    PubMed

    Shiku, Hitoshi; Takeda, Michiaki; Murata, Tatsuya; Akiba, Uichi; Hamada, Fumio; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2009-04-27

    Electrochemical assay using HeLa cell lines transfected with various plasmid vectors encoding SEAP (secreted alkaline phosphatase) as the reporter has been performed by using SECM (scanning electrochemical microscopy). The plasmid vector contains different responsive elements that include GRE (glucocorticoid response elements), CRE (cAMP responsive elements), or kappaB (binding site for NFkappaB (nuclear factor kappa B)) upstream of the SEAP sequence. The transfected HeLa cells were patterned on a culture dish in a 4x4 array of circles of diameter 300 microm by using the PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) stencil technique. The cellular array was first exposed to 100 ng mL(-1) dexamethasone, 10 ng mL(-1) forskolin, or 100 ng mL(-1) TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor alpha) after which it was further cultured in an RPMI culture medium for 6 h. After incubation, the cellular array was soaked in a measuring solution containing 4.7 mM PAPP (p-aminophenylphosphate) at pH 9.5, following which electrochemical measurements were performed immediately within 40 min. The SECM method allows parallel evaluation of different cell lines transfected with pGRE-SEAP, pCRE-SEAP, and pNFkappaB-SEAP patterned on the same solid support for detection of the oxidation current of PAP (p-aminophenol) flux produced from only 300 HeLa cells in each stencil pattern. The results of the SECM method were highly sensitive as compared to those obtained from the conventional CL (chemiluminescence) protocol with at least 5x10(4) cells per well.

  20. A Novel pAA Virulence Plasmid Encoding Toxins and Two Distinct Variants of the Fimbriae of Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jønsson, Rie; Struve, Carsten; Boll, Erik J.; Boisen, Nadia; Joensen, Katrine G.; Sørensen, Camilla A.; Jensen, Betina H.; Scheutz, Flemming; Jenssen, Håvard; Krogfelt, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an increasingly recognized pathogen associated with acute and persistent diarrhea worldwide. While EAEC strains are considered highly heterogeneous, aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAFs) are thought to play a pivotal role in pathogenicity by facilitating adherence to the intestinal mucosa. In this study, we optimized an existing multiplex PCR to target all known AAF variants, which are distinguished by differences in their pilin subunits. We applied the assay on a collection of 162 clinical Danish EAEC strains and interestingly found six, by SNP analysis phylogenetically distinct, strains harboring the major pilin subunits from both AAF/III and AAF/V. Whole-genome and plasmid sequencing revealed that in these six strains the agg3A and agg5A genes were located on a novel pAA plasmid variant. Moreover, the plasmid also encoded several other virulence genes including some not previously found on pAA plasmids. Thus, this plasmid endows the host strains with a remarkably high number of EAEC associated virulence genes hereby likely promoting strain pathogenicity. PMID:28275371

  1. Fasciation induction by the phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians depends upon a linear plasmid encoding a cytokinin synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Crespi, M; Messens, E; Caplan, A B; van Montagu, M; Desomer, J

    1992-03-01

    Rhodococcus fascians is a nocardiform bacteria that induces leafy galls (fasciation) on dicotyledonous and several monocotyledonous plants. The wild-type strain D188 contained a conjugative, 200 kb linear extrachromosomal element, pFiD188. Linear plasmid-cured strains were avirulent and reintroduction of this linear element restored virulence. Pulsed field electrophoresis indicated that the chromosome might also be a linear molecule of 4 megabases. Three loci involved in phytopathogenicity have been identified by insertion mutagenesis of this Fi plasmid. Inactivation of the fas locus resulted in avirulent strains, whereas insertions in the two other loci affected the degree of virulence, yielding attenuated (att) and hypervirulent (hyp) bacteria. One of the genes within the fas locus encoded an isopentenyltranferase (IPT) with low homology to analogous proteins from Gram-negative phytopathogenic bacteria. IPT activity was detected after expression of this protein in Escherichia coli cells. In R.fascians, ipt expression could only be detected in bacteria induced with extracts from fasciated tissue. R.fascians strains without the linear plasmid but containing this fas locus alone could not provoke any phenotype on plants, indicating additional genes from the linear plasmid were also essential for virulence. These studies, the first genetic analysis of the interaction of a Gram-positive bacterium with plants, suggest that a novel mechanism for plant tumour induction has evolved in R.fascians independently from the other branches of the eubacteria.

  2. Transcriptome Reprogramming by Plasmid-Encoded Transcriptional Regulators Is Required for Host Niche Adaption of a Macrophage Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Coulson, Garry B.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Aleksandra A.; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Wang, Xiaoguang; Oliver, Jenna; Willingham-Lane, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular pathogen of macrophages, relying on the presence of a conjugative virulence plasmid harboring a 21-kb pathogenicity island (PAI) for growth in host macrophages. The PAI encodes a family of 6 virulence-associated proteins (Vaps) in addition to 20 other proteins. The contribution of these to virulence has remained unclear. We show that the presence of only 3 virulence plasmid genes (of 73 in total) is required and sufficient for intracellular growth. These include a single vap family member, vapA, and two PAI-located transcriptional regulators, virR and virS. Both transcriptional regulators are essential for wild-type-level expression of vapA, yet vapA expression alone is not sufficient to allow intracellular growth. A whole-genome microarray analysis revealed that VirR and VirS substantially integrate themselves into the chromosomal regulatory network, significantly altering the transcription of 18% of all chromosomal genes. This pathoadaptation involved significant enrichment of select gene ontologies, in particular, enrichment of genes involved in transport processes, energy production, and cellular metabolism, suggesting a major change in cell physiology allowing the bacterium to grow in the hostile environment of the host cell. The results suggest that following the acquisition of the virulence plasmid by an avirulent ancestor of R. equi, coevolution between the plasmid and the chromosome took place, allowing VirR and VirS to regulate the transcription of chromosomal genes in a process that ultimately promoted intracellular growth. Our findings suggest a mechanism for cooption of existing chromosomal traits during the evolution of a pathogenic bacterium from an avirulent saprophyte. PMID:26015480

  3. The plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol-resistance protein of Rhodococcus fascians is homologous to the transmembrane tetracycline efflux proteins.

    PubMed

    Desomer, J; Vereecke, D; Crespi, M; Van Montagu, M

    1992-08-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the chloramphenicol-resistance gene (cmr) of Rhodococcus fascians NCPPB 1675 (located on the conjugative plasmid pRF2) allowed the identification of two possible open reading frames (ORFs), of which ORF1 was consistent with the mutational analysis. Biochemical analysis of cmr revealed that it does not encode an antibiotic-modifying enzyme. The amino acid sequence of ORF1 predicted a hydrophobic protein, with 12 putative membrane-spanning domains, homologous to proteins involved in the efflux of tetracycline across the plasma membrane. Expression of the cmr gene was induced by addition of chloramphenicol to the growth media. The promoter of this gene was restricted to 50 bp upstream from a 200 bp 5'-untranslated mRNA region, the latter containing two inverted repeats. At the amino acid level, the cmr gene is 52% identical to a previously identified chloramphenicol-resistance determinant in Streptomyces lividans, indicating a wider dispersion of this type of cmr gene among the actinomycetes.

  4. Plasmid-encoded biosynthetic genes alleviate metabolic disadvantages while increasing glucose conversion to shikimate in an engineered Escherichia coli strain.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alberto; Martínez, Juan A; Millard, Pierre; Gosset, Guillermo; Portais, Jean-Charles; Létisse, Fabien; Bolivar, Francisco

    2017-02-10

    Metabolic engineering strategies applied over the last two decades to produce shikimate (SA) in Escherichia coli have resulted in a battery of strains bearing many expression systems. However, the effects that these systems have on the host physiology and how they impact the production of SA are still not well understood. In this work we utilized an engineered E. coli strain to determine the consequences of carrying a vector that promotes SA production from glucose with a high yield but that is also expected to impose a significant cellular burden. Kinetic comparisons in fermentors showed that instead of exerting a negative effect, the sole presence of the plasmid increased glucose consumption without diminishing the growth rate. By constitutively expressing a biosynthetic operon from this vector, the more active glycolytic metabolism was exploited to redirect intermediates towards the production of SA, which further increased the glucose consumption rate and avoided excess acetate production. Fluxomics and metabolomics experiments revealed a global remodeling of the carbon and energy metabolism in the production strain, where the increased SA production reduced the carbon available for oxidative and fermentative pathways. Moreover, the results showed that the production of SA relies on a specific setup of the PPP, where both its oxidative and non-oxidative branches are strongly activated to supply E4P and balance the NADPH requirements. This work improves our understanding of the metabolic reorganization observed in E. coli in response to the plasmid-based expression of the SA biosynthetic pathway. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Shrimp AHPND-causing plasmids encoding the PirAB toxins as mediated by pirAB-Tn903 are prevalent in various Vibrio species

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jinzhou; Liu, Liyuan; Ke, Yiyun; Li, Xiefei; Liu, Yunfei; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2017-01-01

    Acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) is a newly emerging shrimp disease caused by pirAB toxins encoded by a plasmid found in Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The pirAB toxins are the homologs of the Photorhabdus insect-related (Pir) toxins. Here, we report the complete sequences of the AHPND-causing plasmid isolated from V. owensii, as well as those of its 11 siblings (pVH family). In addition, we also included 13 related plasmids (pVH-r family) without the pirAB genes isolated from a variety of species within the Vibrio Harveyi clade. Furthermore, the pirAB-Tn903 composite transposon was identified in pVH, and both ends of the transposon appeared to have inserted simultaneously into the ancestor plasmid at different sites. The homologue counterparts of pirAB were also detected in a non-pVH plasmid in V. campbellii. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the acquisition and evolution of pirAB as well as related plasmids in the Vibrio Harveyi clade. PMID:28169338

  6. Globally Expanding Carbapenemase Finally Appears in Spain: Nosocomial Outbreak of Acinetobacter baumannii Producing Plasmid-Encoded OXA-23 in Barcelona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, Noraida; Espinal, Paula; Cosgaya, Clara; Viota, Sergio; Plasensia, Virginia; Álvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Montero, Milagro; Gómez, Julià; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Roca, Ignasi

    2013-01-01

    Resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates to carbapenems is on the rise worldwide mainly in association with the production of OXA-23. Until recently, however, OXA-23 was absent in Spain. In this work, we report the molecular characterization of a hospital outbreak of OXA-23-producing A. baumannii in Barcelona caused by a multidrug-resistant (MDR) clone belonging to international clone IC-II/sequence type ST85 between October 2010 and May 2011. blaOXA-23 was carried in a plasmid of 90 kb and located within the composite transposon Tn2006. PMID:23877694

  7. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of pGA45, a 140,698-bp IncFIIY Plasmid Encoding blaIMI-3-Mediated Carbapenem Resistance, from River Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Bingjun; Mao, Daqing; Luo, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Plasmid pGA45 was isolated from the sediments of Haihe River using Escherichia coli CV601 (gfp-tagged) as recipients and indigenous bacteria from sediment as donors. This plasmid confers reduced susceptibility to imipenem which belongs to carbapenem group. Plasmid pGA45 was fully sequenced on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. The complete sequence of plasmid pGA45 was 140,698 bp in length with an average G + C content of 52.03%. Sequence analysis shows that pGA45 belongs to IncFIIY group and harbors a backbone region which shares high homology and gene synteny to several other IncF plasmids including pNDM1_EC14653, pYDC644, pNDM-Ec1GN574, pRJF866, pKOX_NDM1, and pP10164-NDM. In addition to the backbone region, plasmid pGA45 harbors two notable features including one blaIMI-3-containing region and one type VI secretion system region. The blaIMI-3-containing region is responsible for bacteria carbapenem resistance and the type VI secretion system region is probably involved in bacteria virulence, respectively. Plasmid pGA45 represents the first complete nucleotide sequence of the blaIMI-harboring plasmid from environment sample and the sequencing of this plasmid provided insight into the architecture used for the dissemination of blaIMI carbapenemase genes. PMID:26941718

  8. Flexibility of KorA, a plasmid-encoded, global transcription regulator, in the presence and the absence of its operator

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekar, Karthik V.; Lovering, Andrew L.; Dancea, Felician; Scott, David J.; Harris, Sarah A.; Bingle, Lewis E.H.; Roessle, Manfred; Thomas, Christopher M.; Hyde, Eva I.; White, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The IncP (Incompatibility group P) plasmids are important carriers in the spread of antibiotic resistance across Gram-negative bacteria. Gene expression in the IncP-1 plasmids is stringently controlled by a network of four global repressors, KorA, KorB, TrbA and KorC interacting cooperatively. Intriguingly, KorA and KorB can act as co-repressors at varying distances between their operators, even when they are moved to be on opposite sides of the DNA. KorA is a homodimer with the 101-amino acid subunits, folding into an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal dimerization domain. In this study, we have determined the structures of the free KorA repressor and two complexes each bound to a 20-bp palindromic DNA duplex containing its consensus operator sequence. Using a combination of X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, SAXS and molecular dynamics calculations, we show that the linker between the two domains is very flexible and the protein remains highly mobile in the presence of DNA. This flexibility allows the DNA-binding domains of the dimer to straddle the operator DNA on binding and is likely to be important in cooperative binding to KorB. Unexpectedly, the C-terminal domain of KorA is structurally similar to the dimerization domain of the tumour suppressor p53. PMID:27016739

  9. Identification of new protein-protein interactions involving the products of the chromosome- and plasmid-encoded type IV secretion loci of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    PubMed

    Alegria, Marcos C; Souza, Diorge P; Andrade, Maxuel O; Docena, Cassia; Khater, Leticia; Ramos, Carlos H I; da Silva, Ana C R; Farah, Chuck S

    2005-04-01

    The recently sequenced genome of the bacterial plant pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri contains two virB gene clusters, one on the chromosome and one on a 64-kb plasmid, each of which codes for a previously uncharacterized type IV secretion system (T4SS). Here we used a yeast two-hybrid assay to identify protein-protein interactions in these two systems. Our results revealed interactions between known T4SS components as well as previously uncharacterized interactions involving hypothetical proteins coded by open reading frames in the two X. axonopodis pv. citri virB loci. Our results indicate that both loci may code for previously unidentified VirB7 proteins, which we show interact with either VirB6 or VirB9 or with a hypothetical protein coded by the same locus. Furthermore, a set of previously uncharacterized Xanthomonas proteins have been found to interact with VirD4, whose gene is adjacent to the chromosomal virB locus. The gene for one member of this family is found within the chromosomal virB locus. All these uncharacterized proteins possess a conserved 120-amino-acid domain in their C termini and may represent a family of cofactors or substrates of the Xanthomonas T4SS.

  10. The gene therapy of collagen-induced arthritis in rats by intramuscular administration of the plasmid encoding TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Shchelkunov, S N; Taranov, O S; Tregubchak, T V; Maksyutov, R A; Silkov, A N; Nesterov, A E; Sennikov, S V

    2016-07-01

    Wistar rats with collagen-induced arthritis were intramuscularly injected with the recombinant plasmid pcDNA/sTNF-BD encoding the sequence of the TNF-binding protein domain of variola virus CrmB protein (VARV sTNF-BD) or the pcDNA3.1 vector. Quantitative analysis showed that the histopathological changes in the hind-limb joints of rats were most severe in the animals injected with pcDNA3.1 and much less severe in the group of rats injected with pcDNA/sTNF-BD, which indicates that gene therapy of rheumatoid arthritis is promising in the case of local administration of plasmids governing the synthesis of VARV immunomodulatory proteins.

  11. Antibiotic trapping by plasmid-encoded CMY-2 β-lactamase combined with reduced outer membrane permeability as a mechanism of carbapenem resistance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goessens, Wil H F; van der Bij, Akke K; van Boxtel, Ria; Pitout, Johann D D; van Ulsen, Peter; Melles, Damian C; Tommassen, Jan

    2013-08-01

    A liver transplant patient was admitted with cholangitis, for which meropenem therapy was started. Initial cultures showed a carbapenem-susceptible (CS) Escherichia coli strain, but during admission, a carbapenem-resistant (CR) E. coli strain was isolated. Analysis of the outer membrane protein profiles showed that both CS and CR E. coli lacked the porins OmpF and OmpC. Furthermore, PCR and sequence analysis revealed that both CS and CR E. coli possessed bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(OXA-1). The CR E. coli strain additionally harbored bla(CMY-2) and demonstrated a >15-fold increase in β-lactamase activity against nitrocefin, but no hydrolysis of meropenem was detected. However, nitrocefin hydrolysis appeared strongly inhibited by meropenem. Furthermore, the CMY-2 enzyme demonstrated lower electrophoretic mobility after its incubation either in vitro or in vivo with meropenem, indicative of its covalent modification with meropenem. The presence of the acyl-enzyme complex was confirmed by mass spectrometry. By transformation of the CMY-2-encoding plasmid into various E. coli strains, it was established that both porin deficiency and high-level expression of the enzyme were needed to confer meropenem resistance. In conclusion, carbapenem resistance emerged by a combination of elevated β-lactamase production and lack of porin expression. Due to the reduced outer membrane permeability, only small amounts of meropenem can enter the periplasm, where they are trapped but not degraded by the large amount of the β-lactamase. This study, therefore, provides evidence that the mechanism of "trapping" by CMY-2 β-lactamase plays a role in carbapenem resistance.

  12. Large IncHI2-plasmids encode extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Enterobacter spp. bloodstream isolates, and support ESBL-transfer to Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, E; Haldorsen, B C; Sundsfjord, A; Simonsen, G S; Ingebretsen, A; Naseer, U; Samuelsen, O

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) in Enterobacter spp. bloodstream isolates from 19 hospital laboratories in Norway during 2011. A total of 62/230 (27%) isolates were resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and four (1.7%) were ESBL-positive; blaCTX -M-15 (n = 3) and blaSHV -12 (n = 1). This is comparable to the prevalence of ESBLs in clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in Norway during the same period. All ESBL-positive isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR) and harboured plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance. Three isolates supported transfer of large IncHI2-plasmids harbouring ESBL- and MDR-encoding genes to E. coli recipients by in vitro conjugation.

  13. A bivalent typhoid live vector vaccine expressing both chromosome- and plasmid-encoded Yersinia pestis antigens fully protects against murine lethal pulmonary plague infection.

    PubMed

    Galen, James E; Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A; Lloyd, Scott A; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity.

  14. Antibody response against plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) and the protein involved in intestinal colonization (Pic) in children with diarrhea produced by enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Estela M; Elias, Waldir P; Gomes, Tânia A T; Tanaka, Tânia L; Taddei, Carla R; Huerta, Rocio; Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez, Marina B

    2005-02-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is an emerging cause of pediatric and adult travellers diarrhea. The mechanism by which EAEC induce diarrhea is not completely known. Two serine protease autotransporter proteins, named Pet and Pic have been identified in EAEC strains. Pet has enterotoxic and cytotoxic activities, while the role of Pic in pathogenesis may lie on its mucinolytic activity. Little is known about Pet and Pic biological activities in vivo. In this study the antibody responses against these autotransporter proteins in convalescent children is investigated. Fifteen (83%) children showed specific antibodies against Pet or Pic in their sera. IgG and IgM antibodies were the main isotype found. Specific antibodies against Pic, but not against Pet, were detected in sera from age-matched control group. These data show that specific anti-Pet and anti-Pic antibodies are produced during the course of a natural EAEC infection in children.

  15. A Bivalent Typhoid Live Vector Vaccine Expressing both Chromosome- and Plasmid-Encoded Yersinia pestis Antigens Fully Protects against Murine Lethal Pulmonary Plague Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A.; Lloyd, Scott A.; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D.; Nataro, James P.; Pasetti, Marcela F.

    2014-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. PMID:25332120

  16. Evaluation of Selected Borrelia burgdorferi lp54 Plasmid-Encoded Gene Products Expressed during Mammalian Infection as Antigens To Improve Serodiagnostic Testing for Early Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Zachary P; Crew, Rebecca M; Brandt, Kevin S; Ullmann, Amy J; Schriefer, Martin E; Molins, Claudia R; Gilmore, Robert D

    2015-11-01

    Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of Lyme disease is performed primarily by serologic assays and is accurate for detection beyond the acute stage of the infection. Serodiagnostic assays to detect the early stages of infection, however, are limited in their sensitivity, and improvement is warranted. We analyzed a series of Borrelia burgdorferi proteins known to be induced within feeding ticks and/or during mammalian infection for their utility as serodiagnostic markers against a comprehensive panel of Lyme disease patient serum samples. The antigens were assayed for IgM and IgG reactivity in line immunoblots and separately by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with a focus on reactivity against early Lyme disease with erythema migrans (EM), early disseminated Lyme neuroborreliosis, and early Lyme carditis patient serum samples. By IgM immunoblotting, we found that recombinant proteins BBA65, BBA70, and BBA73 reacted with early Lyme EM samples at levels comparable to those of the OspC antigen used in the current IgM blotting criteria. Additionally, these proteins reacted with serum samples from patients with early neuroborreliosis and early carditis, suggesting value in detecting early stages of this disease progression. We also found serological reactivity against recombinant proteins BBA69 and BBA73 with early-Lyme-disease samples using IgG immunoblotting and ELISA. Significantly, some samples that had been scored negative by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-recommended 2-tiered testing algorithm demonstrated positive reactivity to one or more of the antigens by IgM/IgG immunoblot and ELISA. These results suggest that incorporating additional in vivo-expressed antigens into the current IgM/IgG immunoblotting tier in a recombinant protein platform assay may improve the performance of early-Lyme-disease serologic testing.

  17. Bicistronic expression plasmid encoding allergen and anti-IgE single chain variable fragment antibody as a novel DNA vaccine for allergy therapy and prevention.

    PubMed

    Bandbon Balenga, Nariman Aghaei; Thalhamer, Josef; Weiss, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Several approaches have been applied in order to alleviate the difficulties allergic patients are suffering from. Among them DNA vaccination and anti-IgE antibody have shown promising results. Herewith, a combination of both strategies is proposed to minimize IgE production while inducing high levels of blocking IgG and strong Th1 immune responses. A bicistronic expression plasmid including an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) can express both, allergen and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody against human IgE within antigen presenting cells (APCs) including B cells. Presentation of allergen derived peptides via MHC I and MHC II stimulates specific Th1 responses resulting in high levels of IFN-gamma and IgG. Anti-IgE scFv antibody binds to newly synthesized IgE molecules within B cell cytoplasm and also to free serum IgE, thereby inhibiting attachment of IgE to its receptors on basophils and mast cells. Also, IgE-anti-IgE complex functions as blocking antibody and neutralizes allergens entering the body. Additionally, anti-IgE scFv antibody binds to membrane bound IgE (mIgE) on B cells and interferes with IgE expression. Using assays, such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), IgG and IgE production in response to this expression system can be evaluated. Also, rat basophil leukemia cell assay (using RBL-2H3 cells) can show the amount of functional IgE in sera as basophil mediator release is regarded as an indicator of the allergic hypersensitive reactions. The proposed approach may result in high levels of blocking IgG and low levels of IgE secretion from B cells. Additionally, it can inhibit activity of IgE in degranulation of basophils and mast cells.

  18. Transformation of Escherichia coli K-12 with a high-copy plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein reduces growth: implications for predictive microbiology.

    PubMed

    Oscar, T P; Dulal, K; Boucaud, D

    2006-02-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has been widely used as a biomarker and has potential for use in developing predictive models for growth of pathogens on naturally contaminated food. However, constitutive production of GFP can reduce growth of transformed strains. Consequently, a high-copy plasmid with gfp under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter (pTGP) was constructed. The plasmid was first introduced into a tetracycline-resistant strain of Escherichia coli K-12 to propagate it for subsequent transformation of tetracycline-resistant strains of Salmonella. In contrast to transformed E. coli K-12, which only fluoresced in response to tetracycline, transformed Salmonella fluoresced maximally without tetracycline induction of gfp. Although pTGP did not function as intended in Salmonella, growth of parent and GFP E. coli K-12 was compared to test the hypothesis that induction of GFP production reduced growth. Although GFP production was not induced during growth on sterile chicken in the absence of tetracycline, maximum specific growth rate (mumax) of GFP E. coli K-12 was reduced 40 to 50% (P < 0.05) at 10, 25, and 40 degrees C compared with the parent strain. When growth of parent and GFP strains of E. coli K-12 was compared in sterile broth at 40 degrees C, mumax and maximum population density of the GFP strain were reduced (P < 0.05) to the same extent (50 to 60%) in the absence and presence of tetracycline. These results indicated that transformation reduced growth of E. coli K-12 independent of gfp induction. Thus, use of a low-copy plasmid or insertion of gfp into the chromosome may be required to construct valid strains for development of predictive models for growth of pathogens on naturally contaminated food.

  19. Genetic determinants of a nickel-specific transport system are part of the plasmid-encoded hydrogenase gene cluster in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Eberz, G; Eitinger, T; Friedrich, B

    1989-01-01

    Nickel-deficient (Nic-) mutants of Alcaligenes eutrophus requiring high levels of nickel ions for autotrophic growth with hydrogen were characterized. The Nic- mutants carried defined deletions in the hydrogenase gene cluster of the indigenous pHG megaplasmid. Nickel deficiency correlated with a low level of the nickel-containing hydrogenase activity, a slow rate of nickel transport, and reduced activity of urease. The Nic+ phenotype was restored by a cloned DNA sequence (hoxN) of a megaplasmid pHG1 DNA library of A. eutrophus H16. hoxN is part of the hydrogenase gene cluster. The nickel requirement of Nic- mutants was enhanced by increasing the concentration of magnesium. This suggests that the Nic- mutants are impaired in the nickel-specific transport system and thus depend on the second transport activity which normally mediates the uptake of magnesium. PMID:2646280

  20. Identification by DNA sequence analysis of a new plasmid-encoded trimethoprim resistance gene in fecal Escherichia coli isolates from children in day-care centers.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, K V; Reves, R R; Pickering, L K; Murray, B E

    1992-01-01

    In our ongoing studies of trimethoprim resistance (Tmpr) in day-care centers (DCC), we have shown a high rate of fecal colonization with Tmpr Escherichia coli and, using total plasmid content analysis, have shown that this is due to a diversity of strains. In the present study, we analyzed 367 highly Tmpr (MIC, greater than or equal to 2,000 micrograms/ml) isolates of E. coli from 72 children over a 5-month period and found at least 83 distinct plasmid patterns, indicating that at least 83 strains were involved. Several strains were particularly common in a given DCC, including one found in 61% of children with Tmpr E. coli; these common strains usually persisted within a DCC for several months. Colony lysates were hybridized with gene probes for dihydrofolate reductases (DHFR) types I, II, III, V, and VII; 21% hybridized under stringent conditions, and all of these were with type I (17%) or type V (4%) probes. Tmpr was cloned from a probe-negative Tmpr transconjugant, and an intragenic probe was prepared from this clone. Approximately 21% of the Tmpr E. coli strains (76 isolates) in the DCC were found to have this new gene, 74 of which were in one DCC. The DNA sequence of this gene was determined, and the predicted amino acid sequence was shown to have between 32% and 39% identity with the amino acid sequences for types I, III, V, VI, and VII and the partial sequence of type IV and approximately 26% identity with types IX and X DHFR. This confirms the uniqueness of this gene, which has tentatively been named dhfrxii, and its translation product, DHFR type XII. Images PMID:1416855

  1. A Recombinant DNA Plasmid Encoding the sIL-4R-NAP Fusion Protein Suppress Airway Inflammation in an OVA-Induced Mouse Model of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Fu, Guo; Ji, Zhenyu; Huang, Xiabing; Ding, Cong; Jiang, Hui; Wang, Xiaolong; Du, Mingxuan; Wang, Ting; Kang, Qiaozhen

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease. It was prevalently perceived that Th2 cells played the crucial role in asthma pathogenesis, which has been identified as the important target for anti-asthma therapy. The soluble IL-4 receptor (sIL-4R), which is the decoy receptor for Th2 cytokine IL-4, has been reported to be effective in treating asthma in phase I/II clinical trail. To develop more efficacious anti-asthma agent, we attempt to test whether the Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP), a novel TLR2 agonist, would enhance the efficacy of sIL-4R in anti-asthma therapy. In our work, we constructed a pcDNA3.1-sIL-4R-NAP plasmid, named PSN, encoding fusion protein of murine sIL-4R and HP-NAP. PSN significantly inhibited airway inflammation, decreased the serum OVA-specific IgE levels and remodeled the Th1/Th2 balance. Notably, PSN is more effective on anti-asthma therapy comparing with plasmid only expressing sIL-4R.

  2. A Novel Class A Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (BES-1) in Serratia marcescens Isolated in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, R.; Sampaio, J. L. M.; Chanal, C.; Sirot, D.; De Champs, C.; Viallard, J. L.; Labia, R.; Sirot, J.

    2000-01-01

    Serratia marcescens Rio-5, one of 18 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing strains isolated in several hospitals in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) in 1996 and 1997, exhibited a high level of resistance to aztreonam (MIC, 512 μg/ml) and a distinctly higher level of resistance to cefotaxime (MIC, 64 μg/ml) than to ceftazidime (MIC, 8 μg/ml). The strain produced a plasmid-encoded ESBL with a pI of 7.5 whose bla gene was not related to those of other plasmid-mediated Ambler class A ESBLs. Cloning and sequencing revealed a bla gene encoding a novel class A β-lactamase in functional group 2be, designated BES-1 (Brazil extended-spectrum β-lactamase). This enzyme had 51% identity with chromosomal class A penicillinase of Yersinia enterocolitica Y56, which was the most closely related enzyme and 47 to 48% identity with CTX-M-type β-lactamases, which were the most closely related ESBLs. In common with CTX-M enzymes, BES-1 exhibited high cefotaxime-hydrolyzing activity (kcat, 425 s−1). However, BES-1 differed from CTX-M enzymes by its significant ceftazidime-hydrolyzing activity (kcat, 25 s−1), high affinity for aztreonam (Ki, 1 μM), and lower susceptibility to tazobactam (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.820 μM) than to clavulanate (IC50, 0.045 μM). Likewise, certain characteristic structural features of CTX-M enzymes, such as Phe-160, Ser-237, and Arg-276, were observed for BES-1, which, in addition, harbored different residues (Ala-104, Ser-171, Arg-220, Gly-240) and six additional residues at the end of the sequence. BES-1, therefore, may be an interesting model for further investigations of the structure-function relationships of class A ESBLs. PMID:11036023

  3. The 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid encodes chloromethane utilization genes and redundant genes for vitamin B12- and tetrahydrofolate-dependent chloromethane metabolism in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4: a proteomic and bioinformatics study.

    PubMed

    Roselli, Sandro; Nadalig, Thierry; Vuilleumier, Stéphane; Bringel, Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is the most abundant volatile halocarbon in the atmosphere and contributes to the destruction of stratospheric ozone. The only known pathway for bacterial chloromethane utilization (cmu) was characterized in Methylobacterium extorquens CM4, a methylotrophic bacterium able to utilize compounds without carbon-carbon bonds such as methanol and chloromethane as the sole carbon source for growth. Previous work demonstrated that tetrahydrofolate and vitamin B12 are essential cofactors of cmuA- and cmuB-encoded methyltransferases of chloromethane dehalogenase, and that the pathway for chloromethane utilization is distinct from that for methanol. This work reports genomic and proteomic data demonstrating that cognate cmu genes are located on the 380 kb pCMU01 plasmid, which drives the previously defined pathway for tetrahydrofolate-mediated chloromethane dehalogenation. Comparison of complete genome sequences of strain CM4 and that of four other M. extorquens strains unable to grow with chloromethane showed that plasmid pCMU01 harbors unique genes without homologs in the compared genomes (bluB2, btuB, cobA, cbiD), as well as 13 duplicated genes with homologs of chromosome-borne genes involved in vitamin B12-associated biosynthesis and transport, or in tetrahydrofolate-dependent metabolism (folC2). In addition, the presence of both chromosomal and plasmid-borne genes for corrinoid salvaging pathways may ensure corrinoid coenzyme supply in challenging environments. Proteomes of M. extorquens CM4 grown with one-carbon substrates chloromethane and methanol were compared. Of the 49 proteins with differential abundance identified, only five (CmuA, CmuB, PurU, CobH2 and a PaaE-like uncharacterized putative oxidoreductase) are encoded by the pCMU01 plasmid. The mainly chromosome-encoded response to chloromethane involves gene clusters associated with oxidative stress, production of reducing equivalents (PntAA, Nuo complex), conversion of tetrahydrofolate-bound one-carbon units, and central metabolism. The mosaic organization of plasmid pCMU01 and the clustering of genes coding for dehalogenase enzymes and for biosynthesis of associated cofactors suggests a history of gene acquisition related to chloromethane utilization.

  4. Molecular Characterization of Plasmids Encoding CTX-M β-Lactamases and their Associated Addiction Systems Circulating Among Escherichia coli from Retail Chickens, Chicken Farms, and Slaughterhouses in Korea.

    PubMed

    Jo, Su-Jin; Woo, Gun-Jo

    2016-02-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), particularly those of the CTX-M types, are the predominant resistance determinants of Escherichia coli that are rapidly spreading worldwide. To determine CTX-M types, E. coli isolates were collected from retail chickens (n = 390) and environmental samples from chicken farms (n = 32) and slaughterhouses (n = 67) in Korea. Fifteen strains harboring blaCTX-M genes were isolated from 358 E. coli isolates. The most common CTX-M type was eight of CTX-M-15, followed by six of CTX-M-1 and one of CTX-M- 14. The blaCTX-M genes were identified in the isolates from retail chickens (n = 9), followed by feces, water pipes, floors, and walls. Conjugations confirmed the transferability of the plasmids carrying blaCTX-M genes to the recipient E. coli J53 strain. Furthermore, eight addiction systems carried by the replicons in CTX-M types were confirmed. The dominant system was identified as ccdAB, vagCD, and pndAC in donor strains and transconjugants. The clonal relationship between the two strains carrying blaCTX-M genes indicates that E. coli may transmit from the farm to retail chickens, suggesting a possible public health risk. Our findings demonstrate that the detection of CTX-M types in E. coli isolates is important for tracking ESBL production in animals, and suggest linkage of multiple addiction systems in plasmids bearing blaCTX-M genes.

  5. Detection of an IncA/C plasmid encoding VIM-4 and CMY-4 β-lactamases in Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter koseri from an inpatient in a cardiac rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Caltagirone, Mariasofia; Bitar, Ibrahim; Piazza, Aurora; Spalla, Melissa; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Navarra, Antonella; Migliavacca, Roberta

    2015-07-01

    A 62-year-old patient was transferred to the cardiac rehabilitation unit of the I.R.C.C.S. Fondazione S. Maugeri after undergoing a heart transplantation at the Acute Care Hospital I.R.C.C.S. S. Matteo of Pavia. On 1 August 2013 and during hospitalization in the rehabilitation unit, Klebsiella oxytoca and Citrobacter koseri clinical isolates were simultaneously recovered from the patient's preputial swab. Both the K. oxytoca and C. koseri strains were carbapenem- resistant by MicroScan System (Beckman Coulter). Carbapenem-resistant K. pneumoniae had previously been reported in the same rehabilitation facility. The aim of the study was to identify the carbapenem resistance mechanisms among the enterobacterial species recovered. Phenotypic screening tests useful to detect the β-lactamases/carbapenemases were performed. Carbapenem MICs were obtained by Etest. AmpC and MBL encoding genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. Conjugation assays and plasmid characterization were performed. Both of the K. oxytoca and C. koseri isolates were multi drug resistant, showing resistance to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, three generation cephalosporins, ertapenem (K. oxytoca MIC, >32 mg/L; C. koseri MIC, 4 mg/L), imipenem (K. oxytoca MIC, 4 mg/L; C. koseri MIC, 12 mg/L), thrimethoprim sulphamethoxazole and gentamicin. Susceptibility was retained to fluoroquinolones, colistin and tigecycline. Molecular characterization confirmed the co-presence of blaCMY-4 and blaVIM-4 determinants in a 150 Kb transferable plasmid of IncA/C group. This case is the first detection in Italy of the K. oxytoca and C. koseri clinical isolates co-producing the CMY-4 and VIM-4 enzymes.

  6. Characterization of pKP-M1144, a Novel ColE1-Like Plasmid Encoding IMP-8, GES-5, and BEL-1 β-Lactamases, from a Klebsiella pneumoniae Sequence Type 252 Isolate.

    PubMed

    Papagiannitsis, Costas C; Dolejska, Monika; Izdebski, Radoslaw; Dobiasova, Hana; Studentova, Vendula; Esteves, Francisco J; Derde, Lennie P G; Bonten, Marc J M; Hrabák, Jaroslav; Gniadkowski, Marek

    2015-08-01

    IMP-8 metallo-β-lactamase was identified in Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 252 (ST252), isolated in a Portuguese hospital in 2009. blaIMP-8 was the first gene cassette of a novel class 3 integron, In1144, also carrying the blaGES-5, blaBEL-1, and aacA4 cassettes. In1144 was located on a ColE1-like plasmid, pKP-M1144 (12,029 bp), with a replication region of limited nucleotide similarity to those of other RNA-priming plasmids, such as pJHCMW1. In1144 and pKP-M1144 represent an interesting case of evolution of resistance determinants in Gram-negative bacteria.

  7. Safety and immunogenicity in humans of an attenuated Salmonella typhi vaccine vector strain expressing plasmid-encoded hepatitis B antigens stabilized by the Asd-balanced lethal vector system.

    PubMed Central

    Tacket, C O; Kelly, S M; Schödel, F; Losonsky, G; Nataro, J P; Edelman, R; Levine, M M; Curtiss, R

    1997-01-01

    Attenuated Salmonella typhi organisms which express genes encoding protective antigens of other pathogens have been developed for use as experimental oral vaccines. A delta asd S. typhi strain attenuated by deletions in cya, crp, and cdt which contains hepatitis B core (HBc) and pre-S genes encoded on an Asd+ pBR-based plasmid vector was constructed. Healthy adult volunteers ingested a single dose of 5 x 10(5) to 5 x 10(8) CFU of strain chi4073 (delta cya delta crp delta cdt S. typhi Ty2), 6 x 10(7) or 1 x 10(9) CFU of strain chi4632(pYA3149), a further derivative of chi4073 deleted in asd and containing the Asd+ vector without the HBc-pre-S fusion, or 3 x 10(7) or 7 x 10(8) CFU of strain X4632(pYA3167), a derivative containing the vector with the HBc-pre-S fusion. Chi4073 was generally well tolerated by 22 volunteers. No volunteer had fever or positive blood cultures; 4 of 22 volunteers shed vaccine organisms in the stool in the first 48 h only. Two of 18 volunteers who received one of the plasmid-containing derivatives of chi4073 developed low-grade fevers on day 10 or 12 after ingestion. One of these volunteers had positive blood cultures on days 7 and 8. Seven of these 18 volunteers had vaccine organisms detected in their stools in the first 48 h only. Most volunteers developed S. typhi-specific serum responses and developed S. typhi-specific antibody-secreting cells. However, no volunteer developed serum antibody to hepatitis pre-S or pre-S-specific antibody-secreting cells. Although the parent strain chi4073 was well tolerated, induced immunoglobulin G seroconversion to S. typhi lipopolysaccharide in 80 to 100% of vaccinees and stimulated specific IgA-secreting lymphocytes in 80 to 100% of vaccinees given a single oral dose of 2 x 10(7) and 5 x 10(8) CFU, chi4073 derivatives containing the Asd+ vector with and without sequences encoding the HBc-pre-S fusion caused occasional febrile reactions at high doses and did not stimulate detectable immune responses to hepatitis B antigens. PMID:9234801

  8. PLASMID-ENCODED PHTHALATE CATABOLIC PATHWAY IN ARTHROBACTER KEYSERI 12B: BIOTRANSFORMATIONS OF 2-SUBSTITUTED BENZOATES AND THEIR USE IN CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PHTHALATE CATABOLISM GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several 2-substituted benzoates (including 2-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro-, 2-bromo-, 2-iodo-, 2-nitro-, 2-methoxy-, and 2-acetyl-benzoates) were converted by phthalate-grown Arthrobacter keyseri 12B to the corresponding 2-substituted 3,4-dihydroxybenzoates (protocatechuates)...

  9. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 bares the characteristics of both enterohemorrhagic (EHEC) and enteroaggregative (EAEC) E. coli. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga...

  10. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Salmonella enterica Strains Isolated from Turkey-Associated Sources

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jing; Gokulan, Kuppan; Zhao, Shaohua; Gies, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genomes of four Salmonella enterica isolates evaluated for the contribution of plasmids to virulence. Strains SE163A, SE696A, and SE710A carry plasmids demonstrated to facilitate plasmid-associated virulence, while SE819 is less virulent and has been used as a recipient for conjugation experiments to assess plasmid-encoded virulence mechanisms. PMID:27738037

  11. Plasmid-determined inducible efflux is responsible for resistance to cadmium, zinc, and cobalt in Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    PubMed Central

    Nies, D H; Silver, S

    1989-01-01

    In Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, resistance to chromate is plasmid determined, inducible, and based on decreased net accumulation of the metal anion. Plasmid-encoded resistances to zinc, cadmium, cobalt, and nickel are resulting from inducible, energy-dependent cation efflux systems. PMID:2914875

  12. Expression of recombinant organophosphorus hydrolase in the original producer of the enzyme, Sphingobium fuliginis ATCC 27551.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Kosuke; Ohmori, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Satoshi; Iwata, Natsumi; Seto, Yasuo; Kawahara, Kazuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    The plasmid encoding His-tagged organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) cloned from Sphingobium fuliginis was modified to be transferred back to this bacterium. The replication function of S. amiense plasmid was inserted at downstream of OPH gene, and S. fuliginis was transformed with this plasmid. The transformant produced larger amount of active OPH with His-tag than E. coli.

  13. Strategies used by Yersinia enterocolitica to evade killing by the host: thinking beyond Yops.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Mahesh Shanker; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2014-02-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is an important gastrointestinal pathogen. Its pathogenicity has been attributed primarily to the plasmid encoded Yersinia outer proteins or Yops that are known to subvert the immune system. This review, however, highlights the role of Yop-independent mechanisms that help Y. enterocolitica evade immune system and contribute significantly to its survival in the host.

  14. Analysis of Protein Localization and Secretory Pathway Function Using the Yeast "Saccharomyces Cerevisiae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallen, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    The isolation and characterization of mutants has been crucial in understanding a number of processes in the field of cell biology. In this exercise, students examine the effects of mutations in the secretory pathway on protein localization. Yeast strains deficient for synthesis of histidinol dehydrogenase are transformed with a plasmid encoding a…

  15. Detection of Florfenicol Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli Isolated from Sick Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Kathleen; Hudson, Charlene; Maurer, John J.; Thayer, Stephan; White, David G.; Lee, Margie D.

    2000-01-01

    Florfenicol is an antibiotic approved for veterinary use in cattle in the United States in 1996. Although this drug is not used in poultry, we have detected resistance to florfenicol in clinical isolates of avian Escherichia coli. Molecular typing demonstrated that the florfenicol resistance gene, flo, was independently acquired and is plasmid encoded. PMID:10639375

  16. DNA-Encoded Flagellin Activates Toll-Like Receptor 5 (TLR5), Nod-like Receptor Family CARD Domain-Containing Protein 4 (NRLC4), and Acts as an Epidermal, Systemic, and Mucosal-Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Nyström, Sanna; Bråve, Andreas; Falkeborn, Tina; Devito, Claudia; Rissiek, Björn; Johansson, Daniel X.; Schröder, Ulf; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Hinkula, Jorma; Applequist, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Eliciting effective immune responses using non-living/replicating DNA vaccines is a significant challenge. We have previously shown that ballistic dermal plasmid DNA-encoded flagellin (FliC) promotes humoral as well as cellular immunity to co-delivered antigens. Here, we observe that a plasmid encoding secreted FliC (pFliC(-gly)) produces flagellin capable of activating two innate immune receptors known to detect flagellin; Toll-like Receptor 5 (TLR5) and Nod-like Receptor family CARD domain-containing protein 4 (NRLC4). To test the ability of pFliC(-gly) to act as an adjuvant we immunized mice with plasmid encoding secreted FliC (pFliC(-gly)) and plasmid encoding a model antigen (ovalbumin) by three different immunization routes representative of dermal, systemic, and mucosal tissues. By all three routes we observed increases in antigen-specific antibodies in serum as well as MHC Class I-dependent cellular immune responses when pFliC(-gly) adjuvant was added. Additionally, we were able to induce mucosal antibody responses and Class II-dependent cellular immune responses after mucosal vaccination with pFliC(-gly). Humoral immune responses elicited by heterologus prime-boost immunization with a plasmid encoding HIV-1 from gp160 followed by protein boosting could be enhanced by use of pFliC(-gly). We also observed enhancement of cross-clade reactive IgA as well as a broadening of B cell epitope reactivity. These observations indicate that plasmid-encoded secreted flagellin can activate multiple innate immune responses and function as an adjuvant to non-living/replicating DNA immunizations. Moreover, the capacity to elicit mucosal immune responses, in addition to dermal and systemic properties, demonstrates the potential of flagellin to be used with vaccines designed to be delivered by various routes. PMID:26344341

  17. Widening the Spaces of Selection: Evolution along Sublethal Antimicrobial Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Coque, Teresa M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The work of Gullberg et al. (E. Gullberg, L. M. Albrecht, C. Karlsson, L. Sandegren, D. I. Andersson, mBio 5:e01918-14, 2014) indicates that extremely low concentrations of antibiotics and heavy metals are able to compensate for the cost of harboring a plasmid encoding resistances to these inhibitors. Therefore, the “spaces of selection” for plasmids encoding antibiotic or metal resistance along gradients of antimicrobial agents might be huge, and in wide spaces a high number of bacterial cells are exposed to the selective effects. These spaces are even broader if several inhibitors are simultaneously present. Probably very small inhibitor concentrations in the environment, including in sewage and other water bodies, are sufficient to ensure the maintenance and spread of this kind of multiresistance plasmid. PMID:25491358

  18. Transcription activation of a UV-inducible Clostridium perfringens bacteriocin gene by a novel sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Bruno; Mani, Nagraj; Katayama, Seiichi; Sonenshein, Abraham L

    2005-02-01

    Expression of the plasmid-encoded Clostridium perfringens gene for bacteriocin BCN5 was shown to depend in vivo and in vitro on the activity of UviA protein. UviA, also plasmid-encoded, proved to be an RNA polymerase sigma factor and was also partly autoregulatory. The uviA gene has two promoters; one provided a UviA-independent, basal level of gene expression while the stronger, UviA-dependent promoter was only utilized after the cell experienced DNA damage. As a result, BCN5 synthesis is induced by treatment with UV light or mitomycin C. UviA is related to a special class of sigma factors found to date only in Clostridium species and responsible for activating transcription of toxin genes in Clostridium difficile, Clostridium tetani, and Clostridium botulinum.

  19. Resistance mechanisms to arsenicals and antimonials.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B P

    1995-01-01

    Salts and organic derivatives of arsenic and antimony are quite toxic. Living organisms have adapted to this toxicity by the evolution of resistance mechanisms. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells develop resistance when exposed to arsenicals or antimonials. In the case of bacteria resistance is conferred by plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operons. The genes and gene products of the ars operon of the clinically-isolated conjugative R-factor R773 have been identified and their mechanism of action elucidated. The operon encodes an ATP-driven pump that extrudes arsenite and antimonite from the cells. The lowering of their intracellular concentration results in resistance. Arsenate resistance results from the action of the plasmid-encoded arsenate reductase that reduces arsenate to arsenite, which is then pumped out of the cell.

  20. Temperature Regulation of Shigella Virulence: Identification of Temperature-Regulated Shigella Invasion Genes by the Isolation of inv::lacZ Operon Fusions and the Characterization of the Virulence Gene Regulator virR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-10

    promoters was also isolated and shown to require a virulence plasmid-encoded transcriptional activator for activity . Virulence in both Shigella spp. and...Insertional mutagenesis of this coding sequence caused a loss of VirR* activity . It was concluded that the S. flexneri virR gene is an allele of hns, the...Sereny test 47 iv) Assay for Contact Hemolytic Activity 48 Phage lysates and generalized transduction 49 Western blot 50 ELISA 52 Mutagenesis

  1. Criblamydia sequanensis Harbors a Megaplasmid Encoding Arsenite Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, Claire; Goesmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Criblamydia sequanensis is an amoeba-resisting bacterium recently isolated from the Seine River. This Chlamydia-related bacterium harbors a genome of approximately 3 Mbp and a megaplasmid of 89,525 bp. The plasmid encodes several efflux systems and an operon for arsenite resistance. This first genome sequence within the Criblamydiaceae family enlarges our view on the evolution and the ecology of this important bacterial clade largely understudied so far. PMID:25342672

  2. Measuring the Effects of an Ever-Changing Environment on Malaria Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-04-01

    comparison, birds vaccinated and boosted with a DNA vaccine plasmid encoding the circumsporo- zoite protein of P. relictum exhibited a moderate degree of...protection against natural infection (P < 0.01). In the second year we followed the fate of all surviving birds with no further manipulation. The...vaccinated birds from the first year were no longer statistically distinguishable for protection against malaria from cages of naïve birds . During this period

  3. Iteron Plasmids.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Igor; Bury, Katarzyna; Wawrzycka, Aleksandra; Wegrzyn, Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Iteron-containing plasmids are model systems for studying the metabolism of extrachromosomal genetic elements in bacterial cells. Here we describe the current knowledge and understanding of the structure of iteron-containing replicons, the structure of the iteron plasmid encoded replication initiation proteins, and the molecular mechanisms for iteron plasmid DNA replication initiation. We also discuss the current understanding of control mechanisms affecting the plasmid copy number and how host chaperone proteins and proteases can affect plasmid maintenance in bacterial cells.

  4. Identification of nah-1 genes of the Pseudomonas putida naphthalene-degrading NPL-41 plasmid operon.

    PubMed

    Serebriiskaya, T S; Lenets, A A; Goldenkova, I V; Kobets, N S; Piruzian, E S

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida BS202 degrades naphthalene via a plasmid-encoded catabolic pathway. The nucleotide sequence of the nahC gene encoding one of this pathway enzymes, 1,2-dihydroxynaphthalene dioxygenase, has been determined. Analysis of nucleotide sequence of its flanking regions identified partially the nahF and putative nahQ genes. Comparison of these three genes with corresponding ones in the NAH7 plasmid and DOX operon showed a high degree of homology.

  5. Understanding the role of the catalase/peroxide genes in H2O2 resistance of E. coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 defenses against H2O2 include the peroxiredoxin AhpC and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR in exponential phase, while KatE is indu...

  6. Peroxide resistance in Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 biofilms is regulated by both RpoS dependent and independent mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many Escherichia coli serotype O157:H7 strains, defenses against peroxide damage include the peroxiredoxin AhpCF and three catalases: KatG (catalase-peroxidase), KatE (catalase), and the plasmid-encoded KatP (catalase/peroxidase). AhpC, KatG, and KatP are induced by OxyR /s70 in exponential phase...

  7. Biofilms and the plasmid maintenance question.

    PubMed

    Imran, Mudassar; Jones, Don; Smith, Hal

    2005-02-01

    Can a conjugative plasmid encoding enhanced biofilm forming abilities for its bacterial host facilitate the persistence of the plasmid in a bacterial population despite conferring diminished growth rate and segregative plasmid loss on its bearers? We construct a mathematical model in a chemostat and in a plug flow environment to answer this question. Explicit conditions for an affirmative answer are derived. Numerical simulations support the conclusion.

  8. Noncontact microsurgery of cell membranes using femtosecond laser pulses for optoinjection of specified substances into cells

    SciTech Connect

    Il'ina, I V; Ovchinnikov, A V; Chefonov, O V; Sitnikov, D S; Agranat, Mikhail B; Mikaelyan, A S

    2013-04-30

    IR femtosecond laser pulses were used for microsurgery of a cell membrane aimed at local and short-duration change in its permeability and injection of specified extracellular substances into the cells. The possibility of noncontact laser delivery of the propidium iodide fluorescent dye and the pEGFP plasmid, encoding the green fluorescent protein, into the cells with preservation of the cell viability was demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  9. Reduced oligomeric and vascular amyloid-beta following immunization of TgCRND8 mice with an Alzheimer's DNA vaccine.

    PubMed

    DaSilva, Kevin A; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, JoAnne

    2009-02-25

    Immunization with amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide reduces amyloid load in animal studies and in humans; however clinical trials resulted in the development of a pro-inflammatory cellular response to Abeta. Apoptosis has been employed to stimulate humoral and Th2-biased cellular immune responses. Thus, we sought to investigate whether immunization using a DNA vaccine encoding Abeta in conjunction with an attenuated caspase generates therapeutically effective antibodies. Plasmids encoding Abeta and an attenuated caspase were less effective in reducing amyloid pathology than those encoding Abeta alone. Moreover, use of Abeta with an Arctic mutation (E22G) as an immunogen was less effective than wild-type Abeta in terms of improvements in pathology. Low levels of IgG and IgM were generated in response to immunization with a plasmid encoding wild-type Abeta. These antibodies decreased plaque load by as much as 36+/-8% and insoluble Abeta42 levels by 56+/-3%. Clearance of Abeta was most effective when antibodies were directed against N-terminal epitopes of Abeta. Moreover, immunization reduced CAA by as much as 69+/-12% in TgCRND8 mice. Finally, high-molecular-weight oligomers and Abeta trimers were significantly reduced with immunization. Thus, immunization with a plasmid encoding Abeta alone drives an attenuated immune response that is sufficient to clear amyloid pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene.

    PubMed Central

    Sanseverino, J; Applegate, B M; King, J M; Sayler, G S

    1993-01-01

    The well-characterized plasmid-encoded naphthalene degradation pathway in Pseudomonas putida PpG7(NAH7) was used to investigate the role of the NAH plasmid-encoded pathway in mineralizing phenanthrene and anthracene. Three Pseudomonas strains, designated 5R, DFC49, and DFC50, were recovered from a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading inoculum developed from a manufactured gas plant soil slurry reactor. Plasmids pKA1, pKA2, and pKA3, approximately 100 kb in size, were isolated from these strains and characterized. These plasmids have homologous regions of upper and lower NAH7 plasmid catabolic genes. By conjugation experiments, these plasmids, including NAH7, have been shown to encode the genotype for mineralization of [9-14C]phenanthrene and [U-14C]anthracene, as well as [1-14C]naphthalene. One strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens 5RL, which has the complete lower pathway inactivated by transposon insertion in nahG, accumulated a metabolite from phenanthrene and anthracene degradation. This is the first direct evidence to indicate that the NAH plasmid-encoded catabolic genes are involved in degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons other than naphthalene. Images PMID:8328809

  11. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  12. Induction of a protective response in mice by the dengue virus NS3 protein using DNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Costa, Simone M; Yorio, Anna Paula; Gonçalves, Antônio J S; Vidale, Mariana M; Costa, Emmerson C B; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Motta, Marcia A; Freire, Marcos S; Alves, Ada M B

    2011-01-01

    The dengue non-structural 3 (NS3) is a multifunctional protein, containing a serino-protease domain, located at the N-terminal portion, and helicase, NTPase and RTPase domains present in the C-terminal region. This protein is considered the main target for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses during dengue infection, which may be involved in protection. However, few studies have been undertaken evaluating the use of this protein as a protective antigen against dengue, as well as other flavivirus. In the present work, we investigate the protective efficacy of DNA vaccines based on the NS3 protein from DENV2. Different recombinant plasmids were constructed, encoding either the full-length NS3 protein or only its functional domains (protease and helicase), fused or not to a signal peptide (t-PA). The recombinant proteins were successfully expressed in transfected BHK-21 cells, and only plasmids encoding the t-PA signal sequence mediated protein secretion. Balb/c mice were immunized with the different DNA vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of DENV2. Most animals immunized with plasmids encoding the full-length NS3 or the helicase domain survived challenge, regardless of the presence of the t-PA. However, some mice presented clinical signs of infection with high morbidity (hind leg paralysis and hunched posture), mainly in animal groups immunized with the DNA vaccines based on the helicase domain. On the other hand, inoculation with plasmids encoding the protease domain did not induce any protection, since mortality and morbidity rates in these mouse groups were similar to those detected in the control animals. The cellular immune response was analyzed by ELISPOT with a specific-CD8+ T cell NS3 peptide. Results revealed that the DNA vaccines based on the full-length protein induced the production of INF-γ, thus suggesting the involvement of this branch of the immune system in the protection.

  13. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Bifunctional Modulators of the Androgen Receptor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    specific antigen promoter (1 µg), a fusion protein of HDAC3 with the VP16 TAD at its N-terminus and a FLAG tag at the C-terminus (1 µg), and a CMV ...promoters. Briefly, U2-OS cells were seeded in a six -well plate and transfected with a blank pCDNA3 vector (750 ng) along with plasmids encoding...of 5,000 cells per well. After adhering for six hours, cells were dosed with RU-O3-N3, RU-O3-JQ1, or DMSO as a vehicle control for eighteen hours, or

  14. Ribonucleases, antisense RNAs and the control of bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed

    Saramago, Margarida; Bárria, Cátia; Arraiano, Cecília M; Domingues, Susana

    2015-03-01

    In the last decade regulatory RNAs have emerged as powerful tools to regulate the expression of genes both in prokaryotes and in eukaryotes. RNases, by degrading these RNA molecules, control the right amount of regulatory RNAs, which is fundamental for an accurate regulation of gene expression in the cell. Remarkably the first antisense RNAs identified were plasmid-encoded and their detailed study was crucial for the understanding of prokaryotic antisense RNAs. In this review we highlight the role of RNases in the precise modulation of antisense RNAs that control plasmid replication, maintenance and transfer.

  15. [Classification and diagnostics of multiresistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Schneider, C M; Serr, A

    2010-04-01

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are spreading worldwide. Chromosomally encoded resistance mechanisms are spread by clonal expansion, e.g., methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. Plasmid-encoded mechanisms such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases spread even more efficiently because they can also be horizontally transferred into other species. Acquisition of additional resistance genes minimizes therapeutic options and leads to frequent treatment failure. Laboratory diagnostics is laborious and time-consuming and requires combinations of different phenotypic and molecular methods. Increasing knowledge of treatment and diagnostics is essential for physicians.

  16. Clostridium perfringens type A-E toxin plasmids.

    PubMed

    Freedman, John C; Theoret, James R; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A

    2015-05-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell.

  17. Development of Targeted Therapeutic Agents for Botulism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    Ba 2 +-evoked hGH and catecholamine secretion were observed (Figure 7, 9A). Transfection with a plasmid encoding SNAP-25 did not alter the amount of hGH...oN 2 5 ( 0 -,h 9)- + caJ in Cells transfected B with vectors encoding 0 CAT R198T o 10 C.u CO (D T- - BoNT/A + BoNT/EI + 39 Figure 10 Chromaffin cells...Analysis-In some experiments, the cellular SNAP-23> Human distribution of expressed PKB (which possesses a HA tag) was deter- CACO 2 mined. Cells were

  18. Site Specific Incorporation of Amino Acid Analogues into Proteins In Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-11

    Positions in CCR5 ( ) and rhodopsin ( ) subjected to site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids are indicated. Figure 15. Expression...of functional CCR5 mutants containing Acp or Bzp at positions 28, 96, or 260. HEK293T cells were transfected with plasmids carrying the genes for... CCR5 -wt or CCR5 mutant with an amber mutation at position I28, F96, or F260. Plasmids encoding Bst-Yam and E. coli TyrRS (AcpRS or BzpRS) were co

  19. NF-kB2/p52 Activation and Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    characterize the role of NF-B2/p52 in the aberrant activation of AR signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer. The growth of prostate cancer...androgen insensitive C4-2 and LNCaP- IL6+ cells can block tumor growth ). Downregulation of p52 inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation We obtained...which express higher levels of p52 compared to LNCaP, were transfected with plasmids encoding p52 shRNA and growth was monitored in FBS and CS-FBS

  20. Exposing Plasmids as the Achilles’ Heel of Drug-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Julia J.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Many multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens harbor large plasmids that encode proteins conferring resistance to antibiotics. While the acquisition of these plasmids often enables bacteria to survive in the presence of antibiotics, it is possible that plasmids also represent a vulnerability that can be exploited in tailored antibacterial therapy. This review highlights three recently described strategies designed to specifically combat bacteria harboring such plasmids: Inhibition of plasmid conjugation, inhibition of plasmid replication, and exploitation of plasmid-encoded toxin-antitoxin systems. PMID:18625335

  1. Delivery of recombinant vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 gD and Babesia bovis MSA-2c to mice using liposomes derived from egg yolk lipids.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Anabel E; Zamorano, Patricia; Wilkowsky, Silvina; Torrá, Florencia; Ferreri, Lucas; Dominguez, Mariana; Florin-Christensen, Mónica

    2013-06-01

    Liposomes prepared from total egg yolk lipid extracts were used to deliver experimental DNA vaccines to mice consisting of pCI-neo plasmids encoding bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BoHV-1) gD or Babesia bovis MSA-2c. A significantly higher proportion of mice in the B. bovis MSA-2c group, but not those in the BoHV-1 gD group, developed detectable immunoglobulin G responses when vaccinated with liposome encapsulated DNA in comparison with mice vaccinated with naked DNA. In both groups, antibody titres were similar between mice vaccinated with liposome encapsulated DNA and naked DNA.

  2. The level of Yop proteins secreted by Yersinia enterocolitica is changed in maltose mutants.

    PubMed

    Brzostek, K; Raczkowska, A

    2001-10-16

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica strains express a set of plasmid-encoded proteins called Yops, involved in pathogenicity. We studied the influence of the maltose system on the production of Yop proteins and found that the level of Yop proteins of Y. enterocolitica O:9 was reduced in the presence of maltose. Transposon insertion mutants impaired with the maltose transport activity showed a decreased level in the production of Yop proteins. The transcription of the yopH gene for YopH phosphatase in these maltose mutants was unchanged and revealed a maltose mutation impaired in the secretion of Yop proteins instead of their expression.

  3. Clostridium perfringens type A–E toxin plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, John C.; Theoret, James R.; Wisniewski, Jessica A.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens relies upon plasmid-encoded toxin genes to cause intestinal infections. These toxin genes are associated with insertion sequences that may facilitate their mobilization and transfer, giving rise to new toxin plasmids with common backbones. Most toxin plasmids carry a transfer of clostridial plasmids locus mediating conjugation, which likely explains the presence of similar toxin plasmids in otherwise unrelated C. perfringens strains. The association of many toxin genes with insertion sequences and conjugative plasmids provides virulence flexibility when causing intestinal infections. However, incompatibility issues apparently limit the number of toxin plasmids maintained by a single cell. PMID:25283728

  4. The Role of Semaphorin 3B (SEMA3B) in the Pathogenesis of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    of a plasmid encoding SEMA3B into H1299 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells lead to induction of apoptosis and a dramatic decrease in colony...treated with Cos7 media after transfection with SEMA3B, or control vector (Figure 1). It is important to point out that the lung cancer line H1299 is...SEMA3B effect. In conclusion we have found that most cells lines will respond to SEMA3B growth inhibition. 0 50 100 150 H1299 H2009 H44 HCC1806

  5. Common findings of bla CTX-M-55-encoding 104-139 kbp plasmids harbored by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in pork meat, wholesale market workers, and patients with urinary tract infection in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Hoang, T A V; Nguyen, T N H; Ueda, S; Le, Q P; Tran, T T N; Nguyen, T N D; Dao, T V K; Tran, M T; Le, T T T; Le, T L; Nakayama, T; Hirai, I; Do, T H; Vien, Q M; Yamamoto, Y

    2017-02-01

    Extended-spectrum, β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E) harboring the bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmid (ESBL-E55) has been reported to be associated with urinary tract infection (UTI). The aims of this study were to clarify the prevalence of ESBL-E55 in pork meats and workers from the same wholesale market, as well as patients with UTI from a nearby hospital in Vietnam; we also investigated the plasmids encoding bla CTX-M-55. Sequencing analysis showed that 66.6% of the ESBL-E isolated from pork meats contained bla CTX-M-55, whereas the gene was present in 25.0% of workers and 12.5% of patients with UTI. Plasmid analysis showed that several sizes of plasmid encoded bla CTX-M-55 in ESBL-E55 isolated from pork meats, whereas ESBL-E55 isolated from workers and patients with UTI contained only 104-139 kbp of bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmids. This indicates that the 104-139 kbp sizes of bla CTX-M-55-encoding plasmids were commonly disseminated in pork meats, wholesale market workers, and patients with UTI.

