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Sample records for plasmodium-infected red blood

  1. Rodent Plasmodium-infected red blood cells: imaging their fates and interactions within their hosts.

    PubMed

    Claser, Carla; Malleret, Benoit; Peng, Kaitian; Bakocevic, Nadja; Gun, Sin Yee; Russell, Bruce; Ng, Lai Guan; Rénia, Laurent

    2014-02-01

    Malaria, a disease caused by the Plasmodium parasite, remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases known to mankind. The parasite has a complex life cycle, of which only the erythrocytic stage is responsible for the diverse pathologies induced during infection. To date, the disease mechanisms that underlie these pathologies are still poorly understood. In the case of infections caused by Plasmodium falciparum, the species responsible for most malaria related deaths, pathogenesis is thought to be due to the sequestration of infected red blood cells (IRBCs) in deep tissues. Other human and rodent malaria parasite species are also known to exhibit sequestration. Here, we review the different techniques that allow researchers to study how rodent malaria parasites modify their host cells, the distribution of IRBCs in vivo as well as the interactions between IRBCs and host tissues. PMID:23892178

  2. Immunoliposome-mediated drug delivery to Plasmodium-infected and non-infected red blood cells as a dual therapeutic/prophylactic antimalarial strategy.

    PubMed

    Moles, Ernest; Urbán, Patricia; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera-Morilla, Sara; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Busquets, Maria Antònia; Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier

    2015-07-28

    One of the most important factors behind resistance evolution in malaria is the failure to deliver sufficiently high amounts of drugs to early stages of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells (pRBCs). Despite having been considered for decades as a promising approach, the delivery of antimalarials encapsulated in immunoliposomes targeted to pRBCs has not progressed towards clinical applications, whereas in vitro assays rarely reach drug efficacy improvements above 10-fold. Here we show that encapsulation efficiencies reaching >96% are achieved for the weak basic drugs chloroquine (CQ) and primaquine using the pH gradient loading method in liposomes containing neutral saturated phospholipids. Targeting antibodies are best conjugated through their primary amino groups, adjusting chemical crosslinker concentration to retain significant antigen recognition. Antigens from non-parasitized RBCs have also been considered as targets for the delivery to the cell of drugs not affecting the erythrocytic metabolism. Using this strategy, we have achieved unprecedented complete nanocarrier targeting to early intraerythrocytic stages of the malaria parasite for which there is a lack of specific extracellular molecular tags. Immunoliposomes studded with monoclonal antibodies raised against the erythrocyte surface protein glycophorin A were capable of targeting 100% RBCs and pRBCs at the low concentration of 0.5μM total lipid in the culture, with >95% of added liposomes retained on cell surfaces. When exposed for only 15min to Plasmodium falciparum in vitro cultures of early stages, free CQ had no significant effect on the viability of the parasite up to 200nM, whereas immunoliposomal 50nM CQ completely arrested its growth. In vivo assays in mice showed that immunoliposomes cleared the pathogen below detectable levels at a CQ dose of 0.5mg/kg, whereas free CQ administered at 1.75mg/kg was, at most, 40-fold less efficient. Our data suggest that this significant improvement is in part

  3. Red blood cell production

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells are an important element of blood. Their job is to transport oxygen to the body’s tissues in exchange for carbon dioxide, which is carried to and eliminated by the lungs. Red blood cells are formed in the red bone marrow of bones. Stem cells in the red bone marrow called hemocytoblasts ...

  4. A Nature-Inspired Betalainic Probe for Live-Cell Imaging of Plasmodium-Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Tonelli, Renata Rosito; Bagnaresi, Piero; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    A model betalainic dye was semisynthesized from betanin, the magenta pigment of the red beet, and was effective for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. This water-soluble fluorescent probe is photostable, excitable in the visible region and cell membrane-permeable, and its photophysical properties are not notably pH-sensitive. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria in humans, showed that only the parasite was stained. Z-stacking analysis suggested that the probe accumulates proximal to the nucleus of the parasite. Indicaxanthin, one of the natural fluorescent betalains found in the petals of certain flowers, did not stain the parasite or the red blood cell. PMID:23342028

  5. A nature-inspired betalainic probe for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Tonelli, Renata Rosito; Bagnaresi, Piero; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    A model betalainic dye was semisynthesized from betanin, the magenta pigment of the red beet, and was effective for live-cell imaging of Plasmodium-infected red blood cells. This water-soluble fluorescent probe is photostable, excitable in the visible region and cell membrane-permeable, and its photophysical properties are not notably pH-sensitive. Fluorescence imaging microscopy of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum, a causative agent of malaria in humans, showed that only the parasite was stained. Z-stacking analysis suggested that the probe accumulates proximal to the nucleus of the parasite. Indicaxanthin, one of the natural fluorescent betalains found in the petals of certain flowers, did not stain the parasite or the red blood cell. PMID:23342028

  6. Red blood cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    2013-06-01

    The foundation of laboratory hematologic diagnosis is the complete blood count and review of the peripheral smear. In patients with anemia, the peripheral smear permits interpretation of diagnostically significant red blood cell (RBC) findings. These include assessment of RBC shape, size, color, inclusions, and arrangement. Abnormalities of RBC shape and other RBC features can provide key information in establishing a differential diagnosis. In patients with microcytic anemia, RBC morphology can increase or decrease the diagnostic likelihood of thalassemia. In normocytic anemias, morphology can assist in differentiating among blood loss, marrow failure, and hemolysis-and in hemolysis, RBC findings can suggest specific etiologies. In macrocytic anemias, RBC morphology can help guide the diagnostic considerations to either megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic causes. Like all laboratory tests, RBC morphologies must be interpreted with caution, particularly in infants and children. When used properly, RBC morphology can be a key tool for laboratory hematology professionals to recommend appropriate clinical and laboratory follow-up and to select the best tests for definitive diagnosis. PMID:23480230

  7. Red blood cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Ford, J

    2013-06-01

    The foundation of laboratory hematologic diagnosis is the complete blood count and review of the peripheral smear. In patients with anemia, the peripheral smear permits interpretation of diagnostically significant red blood cell (RBC) findings. These include assessment of RBC shape, size, color, inclusions, and arrangement. Abnormalities of RBC shape and other RBC features can provide key information in establishing a differential diagnosis. In patients with microcytic anemia, RBC morphology can increase or decrease the diagnostic likelihood of thalassemia. In normocytic anemias, morphology can assist in differentiating among blood loss, marrow failure, and hemolysis-and in hemolysis, RBC findings can suggest specific etiologies. In macrocytic anemias, RBC morphology can help guide the diagnostic considerations to either megaloblastic or nonmegaloblastic causes. Like all laboratory tests, RBC morphologies must be interpreted with caution, particularly in infants and children. When used properly, RBC morphology can be a key tool for laboratory hematology professionals to recommend appropriate clinical and laboratory follow-up and to select the best tests for definitive diagnosis.

  8. Red blood cells, spherocytosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Spherocytosis is a hereditary disorder of the red blood cells (RBCs), which may be associated with a mild anemia. Typically, the affected RBCs are small, spherically shaped, and lack the light centers seen ...

  9. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  10. Red blood cells, multiple sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Sickle cell anemia is an inherited disorder in which abnormal hemoglobin (the red pigment inside red blood cells) is produced. The abnormal hemoglobin causes red blood cells to assume a sickle shape, like the ones seen in this photomicrograph.

  11. Red blood cells, sickle cell (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inherited blood disease in which the red blood cells produce abnormal pigment (hemoglobin). The abnormal hemoglobin causes deformity of the red blood cells into crescent or sickle-shapes, as ...

  12. No evidence for ape Plasmodium infections in humans in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Délicat-Loembet, Lucresse; Rougeron, Virginie; Ollomo, Benjamin; Arnathau, Céline; Roche, Benjamin; Elguero, Eric; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okougha, Alain-Prince; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Boundenga, Larson; Houzé, Sandrine; Galan, Maxime; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M; Durand, Patrick; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2015-01-01

    African great apes are naturally infected by a multitude of Plasmodium species most of them recently discovered, among which several are closely related to human malaria agents. However, it is still unknown whether these animals can serve as source of infections for humans living in their vicinity. To evaluate this possibility, we analysed the nature of Plasmodium infections from a bank of 4281 human blood samples collected in 210 villages of Gabon, Central Africa. Among them, 2255 were detected positive to Plasmodium using molecular methods (Plasmodium Cytochrome b amplification). A high throughput sequencing technology (454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, Roche) was then used to identify the Plasmodium species present within each positive sample. Overall, we identified with confidence only three species infecting humans in Gabon: P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale. None of the species known to infect non-human primates in Central Africa was found. Our study shows that ape Plasmodium parasites of the subgenus Laverania do not constitute a frequent source of infection for humans. It also suggests that some strong host genetic barriers must exist to prevent the cross species transmission of ape Plasmodium in a context of ever increasing contacts between humans and wildlife.

  13. No Evidence for Ape Plasmodium Infections in Humans in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Ollomo, Benjamin; Arnathau, Céline; Roche, Benjamin; Elguero, Eric; Moukodoum, Nancy Diamella; Okougha, Alain-Prince; Mve Ondo, Bertrand; Boundenga, Larson; Houzé, Sandrine; Galan, Maxime; Nkoghé, Dieudonné; Leroy, Eric M.; Durand, Patrick; Paupy, Christophe; Renaud, François; Prugnolle, Franck

    2015-01-01

    African great apes are naturally infected by a multitude of Plasmodium species most of them recently discovered, among which several are closely related to human malaria agents. However, it is still unknown whether these animals can serve as source of infections for humans living in their vicinity. To evaluate this possibility, we analysed the nature of Plasmodium infections from a bank of 4281 human blood samples collected in 210 villages of Gabon, Central Africa. Among them, 2255 were detected positive to Plasmodium using molecular methods (Plasmodium Cytochrome b amplification). A high throughput sequencing technology (454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, Roche) was then used to identify the Plasmodium species present within each positive sample. Overall, we identified with confidence only three species infecting humans in Gabon: P. falciparum, P. malariae and P. ovale. None of the species known to infect non-human primates in Central Africa was found. Our study shows that ape Plasmodium parasites of the subgenus Laverania do not constitute a frequent source of infection for humans. It also suggests that some strong host genetic barriers must exist to prevent the cross species transmission of ape Plasmodium in a context of ever increasing contacts between humans and wildlife. PMID:26039338

  14. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  15. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  16. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  17. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  18. 21 CFR 640.10 - Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Red Blood Cells. 640.10 Section 640.10 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Red Blood Cells § 640.10 Red Blood Cells. The proper name of this product shall be Red Blood Cells. The product is defined as red blood cells...