  6. Gut inflammation can boost horizontal gene transfer between pathogenic and commensal Enterobacteriaceae

    PubMed Central

    Stecher, Bärbel; Denzler, Rémy; Maier, Lisa; Bernet, Florian; Sanders, Mandy J.; Pickard, Derek J.; Barthel, Manja; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Walker, Alan W.; Ackermann, Martin; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gut harbors a dense microbial community interacting in multiple ways, including horizontal gene transfer (HGT). Pangenome analyses established particularly high levels of genetic flux between Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae. However, the mechanisms fostering intraenterobacterial HGT are incompletely understood. Using a mouse colitis model, we found that Salmonella-inflicted enteropathy elicits parallel blooms of the pathogen and of resident commensal Escherichia coli. These blooms boosted conjugative HGT of the colicin-plasmid p2 from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to E. coli. Transconjugation efficiencies of ∼100% in vivo were attributable to high intrinsic p2-transfer rates. Plasmid-encoded fitness benefits contributed little. Under normal conditions, HGT was blocked by the commensal microbiota inhibiting contact-dependent conjugation between Enterobacteriaceae. Our data show that pathogen-driven inflammatory responses in the gut can generate transient enterobacterial blooms in which conjugative transfer occurs at unprecedented rates. These blooms may favor reassortment of plasmid-encoded genes between pathogens and commensals fostering the spread of fitness-, virulence-, and antibiotic-resistance determinants. PMID:22232693

  7. Rarity of transferable beta-lactamase production by Klebsiella species.

    PubMed

    Leung, M; Shannon, K; French, G

    1997-06-01

    We report a survey of beta-lactamases and their transferability in Klebsiella spp. isolated from blood during 1992-95. beta-Lactamases were characterized by determination of isoelectric point (pI), by hybridization of plasmid DNA preparations with probes for SHV and TEM sequences and by PCR with SHV- or TEM-specific primers. There were 80 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 22 isolates of Klebsiella oxytoca. Most isolates of K. pneumoniae had a chromosomally encoded SHV-1 beta-lactamase (or a closely related enzyme); K. oxytoca also produced chromosomal beta-lactamases, but these were distinct from SHV-1. Plasmid-encoded beta-lactamases were rare in Klebsiella spp., being found in six (7.5%) isolates of K. pneumoniae and in none of the K. oxytoca. beta-Lactamase activities were relatively low (< 100 nmoles nitrocefin hydrolysed per minute per mg of protein) and ampicillin MICs were < or = 128 mg/L for most isolates of both species. However, all isolates of K. pneumoniae with plasmid-encoded beta-lactamases, three other isolates of K. pneumoniae and three isolates of K. oxytoca had high beta-lactamase activities (> 100 nmoles/mg/min) and very high ampicillin MICs (> or = 1024 mg/L).

  8. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-12-25

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling.

  9. Prevalence and significance of plasmid maintenance functions in the virulence plasmids of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Manjistha; Austin, Stuart

    2011-07-01

    Virulence functions of pathogenic bacteria are often encoded on large extrachromosomal plasmids. These plasmids are maintained at low copy number to reduce the metabolic burden on their host. Low-copy-number plasmids risk loss during cell division. This is countered by plasmid-encoded systems that ensure that each cell receives at least one plasmid copy. Plasmid replication and recombination can produce plasmid multimers that hinder plasmid segregation. These are removed by multimer resolution systems. Equitable distribution of the resulting monomers to daughter cells is ensured by plasmid partition systems that actively segregate plasmid copies to daughter cells in a process akin to mitosis in higher organisms. Any plasmid-free cells that still arise due to occasional failures of replication, multimer resolution, or partition are eliminated by plasmid-encoded postsegregational killing systems. Here we argue that all of these three systems are essential for the stable maintenance of large low-copy-number plasmids. Thus, they should be found on all large virulence plasmids. Where available, well-annotated sequences of virulence plasmids confirm this. Indeed, virulence plasmids often appear to contain more than one example conforming to each of the three system classes. Since these systems are essential for virulence, they can be regarded as ubiquitous virulence factors. As such, they should be informative in the search for new antibacterial agents and drug targets.

  10. Mechanisms of Theta Plasmid Replication.

    PubMed

    Lilly, Joshua; Camps, Manel

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are autonomously replicating pieces of DNA. This article discusses theta plasmid replication, which is a class of circular plasmid replication that includes ColE1-like origins of replication popular with expression vectors. All modalities of theta plasmid replication initiate synthesis with the leading strand at a predetermined site and complete replication through recruitment of the host's replisome, which extends the leading strand continuously while synthesizing the lagging strand discontinuously. There are clear differences between different modalities of theta plasmid replication in mechanisms of DNA duplex melting and in priming of leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. In some replicons duplex melting depends on transcription, while other replicons rely on plasmid-encoded trans-acting proteins (Reps); primers for leading-strand synthesis can be generated through processing of a transcript or in other replicons by the action of host- or plasmid-encoded primases. None of these processes require DNA breaks. The frequency of replication initiation is tightly regulated to facilitate establishment in permissive hosts and to achieve a steady state. The last section of the article reviews how plasmid copy number is sensed and how this feedback modulates the frequency of replication.

  11. Plasmid pORF-hTRAIL targeting to glioma using transferrin-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Song; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Chen; Hong, Bo; Hao, Bing

    2016-01-01

    A gene drug delivery system for glioma therapy based on transferrin (Tf)-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer (PAMAM) was prepared. Gene drug, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (hTRAIL)-encoding plasmid open reading frame (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail), was condensed by Tf-modified PAMAM to form nanoparticles (NPs). PAMAM-PEG-Tf/DNA NPs showed higher cellular uptake, in vitro gene expression, and cytotoxicity than PAMAM-PEG/DNA NPs in C6 cells. The in vivo targeting efficacy of NPs was visualized by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. Tf-modified NPs showed obvious glioma-targeting trend. Plasmid encoding green fluorescence protein (GFP) was also condensed by modified or unmodified PAMAM to evaluate the in vivo gene expression level. The PAMAM-PEG-Tf/plasmid encoding enhanced green fluorescence protein (pEGFP) NPs exhibited higher GFP expression level than PAMAM-PEG/pEGFP NPs. TUNEL assay revealed that Tf-modified NPs could induce much more tumor apoptosis. The median survival time of PAMAM-PEG-Tf/Trail-treated rats (28.5 days) was longer than that of rats treated with PAMAM-PEG/Trail (25.5 days), temozolomide (24.5 days), PAMAM-PEG-Tf/pEGFP (19 days), or saline (17 days). The therapeutic effect was further confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated that targeting gene delivery system had potential application for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26719669

  12. Plasmid and clonal interference during post horizontal gene transfer evolution.

    PubMed

    Bedhomme, S; Perez Pantoja, D; Bravo, I G

    2017-02-16

    Plasmids are nucleic acid molecules that can drive their own replication in a living cell. They can be transmitted horizontally and can thrive in the host cell to high-copy numbers. Plasmid replication and gene expression consume cellular resources and cells carrying plasmids incur fitness costs. But many plasmids carry genes that can be beneficial under certain conditions, allowing the cell to endure in the presence of antibiotics, toxins, competitors or parasites. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-encoded genes can thus instantaneously confer differential adaptation to local or transient selection conditions. This conflict between cellular fitness and plasmid spread sets the scene for multilevel selection processes. We have engineered a system to study the short-term evolutionary impact of different synonymous versions of a plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance gene. Applying experimental evolution under different selection conditions and deep sequencing allowed us to show rapid local adaptation to the presence of antibiotic and to the specific version of the resistance gene transferred. We describe the presence of clonal interference at two different levels: at the within-cell level, because a single cell can carry several plasmids, and at the between-cell level, because a bacterial population may contain several clones carrying different plasmids and displaying different fitness in the presence/absence of antibiotic. Understanding the within-cell and between-cell dynamics of plasmids after horizontal gene transfer is essential to unravel the dense network of mobile elements underlying the worldwide threat to public health of antibiotic resistance.

  13. Coadministration of cruzipain and GM-CSF DNAs, a new immunotherapeutic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    PubMed

    Cerny, Natacha; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Bivona, Augusto E; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Frank, Fernanda M; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccine research and development are especially important in Chagas disease considering the characteristics of the chronic infection and the number of people in the Americas living with a parasite infection for decades. We have previously reported the efficacy of attenuated Salmonella enterica (S) carrying plasmid encoding cruzipain (SCz) to protect against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In the present work we investigated whether Cz DNA vaccine immunotherapy could be effective in controlling an ongoing T. cruzi infection in mice. We here report the intramuscular administration of naked Cz DNA or the oral administration of Salmonella as Cz DNA delivery system as therapeutic vaccines in mice during acute or chronic infection. The coadministration of a plasmid encoding GM-CSF improved vaccine performance, indicating that the stimulation of innate immune cells is needed in the event of an ongoing infection. These therapeutic vaccines were able to address the response to a protective and sustained Th1 biased profile not only against Cz but also against a variety of parasite antigens. The combined therapeutic vaccine during the chronic phase of infection prevents tissue pathology as shown by a reduced level of enzyme activity characteristic of tissue damage and a tissue status compatible with normal tissue. The obtained results suggest that immunotherapy with Cz and GM-CSF DNAs, either alone or in combination with other drug treatments, may represent a promising alternative for Chagas disease therapy.

  14. Cleavage of Signal Regulatory Protein α (SIRPα) Enhances Inflammatory Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Londino, James D.; Gulick, Dexter; Isenberg, Jeffrey S.; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2015-01-01

    Signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) is a membrane glycoprotein immunoreceptor abundant in cells of monocyte lineage. SIRPα ligation by a broadly expressed transmembrane protein, CD47, results in phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs, resulting in the inhibition of NF-κB signaling in macrophages. Here we observed that proteolysis of SIRPα during inflammation is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), resulting in the generation of a membrane-associated cleavage fragment in both THP-1 monocytes and human lung epithelia. We mapped a charge-dependent putative cleavage site near the membrane-proximal domain necessary for ADAM10-mediated cleavage. In addition, a secondary proteolytic cleavage within the membrane-associated SIRPα fragment by γ-secretase was identified. Ectopic expression of a SIRPα mutant plasmid encoding a proteolytically resistant form in HeLa cells inhibited activation of the NF-κB pathway and suppressed STAT1 phosphorylation in response to TNFα to a greater extent than expression of wild-type SIRPα. Conversely, overexpression of plasmids encoding the proteolytically cleaved SIRPα fragments in cells resulted in enhanced STAT-1 and NF-κB pathway activation. Thus, the data suggest that combinatorial actions of ADAM10 and γ-secretase on SIRPα cleavage promote inflammatory signaling. PMID:26534964

  15. Gene electrotransfer into skin using noninvasive multi-electrode array for vaccination and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Kos, Spela; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; Dolinsek, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Jelenc, Jure; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2017-04-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer due to its easy accessibility and its interesting immune properties. Since electrodes are often invasive and frequently induce discomfort during pulse application, there is a fundamental need for non-invasive electrodes for skin delivery. We developed circular pin non-invasive multi-electrode array (MEA), suitable for different clinical applications. MEA was first employed to deliver a luciferase reporter gene. Then, it was used to deliver a DNA vaccine coding for ovalbumin or a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 for promoting wound healing. The results demonstrated a strong gene expression and an efficient delivery of both, DNA vaccine and wound healing agent, dependent on the pulses applied. The use of MEA to deliver the ovalbumin plasmid demonstrated a strong immune response, as evidenced by the presence of antibodies in sera, the IFN-gamma response and the delayed tumor growth when the mice were subsequently challenged with B16-OVA cells. The delivery of a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 significantly accelerated wound closure. The easy applicability and non-invasiveness of MEA make it suitable for various clinical applications that require gene electrotransfer to skin. Specifically, by adapting electric pulses to the expected action of a transgene, non-invasive MEA can be employed either for vaccination or for wound healing.

  16. An in vivo assay for conjugation-mediated recombination yields novel results for Streptomyces plasmid pIJ101.

    PubMed

    Ducote, Matthew J; Pettis, Gregg S

    2006-05-01

    Efficient transmission of circular plasmids in Streptomyces spp. proceeds by an uncharacterized mechanism that requires a cis-acting locus of transfer (clt) and often only a single plasmid-encoded protein. For circular plasmids from other bacteria, site- and strand-specific nicking takes place at the cis-acting oriT locus via the plasmid-encoded relaxase protein prior to single-strand transfer. Using an assay originally designed to demonstrate that conjugative transfer of plasmids containing tandem oriT loci results in the formation of a single composite oriT locus, we show here that an analogous construct involving the pIJ101 clt locus apparently does not undergo such a conjugation-mediated event during plasmid transfer. Our results, which imply that streptomycete plasmids are transferred by a functionally distinct mechanism compared to oriT-containing plasmids, are complementary to other recent evidences that support a novel double-stranded model for streptomycete circular plasmid transfer.

  17. Protein kinase A activation of the surfactant protein B gene is mediated by phosphorylation of thyroid transcription factor 1.

    PubMed

    Yan, C; Whitsett, J A

    1997-07-11

    Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) is a homeodomain-containing nuclear transcription factor expressed in epithelial cells of the lung and thyroid. TTF-1 binds to and activates the transcription of genes expressed selectively in the respiratory epithelium including pulmonary surfactant A, B, C and Clara cell secretory protein. Transfection with a plasmid encoding the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) catalytic subunit, Cat-beta, stimulated the phosphorylation of a TTF-1-flag fusion protein 6-7-fold in H441 pulmonary adenocarcinoma cells. Recombinant TTF-1 was phosphorylated by purified PKA catalytic subunit in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP. PKA catalytic subunit family members, Cat-alpha and Cat-beta, markedly enhanced the transcriptional activation of surfactant B gene promoters by TTF-1 in vitro. Peptide mapping was used to identify a PKA phosphorylation site at the NH2 terminus of TTF-1. A 17-amino acid synthetic peptide comprising this site completely inhibited the PKA-dependent phosphorylation of TTF-1 in vitro. A substitution mutation of TTF-1 (Thr9 two head right arrow Ala) abolished phosphorylation by PKA and reduced transactivation of the surfactant B gene promoter. Transfection with a plasmid encoding the cAMP regulatory element binding factor inhibited transcriptional activity of the surfactant protein B gene promoter. Phosphorylation of TTF-1 mediates PKA-dependent activation of surfactant protein B gene transcription.

  18. Efflux pump-mediated benzalkonium chloride resistance in Listeria monocytogenes isolated from retail food.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaobing; Yu, Tao; Liang, Yu; Ji, Shengdong; Guo, Xiaowei; Ma, Jianmin; Zhou, Lijun

    2016-01-18

    In this study, efflux pump-mediated benzalkonium chloride (BC) resistance, including plasmid-encoded (Qac protein family and BcrABC) and chromosome-borne efflux pumps, was investigated in Listeria monocytogenes from retail food in China. Among the 59 L. monocytogenes strains, 13 (22.0%) strains were resistant to BC. The PCR results showed that bcrABC was harbored by 2 of 13 BC resistant strains. However, none of the qac genes were detected among the 59 strains. The bcrABC was absent in both of the plasmid cured strains, indicating that this BC resistance determinant was plasmid-encoded in the two bcrABC-positive strains. In the presence of reserpine, most of the bcrABC-negative strains had decreases in the MICs of BC, suggesting the existence of other efflux pumps and their role in BC resistance. After exposed to reserpine, the reduction in BC MICs was observed in the two cured strains, indicating that efflux pumps located on chromosome was also involved in BC resistance. Our findings suggest that food products may act as reservoirs for BC resistant isolates of L. monocytogenes and plasmid- and chromosome-encoded efflux pumps could mediate the BC resistance of L. monocytogenes, which is especially relevant to the adaption of this organism in food-related environments with frequent BC use.

  19. Survival and replication of Rhodococcus equi in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Hondalus, M K; Mosser, D M

    1994-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium of macrophages that can cause serious pneumonia in both young horses and immunocompromised people. Essential to understanding rhodococcus pathogenesis is a quantitative documentation of the intracellular events that follow macrophage phagocytosis of the organism. By using a bacterial immunofluorescence staining assay, we verified the intracellular survival and replicative potential of R. equi in both murine peritoneal macrophages and equine alveolar macrophages in vitro. Following an initial lag period of 6 to 12 h, the intracellular numbers of R. equi begin to rise, often reaching macrophage-compromising levels by 48 h. A quantitative determination of bacterial growth by a novel image analysis cytometry technique confirmed our fluorescence microscopic results. By 48 h postinfection, bacterial numbers had increased by more than fivefold, and the majority of infected macrophages in the monolayer contained 10 or more bacteria per cell. The intracellular organisms were viable, as evidenced by the ability to incorporate radiolabeled uracil. The use of these techniques has identified differences in the in vitro replicative capacities of a virulent strain and an avirulent strain of R. equi. A clinical isolate of R. equi expressing a 17-kDa virulence-associated plasmid-encoded antigen was able to survive and replicate within macrophages, whereas an avirulent, non-plasmid-containing strain replicated poorly. These results suggest that plasmid-encoded bacterial virulence factors may contribute to the ability of R. equi to replicate within its host cell, the macrophage. Images PMID:7927672

  20. Experimental piscine alphavirus RNA recombination in vivo yields both viable virus and defective viral RNA

    PubMed Central

    Petterson, Elin; Guo, Tz-Chun; Evensen, Øystein; Mikalsen, Aase B.

    2016-01-01

    RNA recombination in non-segmented RNA viruses is important for viral evolution and documented for several virus species through in vitro studies. Here we confirm viral RNA recombination in vivo using an alphavirus, the SAV3 subtype of Salmon pancreas disease virus. The virus causes pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon and heavy losses in European salmonid aquaculture. Atlantic salmon were injected with a SAV3 6K-gene deleted cDNA plasmid, encoding a non-viable variant of SAV3, together with a helper cDNA plasmid encoding structural proteins and 6K only. Later, SAV3-specific RNA was detected and recombination of viral RNA was confirmed. Virus was grown from plasmid-injected fish and shown to infect and cause pathology in salmon. Subsequent cloning of PCR products confirming recombination, documented imprecise homologous recombination creating RNA deletion variants in fish injected with cDNA plasmid, corresponding with deletion variants previously found in SAV3 from the field. This is the first experimental documentation of alphavirus RNA recombination in an animal model and provides new insight into the production of defective virus RNA. PMID:27805034

  1. Influence of surface modulations by enzymes and monoclonal antibodies on alternative complement pathway activation by Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, E; Brade, V

    1989-01-01

    Effector mechanisms resulting from alternative complement pathway (ACP) activation cannot act efficiently against Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O3, as indicated by poor C3 to C9 consumption and by survival in EGTA (ethyleneglycoldiaminetetraacetic acid) Mg-serum. These results were not influenced by the lack or presence of plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with different amounts of side chains or by treatment of the bacteria with pronase or neuraminidase. Surface modulation of Y. enterocolitica with polyclonal immunoglobulin G or the immunoglobulin G fragments F(ab')2 and Fab always converted Y. enterocolitica to a high ACP activator, with strong C3 to C9 consumption and surface deposition of activated C3. Killing of Y. enterocolitica as a result of antibody-mediated ACP activation was observed only with bacteria grown at 22 degrees C but not with bacteria from 37 degrees C cultures. The expression of complement resistance in Y. enterocolitica grown at 37 degrees C was not influenced by the presence or absence of plasmids. Using different monoclonal antibodies (MAb), we found that MAb with LPS specificity mediated ACP activation, whereas MAb specific for different plasmid-encoded outer membrane proteins were ineffective, despite surface binding. These results suggest a major inhibitory role of LPS on ACP activation which was neutralized by LPS-specific antibodies. PMID:2731980

  2. Characterization of Resistance Genes and Plasmids from Outbreaks and Illness Clusters Caused by Salmonella Resistant to Ceftriaxone in the United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Folster, Jason P; Grass, Julian E; Bicknese, Amelia; Taylor, Julia; Friedman, Cindy R; Whichard, Jean M

    2017-03-01

    Salmonella is an important cause of foodborne illness; however, quickly identifying the source of these infections can be difficult, and source identification is a crucial step in preventing additional illnesses. Although most infections are self-limited, invasive salmonellosis may require antimicrobial treatment. Ceftriaxone, an extended-spectrum cephalosporin, is commonly used for treatment of salmonellosis. Previous studies have identified a correlation between the food animal/retail meat source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella and the type of resistance gene and plasmid it carries. In this study, we examined seven outbreaks of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections, caused by serotypes Typhimurium, Newport, Heidelberg, and Infantis. All isolates were positive for a plasmid-encoded blaCMY gene. Plasmid incompatibility typing identified five IncI1 and two IncA/C plasmids. Both outbreaks containing blaCMY-IncA/C plasmids were linked to consumption of cattle products. Three of five outbreaks with blaCMY-IncI1 (ST12) plasmids were linked to a poultry source. The remaining IncI1 outbreaks were associated with ground beef (ST20) and tomatoes (ST12). In addition, we examined isolates from five unsolved clusters of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella infections and used our plasmid-encoded gene findings to predict the source. Overall, we identified a likely association between the source of ceftriaxone-resistant Salmonella outbreaks and the type of resistance gene/plasmid it carries.

  3. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    ZHAI, YONGZHEN; ZHOU, YAN; LI, XIMEI; FENG, GUOHE

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF. PMID:25738258

  4. A Multiple siRNA-Based Anti-HIV/SHIV Microbicide Shows Protection in Both In Vitro and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Raulji, Payal; Mohapatra, Subhra; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) are the etiologic agents of AIDS. Most HIV-1 infected individuals worldwide are women, who acquire HIV infections during sexual contact. Blocking HIV mucosal transmission and local spread in the female lower genital tract is important in preventing infection and ultimately eliminating the pandemic. Microbicides work by destroying the microbes or preventing them from establishing an infection. Thus, a number of different types of microbicides are under investigation, however, the lack of their solubility and bioavailability, and toxicity has been major hurdles. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional chitosan-lipid nanocomplexes that can effectively deliver plasmids encoding siRNA(s) as microbicides without adverse effects and provide significant protection against HIV in both in vitro and in vivo models. Chitosan or chitosan-lipid (chlipid) was complexed with a cocktail of plasmids encoding HIV-1-specific siRNAs (psiRNAs) and evaluated for their efficacy in HEK-293 cells, PBMCs derived from nonhuman primates, 3-dimensional human vaginal ectocervical tissue (3D-VEC) model and also in non-human primate model. Moreover, prophylactic administration of the chlipid to deliver a psiRNA cocktail intravaginally with a cream formulation in a non-human primate model showed substantial reduction of SHIV (simian/human immunodeficiency virus SF162) viral titers. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the potential of chlipid-siRNA nanocomplexes as a potential genetic microbicide against HIV infections. PMID:26407080

  5. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Spela; Blagus, Tanja; Cemazar, Maja; Lampreht Tratar, Ursa; Stimac, Monika; Prosen, Lara; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kamensek, Urska; Kranjc, Simona; Steinstraesser, Lars; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique; Sersa, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed). Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule) were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene. PMID:27574782

  6. Electrogene therapy with interleukin-12 in canine mast cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pavlin, Darja; Cemazar, Maja; Cör, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Pogacnik, Azra; Tozon, Natasa

    2011-01-01

    Background Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors in dogs with extremely variable biological behaviour. Different treatment approaches can be used in canine cutaneous MCT, with surgical excision being the treatment of choice. In this study, electrogene therapy (EGT) as a new therapeutic approach to canine MCTs, was established. Materials and methods. Eight dogs with a total of eleven cutaneous MCTs were treated with intratumoral EGT using DNA plasmid encoding human interleukin-12 (IL-12). The local response to the therapy was evaluated by repeated measurements of tumor size and histological examination of treated tumors. A possible systemic response was assessed by determination of IL-12 and interferon- γ (IFN-γ) in patients’ sera. The occurence of side effects was monitored with weekly clinical examinations of treated animals and by performing basic bloodwork, consisting of the complete bloodcount and determination of selected biochemistry parameters. Results Intratumoral EGT with IL-12 elicits significant reduction of treated tumors’ size, ranging from 13% to 83% (median 50%) of the initial tumor volume. Additionally, a change in the histological structure of treated nodules was seen. There was a reduction in number of malignant mast cells and inflammatory cell infiltration of treated tumors. Systemic release of IL-12 in four patients was detected, without any noticeable local or systemic side effects. Conclusions These data suggest that intratumoral EGT with plasmid encoding IL-12 may be useful in the treatment of canine MCTs, exerting a local antitumor effect. PMID:22933932

  7. Immunomodulatory Yersinia outer proteins (Yops) -useful tools for bacteria and humans alike.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Benjamin; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2017-03-15

    Human-pathogenic Yersinia produce plasmid-encoded Yersinia outer proteins (Yops), which are necessary to down-regulate anti-bacterial responses that constrict bacterial survival in the host. These Yops are effectively translocated directly from the bacterial into the target cell cytosol by the type III secretion system (T3SS). Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) in contrast are characterized by their ability to autonomously cross cell membranes and to transport cargo - independent of additional translocation systems. The recent discovery of bacterial cell-penetrating effector proteins (CPEs) - with the prototype being the T3SS effector protein YopM - established a new class of autonomously translocating immunomodulatory proteins. CPEs represent a vast source of potential self-delivering, anti-inflammatory therapeutics. In this review, we give an update on the characteristic features of the plasmid-encoded Yops and, based on recent findings, propose the further development of these proteins for potential therapeutic applications as natural or artificial cell-penetrating forms of Yops might be of value as bacteria-derived biologics.

  8. Synthesis and evaluation of cationic nanomicelles for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandke, Rhishikesh Subhash

    The goal of proposed study was to contribute towards the development of a nano size, high efficiency and low toxicity non-viral polymeric vector for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. A series of fatty acid grafted low-molecular-weight chitosan (N-acyl LMWCs) were synthesized, purified and characterized for their physicochemical properties using various analytical techniques such as infrared spectroscopy, elemental analysis and dynamic light scattering. The formulation parameters including pH, sonication duration, and filtration altered the physicochemical characteristics of N-acyl LMWC nanomicelles. The acyl chain length and degree of unsaturation in fatty acids also had an impact on the physicochemical properties and the transfection efficiency of nanomicelles. N-acyl LMWC nanomicelles showed efficient in vitro transfection as visualized and quantified using a reporter plasmid (encoding green fluorescent protein), and therapeutic plasmids (encoding for interleukin-4 and interleukin-10), respectively. The in vitro transfection efficiencies of N-acyl LMWCs with 18:1 and 18:2 grafts (oleic and linoleic acids) were comparable with FuGENERTM HD (marketed non-viral vector) but were ˜8-fold and 35-fold higher as compared to LMWC and naked DNA, respectively. The in vivo transfection efficiency of N-acyl LMWC to deliver plasmids individually encoding IL-4 and IL-10 as well as a bicistronic plasmid encoding both IL-4 and IL-10 was studied in a multiple, low-dose streptozotocin induced diabetic mouse model. The transfection efficiency of pDNA/N-acyl LMWC polyplexes injected via intramuscular route showed significant improvement (p<0.05) over passive (naked DNA) or positive (FuGENE HD) controls. Additionally, a sustained and efficient expression of IL-4 and IL-10 was observed, accompanied by a reduction in interferon-gamma (INF-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels. The pancreas of pDNA/N-acyl LMWC polyplex treated animals exhibited protection from

  9. Homology among arsenate resistance determinants of R factors in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Mobley, H L; Silver, S; Porter, F D; Rosen, B P

    1984-01-01

    Escherichia coli bearing R factors R773 or R46 or hybrid recombinant plasmids carrying the arsenic resistance determinants derived from these plasmids synthesized inducible polypeptides of similar apparent molecular weights when exposed to arsenite salts (R773 derivative, 64,000 and 16,000; R46 derivative, 62,000, 16,500, and 13,500). In addition, both plasmids encoded energy-dependent arsenate efflux systems and demonstrated DNA sequence homology by filter blot hybridization. Human isolates of arsenate- and arsenite-resistant enterobacteria were tested for homology with the arsenate operon of R773 by colony blot hybridization. Approximately one-third of the isolates hybridized strongly, and two-thirds showed little or no evidence of homology, suggesting the presence of two or more genetically distinct arsenate resistant determinants. Images PMID:6370124

  10. Fatal multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis in a patient with travel history and recent onset of systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Weyrich, P; Borgmann, S; Mayer, F; Heeg, P; Riessen, R; Kötter, I

    2006-11-01

    Severe infections are a common cause of death in patients suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We here report on a fatal multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii sepsis in a patient with newly diagnosed SLE, who had to be treated with immunosuppressants due to lupus nephritis. Detailed analysis of the patient's history revealed that colonisation probably had occurred during a recent hospitalisation of the patient in the Mediterranean region. E-test analysis indicated that resistance to carbapenems was mediated by a plasmid-encoded metallo-beta-lactamase. We conclude that travel history including previously visited health care facilities always should be carefully considered for decisions on anti-infective therapy, as travel activities increasingly facilitate spread of antimicrobial resistances.

  11. Crystal structure of the MazE/MazF complex: molecular bases of antidote-toxin recognition.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; Hanaoka, Fumio; Burley, Stephen K

    2003-04-01

    A structure of the Escherichia coli chromosomal MazE/MazF addiction module has been determined at 1.7 A resolution. Addiction modules consist of stable toxin and unstable antidote proteins that govern bacterial cell death. MazE (antidote) and MazF (toxin) form a linear heterohexamer composed of alternating toxin and antidote homodimers (MazF(2)-MazE(2)-MazF(2)). The MazE homodimer contains a beta barrel from which two extended C termini project, making interactions with flanking MazF homodimers that resemble the plasmid-encoded toxins CcdB and Kid. The MazE/MazF heterohexamer structure documents that the mechanism of antidote-toxin recognition is common to both chromosomal and plasmid-borne addiction modules, and provides general molecular insights into toxin function, antidote degradation in the absence of toxin, and promoter DNA binding by antidote/toxin complexes.

  12. Attenuated Salmonella sp. as a DNA Delivery System for Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens.

    PubMed

    Bivona, Augusto E; Cerny, Natacha; Alberti, Andrés Sánchez; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is an important neglected disease affecting thousands of people in the Americas. Novel strategies for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against the etiological agent, the intracellular protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, are urgently needed. Vaccines based on attenuated virus and bacteria as a foreign DNA delivery system represent a strong advantage over naked DNA-based vaccines. Here we describe the use of attenuated Salmonella carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding a T. cruzi antigen. The main advantages of the methodology are the oral administration of the Salmonella-based vaccine and the induction of a strong humoral and cell-mediated immune response at both mucosal and systemic level, favored by the adjuvant effect elicited by the bacteria pathogen-associated molecular patterns.

  13. Translocated effectors of Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Young, Glenn M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Currently, all known translocated effectors of Yersinia are delivered into host cells by type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Pathogenic Yersinia maintain the plasmid-encoded Ysc T3SS for the specific delivery of the well-studied Yop effectors. New horizons for effector biology have opened with the discovery of the Ysps of Y. enterocolitica Biovar 1B, which are translocated into host cells by the chromosome-endoded Ysa T3SS. The reported arsenal of effectors is likely to expand since genomic analysis has revealed gene-clusters in some Yersinia that code for other T3SSs. These efforts also revealed possible type VI secretion (T6S) systems, which may indicate translocation of effectors occurs by multiple mechanisms. PMID:19185531

  14. Early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of Canine distemper virus induces robust protection against distemper.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-08-20

    Young mink kits (n=8) were vaccinated with DNA plasmids encoding the viral haemagglutinin protein (H) of a vaccine strain of Canine distemper virus (CDV). Virus neutralising (VN) antibodies were induced after 2 immunisations and after the third immunisation all kits had high VN antibody titres. The VN antibody titres remained high for more than 4 months and the mink were protected against viraemia, lymphopenia, clinical disease and changes in the percentage of IFN-gamma producing peripheral blood leucocytes after challenge inoculation with a recent wild type strain of CDV. Essentially, these results demonstrate that early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of a CDV vaccine strain induced robust protective immunity against a recent wild type CDV.

  15. Ceftazidime and aztreonam resistance in Providencia stuartii: characterization of a natural TEM-derived extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-60.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, N; Perilli, M; Segatore, B; Setacci, D; Amicosante, G; Mazzariol, A; Cornaglia, G

    1998-06-01

    A plasmid-encoded beta-lactamase produced from a clinical strain of Providencia stuartii has been purified and characterized. The gene coding for the beta-lactamase was cloned and sequenced. It appears to be a new natural TEM-derived enzyme, named TEM-60. Point mutations (Q39K, L51P, E104K, and R164S) are present with respect to the TEM-1 enzyme; the mutation L51P has never been previously reported, with the exception of the chromosomally encoded extended-spectrum beta-lactamase PER-1. Kinetic parameters relative to penicillins, cephalosporins, and monobactams other than mechanism-based inactivators were related to the in vitro susceptibility phenotype.

  16. Providencia stuartii Isolates from Greece: Co-Carriage of Cephalosporin (blaSHV-5, blaVEB-1), Carbapenem (blaVIM-1), and Aminoglycoside (rmtB) Resistance Determinants by a Multidrug-Resistant Outbreak Clone.

    PubMed

    Oikonomou, Olga; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Phee, Lynette M; Betts, Jonathan; Mevius, Dik; Wareham, David W

    2016-07-01

    Providencia stuartii has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen. We describe an outbreak due to a multidrug-resistant strain over a 4-month period in a critical care unit in Athens. Molecular typing revealed each of the isolates to be clonally related with coresistance to cephalosporins, carbapenems, aminoglycosides, and quinolones. Each isolate contained a 220-kb multi-replicon (IncA/C and IncR) conjugative plasmid encoding TEM-1, SHV-5, VEB-1, and VIM-1 β-lactamases and the 16S rDNA methylase RmtB. Antimicrobial therapy was unsuccessful in 3 of 6 cases, and resistance was readily transmissible to susceptible strains of Escherichia coli by transformation and conjugation. This highlights the clinical importance of P. stuartii and its ability to disseminate critical resistance determinants to other bacterial pathogens.

  17. Control of infection with multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria in a hospital renal unit: the value of plasmid characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, C. S.; Barrett, S. P.; Threlfall, E. J.; Cheasty, T.

    1995-01-01

    An outbreak of infections due to multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria took place over a period of approximately 18 months in a renal unit. Strains of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were involved, and a variety of antibiotic resistances was encountered. Closely related plasmids encoding resistance to aztreonam, ceftazidime and piperacillin, possibly derived from an archetypal plasmid of 105 kb were found in the majority of isolates examined. After limiting the use of aztreonam the incidence of new patient isolates of multiple-resistant organisms was greatly reduced. This study demonstrated how molecular studies can contribute to the control of an outbreak situation in a hospital unit by providing an impetus to reduce the use of specific antibiotics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7641839

  18. Targeting PRMT5 as a Novel Radiosensitization Approach for Primary and Recurrent Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    and anti-Flag M2 (F3165) antibodies were from sigma . Monoclonal Anti-Human PARP antibody (4C10-5) was purchased from BD Biosciences (San Diego, CA... sigma ). Plasmids encoding c-Jun63A/73A, c-JunDLZ (c-JunD280-317), c-Jun A?D265 In265 and TAM67 (c-JunD3-122) were generated by PCR or ligation PCR (Ali...cotransfected with 2 lg of pLVX-Tet-On, 1.5 lg of pHR0- CMV -DR8.20vpr, and 0.5 lg of pHR0- CMV -VSV-G using Fugene HD reagent (Roche Ap- plied Science

  19. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  20. Fosfomycin resistance plasmids do not affect fosfomycin transport into Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    León, J; García-Lobo, J M; Ortiz, J M

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells carrying fosfomycin resistance plasmids were able to take up fosfomycin from the medium to the same extent as plasmid-free bacteria. The antibiotic entered the plasmid-harboring cells by means of the glpT and uhp transport systems, as is the case with susceptible bacteria. Active fosfomycin could be detected in soluble extracts of cells which had previously been incubated in the presence of the antibiotic. Furthermore, fosfomycin resistance plasmids did not confer on E. coli cells resistance to the novel antibiotic FR-31564, which is incorporated by the same transport systems as fosfomycin. We conclude that, in contrast to chromosomal resistance mutants, altered transport does not play a role in the plasmid-encoded fosfomycin resistance mechanism. PMID:7044304

  1. [Characterization of first sorbitol-fermenting shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H- strain isolated in Poland].

    PubMed

    Jakubczak, Aleksandra; Szych, Jolanta; Januszkiewicz, Kamil

    2008-01-01

    Sorbitol-fermenting shiga toxin-producing E. coli O157:H- strains have emerged as a cause of human disease in many European and non-European countries. The role of SF VTEC O157:H- in the etiology of pediatric HUS and diarrhea is significant. We characterized the first SF VTEC O157:H- strain isolated from 9 year old patient in Poland. Strain possessed many traits characteristics for SF VTEC O157:H-. It fermented sorbitol after overnight incubation and produced beta-glucuronidase. It possessed the stx2, eae-gamma, EhlyA and sfpA genes and did not harbour plasmid-encoded katP and espP genes. Motility was not expressed but the strain possessed the chromosomal fliC locus for H7 antigen. The spread of SF VTEC O157:H- strains demonstrates the need for appropriate procedures for their microbiological diagnosis in Poland.

  2. Plasmid-mediated mineralization of naphthalene, phenanthrene, and anthracene

    SciTech Connect

    Sanseverino, J. IT Corp., Knoxville, TN ); Applegate, B.M.; King, J.M.H.; Sayler, G.S. )

    1993-06-01

    The biochemistry and genetics of the naphthalene degradation pathway contained on plasmid NAH7 have been well characterized. However, not much is known about the substrate specificity of the enzymes of nah operons and whether the nah-encoded enzymes are capable of metabolizing higher polyaromatic hydrocarbons. This paper shows that NAH7 and NAH7-like plasmids can mediate metabolism of phenanthrene and anthracene as well as naphthalene. In addition, a mutant blocked in the nahG (salicylate hydroxylase) gene produced unidentified metabolites when it is grown in the presence of phenanthrene and anthracene. This implies that phenanthrene and anthracene are degraded through the nah plasmid-encoded system. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A series of medium and high copy number arabinose-inducible Escherichia coli expression vectors compatible with pBR322 and pACYC184.

    PubMed

    Chakravartty, Vandana; Cronan, John E

    2015-09-01

    The original pBAD24 plasmid and the derived lower copy number (the pBAD322 series) expression vectors have been widely used in Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and related bacteria. However, a flexible pBAD expression system has been available only in pMB1 (ColE1) vectors. We report a series of pBAD vectors that replicate using the origin of plasmid RSF1030 that are compatible with pMB1 (ColE1) and p15A (pACYC) vectors. Both high (≥pBAD24) and medium (~pBAD322) copy number plasmids encoding resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, kanamycin, tetracycline, spectinomycin/streptomycin, gentamycin, or trimethoprim are available.

  4. Acquired Class D β-Lactamases

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Nuno T.; Fisher, Jed F.

    2014-01-01

    The Class D β-lactamases have emerged as a prominent resistance mechanism against β-lactam antibiotics that previously had efficacy against infections caused by pathogenic bacteria, especially by Acinetobacter baumannii and the Enterobacteriaceae. The phenotypic and structural characteristics of these enzymes correlate to activities that are classified either as a narrow spectrum, an extended spectrum, or a carbapenemase spectrum. We focus on Class D β-lactamases that are carried on plasmids and, thus, present particular clinical concern. Following a historical perspective, the susceptibility and kinetics patterns of the important plasmid-encoded Class D β-lactamases and the mechanisms for mobilization of the chromosomal Class D β-lactamases are discussed. PMID:27025753

  5. Fermentation characterization and flux analysis of recombinant strains of Clostridium acetobutylicum with an inactivated solR gene.

    PubMed

    Harris, L M; Blank, L; Desai, R P; Welker, N E; Papoutsakis, E T

    2001-11-01

    The effect of solR inactivation on the metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum was examined using fermentation characterization and metabolic flux analysis. The solR-inactivated strain (SolRH) of this study had a higher rate of glucose utilization and produced higher solvent concentrations (by 25%, 14%, and 81%, respectively, for butanol, acetone, and ethanol) compared to the wild type. Strain SolRH(pTAAD), carrying a plasmid-encoded copy of the bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (aad) used in butanol production, produced even higher concentrations of solvents (by 21%, 45%, and 62%, respectively, for butanol, acetone, and ethanol) than strain SolRH. Clarithromycin used for strain SolRH maintenance during SolRH(pTAAD) fermentations did not alter product formation; however, tetracycline used for pTAAD maintenance resulted in 90% lower solvent production.

  6. Recombination of the bph (Biphenyl) Catabolic Genes from Plasmid pWW100 and Their Deletion during Growth on Benzoate

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd-Jones, Gareth; de Jong, Caroline; Ogden, Richard C.; Duetz, Wouter A.; Williams, Peter A.

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain CB406 was isolated from polychlorinated biphenyl-contaminated soil and harbors a nontransmissible plasmid, pWW100, of approximately 200 kb which carries the genes required for biphenyl and 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. The catabolic phenotype was mobilized following the construction in vivo of a cointegrate plasmid containing functional upper and lower biphenyl operons inserted into the broad-host-range R plasmid RP4. The Bph+ phenotype carried by pWW100 was stable in nonselective media but was unstable during growth on benzoate, where the sequential selection of two species of bph deletion derivatives occurs at high frequency. This mirrors observations made with TOL plasmids (encoding toluene and xylene catabolism) grown under similar conditions. Subcloning of dioxygenase genes involved in biphenyl catabolism confirmed the localization of the bph genes on the wild-type plasmid and the RP4 cointegrate plasmid. Images PMID:16349195

  7. Strong enhancement of recombinant cytosine deaminase activity in Bifidobacterium longum for tumor-targeting enzyme/prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Yoshinori; Fujimori, Minoru; Sasaki, Takayuki; Matsuhashi, Hitomi; Matsui-Seki, Keiichi; Shimatani-Shibata, Yuko; Kano, Yasunobu; Amano, Jun; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro

    2007-04-01

    In our previous studies, a strain of the nonpathogenic, anaerobic, intestinal bacterium, Bifidobacterium longum (B. longum), was found to be localized selectively and to proliferate within solid tumors after systemic administration. In addition, B. longum transformed with the shuttle-plasmid encoding the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene expressed active CD, which deaminated the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). We also reported antitumor efficacy with the same plasmid in several animal experiments. In this study, we constructed a novel shuttle-plasmid, pAV001-HU-eCD-M968, which included the mutant CD gene with a mutation at the active site to increase the enzymatic activity. In addition, the plasmid-transformed B. longum produces mutant CD and strongly increased (by 10-fold) its 5-FC to 5-FU enzymatic activity. The use of B. longum harboring the new shuttle-plasmid increases the effectiveness of our enzyme/prodrug strategy.

  8. Intranasal immunisation against tetanus with an attenuated Bordetella bronchiseptica vector expressing FrgC: improved immunogenicity using a Bvg-regulated promoter to express FrgC.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Andrew; Roberts, Mark

    2004-10-22

    Mice were immunised intranasally with live Bordetella bronchiseptica aroA strains possessing plasmids encoding fragment C (FrgC) of tetanus toxin. FrgC was expressed either from a constitutive tac promoter (strain GVB120) or the Bvg-dependent fhaB promoter (strain GVB1543). Serum anti-FrgC antibody titres were detected in all mice immunised with GVB1543 and GVB120 but the average titres were higher and the responses to FrgC were more consistent in GVB1543 immunised animals. This was reflected in the protective immunity conferred by the different strains: 100% of GVB1543 immunised mice were protected against tetanus toxin challenge whereas only 60% of animals immunised with GVB120 survived tetanus challenge. Viability of the B. bronchiseptica vector strain was shown to be critical to its efficacy as a vector for FrgC.

  9. Efficacy of particle-based DNA delivery for vaccination of sheep against FMDV.

    PubMed

    Niborski, V; Li, Y; Brennan, F; Lane, M; Torché, A M; Remond, M; Bonneau, M; Riffault, S; Stirling, C; Hutchings, G; Takamatsu, H; Barnett, P; Charley, B; Schwartz-Cornil, I

    2006-11-30

    As an alternative strategy to classical inactivated viral vaccine against FMDV, naked DNA vaccine is attractive because of safety, flexibility and low cost. However DNA vaccination is usually poorly efficient in target species. Indeed we found that naked DNA plasmids encoding for P1-2A3C3D and GM-CSF proteins did not induce any detectable immunity against FMDV in sheep. Interestingly, we demonstrate herein that formulations of DNA on poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) or in lipofectin triggered divergent types of immune responses: PLG stimulated a T cell response and could elicit significant neutralising antibody titers, whereas lipofectin generated even higher antibody titers but no significant T cell response. The DNA/PLG regimen used in five sheep protected against clinical symptoms and viraemia and prevented the carrier state in four of them. Thus formulated DNA can be remarkably efficient against FMDV in a ruminant species that is usually refractory to DNA vaccination.

  10. Production and Characterization of Vectors Based on the Cardiotropic AAV Serotype 9.

    PubMed

    Kohlbrenner, Erik; Weber, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) efficiently transduce cardiomyocytes in both rodents and large animal models upon either systemic or regional vector delivery. In this chapter, we describe the most widely used production and purification method of AAV9. This production approach does not depend on the use of a helpervirus but instead on transient transfection of HEK293T cells with a plasmid containing the recombinant AAV genome and a second plasmid encoding the AAV9 capsid proteins, the AAV Rep proteins and the adenoviral helper functions. The recombinant AAV is then purified by iodixanol density gradient centrifugation. This chapter also describes in detail the characterization and quality control methods required for assuring high quality vector preparations, which is of particular importance for experiments in large animal models.

  11. Induction of Duplication Reversion in Human Fibroblasts, by Wild-Type and Mutated Sv40 T Antigen, Covaries with the Ability to Induce Host DNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Shammas, M. A.; Xia, S. J.; Reis, RJS.

    1997-01-01

    Intrachromosomal homologous recombination, manifest as reversion of a 14-kbp duplication in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene, is elevated in human cells either stably transformed or transiently transfected by the SV40 (simian virus 40) large T antigen gene. Following introduction of wild-type SV40, or any of several T-antigen point mutations in a constant SV40 background, we observed a strong correlation between the stimulation of chromosomal recombination and induction of host-cell DNA synthesis. Moreover, inhibitors of DNA replication (aphidicolin and hydroxyurea) suppress SV40-induced homologous recombination to the extent that they suppress DNA synthesis. Stable integration of plasmids encoding T antigen also augments homologous recombination, which is suppressed by aphidicolin. We infer that the mechanism by which T antigen stimulates homologous recombination in human fibroblasts involves DNA replicative synthesis. PMID:9258684

  12. Immunization with plasmid DNA encoding the hemagglutinin and the nucleoprotein confers robust protection against a lethal canine distemper virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Lotte; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Gottschalck, Elisabeth; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Nielsen, Line; Andersen, Mads Klindt; Buckland, Robin; Wild, T Fabian; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2004-09-09

    We have investigated the protective effect of immunization of a highly susceptible natural host of canine distemper virus (CDV) with DNA plasmids encoding the viral nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H). The combined intradermal and intramuscular routes of immunization elicited high virus-neutralizing serum antibody titres in mink (Mustela vison). To mimic natural exposure, we also conducted challenge infection by horizontal transmission from infected contact animals. Other groups received a lethal challenge infection by administration to the mucosae of the respiratory tract and into the muscle. One of the mink vaccinated with N plasmid alone developed severe disease after challenge. In contrast, vaccination with the H plasmid together with the N plasmid conferred solid protection against disease and we were unable to detect CDV infection in PBMCs or in different tissues after challenge. Our findings show that DNA immunization by the combined intradermal and intramuscular routes can confer solid protective immunity against naturally transmitted morbillivirus infection and disease.

  13. A septal chromosome segregator protein evolved into a conjugative DNA-translocator protein

    PubMed Central

    Sepulveda, Edgardo; Vogelmann, Jutta

    2011-01-01

    Streptomycetes, Gram-positive soil bacteria well known for the production of antibiotics feature a unique conjugative DNA transfer system. In contrast to classical conjugation which is characterized by the secretion of a pilot protein covalently linked to a single-stranded DNA molecule, in Streptomyces a double-stranded DNA molecule is translocated during conjugative transfer. This transfer involves a single plasmid encoded protein, TraB. A detailed biochemical and biophysical characterization of TraB, revealed a close relationship to FtsK, mediating chromosome segregation during bacterial cell division. TraB translocates plasmid DNA by recognizing 8-bp direct repeats located in a specific plasmid region clt. Similar sequences accidentally also occur on chromosomes and have been shown to be bound by TraB. We suggest that TraB mobilizes chromosomal genes by the interaction with these chromosomal clt-like sequences not relying on the integration of the conjugative plasmid into the chromosome. PMID:22479692

  14. Immunization against Small Ruminant Lentiviruses

    PubMed Central

    Reina, Ramsés; de Andrés, Damián; Amorena, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Multisystemic disease caused by Small Ruminant Lentiviruses (SRLV) in sheep and goats leads to production losses, to the detriment of animal health and welfare. This, together with the lack of treatments, has triggered interest in exploring different strategies of immunization to control the widely spread SRLV infection and, also, to provide a useful model for HIV vaccines. These strategies involve inactivated whole virus, subunit vaccines, DNA encoding viral proteins in the presence or absence of plasmids encoding immunological adjuvants and naturally or artificially attenuated viruses. In this review, we revisit, comprehensively, the immunization strategies against SRLV and analyze this double edged tool individually, as it may contribute to either controlling or enhancing virus replication and/or disease. PMID:23917352

  15. Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Genetic Organization of the 210-Kilobase Linear Plasmid of Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2

    PubMed Central

    Stecker, Christiane; Johann, Andre; Herzberg, Christina; Averhoff, Beate; Gottschalk, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the linear plasmid pBD2 from Rhodococcus erythropolis BD2 comprises 210,205 bp. Sequence analyses of pBD2 revealed 212 putative open reading frames (ORFs), 97 of which had an annotatable function. These ORFs could be assigned to six functional groups: plasmid replication and maintenance, transport and metalloresistance, catabolism, transposition, regulation, and protein modification. Many of the transposon-related sequences were found to flank the isopropylbenzene pathway genes. This finding together with the significant sequence similarities of the ipb genes to genes of the linear plasmid-encoded biphenyl pathway in other rhodococci suggests that the ipb genes were acquired via transposition events and subsequently distributed among the rhodococci via horizontal transfer. PMID:12923100

  16. Physical comparison of parathion hydrolase plasmids from Pseudomonas diminuta and Flavobacterium sp.

    PubMed

    Mulbry, W W; Kearney, P C; Nelson, J O; Karns, J S

    1987-09-01

    Restriction maps of two plasmids encoding parathion hydrolase have been determined. pPDL2 is a 39-kb plasmid harbored by Flavobacterium sp. (ATCC 27551), while pCMS1 is a 70-kb plasmid found in Pseudomonas diminuta (strain MG). Both plasmids previously have been shown to share homologous parathion hydrolase genes (termed opd for organophosphate degradation) as judged by DNA-DNA hybridization and restriction mapping. In the present study, we conducted DNA hybridization experiments using each of nine PstI restriction fragments from pCMS1 as probes against Flavobacterium plasmid DNA. The opd genes of both plasmids are located within a highly conserved region of approximately 5.1 kb. This region of homology extends approximately 2.6 kb upstream and 1.7 kb downstream from the opd genes. No homology between the two plasmids is evident outside of this region.

  17. Association of Composite IS26-sul3 Elements with Highly Transmissible IncI1 Plasmids in Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Clones from Humans▿

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Cantón, Rafael; Garcillán-Barcia, M. Pilar; de la Cruz, Fernando; Baquero, Fernando; Coque, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The association of an IS440-sul3 platform with Tn21 class 1 integrons carried by IncI1 plasmids encoding extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs; mainly SHV-12 and CTX-M-14) among worldwide Escherichia coli clones of phylogroups A (ST10, ST23, and ST46), B1 (ST155, ST351, and ST359), and D/B2 (ST131) is reported. An in silico comparative analysis of sul3 elements available in the GenBank database shows the evolution of sul3 platforms by hosting different transposable elements facilitating the potential genesis of IS26 composite transposons and further insertion element-mediated promoted arrangements. PMID:21343460

  18. Unique activity spectrum of colicin FY: all 110 characterized Yersinia enterocolitica isolates were colicin FY susceptible.

    PubMed

    Bosák, Juraj; Micenková, Lenka; Vrba, Martin; Ševčíková, Alena; Dědičová, Daniela; Garzetti, Debora; Šmajs, David

    2013-01-01

    Colicin FY is a plasmid encoded toxin that recognizes a yersinia-specific outer membrane protein (YiuR) as a receptor molecule. We have previously shown that the activity spectrum of colicin FY comprises strains of the genus Yersinia. In this study, we analyzed the activity of colicin FY against 110 Yersinia enterocolitica isolates differing in geographical origin and source. All isolates were characterized through analysis of 16S rRNA genes, serotyping, biotyping, restriction profiling of genomic DNA, detection of virulence markers and susceptibility to antibiotics. This confirmed the broad variability of the collection, in which all 110 Y. enterocolitica isolates, representing 77 various strains, were inhibited by colicin FY. Although isolates showed variable levels of susceptibility to colicin FY, it was not associated with any strain characteristic. The universal susceptibility of Y. enterocolitica strains to colicin FY together with the absence of activity towards strains outside the Yersinia genus suggests potential therapeutic applications for colicin FY.

  19. Construction and expression of a recombinant DNA gene encoding a polyomavirus middle-size tumor antigen with the carboxyl terminus of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G

    SciTech Connect

    Templeton, D.; Voronova, A.; Eckhart, W.

    1984-02-01

    The authors constructed a molecular clone encoding the N-terminal 379 amino acids of the polyomavirus middle-size tumor antigen, followed by the C-terminal 60 amino acids of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein G. This hybrid gene contained the coding region for the C-terminal hydrophobic membrane-spanning domain of the G protein in place of the C-terminal hydrophobic domain of the middle-size tumor antigen. The hybrid gene was expressed in COS-1 cells under the control of the simian virus 40 late promoter. The hybrid protein was located in cell membranes and was associated with a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity, as was the middle-size tumor antigen. Plasmids encoding the hybrid protein failed to transform mouse NIH 3T3 or rat F2408 cells.

  20. Design of novel 3D gene activated PEG scaffolds with ordered pore structure.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Silvia; Guarnieri, Daniela; Netti, Paolo A

    2010-03-01

    The ability to genetically modify cells seeded inside synthetic hydrogel scaffolds offers a suitable approach to induce and control tissue repair and regeneration guiding cell fate. In fact the transfected cells can act as local in vivo bioreactor, secreting plasmid encoded proteins that augment tissue regeneration processes. We have realized a DNA bioactivated high porous poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) matrix by polyethyleneimine (PEI)/DNA complexes adsorption. As the design of the microarchitectural features of a scaffold also contributes to promote and influence cell fate, we appropriately designed the inner structure of gene activated PEG hydrogels by gelatine microparticles templating. Microarchitectural properties of the scaffold were analysed by scanning electron microscopy. 3D cell migration and transfection were monitored through time-lapse videomicroscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  1. Xenopus LAP2β protein knockdown affects location of lamin B and nucleoporins and has effect on assembly of cell nucleus and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Dubińska-Magiera, Magda; Chmielewska, Magdalena; Kozioł, Katarzyna; Machowska, Magdalena; Hutchison, Christopher J; Goldberg, Martin W; Rzepecki, Ryszard

    2016-05-01

    Xenopus LAP2β protein is the single isoform expressed in XTC cells. The protein localizes on heterochromatin clusters both at the nuclear envelope and inside a cell nucleus. The majority of XLAP2β fraction neither colocalizes with TPX2 protein during interphase nor can be immunoprecipitated with XLAP2β antibody. Knockdown of the XLAP2β protein expression in XTC cells by synthetic siRNA and plasmid encoded siRNA resulted in nuclear abnormalities including changes in shape of nuclei, abnormal chromatin structure, loss of nuclear envelope, mislocalization of integral membrane proteins of INM such as lamin B2, mislocalization of nucleoporins, and cell death. Based on timing of cell death, we suggest mechanism associated with nucleus reassembly or with entry into mitosis. This confirms that Xenopus LAP2 protein is essential for the maintenance of cell nucleus integrity and the process of its reassembly after mitosis.

  2. Design of environment-responsive biomolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aizawa, Masuo; Niimi, T.; Haruyama, T.; Kobatake, E.

    1996-02-01

    Two different types of biomolecular network systems have been designed to respond to the environmental conditions. One is the calmodulin and enzyme (phosphodiesterase, PDE) that activates phosphodiesterase through the conformational change in responding calcium ion. Calmodulin was genetically engineered to be fused with glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Calmodulin/GST fused protein was self-assembled on the gold surface through glutathione. The calmodulin/GST protein layer exhibited an ability to modulate the PDE activity in a solution phase depending on the calcium ion concentration. The other is the engineered gene structure that produces firefly luciferase in responding environmental pollutants. A TOL plasmid, encoding a binding protein xyl R for xyline and a marker enzyme firefly luciferase, has been implemented in a bacterial cell. The whole cell responded to environmentally hazardous substances such as xylene in emitting light.

  3. Comparative biochemical and genetic analysis of naphthalene degradation among Pseudomonas stutzeri strains

    SciTech Connect

    Rossello-Mora, R.A.; Lalucat, J.; Garcia-Valdes, E. )

    1994-03-01

    Of a 49-strain collection of Pseudomonas stutzeri species, 11 isolates were able to degrade naphthalene and 1 isolate was able to use m- and p-toluate as sole carbon and energy sources. Of these 12 strains, 10 shared a highly homologous set of naphthalene catabolic genes, even though they belong to four different genomovars. These genes differed from the present in plasmid NAH7. In only one of these degraders could a plasmid-encoded pathway be demonstrated, and a chromosome-encoded pathway is proposed for the remaining strains. meta cleavage of catechol was only observed in those strains able to metabolize alkyl derivatives of catechol. 59 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Attenuation of vaccinia Tian Tan strain by removal of viral TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes.

    PubMed

    Kan, Shifu; Wang, Yuhang; Sun, Lili; Jia, Peng; Qi, Yanxin; Su, Jiaqiang; Liu, Lei; Yang, Guohua; Liu, Liming; Wang, Zhuoyue; Wang, Jinhui; Liu, Guangchen; Jin, Ningyi; Li, Xiao; Ding, Zhuang

    2012-01-01

    Vaccinia Tian Tan (VTT) was attenuated by deletion of the TC7L-TK2L and TA35R genes to generate MVTT3. The mutant was generated by replacing the open reading frames by a gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) flanked by loxP sites. Viruses expressing EGFP were then screened for and purified by serial plaque formation. In a second step the marker EGFP gene was removed by transfecting cells with a plasmid encoding cre recombinase and selecting for viruses that had lost the EGFP phenotype. The MVTT3 mutant was shown to be avirulent and immunogenic. These results support the conclusion that TC7L-TK2L and TA35R deletion mutants can be used as safe viral vectors or as platform for vaccines.

  5. Roles of the 2 microns gene products in stable maintenance of the 2 microns plasmid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, A E; Murray, A W; Szostak, J W

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the replication and segregation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 2 microns circle. The amplification of the plasmid at low copy numbers requires site-specific recombination between the 2 microns inverted repeat sequences catalyzed by the plasmid-encoded FLP gene. No other 2 microns gene products are required. The overexpression of FLP in a strain carrying endogenous 2 microns leads to uncontrolled plasmid replication, longer cell cycles, and cell death. Two different assays show that the level of Flp activity decreases with increasing 2 microns copy number. This regulation requires the products of the REP1 and REP2 genes. These gene products also act together to ensure that 2 microns molecules are randomly segregated between mother and daughter cells at cell division. Images PMID:3316982

  6. GFP plasmid-induced defects in Salmonella invasion depend on plasmid architecture, not protein expression.

    PubMed

    Clark, Leann; Martinez-Argudo, Isabel; Humphrey, Tom J; Jepson, Mark A

    2009-02-01

    We have investigated the impact of plasmids and GFP expression on invasion of cultured epithelial cells by Salmonella enterica Typhimurium strain SL1344. The invasiveness of SL1344 carrying plasmids derived from pBR322, encoding promoterless GFP or constitutively expressed rpsM-GFP, was compared under optimal growth conditions with that of SL1344(pBR322), unmodified SL1344 and a strain with chromosome-integrated rpsM-GFP. The strain carrying pBR322 exhibited normal invasion, but the presence of modified plasmids impaired invasiveness, and impairment was exacerbated by plasmid-encoded chloramphenicol resistance (CmR). Using a different antibiotic resistance marker, kanamycin (KmR), did not impair invasiveness. Despite the effect of plasmid-encoded CmR, the strain containing chromosomally encoded GFP, also carrying a CmR gene, was as invasive as the wild-type. To investigate the mechanism by which plasmid carriage decreases invasion, we monitored SPI-1 gene expression using prgH promoter activity as an index of SPI-1 activity. An SL1344 strain with a chromosome-integrated prgH::gfp reporter construct exhibited lower GFP expression during exponential phase when carrying plasmids incorporating CmR or gfp, mirroring invasion data. These data provide evidence that suppression of SPI-1 gene expression is a major factor in the loss of invasiveness associated with plasmid carriage. Our findings also indicate that some plasmids, especially those carrying CmR, should be used with caution, as virulence traits and gene expression may be affected by their presence. Integration of reporter proteins into the bacterial chromosome, however, appears to circumvent the adverse effects observed with plasmids.

  7. Structure of the virulence-associated protein VapD from the intracellular pathogen Rhodococcus equi

    SciTech Connect

    Whittingham, Jean L.; Blagova, Elena V.; Finn, Ciaran E.; Luo, Haixia; Miranda-CasoLuengo, Raúl; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Leech, Andrew P.; Walton, Paul H.; Murzin, Alexey G.; Meijer, Wim G.; Wilkinson, Anthony J.

    2014-08-01

    VapD is one of a set of highly homologous virulence-associated proteins from the multi-host pathogen Rhodococcus equi. The crystal structure reveals an eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel fold and a glycine rich ‘bald’ surface. Rhodococcus equi is a multi-host pathogen that infects a range of animals as well as immune-compromised humans. Equine and porcine isolates harbour a virulence plasmid encoding a homologous family of virulence-associated proteins associated with the capacity of R. equi to divert the normal processes of endosomal maturation, enabling bacterial survival and proliferation in alveolar macrophages. To provide a basis for probing the function of the Vap proteins in virulence, the crystal structure of VapD was determined. VapD is a monomer as determined by multi-angle laser light scattering. The structure reveals an elliptical, compact eight-stranded β-barrel with a novel strand topology and pseudo-twofold symmetry, suggesting evolution from an ancestral dimer. Surface-associated octyl-β-d-glucoside molecules may provide clues to function. Circular-dichroism spectroscopic analysis suggests that the β-barrel structure is preceded by a natively disordered region at the N-terminus. Sequence comparisons indicate that the core folds of the other plasmid-encoded virulence-associated proteins from R. equi strains are similar to that of VapD. It is further shown that sequences encoding putative R. equi Vap-like proteins occur in diverse bacterial species. Finally, the functional implications of the structure are discussed in the light of the unique structural features of VapD and its partial structural similarity to other β-barrel proteins.

  8. Obtaining anti-type 1 melatonin receptor antibodies by immunization with melatonin receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Nelia; Wijkhuisen, Anne; Savatier, Alexandra; Moulharat, Natacha; Ferry, Gilles; Léonetti, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies (Abs) specific to cell-surface receptors are attractive tools for studying the physiological role of such receptors or for controlling their activity. We sought to obtain such antibodies against the type 1 receptor for melatonin (MT1). For this, we injected mice with CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human MT1 (CHO-MT1-h), in the presence or absence of an adjuvant mixture containing Alum and CpG1018. As we previously observed that the immune response to a protein antigen is increased when it is coupled to a fusion protein, called ZZTat101, we also investigated if the association of ZZTat101 with CHO-MT1-h cells provides an immunogenic advantage. We measured similar levels of anti-CHO and anti-MT1-h Ab responses in animals injected with either CHO-MT1-h cells or ZZTat101/CHO-MT1-h cells, with or without adjuvant, indicating that neither the adjuvant mixture nor ZZTat101 increased the anti-cell immune response. Then, we investigated whether the antisera also recognized murine MT1 (MT1-m). Using cloned CHO cells transfected with a plasmid encoding MT1-m, we found that antisera raised against CHO-MT1-h cells also bound the mouse receptor. Altogether our studies indicate that immunizing approaches based on MT1-h-expressing CHO cells allow the production of polyclonal antibodies against MT1 receptors of different origins. This paves the way to preparation of MT1-specific monoclonal antibodies.

  9. Expression and secretion of the S-1 subunit and C180 peptide of pertussis toxin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, J T; Moloney, B K; Mende-Mueller, L M

    1989-01-01

    The structural gene of the S-1 subunit of pertussis toxin (rS-1) and the catalytic C180 peptide of the S-1 subunit (C180 peptide) were independently subcloned downstream of the tac promoter in Escherichia coli. Both constructions included DNA encoding for the predicted leader sequence of the S-1 subunit which was inserted between the tac promoter and the structural gene. E. coli containing the plasmids encoding for rS-1 and C180 peptide produced a peptide that reacted with anti-pertussis toxin antibody and had a molecular weight corresponding to that of the cloned gene; some degradation of rS-1 was observed. Extracts of E. coli containing plasmids encoding for rS-1 and the C180 peptide possessed ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Subcellular fractionation showed that both rS-1 and the C180 peptide were present in the periplasm, indicating that E. coli recognized the pertussis toxin peptide leader sequence. The protein sequence of the amino terminus of the C180 peptide was identical to that of authentic S-1 subunit produced by Bordetella pertussis, which showed that E. coli leader peptidase correctly processed the pertussis toxin peptide leader sequence. Two single amino acid substitutions at residue 26 (C180I-26) and residue 139 (C180S-139) which were previously shown to reduce ADP-ribosyltransferase activity were introduced into the C180 peptide. C180I-26 possessed approximately 1% of the NAD-glycohydrolase activity of the C180 peptide, suggesting that tryptophan 26 functions in the interaction of NAD with the C180 peptide. In contrast, C180S-139 possessed essentially the same level of NAD-glycohydrolase activity as the C180 peptide, suggesting that glutamic acid 139 does not function in the interaction of NAD but plays a role in a later step in the ADP-ribosyltransferase reaction. Images PMID:2546919

  10. Comparative genomics of an IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid from Escherichia coli and Klebsiella isolates from intensive care unit patients and the utility of whole-genome sequencing in health care settings.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Boutin, Mallory A; Stancil, Angela; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-08-01

    The IncA/C plasmids have been implicated for their role in the dissemination of β-lactamases, including gene variants that confer resistance to expanded-spectrum cephalosporins, which are often the treatment of last resort against multidrug-resistant, hospital-associated pathogens. A bla(FOX-5) gene was detected in 14 Escherichia coli and 16 Klebsiella isolates that were cultured from perianal swabs of patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) of the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) in Baltimore, MD, over a span of 3 years. Four of the FOX-encoding isolates were obtained from subsequent samples of patients that were initially negative for an AmpC β-lactamase upon admission to the ICU, suggesting that the AmpC β-lactamase-encoding plasmid was acquired while the patient was in the ICU. The genomes of five E. coli isolates and six Klebsiella isolates containing bla(FOX-5) were selected for sequencing based on their plasmid profiles. An ∼ 167-kb IncA/C plasmid encoding the FOX-5 β-lactamase, a CARB-2 β-lactamase, additional antimicrobial resistance genes, and heavy metal resistance genes was identified. Another FOX-5-encoding IncA/C plasmid that was nearly identical except for a variable region associated with the resistance genes was also identified. To our knowledge, these plasmids represent the first FOX-5-encoding plasmids sequenced. We used comparative genomics to describe the genetic diversity of a plasmid encoding a FOX-5 β-lactamase relative to the whole-genome diversity of 11 E. coli and Klebsiella isolates that carry this plasmid. Our findings demonstrate the utility of whole-genome sequencing for tracking of plasmid and antibiotic resistance gene distribution in health care settings.

  11. Protective Effects of Membrane-Anchored and Secreted DNA Vaccines Encoding Fatty Acid-Binding Protein and Glutathione S-Transferase against Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yaqin; Hu, Yang; Fan, Guorun; Chen, Zhihao; Liu, Lin; Man, Dandan; Liu, Shuojie; Tang, Chengwu; Zhang, Yin; Dai, Wuxing

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore the high performance bivalent DNA-based vaccine against schistosomes, SjFABP and Sj26GST were selected and used to construct a vaccine. Two strategies were used to construct the bivalent DNA vaccine. In the first strategy, a plasmid encoding antigen in the secreted form was used, while in the other, a plasmid encoding a truncated form of SjFABP and Sj26GST targeted to the cell surface was used. Various parameters, including antibody and cytokine response, proliferation, histopathological examination, and characterization of T cell subsets were used to evaluate the type of immune response and the level of protection against challenge infection. Injection with secreted pIRES-sjFABP-sj26GST significantly increased the levels of antibody, splenocyte proliferation, and production of IFN-γ, compared with membrane-anchored groups. Analysis of splenic T cell subsets showed that the secreted vaccine significantly increased the percentage of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cells. Liver immunopathology (size of liver granulomas) was significantly reduced in the secreted group compared with the membrane-anchored groups. Moreover, challenge experiments showed that the worm and egg burdens were significantly reduced in animals immunized with recombinant vaccines. Most importantly, secreted Sj26GST-SjFABP markedly enhanced protection, by reducing worm and egg burdens by 31.8% and 24.78%, respectively, while the membrane-anchored group decreased worm and egg burdens by 24.80% and 18.80%, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that the secretory vaccine is more promising than the membrane-anchored vaccine, and provides support for the development and application of this vaccine. PMID:24466157

  12. Virulence Plasmids of Spore-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Adams, Vicki; Li, Jihong; Wisniewski, Jessica A; Uzal, Francisco A; Moore, Robert J; McClane, Bruce A; Rood, Julian I

    2014-12-01

    Plasmid-encoded virulence factors are important in the pathogenesis of diseases caused by spore-forming bacteria. Unlike many other bacteria, the most common virulence factors encoded by plasmids in Clostridium and Bacillus species are protein toxins. Clostridium perfringens causes several histotoxic and enterotoxin diseases in both humans and animals and produces a broad range of toxins, including many pore-forming toxins such as C. perfringens enterotoxin, epsilon-toxin, beta-toxin, and NetB. Genetic studies have led to the determination of the role of these toxins in disease pathogenesis. The genes for these toxins are generally carried on large conjugative plasmids that have common core replication, maintenance, and conjugation regions. There is considerable functional information available about the unique tcp conjugation locus carried by these plasmids, but less is known about plasmid maintenance. The latter is intriguing because many C. perfringens isolates stably maintain up to four different, but closely related, toxin plasmids. Toxin genes may also be plasmid-encoded in the neurotoxic clostridia. The tetanus toxin gene is located on a plasmid in Clostridium tetani, but the botulinum toxin genes may be chromosomal, plasmid-determined, or located on bacteriophages in Clostridium botulinum. In Bacillus anthracis it is well established that virulence is plasmid determined, with anthrax toxin genes located on pXO1 and capsule genes on a separate plasmid, pXO2. Orthologs of these plasmids are also found in other members of the Bacillus cereus group such as B. cereus and Bacillus thuringiensis. In B. thuringiensis these plasmids may carry genes encoding one or more insecticidal toxins.

  13. Isolation and screening of plasmids from the epilithon which mobilize recombinant plasmid pD10

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.E.; Weightman, A.J.; Fry, J.C. )

    1992-04-01

    This study examined the potential of bacteria from river epilithon to mobilize a recombinant catabolic plasmid, pD10, encoding 3-chlorobenzoate degradation and kanamycin resistance. Fifty-four mobilizing plasmids were exogenously isolated by triparental matings between strains of Pseudomonas putida and epilithic bacteria from the River Taff (South Wales, United Kingdom). Frequencies for mobilization ranged from 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} to 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} per recipient at 20C. The sizes of the mobilizing plasmids isolated ranged from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance from 40 kb to over 200 kb, and 19 of 54 were found to encode mercury resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance to tetracycline and streptomycin was also found but not resistance to UV light or various heavy metals. Eight plasmids of epilithic bacteria, analyzed by comparing restriction fragmentation patterns, showed significant differences between those isolated from different independent matings. Optimal temperatures for mobilization of pD10 were between 15 and 25C. Four mercury resistance plasmids were found to be broad host range, transferring mercury resistance and mobilizing pD10 readily to representative species of {beta}- and {gamma}-purple bacteria. In general, frequencies of pD10 mobilization by plasmids of epilithic bacteria were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than conjugal transfer frequencies. Thus, there is a high potential for exchange of recombinant genes introduced into the epilithon by mobilization between a variety of bacterial species.

  14. Translocation of apolipoprotein B across the endoplasmic reticulum is blocked in a nonhepatic cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Thrift, R N; Drisko, J; Dueland, S; Trawick, J D; Davis, R A

    1992-01-01

    To explore the process of lipoprotein assembly, plasmids encoding truncated forms of apolipoprotein B (apoB) were transfected into Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts. (One, encoding apoB53, the N-terminal 53% of apoB100, can direct the assembly and secretion of lipoproteins when expressed in hepatoma cells, while the other, encoding the shorter apoB15, does not direct lipoprotein assembly.) Expression of apoB15 in CHO cells resulted in the accumulation of apoB15 protein in both medium and cells. In contrast, apoB was not detectable in medium or within CHO cells transfected with the plasmid encoding apoB53, despite the expression of apoB53 mRNA. ApoB53 did accumulate within transfected cells incubated with the thiol protease inhibitor N-acetylleucylleucylnorleucinal (ALLN), suggesting that it is synthesized but completely degraded in the absence of the inhibitor. ApoB53 was not secreted despite its presence within ALLN-treated cells. Essentially all the apoB53 that accumulated in microsomes from ALLN-treated cells was associated with the membrane and was susceptible to degradation by exogenous trypsin, indicating exposure on the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. Thus, translocation of apoB53 across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is blocked. However, the apoB53 bound to concanavalin A, suggesting that it is glycosylated and therefore partly exposed to the lumen as well. ApoB requires a unique process, not expressed in CHO fibroblasts, for its complete translocation and entrance into the secretory pathway. This process might account for the inability of abetalipoproteinemic patients to secrete apoB. Images PMID:1409618

  15. Burkholderia cenocepacia differential gene expression during host-pathogen interactions and adaptation to the host environment.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Eoin P; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) are important in medical, biotechnological, and agricultural disciplines. These bacteria naturally occur in soil and water environments and have adapted to survive in association with plants and animals including humans. All Bcc species are opportunistic pathogens including Burkholderia cenocepacia that causes infections in cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease patients. The adaptation of B. cenocepacia to the host environment was assessed in a rat chronic respiratory infection model and compared to that of high cell-density in vitro grown cultures using transcriptomics. The distribution of genes differentially expressed on chromosomes 1, 2, and 3 was relatively proportional to the size of each genomic element, whereas the proportion of plasmid-encoded genes differentially expressed was much higher relative to its size and most genes were induced in vivo. The majority of genes encoding known virulence factors, components of types II and III secretion systems and chromosome 2-encoded type IV secretion system were similarly expressed between in vitro and in vivo environments. Lower expression in vivo was detected for genes encoding N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase CepI, orphan LuxR homolog CepR2, zinc metalloproteases ZmpA and ZmpB, LysR-type transcriptional regulator ShvR, nematocidal protein AidA, and genes associated with flagellar motility, Flp type pilus formation, and type VI secretion. Plasmid-encoded type IV secretion genes were markedly induced in vivo. Additional genes induced in vivo included genes predicted to be involved in osmotic stress adaptation or intracellular survival, metal ion, and nutrient transport, as well as those encoding outer membrane proteins. Genes identified in this study are potentially important for virulence during host-pathogen interactions and may be associated with survival and adaptation to the host environment during chronic lung infections.

  16. Genome Sequences and Phylogenetic Analysis of K88- and F18-Positive Porcine Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Sara M.; Danzeisen, Jessica L.; Isaacson, Richard E.; Seemann, Torsten; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) continues to result in major morbidity and mortality in the swine industry via postweaning diarrhea. The key virulence factors of ETEC strains, their serotypes, and their fimbrial components have been well studied. However, most studies to date have focused on plasmid-encoded traits related to colonization and toxin production, and the chromosomal backgrounds of these strains have been largely understudied. Here, we generated the genomic sequences of K88-positive and F18-positive porcine ETEC strains and examined the phylogenetic distribution of clinical porcine ETEC strains and their plasmid-associated genetic content. The genomes of porcine ETEC strains UMNK88 and UMNF18 were both found to contain remarkable plasmid complements containing known virulence factors, potential novel virulence factors, and antimicrobial resistance-associated elements. The chromosomes of these strains also possessed several unique genomic islands containing hypothetical genes with similarity to classical virulence factors, although phage-associated genomic islands dominated the accessory genomes of these strains. Phylogenetic analysis of 78 clinical isolates associated with neonatal and porcine diarrhea revealed that a limited subset of porcine ETEC lineages exist that generally contain common toxin and fimbrial profiles, with many of the isolates belonging to the ST10, ST23, and ST169 multilocus sequencing types. These lineages were generally distinct from existing human ETEC database isolates. Overall, most porcine ETEC strains appear to have emerged from a limited subset of E. coli lineages that either have an increased propensity to carry plasmid-encoded virulence factors or have the appropriate ETEC core genome required for virulence. PMID:22081385

  17. Toxin Plasmids of Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jihong; Adams, Vicki; Bannam, Trudi L.; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Garcia, Jorge P.; Uzal, Francisco A.; Rood, Julian I.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In both humans and animals, Clostridium perfringens is an important cause of histotoxic infections and diseases originating in the intestines, such as enteritis and enterotoxemia. The virulence of this Gram-positive, anaerobic bacterium is heavily dependent upon its prolific toxin-producing ability. Many of the ∼16 toxins produced by C. perfringens are encoded by large plasmids that range in size from ∼45 kb to ∼140 kb. These plasmid-encoded toxins are often closely associated with mobile elements. A C. perfringens strain can carry up to three different toxin plasmids, with a single plasmid carrying up to three distinct toxin genes. Molecular Koch's postulate analyses have established the importance of several plasmid-encoded toxins when C. perfringens disease strains cause enteritis or enterotoxemias. Many toxin plasmids are closely related, suggesting a common evolutionary origin. In particular, most toxin plasmids and some antibiotic resistance plasmids of C. perfringens share an ∼35-kb region containing a Tn916-related conjugation locus named tcp (transfer of clostridial plasmids). This tcp locus can mediate highly efficient conjugative transfer of these toxin or resistance plasmids. For example, conjugative transfer of a toxin plasmid from an infecting strain to C. perfringens normal intestinal flora strains may help to amplify and prolong an infection. Therefore, the presence of toxin genes on conjugative plasmids, particularly in association with insertion sequences that may mobilize these toxin genes, likely provides C. perfringens with considerable virulence plasticity and adaptability when it causes diseases originating in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23699255

  18. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Shigella flexneri Serotype Yv in China

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shengli; Wang, Yiting; Wang, Yan; Jin, Dong; Yu, Bo; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Xu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is the major cause of bacterial shigellosis in developing countries. S. flexneri is divided into at least 19 serotypes, the majority of which are modifications of the same basic O-antigen by glucosylation and/or O-acetylation of its sugar residues by phage encoded serotype-converting genes. Recently, a plasmid encoded phosphoethanolamine (PEtN) modification of the O-antigen has been reported, which is responsible for the presence of the MASF IV-1 determinant and results in conversion of traditional serotypes X, 4a and Y to novel serotypes Xv, 4av and Yv, respectively. In this study, we characterized 19 serotype Yv strains isolated in China. A variant of the O-antigen phosphoethanolamine transferase gene opt (formerly called lpt-O) carried by a pSFxv_2-like plasmid was found in serotype Yv strains, which specifies the phosphorylation pattern on the O-antigen of this serotype. For the majority of the O-antigen units, the PEtN modification occurs on RhaIII, while for a minority, modifications occur on both RhaII and RhaIII. Serotype-specific gene detection and PFGE analysis suggested that these serotype Yv isolates were originated from serotypes Y, Xv and 2a by acquisition of an opt-carrying plasmid and/or inactivation of serotype-specific gene gtrII or gtrX. These data, combined with those of serotypes Xv and 4av reported earlier, demonstrate that the plasmid-encoded PEtN modification is an important serotype conversion mechanism in S. flexneri, in addition to glucosylation and O-acetylation. PMID:23936172

  19. Origin-of-transfer sequences facilitate mobilisation of non-conjugative antimicrobial-resistance plasmids in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Frances G.; Yui Eto, Karina; Murphy, Riley J. T.; Fairhurst, Heather M.; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Grubb, Warren B.; Ramsay, Joshua P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of hospital, community and livestock-associated infections and is increasingly resistant to multiple antimicrobials. A significant proportion of antimicrobial-resistance genes are plasmid-borne, but only a minority of S. aureus plasmids encode proteins required for conjugative transfer or Mob relaxase proteins required for mobilisation. The pWBG749 family of S. aureus conjugative plasmids can facilitate the horizontal transfer of diverse antimicrobial-resistance plasmids that lack Mob genes. Here we reveal that these mobilisable plasmids carry copies of the pWBG749 origin-of-transfer (oriT) sequence and that these oriT sequences facilitate mobilisation by pWBG749. Sequences resembling the pWBG749 oriT were identified on half of all sequenced S. aureus plasmids, including the most prevalent large antimicrobial-resistance/virulence-gene plasmids, pIB485, pMW2 and pUSA300HOUMR. oriT sequences formed five subfamilies with distinct inverted-repeat-2 (IR2) sequences. pWBG749-family plasmids encoding each IR2 were identified and pWBG749 mobilisation was found to be specific for plasmids carrying matching IR2 sequences. Specificity of mobilisation was conferred by a putative ribbon-helix-helix-protein gene smpO. Several plasmids carried 2–3 oriT variants and pWBG749-mediated recombination occurred between distinct oriT sites during mobilisation. These observations suggest this relaxase-in trans mechanism of mobilisation by pWBG749-family plasmids is a common mechanism of plasmid dissemination in S. aureus. PMID:26243776

  20. Clinical trial in healthy malaria-naïve adults to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immunogenicity and efficacy of MuStDO5, a five-gene, sporozoite/hepatic stage Plasmodium falciparum DNA vaccine combined with escalating dose human GM-CSF DNA

    PubMed Central

    Richie, Thomas L.; Charoenvit, Yupin; Wang, Ruobing; Epstein, Judith E.; Hedstrom, Richard C.; Kumar, Sanjai; Luke, Thomas C.; Freilich, Daniel A.; Aguiar, Joao C.; Sacci, Jr., John B.; Sedegah, Martha; Nosek, Jr., Ronald A.; De La Vega, Patricia; Berzins, Mara P.; Majam, Victoria F.; Abot, Esteban N.; Ganeshan, Harini; Richie, Nancy O.; Banania, Jo Glenna; Baraceros, Maria Fe B.; Geter, Tanya G.; Mere, Robin; Bebris, Lolita; Limbach, Keith; Hickey, Bradley W.; Lanar, David E.; Ng, Jennifer; Shi, Meng; Hobart, Peter M.; Norman, Jon A.; Soisson, Lorraine A.; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Rogers, William O.; Doolan, Denise L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    When introduced in the 1990s, immunization with DNA plasmids was considered potentially revolutionary for vaccine development, particularly for vaccines intended to induce protective CD8 T cell responses against multiple antigens. We conducted, in 1997−1998, the first clinical trial in healthy humans of a DNA vaccine, a single plasmid encoding Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), as an initial step toward developing a multi-antigen malaria vaccine targeting the liver stages of the parasite. As the next step, we conducted in 2000–2001 a clinical trial of a five-plasmid mixture called MuStDO5 encoding pre-erythrocytic antigens PfCSP, PfSSP2/TRAP, PfEXP1, PfLSA1 and PfLSA3. Thirty-two, malaria-naïve, adult volunteers were enrolled sequentially into four cohorts receiving a mixture of 500 μg of each plasmid plus escalating doses (0, 20, 100 or 500 μg) of a sixth plasmid encoding human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF). Three doses of each formulation were administered intramuscularly by needle-less jet injection at 0, 4 and 8 weeks, and each cohort had controlled human malaria infection administered by five mosquito bites 18 d later. The vaccine was safe and well-tolerated, inducing moderate antigen-specific, MHC-restricted T cell interferon-γ responses but no antibodies. Although no volunteers were protected, T cell responses were boosted post malaria challenge. This trial demonstrated the MuStDO5 DNA and hGM-CSF plasmids to be safe and modestly immunogenic for T cell responses. It also laid the foundation for priming with DNA plasmids and boosting with recombinant viruses, an approach known for nearly 15 y to enhance the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of DNA vaccines. PMID:23151451

  1. High dose of plasmid IL-15 inhibits immune responses in an influenza non-human primates immunogenicity model

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Jiangmei; Dai Anlan; Laddy, Dominick J.; Yan Jian; Arango, Tatiana; Khan, Amir S.; Lewis, Mark G.; Andersen, Hanne; Kutzler, Michele A.; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Weiner, David B.; Boyer, Jean D.

    2009-10-10

    Interleukin (IL)-15, is a cytokine that is important for the maintenance of long-lasting, high-avidity T cell response to invading pathogens and has, therefore, been used in vaccine and therapeutic platforms as an adjuvant. In addition to pure protein delivery, plasmids encoding the IL-15 gene have been utilized. However, it is critical to determine the appropriate dose to maximize the adjuvanting effects. We immunized rhesus macaques with different doses of IL-15 expressing plasmid in an influenza non-human primate immunogenicity model. We found that co-immunization of rhesus macaques with a Flu DNA-based vaccine and low doses of plasmid encoding macaque IL-15 enhanced the production of IFN-gamma (0.5 mg) and the proliferation of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells, as well as T{sub CM} levels in proliferating CD8{sup +} T cells (0.25 mg). Whereas, high doses of IL-15 (4 mg) decrease the production of IFN-gamma and the proliferation of CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells and T{sub CM} levels in the proliferating CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells. In addition, the data of hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titer suggest that although not significantly different, there appears to be a slight increase in antibodies at lower doses of IL-15. Importantly, however, the higher doses of IL-15 decrease the antibody levels significantly. This study demonstrates the importance of optimizing DNA-based cytokine adjuvants.

  2. Interleukin-12 plasmid DNA delivery using l-thyroxine-conjugated polyethylenimine nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehshahri, Ali; Sadeghpour, Hossein; Kazemi Oskuee, Reza; Fadaei, Mahin; Sabahi, Zahra; Alhashemi, Samira Hossaini; Mohazabieh, Erfaneh

    2014-05-01

    In this study, l-thyroxine was covalently grafted on 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine (PEI), and the ability of the nano-sized polyplexes for transferring plasmid encoding interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene was evaluated. As there are several problems in systemic administration of recombinant IL-12 protein, local expression of the plasmid encoding IL-12 gene inside the tumor tissue has been considered as an effective alternative approach. The l-thyroxine-conjugated PEI polyplexes were prepared using pUMVC3-hIL12 plasmid, and their transfection activity was determined in HepG2 human liver carcinoma and Neuro2A neuroblastoma cell lines. The polyplexes characterized in terms of DNA condensation ability, particle size, zeta potential, and buffering capacity as well as cytotoxicity and resistance to enzyme digestion. The results revealed that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI increased gene transfer ability by up to two fold relative to unmodified 25 kDa PEI, the gold standard for non-viral gene delivery, with the highest increase occurring at degrees of conjugation around 10 %. pDNA condensation tests and dynamic light scattering measurements exhibited the ability of PEI conjugates to optimally condense the plasmid DNA into polyplexes in the size range around 200 nm. The modified polymers showed remarkable buffering capacity and protection against enzymatic degradation comparable to that of unmodified PEI. These results suggest that l-thyroxine conjugation of PEI is a simple modification strategy for future investigations aimed at developing a targeting gene vehicle.

  3. Effects of Argonaute on Gene Expression in Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Swarts, Daan C.; Koehorst, Jasper J.; Westra, Edze R.; Schaap, Peter J.; van der Oost, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic Argonaute proteins mediate RNA-guided RNA interference, allowing both regulation of host gene expression and defense against invading mobile genetic elements. Recently, it has become evident that prokaryotic Argonaute homologs mediate DNA-guided DNA interference, and play a role in host defense. Argonaute of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus (TtAgo) targets invading plasmid DNA during and after transformation. Using small interfering DNA guides, TtAgo can cleave single and double stranded DNAs. Although TtAgo additionally has been demonstrated to cleave RNA targets complementary to its DNA guide in vitro, RNA targeting by TtAgo has not been demonstrated in vivo. Methods To investigate if TtAgo also has the potential to control RNA levels, we analyzed RNA-seq data derived from cultures of four T. thermophilus strain HB27 variants: wild type, TtAgo knockout (Δago), and either strain transformed with a plasmid. Additionally we determined the effect of TtAgo on expression of plasmid-encoded RNA and plasmid DNA levels. Results In the absence of exogenous DNA (plasmid), TtAgo presence or absence had no effect on gene expression levels. When plasmid DNA is present, TtAgo reduces plasmid DNA levels 4-fold, and a corresponding reduction of plasmid gene transcript levels was observed. We therefore conclude that TtAgo interferes with plasmid DNA, but not with plasmid-encoded RNA. Interestingly, TtAgo presence stimulates expression of specific endogenous genes, but only when exogenous plasmid DNA was present. Specifically, the presence of TtAgo directly or indirectly stimulates expression of CRISPR loci and associated genes, some of which are involved in CRISPR adaptation. This suggests that TtAgo-mediated interference with plasmid DNA stimulates CRISPR adaptation. PMID:25902012

  4. Microneedle-based vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Prausnitz, Mark R.; Mikszta, John A.; Cormier, Michel; Andrianov, Alexander K.

    2010-01-01

    The threat of pandemic influenza and other public health needs motivates development of better vaccine delivery systems. To address this need, microneedles have been developed as micron-scale needles fabricated using low-cost manufacturing methods that administer vaccine into the skin using a simple device that may be suitable for self-administration. Delivery using solid or hollow microneedles can be accomplished by (i) piercing the skin and then applying a vaccine formulation or patch onto the permeabilized skin, (ii) coating or encapsulating vaccine onto or within microneedles for rapid, or delayed, dissolution and release in the skin and (iii) injection into the skin using a modified syringe or pump. Extensive clinical experience with smallpox, TB and other vaccines has shown that vaccine delivery into the skin using conventional intradermal injection is generally safe and effective and often elicits the same immune responses at lower doses compared to intramuscular injection. Animal experiments using microneedles have shown similar benefits. Microneedles have been used to deliver whole, inactivated virus; trivalent split antigen vaccines; and DNA plasmid encoding the influenza hemagglutinin to rodents and found strong antibody responses. In addition, ChimeriVax™-JE against yellow fever was administered to non-human primates and generated protective levels of neutralizing antibodies more than seven times greater than subcutaneous delivery; DNA plasmid encoding hepatitis B surface antigen was administered to mice and generated antibody and T cell responses at least as strong as hypodermic injections; recombinant Protective Antigen of Baccilus anthracis was administered to rabbits and provided complete protection from lethal aerosol anthrax spore challenge at a lower dose than intramuscular injection; and DNA plasmid encoding four vaccinia virus genes administered to mice in combination with electroporation generated neutralizing antibodies that apparently

  5. Electrotransfer of plasmid DNA radiosensitizes B16F10 tumors through activation of immune response

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, Monika; Kamensek, Urska; Cemazar, Maja; Heller, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Tumor irradiation combined with adjuvant treatments, either vascular targeted or immunomodulatory, is under intense investigation. Gene electrotransfer of therapeutic genes is one of these approaches. The aim of this study was to determine, whether gene electrotransfer of plasmid encoding shRNA for silencing endoglin, with vascular targeted effectiveness, can radiosensitize melanoma B16F10 tumors. Materials and methods The murine melanoma B16F10 tumors, growing on the back of C57Bl/6 mice, were treated by triple gene electrotransfer and irradiation. The antitumor effect was evaluated by determination of tumor growth delay and proportion of tumor free mice. Furthermore, histological analysis of tumors (necrosis, apoptosis, proliferation, vascularization, presence of hypoxia and infiltration of immune cells,) was used to evaluate the therapeutic mechanisms. Results Gene electrotransfer of plasmid silencing endoglin predominantly indicated vascular targeted effects of the therapy, since significant tumor growth delay and 44% of tumor free mice were obtained. In addition, irradiation had minor effects on radioresistant melanoma, with 11% of mice tumor free. The combined treatment resulted in excellent effectiveness with 88% of mice tumor free, with more than half resistant to secondary tumor challenge, which was observed also with the plasmid devoid of the therapeutic gene. Histological analysis of tumors in the combined treatment group, demonstrated similar mode of action of the gene electrotransfer of plasmid encoding shRNA for silencing endoglin and devoid of it, both through the induction of an immune response. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that irradiation can in radioresistant melanoma tumors, by release of tumor associated antigens, serve as activator of the immune response, besides directly affecting tumor cells and vasculature. The primed antitumor immune response can be further boosted by gene electrotransfer of plasmid

  6. Evaluation of CTX-M steady-state mRNA, mRNA half-life and protein production in various STs of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Geyer, Chelsie N.; Fowler, Randal C.; Johnson, James R.; Johnston, Brian; Weissman, Scott J.; Hawkey, Peter; Hanson, Nancy D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives High levels of β-lactamase production can impact treatment with a β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combination. Goals of this study were to: (i) compare the mRNA and protein levels of CTX-M-15- and CTX-M-14-producing Escherichia coli from 18 different STs and 10 different phylotypes; (ii) evaluate the mRNA half-lives and establish a role for chromosomal- and/or plasmid-encoded factors; and (iii) evaluate the zones of inhibition for piperacillin/tazobactam and ceftolozane/tazobactam. Methods Disc diffusion was used to establish zone size. RNA analysis was accomplished using real-time RT–PCR and CTX-M protein levels were evaluated by immunoblotting. Clinical isolates, transformants and transconjugants were used to evaluate mRNA half-lives. Results mRNA levels of CTX-M-15 were up to 165-fold higher compared with CTX-M-14. CTX-M-15 protein levels were 2–48-fold less than their respective transcript levels, while CTX-M-14 protein production was comparable to the observed transcript levels. Nineteen of 25 E. coli (76%) had extended CTX-M-15 mRNA half-lives of 5–15 min and 16 (100%) CTX-M-14 isolates had mRNA half-lives of <2–3 min. Transformants had mRNA half-lives of <2 min for both CTX-M-type transcripts, while transconjugant mRNA half-lives corresponded to the half-life of the donor. Ceftolozane/tazobactam zone sizes were ≥19 mm, while piperacillin/tazobactam zone sizes were ≥17 mm. Conclusions CTX-M-15 mRNA and protein production did not correlate. Neither E. coli ST nor phylotype influenced the variability observed for CTX-M-15 mRNA or protein produced. mRNA half-life is controlled by a plasmid-encoded factor and may influence mRNA transcript levels, but not protein levels. PMID:26612874

  7. New crystal structures of ColE1 Rom and variants resulting from mutation of a surface exposed residue: Implications for RNA-recognition.

    PubMed

    Struble, E B; Ladner, J E; Brabazon, D M; Marino, J P

    2008-08-01

    In ColE1, the plasmid encoded RNA one modulator (Rom) protein, which is also referred to as Rop, specifically binds and stabilizes an intermediate RNA loop-loop kissing structure formed between the plasmid encoded transcripts RNA I and RNA II and thereby acts as an auxiliary repressor of replication. Rom folds into a homodimeric, cylindrically packed four helix bundle with an exact twofold symmetry axis (Banner et al., J Mol Biol 1987;196:657-675; Eberle et al., J Biomol 1991;1:71-83). Previous studies (Castagnoli et al., EMBO J 1989;8:621-629; Predki et al., Cell 1995;80:41-50) have localized the RNA binding surface to the H1/H1' face of the helical bundle and found Phe14 to be a key determinant of the binding affinity and specificity for RNA kissing complexes. To investigate the role of Phe14 in RNA recognition, we have determined high-resolution crystal structures of two point mutants of Rom (F14Y and F14W), as well as a high-resolution structure of a crystal form of Rom in which the dimer comprises the asymmetric unit. Although the structures of F14Y and F14W share a very high degree of structural identity with that of the wild-type protein and each other, differences are observed between the three polypeptide chains found in the asymmetric unit of each crystal in the packing of the tryptophan and tyrosine side chains at position 14, as well as some of the other surface exposed side chains of key amino acids involved in RNA binding. In both the wild-type Rom and mutant structures, crystal packing forces can break the exact twofold symmetry of the dimer and influence the conformation of the side chains presented on the H1/H1' face of Rom. Since the new structures show such a high degree of structural identity, the disruption in RNA binding observed for the mutant proteins can be attributed specifically to the chemical nature of the side chain at position 14. Moreover, the fact that even subtle changes in the side chain at position 14 cannot be compensated for by

  8. Genotypes and virulence characteristics of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O104 strains from different origins and sources.

    PubMed

    Miko, Angelika; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Strockbine, Nancy A; Lindstedt, Björn Arne; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Reetz, Jochen; Beutin, Lothar

    2013-12-01

    Sixty-two Escherichia coli strains carrying the wzxO104-gene from different sources, origins and time periods were analyzed for their serotypes, virulence genes and compared for genomic similarity by pulsed-field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE). The O104 antigen was present in 55 strains and the structurally and genetically related capsular antigen K9 in five strains. The presence of 49 genes associated with enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) was investigated. Fifty-four strains of serotypes O104:H2 (n=1), O104:H4 (n=37), O104:H7 (n=5) and O104:H21 (n=11) produced Shiga-toxins (Stx). Among STEC O104, a close association between serotype, virulence gene profile and genomic similarity was found. EAEC virulence genes were only present in STEC O104:H4 strains. EHEC-O157 plasmid-encoded genes were only found in STEC O104:H2, O104:H7 and O104:H21 strains. None of the 62 O104 or K9 strains carried an eae-gene involved in the attaching and effacing phenotype. The 38 O104:H4 strains formed a single PFGE-cluster (>83.7% similarity). Thirty-one of these strains were from the European O104:H4 outbreak in 2011. The outbreak strains and older O104:H4 strains from Germany (2001), Georgia and France (2009) clustered together at>86.2% similarity. O104:H4 strains isolated between 2001 and 2009 differed for some plasmid-encoded virulence genes compared to the outbreak strains from 2011. STEC O104:H21 and STEC O104:H7 strains isolated in the U.S. and in Europe showed characteristic differences in their Stx-types, virulence gene and PFGE profiles indicating that these have evolved separately. E. coli K9 strains were not associated with virulence and were heterogeneous for their serotypes and PFGE profiles.

  9. Immunological responses induced by a DNA vaccine expressing RON4 and by immunogenic recombinant protein RON4 failed to protect mice against chronic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Imran; Hedhli, Dorsaf; Moiré, Nathalie; Pierre, Josette; Debierre-Grockiego, Françoise; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Mévélec, Marie Noëlle

    2011-11-08

    The development of an effective vaccine against Toxoplasma gondii infection is an important issue due to the seriousness of the related public health problems, and the economic importance of this parasitic disease worldwide. Rhoptry neck proteins (RONs) are components of the moving junction macromolecular complex formed during invasion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vaccine potential of RON4 using two vaccination strategies: DNA vaccination by the intramuscular route, and recombinant protein vaccination by the nasal route. We produced recombinant RON4 protein (RON4S2) using the Schneider insect cells expression system, and validated its antigenicity and immunogenicity. We also constructed optimized plasmids encoding full length RON4 (pRON4), or only the N-terminal (pNRON4), or the C-terminal part (pCRON4) of RON4. CBA/J mice immunized with pRON4, pNRON4 or pCRON4 plus a plasmid encoding the granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor showed high IgG titers against rRON4S2. Mice immunized by the nasal route with rRON4S2 plus cholera toxin exhibited low levels of anti-RON4S2 IgG antibodies, and no intestinal IgA antibodies specific to RON4 were detected. Both DNA and protein vaccination generated a mixed Th1/Th2 response polarized towards the IgG1 antibody isotype. Both DNA and protein vaccination primed CD4+ T cells in vivo. In addition to the production of IFN-γ, and IL-2, Il-10 and IL-5 were also produced by the spleen cells of the immunized mice stimulated with RON4S2, suggesting that a mixed Th1/Th2 type immune response occurred in all the immunized groups. No cytokine was detectable in stimulated mesenteric lymph nodes from mice immunized by the nasal route. Immune responses were induced by both DNA and protein vaccination, but failed to protect the mice against a subsequent oral challenge with T. gondii cysts. In conclusion, strategies designed to enhance the immunogenicity and to redirect the cellular response towards a Th1 type response

  10. Metabolic flux responses to genetic modification for shikimic acid production by Bacillus subtilis strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Shikimic acid (SA) is a key chiral starting molecule for the synthesis of the neuramidase inhibitor GS4104 against viral influenza. Microbial production of SA has been extensively investigated in Escherichia coli, and to a less extent in Bacillus subtilis. However, metabolic flux of the high SA-producing strains has not been explored. In this study, we constructed with genetic manipulation and further determined metabolic flux with 13C-labeling test of high SA-producing B. subtilis strains. Results B. subtilis 1A474 had a mutation in SA kinase gene (aroI) and accumulated 1.5 g/L of SA. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA, aroB, aroC or aroD in B. subtilis revealed that aroD had the most significantly positive effects on SA production. Simultaneous overexpression of genes for 3-deoxy-D-arabinoheptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase (aroA) and SA dehydrogenase (aroD) in B. subtilis BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD resulted in SA production of 3.2 g/L. 13C-Metabolic flux assay (MFA) on the two strains BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu and BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD indicated the carbon flux from glucose to SA increased to 4.6% in BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD from 1.9% in strain BSSA/pHCMC04/pDG148-stu. The carbon flux through tricarboxylic acid cycle significantly reduced, while responses of the pentose phosphate pathway and the glycolysis to high SA production were rather weak, in the strain BSSA/pSAAroA/pDGSAAroD. Based on the results from MFA, two potential targets for further optimization of SA production were identified. Experiments on genetic deletion of phosphoenoylpyruvate kinase gene confirmed its positive influence on SA production, while the overexpression of the transketolase gene did not lead to increase in SA production. Conclusion Of the genes involved in shikimate pathway in B. subtilis, aroD exerted most significant influence on SA accumulation. Overexpression of plasmid-encoded aroA and aroD doubled SA production than its parent strain. MFA revealed metabolic flux

  11. Co-Administration of a Plasmid DNA Encoding IL-15 Improves Long-Term Protection of a Genetic Vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Nicole L.; Blazevic, Azra; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Background Immunization of mice with the Trypanosoma cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) gene using plasmid DNA, adenoviral vector, and CpG-adjuvanted protein delivery has proven highly immunogenic and provides protection against acute lethal challenge. However, long-term protection induced by TS DNA vaccines has not been reported. The goal of the present work was to test whether the co-administration of a plasmid encoding IL-15 (pIL-15) could improve the duration of protection achieved through genetic vaccination with plasmid encoding TS (pTS) alone. Methodology We immunized BALB/c mice with pTS in the presence or absence of pIL-15 and studied immune responses [with TS-specific IFN-γ ELISPOT, serum IgG ELISAs, intracellular cytokine staining (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2), tetramer staining, and CFSE dilution assays] and protection against lethal systemic challenge at 1 to 6 months post vaccination. Mice receiving pTS alone developed robust TS-specific IFN-γ responses and survived a lethal challenge given within the first 3 months following immunization. The addition of pIL-15 to pTS vaccination did not significantly alter T cell responses or protection during this early post-vaccination period. However, mice vaccinated with both pTS and pIL-15 challenged 6 months post-vaccination were significantly more protected against lethal T. cruzi challenges than mice vaccinated with pTS alone (P<0.05). Improved protection correlated with significantly higher numbers of TS-specific IFN-γ producing total and CD8+ T cells detected>6 months post immunization. Also, these TS-specific T cells were better able to expand after in vitro re-stimulation. Conclusion Addition of pIL-15 during genetic vaccination greatly improved long-term T cell survival, memory T cell expansion, and long-term protection against the important human parasite, T. cruzi. PMID:21408124

  12. Hybrid Shiga Toxin-Producing and Enterotoxigenic Escherichia sp. Cryptic Lineage 1 Strain 7v Harbors a Hybrid Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Mammel, Mark K.; Rasko, David A.; Lacher, David W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hybrid isolates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) encoding heat-stable enterotoxin (ST) are being reported with increasing frequency from a variety of sources. However, information regarding the plasmids that these strains harbor is scarce. In this study, we sequence and characterize a plasmid, p7v, from the STEC/ETEC hybrid strain 7v. Whole-genome phylogenetic analyses of STEC/ETEC hybrid strains and prototype E. coli isolates of other pathotypes placed 7v in the Escherichia sp. cryptic lineage 1 (CL1) clade. The complete plasmid, p7v, was determined to be 229,275 bp and encodes putative virulence factors that are typically carried on STEC plasmids as well as those often carried on ETEC plasmids, indicating that the hybrid nature of the strain extends beyond merely encoding the two toxins. Plasmid p7v carries two copies of sta with identical sequences, which were discovered to be divergent from the sta sequences found in the prototype human ETEC strains. Using a nomenclature scheme based on a phylogeny constructed from sta and stb sequences, the sta encoded on p7v is designated STa4. In silico analysis determined that p7v also encodes the K88 fimbria, a colonization factor usually associated with porcine ETEC plasmids. The p7v sequence and the presence of plasmid-encoded virulence factors are compared to those of other STEC/ETEC CL1 hybrid genomes and reveal gene acquisition/loss at the strain level. In addition, the interrogation of 24 STEC/ETEC hybrid genomes for identification of plasmid replicons, colonization factors, Stx and ST subtypes, and other plasmid-encoded virulence genes highlights the diversity of these hybrid strains. IMPORTANCE Hybrid Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli/enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC/ETEC) strains, which have been isolated from environmental, animal, and human clinical samples, may represent an emerging threat as food-borne pathogens. Characterization of these

  13. New recA mutations that dissociate the various RecA protein activities in Escherichia coli provide evidence for an additional role for RecA protein in UV mutagenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Dutreix, M; Moreau, P L; Bailone, A; Galibert, F; Battista, J R; Walker, G C; Devoret, R

    1989-01-01

    To isolate strains with new recA mutations that differentially affect RecA protein functions, we mutagenized in vitro the recA gene carried by plasmid mini-F and then introduced the mini-F-recA plasmid into a delta recA host that was lysogenic for prophage phi 80 and carried a lac duplication. By scoring prophage induction and recombination of the lac duplication, we isolated new recA mutations. A strain carrying mutation recA1734 (Arg-243 changed to Leu) was found to be deficient in phi 80 induction but proficient in recombination. The mutation rendered the host not mutable by UV, even in a lexA(Def) background. Yet, the recA1734 host became mutable upon introduction of a plasmid encoding UmuD*, the active carboxyl-terminal fragment of UmuD. Although the recA1734 mutation permits cleavage of lambda and LexA repressors, it renders the host deficient in the cleavage of phi 80 repressor and UmuD protein. Another strain carrying mutation recA1730 (Ser-117 changed to Phe) was found to be proficient in phi 80 induction but deficient in recombination. The recombination defect conferred by the mutation was partly alleviated in a cell devoid of LexA repressor, suggesting that, when amplified, RecA1730 protein is active in recombination. Since LexA protein was poorly cleaved in the recA1730 strain while phage lambda was induced, we conclude that RecA1730 protein cannot specifically mediate LexA protein cleavage. Our results show that the recA1734 and recA1730 mutations differentially affect cleavage of various substrates. The recA1730 mutation prevented UV mutagenesis, even upon introduction into the host of a plasmid encoding UmuD* and was dominant over recA+. With respect to other RecA functions, recA1730 was recessive to recA+. This demonstrates that RecA protein has an additional role in mutagenesis beside mediating the cleavage of LexA and UmuD proteins. Images PMID:2651400

  14. Yeast tRNA(Phe) expressed in human cells can be selected by HIV-1 for use as a reverse transcription primer.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Nathan J; Morrow, Casey D

    2003-09-01

    All naturally occurring human immune deficiency viruses (HIV-1) select and use tRNA(Lys,3) as the primer for reverse transcription. Studies to elucidate the mechanism of tRNA selection from the intracellular milieu have been hampered due to the difficulties in manipulating the endogenous levels of tRNA(Lys,3). We have previously described a mutant HIV-1 with a primer binding site (PBS) complementary to yeast tRNA(Phe) (psHIV-Phe) that relies on transfection of yeast tRNA(Phe) for infectivity. To more accurately recapitulate the selection process, a cDNA was designed for the intracellular expression of the yeast tRNA(Phe). Increasing amounts of the plasmid encoding tRNA(Phe) resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of yeast tRNA(Phe) in the cell. The yeast tRNA(Phe) isolated from cells transfected with the cDNA for yeast tRNA(Phe), or in the cell lines expressing yeast tRNA(Phe), were aminoacylated, indicating that the expressed yeast tRNA(Phe) was incorporated into tRNA biogenesis pathways and translation. Increasing the cytoplasmic levels of tRNA(Phe) resulted in increased encapsidation of tRNA(Phe) in viruses with a PBS complementary to tRNA(Phe) (psHIV-Phe) or tRNA(Lys,3) (wild-type HIV-1). Production of infectious psHIV-Phe was dependent on the amount of cotransfected tRNA(Phe) cDNA. Increasing amounts of plasmids encoding yeast tRNA(Phe) produced an increase of infectious psHIV-Phe that plateaued at a level lower than that from the transfection of the wild-type genome, which uses tRNA(Lys,3) as the primer for reverse transcription. Cell lines were generated that expressed yeast tRNA(Phe) at levels approximately 0.1% of that for tRNA(Lys,3). Even with this reduced level of yeast tRNA(Phe), the cell lines complemented psHIV-Phe over background levels. The results of these studies demonstrate that intracellular levels of primer tRNA can have a direct effect on HIV-1 infectivity and further support the role for PBS-tRNA complementarity in the primer

  15. Identification and sequence determination of recombinant Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin by use of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hitoshi; Inoue, Masaharu; Tomiki, Masayoshi; Nemoto, Hiroshi; Komoriya, Tomoe; Kimata, Junko; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Kohno, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Only a few methods exist for simple, sensitive and rapid detection of alpha-toxin in clinical and biological samples. The aim of our study was to establish a procedure for the production of an antibody against a recombinant antigen with confirmed sequence identity. We applied a noble approach based on proteomics using a mass spectrometer for the conclusive identification of the recombinant alpha-toxin that was subsequently used as an antigen. The recombinant alpha-toxin was produced in Escherichia coli. A clinical isolate of Clostridium perfringens GAI 94074 was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently, cloning was performed. Three different fragments were cloned using a pET100/D-TOPO vector. These fragments coded for a ribosome binding site, a signal peptide and the alpha-toxin gene, respectively. Recombinant pET100 plasmids were cloned into TOP 10 cells and the isolated plasmids were transferred into BL21 Star (DE3) cells. Their expression was then induced with isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). Recombinant E. coli transformed with a plasmid encoding the alpha-toxin gene alone produced a biologically inactive protein. On the other hand, E. coli carrying the plasmid encoding the toxin sequence and its native signal peptide sequence, or the toxin sequence along with the ribosome binding sequence and the signal peptide sequence secreted an active alpha-toxin with phospholipase activity. Accordingly, the C. perfringens gene encoding the alpha-toxin protein along with its signal peptide was successfully cloned, expressed, and secreted by E. coli. Furthermore, without consideration of its activity, we used mass spectrometry to confirm that the expressed protein was indeed the alpha-toxin. Thus, the identification of alpha-toxin protein using both the biological activity testing and the mass spectrometry analysis is expected to verify the significant production of C. perfringens antibody. The study for the analysis of recombinant alpha

  16. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  17. Application of the shsp Gene, Encoding a Small Heat Shock Protein, as a Food-Grade Selection Marker for Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    El Demerdash, Hassan A. M.; Heller, Knut J.; Geis, Arnold

    2003-01-01

    Plasmid pSt04 of Streptococcus thermophilus contains a gene encoding a protein with homology to small heat shock proteins (A. Geis, H. A. M. El Demerdash, and K. J. Heller, Plasmid 50:53-69, 2003). Strains cured from the shsp plasmids showed significantly reduced heat and acid resistance and a lower maximal growth temperature. Transformation of the cloned shsp gene into S. thermophilus St11 lacking a plasmid encoding shsp resulted in increased resistance to incubation at 60°C or pH 3.5 and in the ability to grow at 52°C. A food-grade cloning system for S. thermophilus, based on the plasmid-encoded shsp gene as a selection marker, was developed. This approach allowed selection after transfer of native and recombinant shsp plasmids into different S. thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis strains. Using a recombinant plasmid carrying an erythromycin resistance (Emr) gene in addition to shsp, we demonstrated that both markers are equally efficient in selecting for plasmid-bearing cells. The average transformation rates in S. thermophilus (when we were selecting for heat resistance) were determined to be 2.4 × 104 and 1.0 × 104 CFU/0.5 μg of DNA, with standard deviations of 0.54 × 104 and 0.32 × 104, for shsp and Emr selection, respectively. When we selected for pH resistance, the average transformation rates were determined to be 2.25 × 104 and 3.8 × 103 CFU/0.5 μg of DNA, with standard deviations of 0.63 × 104 and 3.48 × 103, for shsp and Emr selection, respectively. The applicability of shsp as a selection marker was further demonstrated by constructing S. thermophilus plasmid pHRM1 carrying the shsp gene as a selection marker and the restriction-modification genes of another S. thermophilus plasmid as a functional trait. PMID:12902223

  18. Small multidrug resistance protein EmrE reduces host pH and osmotic tolerance to metabolic quaternary cation osmoprotectants.

    PubMed

    Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J

    2012-11-01

    The small multidrug resistance (SMR) transporter protein EmrE in Escherichia coli is known to confer resistance to toxic antiseptics classified as quaternary cation compounds (QCCs). Naturally derived QCCs synthesized during metabolic activities often act as osmoprotectants, such as betaine and choline, and participate in osmotic homoestasis. The goal of this study was to determine if EmrE proteins transport biological QCC-based osmoprotectants. Plasmid-encoded copies of E. coli emrE and the inactive variant emrE-E14C (emrE with the E → C change at position 14) were expressed in various E. coli strains grown in either rich or minimal media at various pHs (5 to 9) and under hypersaline (0.5 to 1.0 M NaCl and KCl) conditions to identify changes in growth phenotypes induced by osmoprotectant transport. The results demonstrated that emrE expression reduced pH tolerance of E. coli strains at or above neutral pH and when grown in hypersaline media at or above NaCl or KCl concentrations of 0.75 M. Hypersaline growth conditions were used to screen QCC osmoprotectants betaine, choline, l-carnitine, l-lysine, l-proline, and l-arginine. The study identified that betaine and choline are natural QCC substrates of EmrE.

  19. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-bin; Ye, Jin-zhou; Yang, Man-jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication. PMID:28210241

  20. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups. PMID:26411997

  1. Rational plasmid design and bioprocess optimization to enhance recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) productivity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Emmerling, Verena V; Pegel, Antje; Milian, Ernest G; Venereo-Sanchez, Alina; Kunz, Marion; Wegele, Jessica; Kamen, Amine A; Kochanek, Stefan; Hoerer, Markus

    2016-02-01

    Viral vectors used for gene and oncolytic therapy belong to the most promising biological products for future therapeutics. Clinical success of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) based therapies raises considerable demand for viral vectors, which cannot be met by current manufacturing strategies. Addressing existing bottlenecks, we improved a plasmid system termed rep/cap split packaging and designed a minimal plasmid encoding adenoviral helper function. Plasmid modifications led to a 12-fold increase in rAAV vector titers compared to the widely used pDG standard system. Evaluation of different production approaches revealed superiority of processes based on anchorage- and serum-dependent HEK293T cells, exhibiting about 15-fold higher specific and volumetric productivity compared to well-established suspension cells cultivated in serum-free medium. As for most other viral vectors, classical stirred-tank bioreactor production is thus still not capable of providing drug product of sufficient amount. We show that manufacturing strategies employing classical surface-providing culture systems can be successfully transferred to the new fully-controlled, single-use bioreactor system Integrity(TM) iCELLis(TM) . In summary, we demonstrate substantial bioprocess optimizations leading to more efficient and scalable production processes suggesting a promising way for flexible large-scale rAAV manufacturing.

  2. The ratio between CcdA and CcdB modulates the transcriptional repression of the ccd poison-antidote system.

    PubMed

    Afif, H; Allali, N; Couturier, M; Van Melderen, L

    2001-07-01

    The ccd operon of the F plasmid encodes CcdB, a toxin targeting the essential gyrase of Escherichia coli, and CcdA, the unstable antidote that interacts with CcdB to neutralize its toxicity. Although work from our group and others has established that CcdA and CcdB are required for transcriptional repression of the operon, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The results presented here indicate that, although CcdA is the DNA-binding element of the CcdA-CcdB complex, the stoichiometry of the two proteins determines whether or not the complex binds to the ccd operator-promoter region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we show that a (CcdA)2-(CcdB)2 complex binds DNA. The addition of extra CcdB to that protein-DNA complex completely abolishes DNA retardation. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the ratio between CcdA and CcdB regulates the repression state of the ccd operon. When the level of CcdA is superior or equal to that of CcdB, repression results. In contrast, derepression occurs when CcdB is in excess of CcdA. By ensuring an antidote-toxin ratio greater than one, this mechanism could prevent the harmful effect of CcdB in plasmid-containing bacteria.

  3. The Optimisation of Pseudotyped Viruses for the Characterisation of Immune Responses to Equine Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Simon D.; Kinsley, Rebecca; Temperton, Nigel; Daly, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotyped viruses (PVs) produced by co-transfecting cells with plasmids expressing lentiviral core proteins and viral envelope proteins are potentially powerful tools for studying various aspects of equine influenza virus (EIV) biology. The aim of this study was to optimise production of equine influenza PVs. Co-transfection of the HAT protease to activate the haemagglutinin (HA) yielded a higher titre PV than TMPRSS2 with the HA from A/equine/Richmond/1/2007 (H3N8), whereas for A/equine/Newmarket/79 (H3N8), both proteases resulted in equivalent titres. TMPRSS4 was ineffective with the HA of either strain. There was also an inverse relationship between the amount of protease-expression plasmids and the PV titre obtained.  Interestingly, the PV titre obtained by co-transfection of a plasmid encoding the cognate N8 NA was not as high as that generated by the addition of exogenous neuraminidase (NA) from Clostridium perfringens to allow the release of nascent PV particles. Finally, initial characterisation of the reliability of PV neutralisation tests (PVNTs) demonstrated good intra-laboratory repeatability. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that equine influenza PV production can be readily optimised to provide a flexible tool for studying EIV. PMID:27983716

  4. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  5. Genetic immunization based on the ubiquitin-fusion degradation pathway against Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Bin; Hiromatsu, Kenji; Hisaeda, Hajime; Duan, Xuefeng; Imai, Takashi; Murata, Shigeo; Tanaka, Keiji; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2010-02-12

    Cytotoxic CD8{sup +} T cells are particularly important to the development of protective immunity against the intracellular protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. We have developed a new effective strategy of genetic immunization by activating CD8{sup +} T cells through the ubiquitin-fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. We constructed expression plasmids encoding the amastigote surface protein-2 (ASP-2) of T. cruzi. To induce the UFD pathway, a chimeric gene encoding ubiquitin fused to ASP-2 (pUB-ASP-2) was constructed. Mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 presented lower parasitemia and longer survival period, compared with mice immunized with pASP-2 alone. Depletion of CD8{sup +} T cells abolished protection against T. cruzi in mice immunized with pUB-ASP-2 while depletion of CD4{sup +} T cells did not influence the effective immunity. Mice deficient in LMP2 or LMP7, subunits of immunoproteasomes, were not able to develop protective immunity induced. These results suggest that ubiquitin-fused antigens expressed in antigen-presenting cells were effectively degraded via the UFD pathway, and subsequently activated CD8{sup +} T cells. Consequently, immunization with pUB-ASP-2 was able to induce potent protective immunity against infection of T. cruzi.

  6. Lethal Factor, but Not Edema Factor, Is Required to Cause Fatal Anthrax in Cynomolgus Macaques after Pulmonary Spore Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hutt, Julie A.; Lovchik, Julie A.; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L.; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F.; Lyons, C. Rick

    2015-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti–protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores. PMID:25285720

  7. Insights into dynamics of mobile genetic elements in hyperthermophilic environments from five new Thermococcus plasmids.

    PubMed

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles.

  8. Systemic Correction of Storage Disease in MPS I NOD/SCID Mice Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon System

    PubMed Central

    Aronovich, Elena L; Bell, Jason B; Khan, Shaukat A; Belur, Lalitha R; Gunther, Roland; Koniar, Brenda; Schachern, Patricia A; Parker, Josh B; Carlson, Cathy S; Whitley, Chester B; McIvor, R Scott; Gupta, Pankaj; Hackett, Perry B

    2009-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a nonviral vector that directs transgene integration into vertebrate genomes. We hydrodynamically delivered SB transposon plasmids encoding human α-L-iduronidase (hIDUA) at two DNA doses, with and without an SB transposase gene, to NOD.129(B6)-Prkdcscid IDUAtm1Clk/J mice. In transposon-treated, nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice with mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I), plasma IDUA persisted for 18 weeks at levels up to several hundred–fold wild-type (WT) activity, depending on DNA dose and gender. IDUA activity was present in all examined somatic organs, as well as in the brain, and correlated with both glycosaminoglycan (GAG) reduction in these organs and level of expression in the liver, the target of transposon delivery. IDUA activity was higher in the treated males than in females. In females, omission of transposase source resulted in significantly lower IDUA levels and incomplete GAG reduction in some organs, confirming the positive effect of transposition on long-term IDUA expression and correction of the disease. The SB transposon system proved efficacious in correcting several clinical manifestations of MPS I in mice, including thickening of the zygomatic arch, hepatomegaly, and accumulation of foamy macrophages in bone marrow and synovium, implying potential effectiveness of this approach in treatment of human MPS I. PMID:19384290

  9. Short-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of proliferating cell nuclear antigen inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, H; Xin, T; Nancai, Y; Yanxia, W; Qian, L; Wei, M; Yandong, Y; Hanju, H

    2008-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an important protein for DNA polymerase delta in the nucleus, and shown to have a fundamental role in cellular proliferation. It is overexpressed to support cell growth in cervical carcinoma. To study its role in stress response, we design and use short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit PCNA expression in HeLa cells and validate its effect on cell proliferation. In this study, three PCNA-shRNA expression vectors are constructed and introduced into HeLa cells, and the cell cycle is analyzed by flow cytometry. Apoptotic cell is detected by single cell gel electrophoresis assay (comet assay), and caspase cleavage is studied also. Expression of PCNA is assessed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Upon transient transfection with plasmid encoding shRNA, it is found that expression of PCNA decreased in shRNA-transfected cells, downregulation of PCNA inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells. PCNA downregulation also increase cell population in the G0-G1 phase. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that shRNA can inhibit the DNA replication and induce apoptosis in HeLa cells effectively and, therefore, could be used as a new potential anticancer tool for therapy of human cervical carcinoma.

  10. Antibiotic-free production of a herpes simplex virus 2 DNA vaccine in a high yield cGMP process

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jared; Rodriguez, Stephen; Finlayson, Neil; Williams, Jim; Carnes, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Two DNA vaccine plasmids encoding Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D, NTC8485-O2-gD2 and NTC8485-O2-UgD2tr, were produced at large scale under current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) for use in a Phase I human clinical trial. These DNA vaccines incorporate the regulatory agency compliant, minimal, antibiotic-free (AF) NTC8485 mammalian expression vector. Plasmid yields of > 1 g/L were achieved using the HyperGRO™ fed-batch fermentation process, with successful scale up from 10 L process development scale to 320 L culture volume for cGMP production. The DNA vaccines were purified using a low residence time, high shear lysis process and AIRMIXTM technology, followed by chromatographic purification. This combination of optimized plasmid vector, high yield upstream production, and efficient downstream purification resulted in purified HSV-2 DNA vaccines with > 99% total supercoiled plasmid, ≤ 0.2% RNA, ≤ 0.1% host cell genomic DNA, and ≤ 0.1 endotoxin units per mg. PMID:23899469

  11. Activated air produced by shielded sliding discharge plasma mediates plasmid DNA delivery to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Heller, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Cold plasma is emerging as a potential method for medical applications. The current study assessed the efficacy of a novel cold plasma reactor based on shielded sliding discharge producing cathode-directed streamers generated in ambient air for the delivery of plasmid DNA. Experiments were performed with mouse melanoma cells (B16F10) and human keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) inoculated with plasmid DNA encoding luciferase. Quantitative results measured over a 72-h period displayed luciferase expression levels as high as 5-fold greater in cells exposed to plasma-activated air (PAA) than levels obtained from the inoculation of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). No effect on cell viability was observed. Delivery of plasmid encoding GFP to HaCaT cells seeded on polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds was confirmed by immunostaining. The use of cold plasma for DNA delivery is attractive as it provides a non-viral, non-invasive method where the electrode or the plasma itself never directly contacts the exposed site. The current device design provides localized DNA transfer using a novel technology. Our report suggests PAA warrants further exploration as an alternative or supplemental approach for DNA transfer.

  12. A robust TALENs system for highly efficient mammalian genome editing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuanxi; Zhang, Siliang; Huang, Xin

    2014-01-10

    Recently, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have emerged as a highly effective tool for genomic editing. A pair of TALENs binds to two DNA recognition sites separated by a spacer sequence, and the dimerized FokI nucleases at the C terminal then cleave DNA in the spacer. Because of its modular design and capacity to precisely target almost any desired genomic locus, TALEN is a technology that can revolutionize the entire biomedical research field. Currently, for genomic editing in cultured cells, two plasmids encoding a pair of TALENs are co-transfected, followed by limited dilution to isolate cell colonies with the intended genomic manipulation. However, uncertain transfection efficiency becomes a bottleneck, especially in hard-to-transfect cells, reducing the overall efficiency of genome editing. We have developed a robust TALENs system in which each TALEN plasmid also encodes a fluorescence protein. Thus, cells transfected with both TALEN plasmids, a prerequisite for genomic editing, can be isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Our improved TALENs system can be applied to all cultured cells to achieve highly efficient genomic editing. Furthermore, an optimized procedure for genomic editing using TALENs is also presented. We expect our system to be widely adopted by the scientific community.

  13. Role of the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase in voltage generation and Na(+) extrusion in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Vorburger, Thomas; Nedielkov, Ruslan; Brosig, Alexander; Bok, Eva; Schunke, Emina; Steffen, Wojtek; Mayer, Sonja; Götz, Friedrich; Möller, Heiko M; Steuber, Julia

    2016-04-01

    For Vibrio cholerae, the coordinated import and export of Na(+) is crucial for adaptation to habitats with different osmolarities. We investigated the Na(+)-extruding branch of the sodium cycle in this human pathogen by in vivo (23)Na-NMR spectroscopy. The Na(+) extrusion activity of cells was monitored after adding glucose which stimulated respiration via the Na(+)-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR). In a V. cholerae deletion mutant devoid of the Na(+)-NQR encoding genes (nqrA-F), rates of respiratory Na(+) extrusion were decreased by a factor of four, but the cytoplasmic Na(+) concentration was essentially unchanged. Furthermore, the mutant was impaired in formation of transmembrane voltage (ΔΨ, inside negative) and did not grow under hypoosmotic conditions at pH8.2 or above. This growth defect could be complemented by transformation with the plasmid encoded nqr operon. In an alkaline environment, Na(+)/H(+) antiporters acidify the cytoplasm at the expense of the transmembrane voltage. It is proposed that, at alkaline pH and limiting Na(+) concentrations, the Na(+)-NQR is crucial for generation of a transmembrane voltage to drive the import of H(+) by electrogenic Na(+)/H(+) antiporters. Our study provides the basis to understand the role of the Na(+)-NQR in pathogenicity of V. cholerae and other pathogens relying on this primary Na(+) pump for respiration.