  19. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells If you’re ... and sluggish, you might have a condition called anemia. Anemia is a common blood disorder that many ...

  20. Red blood cell decreases of microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1985-01-01

    Postflight decreases in red blood cell mass (RBCM) have regularly been recorded after exposure to microgravity. These 5-25 percent decreases do not relate to the mission duration, workload, caloric intake or to the type of spacecraft used. The decrease is accompanied by normal red cell survivals, increased ferritin levels, normal radioactive iron studies, and increases in mean red blood cell volume. Comparable decreases in red blood cell mass are not found after bed rest, a commonly used simulation of the microgravity state. Inhibited bone marrow erythropoiesis has not been proven to date, although reticulocyte numbers in the peripheral circulation are decreased about 50 percent. To date, the cause of the microgravity induced decreases in RBCM is unknown. Increased splenic trapping of circulating red blood cells seem the most logical way to explain the results obtained.

  1. Red blood cells, sickle cells (image)

    MedlinePlus

    These crescent or sickle-shaped red blood cells (RBCs) are present with Sickle cell anemia, and stand out clearly against the normal round RBCs. These abnormally shaped cells may become entangled and ...

  2. [Current aspects in red blood cell substitutes].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfeng; Pan, Jilun; Yu, Yaoting

    2004-06-01

    Red blood cell substitutes are a group of oxygen carriers designed to temporarily replace transfused blood. Current developing products include perfluorocarbon-based and hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier. Each product is unique in its limitations and advantages. A number of products are in advanced clinical trials and nearing market. When they are available for use it is likely that development will accelerate and even better products will substantially alleviate the world-wide shortage of blood for transfusion.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide production by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Giulivi, C; Hochstein, P; Davies, K J

    1994-01-01

    Red blood cells are frequently employed in studies of oxidative stress. Technical difficulties have previously prevented the measurement of H2O2 production by red blood cells, except during exposure to certain drugs or toxicants. We now show that a combination of glutathione depletion and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (aminotriazole) treatment can be used to measure the endogenous generation of H2O2 by red blood cells. In our studies, aminotriazole was used as an H2O2 dependent (irreversible) catalase inhibitor, and catalase inhibition was used as an indirect measure of H2O2 production. Our results indicate that H2O2 is generated at a rate of 1.36 +/- 0.2 microM/h (3.9 +/- 0.6 nmol.h-1.g Hb-1), and that the steady-state red blood cell concentration of H2O2 is approximately 2 x 10(-10) M. Kinetic comparisons of H2O2 production and oxyhemoglobin autooxidation (which generates O2.- that dismutases to H2O2) indicate that the latter is probably the main source of H2O2 in red blood cells.

  4. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  5. Anesthetics and red blood cell rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydogan, Burcu; Aydogan, Sami

    2014-05-01

    There are many conditions where it is useful for anesthetists to have a knowledge of blood rheology. Blood rheology plays an important role in numerous clinical situations. Hemorheologic changes may significantly affect the induction and recovery times with anesthetic agents. But also, hemorheologic factors are directly or indirectly affected by many anesthetic agents or their metabolites. In this review, the blood rheology with special emphasis on its application in anesthesiology, the importance hemorheological parameters in anesthesiology and also the effect of some anesthetic substances on red blood cell rheology were presented.

  6. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  7. Wolbachia increases susceptibility to Plasmodium infection in a natural system

    PubMed Central

    Zélé, F.; Nicot, A.; Berthomieu, A.; Weill, M.; Duron, O.; Rivero, A.

    2014-01-01

    Current views about the impact of Wolbachia on Plasmodium infections are almost entirely based on data regarding artificially transfected mosquitoes. This work has shown that Wolbachia reduces the intensity of Plasmodium infections in mosquitoes, raising the exciting possibility of using Wolbachia to control or limit the spread of malaria. Whether natural Wolbachia infections have the same parasite-inhibiting properties is not yet clear. Wolbachia–mosquito combinations with a long evolutionary history are, however, key for understanding what may happen with Wolbachia-transfected mosquitoes after several generations of coevolution. We investigate this issue using an entirely natural mosquito–Wolbachia–Plasmodium combination. In contrast to most previous studies, which have been centred on the quantification of the midgut stages of Plasmodium, we obtain a measurement of parasitaemia that relates directly to transmission by following infections to the salivary gland stages. We show that Wolbachia increases the susceptibility of Culex pipiens mosquitoes to Plasmodium relictum, significantly increasing the prevalence of salivary gland stage infections. This effect is independent of the density of Wolbachia in the mosquito. These results suggest that naturally Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may, in fact, be better vectors of malaria than Wolbachia-free ones. PMID:24500167

  8. Viscoelastic Transient of Confined Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Gaël; Farutin, Alexander; Misbah, Chaouqi; Bureau, Lionel

    2015-01-01

    The unique ability of a red blood cell to flow through extremely small microcapillaries depends on the viscoelastic properties of its membrane. Here, we study in vitro the response time upon flow startup exhibited by red blood cells confined into microchannels. We show that the characteristic transient time depends on the imposed flow strength, and that such a dependence gives access to both the effective viscosity and the elastic modulus controlling the temporal response of red cells. A simple theoretical analysis of our experimental data, validated by numerical simulations, further allows us to compute an estimate for the two-dimensional membrane viscosity of red blood cells, ηmem2D ∼ 10−7 N⋅s⋅m−1. By comparing our results with those from previous studies, we discuss and clarify the origin of the discrepancies found in the literature regarding the determination of ηmem2D, and reconcile seemingly conflicting conclusions from previous works. PMID:25954871

  9. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  11. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30 Food... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall be Reagent...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  13. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  14. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  16. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  17. 21 CFR 660.30 - Reagent Red Blood Cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Reagent Red Blood Cells. 660.30 Section 660.30...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Reagent Red Blood Cells § 660.30 Reagent Red Blood Cells. (a) Proper name and definition. The proper name of the product shall...

  18. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  19. Alteration of red blood cell aggregation during blood storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun-Jung; Nam, Jeong-Hun; Lee, Byoung-Kwon; Suh, Jang-Soo; Shin, Sehyun

    2011-06-01

    Even though the trade-off between the benefits and risks of blood transfusion has been discussed for the last several decades, it requires further understanding of the rheological changes in stored blood that include the alteration of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. The RBC aggregation of stored blood in its autologous plasma was monitored through the storage period (35 days). The critical shear stress, as a measure of RBC aggregation, was determined by using a microfluidic aggregometer. Blood was processed into a blood bag containing the anticoagulant CPDA1 and stored at 4°C. It was subjected to assays after zero, seven, 14, and 35 days. The critical shear stress for stored blood did not change up to 14 days of storage but exhibited a significant decrease after 35 days of storage. These results were identical to those of the conventional aggregation index (AI). Also, in the alteration of RBC aggregation for blood storage, the effect of the plasma factor was slightly stronger than that of the cellular factor. Through the present study, the critical shear stress as a new measure of RBC aggregation may help to monitor and control the quality of blood storage.

  20. Preventive (myoglobin, transferrin) and scavenging (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase) anti-oxidative properties of raw liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Olaniyan, Mathew Folaranmi; Babatunde, Elizabeth Moyinoluwa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liquid extract of Morinda lucida leaf has been demonstrated to have antiplasmodial activities. Some phytochemicals act as preventive and or scavenging antioxidants. This study aimed to investigate the preventative and scavenging properties of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf using plasma myoglobin, transferrin, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) peroxidase. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight Plasmodium-infected patients aged 29-47 years that have not been treated with any antimalaria medication but have decided to be treated traditionally using M. lucida leaf extract were recruited from 15 traditional homes in ATISBO, Saki-East, and Saki-West local government areas of Oke-Ogun — the Northern part of Oyo State-Nigeria. Identification of Plasmodium in the blood of the test and normal control subjects were carried out by Giemsha thick film technique. Packed cell volume, total bile acids, blood glucose, blood pressure, plasma myoglobin, transferrin, SOD, and GSH peroxidase (GPx) were evaluated in the normal control subjects and in the Plasmodium-infected patients before and after the treatment with raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Results: A significant (P < 0.05) biochemical alterations were observed in the plasma values of transferrin, SOD, and GPx in the Plasmodium-infected patients when compared with the normal control subjects and after treatment with the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf. Conclusion: Our study supports the possible preventative and scavenging antioxidative effect of the raw liquid extract of M. lucida leaf in the traditional treatment of Plasmodium infection. PMID:27003969

  1. Red blood cells in retinal vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Sherwood, Joseph; Chhablani, Jay; Ricchariya, Ashutosh; Kim, Sangho; Jones, Philip H; Balabani, Stavroula; Shima, David

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular circulation plays a vital role in regulating physiological functions, such as vascular resistance, and maintaining organ health. Pathologies such as hypertension, diabetes, or hematologic diseases affect the microcirculation posing a significant risk to human health. The retinal vasculature provides a unique window for non-invasive visualisation of the human circulation in vivo and retinal vascular image analysis has been established to predict the development of both clinical and subclinical cardiovascular, metabolic, renal and retinal disease in epidemiologic studies. Blood viscosity which was otherwise thought to play a negligible role in determining blood flow based on Poiseuille's law up to the 1970s has now been shown to play an equally if not a more important role in controlling microcirculation and quantifying blood flow. Understanding the hemodynamics/rheology of the microcirculation and its changes in diseased states remains a challenging task; this is due to the particulate nature of blood, the mechanical properties of the cells (such as deformability and aggregability) and the complex architecture of the microvasculature. In our review, we have tried to postulate a possible role of red blood cell (RBC) biomechanical properties and laid down future framework for research related to hemorrheological aspects of blood in patients with retinal vascular disorders.

  2. Anemia and transfusion of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cortés Buelvas, Armando

    2013-10-01

    The red cells transfusion is a mainstay in the treatment of anemic patients. These blood transfusions are not without risks. The risk-benefit profile for red cell transfusions to treat anaemia is uncertain, but they may contribute to adverse patient outcomes in some situations. The ability of a patient to tolerate anaemia depends on their clinical condition and the presence of any significant co-morbidity; maintenance of circulating volume is of paramount importance. There is no universal transfusion trigger. Advances in the development and validation of physiological, accessible, practical and reliable markers to guide therapy are expected. To improve patients' outcomes, further study is required to more fully explore the risk of anemia, optimal hemoglobin level, and the risk and efficacy of RBC transfusion. Future clinical investigations with high priority should determine the efficacy of transfusion in those classified as uncertain scenarios. In the absence of data, it is prudent that transfusion is administered with caution in these clinical scenarios.

  3. Mechanosensing Dynamics of Red blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Jiandi

    2015-11-01

    Mechanical stress-induced deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) plays important physiopathological roles in oxygen delivery, blood rheology, transfusion, and malaria. Recent studies demonstrate that, in response to mechanical deformation, RBCs release adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), suggesting the existence of mechanotransductive pathways in RBCs. Most importantly, the released ATP from RBCs regulates vascular tone and impaired release of ATP from RBCs has been linked to diseases such as type II diabetes and cystic fibrosis. To date, however, the mechanisms of mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs remain unclear. Given that RBCs experience shear stresses continuously during the circulation cycle and the released ATP plays a central role in vascular physiopathology, understanding the mechanotransductive release of ATP from RBCs will provide not only fundamental insights to the role of RBCs in vascular homeostasis but also novel therapeutic strategies for red cell dysfunction and vascular disease. This talk describes the main research in my group on integrating microfluidic-based approaches to study the mechanosensing dynamics of RBCs. Specifically, I will introduce a micro?uidic approach that can probe the dynamics of shear-induced ATP release from RBCs with millisecond resolution and provide quantitative understandings of the mechanosensitive ATP release processes in RBCs. Furthermore, I will also describe our recent findings about the roles of the Piezo1 channel, a newly discovered mechanosensitive cation channel in the mechanotransductive ATP release in RBCs. Last, possible functions of RBCs in the regulation of cerebral blood flow will be discussed.

  4. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells.

  5. Thermoelasticity of red blood cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, R; Evans, E A

    1979-01-01

    The elastic properties of the human red blood cell membrane have been measured as functions of temperature. The area compressibility modulus and the elastic shear modulus, which together characterize the surface elastic behavior of the membrane, have been measured over the temperature range of 2-50 degrees C with micropipette aspiration of flaccid and osmotically swollen red cells. In addition, the fractional increase in membrane surface area from 2-50 degrees C has been measured to give a value for the thermal area expansivity. The value of the elastic shear modulus at 25 degrees C was measured to be 6.6 X 10(-3) dyne/cm. The change in the elastic shear modulus with temperature was -6 X 10(-5) dyne/cm degrees C. Fractional forces were shown to be only on the order of 10-15%. The area compressibility modulus at 25 degrees C was measured to be 450 dyne/cm. The change in the area compressibility modulus with temperature was -6 dyne/cm degrees C. The thermal area expansivity for red cell membrane was measured to be 1.2 X 10(-3)/degrees C. With this data and thermoelastic relations the heat of expansion is determined to be 110-200 ergs/cm2; the heat of extension is 2 X 10(-2) ergs/cm2 for unit extension of the red cell membrane. The heat of expansion is of the order anticipated for a lipid bilayer idealized as twice the behavior of a monolayer at an oil-water interface. The observation that the heat of extension is positive demonstrates that the entropy of the material increases with extension, and that the dominant mechanism of elastic energy storage is energetic. Assuming that the red cell membrane shear rigidity is associated with "spectrin," unit extension of the membrane increases the configurational entropy of spectrin by 500 cal/mol. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:262408

  6. Hemoglobin-based red blood cell substitutes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2004-09-01

    Polyhemoglobin is already well into the final stages of clinical trials in humans with one approved for routine clinical use in South Africa. Conjugated hemoglobin is also in ongoing clinical trials. Meanwhile, recombinant Hb has been modified to modulate the effects of nitric oxide. Other systems contain antioxidant enzymes for those clinical applications that may have potential problems related to ischemia-reperfusion injuries. Other developments are based on hemoglobin-lipid vesicles and also the use of nanotechnology and biodegradable copolymers to prepare nanodimension artificial red blood cells containing hemoglobin and complex enzyme systems.

  7. Multiscale simulation of red blood cell aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, P.; Popel, A. S.

    2004-11-01

    In humans and other mammals, aggregation of red blood cells (RBC) is a major determinant to blood viscosity in microcirculation under physiological and pathological conditions. Elevated levels of aggregation are often related to cardiovascular diseases, bacterial infection, diabetes, and obesity. Aggregation is a multiscale phenomenon that is governed by the molecular bond formation between adjacent cells, morphological and rheological properties of the cells, and the motion of the extra-cellular fluid in which the cells circulate. We have developed a simulation technique using front tracking methods for multiple fluids that includes the multiscale characteristics of aggregation. We will report the first-ever direct computer simulation of aggregation of deformable cells in shear flows. We will present results on the effect of shear rate, strength of the cross-bridging bonds, and the cell rheological properties on the rolling motion, deformation and subsequent breakage of an aggregate.

  8. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window.

  9. Red blood cell replacement, or nanobiotherapeutics with enhanced red blood cell functions?

    PubMed

    Chang, Thomas Ming Swi

    2015-06-01

    Why is this important? Under normal circumstances, donor blood is the best replacement for blood. However, there are exceptions: During natural epidemics (e.g., HIV, Ebola, etc.) or man-made epidemics (terrorism, war, etc.), there is a risk of donor blood being contaminated, and donors being disqualified because they have contracted disease. Unlike red blood cells (RBCs), blood substitutes can be sterilized to remove infective agents. Heart attack and stroke are usually caused by obstruction of arterial blood vessels. Unlike RBCs, which are particulate, blood substitutes are in the form of a solution that can perfuse through obstructed vessels with greater ease to reach the heart and brain, as has been demonstrated in animal studies. Severe blood loss from injuries sustained during accidents, disasters, or war may require urgent blood transfusion that cannot wait for transportation to the hospital for blood group testing. Unlike RBCs, blood substitutes do not have specific blood groups, and can be administered on the spot. RBCs have to be stored under refrigeration for up to 42 days, and are thus difficult to transport and store in times of disaster and at the battlefront. Blood substitutes can be stored at room temperature for more than 1 year, compared to the RBC shelf life of 1 day, at room temperature. In cases of very severe hemorrhagic shock, there is usually a safety window of 60 min for blood replacement, beyond which there could be problems related to irreversible shock. Animal studies show that a particular type of blood substitute, with enhanced RBC enzymes, may be able to prolong the duration of the safety window. PMID:26096663

  10. Red blood cell in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Wei; Hew, Yayu; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2013-03-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBC) in blood flow is critical for oxygen transport, and it also influences inflammation (white blood cells), thrombosis (platelets), and circulatory tumor migration. The physical properties of a RBC can be captured by modeling RBC as lipid membrane linked to a cytoskeletal spectrin network that encapsulates cytoplasm rich in hemoglobin, with bi-concave equilibrium shape. Depending on the shear force, RBC elasticity, membrane viscosity, and cytoplasm viscosity, RBC can undergo tumbling, tank-treading, or oscillatory motion. We investigate the dynamic state diagram of RBC in shear and pressure-driven flow using a combined immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method with a multi-scale RBC model that accurately captures the experimentally established RBC force-deformation relation. It is found that the tumbling (TU) to tank-treading (TT) transition occurs as shear rate increases for cytoplasm/outer fluid viscosity ratio smaller than 0.67. The TU frequency is found to be half of the TT frequency, in agreement with experiment observations. Larger viscosity ratios lead to the disappearance of stable TT phase and unstable complex dynamics, including the oscillation of the symmetry axis of the bi-concave shape perpendicular to the flow direction. The dependence on RBC bending rigidity, shear modulus, the order of membrane spectrin network and fluid field in the unstable region will also be discussed.

  11. Natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the state of Rondônia (Brazilian Western Amazon)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Simian malaria is still an open question concerning the species of Plasmodium parasites and species of New World monkeys susceptible to the parasites. In addition, the lingering question as to whether these animals are reservoirs for human malaria might become important especially in a scenario of eradication of the disease. To aid in the answers to these questions, monkeys were surveyed for malaria parasite natural infection in the Amazonian state of Rondônia, Brazil, a state with intense environmental alterations due to human activities, which facilitated sampling of the animals. Methods Parasites were detected and identified in DNA from blood of monkeys, by PCR with primers for the 18S rRNA, CSP and MSP1 genes and sequencing of the amplified fragments. Multiplex PCR primers for the 18S rRNA genes were designed for the parasite species Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium malariae/Plasmodium brasilianum and Plasmodium simium. Results An overall infection rate of 10.9% was observed or 20 out 184 monkey specimens surveyed, mostly by P. brasilianum. However, four specimens of monkeys were found infected with P. falciparum, two of them doubly infected with P. brasilianum and P. falciparum. In addition, a species of monkey of the family Aotidae, Aotus nigriceps, is firstly reported here naturally infected with P. brasilianum. None of the monkeys surveyed was found infected with P. simium/P. vivax. Conclusion The rate of natural Plasmodium infection in monkeys in the Brazilian state of Rondônia is in line with previous surveys of simian malaria in the Amazon region. The fact that a monkey species was found that had not previously been described to harbour malaria parasites indicates that the list of monkey species susceptible to Plasmodium infection is yet to be completed. Furthermore, finding monkeys in the region infected with P. falciparum clearly indicates parasite transfer from humans to the animals. Whether this parasite can be

  12. Single scattering by red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hammer, M; Schweitzer, D; Michel, B; Thamm, E; Kolb, A

    1998-11-01

    A highly diluted suspension of red blood cells (hematocrit 0.01) was illuminated with an Ar or a dye laser in the wavelength range of 458-660 nm. The extinction and the angle-resolved intensity of scattered light were measured and compared with the predictions of Mie theory, the Rayleigh-Gans approximation, and the anomalous diffraction approximation. Furthermore, empirical phase functions were fitted to the measurements. The measurements were in satisfactory agreement with the predictions of Mie theory. However, better agreement was found with the anomalous diffraction model. In the Rayleigh-Gans approximation, only small-angle scattering is described appropriately. The scattering phase function of erythrocytes may be represented by the Gegenbauer kernel phase function. PMID:18301575

  13. Reversibility of red blood cell deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeitz, Maria; Sens, P.

    2012-05-01

    The ability of cells to undergo reversible shape changes is often crucial to their survival. For red blood cells (RBCs), irreversible alteration of the cell shape and flexibility often causes anemia. Here we show theoretically that RBCs may react irreversibly to mechanical perturbations because of tensile stress in their cytoskeleton. The transient polymerization of protein fibers inside the cell seen in sickle cell anemia or a transient external force can trigger the formation of a cytoskeleton-free membrane protrusion of μm dimensions. The complex relaxation kinetics of the cell shape is shown to be responsible for selecting the final state once the perturbation is removed, thereby controlling the reversibility of the deformation. In some case, tubular protrusion are expected to relax via a peculiar “pearling instability.”