  14. N. meningitidis 1681 is a member of the FinO family of RNA chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Chaulk, Steven; Lu, Jun; Tan, Kemin; Arthur, David C; Edwards, Ross A; Frost, Laura S; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The conjugative transfer of F-like plasmids between bacteria is regulated by the plasmid-encoded RNA chaperone, FinO, which facilitates sense—antisense RNA interactions to regulate plasmid gene expression. FinO was thought to adopt a unique structure, however many putative homologs have been identified in microbial genomes and are considered members of the FinO_conjugation_repressor superfamily. We were interested in determining whether other members were also able to bind RNA and promote duplex formation, suggesting that this motif does indeed identify a putative RNA chaperone. We determined the crystal structure of the N. meningitidis MC58 protein NMB1681. It revealed striking similarity to FinO, with a conserved fold and a large, positively charged surface that could function in RNA interactions. Using assays developed to study FinO-FinP sRNA interactions, NMB1681, like FinO, bound tightly to FinP RNA stem-loops with short 5′ and 3′ single-stranded tails but not to ssRNA. It also was able to catalyze strand exchange between an RNA duplex and a complementary single-strand, and facilitated duplexing between complementary RNA hairpins. Finally, NMB1681 was able to rescue a finO deficiency and repress F plasmid conjugation. This study strongly suggests that NMB1681 is a FinO-like RNA chaperone that likely regulates gene expression through RNA-based mechanisms in N. meningitidis. PMID:21045552

  15. Single Cell Transfection through Precise Microinjection with Quantitatively Controlled Injection Volumes

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Yu Ting; Chen, Shuxun; Wang, Ran; Liu, Chichi; Kong, Chi-wing; Li, Ronald A.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Sun, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Cell transfection is a technique wherein foreign genetic molecules are delivered into cells. To elucidate distinct responses during cell genetic modification, methods to achieve transfection at the single-cell level are of great value. Herein, we developed an automated micropipette-based quantitative microinjection technology that can deliver precise amounts of materials into cells. The developed microinjection system achieved precise single-cell microinjection by pre-patterning cells in an array and controlling the amount of substance delivered based on injection pressure and time. The precision of the proposed injection technique was examined by comparing the fluorescence intensities of fluorescent dye droplets with a standard concentration and water droplets with a known injection amount of the dye in oil. Injection of synthetic modified mRNA (modRNA) encoding green fluorescence proteins or a cocktail of plasmids encoding green and red fluorescence proteins into human foreskin fibroblast cells demonstrated that the resulting green fluorescence intensity or green/red fluorescence intensity ratio were well correlated with the amount of genetic material injected into the cells. Single-cell transfection via the developed microinjection technique will be of particular use in cases where cell transfection is challenging and genetically modified of selected cells are desired. PMID:27067121

  16. Bacteroides mobilizable and conjugative genetic elements: antibiotic resistance among clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Gómez, Carlos

    2011-12-01

    The conjugation is one of the most important mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer in prokaryotes, leading to genetic variation within a species and the acquisition of new traits, such as antibiotic resistance. Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobe of the colon and a significant opportunistic pathogen. Antibiotic resistance among Bacteroides spp. is rapidly increasing, largely due to the dissemination of DNA transfer factors (plasmids and transposons) harbored by members of this genus. Transfer factors can be divided into two classes, conjugative and mobilizable. Species of the intestinal Bacteroides have yielded different resistance plasmids, all of which have been intensely studied, the plasmids encode high-level MLS resistance conferred by a conserved erm gene. It has been reported an interesting observation associated with the transfer of several of these types of elements, all of which conferred Tcr and displayed greatly increased transfer efficiency following exposure to tetracycline. Many of the conjugative transposons (CTns) in Bacteroides are related to various genetic elements (such as CTnDOT, CTnERL, NBU and others). CTnDOT carries a tetracycline resistance gene, tetQ, and an erythromycin resistance gene, ermF. Resistance to drugs used to treat Bacteroides infections, such as clindamycin, has also been increasing. These conjugal elements have been found in Bacteroides clinical isolates. Thus, horizontal gene transfer could conceivably have played a role in the rising incidence of resistance in this bacterial group.

  17. Detection and characterization of Salmonella typhimurium from a dairy herd in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Nolan, L K; Giddings, C W; Boland, E W; Steffen, D J; Brown, J; Misek, A

    1995-01-01

    Nasal secretions, faecal samples and buffy coats were obtained from 102 cattle from a North Dakota dairy herd with a history of calf scours. Treated buffy coats, faecal samples and nasal secretions were inoculated into tetrathionate broth (TB), incubated at 37 degrees C overnight, and plated onto brilliant green agar medium with novobiocin (BGAN). The TB was left at room temperature for 5 days and then used to inoculate fresh TB. The fresh TB was incubated at 37 degrees C over night and plated onto BGAN medium. All the plates were incubated at 37 degrees C over night and observed for Salmonella-like growth. Suspect colonies were further tested and Salmonella isolates were serotyped by the National Veterinary Services laboratory. Twenty-two of the 36 calves sampled harboured S. typhimurium in their faeces, but no samples from cows were positive. No Salmonella were isolated from the buffy coats, but 4 calves were shown to have Salmonella in their nasal secretions. Extended enrichment of the faecal cultures in TB resulted in a significant increase in Salmonella isolations, although 2 samples were positive following the initial enrichment period and not after secondary enrichment. The typical Salmonella isolate detected from this herd contained a transmissible R-plasmid encoding resistance to tetracycline, kanamycin, sulphisoxazole and ampicillin. This study confirmed that delayed secondary enrichment in TB is superior to primary enrichment for detection of Salmonella from cattle.

  18. OXA-235, a novel class D β-lactamase involved in resistance to carbapenems in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Paul G; Pérez-Llarena, Francisco J; Zander, Esther; Fernández, Ana; Bou, Germán; Seifert, Harald

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the mechanism of carbapenem resistance in 10 Acinetobacter baumannii strains isolated from the United States and Mexico between 2005 and 2009. The detection of known metallo-β-lactamase or carbapenem-hydrolyzing oxacillinase (OXA) genes by PCR was negative. The presence of plasmid-encoded carbapenem resistance genes was investigated by transformation of A. baumannii ATCC 17978. Shotgun cloning experiments and sequencing were performed, followed by the expression of a novel β-lactamase in A. baumannii. Three novel OXA enzymes were identified, OXA-235 in 8 isolates and the amino acid variants OXA-236 (Glu173-Val) and OXA-237 (Asp208-Gly) in 1 isolate each. The deduced amino acid sequences shared 85% identity with OXA-134, 54% to 57% identities with the acquired OXA-23, OXA-24, OXA-58, and OXA-143, and 56% identity with the intrinsic OXA-51 and, thus, represent a novel subclass of OXA. The expression of OXA-235 in A. baumannii led to reduced carbapenem susceptibility, while cephalosporin MICs were unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that blaOXA-235, blaOXA-236, and blaOXA-237 were bracketed between two ISAba1 insertion sequences. In addition, the presence of these acquired β-lactamase genes might result from a transposition-mediated mechanism. This highlights the propensity of A. baumannii to acquire multiple carbapenem resistance determinants.

  19. Plasticity of archaeal C/D box sRNA biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Vanessa; Martin, Roman; Orell, Alvaro; Alkhnbashi, Omer S; Backofen, Rolf; Randau, Lennart

    2017-01-01

    Archaeal and eukaryotic organisms contain sets of C/D box s(no)RNAs with guide sequences that determine ribose 2'-O-methylation sites of target RNAs. The composition of these C/D box sRNA sets is highly variable between organisms and results in varying RNA modification patterns which are important for ribosomal RNA folding and stability. Little is known about the genomic organization of C/D box sRNA genes in archaea. Here, we aimed to obtain first insights into the biogenesis of these archaeal C/D box sRNAs and analyzed the genetic context of more than 300 archaeal sRNA genes. We found that the majority of these genes do not possess independent promoters but are rather located at positions that allow for co-transcription with neighboring genes and their start or stop codons were frequently incorporated into the conserved boxC and D motifs. The biogenesis of plasmid-encoded C/D box sRNA variants was analyzed in vivo in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. It was found that C/D box sRNA maturation occurs independent of their genetic context and relies solely on the presence of intact RNA kink-turn structures. The observed plasticity of C/D box sRNA biogenesis is suggested to enable their accelerated evolution and, consequently, allow for adjustments of the RNA modification landscape.

  20. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Protein Contains Domains for ATP Binding, Nuclear Localization, and Type IV Secretion▿

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Vergunst, Annette C.; Neal-McKinney, Jason; den Dulk-Ras, Amke; Moyer, Deborah M.; Hooykaas, Paul J. J.; Ream, Walt

    2006-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes are closely related plant pathogens that cause different diseases, crown gall and hairy root. Both diseases result from transfer, integration, and expression of plasmid-encoded bacterial genes located on the transferred DNA (T-DNA) in the plant genome. Bacterial virulence (Vir) proteins necessary for infection are also translocated into plant cells. Transfer of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and Vir proteins requires a type IV secretion system, a protein complex spanning the bacterial envelope. A. tumefaciens translocates the ssDNA-binding protein VirE2 into plant cells, where it binds single-stranded T-DNA and helps target it to the nucleus. Although some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, they are pathogenic and transfer T-DNA efficiently. Instead, these bacteria express the GALLS protein, which is essential for their virulence. The GALLS protein can complement an A. tumefaciens virE2 mutant for tumor formation, indicating that GALLS can substitute for VirE2. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains ATP-binding and helicase motifs similar to those in TraA, a strand transferase involved in conjugation. Both GALLS and VirE2 contain nuclear localization sequences and a C-terminal type IV secretion signal. Here we show that mutations in any of these domains abolished the ability of GALLS to substitute for VirE2. PMID:17012398

  1. Agrobacterium rhizogenes GALLS Protein Substitutes for Agrobacterium tumefaciens Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein VirE2

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Larry D.; Cuperus, Josh; Ream, Walt

    2004-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Agrobacterium rhizogenes transfer plasmid-encoded genes and virulence (Vir) proteins into plant cells. The transferred DNA (T-DNA) is stably inherited and expressed in plant cells, causing crown gall or hairy root disease. DNA transfer from A. tumefaciens into plant cells resembles plasmid conjugation; single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is exported from the bacteria via a type IV secretion system comprised of VirB1 through VirB11 and VirD4. Bacteria also secrete certain Vir proteins into plant cells via this pore. One of these, VirE2, is an ssDNA-binding protein crucial for efficient T-DNA transfer and integration. VirE2 binds incoming ssT-DNA and helps target it into the nucleus. Some strains of A. rhizogenes lack VirE2, but they still transfer T-DNA efficiently. We isolated a novel gene from A. rhizogenes that restored pathogenicity to virE2 mutant A. tumefaciens. The GALLS gene was essential for pathogenicity of A. rhizogenes. Unlike VirE2, GALLS contains a nucleoside triphosphate binding motif similar to one in TraA, a strand transferase conjugation protein. Despite their lack of similarity, GALLS substituted for VirE2. PMID:15126468

  2. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K; Weiner, David B; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N

    2017-03-07

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14(th) vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection.

  3. Evaluation of Different DNA Vaccines against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Stefano; Ramadori, Giorgio; Villa, Riccardo; Borghetti, Paolo; de Angelis, Elena; Cantoni, Anna Maria; Corradi, Attilio; Amici, Augusto; Ferrari, Maura

    2013-01-01

    In veterinary medicine, there have been different experiences with the plasmid DNA vaccination. In this area and with the hypothesis to demonstrate the effectiveness of different plasmids encoding porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome (PRRS), five DNA vaccines against PRRS were evaluated for their innocuity and efficacy in pigs. Eighteen animals were divided into five groups which were injected with five (A, B, C, D, E) different DNA vaccines. Albeit, none of the proposed vaccines were able to protect the animals against PRRS virus. Only vaccines A and B were able to reduce the clinical signs of the infection. ELISA IgM were detected 30 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine A or B. ELISA IgG were detected 90 days after the first vaccination in the pigs injected by Vaccine B or C. Neutralizing antibody were detected Post Challenge Days 61 (PCD) in all groups. In the pigs inoculated with Vaccine C, IFN-γ were detected 90 days after first vaccination, and after challenge exposure they increased. In the other groups, the IFN-γ were detected after challenge infection. Pigs injected with each of the vaccines A, B, C, D and E showed a significantly higher level of CD4−CD8+ lymphocytes (p < 0.001) after infection in comparison with their controls. PMID:26344342

  4. Quorum-quenching limits quorum-sensing exploitation by signal-negative invaders

    PubMed Central

    Tannières, Mélanie; Lang, Julien; Barnier, Claudie; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Faure, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria produce and perceive quorum-sensing (QS) signals that coordinate several behaviours, including the costly processes that are exoenzyme production and plasmid transfer. In the case of plasmid transfer, the emergence of QS signal-altered invaders and their policing are poorly documented. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the virulence Ti-plasmid encodes both synthesis and sensing of QS-signals, which promote its transfer from a donor to a recipient cell. Here, we reported that QS-altered A. tumefaciens mutants arose during experimental evolution. All showed improved growth compared to their ancestor. Genome sequencing revealed that, though some had lost the Ti-plasmid, most were defective for QS-signal synthesis and Ti-plasmid conjugation (traR mutations) and one exhibited a QS-signal exploitation behaviour, using signal produced by other cells to enhance its own Ti-plasmid transfer. We explored mechanisms that can limit this QS-hijacking. We showed that the A. tumefaciens capacity to inactivate QS-signals by expressing QS-degrading enzyme could attenuate dissemination of the QS signal-negative Ti-plasmids. This work shows that enzymatic QS-disruption whether encoded by the QS-producing Ti-plasmid itself, by a companion plasmid in the same donor cells, or by one in the recipient cells, in all cases can serve as a mechanism for controlling QS exploitation by QS signal-negative mutants. PMID:28054641

  5. Most Enterobacter aerogenes strains in France belong to a prevalent clone.

    PubMed

    Bosi, C; Davin-Regli, A; Bornet, C; Mallea, M; Pages, J M; Bollet, C

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the distribution in France of the Enterobacter aerogenes prevalent clone isolated in the hospitals of the Marseille area (A. Davin-Regli, D. Monnet, P. Saux, C. Bosi, R. Charrel, A. Barthelemy, and C. Bollet, J. Clin. Microbiol. 34:1474-1480, 1996). A total of 123 E. aerogenes isolates were collected from 23 hospital laboratories and analyzed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR to determine their epidemiological relatedness. Molecular typing revealed that 21 of the 23 laboratories had isolated this prevalent clone harboring the plasmid encoding for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase of the TEM-24 type. Most isolates were susceptible only to imipenem and gentamicin. Their dissemination seems to be clonal and was probably the result of the general use of broad-spectrum cephalosporins and quinolones. Four isolates showed an alteration of their outer membrane proteins, causing decrease of susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and imipenem and leading to the critical situation of having no alternative therapeutic. The large dissemination of the E. aerogenes prevalent clone probably results from its good adaptation to the antibiotics administered in France and the hospital environment, particularly in intensive care units.

  6. Establishment and cryopreservation of a fibroblast cell line derived from Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Guan, W J; Liu, C Q; Li, C Y; Liu, D; Zhang, W X; Ma, Y H

    2010-01-01

    The Bengal tiger ear marginal tissue fibroblasts cell line (BTF22), containing 157 tubes of frozen cells, was successfully established by using primary explants technique and cell cryoconservation technology. Biological analysis showed that the population doubling time (PDT) for revival cells was approximately 28 h. Measurement of LDH and MDH isoenzymes showed no cross-contamination among the cells. Karyotyping showed that the frequency of cells with chromosome number 2n = 38 was 90.6-92.2%. Tests for bacteria, fungi, viruses and mycoplasma were negative. Plasmids encoding the fluorescent proteins pEGFP-N3, pEGFP-C1, pECFP-N1, pECFP-mito, pDsRed1-N1, and pEYFP-N1 were transfected into cells to study exogenous gene expression in the cells. The plasmid transfection efficiency was between 4.4% and 31.9%. Every index of the BTF22 cell line meets all the standard quality controls of American type Culture Collection (ATCC). Not only has the germline of this important Bengal tiger species been preserved at the cell level, but also valuable material had been provided for genome, postgenome and somacloning research. Moreover, the establishment of this technical platform would provide both technical and theoretical support for storing the genetic resources of other animals and poultry at the cell level.

  7. Escherichia coli DNA helicase I catalyzes a sequence-specific cleavage/ligation reaction at the F plasmid origin of transfer.

    PubMed

    Sherman, J A; Matson, S W

    1994-10-21

    Recent studies have shown that the Escherichia coli F plasmid-encoded traI gene product (TraIp), also known as DNA helicase I, catalyzes the formation of the site- and strand-specific nick that initiates F plasmid DNA transfer. Scission of the phosphodiester bond at the nic site within the origin of transfer (oriT) is accompanied by the covalent attachment of TraIp to the 5'-phosphate of the nicked DNA strand. This mechanism suggests that TraIp may also be capable of catalyzing a DNA ligation reaction using the energy stored in the protein-DNA intermediate. To test this possibility, an in vitro assay was designed that utilized short single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides of different lengths derived from the region within oriT that spanned the nic site. Purified TraIp was capable of efficiently cleaving single-stranded DNA that contained a nic site, and upon cleavage, the protein became covalently linked to the 5'-end of the nic site. When TraIp was incubated with two oligonucleotides of different length that contained the nic site, there was formation of novel recombinant products resulting from a TraIp-catalyzed cleavage/ligation reaction. Furthermore, the cleavage and ligation reactions were both sequence-specific. These data suggest that TraIp plays an important role in the initiation and termination of conjugative DNA transfer.

  8. Novel mutations in the RB1 gene from Chinese families with a history of retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; Jia, Renbing; Zhao, Junyang; Fan, Jiayan; Zhou, YiXiong; Han, Bing; Song, Xin; Wu, Li; Zhang, He; Song, Huaidong; Ge, Shengfang; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-04-01

    Retinoblastoma is an aggressive eye cancer that develops during infancy and is divided into two clinical types, sporadic and heritable. RB1 has been identified as the only pathological gene responsible for heritable retinoblastoma. Here, we identified 11 RB1 germline mutations in the Han pedigrees of 17 bilateral retinoblastoma patients from China. Four mutations were nonsense mutations, five were splice site mutations, and two resulted in a frame shift due to an insertion or a deletion. Three of the mutations had not been previously reported, and the p.Q344L mutation occurred in two generations of retinoblastoma patients. We investigated phenotypic-genotypic relationships for the novel mutations and showed that these mutations affected the expression, location, and function of the retinoblastoma protein. Abnormal protein localization was observed after transfection of the mutant genes. In addition, changes in the cell cycle distribution and apoptosis rates were observed when the Saos-2 cell line was transfected with plasmids encoding the mutant RB1 genes. Our findings expand the spectrum of known RB1 mutations and will benefit the investigation of RB1 mutation hotspots. Genetic counseling can be offered to families with heritable RB1 mutations.

  9. scFv from Antibody That Mimics gp43 Modulates the Cellular and Humoral Immune Responses during Experimental Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Jannuzzi, Grasielle Pereira; Tavares, Aldo Henrique F. P.; Kaihami, Gilberto Hideo; de Almeida, José Roberto Fogaça; de Almeida, Sandro Rogério; Ferreira, Karen Spadari

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), caused by Paracoccidioides species is a prevalent systemic and progressive mycosis that occurs in Latin America. It is caused by Paracoccidioides species. Immunization with dendritic cells transfected with a plasmid encoding the scFv (pMAC/PS-scFv) that mimics the main antigen of P. brasiliensis (gp43) confers protection in experimental PCM. DCs link innate and adaptive immunity by recognizing invading pathogens and selecting the type of effector T cell to mediate the immune response. Here, we showed that DC-pMAC/PS-scFv induces the activation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results demonstrated that BALB/c mice infected with P. brasiliensis and treated with DC-pMAC/PS-scFv showed the induction of specific IgG production against gp43 and IFN-γ, IL-12 and IL-4 cytokines. Analysis of regional lymph nodes revealed increases in the expression of clec7a, myd88, tlr2, gata3 and tbx21, which are involved in the immune response. Taken together, our results indicate that the scFv modulates the humoral and cellular immune responses and presents epitopes to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. PMID:26091522

  10. Bacterial Argonaute samples the transcriptome to identify foreign DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olovnikov, Ivan; Chan, Ken; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Newman, Dianne K.; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2013-01-01

    summary Eukaryotic Argonautes bind small RNAs and use them as guides to find complementary RNA targets and induce gene silencing. Though homologs of eukaryotic Argonautes are present in many bacteria and archaea their small RNA partners and functions are unknown. We found that the Argonaute of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (RsAgo) associates with 15-19 nt RNAs that correspond to the majority of transcripts. RsAgo also binds single-stranded 22-24 nt DNA molecules that are complementary to the small RNAs and enriched in sequences derived from exogenous plasmids as well as genome-encoded foreign nucleic acids such as transposons and phage genes. Expression of RsAgo in the heterologous E. coli system leads to formation of plasmid– derived small RNA and DNA and plasmid degradation. In a R. sphaeroides mutant lacking RsAgo, expression of plasmid-encoded genes is elevated. Our results indicate that RNAi-related processes found in eukaryotes are also conserved in bacteria and target foreign nucleic acids. PMID:24034694

  11. Immune response of neonates elicited by somatic transgene vaccination with naked DNA.

    PubMed

    Bot, A; Antohi, S; Bona, C

    1997-05-01

    Neonates display lower immune responsiveness and higher susceptibility for high-dose tolerance. Quantitative as well as functional differences between the neonatal and adult lymphocytes or antigen presenting cells (APC) respectively, explain the particular immune responsiveness during the early stages of the postnatal development. Reduced numbers of lymphocytes and APCs as well as a modified responsiveness of T cells in neonates, are the main factors that account for the low threshold of tolerance in newborns. Taking into account these particularities, the design of effective vaccines for neonates poses significant difficulties. We hypothesized that a continuous exposure to low doses of antigens may avoid high-zone tolerance and may lead instead, to effective expansion of effector and memory cells. Indeed, inoculation of newborn mice with plasmids encoding nucleoprotein (NP) or hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus, led to the priming of specific cytotoxic (CTL), helper (Th) and B cells, rather than induction of unresponsiveness. Mice immunized as neonates with naked DNA and challenged later with lethal doses of influenza virus, displayed significant protection. Thus, DNA immunization may be a promising strategy for vaccination against serious infectious diseases of infants and children.

  12. Effects of Efflux Transporter Genes on Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to Tigecycline (GAR-936)

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Takahiro; Saito, Asami; Nishino, Kunihiko; Tamura, Norihisa; Yamaguchi, Akihito

    2004-01-01

    The activity of tigecycline, 9-(t-butylglycylamido)-minocycline, against Escherichia coli KAM3 (acrB) strains harboring plasmids encoding various tetracycline-specific efflux transporter genes, tet(B), tet(C), and tet(K), and multidrug transporter genes, acrAB, acrEF, and bcr, was examined. Tigecycline showed potent activity against all three Tet-expressing, tetracycline-resistant strains, with the MICs for the strains being equal to that for the host strain. In the Tet(B)-containing vesicle study, tigecycline did not significantly inhibit tetracycline efflux-coupled proton translocation and at 10 μM did not cause proton translocation. This suggests that tigecycline is not recognized by the Tet efflux transporter at a low concentration; therefore, it exhibits significant antibacterial activity. These properties can explain its potent activity against bacteria with a Tet efflux resistance determinant. Tigecycline induced the Tet(B) protein approximately four times more efficiently than tetracycline, as determined by Western blotting, indicating that it is at least recognized by a TetR repressor. The MICs for multidrug efflux proteins AcrAB and AcrEF were increased fourfold. Tigecycline inhibited active ethidium bromide efflux from intact E. coli cells overproducing AcrAB. Therefore, tigecycline is a possible substrate of AcrAB and its close homolog, AcrEF, which are resistance-modulation-division-type multicomponent efflux transporters. PMID:15155219

  13. Polylactide-co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles modify the immune response to DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Helson, Rebecca; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Singh, Manmohan; Megede, Jan Zur; Melero, Jose A; O'Hagan, Derek; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2008-02-06

    Priming with the major surface glycoprotein G of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) expressed by recombinant vaccinia leads to strong Th2 responses and lung eosinophilia during viral challenge. We now show that DNA vaccination in BALB/c mice with plasmids encoding G attenuated RSV replication but also enhanced disease with lung eosinophilia and increased IL-4/5 production. However, formulating the DNA with PLG microparticles reduced the severity of disease during RSV challenge without significantly lessening protection against viral replication. PLG formulation greatly reduced lung eosinophilia and prevented the induction of IL-4 and IL-5 during challenge, accompanied by a less marked CD4+ T cell response and a restoration of the CD8+ T cell recruitment seen during infection of non-vaccinated animals. After RSV challenge, lung eosinophilia was enhanced and prolonged in mice vaccinated with DNA encoding a secreted form of G; this effect was virtually prevented by PLG formulation. Therefore, PLG microparticulate formulation modifies the pattern of immune responses induced by DNA vaccination boosts CD8+ T cell priming and attenuates Th2 responses. We speculate that PLG microparticles affect antigen uptake and processing, thereby influencing the outcome of DNA vaccination.

  14. Functional repair of p53 mutation in colorectal cancer cells using trans-splicing.

    PubMed

    He, Xingxing; Liao, Jiazhi; Liu, Fang; Yan, Junwei; Yan, Jingjun; Shang, Haitao; Dou, Qian; Chang, Ying; Lin, Jusheng; Song, Yuhu

    2015-02-10

    Mutation in the p53 gene is arguably the most frequent type of gene-specific alterations in human cancers. Current p53-based gene therapy contains the administration of wt-p53 or the suppression of mutant p53 expression in p53-defective cancer cells. . We hypothesized that trans-splicing could be exploited as a tool for the correction of mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. In this study, the plasmids encoding p53 pre-trans-splicing molecules (PTM) were transfected into human CRC cells carrying p53 mutation. The plasmids carrying p53-PTM repaired mutant p53 transcripts in p53-mutated CRC cells, which resulted in a reduction in mutant p53 transcripts and an induction of wt-p53 simultaneously. Intratumoral administration of adenovirus vectors carrying p53 trans-splicing cassettes suppressed the growth of tumor xenografts. Repair of mutant p53 transcripts by trans-splicing induced cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in p53-defective colorectal cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated for the first time that trans-splicing was exploited as a strategy for the repair of mutant p53 transcripts, which revealed that trans-splicing would be developed as a new therapeutic approach for human colorectal cancers carrying p53 mutation.

  15. Protein-Nanocrystal Conjugates Support a Single Filament Polymerization Model in R1 Plasmid Segregation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Charina L.; Claridge, Shelley A.; Garner, Ethan C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2008-07-15

    To ensure inheritance by daughter cells, many low-copy number bacterial plasmids, including the R1 drug-resistance plasmid, encode their own DNA segregation systems. The par operon of plasmid R1 directs construction of a simple spindle structure that converts free energy of polymerization of an actin-like protein, ParM, into work required to move sister plasmids to opposite poles of rod-shaped cells. The structures of individual components have been solved, but little is known about the ultrastructure of the R1 spindle. To determine the number of ParM filaments in a minimal R1 spindle, we used DNA-gold nanocrystal conjugates as mimics of the R1 plasmid. Wefound that each end of a single polar ParM filament binds to a single ParR/parC-gold complex, consistent with the idea that ParM filaments bind in the hollow core of the ParR/parC ring complex. Our results further suggest that multifilament spindles observed in vivo are associated with clusters of plasmidssegregating as a unit.

  16. Synthesis of GDP-mannose and mannosylglycerate from labeled mannose by genetically engineered Escherichia coli without loss of specific isotopic enrichment.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Maria-Manuel; Santos, Helena; Boos, Winfried

    2003-01-01

    We report the construction of an Escherichia coli mutant that harbors two compatible plasmids and that is able to synthesize labeled 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate from externally added labeled mannose without the loss of specific isotopic enrichment. The strain carries a deletion in the manA gene, encoding phosphomannose isomerase. This deletion prevents the formation of fructose-6-phosphate from mannose-6-phosphate after the uptake of mannose from the medium by mannose-specific enzyme II of the phosphotransferase system (PtsM). The strain also has a deletion of the cps gene cluster that prevents the synthesis of colanic acid, a mannose-containing polymer. Plasmid-encoded phosphomannomutase (cpsG) and mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase (cpsB) ensure the formation of GDP-mannose. A second plasmid harbors msg, a gene from Rhodothermus marinus that encodes mannosylglycerate synthase, which catalyzes the formation of 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate from GDP-mannose and endogenous glycerate. The rate-limiting step in 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate formation is the transfer of GDP-mannose to glycerate. 2-O-alpha-D-mannosyl-D-glycerate can be released from cells by treatment with cold-water shock. The final product is formed in a yield exceeding 50% the initial quantity of labeled mannose, including loss during preparation and paper chromatography.

  17. Size and conformation limits to secretion of disulfide-bonded loops in autotransporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Denisse L; Sevastsyanovich, Yanina R; Browning, Douglas F; Rossiter, Amanda E; Wells, Timothy J; Fitzpatrick, Rebecca E; Overduin, Michael; Cunningham, Adam F; Henderson, Ian R

    2011-12-09

    Autotransporters are a superfamily of virulence factors typified by a channel-forming C terminus that facilitates translocation of the functional N-terminal passenger domain across the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This final step in the secretion of autotransporters requires a translocation-competent conformation for the passenger domain that differs markedly from the structure of the fully folded secreted protein. The nature of the translocation-competent conformation remains controversial, in particular whether the passenger domain can adopt secondary structural motifs, such as disulfide-bonded segments, while maintaining a secretion-competent state. Here, we used the endogenous and closely spaced cysteine residues of the plasmid-encoded toxin (Pet) from enteroaggregative Escherichia coli to investigate the effect of disulfide bond-induced folding on translocation of an autotransporter passenger domain. We reveal that rigid structural elements within disulfide-bonded segments are resistant to autotransporter-mediated secretion. We define the size limit of disulfide-bonded segments tolerated by the autotransporter system demonstrating that, when present, cysteine pairs are intrinsically closely spaced to prevent congestion of the translocator pore by large disulfide-bonded regions. These latter data strongly support the hairpin mode of autotransporter biogenesis.

  18. Complete genome sequence and comparative analysis of the wild-type commensal Escherichia coli strain SE11 isolated from a healthy adult.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sasamoto, Hiroyuki; Morita, Hidetoshi; Park, Sang-Hee; Ooka, Tadasuke; Iyoda, Sunao; Taylor, Todd D; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kikuji; Hattori, Masahira

    2008-12-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the genome of a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain SE11 (O152:H28) recently isolated from feces of a healthy adult and classified into E. coli phylogenetic group B1. SE11 harbored a 4.8 Mb chromosome encoding 4679 protein-coding genes and six plasmids encoding 323 protein-coding genes. None of the SE11 genes had sequence similarity to known genes encoding phage- and plasmid-borne virulence factors found in pathogenic E. coli strains. The comparative genome analysis with the laboratory strain K-12 MG1655 identified 62 poorly conserved genes between these two non-pathogenic strains and 1186 genes absent in MG1655. These genes in SE11 were mostly encoded in large insertion regions on the chromosome or in the plasmids, and were notably abundant in genes of fimbriae and autotransporters, which are cell surface appendages that largely contribute to the adherence ability of bacteria to host cells and bacterial conjugation. These data suggest that SE11 may have evolved to acquire and accumulate the functions advantageous for stable colonization of intestinal cells, and that the adhesion-associated functions are important for the commensality of E. coli in human gut habitat.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Analysis of the Wild-type Commensal Escherichia coli Strain SE11 Isolated from a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Sasamoto, Hiroyuki; Morita, Hidetoshi; Park, Sang-Hee; Ooka, Tadasuke; Iyoda, Sunao; Taylor, Todd D.; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Itoh, Kikuji; Hattori, Masahira

    2008-01-01

    We sequenced and analyzed the genome of a commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain SE11 (O152:H28) recently isolated from feces of a healthy adult and classified into E. coli phylogenetic group B1. SE11 harbored a 4.8 Mb chromosome encoding 4679 protein-coding genes and six plasmids encoding 323 protein-coding genes. None of the SE11 genes had sequence similarity to known genes encoding phage- and plasmid-borne virulence factors found in pathogenic E. coli strains. The comparative genome analysis with the laboratory strain K-12 MG1655 identified 62 poorly conserved genes between these two non-pathogenic strains and 1186 genes absent in MG1655. These genes in SE11 were mostly encoded in large insertion regions on the chromosome or in the plasmids, and were notably abundant in genes of fimbriae and autotransporters, which are cell surface appendages that largely contribute to the adherence ability of bacteria to host cells and bacterial conjugation. These data suggest that SE11 may have evolved to acquire and accumulate the functions advantageous for stable colonization of intestinal cells, and that the adhesion-associated functions are important for the commensality of E. coli in human gut habitat. PMID:18931093

  20. Identification of a Gene within a Pathogenicity Island of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli H10407 Required for Maximal Secretion of the Heat-Labile Enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Fleckenstein, James M.; Lindler, Luther E.; Elsinghorst, Eric A.; Dale, James B.

    2000-01-01

    Studies of the pathogenesis of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) have largely centered on extrachromosomal determinants of virulence, in particular the plasmid-encoded heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins and the colonization factor antigens. ETEC causes illnesses that range from mild diarrhea to severe cholera-like disease. These differences in disease severity are not readily accounted for by our current understanding of ETEC pathogenesis. Here we demonstrate that Tia, a putative adhesin of ETEC H10407, is encoded on a large chromosomal element of approximately 46 kb that shares multiple features with previously described E. coli pathogenicity islands. Further analysis of the region downstream from tia revealed the presence of several candidate open reading frames (ORFs) in the same transcriptional orientation as tia. The putative proteins encoded by these ORFs bear multiple motifs associated with bacterial secretion apparatuses. An in-frame deletion in one candidate gene identified here as leoA (labile enterotoxin output) resulted in marked diminution of secretion of the LT enterotoxin and lack of fluid accumulation in a rabbit ileal loop model of infection. Although previous studies have suggested that E. coli lacks the capacity to secrete LT, our studies show that maximal release of LT from the periplasm of H10407 is dependent on one or more elements encoded on a pathogenicity island. PMID:10768971

  1. Gastric attaching and effacing Escherichia coli lesions in a puppy with naturally occurring enteric colibacillosis and concurrent canine distemper virus infection.

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Kondo, H; Nakaoka, Y; Kubo, M

    1996-11-01

    A puppy suffering from chronic diarrhea was humanely killed at 90 days of age. Numerous Gram-negative bacilli were found adhering to the surface of as well as within epithelial cells from the stomach to the colon. Canine distemper virus inclusions were in the epithelial cytoplasm of the esophageal, gastric, and intestinal mucosa. Typical attaching and effacing ultrastructural lesions were in the stomach, and some bacilli were in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells. Escherichia coli, isolated from the contents of the small intestine, belonged to serotype 0118: NM and were negative for plasmid-encoded EPEC adherence factor (EAF) and positive for the E. coli attaching effacing (eae) gene. Immunohistologically, bacilli attached to the epithelium from the stomach to the colon were positive for antisera against E. coli 0118. E. coli 0118: NM inoculated into human tissue culture cells (HEp-2 cells) were attached to the surface of the cells and within the cytoplasm. This is the first report of attaching and effacing E. coli (AEEC) infection in the stomach of the dog.

  2. Heterologous Expression and Delivery of Biologically Active Exendin-4 by Lactobacillus paracasei L14.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhu; Yu, Rui; Zuo, Fanglei; Zhang, Bo; Peng, Deju; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-01-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like protein-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is an excellent therapeutic peptide drug for type 2 diabetes due to longer lasting biological activity compared to GLP-1. This study explored the feasibility of using probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an oral vector for recombinant exendin-4 peptide delivery, an alternative to costly chemical synthesis and inconvenient administration by injection. L. paracasei transformed with a plasmid encoding the exendin-4 gene (L. paracasei L14/pMG76e-exendin-4) with a constitutive promotor was successfully constructed and showed efficient secretion of exendin-4. The secreted exendin-4 significantly enhanced insulin secretion of INS-1 β-cells, along with an increment in their proliferation and inhibition of their apoptosis, corresponding to the effect of GLP-1 on these cells. The transcription level of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 gene (PDX-1), a key transcription factor for cellular insulin synthesis and secretion, was upregulated by the treatment with secreted exendin-4, paralleling the upregulation of insulin gene expression. Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay showed a 34-fold increase in the transport of exendin-4 delivered by L. paracasei vs. that of free exendin-4 (control), suggesting effective facilitation of exendin-4 transport across the intestinal barrier by this delivery system. This study demonstrates that the probiotic Lactobacillus can be engineered to secrete bioactive exendin-4 and facilitate its transport through the intestinal barrier, providing a novel strategy for oral exendin-4 delivery using this lactic acid bacterium.

  3. Large Ribosomal Protein 4 Increases Efficiency of Viral Recoding Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Green, Lisa; Houck-Loomis, Brian; Yueh, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Expression of retroviral replication enzymes (Pol) requires a controlled translational recoding event to bypass the stop codon at the end of gag. This recoding event occurs either by direct suppression of termination via the insertion of an amino acid at the stop codon (readthrough) or by alteration of the mRNA reading frame (frameshift). Here we report the effects of a host protein, large ribosomal protein 4 (RPL4), on the efficiency of recoding. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we found that transfection of cells with a plasmid encoding RPL4 cDNA increases recoding efficiency in a dose-dependent manner, with a maximal enhancement of nearly twofold. Expression of RPL4 increases recoding of reporters containing retroviral readthrough and frameshift sequences, as well as the Sindbis virus leaky termination signal. RPL4-induced enhancement of recoding is cell line specific and appears to be specific to RPL4 among ribosomal proteins. Cotransfection of RPL4 cDNA with Moloney murine leukemia proviral DNA results in Gag processing defects and a reduction of viral particle formation, presumably caused by the RPL4-dependent alteration of the Gag-to-Gag-Pol ratio required for virion assembly and release. PMID:22718819

  4. High instability of a nematicidal Cry toxin plasmid in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, Anna E; Nakad, Rania; Saebelfeld, Manja; Masche, Anna C; Dierking, Katja; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-01-01

    In bacterial pathogens, virulence factors are often carried on plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, and as such, plasmid evolution is central in understanding pathogenicity. Bacillus thuringiensis is an invertebrate pathogen that uses plasmid-encoded crystal (Cry) toxins to establish infections inside the host. Our study aimed to quantify stability of two Cry toxin-encoding plasmids, BTI_23p and BTI_16p, under standard laboratory culturing conditions. These two plasmids are part of the genome of the B. thuringiensis strain MYBT18679, which is of particular interest because of its high pathogenicity towards nematodes. One of the plasmids, BTI_23p, was found to be highly unstable, with substantial loss occurring within a single growth cycle. Nevertheless, longer term experimental evolution in the absence of a host revealed maintenance of the plasmid at low levels in the bacterial populations. BTI_23p encodes two nematicidal Cry toxins, Cry21Aa2 and Cry14Aa1. Consistent with previous findings, loss of the plasmid abolished pathogenicity towards the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which could be rescued by addition of Cry21Aa2-expressing Escherichia coli. These results implicate BTI_23p as a plasmid that is required for successful infection, yet unstable when present at high frequency in the population, consistent with the role of Cry toxins as public goods.

  5. Anticancer DNA vaccine based on human telomerase reverse transcriptase generates a strong and specific T cell immune response

    PubMed Central

    Thalmensi, Jessie; Pliquet, Elodie; Liard, Christelle; Escande, Marie; Bestetti, Thomas; Julithe, Marion; Kostrzak, Anna; Pailhes-Jimenez, Anne-Sophie; Bourges, Emanuèle; Loustau, Maria; Caumartin, Julien; Lachgar, Abderrahim; Huet, Thierry; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Langlade-Demoyen, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is overexpressed in more than 85% of human cancers regardless of their cellular origin. As immunological tolerance to hTERT can be overcome not only spontaneously but also by vaccination, it represents a relevant universal tumor associated antigen (TAA). Indeed, hTERT specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursors are present within the peripheral T-cell repertoire. Consequently, hTERT vaccine represents an attractive candidate for antitumor immunotherapy. Here, an optimized DNA plasmid encoding an inactivated form of hTERT, named INVAC-1, was designed in order to trigger cellular immunity against tumors. Intradermal injection of INVAC-1 followed by electrogene transfer (EGT) in a variety of mouse models elicited broad hTERT specific cellular immune responses including high CD4+ Th1 effector and memory CD8+ T‑cells. Furthermore, therapeutic INVAC‑1 immunization in a HLA-A2 spontaneous and aggressive mouse sarcoma model slows tumor growth and increases survival rate of 50% of tumor-bearing mice. These results emphasize that INVAC-1 based immunotherapy represents a relevant cancer vaccine candidate. PMID:27141336

  6. Structures of replication initiation proteins from staphylococcal antibiotic resistance plasmids reveal protein asymmetry and flexibility are necessary for replication

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Stephen B.; Phillips, Simon E.V.; Thomas, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a continual threat to human health, often residing in extrachromosomal plasmid DNA. Plasmids of the pT181 family are widespread and confer various antibiotic resistances to Staphylococcus aureus. They replicate via a rolling circle mechanism that requires a multi-functional, plasmid-encoded replication protein to initiate replication, recruit a helicase to the site of initiation and terminate replication after DNA synthesis is complete. We present the first atomic resolution structures of three such replication proteins that reveal distinct, functionally relevant conformations. The proteins possess a unique active site and have been shown to contain a catalytically essential metal ion that is bound in a manner distinct from that of any other rolling circle replication proteins. These structures are the first examples of the Rep_trans Pfam family providing insights into the replication of numerous antibiotic resistance plasmids from Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative phage and the mobilisation of DNA by conjugative transposons. PMID:26792891

  7. Engineering of bacteria for the visualization of targeted delivery of a cytolytic anticancer agent.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-11-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent.

  8. Optical tracking of organically modified silica nanoparticles as DNA carriers: a nonviral, nanomedicine approach for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Roy, Indrajit; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Bharali, Dhruba J; Pudavar, Haridas E; Mistretta, Ruth A; Kaur, Navjot; Prasad, Paras N

    2005-01-11

    This article reports a multidisciplinary approach to produce fluorescently labeled organically modified silica nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery and biophotonics methods to optically monitor intracellular trafficking and gene transfection. Highly monodispersed, stable aqueous suspensions of organically modified silica nanoparticles, encapsulating fluorescent dyes and surface functionalized by cationic-amino groups, are produced by micellar nanochemistry. Gel-electrophoresis studies reveal that the particles efficiently complex with DNA and protect it from enzymatic digestion of DNase 1. The electrostatic binding of DNA onto the surface of the nanoparticles, due to positively charged amino groups, is also shown by intercalating an appropriate dye into the DNA and observing the Forster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer between the dye (energy donor) intercalated in DNA on the surface of nanoparticles and a second dye (energy acceptor) inside the nanoparticles. Imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy shows that cells efficiently take up the nanoparticles in vitro in the cytoplasm, and the nanoparticles deliver DNA to the nucleus. The use of plasmid encoding enhanced GFP allowed us to demonstrate the process of gene transfection in cultured cells. Our work shows that the nanomedicine approach, with nanoparticles acting as a drug-delivery platform combining multiple optical and other types of probes, provides a promising direction for targeted therapy with enhanced efficacy as well as for real-time monitoring of drug action.

  9. Rescue of measles viruses from cloned DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Radecke, F; Spielhofer, P; Schneider, H; Kaelin, K; Huber, M; Dötsch, C; Christiansen, G; Billeter, M A

    1995-01-01

    A system has been established allowing the rescue of replicating measles viruses (MVs) from cloned DNA. On one hand, plasmids were constructed from which MV antigenomic RNAs with the correct termini are transcribed by phage T7 RNA polymerase. On the other hand, helper cells derived from the human embryonic kidney 293 cell line were generated constitutively expressing T7 RNA polymerase together with MV nucleocapsid protein and phosphoprotein. Simultaneous transfection of the helper cells with the MV antigenomic plasmid and with a plasmid encoding the MV polymerase under direction of a T7 promoter led to formation of syncytia from which MVs were easily recovered. A genetic tag comprising three nucleotide changes was present in the progeny virus. As a first application of reverse genetics, a segment of 504 nucleotides from the 5' non-coding region of the fusion gene was deleted, leading to an MV variant whose replication behaviour in Vero cells was indistinguishable from that of the laboratory Edmonston B strain. Since no helper virus is involved, this system, in principle, should be applicable to the rescue of any member of the large virus order Mononegavirales, i.e. viruses with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome. Images PMID:8846771

  10. Advances in the Function and Regulation of Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803

    PubMed Central

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Veaudor, Théo; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In order to use cyanobacteria for the biological production of hydrogen, it is important to thoroughly study the function and the regulation of the hydrogen-production machine in order to better understand its role in the global cell metabolism and identify bottlenecks limiting H2 production. Most of the recent advances in our understanding of the bidirectional [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase (Hox) came from investigations performed in the widely-used model cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 where Hox is the sole enzyme capable of combining electrons with protons to produce H2 under specific conditions. Recent findings suggested that the Hox enzyme can receive electrons from not only NAD(P)H as usually shown, but also, or even preferentially, from ferredoxin. Furthermore, plasmid-encoded functions and glutathionylation (the formation of a mixed-disulfide between the cysteines residues of a protein and the cysteine residue of glutathione) are proposed as possible new players in the function and regulation of hydrogen production. PMID:25365180

  11. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  12. Polymeric structure and host Toll-like receptor 4 dictate immunogenicity of NY-ESO-1 antigen in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Tian, Xiaoli; Leitner, Wolfgang W; Aldridge, Michael E; Zheng, Junying; Yu, Zhiya; Restifo, Nicholas P; Weiss, Richard; Scheiblhofer, Sandra; Xie, Chong; Sun, Ren; Cheng, Genhong; Zeng, Gang

    2011-10-28

    In search of intrinsic factors that contribute to the distinctively strong immunogenicity of a non-mutated cancer/testis antigen, we found that NY-ESO-1 forms polymeric structures through disulfide bonds. NY-ESO-1 binding to immature dendritic cells was dependent on its polymeric structure and involved Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) on the surface of immature dendritic cells in mouse and human. Gene gun-delivered plasmid encoding the wild-type NY-ESO-1 readily induced T cell-dependent antibody (Ab) responses in wild-type C57BL/10 mice but not TLR4-knock-out C57BL/10ScNJ mice. Disrupting polymeric structures of NY-ESO-1 by cysteine-to-serine (Cys-to-Ser) substitutions lead to diminished immunogenicity and altered TLR4-dependence in the induced Ab response. To demonstrate its adjuvant effect, NY-ESO-1 was fused with a major mugwort pollen allergen Art v 1 and a tumor-associated antigen, carbonic anhydrase 9. Plasmid DNA vaccines encoding the fusion genes generated robust immune responses against otherwise non-immunogenic targets in mice. Polymeric structure and TLR4 may play important roles in rendering NY-ESO-1 immunogenic and thus serve as a potent molecular adjuvant. NY-ESO-1 thus represents the first example of a cancer/testis antigen that is a also damage-associated molecular pattern.

  13. The role of flies in spreading the extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene from cattle.

    PubMed

    Usui, Masaru; Iwasa, Tomohiro; Fukuda, Akira; Sato, Toyotaka; Okubo, Torahiko; Tamura, Yutaka

    2013-10-01

    The spreading of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria and genes from food-producing animals to humans has been a subject of increasing concern. To clarify the role of flies in spreading the extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) gene from food-producing animals to humans, we isolated and characterized a third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli strain from flies and cattle feces from a cattle barn. Cephalosporin-resistant strains were isolated from 14.3% (13/91) of houseflies, 10.3% (7/68) of false stable flies, and 7.5% (7/93) of cattle feces. Twenty-seven cephalosporin-resistant strains were tested for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes. Of the 27 samples, 22 isolates from 11 houseflies, 5 false stable flies, and 6 cattle feces samples harbored the blaCTX-M-15 gene. All blaCTX-M-15-harboring isolates belonged to phylogenetic group D and the ST38 clonal group. Analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that these isolates were divided into two clusters, indicating that flies carried several of the same clones that were detected in cattle feces. All blaCTX-M-15 gene-harboring plasmids were transferable and were members of incompatibility group FIB. These results suggest that transferable plasmids encoding ESBL were prevalent among flies and cattle. As vectors, flies may play an important role in spreading ESBL-producing bacteria from food-producing animals to humans.

  14. Isolation and DNA sequence of ADH3, a nuclear gene encoding the mitochondrial isozyme of alcohol dehydrogenase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Young, E T; Pilgrim, D

    1985-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear gene, ADH3, that encodes the mitochondrial alcohol dehydrogenase isozyme ADH III was cloned by virtue of its nucleotide homology to ADH1 and ADH2. Both chromosomal and plasmid-encoded ADH III isozymes were repressed by glucose and migrated heterogeneously on nondenaturing gels. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated 73 and 74% identity for ADH3 with ADH1 and ADH2, respectively. The amino acid identity between the predicted ADH III polypeptide and ADH I and ADH II was 79 and 80%, respectively. The open reading frame encoding ADH III has a highly basic 27-amino-acid amino-terminal extension relative to ADH I and ADH II. The nucleotide sequence of the presumed leader peptide has a high degree of identity with the untranslated leader regions of ADH1 and ADH2 mRNAs. A strain containing a null allele of ADH3 did not have a detectably altered phenotype. The cloned gene integrated at the ADH3 locus, indicating that this is the structural gene for ADH III. Images PMID:2943982

  15. Glucocorticoids facilitate the stable transformation of embryonal rat fibroblasts by a polyomavirus large tumor antigen-deficient mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Martens, I; Nilsson, M; Magnusson, G; Linder, S

    1988-01-01

    The addition of glucocorticoids to the growth medium could substitute for the expression of the polyomavirus large tumor antigen in the transformation of rat fibroblasts in vitro. After transfection with a large tumor antigen-deficient mutant of polyomavirus, pbc1051, high-frequency permanent transformation was observed, if the cells were grown in medium containing dexamethasone. Growth of pbc1051-transfected rat fibroblasts was strictly dependent on the presence of glucocorticoids during the initial phase of transformation. In the second phase, the growth of pbc1051-transfected cells was stimulated by dexamethasone, but the hormone was not essential for growth. After approximately 10 weeks in culture, pbc1051-transfected cells had progressed to hormone independent growth. Rat embryo cells transfected with wild-type polyomavirus DNA had the second phase in which growth was stimulated by glucocorticoid, and after this phase growth was steroid independent. Addition of glucocorticoids to rat fibroblasts transfected with a plasmid encoding only the middle-sized tumor antigen resulted in only a weak stimulation of growth. In contrast, embryo cells transfected with a plasmid containing the human homologue of the cellular T24 Ha-ras gene linked to murine sarcoma virus and simian virus 40 enhancers could be efficiently established as cell lines in medium supplemented with glucocorticoids. The data suggest that, in the transformation of primary rodent cells by polyomavirus, the activity of large tumor antigen can be substituted for by stimulating normal cellular functions with dexamethasone. Images PMID:2840668

  16. Evaluating the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a DNA vaccine encoding Lassa virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Carreno, Maria P; Nelson, Michael S; Botten, Jason; Smith-Nixon, Kim; Buchmeier, Michael J; Whitton, J Lindsay

    2005-04-25

    Several viruses in the Arenavirus genus of the family Arenaviridae cause severe, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever. One such virus, Lassa virus (LV), is a frequent cause of disease in Africa, and survivors often are left with substantial neurological impairment. The feasibility of protective immunization against LV infection, and the associated disease, has been demonstrated in animal models, using recombinant vaccinia viruses to deliver Lassa proteins. Circumstantial evidence implicates cellular immunity in this Lassa-induced protection, but this has not been confirmed. Here, we describe DNA vaccines that encode LV proteins. A single inoculation of a plasmid encoding full-length Lassa nucleoprotein (LNP) can induce CD8(+) T cell responses in mice and can protect against challenge with two arenaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and Pichinde virus (PV). A DNA minigene vaccine encoding a 9 amino acid sequence from LNP also induces CD8(+) T cells and protects against arenavirus challenge, thus confirming prior speculation that protective cellular immunity is induced by LV proteins.

  17. High-throughput in situ cell electroporation microsystem for parallel delivery of single guide RNAs into mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Shengtai; Zhou, Yicen; Hu, Yawei; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Xiaofang; Xu, Youchun; Liu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Arrayed genetic screens mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 technology with single guide RNA (sgRNA) libraries demand a high-throughput platform capable of transfecting diverse cell types at a high efficiency in a genome-wide scale for detection and analysis of sophisticated cellular phenotypes. Here we developed a high-throughput in situ cell electroporation (HiCEP) microsystem which leveraged the superhydrophobic feature of the microwell array to achieve individually controlled conditions in each microwell and coupled an interdigital electrode array chip with the microwells in a modular-based scheme for highly efficient delivery of exogenous molecules into cells. Two plasmids encoding enhanced green and red fluorescent proteins (EGFP and ERFP), respectively, were successfully electroporated into attached HeLa cells on a 169-microwell array chip with transfection efficiencies of 71.6 ± 11.4% and 62.9 ± 2.7%, and a cell viability above 95%. We also successfully conducted selective electroporation of sgRNA into 293T cells expressing the Cas9 nuclease in a high-throughput manner and observed the four-fold increase of the GFP intensities due to the repair of the protein coding sequences mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system. This study proved that this HiCEP system has the great potential to be used for arrayed functional screens with genome-wide CRISPR libraries on hard-to-transfect cells in the future. PMID:28211892

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Finegoldia magna, an Anaerobic Opportunistic Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Takatsugu; Yamashita, Atsushi; Hirakawa, Hideki; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Todo, Kozo; Ohshima, Kenshiro; Toh, Hidehiro; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kuhara, Satoru; Hattori, Masahira; Shimizu, Tohru; Akimoto, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    Finegoldia magna (formerly Peptostreptococcus magnus), a member of the Gram-positive anaerobic cocci (GPAC), is a commensal bacterium colonizing human skin and mucous membranes. Moreover, it is also recognized as an opportunistic pathogen responsible for various infectious diseases. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of F. magna ATCC 29328. The genome consists of a 1 797 577 bp circular chromosome and an 189 163 bp plasmid (pPEP1). The metabolic maps constructed based on the genome information confirmed that most F. magna strains cannot ferment most sugars, except fructose, and have various aminopeptidase activities. Three homologs of albumin-binding protein, a known virulence factor useful for antiphagocytosis, are encoded on the chromosome, and one albumin-binding protein homolog is encoded on the plasmid. A unique feature of the genome is that F. magna encodes many sortase genes, of which substrates may be involved in bacterial pathogenesis, such as antiphagocytosis and adherence to the host cell. The plasmid pPEP1 encodes seven sortase and seven substrate genes, whereas the chromosome encodes four sortase and 19 substrate genes. These plasmid-encoded sortases may play important roles in the pathogenesis of F. magna by enriching the variety of cell wall anchored surface proteins. PMID:18263572

  19. Role of bacteriophages in STEC infections: new implications for the design of prophylactic and treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Jaime H.; Del Cogliano, Manuel E.; Fernandez-Brando, Romina J.; Bilen, Marcos F.; Jesus, Monica R.; Luiz, Wilson B.; Palermo, Marina S.; Ferreira, Rita C.C.; Servat, Esteban G.; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D.; Ferreira, Luis C.S; Bentancor, Leticia V.

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is considered the main virulence factor in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. Previously we reported the expression of biologically active Stx by eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo following transfection with plasmids encoding Stx under control of the native bacterial promoter 1,2. Since stx genes are present in the genome of lysogenic bacteriophages, here we evaluated the relevance of bacteriophages during STEC infection. We used the non-pathogenic E. coli C600 strain carrying a lysogenic 933W mutant bacteriophage in which the stx operon was replaced by a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Tracking GFP expression using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS), we detected fluorescence in liver, kidney, and intestine of mice infected with the recombinant E. coli strain after treatment with ciprofloxacin, which induces the lytic replication and release of bacteriophages. In addition, we showed that chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of d-glucosamine residues and with a number of commercial and biomedical uses, had strong anti-bacteriophage effects, as demonstrated at in vitro and in vivo conditions. These findings bring promising perspectives for the prevention and treatment of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases. PMID:25580222

  20. Heterologous Expression and Delivery of Biologically Active Exendin-4 by Lactobacillus paracasei L14

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhu; Yu, Rui; Zuo, Fanglei; Zhang, Bo; Peng, Deju; Ma, Huiqin; Chen, Shangwu

    2016-01-01

    Exendin-4, a glucagon-like protein-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is an excellent therapeutic peptide drug for type 2 diabetes due to longer lasting biological activity compared to GLP-1. This study explored the feasibility of using probiotic Lactobacillus paracasei as an oral vector for recombinant exendin-4 peptide delivery, an alternative to costly chemical synthesis and inconvenient administration by injection. L. paracasei transformed with a plasmid encoding the exendin-4 gene (L. paracasei L14/pMG76e-exendin-4) with a constitutive promotor was successfully constructed and showed efficient secretion of exendin-4. The secreted exendin-4 significantly enhanced insulin secretion of INS-1 β-cells, along with an increment in their proliferation and inhibition of their apoptosis, corresponding to the effect of GLP-1 on these cells. The transcription level of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 gene (PDX-1), a key transcription factor for cellular insulin synthesis and secretion, was upregulated by the treatment with secreted exendin-4, paralleling the upregulation of insulin gene expression. Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay showed a 34-fold increase in the transport of exendin-4 delivered by L. paracasei vs. that of free exendin-4 (control), suggesting effective facilitation of exendin-4 transport across the intestinal barrier by this delivery system. This study demonstrates that the probiotic Lactobacillus can be engineered to secrete bioactive exendin-4 and facilitate its transport through the intestinal barrier, providing a novel strategy for oral exendin-4 delivery using this lactic acid bacterium. PMID:27764251

  1. A novel cryohemagglutinin associated with adherence of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, T; Wakisaka, N; Nakae, T

    1997-01-01

    Strain O42 (serotype O44:H18) of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAggEC) has been shown to be pathogenic in volunteer experiments. This strain exhibited plasmid (pO42)-encoded D-mannose-resistant hemagglutinating activity (MRHA) that was detected only at low temperatures (e.g., 0 degrees C) and only with human erythrocytes. The production of this cryogenic MRHA (cryo-MRHA) was observed when the bacteria were grown in liquid media and was strictly regulated by bacterial growth temperatures. Transposon-insertion mutagenesis revealed that this MRHA is associated with (i) bacterial clump formation in liquid cultures, (ii) bacterial adherence to HEp-2 cells as well as (Formalin-fixed) human colonic mucosa, and (iii) production of a 16-kDa outer membrane protein. The PCR designed on the basis of the determined cryo-MRHA-associated DNA sequence sharply distinguished strain O42 from eight other EAggEC strains whose MRHAs were detected at both cold and room temperatures to the same (or similar) extent. Strain O42 possessed a surface layer that may enhance the pO42-mediated adherence. The data suggest that a plasmid-encoded cryo-MRHA is a candidate for a major adhesin of EAggEC strain O42. PMID:9234817

  2. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota.

    PubMed

    Forterre, Patrick; Krupovic, Mart; Raymann, Kasie; Soler, Nicolas

    2014-12-01

    Many plasmids have been described in Euryarchaeota, one of the three major archaeal phyla, most of them in salt-loving haloarchaea and hyperthermophilic Thermococcales. These plasmids resemble bacterial plasmids in terms of size (from small plasmids encoding only one gene up to large megaplasmids) and replication mechanisms (rolling circle or theta). Some of them are related to viral genomes and form a more or less continuous sequence space including many integrated elements. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota have been useful for designing efficient genetic tools for these microorganisms. In addition, they have also been used to probe the topological state of plasmids in species with or without DNA gyrase and/or reverse gyrase. Plasmids from Euryarchaeota encode both DNA replication proteins recruited from their hosts and novel families of DNA replication proteins. Euryarchaeota form an interesting playground to test evolutionary hypotheses on the origin and evolution of viruses and plasmids, since a robust phylogeny is available for this phylum. Preliminary studies have shown that for different plasmid families, plasmids share a common gene pool and coevolve with their hosts. They are involved in gene transfer, mostly between plasmids and viruses present in closely related species, but rarely between cells from distantly related archaeal lineages. With few exceptions (e.g., plasmids carrying gas vesicle genes), most archaeal plasmids seem to be cryptic. Interestingly, plasmids and viral genomes have been detected in extracellular membrane vesicles produced by Thermococcales, suggesting that these vesicles could be involved in the transfer of viruses and plasmids between cells.

  3. Regulation of the pAD1 sex pheromone response of Enterococcus faecalis by direct interaction between the cAD1 peptide mating signal and the negatively regulating, DNA-binding TraA protein

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Shuhei; Clewell, Don B.

    1998-01-01

    The Enterococcus faecalis conjugative plasmid pAD1 (60 kb) encodes a mating response to the recipient-produced peptide sex pheromone cAD1. The response involves two key plasmid-encoded regulatory proteins: TraE1, which positively regulates all or most structural genes relating to conjugation, and TraA, which binds DNA and negatively regulates expression of traE1. In vitro studies that included development of a DNA-associated protein-tag affinity chromatography technique showed that TraA (37.9 kDa) binds directly to cAD1 near its carboxyl-terminal end and, as a consequence, loses its affinity for DNA. Analyses of genetically modified TraA proteins indicated that truncations within the carboxyl-terminal 9 residues significantly affected the specificity of peptide-directed association/dissociation of DNA. The data support earlier observations that transposon insertions near the 3′ end of traA eliminated the ability of cells to respond to cAD1. PMID:9600983

  4. Ecology, physiology, and phylogeny of deep subsurface Sphingomonas sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Balkwill, David L.; Romine, Margaret F.; Shi, T

    1999-10-01

    Several new species of the genus Sphingomonas including S. aromaticivorans, S. stygia, and S. subterranea that have the capacity for degrading a broad range of aromatic compounds including toluene, naphthalene, xylenes, p-cresol, fluorene, biphenyl, and dibenzothiophene, were isolated from deeply-buried (>200 m) sediments of the US Atlantic coastal plain (ACP). In S. aromaticivorans F199, many of the genes involved in the catabolism of these aromatic compounds are encoded on a 184-kb conjugative plasmid; some of the genes involved in aromatic catabolism are plasmid-encoded in the other strains as well. Members of the genus Sphingomonas were common among aerobic heterotrophic bacteria cultured from ACP sediments and have been detected in deep subsurface environments elsewhere. The major source of organic carbon for heterotrophic metabolism in ACP deep aquifers is lignite that originated from plant material buried with the sediments. We speculate that the ability of the subsurface Sphingomonas strains to degrade a wide array of aromatic compounds represents an adaptation for utilization of sedimentary lignite. These and related subsurface Sphingomonas spp may play an important role in the transformation of sedimentary organic carbon in the aerobic and microaerobic regions of the deep aquifers of the ACP.