  14. Red blood cell volume in preterm neonates

    SciTech Connect

    Quaife, M.A.; Dirksen, J.W.; Paxson, C.L. Jr.; McIntire, R.H. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    In the high-risk neonate, the direct determination of the red cell volume by radionuclide dilution technique appears to be the singularly definitive method of defining treatment efficacy, and is thus a useful evaluation and management tool for the pediatrician. For effective patient management, the red blood cell(RBC) volume of 69 preterm and term neonates was determined. The method utilized, Tc-99m-labeled RBCs, provided a fast and accurate answer with a large reduction in the absorbed radiation dose. In the population studied within a high-risk newborn ICU, the mean RBC volumes between the preterm and term neonates were without significant difference. Grouping and analysis of the RBC volume data with respect to birth weight, gestational ages, and 1- and 5-minute Apgar scores revealed on statistical difference. The mean value found in our population, 32.2 +/- 9.2 ml/kg, however, does differ from those previously reported in which the determinations were made using an indirect estimation from the plasma compartment.

  15. Human red blood cells' physiological water exchange with the plasma.

    PubMed

    Kargol, M; Kargol, A; Przestalski, M; Siedlecki, J; Karpińska, M; Rogowski, M

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, fundamental issues related to the mechanisms of human red blood cells' physiological water exchange with the plasma (for the stationary conditions) have been discussed. It has been demonstrated, on the basis of mechanistic transport equations for membrane transport that red blood cells are capable of exchanging considerable amounts of water with the plasma. Water absorption is osmosis-driven, and its removal occurs according to the hydromechanics principle, i.e. is driven by the turgor pressure of red blood cells. This newly-acquired knowledge of these issues may appear highly useful for clinical diagnosis of blood diseases and blood circulation failures. PMID:16358974

  16. Red blood cell storage duration and trauma.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2015-04-01

    Numerous retrospective clinical studies suggest that transfusion of longer stored red blood cells (RBCs) is associated with an independent risk of poorer outcomes for certain groups of patients, including trauma, intensive care, and cardiac surgery patients. Large multicenter randomized controlled trials are currently underway to address the concern about RBC storage duration. However, none of these randomized controlled trials focus specifically on trauma patients with hemorrhage. Major trauma, particularly due to road accidents, is the leading cause of critical injury in the younger-than-40-year-old age group. Severe bleeding associated with major trauma induces hemodynamic dysregulation that increases the risk of hypoxia, coagulopathy, and potentially multiorgan failure, which can be fatal. In major trauma, a multitude of stress-associated changes occur to the patient's RBCs, including morphological changes that increase cell rigidity and thereby alter blood flow hemodynamics, particularly in the microvascular vessels, and reduce RBC survival. Initial inflammatory responses induce deleterious cellular interactions, including endothelial activation, RBC adhesion, and erythrophagocytosis that are quickly followed by profound immunosuppressive responses. Stored RBCs exhibit similar biophysical characteristics to those of trauma-stressed RBCs. Whether transfusion of RBCs that exhibit storage lesion changes exacerbates the hemodynamic perturbations already active in the trauma patient is not known. This article reviews findings from several recent nonrandomized studies examining RBC storage duration and clinical outcomes in trauma patients. The rationale for further research on RBC storage duration in the trauma setting is provided.

  17. Destruction of newly released red blood cells in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alfrey, C. P.; Udden, M. M.; Huntoon, C. L.; Driscoll, T.

    1996-01-01

    Space flight results in a rapid change in total blood volume, plasma volume, and red blood cell mass because the space to contain blood is decreased. The plasma volume and total blood volume decreases during the first hours in space and remain at a decreased level for the remainder of the flight. During the first several hours following return to earth, plasma volume and total blood volume increase to preflight levels. During the first few days in space recently produced red blood cells disappear from the blood resulting in a decrease in red blood cell mass of 10-15%. Red cells 12 d old or older survive normally and production of new cells continues at near preflight levels. After the first few days in space, the red cell mass is stable at the decreased level. Following return to earth the hemoglobin and red blood cell mass concentrations decrease reflecting the increase in plasma volume. The erythropoietin levels increase responding to "postflight anemia"; red cell production increases, and the red cell mass is restored to preflight levels after several weeks.

  18. Hemobilia detected by Tc-99m labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; Wholey, M.H.; Ismail-Beigi, F.

    1982-01-01

    Tc-99m labeled red blood cells were successfully used to determine the site of hemorrhage in a 67-year-old man with hemobilia. A false hepatic artery aneurysm was confirmed at angiography and ultimately successfully embolized. The relative merits of using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells for detecting sources of upper gastrointestinal bleeding are discussed.

  19. Red blood cells in sports: effects of exercise and training on oxygen supply by red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Mairbäurl, Heimo

    2013-01-01

    During exercise the cardiovascular system has to warrant substrate supply to working muscle. The main function of red blood cells in exercise is the transport of O2 from the lungs to the tissues and the delivery of metabolically produced CO2 to the lungs for expiration. Hemoglobin also contributes to the blood's buffering capacity, and ATP and NO release from red blood cells contributes to vasodilation and improved blood flow to working muscle. These functions require adequate amounts of red blood cells in circulation. Trained athletes, particularly in endurance sports, have a decreased hematocrit, which is sometimes called “sports anemia.” This is not anemia in a clinical sense, because athletes have in fact an increased total mass of red blood cells and hemoglobin in circulation relative to sedentary individuals. The slight decrease in hematocrit by training is brought about by an increased plasma volume (PV). The mechanisms that increase total red blood cell mass by training are not understood fully. Despite stimulated erythropoiesis, exercise can decrease the red blood cell mass by intravascular hemolysis mainly of senescent red blood cells, which is caused by mechanical rupture when red blood cells pass through capillaries in contracting muscles, and by compression of red cells e.g., in foot soles during running or in hand palms in weightlifters. Together, these adjustments cause a decrease in the average age of the population of circulating red blood cells in trained athletes. These younger red cells are characterized by improved oxygen release and deformability, both of which also improve tissue oxygen supply during exercise. PMID:24273518

  20. Osmotic parameters of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; McGann, Locksley E; Acker, Jason P

    2014-06-01

    The transfusion of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood (cord RBCs) is gathering significant interest for the treatment of fetal and neonatal anemia, due to its high content of fetal hemoglobin as well as numerous other potential benefits to fetuses and neonates. However, in order to establish a stable supply of cord RBCs for clinical use, a cryopreservation method must be developed. This, in turn, requires knowledge of the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic parameters of cord RBCs: osmotically inactive fraction (b), hydraulic conductivity (Lp), permeability to cryoprotectant glycerol (Pglycerol), and corresponding Arrhenius activation energies (Ea). For Lp and Pglycerol determination, RBCs were analyzed using a stopped-flow system to monitor osmotically-induced RBC volume changes via intrinsic RBC hemoglobin fluorescence. Lp and Pglycerol were characterized at 4°C, 20°C, and 35°C using Jacobs and Stewart equations with the Ea calculated from the Arrhenius plot. Results indicate that cord RBCs have a larger osmotically inactive fraction compared to adult RBCs. Hydraulic conductivity and osmotic permeability to glycerol of cord RBCs differed compared to those of adult RBCs with the differences dependent on experimental conditions, such as temperature and osmolality. Compared to adult RBCs, cord RBCs had a higher Ea for Lp and a lower Ea for Pglycerol. This information regarding osmotic parameters will be used in future work to develop a protocol for cryopreserving cord RBCs. PMID:24727610

  1. Developmental Plasticity of Red Blood Cell Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Golub, Mari S.; Hogrefe, Casey E.; Malka, Roy; Higgins, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Most human physiologic set points like body temperature are tightly regulated and show little variation between healthy individuals. Red blood cell (RBC) characteristics such as hematocrit (HCT) and mean cell volume (MCV) are stable within individuals but can vary by 20% from one healthy person to the next. The mechanisms for the majority of this inter-individual variation are unknown and do not appear to involve common genetic variation. Here we show that environmental conditions present during development, namely in utero iron availability, can exert long-term influence on a set point related to the RBC life cycle. In a controlled study of rhesus monkeys and a retrospective study of humans, we use a mathematical model of in vivo RBC population dynamics to show that in utero iron deficiency is associated with a lowered threshold for RBC clearance and turnover. This in utero effect is plastic, persisting at least two years after birth and after the cessation of iron deficiency. Our study reports a rare instance of developmental plasticity in the human hematologic systems and also shows how mathematical modeling can be used to identify cellular mechanisms involved in the adaptive control of homeostatic set points. PMID:24415575

  2. Red Blood Cell Count Automation Using Microscopic Hyperspectral Imaging Technology.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingli; Zhou, Mei; Liu, Hongying; Wang, Yiting; Guo, Fangmin

    2015-12-01

    Red blood cell counts have been proven to be one of the most frequently performed blood tests and are valuable for early diagnosis of some diseases. This paper describes an automated red blood cell counting method based on microscopic hyperspectral imaging technology. Unlike the light microscopy-based red blood count methods, a combined spatial and spectral algorithm is proposed to identify red blood cells by integrating active contour models and automated two-dimensional k-means with spectral angle mapper algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm has better performance than spatial based algorithm because the new algorithm can jointly use the spatial and spectral information of blood cells. PMID:26554882

  3. Effects of helicopter transport on red blood cell components

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Taiichi; Oki, Ken-ichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Tamura, Satoru; Naito, Yuki; Homma, Chihiro; Ikeda, Hisami; Sumita, Shinzou

    2012-01-01

    Background There are no reported studies on whether a helicopter flight affects the quality and shelf-life of red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate. Materials and methods Seven days after donation, five aliquots of red blood cells from five donors were packed into an SS-BOX-110 container which can maintain the temperature inside the container between 2 °C and 6 °C with two frozen coolants. The temperature of an included dummy blood bag was monitored. After the box had been transported in a helicopter for 4 hours, the red blood cells were stored again and their quality evaluated at day 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21 and 42 after donation. Red blood cell quality was evaluated by measuring adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, and supernatant potassium, as well as haematocrit, intracellular pH, glucose, supernatant haemoglobin, and haemolysis rate at the various time points. Results During the experiment the recorded temperature remained between 2 and 6 °C. All data from the red blood cells that had undergone helicopter transportation were the same as those from a control group of red blood cell samples 7 (just after the flight), 14, 21, and 42 days after the donation. Only supernatant Hb and haemolysis rate 42 days after the donation were slightly increased in the helicopter-transported group of red blood cell samples. All other parameters at 42 days after donation were the same in the two groups of red blood cells. Discussion These results suggest that red blood cells stored in mannitol-adenine-phosphate are not significantly affected by helicopter transportation. The differences in haemolysis by the end of storage were small and probably not of clinical significance. PMID:22153688

  4. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with [sup 99]Tc

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1992-05-26

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  5. Kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with .sup.9 TC

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1992-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for reduction of technetium.