  5. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase regulates basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated but not phorbol ester-stimulated transcription of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Kim, K S; Tinti, C; Song, B; Cubells, J F; Joh, T H

    1994-09-01

    To define the precise role of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene, we performed transient cotransfection analyses of a reporter construct containing the upstream 2,400 bp sequence of the rat TH gene with expression plasmids encoding a heat-stable specific inhibitor of PKA (PKI), a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA, or the catalytic subunit of PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by expression of either PKI or mutant regulatory subunit blocked cAMP-stimulated induction and reduced basal transcription of the TH-reporter construct. Expression of the catalytic subunit of PKA induced the expression of the TH-reporter construct up to 50-fold in a dose-dependent manner. Primer extension analysis confirmed that PKA-mediated induction of TH-reporter expression occurred at the correct transcription initiation site. Expression of PKI did not affect induction following phorbol ester treatment, suggesting that PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) induce TH transcription by independent mechanisms. Finally, a double mutation within the cAMP response element (CRE) of TH2400-CAT diminished its basal and forskolin-stimulated transcription to the level of the promoterless plasmid, pBLCAT3, but did not alter the induction following treatment with phorbol ester, indicating that the CRE is not required for PKC-mediated transcriptional induction. Our results indicate that PKA, via the CRE, plays a crucial role for basal and cAMP-inducible transcription of the TH gene.

  6. Coexistence of evolving bacteria stabilized by a shared Black Queen function.

    PubMed

    Morris, J Jeffrey; Papoulis, Spiridon E; Lenski, Richard E

    2014-10-01

    The Black Queen Hypothesis (BQH) was originally proposed to explain the dependence of some marine bacteria on helper organisms for protection from hydrogen peroxide (HOOH). The BQH predicts that selection for the evolutionary loss of leaky functions from individuals can produce commensal or mutualistic interactions. We demonstrated the leakiness of HOOH detoxification by complementing a HOOH-sensitive Escherichia coli mutant with a plasmid-encoded HOOH-detoxifying enzyme, KatG, and then evolving populations founded by this strain in two environments. When HOOH was absent, plasmid-carrying cells were outcompeted by plasmid-free segregants, reflecting the high cost of KatG expression. However, plasmid-carrying and plasmid-free cells coexisted for at least 1200 generations in three replicate populations evolved in the presence of HOOH, although their relative proportions fluctuated as beneficial mutations arose in one type or the other. Evolved plasmid-bearing cells reduced the cost of plasmid carriage even as they increased the rate of HOOH removal relative to the ancestor. Meanwhile, plasmid-free cells remained dependent on HOOH detoxification by the plasmid-bearing cells. These results demonstrate that partitioning of a Black Queen function can enable the stable coexistence of very similar organisms, even in this most restrictive case where the two types are competing for a single resource.

  7. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids.

    PubMed

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica.

  8. Evaluation of a novel non-penetrating electrode for use in DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Donate, Amy; Coppola, Domenico; Cruz, Yolmari; Heller, Richard

    2011-04-29

    Current progress in the development of vaccines has decreased the incidence of fatal and non-fatal infections and increased longevity. However, new technologies need to be developed to combat an emerging generation of infectious diseases. DNA vaccination has been demonstrated to have great potential for use with a wide variety of diseases. Alone, this technology does not generate a significant immune response for vaccination, but combined with delivery by electroporation (EP), can enhance plasmid expression and immunity. Most EP systems, while effective, can be invasive and painful making them less desirable for use in vaccination. Our lab recently developed a non-invasive electrode known as the multi-electrode array (MEA), which lies flat on the surface of the skin without penetrating the tissue. In this study we evaluated the MEA for its use in DNA vaccination using Hepatitis B virus as the infectious model. We utilized the guinea pig model because their skin is similar in thickness and morphology to humans. The plasmid encoding Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was delivered intradermally with the MEA to guinea pig skin. The results show increased protein expression resulting from plasmid delivery using the MEA as compared to injection alone. Within 48 hours of treatment, there was an influx of cellular infiltrate in experimental groups. Humoral responses were also increased significantly in both duration and intensity as compared to injection only groups. While this electrode requires further study, our results suggest that the MEA has potential for use in electrically mediated intradermal DNA vaccination.

  9. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Bacterial Conjugation Factor PsiB, a Negative Regulator of RecA

    SciTech Connect

    Petrova, Vessela; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; George, Nicholas P.; McCaslin, Darrell; Cox, Michael M.; Keck, James L.

    2012-03-16

    During bacterial conjugation, genetic material from one cell is transferred to another as single-stranded DNA. The introduction of single-stranded DNA into the recipient cell would ordinarily trigger a potentially deleterious transcriptional response called SOS, which is initiated by RecA protein filaments formed on the DNA. During F plasmid conjugation, however, the SOS response is suppressed by PsiB, an F-plasmid-encoded protein that binds and sequesters free RecA to prevent filament formation. Among the many characterized RecA modulator proteins, PsiB is unique in using sequestration as an inhibitory mechanism. We describe the crystal structure of PsiB from the Escherichia coli F plasmid. The stucture of PsiB is surprisingly similar to CapZ, a eukaryotic actin filament capping protein. Structure-directed neutralization of electronegative surfaces on PsiB abrogates RecA inhibition whereas neutralization of an electropositive surface element enhances PsiB inhibition of RecA. Together, these studies provide a first molecular view of PsiB and highlight its use as a reagent in studies of RecA activity.

  10. Activity of physalin F in a collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Brustolim, Daniele; Vasconcelos, Juliana F; Freitas, Luiz Antônio R; Teixeira, Mauro M; Farias, Marcel T; Ribeiro, Yvone M; Tomassini, Therezinha C B; Oliveira, Geraldo G S; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain C; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo; Soares, Milena B P

    2010-08-27

    The effects of physalin F (1), a steroid derivative purified from Physalis angulata, were investigated in models of collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice and allergic airway inflammation in BALB/c mice. Oral treatment with 1 or dexamethasone caused a marked decrease in paw edema and joint inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated arthritic mice. In contrast, treatment with 1 had no effect in mice with allergic airway inflammation caused by ovalbumin immunization, whereas dexamethasone significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and eosinophils in the broncoalveolar lavage fluid and in lung sections of challenged mice. To further demonstrate that 1 acts through a mechanism different from that of glucocorticoids, a nuclear translocation assay was performed of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) using COS-7 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding for a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-GR fusion protein. Untreated or treated cells with 1 had YFP staining mainly in the cytoplasm, whereas in dexamethasone-treated cells the YFP staining was concentrated in the nuclei. It is concluded that the mechanism of the immunosuppressive activity of physalin F is distinct from that of the glucocorticoids.

  11. Multiple factors affect immunogenicity of DNA plasmid HIV vaccines in human clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xia; Morgan, Cecilia; Yu, Xuesong; DeRosa, Stephen; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Kublin, James; Corey, Larry; Keefer, Michael C

    2015-05-11

    Plasmid DNA vaccines have been licensed for use in domesticated animals because of their excellent immunogenicity, but none have yet been licensed for use in humans. Here we report a retrospective analysis of 1218 healthy human volunteers enrolled in 10 phase I clinical trials in which DNA plasmids encoding HIV antigens were administered. Elicited T-cell immune responses were quantified by validated intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) stimulated with HIV peptide pools. HIV-specific binding and neutralizing antibody activities were also analyzed using validated assays. Results showed that, in the absence of adjuvants and boosting with alternative vaccines, DNA vaccines elicited CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses in an average of 13.3% (95% CI: 9.8-17.8%) and 37.7% (95% CI: 31.9-43.8%) of vaccine recipients, respectively. Three vaccinations (vs. 2) improved the proportion of subjects with antigen-specific CD8+ responses (p=0.02), as did increased DNA dosage (p=0.007). Furthermore, female gender and participants having a lower body mass index were independently associated with higher CD4+ T-cell response rate (p=0.001 and p=0.008, respectively). These vaccines elicited minimal neutralizing and binding antibody responses. These findings of the immunogenicity of HIV DNA vaccines in humans can provide guidance for future clinical trials.

  12. Analysis of the Mechanism of Action of the Antisense RNA That Controls the Replication of the repABC Plasmid p42d ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-Rivera, Ramón; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Cevallos, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Replication and segregation of the Rhizobium etli symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) depend on the presence of a repABC operon, which carries all the plasmid-encoded elements required for these functions. All repABC operons share three protein-encoding genes (repA, repB, and repC), an antisense RNA (ctRNA) coding gene, and at least one centromere-like region (parS). The products of repA and repB, in conjunction with the parS region, make up the segregation system, and they negatively regulate operon transcription. The last gene of the operon, repC, encodes the initiator protein. The ctRNA is a negative posttranscriptional regulator of repC. In this work, we analyzed the secondary structures of the ctRNA and its target and mapped the motifs involved in the complex formed between them. Essential residues for the effective interaction localize at the unpaired 5′ end of the antisense molecule and the loop of the target mRNA. In light of our results, we propose a model explaining the mechanism of action of this ctRNA in the regulation of plasmid replication in R. etli. PMID:20435728

  13. S-Adenosylmethionine suppresses the expression of Smad3/4 in activated human hepatic stellate cells via Rac1 promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, KANGQI; ZHANG, FENG; WANG, TINGTING; ZOU, XIAOPING; DUAN, XUHONG; CHEN, GUANGXIA; ZHUGE, YUZHENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was able to suppress activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Human LX-2 HSCs were cultured with SAM or NSC23766, and were transfected with plasmids encoding ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) protein or an empty expression vector. Cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8. Cell migration and invasion were determined using the Transwell assay. The expression levels of Rac1 and Smad3/4 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or western blotting. The methylation status of Rac1 promoters was measured by methylation-specific PCR. The results demonstrated that SAM and NSC23766 suppressed the expression of Smad3/4 in LX-2 cells. The overexpression of Rac1 enhanced the proliferation, migration and invasion of LX-2 cells. In addition, compared with the control groups, a marked increase was observed in the protein expression levels of Smad3/4 in the LX-2 cells transfected with Rac1 plasmids. The methylation-specific PCR findings showed that SAM increased the methylation of Rac1 promoters. The results of the present study suggested that Rac1 enhanced the expression of Smad3/4 in activated HSCs; however, this increase may be suppressed by SAM-induced methylation of Rac1 promoters. PMID:26986629

  14. Extending CRISPR-Cas9 Technology from Genome Editing to Transcriptional Engineering in the Genus Clostridium.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Mark R; Pyne, Michael E; Moo-Young, Murray; Chung, Duane A; Chou, C Perry

    2016-10-15

    The discovery and exploitation of the prokaryotic adaptive immunity system based on clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins have revolutionized genetic engineering. CRISPR-Cas tools have enabled extensive genome editing as well as efficient modulation of the transcriptional program in a multitude of organisms. Progress in the development of genetic engineering tools for the genus Clostridium has lagged behind that of many other prokaryotes, presenting the CRISPR-Cas technology an opportunity to resolve a long-existing issue. Here, we applied the Streptococcus pyogenes type II CRISPR-Cas9 (SpCRISPR-Cas9) system for genome editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum DSM792. We further explored the utility of the SpCRISPR-Cas9 machinery for gene-specific transcriptional repression. For proof-of-concept demonstration, a plasmid-encoded fluorescent protein gene was used for transcriptional repression in C. acetobutylicum Subsequently, we targeted the carbon catabolite repression (CCR) system of C. acetobutylicum through transcriptional repression of the hprK gene encoding HPr kinase/phosphorylase, leading to the coutilization of glucose and xylose, which are two abundant carbon sources from lignocellulosic feedstocks. Similar approaches based on SpCRISPR-Cas9 for genome editing and transcriptional repression were also demonstrated in Clostridium pasteurianum ATCC 6013. As such, this work lays a foundation for the derivation of clostridial strains for industrial purposes.

  15. Assessing Tn5 and Sleeping Beauty for transpositional transgenesis by cytoplasmic injection into bovine and ovine zygotes

    PubMed Central

    Bevacqua, R. J.; Fernandez-Martin, R.; Canel, N. G.; Gibbons, A.; Texeira, D.; Lange, F.; Vans Landschoot, G.; Savy, V.; Briski, O.; Hiriart, M. I.; Grueso, E.; Ivics, Z.; Taboga, O.; Kues, W. A.; Ferraris, S.

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic domestic animals represent an alternative to bioreactors for large-scale production of biopharmaceuticals and could also provide more accurate biomedical models than rodents. However, their generation remains inefficient. Recently, DNA transposons allowed improved transgenesis efficiencies in mice and pigs. In this work, Tn5 and Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon systems were evaluated for transgenesis by simple cytoplasmic injection in livestock zygotes. In the case of Tn5, the transposome complex of transposon nucleic acid and Tn5 protein was injected. In the case of SB, the supercoiled plasmids encoding a transposon and the SB transposase were co-injected. In vitro produced bovine zygotes were used to establish the cytoplasmic injection conditions. The in vitro cultured blastocysts were evaluated for reporter gene expression and genotyped. Subsequently, both transposon systems were injected in seasonally available ovine zygotes, employing transposons carrying the recombinant human factor IX driven by the beta-lactoglobulin promoter. The Tn5 approach did not result in transgenic lambs. In contrast, the Sleeping Beauty injection resulted in 2 lambs (29%) carrying the transgene. Both animals exhibited cellular mosaicism of the transgene. The extraembryonic tissues (placenta or umbilical cord) of three additional animals were also transgenic. These results show that transpositional transgenesis by cytoplasmic injection of SB transposon components can be applied for the production of transgenic lambs of pharmaceutical interest. PMID:28301581

  16. Postsymbiotic plasmid acquisition and evolution of the repA1-replicon in Buchnera aphidicola

    PubMed Central

    Van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; González-Candelas, Fernando; Silva, Francisco J.; Sabater, Beatriz; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Buchnera aphidicola is an obligate, strictly vertically transmitted, bacterial symbiont of aphids. It supplies its host with essential amino acids, nutrients required by aphids but deficient in their diet of plant phloem sap. Several lineages of Buchnera show adaptation to their nutritional role in the form of plasmid-mediated amplification of key-genes involved in the biosynthesis of tryptophan (trpEG) and leucine (leuABCD). Phylogenetic analyses of these plasmid-encoded functions have thus far suggested the absence of horizontal plasmid exchange among lineages of Buchnera. Here, we describe three new Buchnera plasmids, obtained from species of the aphid host families Lachnidae and Pemphigidae. All three plasmids belong to the repA1 family of Buchnera plasmids, which is characterized by the presence of a repA1-replicon responsible for replication initiation. A comprehensive analysis of this family of plasmids unexpectedly revealed significantly incongruent phylogenies for different plasmid and chromosomally encoded loci. We infer from these incongruencies a case of horizontal plasmid transfer in Buchnera. This process may have been mediated by secondary endosymbionts, which occasionally undergo horizontal transmission in aphids. PMID:10984505

  17. Multi-layered nanoparticles for combination gene and drug delivery to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ediriwickrema, Asiri; Zhou, Jiangbing; Deng, Yang; Saltzman, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance and toxicity are major obstacles in cancer chemotherapy. Combination therapies can overcome resistance, and synergies can minimize dosing. Polymer nanocarriers are interesting vehicles for cancer therapeutics for their delivery and tumor targeting abilities. We synthesized a multilayered polymer nanoparticle (MLNP), comprising of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) with surface polyethyleneimine and functional peptides, for targeted drug and gene delivery. We confirmed the particle’s ability to inhibit tumor growth through synergistic action of the drug and gene product. MLNPs achieved transfection levels similar to lipofectamine, while maintaining minimal cytotoxicity. The particles delivered camptothecin (CPT), and plasmid encoding TNF related apoptosis inducing ligand (pTRAIL) (CT MLNPs), and synergistically inhibited growth of multiple cancer cells in vitro. The synergy of co-delivering CPT and pTRAIL via CT MLNPs was confirmed using the Chou-Talalay method: the combination index (CI) values at 50% inhibition ranged between 0.31–0.53 for all cell lines. Further, co-delivery with MLNPs resulted in a 3.1–15 fold reduction in CPT and 4.7–8.0 fold reduction in pTRAIL dosing. CT MLNPs obtained significant HCT116 growth inhibition in vivo compared to monotherapy. These results support our hypothesis that MLNPs can deliver both small molecules and genetic agents towards synergistically inhibiting tumor growth. PMID:25112935

  18. Subtractive Hybridization Yields a Silver Resistance Determinant Unique to Nosocomial Pathogens in the Enterobacter cloacae Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Harald

    2012-01-01

    The heterogeneity and the increasing clinical importance of the Enterobacter cloacae complex have often been discussed. However, little is known about molecular factors causing pathogenicity within this nomenspecies. Here, we analyzed the genetic differences between an avirulent plant isolate and a pathogenic strain causing an outbreak with septicemia in three patients. We identified an IncHI-2 plasmid as a major difference between these two strains. Besides resistance to several antibiotics, this plasmid encoded a silver resistance determinant. We further showed that this sil determinant was present not only in the analyzed outbreak strain but also in the vast majority of clinical isolates of the E. cloacae complex, predominantly in (sub)species that frequently cause nosocomial infections. The identified sil determinant was highly conserved within the E. cloacae complex and mediated resistance to up to 600 μM silver nitrate. As silver is often used as a disinfectant and treatment for burn wounds, we present here an important fitness factor within the clinically most prevalent subspecies of the E. cloacae complex. This provides a possible explanation for their unequal involvement in nosocomial and especially burn wound infections. PMID:22837330

  19. Identification of residues important for the activity of Haloferax volcanii AglD, a component of the archaeal N-glycosylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2010-05-06

    In Haloferax volcanii, AglD adds the final hexose to the N-linked pentasaccharide decorating the S-layer glycoprotein. Not knowing the natural substrate of the glycosyltransferase, together with the challenge of designing assays compatible with hypersalinity, has frustrated efforts at biochemical characterization of AglD activity. To circumvent these obstacles, an in vivo assay designed to identify amino acid residues important for AglD activity is described. In the assay, restoration of AglD function in an Hfx. volcanii aglD deletion strain transformed to express plasmid-encoded versions of AglD, generated through site-directed mutagenesis at positions encoding residues conserved in archaeal homologues of AglD, is reflected in the behavior of a readily detectable reporter of N-glycosylation. As such Asp110 and Asp112 were designated as elements of the DXD motif of AglD, a motif that interacts with metal cations associated with nucleotide-activated sugar donors, while Asp201 was predicted to be the catalytic base of the enzyme.

  20. The T cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein (TARP), a prostate-specific protein localized in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Nagata, Satoshi; Wolfgang, Curt D; Bratthauer, Gary L; Bera, Tapan K; Pastan, Ira

    2004-06-04

    We previously showed that mRNA encoding TARP (T cell receptor gamma chain alternate reading frame protein) is exclusively expressed in the prostate in males and is up-regulated by androgen in LNCaP cells, an androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell line. We have now developed an anti-TARP monoclonal antibody named TP1, and show that TARP protein is up-regulated by androgen in both LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b cells. We used TP1 to determine the subcellular localization of TARP by Western blotting following subcellular fractionation and immunocytochemistry. Both methods showed that TARP is localized in the mitochondria of LNCaP cells, MDA-PCa-2b cells, and PC-3 cells transfected with a TARP-expressing plasmid. We also transfected a plasmid encoding TARP fused to green fluorescent protein into LNCaP, MDA-Pca-2b, and PC-3 cells and confirmed its specific mitochondrial localization in living cells. Fractionation of mitochondria shows that TARP is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane. Immunohistochemistry using a human prostate cancer sample showed that TP1 reacted in a dot-like cytoplasmic pattern consistent with the presence of TARP in mitochondria. These data demonstrate that TARP is the first prostate-specific protein localizing in mitochondria and indicate that TARP, an androgen-regulated protein, may act on mitochondria to carry out its biological functions.

  1. Structural Basis of APH(3)-IIIa-Mediated Resistance to N1-Substituted Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Butirosin is unique among the naturally occurring aminoglycosides, having a substituted amino group at position 1 (N1) of the 2-deoxystreptamine ring with an (S)-4-amino-2-hydroxybutyrate (AHB) group. While bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides can be ascribed chiefly to drug inactivation by plasmid-encoded aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, the presence of an AHB group protects the aminoglycoside from binding to many resistance enzymes, and hence, the antibiotic retains its bactericidal properties. Consequently, several semisynthetic N1-substituted aminoglycosides, such as amikacin, isepamicin, and netilmicin, were developed. Unfortunately, butirosin, amikacin, and isepamicin are not resistant to inactivation by 3'-aminoglycoside O-phosphotransferase type IIIa [APH(3')-IIIa]. We report here the crystal structure of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with an ATP analog, AMPPNP [adenosine 5'-(?,{gamma}-imido)triphosphate], and butirosin A to 2.4-A resolution. The structure shows that butirosin A binds to the enzyme in a manner analogous to other 4,5-disubstituted aminoglycosides, and the flexible antibiotic-binding loop is key to the accommodation of structurally diverse substrates. Based on the crystal structure, we have also constructed a model of APH(3')-IIIa in complex with amikacin, a commonly used semisynthetic N1-substituted 4,6-disubstituted aminoglycoside. Together, these results suggest a strategy to further derivatize the AHB group in order to generate new aminoglycoside derivatives that can elude inactivation by resistance enzymes while maintaining their ability to bind to the ribosomal A site.

  2. Structure of the Antibiotic Resistance Factor Spectinomycin Phosphotransferase from Legionella pneumophila

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, D.; Lemke, C; Huang, J; Xiong, B; Berghuis, A

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) constitute a diverse group of enzymes that are often the underlying cause of aminoglycoside resistance in the clinical setting. Several APHs have been extensively characterized, including the elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of two APH(3{prime}) isozymes and an APH(2{double_prime}) enzyme. Although many APHs are plasmid-encoded and are capable of inactivating numerous 2-deoxystreptmaine aminoglycosides with multiple regiospecificity, APH(9)-Ia, isolated from Legionella pneumophila, is an unusual enzyme among the APH family for its chromosomal origin and its specificity for a single non-2-deoxystreptamine aminoglycoside substrate, spectinomycin. We describe here the crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia in its apo form, its binary complex with the nucleotide, AMP, and its ternary complex bound with ADP and spectinomycin. The structures reveal that APH(9)-Ia adopts the bilobal protein kinase-fold, analogous to the APH(3{prime}) and APH(2{double_prime}) enzymes. However, APH(9)-Ia differs significantly from the other two types of APH enzymes in its substrate binding area and that it undergoes a conformation change upon ligand binding. Moreover, kinetic assay experiments indicate that APH(9)-Ia has stringent substrate specificity as it is unable to phosphorylate substrates of choline kinase or methylthioribose kinase despite high structural resemblance. The crystal structures of APH(9)-Ia demonstrate and expand our understanding of the diversity of the APH family, which in turn will facilitate the development of new antibiotics and inhibitors.

  3. The mechanism and control of DNA transfer by the conjugative relaxase of resistance plasmid pCU1

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Rebekah Potts; Habibi, Sohrab; Cheng, Yuan; Lujan, Scott A.; Redinbo, Matthew

    2010-11-15

    Bacteria expand their genetic diversity, spread antibiotic resistance genes, and obtain virulence factors through the highly coordinated process of conjugative plasmid transfer (CPT). A plasmid-encoded relaxase enzyme initiates and terminates CPT by nicking and religating the transferred plasmid in a sequence-specific manner. We solved the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the relaxase responsible for the spread of the resistance plasmid pCU1 and determined its DNA binding and nicking capabilities. The overall fold of the pCU1 relaxase is similar to that of the F plasmid and plasmid R388 relaxases. However, in the pCU1 structure, the conserved tyrosine residues (Y18,19,26,27) that are required for DNA nicking and religation were displaced up to 14 {angstrom} out of the relaxase active site, revealing a high degree of mobility in this region of the enzyme. In spite of this flexibility, the tyrosines still cleaved the nic site of the plasmid's origin of transfer, and did so in a sequence-specific, metal-dependent manner. Unexpectedly, the pCU1 relaxase lacked the sequence-specific DNA binding previously reported for the homologous F and R388 relaxase enzymes, despite its high sequence and structural similarity with both proteins. In summary, our work outlines novel structural and functional aspects of the relaxase-mediated conjugative transfer of plasmid pCU1.

  4. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  5. Lethal factor, but not edema factor, is required to cause fatal anthrax in cynomolgus macaques after pulmonary spore challenge.

    PubMed

    Hutt, Julie A; Lovchik, Julie A; Drysdale, Melissa; Sherwood, Robert L; Brasel, Trevor; Lipscomb, Mary F; Lyons, C Rick

    2014-12-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by inhalation of Bacillus anthracis spores. The ability of B. anthracis to cause anthrax is attributed to the plasmid-encoded A/B-type toxins, edema toxin (edema factor and protective antigen) and lethal toxin (lethal factor and protective antigen), and a poly-d-glutamic acid capsule. To better understand the contribution of these toxins to the disease pathophysiology in vivo, we used B. anthracis Ames strain and isogenic toxin deletion mutants derived from the Ames strain to examine the role of lethal toxin and edema toxin after pulmonary spore challenge of cynomolgus macaques. Lethal toxin, but not edema toxin, was required to induce sustained bacteremia and death after pulmonary challenge with spores delivered via bronchoscopy. After intravenous challenge with bacilli to model the systemic phase of infection, lethal toxin contributed to bacterial proliferation and subsequent host death to a greater extent than edema toxin. Deletion of protective antigen resulted in greater loss of virulence after intravenous challenge with bacilli than deletion of lethal toxin or edema toxin alone. These findings are consistent with the ability of anti-protective antigen antibodies to prevent anthrax and suggest that lethal factor is the dominant toxin that contributes to the escape of significant numbers of bacilli from the thoracic cavity to cause anthrax after inhalation challenge with spores.

  6. Targeted mutagenesis in chicken using CRISPR/Cas9 system

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Isao; Yoshii, Kyoko; Miyahara, Daichi; Kagami, Hiroshi; Tagami, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple and powerful tool for genome editing in various organisms including livestock animals. However, the system has not been applied to poultry because of the difficulty in accessing their zygotes. Here we report the implementation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting in chickens. Two egg white genes, ovalbumin and ovomucoid, were efficiently (>90%) mutagenized in cultured chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) by transfection of circular plasmids encoding Cas9, a single guide RNA, and a gene encoding drug resistance, followed by transient antibiotic selection. We transplanted CRISPR-induced mutant-ovomucoid PGCs into recipient chicken embryos and established three germline chimeric roosters (G0). All of the roosters had donor-derived mutant-ovomucoid spermatozoa, and the two with a high transmission rate of donor-derived gametes produced heterozygous mutant ovomucoid chickens as about half of their donor-derived offspring in the next generation (G1). Furthermore, we generated ovomucoid homozygous mutant offspring (G2) by crossing the G1 mutant chickens. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a simple and effective gene-targeting method in chickens. PMID:27050479

  7. Improved lysis efficiency and immunogenicity of Salmonella ghosts mediated by co-expression of λ phage holin-endolysin and ɸX174 gene E

    PubMed Central

    Won, Gayeon; Hajam, Irshad Ahmed; Lee, John Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty cell envelopes derived from Gram-negative bacteria by bacteriophage ɸX174 gene E mediated lysis. They represent a novel inactivated vaccine platform; however, the practical application of BGs for human vaccines seems to be limited due to the safety concerns on the presence of viable cells in BGs. Therefore, to improve the lysis efficiency of the gene E, we exploited the peptidoglycan hydrolyzing ability of the λ phage holin-endolysins to expedite the process of current BG production system. In this report, we constructed a novel ghost plasmid encoding protein E and holin-endolysins in tandem. We observed that sequential expressions of the gene E and the holin-endolysins elicited rapid and highly efficient Salmonella lysis compared to the lysis mediated by gene E only. These lysed BGs displayed improved immunogenicity in mice compared to the gene E mediated BGs. Consequently, seventy percent of the mice immunized with these novel ghosts survived against a lethal challenge while all the mice vaccinated with gene E mediated ghosts died by day 9 post-infection. We conclude that this novel strategy has the potential to generate highly efficient inactivated candidate vaccines that could replace the currently available bacterial vaccines. PMID:28332591

  8. Oral multicomponent DNA vaccine delivered by attenuated Salmonella elicited immunoprotection against American trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Cazorla, Silvia I; Matos, Marina N; Cerny, Natacha; Ramirez, Carolina; Alberti, Andrés Sanchez; Bivona, Augusto E; Morales, Celina; Guzmán, Carlos A; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2015-03-01

    We have reported that attenuated Salmonella (S) carrying plasmids encoding the cysteine protease cruzipain (Cz) protects against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Here, we determined whether immunoprotection could be improved by the oral coadministration of 3 Salmonella carrying the plasmids that encode the antigens Cz, Tc52, and Tc24. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized mice presented an increased antibody response against each antigen compared with those in the single antigen-immunized groups, as well as higher trypomastigotes antibody-mediated lyses and cell invasion inhibition compared with controls. SCz+STc52+STc24-immunized and -challenged mice rendered lower parasitemia. Weight loss after infection was detected in all mice except those in the SCz+STc52+STc24 group. Moreover, cardiomyopathy-associated enzyme activity was significantly lower in SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice compared with controls. Few or no abnormalities were found in muscle tissues of SCz+STc24+STc52-immunized mice, whereas controls presented with inflammatory foci, necrosis, and amastigote nests. We conclude that a multicomponent approach that targets several invasion and metabolic mechanisms improves protection compared with single-component vaccines.

  9. Transfer of the pheromone-inducible plasmid pCF10 among Enterococcus faecalis microorganisms colonizing the intestine of mini-pigs.

    PubMed

    Licht, Tine Rask; Laugesen, Dorthe; Jensen, Lars Bogø; Jacobsen, Bodil Lund

    2002-01-01

    A new animal model, the streptomycin-treated mini-pig, was developed in order to allow colonization of defined strains of Enterococcus faecalis in numbers sufficient to study plasmid transfer. Transfer of the pheromone-inducible pCF10 plasmid between streptomycin-resistant strains of E. faecalis OG1 was investigated in the model. The plasmid encodes resistance to tetracycline. Numbers of recipient, donor, and transconjugant bacteria were monitored by selective plating of fecal samples, and transconjugants were subsequently verified by PCR. After being ingested by the mini-pigs, the recipient strain persisted in the intestine at levels between 10(6) and 10(7) CFU per g of feces throughout the experiment. The donor strain, which carried different resistance markers but was otherwise chromosomally isogenic to the recipient strain, was given to the pigs 3 weeks after the recipient strain. The donor cells were initially present in high numbers (10(6) CFU per g) in feces, but they did not persist in the intestine at detectable levels. Immediately after introduction of the donor bacteria, transconjugant cells appeared and persisted in fecal samples at levels between 10(3) and 10(4) CFU per g until the end of the experiment. These observations showed that even in the absence of selective tetracycline pressure, plasmid pCF10 was transferred from ingested E. faecalis cells to other E. faecalis organisms already present in the intestinal environment and that the plasmid subsequently persisted in the intestine.

  10. Aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) mediate colonization of fresh produce and abiotic surface by Shiga toxigenic enteroaggregative Escherichia coli O104:H4.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Attila; Xu, Yunfeng; Bauchan, Gary R; Shelton, Daniel R; Nou, Xiangwu

    2016-07-16

    The Shiga toxigenic Escherichia coli O104:H4 isolated during the 2011 European outbreak expresses Shiga toxin 2a and possess virulence genes associated with the enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) pathotype. It produces plasmid encoded aggregative adherence fimbriae I (AAF/I) which mediate cell aggregation and biofilm formation in human intestine and promote Shiga-toxin adsorption, but it is not clear whether the AAF/I fimbriae are involved in the colonization and biofilm formation on food and environmental matrices such as the surface of fresh produce. We deleted the gene encoding for the AAF/I fimbriae main subunit (AggA) from an outbreak associated E. coli O104:H4 strain, and evaluated the role of AAF/I fimbriae in the adherence and colonization of E. coli O104:H4 to spinach and abiotic surfaces. The deletion of aggA did not affect the adherence of E. coli O104:H4 to these surfaces. However, it severely diminished the colonization and biofilm formation of E. coli O104:H4 on these surfaces. Strong aggregation and biofilm formation on spinach and abiotic surfaces were observed with the wild type strain but not the isogenic aggA deletion mutant, suggesting that AAF/I fimbriae play a crucial role in persistence of O104:H4 cells outside of the intestines of host species, such as on the surface of fresh produce.

  11. Thymidine kinase mutants obtained by random sequence selection.

    PubMed

    Munir, K M; French, D C; Loeb, L A

    1993-05-01

    Knowledge of the catalytic properties and structural information regarding the amino acid residues that comprise the active site of an enzyme allows one, in principle, to use site-specific mutagenesis to construct genes that encode enzymes with altered functions. However, such information about most enzymes is not known and the effects of specific amino acid substitutions are not generally predictable. An alternative approach is to substitute random nucleotides for key codons in a gene and to use genetic selection to identify new and interesting enzyme variants. We describe here the construction, selection, and characterization of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase mutants either with different catalytic properties or with enhanced thermostability. From a library containing 2 x 10(6) plasmid-encoded herpes thymidine kinase genes, each with a different nucleotide sequence at the putative nucleoside binding site, we obtained 1540 active mutants. Using this library and one previously constructed, we identified by secondary selection Escherichia coli harboring thymidine kinase mutant clones that were unable to grow in the presence of concentrations of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) that permits colony formation by E. coli harboring the wild-type plasmid. Two of the mutant enzymes exhibited a reduced Km for AZT, one of which displayed a higher catalytic efficiency for AZT over thymidine relative to that of the wild type. We also identified one mutant with enhanced thermostability. These mutants may have clinical potential as the promise of gene therapy is increasingly becoming a reality.

  12. Interaction of the Rabies Virus P Protein with the LC8 Dynein Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Raux, Hélène; Flamand, Anne; Blondel, Danielle

    2000-01-01

    The rabies virus P protein is involved in viral transcription and replication but its precise function is not clear. We investigated the role of P (CVS strain) by searching for cellular partners by using a two-hybrid screening of a PC12 cDNA library. We isolated a cDNA encoding a 10-kDa dynein light chain (LC8). LC8 is a component of cytoplasmic dynein involved in the minus end-directed movement of organelles along microtubules. We confirmed that this molecule interacts with P by coimmunoprecipitation in infected cells and in cells transfected with a plasmid encoding P protein. LC8 was also detected in virus particles. Series of deletions from the N- and C-terminal ends of P protein were used to map the LC8-binding domain to the central part of P (residues 138 to 172). These results are relevant to speculate that dynein may be involved in the axonal transport of rabies virus along microtubules through neuron cells. PMID:11024151

  13. Insights into Dynamics of Mobile Genetic Elements in Hyperthermophilic Environments from Five New Thermococcus Plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Gonnet, Mathieu; Hania, Wajdi Ben; Forterre, Patrick; Erauso, Gaël

    2013-01-01

    Mobilome of hyperthermophilic archaea dwelling in deep-sea hydrothermal vents is poorly characterized. To gain insight into genetic diversity and dynamics of mobile genetic elements in these environments we have sequenced five new plasmids from different Thermococcus strains that have been isolated from geographically remote hydrothermal vents. The plasmids were ascribed to two subfamilies, pTN2-like and pEXT9a-like. Gene content and phylogenetic analyses illuminated a robust connection between pTN2-like plasmids and Pyrococcus abyssi virus 1 (PAV1), with roughly half of the viral genome being composed of genes that have homologues in plasmids. Unexpectedly, pEXT9a-like plasmids were found to be closely related to the previously sequenced plasmid pMETVU01 from Methanocaldococcus vulcanius M7. Our data suggests that the latter observation is most compatible with an unprecedented horizontal transfer of a pEXT9a-like plasmid from Thermococcales to Methanococcales. Gene content analysis revealed that thermococcal plasmids encode Hfq-like proteins and toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems of two different families, VapBC and RelBE. Notably, although abundant in archaeal genomes, to our knowledge, TA and hfq-like genes have not been previously found in archaeal plasmids or viruses. Finally, the plasmids described here might prove to be useful in developing new genetic tools for hyperthermophiles. PMID:23326305

  14. Single Cell Transfection through Precise Microinjection with Quantitatively Controlled Injection Volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Yu Ting; Chen, Shuxun; Wang, Ran; Liu, Chichi; Kong, Chi-Wing; Li, Ronald A.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Sun, Dong

    2016-04-01

    Cell transfection is a technique wherein foreign genetic molecules are delivered into cells. To elucidate distinct responses during cell genetic modification, methods to achieve transfection at the single-cell level are of great value. Herein, we developed an automated micropipette-based quantitative microinjection technology that can deliver precise amounts of materials into cells. The developed microinjection system achieved precise single-cell microinjection by pre-patterning cells in an array and controlling the amount of substance delivered based on injection pressure and time. The precision of the proposed injection technique was examined by comparing the fluorescence intensities of fluorescent dye droplets with a standard concentration and water droplets with a known injection amount of the dye in oil. Injection of synthetic modified mRNA (modRNA) encoding green fluorescence proteins or a cocktail of plasmids encoding green and red fluorescence proteins into human foreskin fibroblast cells demonstrated that the resulting green fluorescence intensity or green/red fluorescence intensity ratio were well correlated with the amount of genetic material injected into the cells. Single-cell transfection via the developed microinjection technique will be of particular use in cases where cell transfection is challenging and genetically modified of selected cells are desired.

  15. Optical tracking of organically modified silica nanoparticles as DNA carriers: A nonviral, nanomedicine approach for gene delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Indrajit; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y.; Bharali, Dhruba J.; Pudavar, Haridas E.; Mistretta, Ruth A.; Kaur, Navjot; Prasad, Paras N.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports a multidisciplinary approach to produce fluorescently labeled organically modified silica nanoparticles as a nonviral vector for gene delivery and biophotonics methods to optically monitor intracellular trafficking and gene transfection. Highly monodispersed, stable aqueous suspensions of organically modified silica nanoparticles, encapsulating fluorescent dyes and surface functionalized by cationic-amino groups, are produced by micellar nanochemistry. Gel-electrophoresis studies reveal that the particles efficiently complex with DNA and protect it from enzymatic digestion of DNase 1. The electrostatic binding of DNA onto the surface of the nanoparticles, due to positively charged amino groups, is also shown by intercalating an appropriate dye into the DNA and observing the Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer between the dye (energy donor) intercalated in DNA on the surface of nanoparticles and a second dye (energy acceptor) inside the nanoparticles. Imaging by fluorescence confocal microscopy shows that cells efficiently take up the nanoparticles in vitro in the cytoplasm, and the nanoparticles deliver DNA to the nucleus. The use of plasmid encoding enhanced GFP allowed us to demonstrate the process of gene transfection in cultured cells. Our work shows that the nanomedicine approach, with nanoparticles acting as a drug-delivery platform combining multiple optical and other types of probes, provides a promising direction for targeted therapy with enhanced efficacy as well as for real-time monitoring of drug action. nonviral vector | ORMOSIL nanoparticles | confocal microscopy

  16. The extended regulatory networks of SXT/R391 integrative and conjugative elements and IncA/C conjugative plasmids

    PubMed Central

    Poulin-Laprade, Dominic; Carraro, Nicolas; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, healthcare systems are challenged by a major worldwide drug resistance crisis caused by the massive and rapid dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and associated emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria, in both clinical and environmental settings. Conjugation is the main driving force of gene transfer among microorganisms. This mechanism of horizontal gene transfer mediates the translocation of large DNA fragments between two bacterial cells in direct contact. Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) of the SXT/R391 family (SRIs) and IncA/C conjugative plasmids (ACPs) are responsible for the dissemination of a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistance genes among diverse species of Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae. The biology, diversity, prevalence and distribution of these two families of conjugative elements have been the subject of extensive studies for the past 15 years. Recently, the transcriptional regulators that govern their dissemination through the expression of ICE- or plasmid-encoded transfer genes have been described. Unrelated repressors control the activation of conjugation by preventing the expression of two related master activator complexes in both types of elements, i.e., SetCD in SXT/R391 ICEs and AcaCD in IncA/C plasmids. Finally, in addition to activating ICE- or plasmid-borne genes, these master activators have been shown to specifically activate phylogenetically unrelated mobilizable genomic islands (MGIs) that also disseminate antibiotic resistance genes and other adaptive traits among a plethora of pathogens such as Vibrio cholerae and Salmonella enterica. PMID:26347724

  17. Lung Gene Therapy with Highly Compacted DNA Nanoparticles that Overcome the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Soo; Kim, Anthony J.; Trehan, Kanika; Schneider, Craig S.; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Woodward, Owen M.; Boylan, Nicholas J.; Boyle, Michael P.; Lai, Samuel K.; Guggino, William B.; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled gene carriers must penetrate the highly viscoelastic and adhesive mucus barrier in the airway in order to overcome rapid mucociliary clearance and reach the underlying epithelium; however, even the most widely used viral gene carriers are unable to efficiently do so. We developed two polymeric gene carriers that compact plasmid DNA into small and highly stable nanoparticles with dense polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings. These highly compacted, densely PEG-coated DNA nanoparticles rapidly penetrate human cystic fibrosis (CF) mucus ex vivo and mouse airway mucus ex situ. Intranasal administration of the mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles greatly enhanced particle distribution, retention and gene transfer in the mouse lung airways compared to conventional gene carriers. Successful delivery of a full-length plasmid encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was achieved in mouse lungs and airway cells, including a primary culture of mucus-covered human airway epithelium grown at air-liquid interface, without causing acute inflammation or toxicity. Highly compacted mucus penetrating DNA nanoparticles hold promise for lung gene therapy. PMID:24440664

  18. Novel Antitumor Strategy Utilizing a Plasmid Expressing a Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigen as a “Danger Signal” to Block Immune Escape of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Yoshihara, Chieko; Ito, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Immune escape of tumor cells is one of the main obstacles hindering the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. We developed a novel strategy to block immune escape by transfecting tumor cells in vivo with genes of pathogenic antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB). This induces presentation of the TB antigen on tumor cell surfaces, which can be recognized by antigen presenting cells (APCs) as a “danger signal” to stimulate antitumor immune response. This strategy is also expected to amplify the immune response against tumor-associated antigens, and block immune escape of the tumor. DNA/PEI/chondroitin sulfate ternary complex is a highly effective non-viral gene vector system for in vivo transfection. A therapeutic complex was prepared using a plasmid encoding the TB antigen, early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6). This was injected intratumorally into syngeneic tumor-bearing mice, and induced significant tumor growth suppression comparable to or higher than similar complexes expressing cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interleukin-12 (IL-12). Co-transfection of the cytokine-genes and the ESAT-6-gene enhanced the antitumor efficacy of either treatment alone. In addition, complete tumor regression was achieved with the combination of ESAT-6 and IL-2 genes. PMID:26213962

  19. Protective effect of Qnr on agents other than quinolones that target DNA gyrase.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, George A; Corcoran, Marian A; Hooper, David C

    2015-11-01

    Qnr is a plasmid-encoded and chromosomally determined protein that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from inhibition by quinolones. Despite its prevalence worldwide and existence prior to the discovery of quinolones, its native function is not known. Other synthetic compounds and natural products also target bacterial topoisomerases. A number were studied as molecular probes to gain insight into how Qnr acts. Qnr blocked inhibition by synthetic compounds with somewhat quinolone-like structure that target the GyrA subunit, such as the 2-pyridone ABT-719, the quinazoline-2,4-dione PD 0305970, and the spiropyrimidinetrione pyrazinyl-alkynyl-tetrahydroquinoline (PAT), indicating that Qnr is not strictly quinolone specific, but Qnr did not protect against GyrA-targeting simocyclinone D8 despite evidence that both simocyclinone D8 and Qnr affect DNA binding to gyrase. Qnr did not affect the activity of tricyclic pyrimidoindole or pyrazolopyridones, synthetic inhibitors of the GyrB subunit, or nonsynthetic GyrB inhibitors, such as coumermycin A1, novobiocin, gyramide A, or microcin B17.Thus, in this set of compounds the protective activity of Qnr was confined to those that, like quinolones, trap gyrase on DNA in cleaved complexes.

  20. Complexity in efflux pump control: cross-regulation by the paralogues TtgV and TtgT.

    PubMed

    Terán, Wilson; Felipe, Antonia; Fillet, Sandy; Guazzaroni, María-Eugenia; Krell, Tino; Ruiz, Raquel; Ramos, Juan L; Gallegos, María-Trinidad

    2007-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, known for its high tolerance to solvents, possesses three Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type (RND) efflux pumps, namely TtgABC, TtgDEF and TtgGHI, which are involved in the active extrusion of solvents. Expression of the ttgABC and ttgGHI operons was previously shown to be regulated by the adjacently encoded repressors, TtgR and TtgV, respectively. Upstream of the third RND operon, ttgDEF, is located a putative regulator gene, ttgT. In this study, TtgT is shown to bind to the promoter region of the ttgDEF operon, and to be released from DNA in the presence of organic solvents. In vitro studies revealed that TtgV and TtgT bind the same operator sites in both the ttgDEF and the ttgGHI promoters. However, the affinity of TtgV for the ttgDEF operator was higher than that of TtgT, which, together with the fact that the ttgV promoter seems to be almost twice stronger than the ttgT promoter, explains why TtgV takes over in the regulation of the two efflux pump operons. The functional replacement of the cognate, chromosomally encoded TtgT by the plasmid-encoded paralogue TtgV illustrates a new mode of efflux pump regulation of which the physiological relevance is discussed.

  1. Characterization of the Lactobacillus plantarum plasmid pCD033 and generation of the plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH.

    PubMed

    Heiss, Silvia; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum CD033, a strain isolated from grass silage in Austria, harbors a 7.9 kb plasmid designated pCD033. Sequence analysis identified 14 open reading frames and 8 of these were supposed to be putative coding sequences. Gene annotation revealed no putative essential genes being plasmid encoded, but a plasmid addiction system based on a PemI/PemK-like toxin-antitoxin system, able to stabilize plasmid maintenance. Absence of a replication initiation protein, a double strand origin as well as a single strand origin on plasmid pCD033 suggests replication via a new type of theta mechanism, whereby plasmid replication is potentially initiated and regulated by non-coding RNA. Detailed examination of segregational stability of plasmid vectors consisting of pCD033-fragments, combined with a selection marker, resulted in definition of a stably maintained minimal replicon. A gene encoding a RepB/OrfX-like protein was found to be not essential for plasmid replication. Alignment of the amino acid sequence of this protein with related proteins unveiled a highly conserved amino acid motif (LLDQQQ). L. plantarum CD033 was cured of pCD033 resulting in the novel plasmid free strain L. plantarum 3NSH. Plasmid curing demonstrated that no essential features are provided by pCD033 under laboratory conditions.

  2. Overlap of Doxycycline Fluorescence with that of the Redox-Sensitive Intracellular Reporter roGFP.

    PubMed

    Khader, Heba; Solodushko, Victor; Al-Mehdi, Abu Bakr; Audia, Jonathon; Fouty, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Tetracycline-inducible systems allow for either suppression or induction of transgene expression to facilitate studies of cell physiology. Doxycycline is a preferred inducer for these gene expression systems due to its membrane permeability; however, the heterocyclic structure of doxycycline exhibits fluorogenic properties that can potentially bias measurement of other fluorochromes. Thus the simultaneous use of tetracycline-inducible systems and fluorescent proteins as reporter genes or as intracellular biosensors may lead to potentially confounding results. Herein, using cells which co-express the ratiometric redox sensitive intracellular reporter, roGFP, and a tetracycline-inducible reporter plasmid encoding the reporter gene, mCherry, as a model system, we describe the overlapping intracellular fluorescent signals between doxycycline and commonly used intracellular fluorescent probes. In our cells, the addition of doxycycline to cells caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in cell fluorescence with 405 nm excitation which overlapped with that of the oxidized configuration of roGFP. Incubating cells in concentrations of doxycycline less than 1 μg/mL and removing doxycycline from the media 60 min before performing experiments eliminated fluorescence interference while still maintaining maximal reporter transgene activation.

  3. Reconstitution of a prokaryotic minus end-tracking system using TubRC centromeric complexes and tubulin-like protein TubZ filaments

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Gero; Löwe, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Segregation of DNA is a fundamental process during cell division. The mechanism of prokaryotic DNA segregation is largely unknown, but several low-copy-number plasmids encode cytomotive filament systems of the actin type and tubulin type important for plasmid inheritance. Of these cytomotive filaments, only actin-like systems are mechanistically well characterized. In contrast, the mechanism by which filaments of tubulin-like TubZ protein mediate DNA motility is unknown. To understand polymer-driven DNA transport, we reconstituted the filaments of TubZ protein (TubZ filaments) from Bacillus thuringiensis pBtoxis plasmid with their centromeric TubRC complexes containing adaptor protein TubR and tubC DNA. TubZ alone assembled into polar filaments, which annealed laterally and treadmilled. Using single-molecule imaging, we show that TubRC complexes were not pushed by filament polymerization; instead, they processively tracked shrinking, depolymerizing minus ends. Additionally, the TubRC complex nucleated TubZ filaments and allowed for treadmilling. Overall, our results indicate a pulling mechanism for DNA transport by the TubZRC system. The discovered minus end-tracking property of the TubRC complex expands the mechanistic diversity of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton. PMID:25825718

  4. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  5. Fluorescent Reporters for Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Cheryl L.; Boles, Blaise R.; Lauderdale, Katherine J.; Thoendel, Matthew; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of Staphylococcus aureus as a prominent pathogen in community and healthcare settings, there is a growing need for effective reporter tools to facilitate physiology and pathogenesis studies. Fluorescent proteins are ideal as reporters for their convenience in monitoring gene expression, performing host interaction studies, and monitoring biofilm growth. We have developed a suite of fluorescent reporter plasmids for labeling S. aureus cells. These plasmids encode either green fluorescent protein (GFP) or higher wavelength reporter variants for yellow (YFP) and red (mCherry) labeling. The reporters were placed under control of characterized promoters to enable constitutive or inducible expression. Additionally, plasmids were assembled with fluorescent reporters under control of the agr quorum-sensing and Sigma factor B promoters, and the fluorescent response with wildtype and relevant mutant strains was characterized. Interestingly, reporter expression displayed a strong dependence on ribosome binding site (RBS) sequence, with the superoxide dismutase RBS displaying the strongest expression kinetics of the sequences examined. To test the robustness of the reporter plasmids, cell imaging was performed with fluorescence microscopy and cell populations were separated using florescence activated cell sorting (FACS), demonstrating the possibilities of simultaneous monitoring of multiple S. aureus properties. Finally, a constitutive YFP reporter displayed stable, robust labeling of biofilm growth in a flow cell apparatus. This toolbox of fluorescent reporter plasmids will facilitate cell labeling for a variety of different experimental applications. PMID:19264102

  6. BAX gene over-expression via nucleofection to induce apoptosis in human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanwen; Mo, Xiaofen; Luo, Yi; Lu, Yi

    2012-09-01

    Despite significant advances in cataract surgery techniques, posterior capsule opacification (PCO) remains a common complication. In PCO, remaining epithelial cells cloud the lens capsule and impair postoperative vision. This in vitro study was designed to investigate the potential of a gene-based approach, specifically over-expression of the proapoptotic BAX gene, to prevent PCO. Human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) were transfected by nucleofection with a plasmid encoding a fusion protein of green fluorescent protein and human BAX. The expression levels of BAX and its antiapoptotic counterpart BCL2 were determined by realtime reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. BAX over-expression-induced cell death was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting using the Annexin V antibody. Fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used to assess changes in morphology and ultrastructure. Differential expression of the downstream apoptosis-related factor, caspase 3, was detected by Western blotting. Nucleofection efficiency was high (nearly 80%). BAX-transfected HLECs showed remarkably enhanced BAX gene expression and BAX:BCL2 ratio, but relatively little change in endogenous BCL2 expression. BAX over-expression also led to significant cytotoxicity, induction of apoptosis-related characteristics and activation of caspase 3. In conclusion, our results indicate that BAX gene over-expression can trigger cell death in HLECs via an apoptotic pathway. Thus, BAX may be a promising candidate for human gene therapy to treat PCO.

  7. Electroporation-Mediated Gene Transfer to the Developing Mouse Inner Ear

    PubMed Central

    Brigande, John V.; Gubbels, Samuel P.; Woessner, David W.; Jungwirth, Jonathan J.; Bresee, Catherine S.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian inner ear forms from a thickened patch of head ectoderm called the otic placode. The placodal ectoderm invaginates to form a cup whose edges cinch together to establish a fluid-filled sac called the otic vesicle or otocyst. The progenitor cells lining the otocyst lumen will give rise to sensory and non-sensory cells of the inner ear. These formative stages of inner ear development are initiated during the first week of postimplantation embryonic development in the mouse. The inaccessibility of the inner ear in utero has hampered efforts to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating essential developmental processes. An experimental embryological method to misexpress genes in the developing mammalian inner ear is presented. Expression plasmid encoding a gene of interest is microinjected through the uterine wall into the lumen of the otocyst and electroporated into otic epithelial progenitor cells. Downstream analysis of the transfected embryonic or postnatal inner ear is then conducted to gain insight into gene function. PMID:18839345

  8. Transfection of the IHH gene into rabbit BMSCs in a simulated microgravity environment promotes chondrogenic differentiation and inhibits cartilage aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng-Cheng; Liu, Kuan; Liu, Jun-Feng; Xia, Kuo; Chen, Li-Yang; Wu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The effect of overexpressing the Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene on the chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) was investigated in a simulated microgravity environment. An adenovirus plasmid encoding the rabbit IHH gene was constructed in vitro and transfected into rabbit BMSCs. Two large groups were used: conventional cell culture and induction model group and simulated microgravity environment group. Each large group was further divided into blank control group, GFP transfection group, and IHH transfection group. During differentiation induction, the expression levels of cartilage-related and cartilage hypertrophy-related genes and proteins in each group were determined. In the conventional model, the IHH transfection group expressed high levels of cartilage-related factors (Coll2 and ANCN) at the early stage of differentiation induction and expressed high levels of cartilage hypertrophy-related factors (Coll10, annexin 5, and ALP) at the late stage. Under the simulated microgravity environment, the IHH transfection group expressed high levels of cartilage-related factors and low levels of cartilage hypertrophy-related factors at all stages of differentiation induction. Under the simulated microgravity environment, transfection of the IHH gene into BMSCs effectively promoted the generation of cartilage and inhibited cartilage aging and osteogenesis. Therefore, this technique is suitable for cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:27802423

  9. A Phase l Study of a Tumor-targeted Systemic Nanodelivery System, SGT-94, in Genitourinary Cancers.

    PubMed

    Siefker-Radtke, Arlene; Zhang, Xin-Qiao; Guo, Charles C; Shen, Yu; Pirollo, Kathleen F; Sabir, Sharjeel; Leung, Chris; Leong-Wu, Cindy; Ling, Chi-Ming; Chang, Esther H; Millikan, Randall E; Benedict, William F

    2016-08-01

    Gene therapy development has been limited by our inability to target multifocal cancer with systemic delivery. We developed a systemically administered, tumor-targeted liposomal nanodelivery complex (SGT-94) carrying a plasmid encoding RB94, a truncated form of the RB gene. In preclinical studies, RB94 showed marked cytotoxicity against tumor but not normal cells. SGT-94 was administered intravenously in a first-in-man study in metastatic genitourinary cancer. Minimal side effects were observed; dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) has not been reached in 11 evaluable patients. There was evidence of clinical activity at the 2.4 mg dose with one complete remission (CR) and one partial remission (PR). The patient in CR was retreated upon progression and had a second PR. Furthermore, there was tumor-specific targeting of the SGT-94 complex. One patient had wedge resections of two lung metastases which demonstrated RB94 expression at the DNA level by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and at the protein level by Western blotting, with no RB94 present in normal contiguous lung. In conclusion, systemically delivered SGT-94 showed evidence of selective tumor targeting and was well tolerated with evidence of clinical activity. Additional studies are warranted to explore the activity of this drug as a single agent and in combination therapy.

  10. Enhancement of the protective efficacy of a ROP18 vaccine against chronic toxoplasmosis by nasal route.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Imran; Moiré, Nathalie; Héraut, Bruno; Dimier-Poisson, Isabelle; Mévélec, Marie-Noëlle

    2017-02-01

    Infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii causes serious public health problems and is of great economic importance worldwide. No vaccine is currently available, so the design of efficient vaccine strategies is still a topical question. In this study, we evaluated the immunoprophylactic potential of a T. gondii virulence factor, the rhoptry kinase ROP18, in a mouse model of chronic toxoplasmosis: first using a recombinant protein produced in Schneider insect cells adjuvanted with poly I:C emulsified in Montanide SV71 by a parenteral route or adjuvanted with cholera toxin by the nasal route and second using a DNA plasmid encoding ROP18 adjuvanted with GM-CSF ± IL-12 DNA. If both intranasal and subcutaneous recombinant ROP18 immunizations induced predominantly anti-ROP18 IgG1 antibodies and generated a mixed systemic Th1-/Th2-type cellular immune response characterized by the production of IFN-γ, IL-2, Il-10 and IL-5, only intranasal vaccination induced a mucosal (IgA) humoral response in intestinal washes associated with a significant brain cyst reduction (50 %) after oral challenge with T. gondii cysts. DNA immunization induced antibodies and redirected the cellular immune response toward a Th1-type response (production of IFN-γ and IL-2) but did not confer protection. These results suggest that ROP18 could be a component of a subunit vaccine against toxoplasmosis and that strategies designed to enhance mucosal protective immune responses could lead to more encouraging results.

  11. Epidemiology of Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii in Mediterranean Countries

    PubMed Central

    Djahmi, Nassima; Dunyach-Remy, Catherine; Pantel, Alix; Dekhil, Mazouz; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The emergence and global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Acinetobacter baumannii are of great concern to health services worldwide. These β-lactamases hydrolyse almost all β-lactams, are plasmid-encoded, and are easily transferable among bacterial species. They are mostly of the KPC, VIM, IMP, NDM, and OXA-48 types. Their current extensive spread worldwide in Enterobacteriaceae is an important source of concern. Infections caused by these bacteria have limited treatment options and have been associated with high mortality rates. Carbapenemase producers are mainly identified among Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and A. baumannii and still mostly in hospital settings and rarely in the community. The Mediterranean region is of interest due to a great diversity and population mixing. The prevalence of carbapenemases is particularly high, with this area constituting one of the most important reservoirs. The types of carbapenemase vary among countries, partially depending on the population exchange relationship between the regions and the possible reservoirs of each carbapenemase. This review described the epidemiology of carbapenemases produced by enterobacteria and A. baumannii in this part of the world highlighting the worrisome situation and the need to screen and detect these enzymes to prevent and control their dissemination. PMID:24955354

  12. Protein Hydrolysates from Non-bovine and Plant Sources Replaces Tryptone in Microbiological Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranganathan, Yamini; Patel, Shifa; Pasupuleti, Vijai K.; Meganathan, R.

    Tryptone (pancreatic digest of casein) is a common ingredient in laboratory and fermentation media for growing wild-type and genetically modified microorganisms. Many of the commercially manufactured products such as human growth hormone, antibiotics, insulin, etc. are produced by recombinant strains grown on materials derived from bovine sources. With the emergence of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) and the consequent increase in Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations, elimination of materials of bovine origin from fermentation media is of paramount importance. To achieve this objective, a number of protein hydrolysates derived from non-bovine animal and plant sources were evaluated. Tryptone in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth was replaced with an equal quantity of alternate protein hydrolysates. Four of the six hydrolysates (one animal and three from plants) were found to efficiently replace the tryptone present in LB-medium as measured by growth rate and growth yield of a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. In addition, we have determined plasmid stability, inducibility and activity of the plasmid encoded β-galactosidase in the recombinant strain grown in the presence of various protein hydrolysates.

  13. RepD-mediated recruitment of PcrA helicase at the Staphylococcus aureus pC221 plasmid replication origin, oriD

    PubMed Central

    Machón, C.; Lynch, G. P.; Thomson, N. H.; Scott, D. J.; Thomas, C. D.; Soultanas, P.

    2010-01-01

    Plasmid encoded replication initiation (Rep) proteins recruit host helicases to plasmid replication origins. Previously, we showed that RepD recruits directionally the PcrA helicase to the pC221 oriD, remains associated with it, and increases its processivity during plasmid unwinding. Here we show that RepD forms a complex extending upstream and downstream of the core oriD. Binding of RepD causes remodelling of a region upstream from the core oriD forming a ‘landing pad’ for the PcrA. PcrA is recruited by this extended RepD–DNA complex via an interaction with RepD at this upstream site. PcrA appears to have weak affinity for this region even in the absence of RepD. Upon binding of ADPNP (non-hydrolysable analogue of ATP), by PcrA, a conformational rearrangement of the RepD–PcrA–ATP initiation complex confines it strictly within the boundaries of the core oriD. We conclude that RepD-mediated recruitment of PcrA at oriD is a three step process. First, an extended RepD–oriD complex includes a region upstream from the core oriD; second, the PcrA is recruited to this upstream region and thirdly upon ATP-binding PcrA relocates within the core oriD. PMID:20044350

  14. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB5 toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins. PMID:26755534

  15. Repair of a Bacterial Small β-Barrel Toxin Pore Depends on Channel Width

    PubMed Central

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J.; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Parekh, Sapun

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Membrane repair emerges as an innate defense protecting target cells against bacterial pore-forming toxins. Here, we report the first paradigm of Ca2+-dependent repair following attack by a small β-pore-forming toxin, namely, plasmid-encoded phobalysin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae. In striking contrast, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, the closest ortholog of phobalysin, subverted repair. Mutational analysis uncovered a role of channel width in toxicity and repair. Thus, the replacement of serine at phobalysin´s presumed channel narrow point with the bulkier tryptophan, the corresponding residue in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (W318), modulated Ca2+ influx, lysosomal exocytosis, and membrane repair. And yet, replacing tryptophan (W318) with serine in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin enhanced toxicity. The data reveal divergent strategies evolved by two related small β-pore-forming toxins to manipulate target cells: phobalysin leads to fulminant perturbation of ion concentrations, closely followed by Ca2+ influx-dependent membrane repair. In contrast, V. cholerae cytolysin causes insidious perturbations and escapes control by the cellular wounded membrane repair-like response. PMID:28196960

  16. Functional amyloids as inhibitors of plasmid DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Molina-García, Laura; Gasset-Rosa, Fátima; Moreno-del Álamo, María; Fernández-Tresguerres, M. Elena; Moreno-Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Lurz, Rudi; Giraldo, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication is tightly regulated to constrain the genetic material within strict spatiotemporal boundaries and copy numbers. Bacterial plasmids are autonomously replicating DNA molecules of much clinical, environmental and biotechnological interest. A mechanism used by plasmids to prevent over-replication is ‘handcuffing’, i.e. inactivating the replication origins in two DNA molecules by holding them together through a bridge built by a plasmid-encoded initiator protein (Rep). Besides being involved in handcuffing, the WH1 domain in the RepA protein assembles as amyloid fibres upon binding to DNA in vitro. The amyloid state in proteins is linked to specific human diseases, but determines selectable and epigenetically transmissible phenotypes in microorganisms. Here we have explored the connection between handcuffing and amyloidogenesis of full-length RepA. Using a monoclonal antibody specific for an amyloidogenic conformation of RepA-WH1, we have found that the handcuffed RepA assemblies, either reconstructed in vitro or in plasmids clustering at the bacterial nucleoid, are amyloidogenic. The replication-inhibitory RepA handcuff assembly is, to our knowledge, the first protein amyloid directly dealing with DNA. Built on an amyloid scaffold, bacterial plasmid handcuffs can bring a novel molecular solution to the universal problem of keeping control on DNA replication initiation. PMID:27147472

  17. Crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticle assisted photothermal delivery into cells using CW near-infrared laser beam.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ling; Koymen, Ali R; Mohanty, Samarendra K

    2014-05-29

    Efficient and targeted delivery of impermeable exogenous material such as small molecules, proteins, and plasmids into cells in culture as well as in vivo is of great importance for drug, vaccine and gene delivery for different therapeutic strategies. Though advent of optoporation by ultrafast laser microbeam has allowed spatial targeting in cells, the requirement of high peak power to create holes on the cell membrane is not practical and also challenging in vivo. Here, we report development and use of uniquely non-reactive crystalline magnetic carbon nanoparticles (CMCNPs) for photothermal delivery (PTD) of impermeable dyes and plasmids encoding light-sensitive proteins into cells using low power continuous wave near-infrared (NIR) laser beam. Further, we utilized the magnetic nature of these CMCNPs to localize them in desired region by external magnetic field, thus minimizing the required number of nanoparticles. We discovered that irradiation of the CMCNPs near the desired cell(s) with NIR laser beam leads to temperature rise that not only stretch the cell-membrane to ease delivery, it also creates fluid flow to allow mobilization of exogenous substances to the delivery. Due to significant absorption properties of the CMCNPs in the NIR therapeutic window, PTD under in vivo condition is highly possible.