  6. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Front, D.; Israel, O.; Groshar, D.; Weininger, J.

    1984-07-01

    Red blood cells labeled with 99mTc constitute a suitable intravascular agent for imaging of vascular abnormalities. Hemangiomas are characterized by low perfusion and a high blood pool. This ''perfusion blood-pool mismatch,'' not encountered in other lesions, may help in the specific diagnosis of this tumor. This is particularly so in cavernous hemangiomas of the liver where three-phase 99mTc-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy should precede liver biopsy. Red cell scintigraphy also is useful for establishing the vascular nature of hemangiomas of the head and neck and the skin and for diagnosis of venous occlusion. Heat-damaged red blood cells provide a specific spleen imaging agent. This should be used when patients with suspected splenic pathology have equivocal colloid scintigraphy.

  7. Models for the red blood cell lifespan.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rajiv P; Horowitz, Joseph; Hollot, Christopher V; Germain, Michael J; Widness, John A; Mock, Donald M; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chait, Yossi

    2016-06-01

    The lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) plays an important role in the study and interpretation of various clinical conditions. Yet, confusion about the meanings of fundamental terms related to cell survival and their quantification still exists in the literature. To address these issues, we started from a compartmental model of RBC populations based on an arbitrary full lifespan distribution, carefully defined the residual lifespan, current age, and excess lifespan of the RBC population, and then derived the distributions of these parameters. For a set of residual survival data from biotin-labeled RBCs, we fit models based on Weibull, gamma, and lognormal distributions, using nonlinear mixed effects modeling and parametric bootstrapping. From the estimated Weibull, gamma, and lognormal parameters we computed the respective population mean full lifespans (95 % confidence interval): 115.60 (109.17-121.66), 116.71 (110.81-122.51), and 116.79 (111.23-122.75) days together with the standard deviations of the full lifespans: 24.77 (20.82-28.81), 24.30 (20.53-28.33), and 24.19 (20.43-27.73). We then estimated the 95th percentiles of the lifespan distributions (a surrogate for the maximum lifespan): 153.95 (150.02-158.36), 159.51 (155.09-164.00), and 160.40 (156.00-165.58) days, the mean current ages (or the mean residual lifespans): 60.45 (58.18-62.85), 60.82 (58.77-63.33), and 57.26 (54.33-60.61) days, and the residual half-lives: 57.97 (54.96-60.90), 58.36 (55.45-61.26), and 58.40 (55.62-61.37) days, for the Weibull, gamma, and lognormal models respectively. Corresponding estimates were obtained for the individual subjects. The three models provide equally excellent goodness-of-fit, reliable estimation, and physiologically plausible values of the directly interpretable RBC survival parameters.

  8. Formation of dimethylthioarsenicals in red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Naranmandura, Hua; Suzuki, Kazuo T.

    2008-03-15

    The bladder and skin are the primary targets for arsenic-induced carcinogenicity in mammals. Thioarsenicals dimethylmonothioarsinic (DMMTA{sup V}) and dimethyldithioarsinic (DMDTA{sup V}) acids are common urinary metabolites, the former being much more toxic than non-thiolated dimethylarsinic acid (DMA{sup V}) and comparable to dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}) in epidermoid cells, suggesting that the metabolic production of thioarsenicals may be a risk factor for the development of cancer in these organs. To reveal their production sites (tissues/body fluids), we examined the uptake and transformation of the four dimethylated arsenicals by incubation with rat and human red blood cells (RBCs). Although DMA{sup V} and DMDTA{sup V} were not taken up by either type of RBCs, DMA{sup III} and DMMTA{sup V} were taken up by both (more efficiently by rat ones), though DMMTA{sup V} was taken up slowly, and then the arsenic transformed into DMDTA{sup V} was excreted from both types of animal RBCs. On the other hand, although DMA{sup III} taken up rapidly by rat RBCs was retained in the RBCs, that taken up by human RBCs was immediately transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted into the incubation medium without being retained in the RBCs. In a separate experiment, arsenic remaining in primary rat hepatocytes after incubation with 1.5 {mu}M DMA{sup III} was recovered from the incubation medium in the forms of DMA{sup V} and DMMTA{sup V} in the presence of human RBCs, but not in the presence of rat RBCs (in which the arsenic was bound to hemoglobin). Thus, DMMTA{sup V} was detected in the medium only in the presence of human RBCs and increased with incubation time. It was proposed that arsenic is excreted from hepatocytes into the bloodstream in the form of DMA{sup III} and then taken up by RBCs in humans, where it is transformed into DMMTA{sup V} and then excreted again into the bloodstream.

  9. Control of red blood cell mass during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, H. W.; Alfrey, C. P.; Driscoll, T. B.; Smith, S. M.; Nyquist, L. E.

    1996-01-01

    Data are reviewed from twenty-two astronauts from seven space missions in a study of red blood cell mass. The data show that decreased red cell mass in all astronauts exposed to space for more than nine days, although the actual dynamics of mass changes varies with flight duration. Possible mechanisms for these changes, including alterations in erythropoietin levels, are discussed.

  10. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield.

  11. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    PubMed

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield. PMID:24611298

  12. Misclassification of Plasmodium infections by conventional microscopy and the impact of remedial training on the proficiency of laboratory technicians in species identification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malaria diagnosis is largely dependent on the demonstration of parasites in stained blood films by conventional microscopy. Accurate identification of the infecting Plasmodium species relies on detailed examination of parasite morphological characteristics, such as size, shape, pigment granules, besides the size and shape of the parasitized red blood cells and presence of cell inclusions. This work explores misclassifications of four Plasmodium species by conventional microscopy relative to the proficiency of microscopists and morphological characteristics of the parasites on Giemsa-stained blood films. Case description Ten-day malaria microscopy remedial courses on parasite detection, species identification and parasite counting were conducted for public health and research laboratory personnel. Proficiency in species identification was assessed at the start (pre) and the end (post) of each course using known blood films of Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium malariae, Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium vivax infections with densities ranging from 1,000 to 30,000 parasites/μL. Outcomes were categorized as false negative, positive without speciation, P. falciparum, P. malariae, P. ovale, P. vivax and mixed infections. Discussion and evaluation Reported findings are based on 1,878 P. falciparum, 483 P. malariae, 581 P. ovale and 438 P. vivax cumulative results collated from 2008 to 2010 remedial courses. Pre-training false negative and positive misclassifications without speciation were significantly lower on P. falciparum infections compared to non-falciparum infections (p < 0.0001). Post-training misclassifications decreased significantly compared to pre- training misclassifications which in turn led to significant improvements in the identification of the four species. However, P. falciparum infections were highly misclassified as mixed infections, P. ovale misclassified as P. vivax and P. vivax similarly misclassified as P. ovale (p < 0

  13. Serological distinction of A antigen between red blood cells and saliva in blood grouping of blood and body fluid stains.

    PubMed

    Sagisaka, K; Iwasa, M; Yokoi, T

    1984-02-01

    A antigens of red blood cells and body fluids such as saliva, semen and sweat could be serologically distinguished using rabbit or guinea pig immune anti-A. As for antisera specific for red blood cell A, A+ rabbits were intravenously immunized with A group red blood cells. The resulting antisera were absorbed with O and B red cells and with A. Se saliva. The absorbed anti-A reacted with A red cells (titer 1:32) and was not inhibited with A. Se saliva. Guinea pigs were intramuscularly injected with A. Se saliva. Crude antisera contained agglutinins to human red cells which were abolished by absorption with A red cells. After absorption with O. Se saliva, the antisera were proved to have agglutinin activity with A group saliva using latex coated with A. Se saliva. A antigens from blood or body fluid stains could be distinguished by the elution method with these anti-A sera. PMID:6719447

  14. Computational modeling of red blood cells: A symplectic integration algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiller, Ulf D.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.

    2010-03-01

    Red blood cells can undergo shape transformations that impact the rheological properties of blood. Computational models have to account for the deformability and red blood cells are often modeled as elastically deformable objects. We present a symplectic integration algorithm for deformable objects. The surface is represented by a set of marker points obtained by surface triangulation, along with a set of fiber vectors that describe the orientation of the material plane. The various elastic energies are formulated in terms of these variables and the equations of motion are obtained by exact differentiation of a discretized Hamiltonian. The integration algorithm preserves the Hamiltonian structure and leads to highly accurate energy conservation, hence he method is expected to be more stable than conventional finite element methods. We apply the algorithm to simulate the shape dynamics of red blood cells.

  15. Red blood cell-incompatible allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rowley, S D; Donato, M L; Bhattacharyya, P

    2011-09-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells from red cell-incompatible donors occurs in 30-50% of patients. Immediate and delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions are expected complications of red cell-disparate transplantation and both ABO and other red cell systems such as Kidd and rhesus can be involved. The immunohematological consequences of red cell-incompatible transplantation include delayed red blood cell recovery, pure red cell aplasia and delayed hemolysis from viable lymphocytes carried in the graft ('passenger lymphocytes'). The risks of these reactions, which may be abrupt in onset and fatal, are ameliorated by graft processing and proper blood component support. Red blood cell antigens are expressed on endothelial and epithelial tissues in the body and could serve to increase the risk of GvHD. Mouse models indicate that blood cell antigens may function as minor histocompatibility antigens affecting engraftment. Similar observations have been found in early studies of human transplantation for transfused recipients, although current conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens appear to overcome this affect. No deleterious effects from the use of red cell-incompatible hematopoietic grafts on transplant outcomes, such as granulocyte and platelet engraftments, the incidences of acute or chronic GvHD, relapse risk or OS, have been consistently demonstrated. Most studies, however, include limited number of patients, varying diagnoses and differing treatment regimens, complicating the detection of an effect of ABO-incompatible transplantation. Classification of patients by ABO phenotype ignoring the allelic differences of these antigens also may obscure the effect of red cell-incompatible transplantation on transplant outcomes. PMID:21897398

  16. Red and infrared light distribution in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Magalhães, Ana Carolina; Yoshimura, Elisabeth M.