  18. Display of Peptides and Proteins on the Surface of Bacteriophage λ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Nat; Hoess, Ronald H.

    1995-02-01

    The display of peptides or proteins on the surface of viruses is an important technology for studying peptides or proteins and their interaction with other molecules. Here we describe a display vehicle based on bacteriophage λ that incorporates a number of features distinct from other currently used display systems. Fusions of peptides or protein domains have been made to the amino terminus of the 11-kDa D protein of the λ capsid. These fusions assemble onto the viral capsid and appear to be accessible to ligand interactions, based on the ability of a monoclonal antibody to recognize an epitope fused to the D protein on phage heads. To produce large D fusion display libraries and yet avoid the cumbersome task of cloning many fragments into λ DNA, we have used the Cre-loxP site-specific recombination system in vivo to incorporate plasmids encoding the D fusions into the phage genome. Finally, we show that D fusion proteins can be added in vitro to phage lacking D protein and be assembled onto the viral capsid.

  19. Analysis of pMA67, a predicted rolling-circle replicating, mobilizable, tetracycline-resistance plasmid from the honey bee pathogen, Paenibacillus larvae.

    PubMed

    Murray, K Daniel; Aronstein, Katherine A; de León, Jesse H

    2007-09-01

    This work characterizes a recently discovered natural tetracycline-resistance plasmid called pMA67 from Paenibacillus larvae--a Gram-positive bacterial pathogen of honey bees. We provide evidence that pMA67 replicates by the rolling-circle mechanism, and sequence comparisons place it in the pMV158 family of rolling-circle replicons. The plasmid contains predicted rep, cop, and rnaII genes for control of replication initiating at a predicted double-strand origin. The plasmid has an ssoT single-strand origin, which is efficient enough to allow only very small amounts of the single-stranded DNA intermediate to accumulate. The overall efficiency of replication is sufficient to render the plasmid segregationally stable without selection in P. larvae and in Bacillus megaterium, but not in Escherichia coli. The plasmid is expected to be mobilizable due to the presence of a mob gene and an oriT site. The plasmid contains a tetL gene, whose predicted amino acid sequence implies a relatively ancient divergence from all previously known plasmid-encoded tetL genes. We confirm that the tetL gene alone is sufficient for conferring resistance to tetracyclines. Sequence comparisons, mostly with the well-characterized pMV158, allow us to predict promoters, DNA and RNA secondary structures, DNA and protein motifs, and other elements.

  20. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of the Pasteurella haemolytica A1 glycoprotease gene.

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, K M; Lo, R Y; Mellors, A

    1991-01-01

    Pasteurella haemolytica serotype A1 secretes a glycoprotease which is specific for O-sialoglycoproteins such as glycophorin A. The gene encoding the glycoprotease enzyme has been cloned in the recombinant plasmid pH1, and its nucleotide sequence has been determined. The gene (designated gcp) codes for a protein of 35.2 kDa, and an active enzyme protein of this molecular mass can be observed in Escherichia coli clones carrying pPH1. In vivo labeling of plasmid-encoded proteins in E. coli maxicells demonstrated the expression of a 35-kDa protein from pPH1. The amino-terminal sequence of the heterologously expressed protein corresponds to that predicted from the nucleotide sequence. The glycoprotease is a neutral metalloprotease, and the predicted amino acid sequence of the glycoprotease contains a putative zinc-binding site. The gene shows no significant homology with the genes for other proteases of procaryotic or eucaryotic origin. However, there is substantial homology between gcp and an E. coli gene, orfX, whose product is believed to function in the regulation of macromolecule biosynthesis. Images PMID:1885539

  1. Outer Membrane Proteins form Specific Patterns in Antibiotic-Resistant Edwardsiella tarda.

    PubMed

    Peng, Bo; Wang, Chao; Li, Hui; Su, Yu-Bin; Ye, Jin-Zhou; Yang, Man-Jun; Jiang, Ming; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria play key roles in antibiotic resistance. However, it is unknown whether outer membrane proteins that respond to antibiotics behave in a specific manner. The present study specifically investigated the differentially expressed outer membrane proteins of an antibiotic-resistant bacterium, Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative pathogen that can lead to unnecessary mass medication of antimicrobials and consequently resistance development in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. The comparison of a clinically isolated strain to the laboratory derived kanamycin-, tetracycline-, or chloramphenicol-resistant strains identified their respective outer membrane proteins expression patterns, which are distinct to each other. Similarly, the same approach was utilized to profile the patterns in double antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Surprisingly, one pattern is always dominant over the other as to these three antibiotics; the pattern of chloramphenicol is over tetracycline, which is over kanamycin. This type of pattern was also confirmed in clinically relevant multidrug-resistant bacteria. In addition, the presence of plasmid encoding antibiotic-resistant genes also alters the outer membrane protein profile in a similar manner. Our results demonstrate that bacteria adapt the antibiotic stress through the regulation of outer membrane proteins expression. And more importantly, different outer membrane protein profiles were required to cope with different antibiotics. This type of specific pattern provides the rationale for the development of novel strategy to design outer membrane protein arrays to identify diverse multidrug resistance profiles as biomarkers for clinical medication.

  2. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Gen; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hirose, Atsumi; Kasai, Takuya; Yoshida, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode), the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor. PMID:26394222

  3. Evolution of MS lesions to black holes under DNA vaccine treatment.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; von Felten, Stefanie; Traud, Stefan; Rahman, Amena; Quan, Joanne; King, Robert; Garren, Hideki; Steinman, Lawrence; Cutter, Gary; Kappos, Ludwig; Radue, Ernst Wilhelm

    2012-07-01

    Persistent black holes (PBH) are associated with axonal loss and disability progression in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of this work was to determine if BHT-3009, a DNA plasmid-encoding myelin basic protein (MBP), reduces the risk of new lesions becoming PBH, compared to placebo, and to test if pre-treatment serum anti-MBP antibody levels impact on the effect of BHT-3009 treatment. In this retrospective, blinded MRI study, we reviewed MRI scans of 155 MS patients from a double-blind, randomized, phase II trial with three treatment arms (placebo, 0.5 and 1.5 mg BHT-3009). New lesions at weeks 8 and 16 were tracked at week 48 and those appearing as T1-hypointense were classified as PBH. A subset of 46 patients with available pre-treatment serum anti-MBP IgM levels were analyzed separately. Overall, there was no impact of treatment on the risk for PBH. However, there was a significant interaction between anti-MBP antibodies and treatment effect: patients receiving 0.5 mg BHT-3009 showed a reduced risk of PBH with higher antibody levels compared to placebo (p < 0.01). Although we found no overall reduction of the risk for PBH in treated patients, there may be an effect of low-dose BHT-3009, depending on the patients' pre-treatment immune responses.

  4. Control of carbon flux to glutamate excretion in Klebsiella pneumoniae: the role of the indigenous plasmid and its encoded isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    El-Mansi, Mansi; Trappey, Francois; Clark, Ewan; Campbell, Malcolm

    2015-11-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (NCTC, CL687/80) harbors a large indigenous plasmid (p(C3)), which in addition to encoding for citrate utilization, proline synthesis and glutamate excretion, it uniquely carries the structural gene (icd); encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH). Flux analysis revealed that ICDH, despite its role in the generation of NADPH required for glutamate dehydrogenase, is not rate-limiting (controlling) in central metabolism as evidenced by a negative flux control coefficient and an adverse effect of overexpression (14-fold) on glutamate excretion. More significantly, however, this paper presents, for the first time, clear evidence that the accumulation of glutamate and its subsequent excretion is associated with the C3 plasmid-encoded regulatory elements, which trigger a shift-down in the activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, both in the K. pneumoniae parental strain as well as in the E. coli exconjugants strains. This finding opens the door for the exploitation of regulatory elements as a tool for manipulating flux in microbial cell factories.

  5. Angiogenic inhibitors delivered by the type III secretion system of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium safely shrink tumors in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Yu, Bin; Cai, Chun-Hui; Huang, Jian-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Despite of a growing number of bacterial species that apparently exhibit intrinsic tumor-targeting properties, no bacterium is able to inhibit tumor growth completely in the immunocompetent hosts, due to its poor dissemination inside the tumors. Oxygen and inflammatory reaction form two barriers and restrain the spread of the bacteria inside the tumors. Here, we engineered a Salmonella typhimurium strain named ST8 which is safe and has limited ability to spread beyond the anaerobic regions of tumors. When injected systemically to tumor-bearing immunocompetent mice, ST8 accumulated in tumors at levels at least 100-fold greater than parental obligate anaerobic strain ST4. ST8/pSEndo harboring therapeutic plasmids encoding Endostatin fused with a secreted protein SopA could target vasculature at the tumor periphery, can stably maintain and safely deliver a therapeutic vector, release angiogenic inhibitors through a type III secretion system (T3SS) to interfere with the pro-angiogenic action of growth factors in tumors. Mice with murine CT26 colon cancer that had been injected with ST8/pSEndo showed efficient tumor suppression by inducing more severe necrosis and inhibiting blooding vessel density within tumors. Our findings provide a therapeutic platform for indirectly acting therapeutic strategies such as anti-angiogenesis and immune therapy.

  6. HSP70i Accelerates Depigmentation in a Mouse Model of Autoimmune Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Denman, Cecele J.; McCracken, James; Hariharan, Vidhya; Klarquist, Jared; Oyarbide-Valencia, Kepa; Guevara-Patiño, José A.; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Vitiligo is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the skin. Progressive depigmentation accelerates in response to stress. Personal trauma, contact with bleaching phenols, overexposure to UV, and mechanical injury can lead to progressive loss of melanocytes. This study was focused on the role of stress protein heat shock protein (HSP)70 for translating stress into an autoimmune disease to melanocytes. Intracellular HSP70 can act as a cytoprotectant, preventing apoptosis in cells under stress. Isoform HSP70i can be secreted by live cells, and in prior in vitro studies, HSP70 has been shown to activate dendritic cells and elicit an immune response to chaperoned proteins and peptides. Here, the role of HSP70 in precipitating and perpetuating vitiligo was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of autoimmune vitiligo. In this model, depigmentation was introduced by gene gun vaccination with eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding melanocyte differentiation antigens. Inclusion of human and mouse-derived inducible HSP70 in the vaccination protocol significantly increased and accelerated depigmentation in this model, accompanied by the induction of prolonged humoral responses to HSP70. Cytotoxicity toward targets loaded with a K(b)-restricted tyrosinase-related protein 2-derived peptide correlated with depigmentation. The data presented strongly support a role for HSP70i in progressive depigmentation in vivo. PMID:18337834

  7. A comparative study of non-viral gene delivery techniques to human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Abdul Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza; Fakiruddin, Kamal Shaik; Ali, Syed Atif; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2014-08-26

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold tremendous potential for therapeutic use in stem cell-based gene therapy. Ex vivo genetic modification of MSCs with beneficial genes of interest is a prerequisite for successful use of stem cell-based therapeutic applications. However, genetic manipulation of MSCs is challenging because they are resistant to commonly used methods to introduce exogenous DNA or RNA. Herein we compared the effectiveness of several techniques (classic calcium phosphate precipitation, cationic polymer, and standard electroporation) with that of microporation technology to introduce the plasmid encoding for angiopoietin-1 (ANGPT-1) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) into human adipose-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs). The microporation technique had a higher transfection efficiency, with up to 50% of the viable hAD-MSCs being transfected, compared to the other transfection techniques, for which less than 1% of cells were positive for eGFP expression following transfection. The capability of cells to proliferate and differentiate into three major lineages (chondrocytes, adipocytes, and osteocytes) was found to be independent of the technique used for transfection. These results show that the microporation technique is superior to the others in terms of its ability to transfect hAD-MSCs without affecting their proliferation and differentiation capabilities. Therefore, this study provides a foundation for the selection of techniques when using ex vivo gene manipulation for cell-based gene therapy with MSCs as the vehicle for gene delivery.

  8. Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Public Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Quinteros, M.; Radice, M.; Gardella, N.; Rodriguez, M. M.; Costa, N.; Korbenfeld, D.; Couto, E.; Gutkind, G.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins is often associated with plasmid encoded extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL). In order to evaluate the prevalence and diversity of ESBLs in enterobacteria in our city, a 1-month-period survey was carried out from April to May 2000. Extended-spectrum-cephalosporin-resistant strains, isolated from inpatient clinical specimens other than stools, were collected among 17 participating hospitals. From a total of 427 enterobacterial strains that were collected during this period, 39 were extended-spectrum cephalosporin resistant. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards' Screening and Confirmatory Tests for ESBL production were performed using cefotaxime and ceftazidime; cefepime and cefepime-clavulanic acid-containing disks were included. β-Lactamases were characterized by isoelectric focusing and PCR amplification using specific primers. Three different ESBLs were detected: SHV-related (4 isolates), PER-2-type (9 isolates), and CTX-M-2-related (26 isolates). Sequencing of the corresponding genes confirmed CTX-M-2 in 19 of 21 and CTX-M-31 (an allelic variant) in the remaining 2 of 21. CTX-M-2 (or its variant) was detected in all Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, and Providencia stuartii strains, while PER-2 was detected in Enterobacter cloacae, E. aerogenes, and Klebsiella pneumoniae; SHV-related ESBL were found only in K. pneumoniae. These results clearly show that CTX-M-2 is the most prevalent ESBL produced by enterobacterial species isolated from public hospitals in Buenos Aires. PMID:12936986

  9. Phage shock protein PspA of Escherichia coli relieves saturation of protein export via the Tat pathway.

    PubMed

    DeLisa, Matthew P; Lee, Philip; Palmer, Tracy; Georgiou, George

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression of either heterologous or homologous proteins that are routed to the periplasm via the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway results in a block of export and concomitant accumulation of the respective protein precursor in the cytoplasm. Screening of a plasmid-encoded genomic library for mutants that confer enhanced export of a TorA signal sequence (ssTorA)-GFP-SsrA fusion protein, and thus result in higher cell fluorescence, yielded the pspA gene encoding phage shock protein A. Coexpression of pspA relieved the secretion block observed with ssTorA-GFP-SsrA or upon overexpression of the native Tat proteins SufI and CueO. A similar effect was observed with the Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 PspA homologue, VIPP1, indicating that the role of PspA in Tat export may be phylogenetically conserved. Mutations in Tat components that completely abolish export result in a marked induction of PspA protein synthesis, consistent with its proposed role in enhancing protein translocation via Tat.

  10. Microcin J25 uptake: His5 of the MccJ25 lariat ring is involved in interaction with the inner membrane MccJ25 transporter protein SbmA.

    PubMed

    de Cristóbal, Ricardo E; Solbiati, Jose O; Zenoff, Ana M; Vincent, Paula A; Salomón, Raul A; Yuzenkova, Julia; Severinov, Konstantin; Farías, Ricardo N

    2006-05-01

    Escherichia coli microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a plasmid-encoded antibiotic peptide consisting of 21 L-amino acid residues (G1-G-A-G-H5-V-P-E-Y-F10-V-G-I-G-T15-P-I-S-F-Y20-G). E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) is the intracellular target of MccJ25. MccJ25 enters cells after binding to specific membrane transporters: FhuA in the outer membrane and SbmA in the inner membrane. Here, we studied MccJ25 mutants carrying a substitution of His5 by Lys, Arg, or Ala. The inhibitory effects on cellular growth and in vitro RNAP activity were determined for each mutant microcin. The results show that all mutants inhibited RNAP in vitro. However, the mutants were defective in their ability to inhibit cellular growth. Experiments in which the FhuA protein was bypassed showed that substitutions of MccJ25 His5 affected the SbmA-dependent transport. Our results thus suggest that MccJ25 His5 located in the lariat ring is involved, directly or indirectly, in specific interaction with SbmA and is not required for MccJ25 inhibition of RNAP.

  11. The YopD translocator of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis is a multifunctional protein comprised of discrete domains.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan; Edqvist, Petra J; Bröms, Jeanette E; Forsberg, Ake; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Francis, Matthew S

    2004-07-01

    To establish an infection, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis utilizes a plasmid-encoded type III translocon to microinject several anti-host Yop effectors into the cytosol of target eukaryotic cells. YopD has been implicated in several key steps during Yop effector translocation, including maintenance of yop regulatory control and pore formation in the target cell membrane through which effectors traverse. These functions are mediated, in part, by an interaction with the cognate chaperone, LcrH. To gain insight into the complex molecular mechanisms of YopD function, we performed a systematic mutagenesis study to search for discrete functional domains. We highlighted amino acids beyond the first three N-terminal residues that are dispensable for YopD secretion and confirmed that an interaction between YopD and LcrH is essential for maintenance of yop regulatory control. In addition, discrete domains within YopD that are essential for both pore formation and translocation of Yop effectors were identified. Significantly, other domains were found to be important for effector microinjection but not for pore formation. Therefore, YopD is clearly essential for several discrete steps during efficient Yop effector translocation. Recognition of this modular YopD domain structure provides important insights into the function of YopD.

  12. Deletion of fusion peptide or destabilization of fusion core of HIV gp41 enhances antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Chen Xi; Jiang Shibo Chen Yinghua

    2008-11-07

    The human monoclonal antibody 4E10 against the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of HIV-1 gp41 demonstrates broad neutralizing activity across various strains, and makes its epitope an attractive target for HIV-1 vaccine development. Although the contiguous epitope of 4E10 has been identified, attempts to re-elicit 4E10-like antibodies have failed, possibly due to the lack of proper conformation of the 4E10 epitope. Here we used pIg-tail expression system to construct a panel of eukaryotic cell-surface expression plasmids encoding the extracellular domain of gp41 with deletion of fusion peptide and/or introduction of L568P mutation that may disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle core conformation as DNA vaccines for immunization of mice. We found that these changes resulted in significant increase of the antigenicity and immunogenicity of 4E10 epitope. This information is thus useful for rational design of vaccines targeting the HIV-1 gp41 MPER.

  13. Allergy Vaccines Using a Mycobacterium-Secreted Antigen, Ag85B, and an IL-4 Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Tsujimura, Yusuke; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, the prevalence of allergic diseases, including bronchial asthma, airway hypersensitivity, hay fever, and atopic dermatitis, has been increasing in the industrialized world, and effective treatments probably require manipulating the inflammatory response to pathogenic allergens. T helper (Th) 2 cells are thought to play a crucial role in the initiation, progression, and persistence of allergic responses in association with production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5, and IL-13. Therefore, a strategy of a shift from Th2- to Th1-type immune response may be valuable in the prophylaxis and management of allergic diseases. It is also necessary to develop prophylactic and therapeutic treatment that induces homeostatic functions in the multifaceted allergic environment, because various factors including innate and adaptive immunity, mucosal immune response, and functional and structural maintenance of local tissue might be involved in the pathogenesis of allergic disorders. We review herein recent findings related to the curative effect for mouse models of asthma and atopic dermatitis using DNA-, virus-, and protein-based vaccines of a Mycobacterium secretion antigen, Ag85B, and a plasmid encoding cDNA of antagonistic IL-4 mutant.

  14. Characterization of Klebsiella sp. strain 10982, a colonizer of humans that contains novel antibiotic resistance alleles and exhibits genetic similarities to plant and clinical Klebsiella isolates.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Tracy H; Zhao, LiCheng; Sahl, Jason W; Robinson, Gwen; Harris, Anthony D; Rasko, David A; Johnson, J Kristie

    2014-01-01

    A unique Klebsiella species strain, 10982, was cultured from a perianal swab specimen obtained from a patient in the University of Maryland Medical Center intensive care unit. Klebsiella sp. 10982 possesses a large IncA/C multidrug resistance plasmid encoding a novel FOX AmpC β-lactamase designated FOX-10. A novel variant of the LEN β-lactamase was also identified. Genome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that this isolate contains genes associated with nitrogen fixation, allantoin metabolism, and citrate fermentation. These three gene regions are typically present in either Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolates or Klebsiella nitrogen-fixing endophytes but usually not in the same organism. Phylogenomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 and sequenced Klebsiella genomes demonstrated that Klebsiella sp. 10982 is present on a branch that is located intermediate between the genomes of nitrogen-fixing endophytes and K. pneumoniae clinical isolates. Metabolic features identified in the genome of Klebsiella sp. 10982 distinguish this isolate from other Klebsiella clinical isolates. These features include the nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster, which is typically present in endophytic Klebsiella isolates and is absent from Klebsiella clinical isolates. Additionally, the Klebsiella sp. 10982 genome contains genes associated with allantoin metabolism, which have been detected primarily in K. pneumoniae isolates from liver abscesses. Comparative genomic analysis of Klebsiella sp. 10982 demonstrated that this organism has acquired genes conferring new metabolic strategies and novel antibiotic resistance alleles, both of which may enhance its ability to colonize the human body.

  15. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of plasmid mediated AmpC β-lactamases among Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Proteus mirabilis isolated from urinary tract infections in Egyptian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Mai M; Wasfi, Reham

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of resistance by Enterobacteriaceae to β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitors combination is increasing in Egypt. Three phenotypic techniques, comprising AmpC disk diffusion and inhibition dependent methods using phenylboronic acid (PBA) and cloxacillin, were compared to PCR based method for detection of plasmid mediated AmpC β-lactamase in common urinary tract isolates. A total of 143 isolates, including E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Proteus mirabilis, were collected from urinary tract infections cases in Egyptian hospitals. Plasmid encoded AmpC genes were detected by PCR in 88.46% of cefoxitin resistant isolates. The most prevalent AmpC gene family was CIT including CMY-2, CMY-4, and two CMY-2 variants. The second prevalent gene was DHA-1 which was detected in E. coli and Klebsiella pneumonia. The genes EBC, FOX, and MOX were also detected but in small percentage. Some isolates were identified as having more than one pAmpC gene. The overall sensitivity and specificity of phenotypic tests for detection of AmpC β-lactamase showed that AmpC disk diffusion and inhibition dependent method by cloxacillin were the most sensitive and the most specific disk tests. PCR remains the gold standard for detection of AmpC β-lactamases. This study represents the first report of CMY-2 variants of CMY-42 and CMY-102 β-lactamase-producing E. coli, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Proteus mirabilis isolates in Egypt.

  16. Biosafety of biotechnologically important microalgae: intrinsic suicide switch implementation in cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Čelešnik, Helena; Tanšek, Anja; Tahirović, Aneja; Vižintin, Angelika; Mustar, Jernej; Vidmar, Vita; Dolinar, Marko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In recent years, photosynthetic autotrophic cyanobacteria have attracted interest for biotechnological applications for sustainable production of valuable metabolites. Although biosafety issues can have a great impact on public acceptance of cyanobacterial biotechnology, biosafety of genetically modified cyanobacteria has remained largely unexplored. We set out to incorporate biocontainment systems in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Plasmid-encoded safeguards were constructed using the nonspecific nuclease NucA from Anabaena combined with different metal-ion inducible promoters. In this manner, conditional lethality was dependent on intracellular DNA degradation for regulated autokilling as well as preclusion of horizontal gene transfer. In cells carrying the suicide switch comprising the nucA gene fused to a variant of the copM promoter, efficient inducible autokilling was elicited. Parallel to nuclease-based safeguards, cyanobacterial toxin/antitoxin (TA) modules were examined in biosafety switches. Rewiring of Synechocystis TA pairs ssr1114/slr0664 and slr6101/slr6100 for conditional lethality using metal-ion responsive promoters resulted in reduced growth, rather than cell killing, suggesting cells could cope with elevated toxin levels. Overall, promoter properties and translation efficiency influenced the efficacy of biocontainment systems. Several metal-ion promoters were tested in the context of safeguards, and selected promoters, including a nrsB variant, were characterized by beta-galactosidase reporter assay. PMID:27029902

  17. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Barbier, Mariette; Damron, F. Heath

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications. PMID:26937640

  18. Enhanced immune response with foot and mouth disease virus VP1 and interleukin-1 fusion genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Sun Jin; Oem, Jae Ku; Lee, Kwang Nyeong; Kim, Yong Joo; Kye, Soo Jeong; Park, Jee Yong; Joo, Yi Seok

    2006-09-01

    The capsid of the foot and mouth disease (FMD) virus carries the epitopes that are critical for inducing the immune response. In an attempt to enhance the specific immune response, plasmid DNA was constructed to express VP1/interleukin-1alpha (IL-1alpha) and precursor capsid (P1) in combination with 2A (P1-2A)/IL-1alpha under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) immediateearly promoter and intron. After DNA transfection into MA104 (monkey kidney) cells, Western blotting and an immunofluorescence assay were used to confirm the expression of VP1 or P1-2A and IL-1alpha. Mice were inoculated with the encoding plasmids via the intradermal route, and the IgG1 and IgG2a levels were used to determine the immune responses. These results show that although the immunized groups did not carry a high level of neutralizing antibodies, the plasmids encoding the VP1/ IL-1alpha, and P1-2A /IL-1alpha fused genes were effective in inducing an enhanced immune response.

  19. Preclinical models of Graves' disease and associated secondary complications.

    PubMed

    Moshkelgosha, Sajad; So, Po-Wah; Diaz-Cano, Salvador; Banga, J Paul

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder which consists of two opposing clinical syndromes, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' (hyperthyroidism) disease. Graves' disease is characterized by goiter, hyperthyroidism, and the orbital complication known as Graves' orbitopathy (GO), or thyroid eye disease. The hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of function of thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR), resulting from the production of agonist antibodies to the receptor. A variety of induced mouse models of Graves' disease have been developed over the past two decades, with some reproducible models leading to high disease incidence of autoimmune hyperthyroidism. However, none of the models show any signs of the orbital manifestation of GO. We have recently developed an experimental mouse model of GO induced by immunization of the plasmid encoded ligand binding domain of human TSHR cDNA by close field electroporation that recapitulates the orbital pathology in GO. As in human GO patients, immune mice with hyperthyroid or hypothyroid disease induced by anti-TSHR antibodies exhibited orbital pathology and chemosis, characterized by inflammation of orbital muscles and extensive adipogenesis leading to expansion of the orbital retrobulbar space. Magnetic resonance imaging of the head region in immune mice showed a significant expansion of the orbital space, concurrent with proptosis. This review discusses the different strategies for developing mouse models in Graves' disease, with a particular focus on GO. Furthermore, it outlines how this new model will facilitate molecular investigations into pathophysiology of the orbital disease and evaluation of new therapeutic interventions.

  20. Optimization of Plasmid Maintenance in the Attenuated Live Vector Vaccine Strain Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA†

    PubMed Central

    Galen, James E.; Nair, Jay; Wang, Jin Yuang; Wasserman, Steven S.; Tanner, Michael K.; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    The broad objective of the research presented here is to develop a noncatalytic plasmid maintenance system for the stabilization of multicopy expression plasmids encoding foreign antigens in a Salmonella typhi live-vector vaccine strain such as CVD 908-htrA. We have enhanced the maintenance of expression plasmids at two independent levels. First, we removed dependence upon balanced-lethal maintenance systems that involve catalytic enzymes expressed from multicopy plasmids; we accomplished this through incorporation into expression plasmids of a postsegregational killing system based on the noncatalytic hok-sok plasmid addiction system from the antibiotic resistance factor pR1. We also included at least one naturally occurring plasmid partition function in our expression plasmids, which eliminates random segregation of these plasmids, thereby enhancing their inheritance and stability; to accomplish this, we incorporated either the par locus from pSC101, the parA locus from pR1, or both. We monitored the stability of optimized expression plasmids within CVD 908-htrA by quantitating expression of a variant of green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) by using flow cytometry. In this report, we demonstrate the utility of this novel plasmid maintenance system in enhancing the stability of our expression plasmids and go on to show that as the copy number of stabilized plasmids increases, the toxicity of GFPuv synthesis also increases. The implications of these observations for the rational design of immunogenic and protective bacterial live vector vaccines are discussed. PMID:10569759

  1. Selective Promoter Recognition by Chlamydial σ28 Holoenzyme▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Li; Feng, Xiaogeng; Yuan, Yuan; Luo, Xudong; Hatch, Thomas P.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Liu, Jun S.; Zhang, You-xun

    2006-01-01

    The σ transcription factor confers the promoter recognition specificity of RNA polymerase (RNAP) in eubacteria. Chlamydia trachomatis has three known sigma factors, σ66, σ54, and σ28. We developed two methods to facilitate the characterization of promoter sequences recognized by C. trachomatis σ28 (σ28Ct). One involved the arabinose-induced expression of plasmid-encoded σ28Ct in a strain of Escherichia coli defective in the σ28 structural gene, fliA. The second was an analysis of transcription in vitro with a hybrid holoenzyme reconstituted with E. coli RNAP core and recombinant σ28Ct. These approaches were used to investigate the interactions of σ28Ct with the σ28Ct-dependent hctB promoter and selected E. coli σ28 (σ28Ec)-dependent promoters, in parallel, compared with the promoter recognition properties of σ28EC. Our results indicate that RNAP containing σ28Ct has at least three characteristics: (i) it is capable of recognizing some but not all σ28EC-dependent promoters; (ii) it can distinguish different promoter structures, preferentially activating promoters with upstream AT-rich sequences; and (iii) it possesses a greater flexibility than σ28EC in recognizing variants with different spacing lengths separating the −35 and −10 elements of the core promoter. PMID:16936033

  2. 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, a synthetic androgen with high potency: structure-activity comparisons with other androgens.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N; Crozat, A; Li, F; Catterall, J F; Bardin, C W; Sundaram, K

    1999-12-31

    CNNT. There was a good correlation between bioactivity and binding affinity to AR for the 7alpha-substituted androgens compared to T. In contrast, relative to their binding affinity to AR, the androgenic potency of DHT and 19-NT was lower compared to T. The reason for the lower in vivo androgenic activity of 19-NT is attributable to its enzymatic conversion to 5alpha-reduced-19-NT in the prostate. In the case of DHT, the lower bioactivity could be attributed to its faster metabolic clearance rate relative to T. The correlation was further investigated in vitro by co-transfection of rat ARcDNA expression plasmid and a reporter plasmid encoding the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by an androgen inducible promoter into CV-1 cells. All the androgens led to a dose-dependent increase in the CAT activity. MENT was found to be the most potent followed by DHT, 19-NT, T, and CNNT. The specificity of the androgenic response was confirmed by its inhibition with hydroxyflutamide, an antiandrogen. Thus, there was a good correlation between binding affinity and in vitro bioactivity in the transient transfection assay for the androgens. This suggests that the in vivo bioactivity of androgens could be influenced not only by binding affinity to receptors but also by factors such as absorption, binding to serum proteins and metabolism. However, the high potency of MENT is primarily related to its higher affinity to AR.

  3. On the evolution of the single-subunit RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Ikeda, T M; Miramontes, P; Lang, B F; Gray, M W; Cedergren, R

    1997-12-01

    Many eukaryotic nuclear genomes as well as mitochondrial plasmids contain genes displaying evident sequence similarity to those encoding the single-subunit RNA polymerase (ssRNAP) of bacteriophage T7 and its relatives. We have collected and aligned these ssRNAP sequences and have constructed unrooted phylogenetic trees that demonstrate the separation of ssRNAPs into three well-defined and nonoverlapping clusters (phage-encoded, nucleus-encoded, and plasmid-encoded). Our analyses indicate that these three subfamiles of T7-like RNAPs shared a common ancestor; however, the order in which the groups diverged cannot be inferred from available data. On the basis of structural similarities and mutational data, we suggest that the ancestral ssRNAP gene may have arisen via duplication and divergence of a DNA polymerase or reverse transcriptase gene. Considering the current phylogenetic distribution of ssRNAP sequences, we further suggest that the origin of the ancestral ssRNAP gene closely paralleled in time the introduction of mitochondria into eukaryotic cells through a eubacterial endosymbiosis.

  4. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, X; Davis, F C; Hespell, R B; Ingram, L O

    1997-01-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-beta-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-beta-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. PMID:9023916

  5. Quorum-quenching limits quorum-sensing exploitation by signal-negative invaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannières, Mélanie; Lang, Julien; Barnier, Claudie; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Faure, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria produce and perceive quorum-sensing (QS) signals that coordinate several behaviours, including the costly processes that are exoenzyme production and plasmid transfer. In the case of plasmid transfer, the emergence of QS signal-altered invaders and their policing are poorly documented. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the virulence Ti-plasmid encodes both synthesis and sensing of QS-signals, which promote its transfer from a donor to a recipient cell. Here, we reported that QS-altered A. tumefaciens mutants arose during experimental evolution. All showed improved growth compared to their ancestor. Genome sequencing revealed that, though some had lost the Ti-plasmid, most were defective for QS-signal synthesis and Ti-plasmid conjugation (traR mutations) and one exhibited a QS-signal exploitation behaviour, using signal produced by other cells to enhance its own Ti-plasmid transfer. We explored mechanisms that can limit this QS-hijacking. We showed that the A. tumefaciens capacity to inactivate QS-signals by expressing QS-degrading enzyme could attenuate dissemination of the QS signal-negative Ti-plasmids. This work shows that enzymatic QS-disruption whether encoded by the QS-producing Ti-plasmid itself, by a companion plasmid in the same donor cells, or by one in the recipient cells, in all cases can serve as a mechanism for controlling QS exploitation by QS signal-negative mutants.

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for discrimination of OspA vaccination from spirochete infection.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y Q; Mathiesen, D; Kolbert, C P; Anderson, J; Schoen, R T; Fikrig, E; Persing, D H

    1997-01-01

    Recombinant Lyme disease vaccines based on purified preparations of outer surface protein A (OspA) have been shown to be effective in preventing transmission of Borrelia burgdorferi in experimental animal models and are now being tested in humans. Since the most widely used screening tests for Lyme disease are based on a whole-cell sonicate of B. burgdorferi, serologic false positivity in vaccinated persons could result from reactivity to OspA within the antigen preparation. In order to avoid serologic false positivity in vaccinated subjects, we developed an immunoassay based on a low-passage-number, naturally occurring variant of B. burgdorferi which lacks the plasmid encoding OspA and OspB. The use of an antigen preparation derived from this organism provided sensitive and specific detection of B. burgdorferi seropositivity in experimental animals and in human Lyme disease cases. The OspA-B-negative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) also appeared to be capable of discriminating the vaccinated state from vaccine failure and natural infection in experimental animals. Sera from human subjects participating in a vaccine trial gave false-positive results with an ELISA based on an OspA-containing strain, but no such reactivity was observed when the OspA-negative ELISA was used. We conclude that low-passage-number OspA-B-negative isolates in immunoassays may become useful for the immunologic discrimination of the vaccinated state, natural infection, and vaccine failure. PMID:8968914

  7. Antibiotic Resistance in an Indian Rural Community: A 'One-Health' Observational Study on Commensal Coliform from Humans, Animals, and Water.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Manju Raj; Chandran, Salesh; Shah, Harshada; Diwan, Vishal; Tamhankar, Ashok J; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia

    2017-04-06

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are an escalating grim menace to global public health. Our aim is to phenotype and genotype antibiotic-resistant commensal Escherichia coli (E. coli) from humans, animals, and water from the same community with a 'one-health' approach. The samples were collected from a village belonging to demographic surveillance site of Ruxmaniben Deepchand (R.D.) Gardi Medical College Ujjain, Central India. Commensal coliforms from stool samples from children aged 1-3 years and their environment (animals, drinking water from children's households, common source- and waste-water) were studied for antibiotic susceptibility and plasmid-encoded resistance genes. E. coli isolates from human (n = 127), animal (n = 21), waste- (n = 12), source- (n = 10), and household drinking water (n = 122) carried 70%, 29%, 41%, 30%, and 30% multi-drug resistance, respectively. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers were 57% in human and 23% in environmental isolates. Co-resistance was frequent in penicillin, cephalosporin, and quinolone. Antibiotic-resistance genes blaCTX-M-9 and qnrS were most frequent. Group D-type isolates with resistance genes were mainly from humans and wastewater. Colistin resistance, or the mcr-1 gene, was not detected. The frequency of resistance, co-resistance, and resistant genes are high and similar in coliforms from humans and their environment. This emphasizes the need to mitigate antibiotic resistance with a 'one-health' approach.

  8. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Gen; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Hirose, Atsumi; Kasai, Takuya; Yoshida, Gen; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode), the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  9. Evaluating quantitative methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells

    PubMed Central

    Tal, Shay; Paulsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    The life of plasmids is a constant battle against fluctuations: failing to correct copy number fluctuations can increase the plasmid loss rate by many orders of magnitude, as can a failure to more evenly divide the copies between daughters at cell division. Plasmids are therefore long-standing model systems for stochastic processes in cells, much thanks to the efforts of Kurt Nordström to whose memory this issue is dedicated. Here we analyze a range of experimental methods for measuring plasmid copy numbers in single cells, focusing on challenges, trade-offs and necessary experimental controls. In particular we analyze published and unpublished strategies to infer copy numbers from expression of plasmid-encoded reporters, direct labeling of plasmids with fluorescent probes or DNA binding proteins fused to fluorescent reporters, PCR based methods applied to single cell lysates, and plasmid-specific replication arrest. We conclude that no method currently exists to measure plasmid copy numbers in single cells, and that most methods instead inadvertently measure various types of experimental noise. We also discuss how accurate methods can be developed. PMID:22305922

  10. Toxin–antitoxin systems

    PubMed Central

    Unterholzner, Simon J; Poppenberger, Brigitte; Rozhon, Wilfried

    2013-01-01

    Toxin–antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic elements composed of a toxin gene and its cognate antitoxin. The toxins of all known TA systems are proteins while the antitoxins are either proteins or non-coding RNAs. Based on the molecular nature of the antitoxin and its mode of interaction with the toxin the TA modules are currently grouped into five classes. In general, the toxin is more stable than the antitoxin but the latter is expressed to a higher level. If supply of the antitoxin stops, for instance under special growth conditions or by plasmid loss in case of plasmid encoded TA systems, the antitoxin is rapidly degraded and can no longer counteract the toxin. Consequently, the toxin becomes activated and can act on its cellular targets. Typically, TA toxins act on crucial cellular processes including translation, replication, cytoskeleton formation, membrane integrity, and cell wall biosynthesis. TA systems and their components are also versatile tools for a multitude of purposes in basic research and biotechnology. Currently, TA systems are frequently used for selection in cloning and for single protein expression in living bacterial cells. Since several TA toxins exhibit activity in yeast and mammalian cells they may be useful for applications in eukaryotic systems. TA modules are also considered as promising targets for the development of antibacterial drugs and their potential to combat viral infection may aid in controlling infectious diseases. PMID:24251069

  11. Intranasal delivery of naked DNA encoding the LACK antigen leads to protective immunity against visceral leishmaniasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Daniel Cláudio de Oliveira; Pinto, Eduardo Fonseca; de Melo, Luiz Dione Barbosa; Lima, Wallace Pacienza; Larraga, Vicente; Lopes, Ulisses Gazos; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira

    2007-03-08

    We previously showed that intranasal (i.n.) vaccination with pCIneo plasmid encoding the leishmanial LACK gene (pCIneo-LACK) induces long-lasting protective immunity against cutaneous leishmaniasis in mice. In this work, we proposed to investigate whether the efficacy of i.n. pCIneo-LACK is extensive to visceral leishmaniasis. BALB/c mice received two i.n. doses of 30 microg pCIneo-LACK prior to intravenous (i.v.) infection with Leishmania chagasi. Vaccinated mice developed significantly lower parasite burden in the liver and spleen than control mice receiving empty pCIneo or saline. The spleen cells of vaccinated mice produced significantly increased IFN-gamma and IL-4 concomitant with decreased IL-10 production during infection. Serum levels of specific IgG were elevated whereas TNF-alpha were decreased as compared with controls. These results show that the practical needle-free i.n. pCIneo-LACK vaccine displays potential broad-spectrum activity against leishmaniasis.

  12. Mutagenesis and functional selection protocols for directed evolution of proteins in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Troll, Chris; Alexander, David; Allen, Jennifer; Marquette, Jacob; Camps, Manel

    2011-03-16

    The efficient generation of genetic diversity represents an invaluable molecular tool that can be used to label DNA synthesis, to create unique molecular signatures, or to evolve proteins in the laboratory. Here, we present a protocol that allows the generation of large (>10(11)) mutant libraries for a given target sequence. This method is based on replication of a ColE1 plasmid encoding the desired sequence by a low-fidelity variant of DNA polymerase I (LF-Pol I). The target plasmid is transformed into a mutator strain of E. coli and plated on solid media, yielding between 0.2 and 1 mutations/kb, depending on the location of the target gene. Higher mutation frequencies are achieved by iterating this process of mutagenesis. Compared to alternative methods of mutagenesis, our protocol stands out for its simplicity, as no cloning or PCR are involved. Thus, our method is ideal for mutational labeling of plasmids or other Pol I templates or to explore large sections of sequence space for the evolution of activities not present in the original target. The tight spatial control that PCR or randomized oligonucleotide-based methods offer can also be achieved through subsequent cloning of specific sections of the library. Here we provide protocols showing how to create a random mutant library and how to establish drug-based selections in E. coli to identify mutants exhibiting new biochemical activities.

  13. Antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells induced by the ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Takashi; Duan Xuefeng; Hisaeda, Hajime; Himeno, Kunisuke

    2008-01-25

    We have developed a DNA vaccine encoding a fusion protein of ubiquitin (Ub) and target proteins at the N-terminus for effective induction of antigen-specific CD8{sup +} T cells. A series of expression plasmids encoding a model antigen, ovalbumin (OVA), fused with mutated Ub, was constructed. Western blotting analyses using COS7 cells transfected with these plasmids revealed that there were three types of amino acid causing different binding capacities between Ub and OVA. Natural Ub with a C-terminal glycine readily dissociated from OVA; on the other hand, artificially mutated Ub, the C-terminal amino acid of which had been exchanged to valine or arginine, stably united with the polypeptide, while Ub with a C-terminal alanine partially dissociated. The ability of DNA vaccination to induce OVA-specific CD8{sup +} T cells closely correlated with the stability of Ub fusion to OVA. Our strategy could be used to optimize the effect of genetic vaccines on the induction of CD8{sup +} T cells.

  14. Rhodococcus fascians impacts plant development through the dynamic fas-mediated production of a cytokinin mix.

    PubMed

    Pertry, Ine; Václavíková, Katerina; Gemrotová, Markéta; Spíchal, Lukás; Galuszka, Petr; Depuydt, Stephen; Temmerman, Wim; Stes, Elisabeth; De Keyser, Annick; Riefler, Michael; Biondi, Stefania; Novák, Ondrej; Schmülling, Thomas; Strnad, Miroslav; Tarkowski, Petr; Holsters, Marcelle; Vereecke, Danny

    2010-09-01

    The phytopathogenic actinomycete Rhodococcus fascians D188 relies mainly on the linear plasmid-encoded fas operon for its virulence. The bacteria secrete six cytokinin bases that synergistically redirect the developmental program of the plant to stimulate proliferation of young shoot tissue, thus establishing a leafy gall as a niche. A yeast-based cytokinin bioassay combined with cytokinin profiling of bacterial mutants revealed that the fas operon is essential for the enhanced production of isopentenyladenine, trans-zeatin, cis-zeatin, and the 2-methylthio derivatives of the zeatins. Cytokinin metabolite data and the demonstration of the enzymatic activities of FasD (isopentenyltransferase), FasE (cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase), and FasF (phosphoribohydrolase) led us to propose a pathway for the production of the cytokinin spectrum. Further evaluation of the pathogenicity of different fas mutants and of fas gene expression and cytokinin signal transduction upon infection implied that the secretion of the cytokinin mix is a highly dynamic process, with the consecutive production of a tom initiation wave followed by a maintenance flow.

  15. Biosynthesis of auxin by the gram-positive phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians is controlled by compounds specific to infected plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Vandeputte, Olivier; Oden, Sevgi; Mol, Adeline; Vereecke, Danny; Goethals, Koen; El Jaziri, Mondher; Prinsen, Els

    2005-03-01

    The role and metabolism of indole-3-acetic acid in gram-negative bacteria is well documented, but little is known about indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis and regulation in gram-positive bacteria. The phytopathogen Rhodococcus fascians, a gram-positive organism, incites diverse developmental alterations, such as leafy galls, on a wide range of plants. Phenotypic analysis of a leafy gall suggests that auxin may play an important role in the development of the symptoms. We show here for the first time that R. fascians produces and secretes the auxin indole-3-acetic acid. Interestingly, whereas noninfected-tobacco extracts have no effect, indole-3-acetic acid synthesis is highly induced in the presence of infected-tobacco extracts when tryptophan is not limiting. Indole-3-acetic acid production by a plasmid-free strain shows that the biosynthetic genes are located on the bacterial chromosome, although plasmid-encoded genes contribute to the kinetics and regulation of indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis. The indole-3-acetic acid intermediates present in bacterial cells and secreted into the growth media show that the main biosynthetic route used by R. fascians is the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway with a possible rate-limiting role for indole-3-ethanol. The relationship between indole-3-acetic acid production and the symptoms induced by R. fascians is discussed.

  16. Fabrication of silicon nanowire arrays by near-field laser ablation and metal-assisted chemical etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodoceanu, D.; Alhmoud, H. Z.; Elnathan, R.; Delalat, B.; Voelcker, N. H.; Kraus, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present an elegant route for the fabrication of ordered arrays of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires with tunable geometry at controlled locations on a silicon wafer. A monolayer of transparent microspheres convectively assembled onto a gold-coated silicon wafer acts as a microlens array. Irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse removes the gold beneath each focusing microsphere, leaving behind a hexagonal pattern of holes in the gold layer. Owing to the near-field effects, the diameter of the holes can be at least five times smaller than the laser wavelength. The patterned gold layer is used as catalyst in a metal-assisted chemical etching to produce an array of vertically-aligned silicon nanowires. This approach combines the advantages of direct laser writing with the benefits of parallel laser processing, yielding nanowire arrays with controlled geometry at predefined locations on the silicon surface. The fabricated VA-SiNW arrays can effectively transfect human cells with a plasmid encoding for green fluorescent protein.

  17. E1A RNA transcripts amplify adenovirus-mediated tumor reduction.

    PubMed

    Dion, L D; Goldsmith, K T; Strong, T V; Bilbao, G; Curiel, D T; Garver, R I

    1996-11-01

    Previous work by this group has established that E1-defective, recombinant adenoviruses can be replication-enabled by the codelivery of a plasmid encoding the deleted E1 functions, a strategy now designated conditional replication-enablement system for adenovirus (CRESA). In the studies reported here, the original replication-enabling plasmid was replaced by two separate plasmids that encoded the necessary E1A and E1B functions, respectively. An RNA transcript encoding the requisite E1A functions was shown to substitute functionally for the E1A plasmid without significant loss of new adenovirus production in in vitro experiments. No replication competent adenovirus was detectable in the cells treated with the plasmids, or the RNA and plasmid combinations. Subcutaneous human tumor nodules containing a fraction of cells cotransduced with the replication-enabling RNA + DNA and an adenovirus containing a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) expression cassette were reduced to a greater extent than control nodules containing the same fraction of cells cotransduced with the virus and an irrelevant plasmid. These experiments show that an E1-defective adenovirus can be conditionally replication-enabled by an RNA transcript encoding the required E1 functions, and that the replication-enablement is sufficient to produce an augmentation of an adenovirus-mediated therapeutic effect in vivo.

  18. Local, non-viral IL-12 gene therapy using a water soluble lipopolymer as carrier system combined with systemic paclitaxel for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Janát-Amsbury, Margit Maria; Yockman, James W; Lee, Minhyung; Kern, Steven; Furgeson, Darin Y; Bikram, Malavosklish; Kim, Sung Wan

    2005-01-03

    Development of improved gene transfer methods is needed for gene therapy to achieve its clinical potential. The use of biocompatible polymeric gene carriers has shown effectiveness in overcoming the current problems associated with viral vectors in safety, immunogenicity and mutagenesis. Previous work has demonstrated that repeated, local, non-viral interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery successfully slows down tumor progression, while improving immunogenicity. Combining IL-12 gene delivery with systemic paclitaxel (PCT) chemotherapy as a treatment for various subcutaneous mouse mammary carcinomas, we used PCT with either a biodegradable polymeric solubilizer, HySolv or Cremophor EL for systemic treatment and injected water soluble lipopolymer (WSLP)/plasmid-encoding IL-12 gene (p2CMVmIL-12) complexes local once every week. The amount of lung metastases being essential for survival as well as subcutaneous tumor volume were compared against untreated controls. We showed inhibition of tumor growth and decreased lung metastases in the combined WSLP/p2CMVmIL-12/HySolv group compared to the controls and the PCT only treated groups. Compared to Cremophor, HySolv performed better alone or in combination with IL-12. Using polymeric vectors as gene carrier systems in combination with improved systemic therapies provide evidence for the efficacy and feasibility of polymer-based drug delivery systems. Especially local cytokine gene delivery showed augmentation of systemic chemotherapy while reducing the hosts risk for further systemic toxicity.

  19. Detection and quantification of Aeromonas salmonicida in fish tissue by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Bartkova, S; Kokotovic, B; Skall, H F; Lorenzen, N; Dalsgaard, I

    2017-02-01

    Furunculosis, a septicaemic infection caused by the bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, currently causes problems in Danish seawater rainbow trout production. Detection has mainly been achieved by bacterial culture, but more rapid and sensitive methods are needed. A previously developed real-time PCR assay targeting the plasmid encoded aopP gene of A. salmonicida was, in parallel with culturing, used for the examination of five organs of 40 fish from Danish freshwater and seawater farms. Real-time PCR showed overall a higher frequency of positives than culturing (65% of positive fish by real-time PCR compared to 30% by a culture approach). Also, no real-time PCR-negative samples were found positive by culturing. A. salmonicida was detected by real-time PCR, though not by culturing, in freshwater fish showing no signs of furunculosis, indicating possible presence of carrier fish. In seawater fish examined after an outbreak and antibiotics treatment, real-time PCR showed the presence of the bacterium in all examined organs (1-482 genomic units mg(-1) ). With a limit of detection of 40 target copies (1-2 genomic units) per reaction, a high reproducibility and an excellent efficiency, the present real-time PCR assay provides a sensitive tool for the detection of A. salmonicida.

  20. Non-viral S/MAR vectors replicate episomally in vivo when provided with a selective advantage.

    PubMed

    Wong, S P; Argyros, O; Coutelle, C; Harbottle, R P

    2011-01-01

    The ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent expression without the limitations of safety and reproducibility. We previously reported that a prototype plasmid vector, containing a scaffold matrix attachment region (S/MAR) domain and the luciferase reporter gene, showed transgene expression for at least 6 months following a single administration to MF1 mice. Following partial hepatectomy of the animals, however, we found no detectable vector replication and subsequent propagation in vivo. To overcome this drawback, we have now developed an in vivo liver selection strategy by which liver cells transfected with an S/MAR plasmid are provided with a survival advantage over non-transfected cells. This allows an enrichment of vectors that are capable of replicating and establishing themselves as extra-chromosomal entities in the liver. Accordingly, a novel S/MAR plasmid encoding the Bcl-2 gene was constructed; Bcl-2 expression confers resistance against apoptosis-mediated challenges by the Fas-activating antibody Jo2. Following hydrodynamic delivery to the livers of mice and frequent Jo2 administrations, we demonstrate that this Bcl-luciferase S/MAR plasmid is indeed capable of providing sustained luciferase reporter gene expression for over 3 months and that this plasmid replicates as an episomal entity in vivo. These results provide proof-of-principle that S/MAR vectors are capable of preventing transgene silencing, are resistant to integration and are able to confer mitotic stability in vivo when provided with a selective advantage.

  1. Plasmid transfer in Streptomyces lividans: identification of a kil-kor system associated with the transfer region of pIJ101.

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, K J; Cohen, S N

    1987-01-01

    The 8.9-kilobase Streptomyces plasmid pIJ101 is self-transmissible at high frequency into recipient strains. By genetic analysis of the transfer region of the plasmid, we identified six plasmid-encoded loci involved in gene transfer and the associated pocking phenomenon. Two loci, kilA and kilB, could not be cloned into Streptomyces lividans on a minimal pIJ101-based replicon unless suitable kil-override (kor) genes were present, either in cis or in trans. korA could control the lethal effects of both kilA and kilB, whereas korB could control only the effects of kilB. KilB mutants were defective in their pocking reaction; kilA mutants produced no visible pocks whatsoever. Mutations in two other loci, tra and spd, produced no pocks and defective pocks, respectively. These results suggest that kilA, kilB, tra, and spd are intimately involved in plasmid transfer and that the actions of kilA and kilB are regulated by the products of the korA and korB genes. PMID:3040681

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a tuberculosis DNA vaccine co-expressing pro-apoptotic caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Gartner, Tatiana; Romano, Marta; Suin, Vanessa; Kalai, Michaël; Korf, Hannelie; De Baetselier, Patrick; Huygen, Kris

    2008-03-10

    DNA vaccination is a potent means for inducing strong cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity against viral, bacterial and parasite pathogens in rodents. In an attempt to increase cross-presentation through apoptosis, the DNA-encoding caspase-2 prodomain followed by wild-type or catalytically inactive mutated caspase-3 was inserted into a plasmid encoding the 32 kDa mycolyl transferase (Ag85A) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Transient transfection showed that the mutated caspase induced slow apoptosis, normal protein expression and NF-kappaB activation while wild-type caspase induced rapid apoptosis, lower protein expression and no NF-kappaB activation. Ag85A specific antibody production was increased by co-expressing the mutated and decreased by co-expressing the wild-type caspase. Vaccination with pro-apoptotic plasmids triggered more Ag85A specific IFN-gamma producing spleen cells, and more efficient IL-2 and IFN-gamma producing memory cells in spleen and lungs after M. tuberculosis challenge. Compared to DNA-encoding secreted Ag85A, vaccination with DNA co-expressing wild-type caspase increased protection after infection with M. tuberculosis, while vaccination with plasmid co-expressing mutated caspase was not protective, possibly due to the stimulation of IL-6, IL-10 and IL-17A production.

  3. Potential triple helix-mediated inhibition of IGF-I gene expression significantly reduces tumorigenicity of glioblastoma in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Shevelev, A; Burfeind, P; Schulze, E; Rininsland, F; Johnson, T R; Trojan, J; Chernicky, C L; Hélène, C; Ilan, J; Ilan, J

    1997-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-directed triple helix formation is a powerful approach to block transcription of specific genes. Although the oligonucleotide triplex approach is efficient for inhibiting gene expression in cultured cells, suppression is transient. We developed an approach which inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) expression following stable transfection of C6 rat glioblastoma cells with a plasmid from which an RNA is transcribed that codes for the third strand of a potential triple helix. We tested the ability of this expression vector to inhibit IGF-I gene expression in vitro as well as tumorigenesis in an animal. A dramatic reduction of IGF-I RNA and protein levels in cultured cells occurred following transfection of rat C6 cells with a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding the oligopurine variant of the triple helix but not the oligopyrimidine or a control sequence. The cells transfected with the oligopurine variant displayed morphological changes, upregulation of major histocompatibility complex I, and increased expression of protease nexin I. Dramatic inhibition of tumor growth occurred in nude mice following injection of transfected C6 cells. To our knowledge, this is the first example of tumor growth inhibition in an animal model employing a triple helix approach.

  4. Intracellular trafficking of factor VIII to von Willebrand factor storage granules.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, J B; Foster, P A; Kaufman, R J; Vokac, E A; Moussalli, M; Kroner, P A; Montgomery, R R

    1998-01-01

    In plasma, von Willebrand factor (vWf) associates with Factor VIII (FVIII); however, the site at which these proteins first interact has not been defined. Administration of 1-desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) causes a rapid, concomitant elevation in plasma levels of both vWf and FVIII, suggesting the existence of a DDAVP-releasable storage pool for both proteins. To determine whether vWf and FVIII can associate intracellularly and colocalize to storage vesicles, we transfected AtT-20 cells with vWf and FVIII expression plasmids. FVIII alone was not detectable within storage granules; however, transfection of vWf cDNA into the same cell caused FVIII to alter its intracellular trafficking and to undergo granular storage, colocalizing to the vWf-containing granules. In contrast, colocalization of FVIII was not observed when these cells were transfected with plasmids encoding defective FVIII-binding vWf mutants. Transfection of bovine endothelial cells with FVIII further demonstrated vesicular storage of FVIII with vWf in Weibel-Palade bodies. Since gene therapy of hemophilia A may ultimately target endothelium or hematopoietic stem cells, the interaction between vWf and FVIII within a secretory cell is important. Thus, vWf can alter the intracellular trafficking of FVIII from a constitutive to a regulated secretory pathway, thereby producing an intracellular storage pool of both proteins. PMID:9449695

  5. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms and extended-spectrum β-lactamase production in Escherichia coli isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Meireles, D; Leite-Martins, L; Bessa, L J; Cunha, S; Fernandes, R; de Matos, A; Manaia, C M; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistances is now a worldwide problem. Investigating the mechanisms by which pets harboring resistant strains may receive and/or transfer resistance determinants is essential to better understanding how owners and pets can interact safely. Here, we characterized the genetic determinants conferring resistance to β-lactams and quinolones in 38 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of dogs, through PCR and sequencing. The most frequent genotype included the β-lactamase groups TEM (n=5), and both TEM+CTX-M-1 (n=5). Within the CTX-M group, we identified the genes CTX-M-32, CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55/79, CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-2/44. Thirty isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin presented two mutations in the gyrA gene and one or two mutations in the parC gene. A mutation in gyrA (reported here for the first time), due to a transversion and transition (TCG→GTG) originating a substitution of a serine by a valine in position 83 was also detected. The plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance gene, qnrs1, was detected in three isolates. Dogs can be a reservoir of genetic determinants conferring antimicrobial resistance and thus may play an important role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance to humans and other co-habitant animals.

  6. Assessing Tn5 and Sleeping Beauty for transpositional transgenesis by cytoplasmic injection into bovine and ovine zygotes.

    PubMed

    Bevacqua, R J; Fernandez-Martin, R; Canel, N G; Gibbons, A; Texeira, D; Lange, F; Vans Landschoot, G; Savy, V; Briski, O; Hiriart, M I; Grueso, E; Ivics, Z; Taboga, O; Kues, W A; Ferraris, S; Salamone, D F

    2017-01-01

    Transgenic domestic animals represent an alternative to bioreactors for large-scale production of biopharmaceuticals and could also provide more accurate biomedical models than rodents. However, their generation remains inefficient. Recently, DNA transposons allowed improved transgenesis efficiencies in mice and pigs. In this work, Tn5 and Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon systems were evaluated for transgenesis by simple cytoplasmic injection in livestock zygotes. In the case of Tn5, the transposome complex of transposon nucleic acid and Tn5 protein was injected. In the case of SB, the supercoiled plasmids encoding a transposon and the SB transposase were co-injected. In vitro produced bovine zygotes were used to establish the cytoplasmic injection conditions. The in vitro cultured blastocysts were evaluated for reporter gene expression and genotyped. Subsequently, both transposon systems were injected in seasonally available ovine zygotes, employing transposons carrying the recombinant human factor IX driven by the beta-lactoglobulin promoter. The Tn5 approach did not result in transgenic lambs. In contrast, the Sleeping Beauty injection resulted in 2 lambs (29%) carrying the transgene. Both animals exhibited cellular mosaicism of the transgene. The extraembryonic tissues (placenta or umbilical cord) of three additional animals were also transgenic. These results show that transpositional transgenesis by cytoplasmic injection of SB transposon components can be applied for the production of transgenic lambs of pharmaceutical interest.

  7. A peptide factor secreted by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius exhibits properties of both bacteriocins and virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Wladyka, Benedykt; Piejko, Marcin; Bzowska, Monika; Pieta, Piotr; Krzysik, Monika; Mazurek, Łukasz; Guevara-Lora, Ibeth; Bukowski, Michał; Sabat, Artur J; Friedrich, Alexander W; Bonar, Emilia; Międzobrodzki, Jacek; Dubin, Adam; Mak, Paweł

    2015-09-28

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a common commensal bacterium colonizing the skin and mucosal surfaces of household animals. However, it has recently emerged as a dangerous opportunistic pathogen, comparable to S. aureus for humans. The epidemiological situation is further complicated by the increasing number of methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius infections and evidence of gene transmission driving antibiotic resistance between staphylococci colonizing human and zoonotic hosts. In the present study, we describe a unique peptide, BacSp222, that possesses features characteristic of both bacteriocins and virulence factors. BacSp222 is secreted in high quantities by S. pseudintermedius strain 222 isolated from dog skin lesions. This linear, fifty-amino-acid highly cationic peptide is plasmid-encoded and does not exhibit significant sequence similarities to any other known peptides or proteins. BacSp222 kills gram-positive bacteria (at doses ranging from 0.1 to several micromol/l) but also demonstrates significant cytotoxic activities towards eukaryotic cells at slightly higher concentrations. Moreover, at nanomolar concentrations, the peptide also possesses modulatory properties, efficiently enhancing interferon gamma-induced nitric oxide release in murine macrophage-like cell lines. BacSp222 appears to be one of the first examples of multifunctional peptides that breaks the convention of splitting bacteriocins and virulence factors into two unrelated groups.

  8. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) suppresses metastastic potential of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuhong; Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Ying; Xu, Yijun; Qin, Chengyong

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal malignancy with high rate of metastasis and poor prognosis. There are no effective managements to block metastasis of HCC. Programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) is found to be a tumor transformation suppressor. Among investigations on effects of PDCD4, little is about the metastatic potentials of HCC cells. This study was to investigate the role of PDCD4 on metastatic potential of human HCC cells. Methods We examined the expression of PDCD4 in three HCC cell lines with different metastatic potentials, MHCC-97H (high metastatic potential), MHCC-97L (low metastatic potential) and Hep3B (no metastatic potential). A plasmid encoding PDCD4 gene was constructed and then transfected into HCC cells with the lowest PDCD4 expression level. Effects of PDCD4 on cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, gene expression of metastasis tumor antigen 1 (MTA1) and in vitro migration and invasion capacity were assessed after transfection. Results Our results showed that the expression level of PDCD4 was inversely correlated to the metastatic potential of HCC cells. After transfection with the PDCD4 gene, HCC cell proliferation rate was significantly decreased, cell apoptosis rate was significantly increased, the expression of MTA1 gene, HCC cell migration and Matrigel invasion were also remarkably inhibited. Conclusion PDCD4 expression is inversely correlated to the metastatic potential of HCC cells. PDCD4 can effectively suppress the metastatic potential of HCC cells. PMID:19480673

  9. Auricular cartilage repair using cryogel scaffolds loaded with BMP-7-expressing primary chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Odabas, S; Feichtinger, G A; Korkusuz, P; Inci, I; Bilgic, E; Yar, A S; Cavusoglu, T; Menevse, S; Vargel, I; Piskin, E

    2013-10-01

    The loss of cartilage tissue due to trauma, tumour surgery or congenital defects, such as microtia and anotia, is one of the major concerns in head and neck surgery. Recently tissue-engineering approaches, including gene delivery, have been proposed for the regeneration of cartilage tissue. In this study, primary chondrocytes were genetically modified with plasmid-encoding bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP-7) via the commercially available non-viral Turbofect vector, with the aim of bringing ex vivo transfected chondrocytes to resynthesize BMP-7 in vitro as they would in vivo. Genetically modified cells were implanted into gelatin-oxidized dextran scaffolds and cartilage tissue formation was investigated in 15 × 15 mm auricular cartilage defects in vivo in 48 New Zealand (NZ) white rabbits for 4 months. The results were evaluated via histology and early gene expression. Early gene expression results indicated a strong effect of exogenous BMP-7 on matrix synthesis and chondrocyte growth. In addition, histological analysis results exhibited significantly better cartilage healing with BMP-7-modified (transfected) cells than in the non-modified (non-transfected) group and as well as the control.