    2013-02-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) is used in several applications, including the reduction of inflammatory processes. It might be used to prevent the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), which some patients develop after cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery. The objectives of this study were to investigate light distribution inside blood, in order to implement the LLLT during CPB, and, through this study, to determine the best wavelength and the best way to perform the treatment. The blood, diluted to the same conditions of CPB procedure was contained inside a cuvette and an optical fiber was used to collect the scattered light. Two wavelengths were used: 632.8 nm and 820 nm. Light distribution in blood inside CPB tubes was also evaluated. Compared to the 820 nm light, the 632.8 nm light is scattered further away from the laser beam, turning it possible that a bigger volume of blood be treated. The blood should be illuminated through the smallest diameter CPB tube, using at least four distinct points around it, in only one cross section, because the blood is kept passing through the tube all the time and the whole volume will be illuminated.

  17. Cryopreservation of Autologous Blood (Red Blood Cells, Platelets and Plasma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebine, Kunio

    Prevention of post-transfusion hepatitis is still a problem in cardiovascular surgery. We initiated the cryopreservation of autologous blood for the transfusion in elective cardiovascular surgery since 1981. This study includes 152 surgical cases in which autologous frozen, allogeneic frozen, and/or allogeneic non-frozen blood were used. In the 152 surgical cases, there were 69 cases in which autologous blood only (Group I) was used; 12 cases with autologous and allogeneic frozen blood (Group II); 46 cases with autologous and allgeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group III); and 25 cases with allogeneic frozen plus allogeneic non-frozen blood (Group IV). No hepatitis developed in Groups I (0%) and II (0%), but there was positive hepatitis in Groups III (4.3%) and IV (8.0%) . In 357 cases of those who underwent surgery with allogeneic non-frozen whole blood during the same period, the incidence rate of hepatitis was 13.7% (49/357). Patients awaiting elective surgery can store their own blood in the frozen state. Patients who undergo surgery with the cryoautotransfusion will not produce any infections or immunologic reactions as opposed to those who undergo surgery with the allogeneic non-frozen blood.

  18. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of A. gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Gonçalves, Renata L.S.; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that A. gambiae L35 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial State-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when State-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of P. berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  19. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment

    PubMed Central

    Zeidan, Adel; Yelin, Dvir

    2015-01-01

    Measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient’s health. In this work, we have simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns of the cell. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry that imaged the cells in a linear flow without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to confocal images of the cells, this method could be used for measuring cell morphology in three dimensions and for studying their physiology. PMID:26600999

  20. Backward elastic light scattering of malaria infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungjun; Lu, Wei

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the backward light scattering pattern of healthy and malaria (Plasmodium falciparum) parasitized red blood cells. The spectrum could clearly distinguish between predominant ring stage infected blood cells and healthy blood cells. Further, we found that infected samples mixed with different stages of P. falciparum showed different signals, suggesting that even variance in parasite stages could also be detected by the spectrum. These results together with the backward scattering technique suggest the potential of non-invasive diagnosis of malaria through light scattering of blood cells near the surface of human body, such as using eyes or skin surface.

  1. Photoacoustic response of suspended and hemolyzed red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ratan K.; Karmakar, Subhajit; Roy, Madhusudan

    2013-07-01

    The effect of confinement of hemoglobin molecules on photoacoustic (PA) signal is studied experimentally. The PA amplitudes for samples with suspended red blood cells (SRBCs) and hemolyzed red blood cells (HRBCs) were found to be comparable at each hematocrit for 532 nm illumination. The difference between the corresponding amplitudes increased with increasing hematocrit for 1064 nm irradiation. For example, the PA amplitude for the SRBCs was about 260% higher than that of the HRBCs at 40% hematocrit. This observation may help to develop a PA method detecting hemolysis noninvasively.

  2. Method for determining properties of red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Gourley, Paul L.

    2001-01-01

    A method for quantifying the concentration of hemoglobin in a cell, and indicia of anemia, comprises determining the wavelength of the longitudinal mode of a liquid in a laser microcavity; determining the wavelength of the fundamental transverse mode of a red blood cell in the liquid in the laser microcavity; and determining if the cell is anemic from the difference between the wavelength of the longitudinal mode and the fundamental transverse mode. In addition to measuring hemoglobin, the invention includes a method using intracavity laser spectroscopy to measure the change in spectra as a function of time for measuring the influx of water into a red blood cell and the cell's subsequent rupture.

  3. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  4. A natural Anopheles-associated Penicillium chrysogenum enhances mosquito susceptibility to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Angleró-Rodríguez, Yesseinia I.; Blumberg, Benjamin J.; Dong, Yuemei; Sandiford, Simone L.; Pike, Andrew; Clayton, April M.; Dimopoulos, George

    2016-01-01

    Whereas studies have extensively examined the ability of bacteria to influence Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, the tripartite interactions between non-entomopathogenic fungi, mosquitoes, and Plasmodium parasites remain largely uncharacterized. Here we report the isolation of a common mosquito-associated ascomycete fungus, Penicillium chrysogenum, from the midgut of field-caught Anopheles mosquitoes. Although the presence of Pe. chrysogenum in the Anopheles gambiae midgut does not affect mosquito survival, it renders the mosquito significantly more susceptible to Plasmodium infection through a secreted heat-stable factor. We further provide evidence that the mechanism of the fungus-mediated modulation of mosquito susceptibility to Plasmodium involves an upregulation of the insect’s ornithine decarboxylase gene, which sequesters arginine for polyamine biosynthesis. Arginine plays an important role in the mosquito’s anti-Plasmodium defense as a substrate of nitric oxide production, and its availability therefore has a direct impact on the mosquito’s susceptibility to the parasite. While this type of immunomodulatory mechanism has already been demonstrated in other host-pathogen interaction systems, this is the first report of a mosquito-associated fungus that can suppress the mosquito’s innate immune system in a way that would favor Plasmodium infection and possibly malaria transmission. PMID:27678168

  5. Blood vessels and red blood cells preserved in dinosaur bones.

    PubMed

    Pawlicki, R; Nowogrodzka-Zagórska, M

    1998-02-01

    Dinosaur bones, 80 million years old, were studied in the scanning electron microscope, and subjected to X-ray microanalysis. Samples for the investigations were prepared according to specially elaborated, and simultaneously described methods. Analysed were (a) the morphological structure of the blood vessels and (b) the remains of their contents. The walls of the blood vessels were found to be morphologically identical with those in present-day reptiles. Bodies were found at several places inside the vessels which strongly remind one of erythrocytes in modern bones. X-ray microanalysis of places where these bodies were accumulated revealed much higher levels of iron, than at any other regions of the blood-vessel wall. Further analysis of the "dinosaur erythrocyte" iron content could be a starting point for the possible determination of oxygen in the earth's atmosphere, 80 million years ago.

  6. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  7. Hypoxia, hormones, and red blood cell function in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Stefanie; Baumann, Rosemarie

    2003-04-01

    The red blood cell function of avian embryos is regulated by cAMP. Adenosine A(2A) and beta-adrenergic receptor activation during hypoxic conditions cause changes in the hemoglobin oxygen affinity and CO(2) transport. Furthermore, experimental evidence suggests a general involvement of cAMP in terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts.

  8. Morphological changes in neutron irradiated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A C; Wyle, H R

    1985-01-01

    Living human red blood cells (erythrocytes) were irradiated with a beam of thermal neutrons having a thermal neutron flux of 9.4 X 10(9) neutrons/cm2 per sec corresponding to a dose rate of 5 Gray per hour. The neutron beam was obtained from the thermal neutron facility at the MIT Nuclear Reactor and contained some gamma-ray contamination which contributes approximately 8% of the dose effect. Approximately 92% of the dose effect is due to the neutron radiation. Populations of neutron irradiated red blood cells were examined under scanning electron microscopy to observe morphological changes due to the radiation dose. The thermal neutron doses ranged from zero for controls to 75 Gray, and cell populations were examined at various post-irradiation time periods of 10, 48, and 96 h. A four-stage discoid to spheroid shape transformation of the damaged red blood cells was characterized, and the time dependence of each transformation stage was determined for both unirradiated and irradiated cells. The radiation dose caused an initial dose-dependent shift from Stage 1 to Stage 2 with an associated increase in the transformation rate constants. The thermal neutron doses delivered are considered to be in the low dose range for radiation effects on red blood cells, yet the pronounced effects indicate a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for thermal neutrons.

  9. Dependence of technetium-99m red blood cell labeling efficiency on red cell surface charge.

    PubMed

    Seldin, D W; Simchon, S; Jan, K M; Chien, S; Alderson, P O

    1988-10-01

    The mechanisms by which [99mTc]pertechnetate becomes attached to stannous-primed red blood cells are not known in detail. To study the problem further, the effect of red cell surface charge on labeling efficiency was evaluated. Red cell surface charge was reduced by using the enzyme neuraminidase to remove the terminal charge-bearing sialic acid moiety of the membrane glycoprotein. Forty-five blood samples from six volunteers were treated with neuraminidase for varying lengths of time, resulting in the removal of from 11% to 99% of the normal negative surface charge, as determined from electrophoretic mobility measurements. There was excellent linear correlation between labeling efficiency and the remaining red cell surface charge for values down to 20% of normal (r = 0.89). When surface charge was less than 20% of normal, labeling efficiency was constant at 30%. Eleven blood samples from three donors were divided into two groups that were treated with neuraminidase either before or after they were labeled. The labeling efficiency was independent of the order in which the steps were performed. No evidence for shifting of the radiolabel from the cell membrane to hemoglobin was found. The results suggest that clinical conditions associated with a reduction of sialic acid on the erythrocyte membrane may be one cause of decreased red blood cell labeling efficiency, and that increased membrane permeability for reduced technetium species may be responsible for the decrease.

  10. Blood

    MedlinePlus

    ... solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Red blood cells (RBC) deliver oxygen from your lungs to your tissues and organs. White blood cells (WBC) fight infection and are part of your ...

  11. Full dynamics of a red blood cell in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Dupire, Jules; Socol, Marius; Viallat, Annie

    2012-12-18

    At the cellular scale, blood fluidity and mass transport depend on the dynamics of red blood cells in blood flow, specifically on their deformation and orientation. These dynamics are governed by cellular rheological properties, such as internal viscosity and cytoskeleton elasticity. In diseases in which cell rheology is altered genetically or by parasitic invasion or by changes in the microenvironment, blood flow may be severely impaired. The nonlinear interplay between cell rheology and flow may generate complex dynamics, which remain largely unexplored experimentally. Under simple shear flow, only two motions, "tumbling" and "tank-treading," have been described experimentally and relate to cell mechanics. Here, we elucidate the full dynamics of red blood cells in shear flow by coupling two videomicroscopy approaches providing multidirectional pictures of cells, and we analyze the mechanical origin of the observed dynamics. We show that contrary to common belief, when red blood cells flip into the flow, their orientation is determined by the shear rate. We discuss the "rolling" motion, similar to a rolling wheel. This motion, which permits the cells to avoid energetically costly deformations, is a true signature of the cytoskeleton elasticity. We highlight a hysteresis cycle and two transient dynamics driven by the shear rate: an intermittent regime during the "tank-treading-to-flipping" transition and a Frisbee-like "spinning" regime during the "rolling-to-tank-treading" transition. Finally, we reveal that the biconcave red cell shape is highly stable under moderate shear stresses, and we interpret this result in terms of stress-free shape and elastic buckling. PMID:23213229

  12. Red Blood Cell Polymorphism and Susceptibility to Plasmodium vivax

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Peter A.; Ferreira, Marcelo U.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to Plasmodium vivax blood-stage infection has been widely recognised to result from absence of the Duffy (Fy) blood group from the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) in individuals of African descent. Interestingly, recent studies from different malaria-endemic regions have begun to reveal new perspectives on the association between Duffy gene polymorphism and P. vivax malaria. In Papua New Guinea and the Americas, heterozygous carriers of a Duffy-negative allele are less susceptible to P. vivax infection than Duffy-positive homozygotes. In Brazil, studies show that the Fya antigen, compared to Fyb, is associated with lower binding to the P. vivax Duffy-binding protein and reduced susceptibility to vivax malaria. Additionally, it is interesting that numerous studies have now shown that P. vivax can infect RBCs and cause clinical disease in Duffy-negative people. This suggests that the relationship between P. vivax and the Duffy antigen is more complex than customarily described. Evidence of P. vivax Duffy-independent red cell invasion indicates that the parasite must be evolving alternative red cell invasion pathways. In this chapter, we review the evidence for P. vivax Duffy-dependent and Duffy-independent red cell invasion. We also consider the influence of further host gene polymorphism associated with malaria endemicity on susceptibility to vivax malaria. The interaction between the parasite and the RBC has significant potential to influence the effectiveness of P. vivax-specific vaccines and drug treatments. Ultimately, the relationships between red cell polymorphisms and P. vivax blood-stage infection will influence our estimates on the population at risk and efforts to eliminate vivax malaria. PMID:23384621

  13. Red blood cell-derived microparticles: An overview.

    PubMed

    Westerman, Maxwell; Porter, John B

    2016-07-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) is historically the original parent cell of microparticles (MPs). In this overview, we describe the discovery and the early history of red cell-derived microparticles (RMPs) and present an overview of the evolution of RMP. We report the formation, characteristics, effects of RMP and factors which may affect RMP evaluation. The review examines RMP derived from both normal and pathologic RBC. The pathologic RBC studies include sickle cell anemia (SCA), sickle cell trait (STr), thalassemia intermedia (TI), hereditary spherocytosis (HS), hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), hereditary stomatocytosis (HSt) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD). PMID:27282583

  14. Color contrast of red blood cells on solid substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiziev, Adkham A.

    2013-02-01

    In present study we developed the new method of colour visualization of red blood cells without using any chemical staining. The method based on physical phenomena a white light interference on thin transparent films. It is shown that in the case of thin human blood smears colour interference contrast occurs on solid polished substrates. The best contrast shows substrates with maximal refractive index (Mo, W, Si). These materials have been selected as substrate instead of ordinary microscopic slide in reflected light microscopy. It is shown that reflection of incident white light from blood cell surface and boundary cell-substrate generate two coherent lights. The second one (object signal) after passing through red blood cell gathers additional phase and after interference interaction with reference signal (light reflected from outer cell surface) enables cell image in colour. Number of blood smears of healthy persons (control) and patients who were diagnosed with cancer are presented. It is concluded that the offered method may be used as an effective diagnostic tool to detect early stage blood cells lesion by its interference painting in white light. Offered method may be used in research laboratories, hospitals, diagnostic centres, emergency medicine and other as complementary diagnostic tool to present convenient optical and electron microscopy technique.

  15. The functional importance of blood group-active molecules in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anstee, D J

    2011-01-01

    Antigens of 23 of the 30 human blood group systems are defined by the amino acid sequence of red cell membrane proteins. The antigens of DI, RH, RHAG, MNS, GE and CO systems are carried on blood group-active proteins (Band 3, D and CE polypeptides, RhAG, Glycophorins A and B, Glycophorins C and D and Aquaporin 1, respectively) which are expressed at high levels (>200,000 copies/red cell). These major proteins contribute to essential red cell functions either directly as membrane transporters and by providing linkage to the underlying red cell skeleton or by facilitating the membrane assembly of the protein complexes involved in these processes. The proteins expressing antigens of the remaining 17 blood group systems are much less abundant (<20,000 copies/red cell) and their functional importance for the circulating red cell is largely unknown. Human gene knock-outs (null phenotypes) have been described for many of these minor blood group-active proteins, but only absence of Kx glycoprotein has been clearly linked with pathology directly related to the function of circulating red cells. Recent evidence suggesting the normal quality control system for glycoprotein synthesis is altered during the latter stages of red cell production raises the possibility that many of these low abundance blood group-active proteins are vestigial. In sickle cell disease and polycythaemia vera, elevated Lutheran glycoprotein expression may contribute to pathology. Dyserythropoiesis with reduced antigen expression can result from mutations in the erythroid transcription factors GATA-1 and EKLF.

  16. Early skin immunological disturbance after Plasmodium-infected mosquito bites.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Henrique Borges; Caetano, Susana S; Monteiro, Isadora; Gómez-Conde, Iván; Hanson, Kirsten; Penha-Gonçalves, Carlos; Olivieri, David N; Mota, Maria M; Marinho, Cláudio R; D'Imperio Lima, Maria R; Tadokoro, Carlos E

    2012-01-01

    Although the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during malaria infection has been studied extensively, such studies have focused exclusively on the role of Treg during the blood stage of infection; little is known about the detailed mechanisms of Tregs and sporozoite deposition in the dermis by mosquito bites. In this paper we show that sporozoites introduced into the skin by mosquito bites increase the mobility of skin Tregs and dendritic cells (DCs). We also show differences in MHC class II and/or CD86 expression on skin-resident dendritic cell subtypes and macrophages. From the observed decrease of the number of APCs into draining lymph nodes, suppression of CD28 expression in conventional CD4 T cells, and a low homeostatic proliferation of skin-migrated CD4 T found in nude mice indicate that Tregs may play a fundamental role during the initial phase of malaria parasite inoculation into the mammalian host.

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle effects on the red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creangă, D. E.; Culea, M.; Nădejde, C.; Oancea, S.; Curecheriu, L.; Racuciu, M.

    2009-05-01

    In vitro tests on magnetite colloidal nanoparticles effects upon animal red blood cells were carried out. Magnetite cores were stabilized with citric acid in the form of biocompatible magnetic fluid administrated in different dilutions in the whole blood samples. The hemolysis extent was found increased up to 2.75 in horse blood and respectively up to 2.81 in the dog blood. The electronic transitions assigned to the heme group were found shifted with about 500 cm-1 or, respectively, affected by supplementary vibronic structures. The Raman vibrations assigned to oxyhemoglobin were much diminished in intensity probably due to the bonding of OH group from citrate shell to the heme iron ion.

  18. Photosensitized inactivation of infectious agents for sterilization of red blood cell concentrates and whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judy, Millard M.; Matthews, James Lester; Sogandares-Bernal, Franklin M.; Newman, Joseph T.; Chanh, Tran C.; Marengo-Rowe, Alain J.

    1992-06-01

    More than 10 million units of human blood components are transfused annually in the United States. Although donor screening and testing have greatly lowered the risk of transmission of viral and protozoan infectious agents, additional sterilization procedures which also preserve blood component function would be of significant value. Use of visible-light-range photosensitizers for sterilization of red blood cells is currently being aggressively investigated in laboratory-scale optical-mechanical systems. Both the photochemical sterilization process and the optical-mechanical system must operate without introducing significant alteration in the properties of the red cells. With successful demonstration of the efficacy and safety of these sterilization techniques, implementation in the blood bank setting will require scale-up to optical-mechanical systems capable of handling approximately 50,000 units daily in 500 - 1,000 blood banks in the United States.

  19. Characterization of red blood cells (RBCs) using dual Brillouin/Raman micro-spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Bustamante-Lopez, Sandra C.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2016-04-01

    Erythrocytes, or red blood cells, transport oxygen to and carbon dioxide from the body's tissues and organs. Red blood cell mechanical properties are altered in a number of diseases such as sickle cell anaemia and malaria. Additionally, mechanically modified red blood cell ghosts are being considered as a long-term, biocompatible carrier for drug delivery and for blood analyte sensing. Brillouin spectroscopy enables viscoelastic characterization of samples at the microscale. In this report, Brillouin spectroscopy is applied to characterize the mechanical properties of red blood cells and red blood cell ghosts.

  20. My passion and passages with red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F

    2008-01-01

    This article mainly presents, in sequential panels of time, an overview of my professional involvements and laboratory experiences. I became smitten with red blood cells early on, and this passion remains with me to this day. I highlight certain studies, together with those who performed the work, recognizing that it was necessary to limit the details and the topics chosen for discussion. I am uncertain of the interest a personal account has for others, but at least it's here for the record.

  1. Hemoglobin-based red blood cell substitutes and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Yu, Binglan; Bloch, Kenneth D; Zapol, Warren M

    2009-04-01

    Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been studied for decades as red blood cell substitutes. Profound vasoconstrictor effects have limited the clinical utility of HBOCs and are attributable to avid scavenging of nitric oxide (NO). Inhaling NO can charge the body's stores of NO metabolites without producing hypotension and can prevent systemic hypertension induced when HBOCs are subsequently infused. Concurrent breathing of low NO doses can prevent pulmonary vasoconstriction after HBOC infusion without augmenting plasma methemoglobinemia.