  10. Mechanistic aspects of DnaA–RepA interaction as revealed by yeast forward and reverse two-hybrid analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rahul; Kachroo, Aardra; Bastia, Deepak

    2001-01-01

    Using yeast forward and reverse two-hybrid analysis and biochemical techniques, we present novel and definitive in vivo and in vitro evidence that both the N-terminal domain I and C-terminal domain IV of the host-encoded DnaA initiator protein of Escherichia coli interact physically with plasmid-encoded RepA initiator of pSC101. The N-terminal, but not the C-terminal, region of RepA interacted with DnaA in vitro. These protein–protein interactions are critical for two very early steps of replication initiation, namely origin unwinding and helicase loading. Neither domain I nor IV of DnaA could individually collaborate with RepA to promote pSC101 replication. However, when the two domains are co-expressed within a common cell milieu and allowed to associate non-covalently with each other via a pair of leucine zippers, replication of the plasmid was supported in vivo. Thus, the result shows that physical tethering, either non-covalent or covalent, of domain I and IV of DnaA and interaction of both domains with RepA, are critical for replication initiation. The results also provide the molecular basis for a novel, potential, replication-based bacterial two-hybrid system. PMID:11500384

  11. Modulation of Mcl-1 expression reduces age-related cochlear degeneration.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei Ping; Xu, Yang; Guo, Wei Wei; Liu, Hui Zhan; Hu, Bo Hua

    2013-11-01

    Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that modulates apoptosis-related signaling pathways and promotes cell survival. We have previously demonstrated a reduction of Mcl-1 expression in aging cochleae. To investigate whether restoring Mcl-1 expression would reduce aging-related cochlear degeneration, we developed a rat model of Mcl-1 overexpression. A plasmid encoding human Mcl-1/enhanced green fluorescent protein was applied to the round window of the cochlea. This in vivo treatment transfected both the sensory and supporting cells of the cochlear sensory epithelium and enhanced Mcl-1 expression at both the mRNA and the protein level. The upregulation of Mcl-1 expression reduced the progression of age-related cochlear dysfunction and sensory cell death. Furthermore, the transfection of Mcl-1 exerted its protective effect by suppressing cochlear apoptosis at the mitochondrial level. This study demonstrates that the genetic modulation of Mcl-1 expression reduces the progression of age-related cochlear degeneration.

  12. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions. PMID:23569469

  13. High-Throughput Single-Cell Manipulation in Brain Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of neurons and neuronal circuits in brain tissue requires the genetic manipulation, labeling, and tracking of single cells. However, current methods for manipulating cells in brain tissue are limited to either bulk techniques, lacking single-cell accuracy, or manual methods that provide single-cell accuracy but at significantly lower throughputs and repeatability. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput, efficient, reliable, and combinatorial delivery of multiple genetic vectors and reagents into targeted cells within the same tissue sample with single-cell accuracy. Our system automatically loads nanoliter-scale volumes of reagents into a micropipette from multiwell plates, targets and transfects single cells in brain tissues using a robust electroporation technique, and finally preps the micropipette by automated cleaning for repeating the transfection cycle. We demonstrate multi-colored labeling of adjacent cells, both in organotypic and acute slices, and transfection of plasmids encoding different protein isoforms into neurons within the same brain tissue for analysis of their effects on linear dendritic spine density. Our platform could also be used to rapidly deliver, both ex vivo and in vivo, a variety of genetic vectors, including optogenetic and cell-type specific agents, as well as fast-acting reagents such as labeling dyes, calcium sensors, and voltage sensors to manipulate and track neuronal circuit activity at single-cell resolution. PMID:22536416

  14. Cloning and expression in Escherichia coli of Pseudomonas strain LB400 genes encoding polychlorinated biphenyl degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Mondello, F J

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas strain LB400 is able to degrade an unusually wide variety of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). A genomic library of LB400 was constructed by using the broad-host-range cosmid pMMB34 and introduced into Escherichia coli. Approximately 1,600 recombinant clones were tested, and 5 that expressed 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl dioxygenase activity were found. This enzyme is encoded by the bphC gene of the 2,3-dioxygenase pathway for PCB-biphenyl metabolism. Two recombinant plasmids encoding the ability to transform PCBs to chlorobenzoic acids were identified, and one of these, pGEM410, was chosen for further study. The PCB-degrading genes (bphA, -B, -C, and -D) were localized by subcloning experiments to a 12.4-kilobase region of pGEM410. The ability of recombinant strains to degrade PCBs was compared with that of the wild type. In resting-cell assays, PCB degradation by E. coli strain FM4560 (containing a pGEM410 derivative) approached that of LB400 and was significantly greater than degradation by the original recombinant strain. High levels of PCB metabolism by FM4560 did not depend on the growth of the organism on biphenyl, as it did for PCB metabolism by LB400. When cells were grown with succinate as the carbon source, PCB degradation by FM4560 was markedly superior to that by LB400. Images PMID:2493454

  15. Synthetic virus seeds for improved vaccine safety: Genetic reconstruction of poliovirus seeds for a PER.C6 cell based inactivated poliovirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Barbara P; Edo-Matas, Diana; Papic, Natasa; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Custers, Jerome H H V

    2015-10-13

    Safety of vaccines can be compromised by contamination with adventitious agents. One potential source of adventitious agents is a vaccine seed, typically derived from historic clinical isolates with poorly defined origins. Here we generated synthetic poliovirus seeds derived from chemically synthesized DNA plasmids encoding the sequence of wild-type poliovirus strains used in marketed inactivated poliovirus vaccines. The synthetic strains were phenotypically identical to wild-type polioviruses as shown by equivalent infectious titers in culture supernatant and antigenic content, even when infection cultures are scaled up to 10-25L bioreactors. Moreover, the synthetic seeds were genetically stable upon extended passaging on the PER.C6 cell culture platform. Use of synthetic seeds produced on the serum-free PER.C6 cell platform ensures a perfectly documented seed history and maximum control over starting materials. It provides an opportunity to maximize vaccine safety which increases the prospect of a vaccine end product that is free from adventitious agents.

  16. Dissemination of Clonally Related Escherichia coli Strains Expressing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase CTX-M-15

    PubMed Central

    Novais, Ângela; Carattoli, Alessandra; Poirel, Laurent; Pitout, Johann; Peixe, Luísa; Baquero, Fernando; Cantón, Rafael; Nordmann, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed 43 CTX-M-15–producing Escherichia coli isolates and 6 plasmids encoding the blaCTX-M-15 gene from Canada, India, Kuwait, France, Switzerland, Portugal, and Spain. Most isolates belonged to phylogroups B2 (50%) and D (25%). An EC-B2 strain of clonal complex sequence type (ST) 131 was detected in all countries; other B2 isolates corresponded to ST28, ST405, ST354, and ST695 from specific areas. EC-D strains were clonally unrelated but isolates from 3 countries belonged to ST405. All CTX-M-15 plasmids corresponded to IncFII group with overrepresentation of 3 HpaI-digested plasmid DNA profiles (A, B and C; 85–120kb, similarity >70%). Plasmid A was detected in EC-B2 strains (ST131, ST354, or ST405), plasmid C was detected in B2 and D strains, and plasmid B was confined to worldwide-disseminated ST131. Most plasmids contained blaOXA-1, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, and blaTEM-1. Worldwide dissemination of CTX-M-15 seems to be determined by clonal complexes ST131 and ST405 and multidrug-resistant IncFII plasmids. PMID:18258110

  17. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Kostallas, George; Löfblom, John; Samuelson, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are involved in many biological processes and have become important tools in biomedical research and industry. Technologies for engineering and characterization of, for example, proteolytic activity and specificity are essential in protease research. Here, we present a novel method for assessment of site-specific proteolysis. The assay utilizes plasmid-encoded reporters that, upon processing by a co-expressed protease, confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria in proportion to the cleavage efficiency. We have demonstrated that cells co-expressing cleavable reporters together with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) could be discriminated from cells with non-cleavable reporters by growth in selective media. Importantly, the resistance to antibiotics proved to correlate with the substrate processing efficiency. Thus, by applying competitive growth of a mock library in antibiotic-containing medium, we could show that the substrate preferred by TEVp was enriched relative to less-efficient substrates. We believe that this simple methodology will facilitate protease substrate identification, and hold great promise for directed evolution of proteases and protease recognition sequences towards improved or even new functionality.

  18. Gene insertion and long-term expression in lung mediated by the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    PubMed

    Belur, Lalitha R; Frandsen, Joel L; Dupuy, Adam J; Ingbar, David H; Largaespada, David A; Hackett, Perry B; Scott McIvor, R

    2003-09-01

    Gene transfer to the lung could provide important new treatments for chronic and acquired lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis, alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, emphysema, and cancer. DNA-mediated gene transfer to the lung has been previously demonstrated, but anticipated effectiveness has been limited by low gene transfer efficiencies and by transient expression of the transgene. Here, we combine plasmid-based gene transfer with the integrating capacity of the nonviral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon vector system to mediate gene insertion and long-term gene expression in mouse lung. We observed transgene expression after 24 h in lungs of all animals injected with the luciferase transposon (pT/L), but expression for up to 3 months required codelivery of a plasmid encoding the Sleeping Beauty transposase. We also observed long-term expression in pT/L-injected animals transgenic for SB transposase. Transgene expression was localized to the alveolar region of the lung, with transfection including mainly type II pneumocytes. We used a linker-mediated PCR technique to recover transposon flanking sequences, demonstrating transposition of pT/L into mouse chromosomal DNA of the lung.

  19. First report: Yersinia enterocolitica recovered from canine tonsils.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Brenda P; Drummond, Niall; Ringwood, Tamara; O'Sullivan, Edmund; Buckley, James F; Whyte, Paul; Prentice, Mike B; Fanning, Séamus

    2010-12-15

    Yersinia enterocolitica (Y. enterocolitica) is a known zoonotic pathogen and is often found in pig tonsils as the primary site of colonisation. In this study we investigated whether or not Y. enterocolitica could be recovered from canine tonsils. During a study on the prevalence of Y. enterocolitica in animal populations in Ireland, 144 canine tonsils and 72 canine rectal swabs were procured over a ten-month period and subjected to microbiological examination for the presence of this human pathogen. Molecular methods were used to determine virulence and all strains were negative for the chromosomally mediated virulence factor (ail) and plasmid-encoded adhesion molecule (pYad). Y. enterocolitica was recovered from 25 of 216 (12%) samples. Twenty-four strains were from tonsils along with one from a rectal swab. All were biotype 1A. Antimicrobial resistance profiling showed two of 25 (8%) were resistant to cephalothin and the remaining strains were resistant to ampicillin and cephalothin with six of these additionally resistant to streptomycin. Our evidence that a human pathogen may be harboured in the oral cavity of dogs' adds a new dimension to the epidemiology of this organism, identifying a potential public health risk following exposure to dogs.

  20. The Mosaic Type IV Secretion Systems

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli and other Gram-negative and -positive bacteria employ type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) to translocate DNA and protein substrates, generally by contact-dependent mechanisms, to other cells. The T4SSs functionally encompass two major subfamilies, the conjugation systems and the effector translocators. The conjugation systems are responsible for interbacterial transfer of antibiotic resistance genes, virulence determinants, and genes encoding other traits of potential benefit to the bacterial host. The effector translocators are used by many Gram-negative pathogens for delivery of potentially hundreds of virulence proteins termed effectors to eukaryotic cells during infection. In E. coli and other species of Enterobacteriaceae, T4SSs identified to date function exclusively in conjugative DNA transfer. In these species, the plasmid-encoded systems can be classified as the P, F, and I types. The P-type systems are the simplest in terms of subunit composition and architecture, and members of this subfamily share features in common with the paradigmatic Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB/VirD4 T4SS. This review will summarize our current knowledge of the E. coli systems and the A. tumefaciens P-type system, with emphasis on the structural diversity of the T4SSs. Ancestral P-, F-, and I-type systems were adapted throughout evolution to yield the extant effector translocators, and information about well-characterized effector translocators also is included to further illustrate the adaptive and mosaic nature of these highly versatile machines. PMID:27735785

  1. Efficient production of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch by using a genetically modified L-lactate dehydrogenase gene-deficient and alpha-amylase-secreting Lactobacillus plantarum strain.

    PubMed

    Okano, Kenji; Zhang, Qiao; Shinkawa, Satoru; Yoshida, Shogo; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2009-01-01

    In order to achieve direct and efficient fermentation of optically pure D-lactic acid from raw corn starch, we constructed L-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhL1)-deficient Lactobacillus plantarum and introduced a plasmid encoding Streptococcus bovis 148 alpha-amylase (AmyA). The resulting strain produced only D-lactic acid from glucose and successfully expressed amyA. With the aid of secreting AmyA, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished. After 48 h of fermentation, 73.2 g/liter of lactic acid was produced with a high yield (0.85 g per g of consumed sugar) and an optical purity of 99.6%. Moreover, a strain replacing the ldhL1 gene with an amyA-secreting expression cassette was constructed. Using this strain, direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw corn starch was accomplished in the absence of selective pressure by antibiotics. This is the first report of direct D-lactic acid fermentation from raw starch.

  2. Coexpression of the type I signal peptidase gene sipM increases recombinant protein production and export in Bacillus megaterium MS941.

    PubMed

    Malten, Marco; Nahrstedt, Hannes; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Jahn, Dieter

    2005-09-05

    The removal of the signal peptide from a precursor protein is a crucial step of protein secretion. In order to improve Bacillus megaterium as protein production and secretion host, the influence of homologous type I signal peptidase SipM overproduction on recombinant Leuconostoc mesenteroides dextransucrase DsrS synthesis and export was investigated. The dsrS gene was integrated as a single copy into the chromosomal bgaM locus encoding beta-galactosidase. Desired clones were identified by blue-white selection. In this strain, the expression of sipM from a multicopy plasmid using its own promoter increased the amount of secreted DsrS 3.7-fold. This increase in protein secretion by SipM overproduction was next transferred to a high level DsrS production strain using a multicopy plasmid encoding sipM with its natural promoter and dsrS under control of a strong xylose-inducible promoter. No further increase in DsrS export were observed when this vector was carrying two sipM copies. Similarly, bicistronic sipM and dsrS high level expression did not enhance DsrS secretion, indicating the natural limitation of the approach. Interestingly, SipM-enhanced DsrS secretion also resulted in an overall increase of DsrS production.

  3. Genetics and molecular biology of siderophore-mediated iron transport in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, J H

    1989-01-01

    The possession of specialized iron transport systems may be crucial for bacteria to override the iron limitation imposed by the host or the environment. One of the most commonly found strategies evolved by microorganisms is the production of siderophores, low-molecular-weight iron chelators that have very high constants of association for their complexes with iron. Thus, siderophores act as extracellular solubilizing agents for iron from minerals or organic compounds, such as transferrin and lactoferrin in the host vertebrate, under conditions of iron limitation. Transport of iron into the cell cytosol is mediated by specific membrane receptor and transport systems which recognize the iron-siderophore complexes. In this review I have analyzed in detail three siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems: the plasmid-encoded anguibactin system of Vibrio anguillarum, the aerobactin-mediated iron assimilation system present in the pColV-K30 plasmid and in the chromosomes of many enteric bacteria, and the chromosomally encoded enterobactin iron uptake system, found in Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Salmonella spp., and other members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The siderophore systems encoded by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, namely, pyochelin and pyoverdin, as well as the siderophore amonabactin, specified by Aeromonas hydrophila, are also discussed. The potential role of siderophore-mediated systems as virulence determinants in the specific host-bacteria interaction leading to disease is also analyzed with respect to the influence of these systems in the expression of other factors, such as toxins, in the bacterial virulence repertoire. PMID:2531838

  4. Worldwide diversity of Klebsiella pneumoniae that produce beta-lactamase blaKPC-2 gene.

    PubMed

    Cuzon, Gaelle; Naas, Thierry; Truong, HaVy; Villegas, Maria Virginia; Wisell, Karin T; Carmeli, Yehuda; Gales, Ana C; Venezia, Shiri Navon; Quinn, John P; Nordmann, Patrice

    2010-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniaeisolates that produce carbapenemases (KPCs) are rapidly disseminating worldwide. To determine their genetic background, we investigated 16 blaKPC-2-harboring K. pneumoniae isolates from 5 countries. The isolates were multidrug resistant, possessed the blaKPC-2 gene, and differed by additional Beta-lactamase content. They harbored a naturally chromosome-encoded bla gene (blaSHV-1 [12.5%], blaSHV-11 [68.7%], or blaOKP-AVB [18.8%]) and several acquired and plasmid-encoded genes (blaTEM-1 [81.3%], blaCTX-M-2 [31.3%], blaCTX-M-12 [12.5%], blaCTX-M-15 [18.7%], and blaOXA-9 [37.5%]). The blaKPC-2 gene was always associated with 1 of the Tn4401 isoforms (a, b, or c). Tn4401 was inserted on different-sized plasmids that belonged to different incompatibility groups. Several blaKPC-containing K. pneumoniae clones were found: 9 different pulsotypes with 1 major (sequence type 258) and 7 minor distinct allelic profiles. Different clones harboring different plasmids but having identical genetic structure, Tn4401, could be at the origin of the worldwide spread of this emerging resistance gene.

  5. Transplanted fibroblast cell sheets promote migration of hepatic progenitor cells in the incised host liver in allogeneic rat model.

    PubMed

    Muraoka, Izumi; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Sakai, Yusuke; Tomonaga, Tetsuo; Soyama, Akihiko; Hidaka, Masaaki; Hishikawa, Yoshitaka; Koji, Takehiko; Utoh, Rie; Ohashi, Kazuo; Okano, Teruo; Kanematsu, Takashi; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-11-01

    Cell sheet engineering has been noted as a new and valuable approach in the tissue-engineering field. The objective of this study was to explore a procedure to induce hepatic progenitor cells and biliary duct structures in the liver. Sprague-Dawley rat dermal fibroblast (DF) sheets were transplanted into the incised surface of the liver of F344 nude rats. In the control group, an incision was made without transplantation of the DF sheets. Bile duct (BD)-like structures and immature hepatocyte-like cells were observed in the DF sheet transplant sites. These BD-like structures were cytokeratin-8-positive, while the hepatocyte-like cells were both OV-6-positive and α-fetoprotein-positive as well. The proliferation and differentiation of liver progenitor cells were not influenced by hepatectomy. We also transplanted DF sheets transfected with a plasmid encoding the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein target to mitochondria (pEYFP-Mito) by electroporation, and found that the new structures were pEYFP-Mito-negative. We observed new BD-like structures and immature hepatocytes after transplantation of DF sheets onto incised liver surfaces, and clarified that the origin of these BD-like structures and hepatocyte-like cells was the recipient liver. The present study described an aspect of the hepatic differentiation process induced at the site of liver injury.

  6. Antibiotic resistance plasmids spread among natural isolates of Escherichia coli in spite of CRISPR elements.

    PubMed

    Touchon, Marie; Charpentier, Sophie; Pognard, Dominique; Picard, Bertrand; Arlet, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P C; Denamur, Erick; Branger, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are implicated in defence against foreign DNA in various archaeal and bacterial species. They have also been associated with a slower spread of antibiotic resistance. However, experimental and evolutionary studies raise doubts about the role of CRISPRs as a sort of immune system in Escherichia coli. We studied a collection of 263 natural E. coli isolates from human and animal hosts, representative of the phylogenetic and lifestyle diversity of the species and exhibiting various levels of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance. We characterized the strains in terms of CRISPRs, performed replicon typing of the plasmids and tested for class 1 integrons to explore the possible association between CRISPRs and the absence of plasmids and mobile antibiotic resistance determinants. We found no meaningful association between the presence/absence of the cas genes, reflecting the activity of the CRISPRs, and the presence of plasmids, integrons or antibiotic resistance. No CRISPR in the collection contained a spacer that matched an antibiotic resistance gene or element involved in antibiotic resistance gene mobilization, and 79.8 % (210/263) of the strains lacked spacers matching sequences in the 2282 plasmid genomes available. Hence, E. coli CRISPRs do not seem to be efficient barriers to the spread of plasmids and antibiotic resistance, consistent with what has been reported for phages, and contrary to reports concerning other species.

  7. Envelope stress is a trigger of CRISPR RNA-mediated DNA silencing in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Perez-Rodriguez, Ritsdeliz; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; Nam, Ki Hyun; Bernardis, Sarah; Ke, Ailong; DeLisa, Matthew P

    2011-02-01

    A widespread feature in the genomes of most bacteria and archaea is an array of clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) that, together with a group of CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins, mediate immunity against invasive nucleic acids such as plasmids and viruses. Here, the CRISPR-Cas system was activated in cells expressing a plasmid-encoded protein that was targeted to the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) pathway. Expression of this Tat substrate resulted in upregulation of the Cas enzymes and subsequent silencing of the encoding plasmid in a manner that required the BaeSR two-component regulatory system, which is known to respond to extracytoplasmic stress. Furthermore, we confirm that the CasCDE enzymes form a stable ternary complex and appear to function as the catalytic core of the Cas system to process CRISPR RNA into its mature form. Taken together, our results indicate that the CRISPR-Cas system targets DNA directly as part of a defence mechanism in bacteria that is overlapping with but not limited to phage infection.

  8. Antibiotic resistance plasmids spread among natural isolates of Escherichia coli in spite of CRISPR elements.

    PubMed

    Touchon, Marie; Charpentier, Sophie; Pognard, Dominique; Picard, Bertrand; Arlet, Guillaume; Rocha, Eduardo P C; Denamur, Erick; Branger, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) are implicated in defence against foreign DNA in various archaeal and bacterial species. They have also been associated with a slower spread of antibiotic resistance. However, experimental and evolutionary studies raise doubts about the role of CRISPRs as a sort of immune system in Escherichia coli. We studied a collection of 263 natural E. coli isolates from human and animal hosts, representative of the phylogenetic and lifestyle diversity of the species and exhibiting various levels of plasmid-encoded antibiotic resistance. We characterized the strains in terms of CRISPRs, performed replicon typing of the plasmids and tested for class 1 integrons to explore the possible association between CRISPRs and the absence of plasmids and mobile antibiotic resistance determinants. We found no meaningful association between the presence/absence of the cas genes, reflecting the activity of the CRISPRs, and the presence of plasmids, integrons or antibiotic resistance. No CRISPR in the collection contained a spacer that matched an antibiotic resistance gene or element involved in antibiotic resistance gene mobilization, and 79.8% (210/263) of the strains lacked spacers matching sequences in the 2282 plasmid genomes available. Hence, E. coli CRISPRs do not seem to be efficient barriers to the spread of plasmids and antibiotic resistance, consistent with what has been reported for phages, and contrary to reports concerning other species.

  9. Plasmid Vector-Linked Maturation of Natural Killer (NK) Cells Is Coupled to Antigen-Dependent NK Cell Activation during DNA-Based Immunization in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ren; Mancini-Bourgine, Maryline; Zhang, Xiao Ming; Bayard, Florence; Deng, Qiang; Michel, Marie-Louise

    2011-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines serve in a wide array of applications ranging from prophylactic vaccines to potential therapeutic tools against infectious diseases and cancer. In this study, we analyzed the mechanisms underlying the activation of natural killer (NK) cells and their potential role in adaptive immunity during DNA-based immunization against hepatitis B virus surface antigen in mice. We observed that the mature Mac-1+ CD27− NK cell subset increased in the liver of mice early after DNA injection, whereas the number of the less mature Mac-1+ CD27+ NK cells in the liver and spleen was significantly reduced. This effect was attributed to bacterial sequences present in the plasmid backbone rather than to the encoded antigen and was not observed in immunized MyD88-deficient mice. The activation of NK cells by plasmid-DNA injection was associated with an increase in their effector functions that depended on the expressed antigen. Maturation of NK cells was abrogated in the absence of T cells, suggesting that cross talk exists between NK cells and antigen-specific T cells. Taken together, our data unravel the mechanics of plasmid vector-induced maturation of NK cells and plasmid-encoded antigen-dependent activation of NK cells required for a crucial role of NK cells in DNA vaccine-induced immunogenicity. PMID:21775455

  10. Staphylococcus aureus NorD, a putative efflux pump coregulated with the Opp1 oligopeptide permease, contributes selectively to fitness in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yanpeng; Fu, Yingmei; Lee, Jean C; Hooper, David C

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus readily infects humans, causing infections from mild superficial skin infections to lethal bacteremia and endocarditis. Transporters produced by S. aureus allow the pathogen to adapt to a variety of settings, including survival at sites of infection and in the presence of antibiotics. The native functions of many transporters are unknown, but their potential dual contribution to fitness and antimicrobial resistance highlights their importance in staphylococcal infections. Here, we show that S. aureus NorD, a newly recognized efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, contributes to fitness in a murine subcutaneous abscess model. In community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain MW2, norD was selectively upregulated 36-fold at the infection site relative to growth in vitro, and the norD mutant demonstrated significant fitness impairment in abscesses, with fitness 20- to 40-fold lower than that of the parent MW2 strain. Plasmid-encoded NorD could complement the fitness defect of the MW2 norD mutant. Chromosomal norD expression is polycistronic with the upstream oligopeptide permease genes (opp1ABCDF), which encode an ABC oligopeptide transporter. Both norD and opp1 were upregulated in abscesses and iron-restricted culture medium and negatively regulated by Fur, but only NorD contributed to fitness in the murine abscess model.

  11. Characterization of a cryptic plasmid from an alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Park, Miey; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Kyung-Min; Hwang, Sue-Yun; Ahn, Tae In

    2009-01-01

    A new cryptic plasmid pAP3.9 was discovered in symbiotic alpha-proteobacteria present in the cytoplasm of Amoeba proteus. The plasmid is 3869bp with a GC content of 34.66% and contains replication origins for both double-strand (dso) and single-strand (sso). It has three putative ORFs encoding Mob, Rep and phosphoglycolate phosphatase (PGPase). The pAP3.9 plasmid appears to propagate by the conjugative rolling-circle replication (RCR), since it contains all required factors such as Rep, sso and dso. Mob and Rep showed highest similarities to those of the cryptic plasmid pBMYdx in Bacillus mycoides. The PGPase was homologous to that of Bacillus cereus and formed a clade with those of Bacillus sp. in molecular phylogeny. These results imply that the pAP3.9 plasmid evolved by the passage through Bacillus species. We hypothesize that the plasmid-encoded PGPase may have contributed to the establishment of bacterial symbiosis within the hostile environment of amoeba cytoplasm.

  12. Combination electro-gene therapy using herpes virus thymidine kinase and interleukin-12 expression plasmids is highly efficient against murine carcinomas in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tomoaki; Nishi, Toru; Kobayashi, Osamu; Tamura, Takahiko; Dev, Sukhendu B; Takeshima, Hideo; Kochi, Masato; Kuratsu, Jun-ichi; Sakata, Tsuneaki; Ushio, Yukitaka

    2004-11-01

    We report the use of plasmid DNA-mediated combination gene therapy for tumor-bearing mice using in vivo electroporation, also called electro-gene therapy (EGT), that resulted in uncomplicated and complete cures in more than 90% of the mice. Subcutaneously inoculated CT26 tumors in syngeneic BALB/c mice were subjected to repeated EGT treatments consisting of intratumoral co-injection of naked plasmids encoding the cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p35 and p40 subunits) and the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk), followed by in vivo electroporation. The early anti-tumor effect was always stronger, and the rate of cure, as seen in the long-term follow-up, was always greater in the groups treated with combination EGT than in those treated with IL-12 or HSV-tk EGT alone. Systemic levels of IL-12 and IFN-gamma increased in both combination and IL-12-alone EGT-treated groups. Moreover, combination EGT for established subcutaneous tumors strongly reduced hematogenous lung metastases and increased survival time when live CT26 tumor cells were injected through the tail vein. Limited experiments on C57/B16 mice with murine melanoma also showed very similar trends. These results suggest that this simple and safe method of plasmid-mediated combination EGT may provide a potentially effective gene therapy for cancer.

  13. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated efficient PD-1 disruption on human primary T cells from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Su, Shu; Hu, Bian; Shao, Jie; Shen, Bin; Du, Juan; Du, Yinan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Lixia; Zhang, Lianru; Chen, Fangjun; Sha, Huizi; Cheng, Lei; Meng, Fanyan; Zou, Zhengyun; Huang, Xingxu; Liu, Baorui

    2016-01-01

    Strategies that enhance the function of T cells are critical for immunotherapy. One negative regulator of T-cell activity is ligand PD-L1, which is expressed on dentritic cells (DCs) or some tumor cells, and functions through binding of programmed death-1 (PD-1) receptor on activated T cells. Here we described for the first time a non-viral mediated approach to reprogram primary human T cells by disruption of PD-1. We showed that the gene knockout of PD-1 by electroporation of plasmids encoding sgRNA and Cas9 was technically feasible. The disruption of inhibitory checkpoint gene PD-1 resulted in significant reduction of PD-1 expression but didn’t affect the viability of primary human T cells during the prolonged in vitro culture. Cellular immune response of the gene modified T cells was characterized by up-regulated IFN-γ production and enhanced cytotoxicity. These results suggest that we have demonstrated an approach for efficient checkpoint inhibitor disruption in T cells, providing a new strategy for targeting checkpoint inhibitors, which could potentialy be useful to improve the efficacy of T-cell based adoptive therapies. PMID:26818188

  14. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in Fischer 344 rats is attenuated by short interfering RNA against the RSV-NS1 gene

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Weidong; Lockey, Richard F; Auais, Alexander; Piedimonte, Giovanni; Mohapatra, Shyam S

    2007-01-01

    Background Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes severe bronchiolitis and is a risk factor for asthma. Since there is no commercially available vaccine against RSV, a short interfering RNA against the RSV-NS1gene (siNS1) was developed and its potential for decreasing RSV infection and infection-associated inflammation in rats was tested. Methods Plasmids encoding siNS1 or an unrelated siRNA were complexed with a chitosan nanoparticle delivery agent and administered intranasally. Control animals received a plasmid for a non-specific siRNA. After expression of the plasmid in lung cells for 24 hours, the rats were intranasally infected with RSV. Results Prophylaxis with siNS1 significantly reduced lung RSV titers and airway hyperreactivity to methacholine challenge compared to the control group. Lung sections from siNS1-treated rats showed a sizable reduction in goblet cell hyperplasia and in lung infiltration by inflammatory cells, both characteristics of asthma. Also, bronchoalveolar lavage samples from siNS1-treated animals had fewer eosinophils. Treatment of rats with siNS1 prior to RSV exposure was effective in reducing virus titers in the lung and in preventing the inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness associated with the infection that has been linked to development of asthma. Conclusion The use of siNS1 prophylaxis may be an effective method for preventing RSV bronchiolitis and potentially reducing the later development of asthma associated with severe respiratory infections. PMID:17270047

  15. Processing of MucA protein is required for spontaneous and benzo[a]pyrene-induced reversion of the Escherichia coli trpA23 missense mutation by G.C-T.A transversions: effect of a deficiency in the MutY DNA glycosylase.

    PubMed

    Urios, A; Herrera, G; Aleixandre, V; Blanco, M

    1994-12-01

    We have studied the influence of the processing of MucA protein on the occurrence of base substitution mutations. Escherichia coli strains carrying the trpA23 missense mutation and having a full deletion of the chromosomal umuD/C operon were transformed with plasmids encoding the MucB protein together with either wild-type MucA or the nonprocessable MucA202 protein. The efficient reversion of the trpA23 allele by G.C-T.A transversions in benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-treated cells required the function of a matured MucA protein. This processed protein was also necessary for the occurrence of G.C-T.A transversions targeted at spontaneous DNA lesions and for the SOS mutator effect dependent on the constitutive coprotease activity of the RecA730 protein. In contrast, G.C-T.A transversions reverting trpA23 were spontaneously generated by an SOS-independent mechanism in cells deficient in the MutY DNA glycosylase.

  16. Construction of a shuttle vector and transformation of Xylella fastidiosa with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Qin, X; Hartung, J S

    2001-09-01

    We have isolated, cloned, and sequenced a 5823-bp cryptic plasmid from a strain of Xylella fastidiosa. This plasmid encodes five open reading frames (ORF) greater than 400 nucleotides each. ORF 2 encodes a protein with 37% amino acid identity to the replication initiator protein of plasmid pECB2 from Pseudomonas alcaligenes. This RepA protein from X. fastidiosa contains both a leucine zipper and helix turn helix motif characteristic of proteins involved in DNA replication. The sequence 5' of ORF 2 has all of the features characteristic of plasmid origins of replication as well as regulatory elements required for transcription of ORF 2. Open reading frame 2, along with the upstream origin of replication, was cloned as an EcoRI fragment into pUC19 to create a shuttle vector. This construct was introduced into Xylella fastidiosa by electroporation, with selection for carbenicillin resistance. Transformation was verified by both PCR and Southern hybridization experiments. Frequency of transformation was low, but increased ten-fold when the plasmid was grown in X. fastidiosa rather than Escherichia coli prior to transformation. This work represents the first step towards the development of a system for genetic analysis of this important plant pathogen of citrus, grapevines, and other horticultural crops.

  17. Efflux-Mediated Drug Resistance in Bacteria: an Update

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian-Zhi; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps play a key role in drug resistance and also serve other functions in bacteria. There has been a growing list of multidrug and drug-specific efflux pumps characterized from bacteria of human, animal, plant and environmental origins. These pumps are mostly encoded on the chromosome although they can also be plasmid-encoded. A previous article (Li X-Z and Nikaido H, Drugs, 2004; 64[2]: 159–204) had provided a comprehensive review regarding efflux-mediated drug resistance in bacteria. In the past five years, significant progress has been achieved in further understanding of drug resistance-related efflux transporters and this review focuses on the latest studies in this field since 2003. This has been demonstrated in multiple aspects that include but are not limited to: further molecular and biochemical characterization of the known drug efflux pumps and identification of novel drug efflux pumps; structural elucidation of the transport mechanisms of drug transporters; regulatory mechanisms of drug efflux pumps; determining the role of the drug efflux pumps in other functions such as stress responses, virulence and cell communication; and development of efflux pump inhibitors. Overall, the multifaceted implications of drug efflux transporters warrant novel strategies to combat multidrug resistance in bacteria. PMID:19678712

  18. Escherichia coli RNA polymerase is the target of the cyclopeptide antibiotic microcin J25.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M A; Rintoul, M R; Farías, R N; Salomón, R A

    2001-08-01

    Escherichia coli microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a plasmid-encoded, cyclic peptide antibiotic consisting of 21 unmodified amino acid residues. It is primarily active on gram-negative bacteria related to the producer strain, inducing cell filamentation in an SOS-independent way. A mutation causing resistance to MccJ25 was isolated. Genetic analysis indicated that it resided in the rpoC gene, encoding the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase, at 90 min on the E. coli genetic map. The mutation was genetically crossed on to a plasmid containing the wild-type rpoC gene. The presence of the recombinant plasmid conferred complete resistance to otherwise sensitive strains. Nucleotide sequencing of the plasmid-borne, mutant rpoC gene revealed a ACC (Thr)-to-ATC (Ile) change at codon 931, within homology block G, an evolutionarily conserved region in the large subunits of all RNA polymerases. MccJ25 decreased RNA synthesis both in vivo and in vitro. These results point to the RNA polymerase as the target of microcin action. We favor the possibility that the filamentous phenotype induced by MccJ25 results from impaired transcription of genes coding for cell division proteins. As far as we know, MccJ25 is the first peptide antibiotic shown to affect RNA polymerase.

  19. Sensitization of microcin J25-resistant strains by a membrane-permeabilizing peptide.

    PubMed

    Pomares, María Fernanda; Delgado, Mónica A; Corbalán, Natalia S; Farías, Ricardo N; Vincent, Paula A

    2010-10-01

    Microcin J25 (MccJ25) is a plasmid-encoded, 21-amino-acid, antibacterial peptide produced by Escherichia coli. MccJ25 inhibits RNA polymerase and the membrane respiratory chain. MccJ25 uptake into E. coli-sensitive strains is mediated by the outer membrane receptor FhuA and the inner membrane proteins TonB, ExbB, ExbD, and SbmA. This peptide is active on some E. coli, Salmonella, and Shigella species strains, while other Gram-negative bacteria, such as clinical isolates of Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, are completely resistant. In the present work, we demonstrated that the membrane-permeabilizing peptide (KFF)₃K made some resistant strains sensitive to MccJ25, among them S. Typhimurium, where the antibiotic inhibits in vitro cell growth and bacterial replication within macrophages. The results demonstrate that the membrane permeabilization induced by (KFF)₃K allows MccJ25 penetration in an FhuA and SbmA-independent manner and suggest that the combination of both peptides could be considered as a therapeutic agent against pathogenic Salmonella strains.

  20. Preclinical evaluation of multi antigenic HCV DNA vaccine for the prevention of Hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojin; Jeong, Moonsup; Oh, Jooyeon; Cho, Youngran; Shen, Xuefei; Stone, John; Yan, Jian; Rothkopf, Zachary; Khan, Amir S.; Cho, Byung Mun; Park, Young K.; Weiner, David B.; Son, Woo-Chan; Maslow, Joel N.

    2017-01-01

    Direct-acting antiviral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is costly and does not protect from re-infection. For human and chimpanzees, recovery from acute HCV infection correlates with host CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. DNA plasmids targeting the HCV non-structural antigens NS3, NS4, and NS5, were previously reported to induce robust and sustained T cell responses in mice and primates. These plasmids were combined with a plasmid encoding cytokine IL-28B, together named as VGX-6150. The dose-dependent T cell response and safety of VGX-6150 administered intramuscularly and followed by electroporation was assessed in mice. Immune responses plateaued at 20 μg/dose with IL-28B demonstrating significant immunoadjuvant activity. Mice administered VGX-6150 at 40, 400, and 800 μg given either as a single injection or as 14 injections given bi-weekly over 26 weeks showed no vaccine related changes in any clinical parameter compared to placebo recipients. There was no evidence of VGX-6150 accumulation at the injection site or in any organ 1 month following the 14th vaccination. Based on these studies, the approximate lethal dose (ALD) exceeds 800 μg/dose and the NOAEL was 800 μg/dose in mouse. In conclusion, VGX-6150 appears safe and a promising preventive vaccine candidate for HCV infection. PMID:28266565

  1. The Mxi-Spa Type III Secretory Pathway of Shigella flexneri Requires an Outer Membrane Lipoprotein, MxiM, for Invasin Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Raymond; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    1999-01-01

    Invasion of epithelial cells by Shigella flexneri is mediated by a set of translocated bacterial invasins, the Ipa proteins, and its dedicated type III secretion system, called Mxi-Spa. We show here that mxiM, part of the mxi-spa locus in the S. flexneri virulence plasmid, encodes an indispensable type III secretion apparatus component, required for both Ipa translocation and tissue culture cell invasion. We demonstrated that mature MxiM, first identified as a putative lipoprotein, is lipidated in vivo. Consistent with features of known lipoproteins, MxiM (i) can be labeled with [3H]palmitate and [2-3H]glycerol, (ii) is associated with the cell envelope, (iii) is secreted independently of the type III pathway, and (iv) requires an intact lipoprotein modification and processing site for full activity. The lipidated form of MxiM was detected primarily in the outer membrane, where it establishes a peripheral association with the inner leaflet. Through analysis of subcellular Ipa distribution in a mxiM null mutant background, MxiM was found to be required for the assembly and/or function of outer, but not inner, membrane regions of Mxi-Spa. This function probably requires interactions with other Mxi-Spa subunits within the periplasmic space. We discuss implications of these findings with respect to the function of MxiM and the structure of Mxi-Spa as a whole. PMID:10085046

  2. Utility of Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Curran, Joanne E.; Glahn, David C.; Blangero, John

    2016-01-01

    A large number of EBV immortalized LCLs have been generated and maintained in genetic/epidemiological studies as a perpetual source of DNA and as a surrogate in vitro cell model. Recent successes in reprograming LCLs into iPSCs have paved the way for generating more relevant in vitro disease models using this existing bioresource. However, the overall reprogramming efficiency and success rate remain poor and very little is known about the mechanistic changes that take place at the transcriptome and cellular functional level during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. Here, we report a new optimized LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming protocol using episomal plasmids encoding pluripotency transcription factors and mouse p53DD (p53 carboxy-terminal dominant-negative fragment) and commercially available reprogramming media. We achieved a consistently high reprogramming efficiency and 100% success rate using this optimized protocol. Further, we investigated the transcriptional changes in mRNA and miRNA levels, using FC-abs ≥ 2.0 and FDR ≤ 0.05 cutoffs; 5,228 mRNAs and 77 miRNAs were differentially expressed during LCL-to-iPSC reprogramming. The functional enrichment analysis of the upregulated genes and activation of human pluripotency pathways in the reprogrammed iPSCs showed that the generated iPSCs possess transcriptional and functional profiles very similar to those of human ESCs. PMID:27375745

  3. The chromosomal nature of LT-II enterotoxins solved: a lambdoid prophage encodes both LT-II and one of two novel pertussis-toxin-like toxin family members in type II enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are structurally and functionally related to cholera toxin (CT). LT-I toxins are plasmid-encoded and flanked by IS elements, while LT-II toxins of type II ETEC are chromosomally encoded with flanking genes that appear phage related. Here, I determined the complete genomic sequence of the locus for the LT-IIa type strain SA53, and show that the LT-IIa genes are encoded by a 51 239 bp lambdoid prophage integrated at the rac locus, the site of a defective prophage in E. coli K12 strains. Of 50 LT-IIa and LT-IIc, 46 prophages also encode one member of two novel two-gene ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin families that are both related to pertussis toxin, which I named eplBA or ealAB, respectively. The eplBA and ealAB genes are syntenic with the Shiga toxin loci in their lambdoid prophages of the enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic E. coli. These novel AB(5) toxins show pertussis-toxin-like activity on tissue culture cells, and like pertussis toxin bind to sialic acid containing glycoprotein ligands. Type II ETEC are the first mucosal pathogens known to simultaneously produce two ADP-ribosylating toxins predicted to act on and modulate activity of both stimulatory and inhibitory alpha subunits of host cell heterotrimeric G-proteins.

  4. In vitro cytotoxicity induced by Clostridium perfringens isolate carrying a chromosomal cpe gene is exclusively dependent on sporulation and enterotoxin production.

    PubMed

    Yasugi, Mayo; Sugahara, Yuki; Hoshi, Hidenobu; Kondo, Kaori; Talukdar, Prabhat K; Sarker, Mahfuzur R; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Kamata, Yoichi; Miyake, Masami

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens type A is a common source of food poisoning (FP) and non-food-borne (NFB) gastrointestinal diseases in humans. In the intestinal tract, the vegetative cells sporulate and produce a major pathogenic factor, C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE). Most type A FP isolates carry a chromosomal cpe gene, whereas NFB type A isolates typically carry a plasmid-encoded cpe. In vitro, the purified CPE protein binds to a receptor and forms pores, exerting a cytotoxic activity in epithelial cells. However, it remains unclear if CPE is indispensable for C. perfringens cytotoxicity. In this study, we examined the cytotoxicity of cpe-harboring C. perfringens isolates co-cultured with human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells. The FP strains showed severe cytotoxicity during sporulation and CPE production, but not during vegetative cell growth. While Caco-2 cells were intact during co-culturing with cpe-null mutant derivative of strain SM101 (a FP strain carrying a chromosomal cpe gene), the wild-type level cytotoxicity was observed with cpe-complemented strain. In contrast, both wild-type and cpe-null mutant derivative of the NFB strain F4969 induced Caco-2 cell death during both vegetative and sporulation growth. Collectively, the Caco-2 cell cytotoxicity caused by C. perfringens strain SM101 is considered to be exclusively dependent on CPE production, whereas some additional toxins should be involved in F4969-mediated in vitro cytotoxicity.

  5. Synthetic consensus HIV-1 DNA induces potent cellular immune responses and synthesis of granzyme B, perforin in HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection.

  6. Synthetic Consensus HIV-1 DNA Induces Potent Cellular Immune Responses and Synthesis of Granzyme B, Perforin in HIV Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Matthew P; Tebas, Pablo; Yan, Jian; Ramirez, Lorenzo; Slager, Anna; Kraynyak, Kim; Diehl, Malissa; Shah, Divya; Khan, Amir; Lee, Jessica; Boyer, Jean; Kim, J Joseph; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Bagarazzi, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of PENNVAX-B in 12 HIV infected individuals. PENNVAX-B is a combination of three optimized synthetic plasmids encoding for multiclade HIV Gag and Pol and a consensus CladeB Env delivered by electroporation. HIV infected individuals whose virus was effectively suppressed using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) received PENNVAX-B DNA followed by electroporation with CELLECTRA-5P at study weeks 0, 4, 8, and 16. Local administration site and systemic reactions to PENNVAX-B were recorded after each treatment along with any adverse events. Pain of the treatment procedure was assessed using a Visual Analog Scale. Whole PBMCs were isolated for use in IFN ELISpot and Flow Cytometric assays. PENNVAX-B was generally safe and well tolerated. Overall, the four dose regimen was not associated with any serious adverse events or severe local or systemic reactions. A rise in antigen-specific SFU was detected in the INFγ ELISpot assay in all 12 participants. T cells from 8/12 participants loaded with both granzyme B and perforin in response to HIV antigen, an immune finding characteristic of long-term nonprogressors (LTNPs) and elite controllers (ECs). Thus administration of PENNVAX-B may prove useful adjunctive therapy to ART for treatment and control of HIV infection. PMID:25531694

  7. Prenyl Ammonium Salts – New Carriers for Gene Delivery: A B16-F10 Mouse Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Grecka, Emilia; Statkiewicz, Malgorzata; Gorska, Agnieszka; Biernacka, Marzena; Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Masnyk, Marek; Chmielewski, Marek; Gawarecka, Katarzyna; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Malecki, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prenyl ammonium iodides (Amino-Prenols, APs), semi-synthetic polyprenol derivatives were studied as prospective novel gene transfer agents. Methods AP-7, -8, -11 and -15 (aminoprenols composed of 7, 8, 11 or 15 isoprene units, respectively) were examined for their capacity to form complexes with pDNA, for cytotoxicity and ability to transfect genes to cells. Results All the carriers were able to complex DNA. The highest, comparable to commercial reagents, transfection efficiency was observed for AP-15. Simultaneously, AP-15 exhibited the lowest negative impact on cell viability and proliferation—considerably lower than that of commercial agents. AP-15/DOPE complexes were also efficient to introduce pDNA to cells, without much effect on cell viability. Transfection with AP-15/DOPE complexes influenced the expression of a very few among 44 tested genes involved in cellular lipid metabolism. Furthermore, complexes containing AP-15 and therapeutic plasmid, encoding the TIMP metallopeptidase inhibitor 2 (TIMP2), introduced the TIMP2 gene with high efficiency to B16-F10 melanoma cells but not to B16-F10 melanoma tumors in C57BL/6 mice, as confirmed by TIMP2 protein level determination. Conclusion Obtained results indicate that APs have a potential as non-viral vectors for cell transfection. PMID:27088717

  8. Bacillus methanolicus: a candidate for industrial production of amino acids from methanol at 50 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Brautaset, Trygve; Jakobsen, Øyvind M; Josefsen, Kjell D; Flickinger, Michael C; Ellingsen, Trond E

    2007-02-01

    Amino acids are among the major products in biotechnology in both volume and value, and the global market is growing. Microbial fermentation is the dominant method used for industrial production, and today the most important microorganisms used are Corynebacteria utilizing sugars. For low-prize bulk amino acids, the possibility of using alternative substrates such as methanol has gained considerable interest. In this mini review, we highlight the unique genetics and favorable physiological traits of thermotolerant methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus, which makes it an interesting candidate for overproduction of amino acids from methanol. B. methanolicus genes involved in methanol consumption are plasmid-encoded and this bacterium has a high methanol conversion rate. Wild-type strains can secrete 58 g/l of L: -glutamate in fed-batch cultures at 50 degrees C and classical mutants secreting 37 g/l of L: -lysine have been selected. The relative high growth temperature is an advantage with respect to both reactor cooling requirements and low contamination risks. Key genes in L: -lysine and L: -glutamate production have been cloned, high-cell density methanol fermentation technology established, and recently a gene delivery method was developed for this organism. We discuss how this new knowledge and technology may lead to the construction of improved L: -lysine and L: -glutamate producing strains by metabolic engineering.

  9. Canine distemper virus DNA vaccination of mink can overcome interference by maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent; Pertoldi, Cino; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2015-03-10

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is highly contagious and can cause severe disease against which conventional live vaccines are ineffective in the presence of maternal antibodies. Vaccination in the presences of maternal antibodies was challenged by vaccination of 5 days old and 3 weeks old mink kits with CDV DNA vaccines. Virus neutralising (VN) antibody responses were induced in mink kits vaccinated with a plasmid encoding the haemaglutinin protein (H) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-H) or a combination of the H, fusion (F) and nucleoprotein (N) of CDV (n=5, pCDV-HFN). These DNA vaccinated kits were protected against virulent experimental infection with field strains of CDV. The pCDV-H was more efficient in inducing protective immunity in the presence of maternal antibodies compared to the pCDV-HFN. The results show that DNA vaccination with the pCDV-H or pCDV-HFN (n=4) only given once at 5 days of age induces virus specific immune response in neonatal mink and protection against virulent CDV exposure later in life.

  10. Commercially available immunoglobulins contain virus neutralizing antibodies against all major genotypes of polyomavirus BK.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, P; Pastrana, D V; Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Shapiro, R; Sood, P; Puttarajappa, C; Berger, M; Hariharan, S; Buck, C B

    2015-04-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) form the basis of immunotherapeutic strategies against many important human viral infections. Accordingly, we studied the prevalence, titer, genotype-specificity, and mechanism of action of anti-polyomavirus BK (BKV) NAbs in commercially available human immune globulin (IG) preparations designed for intravenous (IV) use. Pseudovirions (PsV) of genotypes Ia, Ib2, Ic, II, III, and IV were generated by co-transfecting a reporter plasmid encoding luciferase and expression plasmids containing synthetic codon-modified VP1, VP2, and VP3 capsid protein genes into 293TT cells. NAbs were measured using luminometry. All IG preparations neutralized all BKV genotypes, with mean EC50 titers as high as 254 899 for genotype Ia and 6,666 for genotype IV. Neutralizing titers against genotypes II and III were higher than expected, adding to growing evidence that infections with these genotypes are more common than currently appreciated. Batch to batch variation in different lots of IG was within the limits of experimental error. Antibody mediated virus neutralizing was dose dependent, modestly enhanced by complement, genotype-specific, and achieved without effect on viral aggregation, capsid morphology, elution, or host cell release. IG contains potent NAbs capable of neutralizing all major BKV genotypes. Clinical trials based on sound pharmacokinetic principles are needed to explore prophylactic and therapeutic applications of these anti-viral effects, until effective small molecule inhibitors of BKV replication can be developed.

  11. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    PubMed

    Barbier, Mariette; Damron, F Heath

    2016-01-01

    Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  12. Synergistic antitumor effect of a human papillomavirus DNA vaccine harboring E6E7 fusion gene and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Fan, Lei; Ma, Wei; Xiao, Huan

    2016-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as the primary etiological factor in cervical cancer as well as in subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. The two HPV viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7, are uniquely and consistently expressed in all HPV-infected cells and are therefore promising targets for therapeutic vaccination. In order to achieve a synergistic antitumor and anti-angiogenesis effect, we designed and constructed a novel DNA vaccine that can express the HPV 16 E6E7 fusion protein and VEGFR2 in the same reading frame. A series of DNA plasmids encoding E6E7, VEGFR2 and their conjugates were constructed and injected into mice. The resultant humoral and cellular immune responses were detected by ELISA and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT), respectively. To evaluate the antitumor efficacy of these plasmids, tumor-bearing mice expressing the E6E7 fusion protein were constructed. After injection into the tumor-bearing mouse model, the plasmid harboring the E6E7 fusion gene and VEGFR2 showed stronger inhibition of tumor growth than the plasmid expressing E6E7 or VEGFR2 alone, which indicated that the combination of E6E7 and VEGFR2 could exert a synergistic antitumor effect. These observations emphasize the potential of a synergistic antitumor and anti-angiogenesis strategy using a DNA vaccine, which could be a promising approach for tumor immunotherapy.

  13. Multidrug Efflux Pumps in Staphylococcus aureus: an Update.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sofia Santos; Viveiros, Miguel; Amaral, Leonard; Couto, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of infections caused by multi- or pan-resistant bacteria in the hospital or in the community settings is an increasing health concern. Albeit there is no single resistance mechanism behind multiresistance, multidrug efflux pumps, proteins that cells use to detoxify from noxious compounds, seem to play a key role in the emergence of these multidrug resistant (MDR) bacteria. During the last decades, experimental data has established their contribution to low level resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria and their potential role in the appearance of MDR phenotypes, by the extrusion of multiple, unrelated compounds. Recent studies suggest that efflux pumps may be used by the cell as a first-line defense mechanism, avoiding the drug to reach lethal concentrations, until a stable, more efficient alteration occurs, that allows survival in the presence of that agent. In this paper we review the current knowledge on MDR efflux pumps and their intricate regulatory network in Staphylococcus aureus, a major pathogen, responsible from mild to life-threatening infections. Particular emphasis will be given to the potential role that S. aureus MDR efflux pumps, either chromosomal or plasmid-encoded, have on resistance towards different antimicrobial agents and on the selection of drug - resistant strains. We will also discuss the many questions that still remain on the role of each specific efflux pump and the need to establish appropriate methodological approaches to address all these questions.

  14. Enhancing immune responses to a DNA vaccine encoding Toxoplasma gondii GRA14 by calcium phosphate nanoparticles as an adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Hashemi Soteh, Mohammad Bagher; Sharif, Mehdi; Rahimi, Mohammad Taghi; Valadan, Reza; Tehrani, Mohsen; Khalilian, Alireza; Montazeri, Mahbobeh; Fasihi-Ramandi, Mahdi; Daryani, Ahmad

    2017-03-09

    Several approaches have been used to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. In the current study, we constructed the plasmid encoding T. gondii dense granule 14 (GRA14) and investigated the immunological properties of calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNs) as nano-adjuvant to enhance the protective efficacy of pcGRA14. BALB/c mice intramuscularly injected three times at two-week intervals and the immune responses were evaluated using lymphocyte proliferation assay, cytokine and antibody measurements, survival times, and parasite load of mice challenged with the virulent T. gondii RH strain. The results showed that the immune responses were induced in mice receiving pcGRA14 DNA vaccine. Interestingly, pcGRA14 coated with nanoparticles led to statistically significant enhancements of cellular and humoral immune responses against Toxoplasma infection (P<0.05). After challenge with RH strain of T. gondii, immunized mice with pcGRA14 showed prolong survival time compared to control groups (P<0.05). In addition, pcGRA14 coated with nano-adjuvant exhibited the lowest parasitic load in the infected mice tissues. For the first time, our data indicate that the pcGRA14 coated with CaPN was more effective for stimulation of immune responses and should be considered as an adjuvant in the design of vaccines against toxoplasmosis.

  15. Induction of the MexXY efflux pump in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is dependent on drug-ribosome interaction.

    PubMed

    Jeannot, Katy; Sobel, Mara L; El Garch, Farid; Poole, Keith; Plésiat, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    MexXY is an inducible efflux system that contributes to the natural resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics. Experiments involving real-time PCR after reverse transcription in reference strain PAO1 showed concentration-dependent induction of gene mexY by various ribosome inhibitors (e.g., chloramphenicol, tetracycline, macrolides, and aminoglycosides) but not by antibiotics acting on other cellular targets (e.g., beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones). Confirming a functional link between the efflux system and the translational machinery, ribosome protection by plasmid-encoded proteins TetO and ErmBP increased the resistance of a DeltamexAB-oprM mutant of PAO1 to tetracycline and erythromycin, respectively, as well as the concentrations of both drugs required to induce mexY. Furthermore, spontaneous mutations resulting in specific resistance to dihydrostreptomycin or spectinomycin also raised the minimal drug concentration for mexXY induction in strain PAO1. While strongly upregulated in a PAO1 mutant defective in gene mexZ (which codes for a putative repressor of operon mexXY), gene mexY remained inducible by agents such as tetracycline, chloramphenicol, and spectinomycin, suggesting additional regulatory loci for mexXY. Altogether, these data demonstrate physiological interplays between MexXY and the ribosome and are suggestive of an alternative function for MexXY beyond antibiotic efflux.

  16. Immunization of the Female Genital Tract with a DNA-Based Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Julie B.; Lu, Shan; Robinson, Harriet; Anderson, Deborah J.

    1998-01-01

    Vaccines are being sought for contraception and the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. However, progress is slow in this area largely because of lack of information on induction of protective immune responses in genital tract mucosa. In this study, we investigated whether in vivo transfection with a model DNA-based antigen delivered by gene gun technology would induce an antibody response detectable in vaginal secretions. Female rats were immunized with plasmids encoding human growth hormone (HGH) under the control of a cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV/HGH) via vaginal mucosa (V), Peyer’s patch (PP), and/or abdominal skin (S) routes. Localization of HGH in the target tissues demonstrated that all three sites can be transfected in vivo with pCMV/HGH. Vaginal tissues expressed roughly the same level of plasmid as skin. Antibodies to HGH were detectable in serum and vaginal secretions in rats immunized with pCMV/HGH. In the rats primed and boosted vaginally, vaginal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgG antibody titers to HGH were sustained for at least 14 weeks, whereas rats immunized via other routes and protocols (S/V, S/S, PP/PP, or PP/V) did not consistently sustain significant vaginal antibody titers beyond week 6. DNA-based immunizations administered by the gene gun may be an effective method of inducing local immunity in the female genital tract. PMID:9423874

  17. Characterization of the ysa pathogenicity locus in the chromosome of Yersinia enterocolitica and phylogeny analysis of type III secretion systems.

    PubMed

    Foultier, Boris; Troisfontaines, Paul; Müller, Simone; Opperdoes, Fred R; Cornelis, Guy R

    2002-07-01

    Several Gram negative bacteria use a complex system called "type III secretion system" (TTSS) to engage their host. The archetype of TTSS is the plasmid-encoded "Yop virulon" shared by the three species of pathogenic Yersinia (Y. pestis, Y. pseudotuberculosis, and Y. enterocolitica). A second TTSS, called Ysa (for Yersinia secretion apparatus) was recently described in Y. enterocolitica 8081, a strain from serotype O:8. In this study, we describe the ysa locus from A127/90, another strain of serotype O:8, and we extend the sequence to several new genes encoding Ysp proteins which are the substrates of this secretion system, and a putative chaperone SycB. According to the deduced protein sequences, the ysa system from A127/90 is identical to that of 8081. It is different from the chromosome-encoded TTSS of Y. pestis but is instead closely related to the Mxi-Spa TTSS of Shigella and to the SPI-1 encoded TTSS of Salmonella enterica. We further demonstrated that the ysa locus is only present in biotype IB strains of Y. enterocolitica. Including this new Ysa system, a phylogenetic analysis of the 26 known TTSSs was carried out, based on the sequence analysis of three conserved proteins. All the TTSSs fall into five different clusters. The phylogenetic tree of these TTSSs is completely different from the evolutionary tree based on 16S RNA, indicating that TTSSs have been distributed by horizontal transfer.

  18. OXA β-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Evans, Benjamin A; Amyes, Sebastian G B

    2014-04-01

    The OXA β-lactamases were among the earliest β-lactamases detected; however, these molecular class D β-lactamases were originally relatively rare and always plasmid mediated. They had a substrate profile limited to the penicillins, but some became able to confer resistance to cephalosporins. From the 1980s onwards, isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii that were resistant to the carbapenems emerged, manifested by plasmid-encoded β-lactamases (OXA-23, OXA-40, and OXA-58) categorized as OXA enzymes because of their sequence similarity to earlier OXA β-lactamases. It was soon found that every A. baumannii strain possessed a chromosomally encoded OXA β-lactamase (OXA-51-like), some of which could confer resistance to carbapenems when the genetic environment around the gene promoted its expression. Similarly, Acinetobacter species closely related to A. baumannii also possessed their own chromosomally encoded OXA β-lactamases; some could be transferred to A. baumannii, and they formed the basis of transferable carbapenem resistance in this species. In some cases, the carbapenem-resistant OXA β-lactamases (OXA-48) have migrated into the Enterobacteriaceae and are becoming a significant cause of carbapenem resistance. The emergence of OXA enzymes that can confer resistance to carbapenems, particularly in A. baumannii, has transformed these β-lactamases from a minor hindrance into a major problem set to demote the clinical efficacy of the carbapenems.

  19. High prevalence of VIM-4 and NDM-1 metallo-β-lactamase among carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Wafaa; Rotimi, Vincent O; Albert, M John; Khodakhast, Fatima; Nordmann, Patrice; Poirel, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the mechanisms leading to carbapenem resistance among multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates recovered from hospitalized patients with nosocomial infections in Mubarak Al Kabeer Hospital, Kuwait. Fourteen carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae isolates were obtained from inpatients in different wards and intensive care units between April 2009 and February 2011. Antibiotic susceptibilities were determined using the E-test method. Genes encoding β-lactamases were characterized by specific PCR amplification, sequencing and conjugation assays. All isolates were identified as metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) producers using phenotypic and molecular methods. Eleven of the 14 isolates produced VIM-4 (six Klebsiella pneumoniae, three Escherichia coli, one Enterobacter cloacae and one Klebsiella oxytoca). Three K. pneumoniae isolates produced the MBL NDM-1 and co-produced the plasmid-encoded AmpC CMY-4. The VIM-4-producing isolates co-produced extended-spectrum β-lactamases including CTX-M-15 and some SHV derivatives. The VIM-4 gene was not transferable by conjugation studies of six selected strains. We demonstrated here the emergence of VIM-4- and NDM-1-producing isolates in the largest teaching hospital in Kuwait.

  20. Analysis of the resistome of a multidrug-resistant NDM-1-producing Escherichia coli strain by high-throughput genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Poirel, Laurent; Bonnin, Rémy A; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-09-01

    The resistome of the multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain 271 carrying the plasmid-mediated bla(NDM-1) carbapenemase gene was analyzed by high-throughput genome sequencing. The p271A plasmid carrying the bla(NDM-1) gene was 35.9 kb in size and possessed an IncN-type backbone that harbored a novel replicase gene. Acquisition of the bla(NDM-1) gene on plasmid p271A had been likely the result of a cointegration event involving the transposase of Tn5403. The expression of bla(NDM-1) was associated with the insertion sequence ISAba125 likely originating from Acinetobacter baumannii. E. coli 271 accumulated multiple resistance determinants, including five β-lactamase genes (comprising the extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M-15), two 16S RNA methylase ArmA- and RmtB-encoding genes, and the qepA gene encoding an efflux pump involved in resistance to fluoroquinolones. These resistance genes were located on three additional plasmids, of 160 kb (IncA/C), 130 kb (IncF), and 110 kb (IncI1). In addition, several chromosomally encoded resistance determinants were identified, such as topoisomerase mutations, porin modifications and truncations, and the intrinsic ampC gene of E. coli that was weakly expressed. The multidrug resistance pattern observed for E. coli 271 was therefore the result of combined chromosome- and plasmid-encoded mechanisms.

  1. Identification of a Ligand on the Wip1 Bacteriophage Highly Specific for a Receptor on Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Sherry; Fornelos, Nadine; Schuch, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Tectiviridae is a family of tailless bacteriophages with Gram-negative and Gram-positive hosts. The family model PRD1 and its close relatives all infect a broad range of enterobacteria by recognizing a plasmid-encoded conjugal transfer complex as a receptor. In contrast, tectiviruses with Gram-positive hosts are highly specific to only a few hosts within the same bacterial species. The cellular determinants that account for the observed specificity remain unknown. Here we present the genome sequence of Wip1, a tectivirus that infects the pathogen Bacillus anthracis. The Wip1 genome is related to other tectiviruses with Gram-positive hosts, notably, AP50, but displays some interesting differences in its genome organization. We identified Wip1 candidate genes for the viral spike complex, the structure located at the capsid vertices and involved in host receptor binding. Phage adsorption and inhibition tests were combined with immunofluorescence microscopy to show that the Wip1 gene product p23 is a receptor binding protein. His-p23 also formed a stable complex with p24, a Wip1 protein of unknown function, suggesting that the latter is involved with p23 in host cell recognition. The narrow host range of phage Wip1 and the identification of p23 as a receptor binding protein offer a new range of suitable tools for the rapid identification of B. anthracis. PMID:23893110

  2. Characterization of KfrA proteins encoded by a plasmid of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T

    PubMed Central

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Mon, Hiroaki; Mori, Kazuki; Mitsudome, Takumi; Lee, Jae Man; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Tashiro, Kousuke; Asano, Shin-ichiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2015-01-01

    A scaffold obtained from whole-genome shotgun sequencing of Paenibacillus popilliae ATCC 14706T shares partial homology with plasmids found in other strains of P. popilliae. PCR and sequencing for gap enclosure indicated that the scaffold originated from a 15,929-bp circular DNA. The restriction patterns of a plasmid isolated from P. popilliae ATCC 14706T were identical to those expected from the sequence; thus, this circular DNA was identified as a plasmid of ATCC 14706T and designated pPOP15.9. The plasmid encodes 17 putative open reading frames. Orfs 1, 5, 7, 8, and 9 are homologous to Orfs 11, 12, 15, 16, and 17, respectively. Orf1 and Orf11 are annotated as replication initiation proteins. Orf8 and Orf16 are homologs of KfrA, a plasmid-stabilizing protein in Gram-negative bacteria. Recombinant Orf8 and Orf16 proteins were assessed for the properties of KfrA. Indeed, they formed multimers and bound to inverted repeat sequences in upstream regions of both orf8 and orf16. A phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of Orf8, Orf16 and Kfr proteins did not correlate with species lineage. PMID:25853059

  3. Expression cloning of the murine interferon gamma receptor cDNA.

    PubMed

    Munro, S; Maniatis, T

    1989-12-01

    A cDNA encoding a receptor for murine interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) was isolated from an expression library made from murine thymocytes. The clone was identified by transfecting the library into monkey COS cells and probing the transfected monolayer with radiolabeled murine IFN-gamma. Cells expressing the receptor were identified by autoradiography and plasmids encoding the receptor were directly rescued from those cells producing a positive signal. A partial cDNA so obtained was used to isolate a full-length cDNA from mouse L929 cells by conventional means. When this cDNA was expressed in COS cells it produced a specific binding site for murine IFN-gamma with an affinity constant similar to that of the receptor found on L929 cells. The predicted amino acid sequence of the murine IFN-gamma receptor shows homology to that previously reported for the human IFN-gamma receptor. However, although the two proteins are clearly related, they show less than 60% identity in both the putative extracellular domain and the intracellular domain.

  4. Toxin Kid uncouples DNA replication and cell division to enforce retention of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Belén; Nair, Radhika; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Preston, Mark A; Agu, Chukwuma A; Wang, Xindan; Bernal, Juan A; Sherratt, David J; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2014-02-18

    Worldwide dissemination of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is facilitated by plasmids that encode postsegregational killing (PSK) systems. These produce a stable toxin (T) and a labile antitoxin (A) conditioning cell survival to plasmid maintenance, because only this ensures neutralization of toxicity. Shortage of antibiotic alternatives and the link of TA pairs to PSK have stimulated the opinion that premature toxin activation could be used to kill these recalcitrant organisms in the clinic. However, validation of TA pairs as therapeutic targets requires unambiguous understanding of their mode of action, consequences for cell viability, and function in plasmids. Conflicting with widespread notions concerning these issues, we had proposed that the TA pair kis-kid (killing suppressor-killing determinant) might function as a plasmid rescue system and not as a PSK system, but this remained to be validated. Here, we aimed to clarify unsettled mechanistic aspects of Kid activation, and of the effects of this for kis-kid-bearing plasmids and their host cells. We confirm that activation of Kid occurs in cells that are about to lose the toxin-encoding plasmid, and we show that this provokes highly selective restriction of protein outputs that inhibits cell division temporarily, avoiding plasmid loss, and stimulates DNA replication, promoting plasmid rescue. Kis and Kid are conserved in plasmids encoding multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including extended spectrum β-lactamases, for which therapeutic options are scarce, and our findings advise against the activation of this TA pair to fight pathogens carrying these extrachromosomal DNAs.

  5. Kid cleaves specific mRNAs at UUACU sites to rescue the copy number of plasmid R1.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Belén; Madine, Mark A; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2005-10-05

    Stability and copy number of extra-chromosomal elements are tightly regulated in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Toxin Kid and antitoxin Kis are the components of the parD stability system of prokaryotic plasmid R1 and they can also function in eukaryotes. In bacteria, Kid was thought to become active only in cells that lose plasmid R1 and to cleave exclusively host mRNAs at UA(A/C/U) trinucleotide sites to eliminate plasmid-free cells. Instead, we demonstrate here that Kid becomes active in plasmid-containing cells when plasmid copy number decreases, cleaving not only host- but also a specific plasmid-encoded mRNA at the longer and more specific target sequence UUACU. This specific cleavage by Kid inhibits bacterial growth and, at the same time, helps to restore the plasmid copy number. Kid targets a plasmid RNA that encodes a repressor of the synthesis of an R1 replication protein, resulting in increased plasmid DNA replication. This mechanism resembles that employed by some human herpesviruses to regulate viral amplification during infection.

  6. A tetracycline-regulated cell line produces high-titer lentiviral vectors that specifically target dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Bryson, Paul D; Zhang, Chupei; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wang, Pin

    2013-06-19

    Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are a powerful means of delivering genetic material to many types of cells. Because of safety concerns associated with these HIV-1 derived vectors, producing large quantities of LVs is challenging. In this paper, we report a method for producing high titers of self-inactivating LVs. We retrovirally transduce the tet-off stable producer cell line GPR to generate a cell line, GPRS, which can express all the viral components, including a dendritic cell-specific glycoprotein, SVGmu. Then, we use concatemeric DNA transfection to transfect the LV transfer plasmid encoding a reporter gene GFP in combination with a selectable marker. Several of the resulting clones can produce LV at a titer 10-fold greater than what we achieve with transient transfection. Plus, these viruses efficiently transduce dendritic cells in vitro and generate a strong T cell immune response to our reporter antigen. This method may be a good option for producing strong LV-based vaccines for clinical studies of cancer or infectious diseases.

  7. Toxin Kid uncouples DNA replication and cell division to enforce retention of plasmid R1 in Escherichia coli cells

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Belén; Nair, Radhika; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Preston, Mark A.; Agu, Chukwuma A.; Wang, Xindan; Bernal, Juan A.; Sherratt, David J.; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide dissemination of antibiotic resistance in bacteria is facilitated by plasmids that encode postsegregational killing (PSK) systems. These produce a stable toxin (T) and a labile antitoxin (A) conditioning cell survival to plasmid maintenance, because only this ensures neutralization of toxicity. Shortage of antibiotic alternatives and the link of TA pairs to PSK have stimulated the opinion that premature toxin activation could be used to kill these recalcitrant organisms in the clinic. However, validation of TA pairs as therapeutic targets requires unambiguous understanding of their mode of action, consequences for cell viability, and function in plasmids. Conflicting with widespread notions concerning these issues, we had proposed that the TA pair kis-kid (killing suppressor-killing determinant) might function as a plasmid rescue system and not as a PSK system, but this remained to be validated. Here, we aimed to clarify unsettled mechanistic aspects of Kid activation, and of the effects of this for kis-kid–bearing plasmids and their host cells. We confirm that activation of Kid occurs in cells that are about to lose the toxin-encoding plasmid, and we show that this provokes highly selective restriction of protein outputs that inhibits cell division temporarily, avoiding plasmid loss, and stimulates DNA replication, promoting plasmid rescue. Kis and Kid are conserved in plasmids encoding multiple antibiotic resistance genes, including extended spectrum β-lactamases, for which therapeutic options are scarce, and our findings advise against the activation of this TA pair to fight pathogens carrying these extrachromosomal DNAs. PMID:24449860

  8. The use of equine influenza pseudotypes for serological screening.

    PubMed

    Scott, Simon; Molesti, Eleonora; Temperton, Nigel; Ferrara, Francesca; Böttcher-Friebertshäuser, Eva; Daly, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Standard assays used for influenza serology present certain practical issues, such as inter-laboratory variability, complex protocols and the necessity for handling certain virus strains in high biological containment facilities. In an attempt to address this, avian and human influenza HA pseudotyped retroviruses have been successfully employed in antibody neutralization assays. In this study we generated an equine influenza pseudotyped lentivirus for serological screening. This was achieved by co-transfection of HEK293T cells with plasmids expressing the haemagglutinin (HA) protein of an H3N8 subtype equine influenza virus strain, HIV gag-pol and firefly luciferase reporter genes and harvesting virus from supernatant. In order to produce infective pseudotype particles it was necessary to additionally co-transfect a plasmid encoding the TMPRSS2 endoprotease to cleave the HA. High titre pseudotype virus (PV) was then used in PV antibody neutralization assays (PVNAs) to successfully distinguish between vaccinated and non-vaccinated equines. The sera were also screened by single radial haemolysis (SRH) assay. There was a 65% correlation between the results of the two assays, with the PVNA assay appearing slightly more sensitive. Future work will extend the testing of the PVNA with a larger number of serum samples to assess sensitivity/specificity, inter/intra-laboratory variability and to define a protective titre.

  9. Efficient gene delivery to human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells by cationized Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qingtong; Cao, Jin; Chen, Baoding; Deng, Wenwen; Cao, Xia; Chen, Jingjing; Wang, Yan; Wang, Shicheng; Yu, Jiangnan; Xu, Ximing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    This study centered on an innovative application of Porphyra yezoensis polysaccharide (PPS) with cationic modification as a safe and efficient nonviral gene vector to deliver a plasmid encoding human Wnt3a (pWnt3a) into human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs). After modification with branched low-molecular-weight (1,200 Da) polyethylenimine, the cationized PPS (CPPS) was combined with pWnt3a to form spherical nanoscale particles (CPPS-pWnt3a nanoparticles). Particle size and distribution indicated that the CPPS-pWnt3a nanoparticles at a CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio of 40:1 might be a potential candidate for DNA plasmid transfection. A cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the nanoparticles prepared at a CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio of 40:1 were nontoxic to HUMSCs compared to those of Lipofectamine 2000 and polyethylenimine (25 kDa). These nanoparticles were further transfected to HUMSCs. Western blotting demonstrated that the nanoparticles (CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio 40:1) had the greatest transfection efficiency in HUMSCs, which was significantly higher than that of Lipofectamine 2000; however, when the CPPS:pWnt3a weight ratio was increased to 80:1, the nanoparticle-treated group showed no obvious improvement in translation efficiency over Lipofectamine 2000. Therefore, CPPS, a novel cationic polysaccharide derived from P. yezoensis, could be developed into a safe, efficient, nonviral gene vector in a gene-delivery system.

  10. Reelin and cofilin cooperate during the migration of cortical neurons: a quantitative morphological analysis.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xuejun; Zhao, Shanting; Fan, Li; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Xi; Shao, Hong; Wang, Shaobo; Song, Lingzhen; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Zobiak, Bernd; Mannherz, Hans G; Frotscher, Michael

    2016-03-15

    In reeler mutant mice, which are deficient in reelin (Reln), the lamination of the cerebral cortex is disrupted. Reelin signaling induces phosphorylation of LIM kinase 1, which phosphorylates the actin-depolymerizing protein cofilin in migrating neurons. Conditional cofilin mutants show neuronal migration defects. Thus, both reelin and cofilin are indispensable during cortical development. To analyze the effects of cofilin phosphorylation on neuronal migration we used in utero electroporation to transfect E14.5 wild-type cortical neurons with pCAG-EGFP plasmids encoding either a nonphosphorylatable form of cofilin 1 (cofilin(S3A)), a pseudophosphorylated form (cofilin(S3E)) or wild-type cofilin 1 (cofilin(WT)). Wild-type controls and reeler neurons were transfected with pCAG-EGFP. Real-time microscopy and histological analyses revealed that overexpression of cofilin(WT) and both phosphomutants induced migration defects and morphological abnormalities of cortical neurons. Of note, reeler neurons and cofilin(S3A)- and cofilin(S3E)-transfected neurons showed aberrant backward migration towards the ventricular zone. Overexpression of cofilin(S3E), the pseudophosphorylated form, partially rescued the migration defect of reeler neurons, as did overexpression of Limk1. Collectively, the results indicate that reelin and cofilin cooperate in controlling cytoskeletal dynamics during neuronal migration.

  11. Employment of Salmonella in Cancer Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Che-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    One of the primary limitations of cancer gene therapy is lack of selectivity of the therapeutic gene to tumor cells. Current efforts are focused on discovering and developing tumor-targeting vectors that selectively target only cancer cells but spare normal cells to improve the therapeutic index. The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative-anaerobic bacteria are capable of multiplying selectively in tumors and inhibiting their growth. In this study, we exploited attenuated Salmonella as a tumoricidal agent and a vector to deliver genes for tumor-targeted gene therapy. Attenuated Salmonella, carrying a eukaryotic expression plasmid encoding an anti-angiogenic gene, was used to evaluate its' ability for tumor targeting and gene delivery in murine tumor models. We also investigated the use of a polymer to modify or shield Salmonella from the pre-existing immune response in the host in order to improve gene delivery to the tumor. These results suggest that tumor-targeted gene therapy using Salmonella carrying a therapeutic gene, which exerts tumoricidal and anti-angiogenic activities, represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.

  12. Nonredundant roles of antibody, cytokines, and perforin in the eradication of established Her-2/neu carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Curcio, Claudia; Di Carlo, Emma; Clynes, Raphael; Smyth, Mark J; Boggio, Katia; Quaglino, Elena; Spadaro, Michela; Colombo, Mario P; Amici, Augusto; Lollini, Pier-Luigi; Musiani, Piero; Forni, Guido

    2003-04-01

    Since the mechanisms by which specific immunity destroys Her-2/neu carcinoma cells are highly undetermined, these were assessed in BALB/c mice vaccinated with plasmids encoding extracellular and transmembrane domains of the protein product (p185(neu)) of the rat Her-2/neu oncogene shot into the skin by gene gun. Vaccinated mice rejected a lethal challenge of TUBO carcinoma cells expressing p185(neu). Depletion of CD4 T cells during immunization abolished the protection, while depletion of CD8 cells during the effector phase halved it, and depletion of polymorphonuclear granulocytes abolished all protection. By contrast, Ig mu-chain gene KO mice, as well as Fcgamma receptor I/III, beta-2 microglobulin, CD1, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), IFN-gamma, and perforin gene KO mice were protected. Only mice with both IFN-gamma and perforin gene KOs were not protected. Although immunization also cured all BALB/c mice bearing established TUBO carcinomas, it did not cure any of the perforin KO or perforin and IFN-gamma KO mice. Few mice were cured that had knockouts of the gene for Ig mu-chain, Fcgamma receptor I/III, IFN-gamma, or beta-2 microglobulin. Moreover, vaccination cured half of the CD1 and the majority of the MCP1 KO mice. The eradication of established p185(neu) carcinomas involves distinct mechanisms, each endowed with a different curative potential.

  13. The Identification of Novel Diagnostic Marker Genes for the Detection of Beer Spoiling Pediococcus damnosus Strains Using the BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Jonas; Zehe, Anja; Vogel, Rudi F.

    2016-01-01

    As the number of bacterial genomes increases dramatically, the demand for easy to use tools with transparent functionality and comprehensible output for applied comparative genomics grows as well. We present BlAst Diagnostic Gene findEr (BADGE), a tool for the rapid prediction of diagnostic marker genes (DMGs) for the differentiation of bacterial groups (e.g. pathogenic / nonpathogenic). DMG identification settings can be modified easily and installing and running BADGE does not require specific bioinformatics skills. During the BADGE run the user is informed step by step about the DMG finding process, thus making it easy to evaluate the impact of chosen settings and options. On the basis of an example with relevance for beer brewing, being one of the oldest biotechnological processes known, we show a straightforward procedure, from phenotyping, genome sequencing, assembly and annotation, up to a discriminant marker gene PCR assay, making comparative genomics a means to an end. The value and the functionality of BADGE were thoroughly examined, resulting in the successful identification and validation of an outstanding novel DMG (fabZ) for the discrimination of harmless and harmful contaminations of Pediococcus damnosus, which can be applied for spoilage risk determination in breweries. Concomitantly, we present and compare five complete P. damnosus genomes sequenced in this study, finding that the ability to produce the unwanted, spoilage associated off-flavor diacetyl is a plasmid encoded trait in this important beer spoiling species. PMID:27028007

  14. Analysis of Two Complementary Single-Gene Deletion Mutant Libraries of Salmonella Typhimurium in Intraperitoneal Infection of BALB/c Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Desai, Prerak; Valenzuela, Camila; Porwollik, Steffen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A; McClelland, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Two pools of individual single gene deletion (SGD) mutants of S. Typhimurium 14028s encompassing deletions of 3,923 annotated non-essential ORFs and sRNAs were screened by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in BALB/c mice followed by recovery from spleen and liver 2 days post infection. The relative abundance of each mutant was measured by microarray hybridization. The two mutant libraries differed in the orientation of the antibiotic resistance cassettes (either sense-oriented Kan(R), SGD-K, or antisense-oriented Cam(R), SGD-C). Consistent systemic colonization defects were observed in both libraries and both organs for hundreds of mutants of genes previously reported to be important after IP injection in this animal model, and for about 100 new candidate genes required for systemic colonization. Four mutants with a range of apparent fitness defects were confirmed using competitive infections with the wild-type parental strain: ΔSTM0286, ΔSTM0551, ΔSTM2363, and ΔSTM3356. Two mutants, ΔSTM0286 and ΔSTM2363, were then complemented in trans with a plasmid encoding an intact copy of the corresponding wild-type gene, and regained the ability to fully colonize BALB/c mice systemically. These results suggest the presence of many more undiscovered Salmonella genes with phenotypes in IP infection of BALB/c mice, and validate the libraries for application to other systems.

  15. Identification of genes and gene products necessary for bacterial bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1984-07-01

    Expression of luminescence in Escherichia coli was recently achieved by cloning genes from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. One DNA fragment on a hybrid plasmid encoded regulatory functions and enzymatic activities necessary for light production. We report the results of a genetic analysis to identify the luminescence genes (lux) that reside on this recombinant plasmid. lux gene mutations were generated by hydroxylamine treatment, and these mutations were ordered on a linear map by complementation in trans with a series of polar transposon insertions on other plasmids. lux genes were defined by complementation of lux gene defects on pairs of plasmids in trans in E. coli. Hybrid plasmids were also used to direct the synthesis of polypeptides in the E. coli minicell system. Seven lux genes and the corresponding gene products were identified from the complementation analysis and the minicell programing experiments. These genes, in the order of their position on a linear map, and the apparent molecular weights of the gene products are luxR (27,000), luxI (25,000), luxC (53,000), luxD (33,000), luxA (40,000), luxB (38,000), and luxE (42,000). From the luminescence phenotypes of E. coli containing mutant plasmids, functions were assigned to these genes: luxA, luxB, luxC, luxD, and luxE encode enzymes for light production and luxR and luxI encode regulatory functions.

  16. Increasing prevalence of hydrogen sulfide negative Salmonella in retail meats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dachuan; Yan, Meiying; Lin, Song; Chen, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production is considered a typical characteristic of Salmonella and an important marker for Salmonella isolation. In this study, a total of 82 (26%) Salmonella strains were isolated from 113 chicken and 204 pork samples, within which 49 Salmonella strains were H2S positive and 33 were H2S negative. Salmonella enterica serovar Derby was most prevalent in both pork and chicken followed by S. Typhimurium in pork and S. Heidelberg in chicken. Salmonella isolated from pork exhibited a much higher H2S positive rate than those from chicken (68% versus 31%). The most prevalent H2S negative serotypes were S. Derby (40%) and S. Heidelberg (30%) in chicken, and S. Typhimurium (23%) and S. Enteritidis (23%) in pork. spvC, a plasmid-encoded virulence marker, was detected in 51% and 42% of the H2S positive and negative Salmonella respectively. The presence of the two most important serotypes, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, as well as a virulence plasmid in H2S negative Salmonella suggested that H2S negative Salmonella is also a significant public health concern. Such finding warrants the development of an improved method for effective coverage of H2S negative Salmonella.

  17. The site of administration influences both the type and the magnitude of the immune response induced by DNA vaccine electroporation.

    PubMed

    Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Vanvarenberg, Kevin; De Beuckelaer, Ans; De Koker, Stefaan; Lambricht, Laure; Uyttenhove, Catherine; Reschner, Anca; Vanderplasschen, Alain; Grooten, Johan; Préat, Véronique

    2015-06-22

    We investigated the influence of the site of administration of DNA vaccine on the induced immune response. DNA vaccines were administered by electroporation at three different sites: tibial cranial muscle, abdominal skin and ear pinna. Aiming to draw general conclusions about DNA vaccine delivery, we successively used several plasmids encoding either luciferase and ovalbumin as models or gp160 and P1A as vaccines against HIV and P815 mastocytoma, respectively. Low levels and duration of luciferase transgene expression were observed after electroporation of the abdominal skin, partly explaining its lower immunogenic performance as compared to the other sites of administration. Analyses of OT-I CD8+ and OT-II CD4+ T cell responses highlighted the differential impact of the delivery site on the elicited immune response. Muscle electroporation induced the strongest humoral immune response and both muscle and ear pinna sites induced cellular immunity against gp160. Ear pinna delivery generated the highest level of CTL responses against P1A but electroporation of muscle and ear pinna were equally efficient in delaying P815 growth and improving mice survival. The present study demonstrated that the site of administration is a key factor to be tested in the development of DNA vaccine.

  18. Deep sequencing reveals different compositions of mRNA transcribed from the F8 gene in a panel of FVIII-producing CHO cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kaas, Christian S; Bolt, Gert; Hansen, Jens J; Andersen, Mikael R; Kristensen, Claus

    2015-07-01

    Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII) is one of the most complex biopharmaceuticals due to the large size, poor protein stability and extensive post-translational modifications. As a consequence, efficient production of FVIII in mammalian cells poses a major challenge, with typical yields two to three orders of magnitude lower than for antibodies. In the present study we investigated CHO DXB11 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding human coagulation factor VIII. Single cell clones were isolated from the pool of transfectants and a panel of 14 clones representing a dynamic range of FVIII productivities was selected for RNA sequencing analysis. The analysis showed distinct differences in F8 RNA composition between the clones. The exogenous F8-dhfr transcript was found to make up the most abundant transcript in the present clones. No correlation was seen between F8 mRNA levels and the measured FVIII productivity. It was found that three MTX resistant, nonproducing clones had different truncations of the F8 transcripts. We find that by using deep sequencing, in contrast to microarray technology, for determining the transcriptome from CHO transfectants, we are able to accurately deduce the mature mRNA composition of the transgene and identify significant truncations that would probably otherwise have remained undetected.

  19. Production of CMAH Knockout Preimplantation Embryos Derived From Immortalized Porcine Cells Via TALE Nucleases.

    PubMed

    Moon, JoonHo; Lee, Choongil; Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Ji-Yei; Lee, Byeong Chun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jang, Goo

    2014-05-27

    Although noncancerous immortalized cell lines have been developed by introducing genes into human and murine somatic cells, such cell lines have not been available in large domesticated animals like pigs. For immortalizing porcine cells, primary porcine fetal fibroblasts were isolated and cultured using the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene. After selecting cells with neomycin for 2 weeks, outgrowing colonized cells were picked up and subcultured for expansion. Immortalized cells were cultured for more than 9 months without changing their doubling time (~24 hours) or their diameter (< 20 µm) while control cells became replicatively senescent during the same period. Even a single cell expanded to confluence in 100 mm dishes. Furthermore, to knockout the CMAH gene, designed plasmids encoding a transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALENs) pairs were transfected into the immortalized cells. Each single colony was analyzed by the mutation-sensitive T7 endonuclease I assay, fluorescent PCR, and dideoxy sequencing to obtain three independent clonal populations of cells that contained biallelic modifications. One CMAH knockout clone was chosen and used for somatic cell nuclear transfer. Cloned embryos developed to the blastocyst stage. In conclusion, we demonstrated that immortalized porcine fibroblasts were successfully established using the human hTERT gene, and the TALENs enabled biallelic gene disruptions in these immortalized cells.

  20. Restoration of junctional tetrads in dysgenic myotubes by dihydropyridine receptor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Takekura, H; Bennett, L; Tanabe, T; Beam, K G; Franzini-Armstrong, C

    1994-01-01

    Excitation-contraction coupling was restored in primary cultures of dysgenic myotubes by transfecting the cells with an expression plasmid encoding the rabbit skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptor. Dishes containing normal, dysgenic, and transfected myotubes were fixed, freeze-fractured, and replicated for electron microscopy. Numerous small domains in the surface membrane of normal myotubes contain ordered arrays of intramembrane particles in groups of four (tetrads). The disposition of tetrads in the arrays is consistent with alternate positioning of tetrads relative to the underlying feet of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Dysgenic myotubes have no arrays of tetrads. Some myotubes from successfully transfected cultures have arrays of tetrads with spacings equal to those found in normal myotubes. Thus the dihydropyridine receptor appears to be needed for the formation of tetrads and their association with the sarcoplasmic reticulum feet. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that each tetrad is composed of four dihydropyridine receptors. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:7948692

  1. Metalloregulatory properties of the ArsD repressor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Rosen, B P

    1997-05-30

    The plasmid-encoded arsenical resistance (ars) operon of plasmid R773 produces resistance to trivalent and pentavalent salts of the metalloids arsenic and antimony in cells of Escherichia coli. The first two genes in the operon, arsR and arsD, were previously shown to encode trans-acting repressor proteins. ArsR controls the basal level of expression of the operon, while ArsD controls maximal expression. Thus, action of the two repressors form a homeostatic regulatory circuit that maintains the level of ars expression within a narrow range. In this study, we demonstrate that ArsD binds to the same site on the ars promoter element as ArsR but with 2 orders of magnitude lower affinity. The results of gel shift assays demonstrate that ArsD is released from the ars DNA promoter by phenylarsine oxide, sodium arsenite, and potassium antimonyl tartrate (in order of effectiveness), the same inducers to which ArsR responds. Using the quenching of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence to measure the affinity of the repressor for inducers, apparent Kd values for Sb(III) and As(III) of 2 and 60 microM, respectively, were obtained. These results demonstrate that the arsR-arsD pair provide a sensitive mechanism for sensing a wide range of environmental heavy metals.

  2. Gene expression analysis of primary normal human hepatocytes infected with human hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyun Mi; Park, Sung Gyoo; Yea, Sung Su; Jang, Won Hee; Yang, Young-Il; Jung, Guhung

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To find the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatocytes during the initial state of infection by cDNA microarray. METHODS: Primary normal human hepatocytes (PNHHs) were isolated and infected with HBV. From the PNHHs, RNA was isolated and inverted into complement DNA (cDNA) with Cy3- or Cy5- labeled dUTP for microarray analysis. The labeled cDNA was hybridized with microarray chip, including 4224 cDNAs. From the image of the microarray, expression profiles were produced and some of them were confirmed by RT-PCR, immunoblot analysis, and NF-κB luciferase reporter assay. RESULTS: From the cDNA microarray, we obtained 98 differentially regulated genes. Of the 98 genes, 53 were up regulated and 45 down regulated. Interestingly, in the up regulated genes, we found the TNF signaling pathway-related genes: LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. By using RT-PCR, we confirmed the up-regulation of these genes in HepG2, Huh7, and Chang liver cells, which were transfected with pHBV1.2×, a plasmid encoding all HBV messages. Moreover, these three genes participated in HBV-mediated NF-κB activation. CONCLUSION: During the initial state of HBV infection, hepatocytes facilitate the activation of NF-κB through up regulation of LT-α, TRAF2, and NIK. PMID:16937494

  3. Role of bacteriophages in STEC infections: new implications for the design of prophylactic and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Jaime H; Del Cogliano, Manuel E; Fernandez-Brando, Romina J; Bilen, Marcos F; Jesus, Monica R; Luiz, Wilson B; Palermo, Marina S; Ferreira, Rita C C; Servat, Esteban G; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Ferreira, Luis C S; Bentancor, Leticia V

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is considered the main virulence factor in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections. Previously we reported the expression of biologically active Stx by eukaryotic cells in vitro and in vivo following transfection with plasmids encoding Stx under control of the native bacterial promoter (1,2). Since stx genes are present in the genome of lysogenic bacteriophages, here we evaluated the relevance of bacteriophages during STEC infection. We used the non-pathogenic E. coli C600 strain carrying a lysogenic 933W mutant bacteriophage in which the stx operon was replaced by a gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Tracking GFP expression using an In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS), we detected fluorescence in liver, kidney, and intestine of mice infected with the recombinant E. coli strain after treatment with ciprofloxacin, which induces the lytic replication and release of bacteriophages. In addition, we showed that chitosan, a linear polysaccharide composed of d-glucosamine residues and with a number of commercial and biomedical uses, had strong anti-bacteriophage effects, as demonstrated at in vitro and in vivo conditions. These findings bring promising perspectives for the prevention and treatment of haemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) cases.

  4. The biology of the gonococcus.

    PubMed

    Morse, S A

    1978-01-01

    Gonorrhea has been known since antiquity. Today, this disease is the most commonly reported infectious disease in the U.S. The natural environment of the etiological agent, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is man. In this host, the organism usually parasitizes mucosal surfaces populated by columnar epithelial cells. Under certain conditions, the gonococcus may disseminate or spread to adjacent organs. The gonococcus is well adapted to its environment and is a successful parasite. Until recently, gonococci were uniformly sensitive to penicilin. However, a plasmid encoding beta-lactamase has been identified in some isolates. Most strains exhibit specific requirements for various amino acids, vitamins, purines, and pyrimidines. Only glucose, pyruvate, and lactate are utilized as sources of energy. Glucose is dissimilated by a combination of the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. A tricarboxylic acid cycle is also present and active under certain conditions. Structurally, the cell envelope of the gonococcus resembles that of a typical Gram-negative bacterium. Gonococci are highly autolytic, especially in older cultures or after depletion of the energy source. Autolysis is not due solely to peptidoglycan hydrolysis, but appears to involve a destabilization of the outer membrane as well. Cell surface components such as pili, lipopolysaccharide, outer membrane proteins, and a capsule are associated with the virulence and pathogenicity of this organism.

  5. Analysis of Two Complementary Single-Gene Deletion Mutant Libraries of Salmonella Typhimurium in Intraperitoneal Infection of BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia A.; Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C.; Desai, Prerak; Valenzuela, Camila; Porwollik, Steffen; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A.; McClelland, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Two pools of individual single gene deletion (SGD) mutants of S. Typhimurium 14028s encompassing deletions of 3,923 annotated non-essential ORFs and sRNAs were screened by intraperitoneal (IP) injection in BALB/c mice followed by recovery from spleen and liver 2 days post infection. The relative abundance of each mutant was measured by microarray hybridization. The two mutant libraries differed in the orientation of the antibiotic resistance cassettes (either sense-oriented KanR, SGD-K, or antisense-oriented CamR, SGD-C). Consistent systemic colonization defects were observed in both libraries and both organs for hundreds of mutants of genes previously reported to be important after IP injection in this animal model, and for about 100 new candidate genes required for systemic colonization. Four mutants with a range of apparent fitness defects were confirmed using competitive infections with the wild-type parental strain: ΔSTM0286, ΔSTM0551, ΔSTM2363, and ΔSTM3356. Two mutants, ΔSTM0286 and ΔSTM2363, were then complemented in trans with a plasmid encoding an intact copy of the corresponding wild-type gene, and regained the ability to fully colonize BALB/c mice systemically. These results suggest the presence of many more undiscovered Salmonella genes with phenotypes in IP infection of BALB/c mice, and validate the libraries for application to other systems. PMID:26779130

  6. Comparative Analysis of Chromosome-Encoded Microcins

    PubMed Central

    Poey, María Eloisa; Azpiroz, María F.; Laviña, Magela

    2006-01-01

    Microcins are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics that are produced by enterobacterial strains. Although the first studies concentrated on plasmid-encoded activities, in the last years three chromosome-encoded microcins have been described: H47, E492, and M. Here, a new microcin, I47, is presented as a fourth member of this group. Common features exhibited by chromosome-encoded microcins were searched for. The comparison of the genetic clusters responsible for microcin production revealed a preserved general scheme. The clusters essentially comprise a pair of activity-immunity genes which determine antibiotic specificity and a set of microcin maturation and secretion genes which are invariably present and whose protein products are highly homologous among the different producing strains. A strict functional relationship between the maturation and secretion pathways of microcins H47, I47, and E492 was demonstrated through genetic analyses, which included heterologous complementation assays. The peptide precursors of these microcins share a maturation process which implies the addition of a catecholate siderophore of the salmochelin type. Microcins thus acquire the ability to enter gram-negative cells through the catechol receptors. In addition, they employ a common mode of secretion to reach the external milieu by means of a type I export apparatus. The results presented herein lead us to propose that chromosome-encoded microcins constitute a defined subgroup of peptide antibiotics which are strictly related by their modes of synthesis, secretion, and uptake. PMID:16569859

  7. Conditional-suicide containment system for bacteria which mineralize aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras, A.; Ramos, J.L. ); Molin, S. )

    1991-05-01

    A model conditional-suicide system to control genetically engineered microorganisms able to degrade substituted benzoates is reported. The system is based on two elements. One element consists of a fusion between the promoter of the Pseudomonas putide TOL plasmid-encoded meta-cleavage pathway operon (P{sub m}) and the lacI gene encoding Lac repressor plus sylS, coding for the positive regulator of P{sub m}. The other element carries a fusion between the P{sub tac} promoter and the gef gene, which encodes a killing function. In the absence of effectors, expression of the P{sub tac}::gef cassette is no longer prevented and a high rate of cell killing is observed. The substitution of XylS for XylSthr45, a mutant regulator with altered effector specificity and increased affinity for benzoates, allows the control of populations able to degrade a wider range of benzoates at micromolar substrate concentrations. Given the wide effector specificity of the key regulators, the wild-type and mutant ZylS proteins, the system should allow the control of populations able to metabolize benzoate; methyl-, dimethyl-, chloro-, dichloro-, ethyl-, and methoxybenzoates; salicylate; and methyl- and chlorosalicylates. A small population of genetically engineered microorganisms became Gef resistant; however, the mechanism of such survival remains unknown.

  8. Facile Construction of Random Gene Mutagenesis Library for Directed Evolution Without the Use of Restriction Enzyme in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Eung; Huang, Rui; Chen, Hui; You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-09-01

    A foolproof protocol was developed for the construction of mutant DNA library for directed protein evolution. First, a library of linear mutant gene was generated by error-prone PCR or molecular shuffling, and a linear vector backbone was prepared by high-fidelity PCR. Second, the amplified insert and vector fragments were assembled by overlap-extension PCR with a pair of 5'-phosphorylated primers. Third, full-length linear plasmids with phosphorylated 5'-ends were self-ligated with T4 ligase, yielding circular plasmids encoding mutant variants suitable for high-efficiency transformation. Self-made competent Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) showed a transformation efficiency of 2.4 × 10(5) cfu/µg of the self-ligated circular plasmid. Using this method, three mutants of mCherry fluorescent protein were found to alter their colors and fluorescent intensities under visible and UV lights, respectively. Also, one mutant of 6-phosphorogluconate dehydrogenase from a thermophilic bacterium Moorella thermoacetica was found to show the 3.5-fold improved catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) on NAD(+) as compared to the wild-type. This protocol is DNA-sequence independent, and does not require restriction enzymes, special E. coli host, or labor-intensive optimization. In addition, this protocol can be used for subcloning the relatively long DNA sequences into any position of plasmids.

  9. Aldosterone does not modify gene expression in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Verhovez, A; Williams, T A; Morello, F; Monticone, S; Brizzi, M F; Dentelli, P; Fallo, F; Fabris, B; Amenta, F; Gomez-Sanchez, C; Veglio, F; Mulatero, P

    2012-03-01

    The toxic effects of aldosterone on the vasculature, and in particular on the endothelial layer, have been proposed as having an important role in the cardiovascular pathology observed in mineralocorticoid-excess states. In order to characterize the genomic molecular mechanisms driving the aldosterone-induced endothelial dysfunction, we performed an expression microarray on transcripts obtained from both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human coronary artery endothelial cells stimulated with 10 - 7 M aldosterone for 18 h. The results were then subjected to qRT-PCR confirmation, also including a group of genes known to be involved in the control of the endothelial function or previously described as regulated by aldosterone. The state of activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor was investigated by means of a luciferase-reporter assay using a plasmid encoding a mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-sensitive promoter. Aldosterone did not determine any significant change in gene expression in either cell type both in the microarray and in the qRT-PCR analysis. The luciferase-reporter assay showed no activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor following aldosterone stimulation. The status of nonfunctionality of the mineralocorticoid receptor expressed in cultured human umbilical and coronary artery endothelial cells does not allow aldosterone to modify gene expression and provides evidence against either a beneficial or harmful genomic effect of aldosterone on healthy endothelial cells.

  10. Ces locus embedded proteins control the non-ribosomal synthesis of the cereulide toxin in emetic Bacillus cereus on multiple levels

    PubMed Central

    Lücking, Genia; Frenzel, Elrike; Rütschle, Andrea; Marxen, Sandra; Stark, Timo D.; Hofmann, Thomas; Scherer, Siegfried; Ehling-Schulz, Monika

    2015-01-01

    The emetic toxin cereulide produced by Bacillus cereus is synthesized by the modular enzyme complex Ces that is encoded on a pXO1-like megaplasmid. To decipher the role of the genes adjacent to the structural genes cesA/cesB, coding for the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), gene inactivation- and overexpression mutants of the emetic strain F4810/72 were constructed and their impact on cereulide biosynthesis was assessed. The hydrolase CesH turned out to be a part of the complex regulatory network controlling cereulide synthesis on a transcriptional level, while the ABC transporter CesCD was found to be essential for post-translational control of cereulide synthesis. Using a gene inactivation approach, we show that the NRPS activating function of the phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PPtase) embedded in the ces locus was complemented by a chromosomally encoded Sfp-like PPtase, representing an interesting example for the functional interaction between a plasmid encoded NRPS and a chromosomally encoded activation enzyme. In summary, our results highlight the complexity of cereulide biosynthesis and reveal multiple levels of toxin formation control. ces operon internal genes were shown to play a pivotal role by acting at different levels of toxin production, thus complementing the action of the chromosomal key transcriptional regulators AbrB and CodY. PMID:26528255

  11. Ribosomal proteins produced in excess are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min-Kyung; Reitsma, Justin M.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Hess, Sonja; Deshaies, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome assembly is an essential process that consumes prodigious quantities of cellular resources. Ribosomal proteins cannot be overproduced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because the excess proteins are rapidly degraded. However, the responsible quality control (QC) mechanisms remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of multiple proteins of the small and large yeast ribosomal subunits is suppressed. Rpl26 overexpressed from a plasmid can be detected in the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, but it largely fails to assemble into ribosomes and is rapidly degraded. However, if the endogenous RPL26 loci are deleted, plasmid-encoded Rpl26 assembles into ribosomes and localizes to the cytosol. Chemical and genetic perturbation studies indicate that overexpressed ribosomal proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome system and not by autophagy. Inhibition of the proteasome led to accumulation of multiple endogenous ribosomal proteins in insoluble aggregates, consistent with the operation of this QC mechanism in the absence of ribosomal protein overexpression. Our studies reveal that ribosomal proteins that fail to assemble into ribosomes are rapidly distinguished from their assembled counterparts and ubiquitinated and degraded within the nuclear compartment. PMID:27385339

  12. Glycoprotein-Specific Antibodies Produced by DNA Vaccination Protect Guinea Pigs from Lethal Argentine and Venezuelan Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Golden, Joseph W.; Maes, Piet; Kwilas, Steven A.; Ballantyne, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several members of the Arenaviridae can cause acute febrile diseases in humans, often resulting in lethality. The use of convalescent-phase human plasma is an effective treatment in humans infected with arenaviruses, particularly species found in South America. Despite this, little work has focused on developing potent and defined immunotherapeutics against arenaviruses. In the present study, we produced arenavirus neutralizing antibodies by DNA vaccination of rabbits with plasmids encoding the full-length glycoprotein precursors of Junín virus (JUNV), Machupo virus (MACV), and Guanarito virus (GTOV). Geometric mean neutralizing antibody titers, as measured by the 50% plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT50), exceeded 5,000 against homologous viruses. Antisera against each targeted virus exhibited limited cross-species binding and, to a lesser extent, cross-neutralization. Anti-JUNV glycoprotein rabbit antiserum protected Hartley guinea pigs from lethal intraperitoneal infection with JUNV strain Romero when the antiserum was administered 2 days after challenge and provided some protection (∼30%) when administered 4 days after challenge. Treatment starting on day 6 did not protect animals. We further formulated an IgG antibody cocktail by combining anti-JUNV, -MACV, and -GTOV antibodies produced in DNA-vaccinated rabbits. This cocktail protected 100% of guinea pigs against JUNV and GTOV lethal disease. We then expanded on this cocktail approach by simultaneously vaccinating rabbits with a combination of plasmids encoding glycoproteins from JUNV, MACV, GTOV, and Sabia virus (SABV). Sera collected from rabbits vaccinated with the combination vaccine neutralized all four targets. These findings support the concept of using a DNA vaccine approach to generate a potent pan-arenavirus immunotherapeutic. IMPORTANCE Arenaviruses are an important family of emerging viruses. In infected humans, convalescent-phase plasma containing neutralizing antibodies can

  13. Expression of familial Alzheimer disease presenilin 1 gene attenuates vesicle traffic and reduces peptide secretion in cultured astrocytes devoid of pathologic tissue environment.

    PubMed

    Stenovec, Matjaž; Trkov, Saša; Lasič, Eva; Terzieva, Slavica; Kreft, Marko; Rodríguez Arellano, José Julio; Parpura, Vladimir; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Zorec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    In the brain, astrocytes provide metabolic and trophic support to neurones. Failure in executing astroglial homeostatic functions may contribute to the initiation and propagation of diseases, including Alzheimer disease (AD), characterized by a progressive loss of neurones over years. Here, we examined whether astrocytes from a mice model of AD isolated in the presymptomatic phase of the disease exhibit alterations in vesicle traffic, vesicular peptide release and purinergic calcium signaling. In cultured astrocytes isolated from a newborn wild-type (wt) and 3xTg-AD mouse, secretory vesicles and acidic endosomes/lysosomes were labeled by transfection with plasmid encoding atrial natriuretic peptide tagged with mutant green fluorescent protein (ANP.emd) and by LysoTracker, respectively. The intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was monitored with Fluo-2 and visualized by confocal microscopy. In comparison with controls, spontaneous mobility of ANP- and LysoTracker-labeled vesicles was diminished in 3xTg-AD astrocytes; the track length (TL), maximal displacement (MD) and directionality index (DI) were all reduced in peptidergic vesicles and in endosomes/lysosomes (P < 0.001), as was the ATP-evoked attenuation of vesicle mobility. Similar impairment of peptidergic vesicle trafficking was observed in wt rat astrocytes transfected to express mutated presenilin 1 (PS1M146V). The ATP-evoked ANP discharge from single vesicles was less efficient in 3xTg-AD and PS1M146V-expressing astrocytes than in respective wt controls (P < 0.05). Purinergic stimulation evoked biphasic and oscillatory [Ca(2+)]i responses; the latter were less frequent (P < 0.001) in 3xTg-AD astrocytes. Expression of PS1M146V in astrocytes impairs vesicle dynamics and reduces evoked secretion of the signaling molecule ANP; both may contribute to the development of AD.

  14. Structural and Biochemical Evidence That a TEM-1 [beta]-Lactamase N170G Active Site Mutant Acts via Substrate-assisted Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas G.; Shanker, Sreejesh; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Palzkill, Timothy

    2010-03-12

    TEM-1 {beta}-lactamase is the most common plasmid-encoded {beta}-lactamase in Gram-negative bacteria and is a model class A enzyme. The active site of class A {beta}-lactamases share several conserved residues including Ser{sup 70}, Glu{sup 166}, and Asn{sub 170} that coordinate a hydrolytic water involved in deacylation. Unlike Ser{sup 70} and Glu{sup 166}, the functional significance of residue Asn{sup 170} is not well understood even though it forms hydrogen bonds with both Glu{sup 166} and the hydrolytic water. The goal of this study was to examine the importance of Asn{sup 170} for catalysis and substrate specificity of {beta}-lactam antibiotic hydrolysis. The codon for position 170 was randomized to create a library containing all 20 possible amino acids. The random library was introduced into Escherichia coli, and functional clones were selected on agar plates containing ampicillin. DNA sequencing of the functional clones revealed that only asparagine (wild type) and glycine at this position are consistent with wild-type function. The determination of kinetic parameters for several substrates revealed that the N170G mutant is very efficient at hydrolyzing substrates that contain a primary amine in the antibiotic R-group that would be close to the Asn{sup 170} side chain in the acyl-intermediate. In addition, the x-ray structure of the N170G enzyme indicated that the position of an active site water important for deacylation is altered compared with the wild-type enzyme. Taken together, the results suggest the N170G TEM-1 enzyme hydrolyzes ampicillin efficiently because of substrate-assisted catalysis where the primary amine of the ampicillin R-group positions the hydrolytic water and allows for efficient deacylation.

  15. Distribution and expression in vitro and in vivo of DNA vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fengrong; Sun, Xiuqin; Liu, Hongzhan; Wu, Xingan; Zhong, Nan; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Guodong

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocystis disease, caused by the lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV), is a significant worldwide problem in fish industry causing substantial economic losses. In this study, we aimed to develop the DNA vaccine against LCDV, using DNA vaccination technology. We evaluated plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3 kb as a DNA vaccine candidate. The plasmid DNA was transiently expressed after liposome transfection into the eukaryotic COS 7 cell line. The distribution and expression of the DNA vaccine (pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3kb) were also analyzed in tissues of the vaccinated Japanese flounder by PCR, RT-PCR and fluorescent microscopy. Results from PCR analysis indicated that the vaccine-containing plasmids were distributed in injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver, 6 and 25 days after vaccination. The vaccine plasmids disappeared 100 d post-vaccination. Fluorescent microscopy revealed green fluorescence in the injected muscle, the muscle opposite the injection site, the hind intestine, gill, spleen, head, kidney and liver of fish 48 h post-vaccination, green fluorescence did not appear in the control treated tissue. Green fluorescence became weak at 60 days post-vaccination. RT-PCR analysis indicated that the mcp gene was expressed in all tested tissues of vaccinated fish 6-50 days post-vaccination. These results demonstrate that the antigen encoded by the DNA vaccine is distributed and expressed in all of the tissues analyzed in the vaccinated fish. The antigen would therefore potentially initiate a specific immune response. the plasmid DNA was injected into Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) intramuscularly and antibodies against LCDV were evaluated. The results indicate that the plasmid encoded DNA vaccine could induce an immune response to LCDV and would therefore offer immune protection against LCD. Further studies are required for the development and application of this promising DNA vaccine.

  16. Proof of concept study with an HER-2 mimotope anticancer vaccine deduced from a novel AAV-mimotope library platform

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Josef; Manzano-Szalai, Krisztina; Fazekas, Judit; Thell, Kathrin; Bentley-Lukschal, Anna; Stremnitzer, Caroline; Roth-Walter, Franziska; Weghofer, Margit; Ritter, Mirko; Pino Tossi, Kerstin; Hörer, Markus; Michaelis, Uwe; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Anticancer vaccines could represent a valuable complementary strategy to established therapies, especially in settings of early stage and minimal residual disease. HER-2 is an important target for immunotherapy and addressed by the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. We have previously generated HER-2 mimotope peptides from phage display libraries. The synthesized peptides were coupled to carriers and applied for epitope-specific induction of trastuzumab-like IgG. For simplification and to avoid methodological limitations of synthesis and coupling chemistry, we herewith present a novel and optimized approach by using adeno-associated viruses (AAV) as effective and high-density mimotope-display system, which can be directly used for vaccination. Methods: An AAV capsid display library was constructed by genetically incorporating random peptides in a plasmid encoding the wild-type AAV2 capsid protein. AAV clones, expressing peptides specifically reactive to trastuzumab, were employed to immunize BALB/c mice. Antibody titers against human HER-2 were determined, and the isotype composition and functional properties of these were tested. Finally, prophylactically immunized mice were challenged with human HER-2 transfected mouse D2F2/E2 cells. Results: HER-2 mimotope AAV-vaccines induced antibodies specific to human HER-2. Two clones were selected for immunization of mice, which were subsequently grafted D2F2/E2 cells. Both mimotope AAV clones delayed the growth of tumors significantly, as compared to controls. Conclusion: In this study, a novel mimotope AAV-based platform was created allowing the isolation of mimotopes, which can be directly used as anticancer vaccines. The example of trastuzumab AAV-mimotopes demonstrates that this vaccine strategy could help to establish active immunotherapy for breast-cancer patients. PMID:27622022

  17. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  18. Stability and toxicity of empty or gene-loaded lipopolysaccharide-amine nanopolymersomes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinmei; Chen, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Zhang, Xinchun; Huang, Hongzhang; Teng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Successful in vivo gene delivery mediated by nonviral vectors requires efficient extracellular and intracellular gene delivery, but few studies have given attention to the former. That is why numerous gene delivery systems have succeeded in vitro, while the expected clinical success has not come about. To realize efficient extracellular gene delivery, the stability of vectors and/or their complexes with genes in body fluids is first required, which prevents loaded genes from premature unloading and degradation. Furthermore, the storage stability of vectors under common conditions is important for their widespread applications. Lipopolysaccharide-amine nanopolymersomes (NPs), a gene vector developed by our group recently, have higher than 95% in vitro transfection efficiency in mesenchymal stem cells when delivering pEGFP, and induce significant angiogenesis in zebrafish when delivering plasmid encoding vascular endothelial growth factor deoxyribonucleic acid (pVEGF). To reveal their extracellular delivery ability and storage stability, in this study their stability in various simulant physiological environments and storage conditions was systematically studied by monitoring their changes in disassembly, size, zeta potential, and transfection efficiency. Additionally, damage to the mitochondria of mesenchymal stem cells was evaluated. Results show that NPs and plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (pDNA)-loaded NPs (pNPs) have acceptable stability against dilution, anions, salts, pH, enzyme, and serum, presumably assuring their efficient extracellular delivery in vivo. Moreover, both the lyophilized NPs at room temperature and NP/pNP solution at 4°C have high storage stability, and pNPs show low damage to the mitochondria. The acceptable stability of NPs combined with compatibility and efficient gene transfection highlight their huge potential in the clinic as a gene delivery vector. PMID:25609964

  19. Restoration of Haemoglobin Level Using Hydrodynamic Gene Therapy with Erythropoietin Does Not Alleviate the Disease Progression in an Anaemic Mouse Model for TGFβ1-Induced Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lea; Wogensen, Lise; Marcussen, Niels; Cecchi, Claudia R; Dalsgaard, Trine; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin, Epo, is a 30.4 kDa glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the fetal liver and the adult kidney. Epo exerts its haematopoietic effects by stimulating the proliferation and differentiation of erythrocytes with subsequent improved tissue oxygenation. Epo receptors are furthermore expressed in non-haematopoietic tissue and today, Epo is recognised as a cytokine with many pleiotropic effects. We hypothesize that hydrodynamic gene therapy with Epo can restore haemoglobin levels in anaemic transgenic mice and that this will attenuate the extracellular matrix accumulation in the kidneys. The experiment is conducted by hydrodynamic gene transfer of a plasmid encoding murine Epo in a transgenic mouse model that overexpresses TGF-β1 locally in the kidneys. This model develops anaemia due to chronic kidney disease characterised by thickening of the glomerular basement membrane, deposition of mesangial matrix and mild interstitial fibrosis. A group of age matched wildtype littermates are treated accordingly. After a single hydrodynamic administration of plasmid DNA containing murine EPO gene, sustained high haemoglobin levels are observed in both transgenic and wildtype mice from 7.5 ± 0.6 mmol/L to 9.4 ± 1.2 mmol/L and 10.7 ± 0.3 mmol/L to 15.5 ± 0.5 mmol/L, respectively. We did not observe any effects in the thickness of glomerular or tubular basement membrane, on the expression of different collagen types in the kidneys or in kidney function after prolonged treatment with Epo. Thus, Epo treatment in this model of chronic kidney disease normalises haemoglobin levels but has no effect on kidney fibrosis or function.

  20. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  1. Recent Findings Regarding Maintenance of Enzootic Variants of Yersinia pestis in Sylvatic Reservoirs and Their Significance in the Evolution of Epidemic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Brubaker, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the widespread presence of bubonic plague in sylvatic reservoirs throughout the world, the causative agent (Yersinia pestis) evolved in its present form within the last 20,000 years from enteropathogenic Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Comparison of the genomes from the two species revealed that Y. pestis possesses only a few unique plasmid-encoded genes that contribute to acute disease, whereas this organism has lost about 13% of the chromosomal genes that remain active in Y. pseudotuberculosis. These losses reflect readily detectable additions, deletions, transpositions, inversions, and acquisition of about 70 insertion sequence (IS) inserts, none of which are likely to promote increased virulence. In contrast, major enzymes of intermediary metabolism, including glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (Zwf ) and aspartase, are present but not catalytically functional due to the presence of missense mutations. The latter are generally not detectable by the technology of bioinformatics and, in the case of Y. pestis, result in radical changes in the metabolic flow of carbon. As an important consequence, plague bacilli exhibit a stringent low-calcium response characterized by conversion of L-glutamate (and metabolically related amino acids) to L-aspartate with secretion of the latter into supernatant fluid at 37°C in culture media containing Na+ but lacking added Ca2+. This phenomenon also occurs in vivo and likely adversely affects the bioenergetics of host amino acid pools. Curiously, aspartase is functional in all tested enzootic (pestoides) strains of Y. pestis. These isolates are typically restricted to the ancient plague reservoirs of Central Asia and Africa and are fully virulent in members of the rodent Superfamily Muroidea but avirulent in guinea pigs and man. The implications of these findings for the distribution and ecology of Y. pestis could be significant. PMID:20158336

  2. Characterization of Putative Virulence Genes on the Related RepFIB Plasmids Harbored by Cronobacter spp. ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Franco, A. A.; Hu, L.; Grim, C. J.; Gopinath, G.; Sathyamoorthy, V.; Jarvis, K. G.; Lee, C.; Sadowski, J.; Kim, J.; Kothary, M. H.; McCardell, B. A.; Tall, B. D.

    2011-01-01

    Cronobacter spp. are emerging neonatal pathogens that cause meningitis, sepsis, and necrotizing enterocolitis. The genus Chronobacter consists of six species: C. sakazakii, C. malonaticus, C. muytjensii, C. turicensis, C. dublinensis, and Cronobacter genomospecies group 1. Whole-genome sequencing of C. sakazakii BAA-894 and C. turicensis z3032 revealed that they harbor similarly sized plasmids identified as pESA3 (131 kb) and pCTU1 (138 kb), respectively. In silico analysis showed that both plasmids encode a single RepFIB-like origin of replication gene, repA, as well as two iron acquisition systems (eitCBAD and iucABCD/iutA). In a chrome azurol S agar diffusion assay, it was demonstrated that siderophore activity was associated with the presence of pESA3 or pCTU1. Additionally, pESA3 contains a cpa (Cronobacter plasminogen activator) gene and a 17-kb type 6 secretion system (T6SS) locus, while pCTU1 contains a 27-kb region encoding a filamentous hemagglutinin gene (fhaB), its specifc transporter gene (fhaC), and associated putative adhesins (FHA locus), suggesting that these are virulence plasmids. In a repA-targeted PCR assay, 97% of 229 Cronobacter species isolates were found to possess a homologous RepFIB plasmid. All repA PCR-positive strains were also positive for the eitCBAD and iucABCD/iutA iron acquisition systems. However, the presence of cpa, T6SS, and FHA loci depended on species, demonstrating a strong correlation with the presence of virulence traits, plasmid type, and species. These results support the hypothesis that these plasmids have evolved from a single archetypical plasmid backbone through the cointegration, or deletion, of specific virulence traits in each species. PMID:21421789

  3. The ltp gene of temperate Streptococcus thermophilus phage TP-J34 confers superinfection exclusion to Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactococcus lactis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Xingmin . E-mail: Xingmin_Sun@brown.edu; Goehler, Andre; Heller, Knut J. . E-mail: knut.heller@bfel.de; Neve, Horst

    2006-06-20

    The ltp gene, located within the lysogeny module of temperate Streptococcus thermophilus phage TP-J34, has been shown to be expressed in lysogenic strain S. thermophilus J34. It codes for a lipoprotein, as demonstrated by inhibition of cleavage of the signal sequence by globomycin. Exposure of Ltp on the surface of Lactococcus lactis protoplasts bearing a plasmid-encoded copy of ltp has been demonstrated by immunogold labeling and electron microscopy. Expression of ltp in prophage- and plasmid-cured S. thermophilus J34-6f interfered with TP-J34 infection. While plating efficiency was reduced by a factor of about 40 and lysis of strain J34-6f in liquid medium was delayed considerably, phage adsorption was not affected at all. Intracellular accumulation of phage DNA was shown to be inhibited by Ltp. This indicates interference of Ltp with infection at the stage of triggering DNA release and injection into the cell, indicating a role of Ltp in superinfection exclusion. Expression of ltp in L. lactis Bu2-60 showed that the same superinfection exclusion mechanism was strongly effective against phage P008, a member of the lactococcal 936 phage species: no plaque-formation was detectable with even 10{sup 9} phage per ml applied, and lysis in liquid medium did not occur. In Lactococcus also, Ltp apparently inhibited phage DNA release and/or injection. Ltp appears to be a member of a family of small, secreted proteins with a 42 amino acids repeat structure encoded by genes of Gram-positive bacteria. Some of these homologous genes are part of the genomes of prophages.

  4. Impact of the administration of a third-generation cephalosporin (3GC) to one-day-old chicks on the persistence of 3GC-resistant Escherichia coli in intestinal flora: An in vivo experiment.

    PubMed

    Baron, Sandrine; Jouy, Eric; Touzain, Fabrice; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Larvor, Emeline; de Boisseson, Claire; Amelot, Michel; Keita, Alassane; Kempf, Isabelle

    2016-03-15

    The aim of the experiment was to evaluate under controlled conditions the impact on the excretion of 3GC-resistant Escherichia coli of the injection of one-day-old chicks with ceftiofur, a third-generation cephalosporin (3GC). Three isolators containing specific-pathogen-free chicks were used. In the first one, 20 birds were injected with ceftiofur then ten of them were orally inoculated with a weak inoculum of a 3GC-resistant E. coli field isolate containing an IncI1/ST3 plasmid encoding a blaCTX-M-1 beta-lactamase. The other chicks were kept as contact birds. None of the 20 birds in the second isolator were injected with ceftiofur, but ten of them were similarly inoculated with the 3GC-resistant strain and the others kept as contact birds. A third isolator contained ten non-injected, non-inoculated chicks. Fecal samples were collected regularly over one month and the E. coli isolated on non-supplemented media were characterized by antimicrobial agar dilution, detection of selected resistance genes and determination of phylogenetic group by PCR. The titers of 3GC-resistant E. coli in individual fecal samples were evaluated by culturing on 3GC-supplemented media. Results showed that the inoculated strain rapidly and abundantly colonized the inoculated and contact birds. The ceftiofur injection resulted in significantly higher percentages of 3GC-resistant E. coli isolates among the analyzed E. coli. No transfer of the 3GC-encoding plasmid to other isolates could be evidenced. In conclusion, these results highlight the dramatic capacity of 3GC-resistant E. coli to colonize and persist in chicks, and the selecting pressure imposed by the off-label use of ceftiofur.

  5. Polyester synthesis genes associated with stress resistance are involved in an insect-bacterium symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Won, Yeo Jin; Nikoh, Naruo; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Han, Sang Heum; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo; Rhee, Young Ha; Park, Ha Young; Kwon, Jeong Yun; Kurokawa, Kenji; Dohmae, Naoshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Lee, Bok Luel

    2013-06-25

    Many bacteria accumulate granules of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) within their cells, which confer resistance to nutritional depletion and other environmental stresses. Here, we report an unexpected involvement of the bacterial endocellular storage polymer, PHA, in an insect-bacterium symbiotic association. The bean bug Riptortus pedestris harbors a beneficial and specific gut symbiont of the β-proteobacterial genus Burkholderia, which is orally acquired by host nymphs from the environment every generation and easily cultivable and genetically manipulatable. Biochemical and cytological comparisons between symbiotic and cultured Burkholderia detected more PHA granules consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and associated phasin (PhaP) protein in the symbiotic Burkholderia. Among major PHA synthesis genes, phaB and phaC were disrupted by homologous recombination together with the phaP gene, whereby ΔphaB, ΔphaC, and ΔphaP mutants were generated. Both in culture and in symbiosis, accumulation of PHA granules was strongly suppressed in ΔphaB and ΔphaC, but only moderately in ΔphaP. In symbiosis, the host insects infected with ΔphaB and ΔphaC exhibited significantly lower symbiont densities and smaller body sizes. These deficient phenotypes associated with ΔphaB and ΔphaC were restored by complementation of the mutants with plasmids encoding a functional phaB/phaC gene. Retention analysis of the plasmids revealed positive selection acting on the functional phaB/phaC in symbiosis. These results indicate that the PHA synthesis genes of the Burkholderia symbiont are required for normal symbiotic association with the Riptortus host. In vitro culturing analyses confirmed vulnerability of the PHA gene mutants to environmental stresses, suggesting that PHA may play a role in resisting stress under symbiotic conditions.

  6. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Overproduction of Reactive Oxygen Species Impairs Postischemic Neovascularization in Mice with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimian, Téni G; Heymes, Christophe; You, Dong; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Mees, Barend; Waeckel, Ludovic; Duriez, Micheline; Vilar, José; Brandes, Ralph P.; Levy, Bernard I.; Shah, Ajay M.; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that diabetes-induced oxidative stress may affect postischemic neovascularization. The response to unilateral femoral artery ligation was studied in wild-type or gp91phox-deficient control or type 1 diabetic mice or in animals treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or with in vivo electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding dominant-negative Rac1 (50 μg) for 21 days. Postischemic neovascularization was reduced in diabetic mice in association with down-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A protein levels. In diabetic animals vascular endothelial growth factor levels and postischemic neovascularization were restored to nondiabetic levels by the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAC administration or the inhibition of ROS generation by gp91phox deficiency or by administration of dominant-negative Rac1. Finally, diabetes reduced the ability of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to differentiate into endothelial progenitor cells. Treatment with NAC (3 mmol/L), apocynin (200 μmol/L), or the p38MAPK inhibitor LY333351 (10 μmol/L) up-regulated the number of endothelial progenitor cell colonies derived from diabetic BM-MNCs by 1.5-, 1.6-, and 1.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.05). In the ischemic hindlimb model, injection of diabetic BM-MNCs isolated from NAC-treated or gp91phox-deficient diabetic mice increased neovascularization by ∼1.5-fold greater than untreated diabetic BM-MNCs (P < 0.05). Thus, inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS overproduction improves the angiogenic and vasculogenic processes and restores postischemic neovascularization in type 1 diabetic mice. PMID:16877369

  7. NADPH oxidase-derived overproduction of reactive oxygen species impairs postischemic neovascularization in mice with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Téni G; Heymes, Christophe; You, Dong; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Mees, Barend; Waeckel, Ludovic; Duriez, Micheline; Vilar, José; Brandes, Ralph P; Levy, Bernard I; Shah, Ajay M; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-08-01

    We hypothesized that diabetes-induced oxidative stress may affect postischemic neovascularization. The response to unilateral femoral artery ligation was studied in wild-type or gp91(phox)-deficient control or type 1 diabetic mice or in animals treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or with in vivo electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding dominant-negative Rac1 (50 microg) for 21 days. Postischemic neovascularization was reduced in diabetic mice in association with down-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A protein levels. In diabetic animals vascular endothelial growth factor levels and postischemic neovascularization were restored to nondiabetic levels by the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAC administration or the inhibition of ROS generation by gp91(phox) deficiency or by administration of dominant-negative Rac1. Finally, diabetes reduced the ability of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to differentiate into endothelial progenitor cells. Treatment with NAC (3 mmol/L), apocynin (200 micromol/L), or the p38MAPK inhibitor LY333351 (10 micromol/L) up-regulated the number of endothelial progenitor cell colonies derived from diabetic BM-MNCs by 1.5-, 1.6-, and 1.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.05). In the ischemic hindlimb model, injection of diabetic BM-MNCs isolated from NAC-treated or gp91(phox)-de