  2. Theory of the sphering of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Fung, Y C; Tong, P

    1968-02-01

    A rigorous mathematical solution of the sphering of a red blood cell is obtained under the assumptions that the red cells is a fluid-filled shell and that it can swell into a perfect sphere in an appropriate hypotonic medium. The solution is valid for finite strain of the cell membrane provided that the membrane is isotropic, elastic and incompressible. The most general nonlinear elastic stress-strain law for the membrane in a state of generalized plane stress is used. A necessary condition for a red cell to be able to sphere is that its extensional stiffness follow a specific distribution over the membrane. This distribution is strongly influenced by the surface tension in the cell membrane. A unique relation exists between the extensional stiffness, pressure differential, surface tension, and the ratio of the radius of the sphere to that of the undeformed red cell. The functional dependence of this stiffness distribution on various physical parameters is presented. A critique of some current literature on red cell mechanics is presented. PMID:5639934

  3. Red blood cell damage by shear stress for different blood types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arwatz, Gilad; Bedkowski, Katherine; Smits, Alexander

    2011-11-01

    In surgical practice, blood damage caused by medical devices is often a limiting factor in the duration of an acute procedure or in chronic exposures such as hemodialysis. In order to establish guidelines for designing medical devices, a study was conducted to determine the relationship between shear stress and damage to red blood cells using a concentric Couette device. By measuring the hemolysis level for various shear stresses and exposure times, a non-dimensional relationship between shear stress and blood damage for different blood types was established. Funding provided by Princeton University's Project X.

  4. Quality of red blood cells isolated from umbilical cord blood stored at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Akabutu, John; Acker, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from cord blood contain fetal hemoglobin that is predominant in newborns and, therefore, may be more appropriate for neonatal transfusions than currently transfused adult RBCs. Post-collection, cord blood can be stored at room temperature for several days before it is processed for stem cells isolation, with little known about how these conditions affect currently discarded RBCs. The present study examined the effect of the duration cord blood spent at room temperature and other cord blood characteristics on cord RBC quality. RBCs were tested immediately after their isolation from cord blood using a broad panel of quality assays. No significant decrease in cord RBC quality was observed during the first 65 hours of storage at room temperature. The ratio of cord blood to anticoagulant was associated with RBC quality and needs to be optimized in future. This knowledge will assist in future development of cord RBC transfusion product.

  5. Mobility Enhancement of Red Blood Cells with Biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Daiki; Oikawa, Noriko; Kurita, Rei

    2016-03-01

    Adhesion of red blood cells (RBC) to substrates are one of crucial problems for a blood clot. Here we investigate the mobility of RBC between two glass substrates in saline with polymer systems. We find that RBCs are adhered to the glass substrate with PEG, however the mobility steeply increases with fibrinogen and dextran, which are biopolymers. We also find that the mobility affects an aggregation dynamics of RBCs, which is related with diseases such as influenza, blood clot and so on. The Brownian motion helps to increase probability of contact with each other and to find a more stable condition of the aggregation. Thus the biopolymers play important roles not only for preventing the adhesion but also for the aggregation.

  6. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with Tc-99m

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Babich, J.W.; Straub, R.; Richards, P.

    1988-07-05

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of [sup 99m]Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available for the reduction of technetium. No Drawings

  7. Method and kit for the selective labeling of red blood cells in whole blood with TC-99M

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, Suresh C.; Babich, John W.; Straub, Rita; Richards, Powell

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed herein are a method and kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc labeled red blood cells using whole blood in a closed sterile system containing stannous tin in a form such that it will enter the red blood cells and be available therein for the reduction of technetium.

  8. Utilization and quality of cryopreserved red blood cells in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Henkelman, S; Noorman, F; Badloe, J F; Lagerberg, J W M

    2015-02-01

    Cryopreserved (frozen) red blood cells have been used in transfusion medicine since the Vietnam war. The main method to freeze the red blood cells is by usage of glycerol. Although the usage of cryopreserved red blood cells was promising due to the prolonged storage time and the limited cellular deterioration at subzero temperatures, its usage have been hampered due to the more complex and labour intensive procedure and the limited shelf life of thawed products. Since the FDA approval of a closed (de) glycerolization procedure in 2002, allowing a prolonged postthaw storage of red blood cells up to 21 days at 2-6°C, cryopreserved red blood cells have become a more utilized blood product. Currently, cryopreserved red blood cells are mainly used in military operations and to stock red blood cells with rare phenotypes. Yet, cryopreserved red blood cells could also be useful to replenish temporary blood shortages, to prolong storage time before autologous transfusion and for IgA-deficient patients. This review describes the main methods to cryopreserve red blood cells, explores the quality of this blood product and highlights clinical settings in which cryopreserved red blood cells are or could be utilized. PMID:25471135

  9. Changes in En(a-) human red blood cell membranes during in vivo ageing.

    PubMed

    Shinozuka, T; Miyata, Y; Takei, S; Yoshida, R; Ogamo, A; Nakagawa, Y; Kuroda, N; Yanagida, J

    1996-01-01

    The human red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) were characterized by the lack of MN antigens. The red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) which were found in a Japanese family were tested to clarify the changes in membrane surfaces of the red blood cells during in vivo ageing. The contents of sialic acid, glucose, mannose, galactose, fucose, N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine of the red blood cell membranes obtained from the old red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) were significantly lower than those of the young red blood cell membranes. Neither the young nor the old red blood cells with phenotype En(a-) showed the agglutination with Arachis hypogaea (PNA) which was capable of binding to T agglutinogen. It is presumed that En(a-) red blood cells are not exposed to sialidase in vivo. In comparison with the young En(a-) red blood cell membranes, the number and the distribution density of lectin receptor sites on the old ones for Limulus polyphemus (LPA), Canavalia ensiformis (Con A), Triticum vulgaris (WGA) and Bauhinia purpurea (BPA) were significantly lower. It is thought that En(a-) red blood cell ageing is accompanied by elimination of some sialoglycoconjugates which have affinity for LPA, Con A, WGA and BPA, whereas En(a-) red blood cells lack glycophorin A. PMID:8866734

  10. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis. PMID:27319318

  11. Flow of Red Blood Cells in Stenosed Microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Balogh, Peter; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2016-06-01

    A computational study is presented on the flow of deformable red blood cells in stenosed microvessels. It is observed that the Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect is significantly enhanced due to the presence of a stenosis. The apparent viscosity of blood is observed to increase by several folds when compared to non-stenosed vessels. An asymmetric distribution of the red blood cells, caused by geometric focusing in stenosed vessels, is observed to play a major role in the enhancement. The asymmetry in cell distribution also results in an asymmetry in average velocity and wall shear stress along the length of the stenosis. The discrete motion of the cells causes large time-dependent fluctuations in flow properties. The root-mean-square of flow rate fluctuations could be an order of magnitude higher than that in non-stenosed vessels. Several folds increase in Eulerian velocity fluctuation is also observed in the vicinity of the stenosis. Surprisingly, a transient flow reversal is observed upstream a stenosis but not downstream. The asymmetry and fluctuations in flow quantities and the flow reversal would not occur in absence of the cells. It is concluded that the flow physics and its physiological consequences are significantly different in micro- versus macrovascular stenosis.

  12. Measurement of Retinal Blood Flow Using Fluorescently Labeled Red Blood Cells1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Kornfield, Tess E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Blood flow is a useful indicator of the metabolic state of the retina. However, accurate measurement of retinal blood flow is difficult to achieve in practice. Most existing optical techniques used for measuring blood flow require complex assumptions and calculations. We describe here a simple and direct method for calculating absolute blood flow in vessels of all sizes in the rat retina. The method relies on ultrafast confocal line scans to track the passage of fluorescently labeled red blood cells (fRBCs). The accuracy of the blood flow measurements was verified by (1) comparing blood flow calculated independently using either flux or velocity combined with diameter measurements, (2) measuring total retinal blood flow in arterioles and venules, (3) measuring blood flow at vessel branch points, and (4) measuring changes in blood flow in response to hyperoxic and hypercapnic challenge. Confocal line scans oriented parallel and diagonal to vessels were used to compute fRBC velocity and to examine velocity profiles across the width of vessels. We demonstrate that these methods provide accurate measures of absolute blood flow and velocity in retinal vessels of all sizes. PMID:26082942

  13. Red blood cell phenotype matching for various ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Badjie, Karafa S W; Tauscher, Craig D; van Buskirk, Camille M; Wong, Clare; Jenkins, Sarah M; Smith, Carin Y; Stubbs, James R

    2011-01-01

    Patients requiring chronic transfusion support are at risk of alloimmunization after red blood cell (RBC) transfusion because of a disparity between donor and recipient antigen profiles. This research explored the probability of obtaining an exact extended phenotype match between blood donors randomly selected from our institution and patients randomly selected from particular ethnic groups. Blood samples from 1,000 blood donors tested by molecular method were evaluated for the predicted phenotype distribution of Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS. A random subsample of 800 donor phenotypes was then evaluated for the probability of obtaining an exact match with respect to phenotype with a randomly selected patient from a particular ethnic group. Overall, there was a greater than 80 percent probability of finding an exact donor-recipient match for the K/k alleles in the Kell system. The probability ranged from 3 percent to 38 percent, depending on the ethnicity and disparities in phenotypic profiles, for the Rh, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS systems. A significant donor-recipient phenotype mismatch ratio exists with certain blood group antigens such that, with current routine ABO and D matching practices, recipients of certain ethnic groups are predisposed to alloimmunization. PMID:22356481

  14. Red blood cell phenotype matching for various ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Badjie, Karafa S W; Tauscher, Craig D; van Buskirk, Camille M; Wong, Clare; Jenkins, Sarah M; Smith, Carin Y; Stubbs, James R

    2011-01-01

    Patients requiring chronic transfusion support are at risk of alloimmunization after red blood cell (RBC) transfusion because of a disparity between donor and recipient antigen profiles. This research explored the probability of obtaining an exact extended phenotype match between blood donors randomly selected from our institution and patients randomly selected from particular ethnic groups. Blood samples from 1,000 blood donors tested by molecular method were evaluated for the predicted phenotype distribution of Rh, Kell, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS. A random subsample of 800 donor phenotypes was then evaluated for the probability of obtaining an exact match with respect to phenotype with a randomly selected patient from a particular ethnic group. Overall, there was a greater than 80 percent probability of finding an exact donor-recipient match for the K/k alleles in the Kell system. The probability ranged from 3 percent to 38 percent, depending on the ethnicity and disparities in phenotypic profiles, for the Rh, Kidd, Duffy, and MNS systems. A significant donor-recipient phenotype mismatch ratio exists with certain blood group antigens such that, with current routine ABO and D matching practices, recipients of certain ethnic groups are predisposed to alloimmunization.

  15. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  16. Red Blood Cell Membrane-Cloaked Nanoparticles For Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Cody Westcott

    Herein we describe the development of the Red Blood Cell coated nanoparticle, RBC-NP. Purified natural erythrocyte membrane is used to coat drug-loaded poly(lacticco-glycolic acid) (PLGA). Synthetic PLGA co-polymer is biocompatible and biodegradable and has already received US FDA approval for drug-delivery and diagnostics. This work looks specifically at the retention of immunosuppressive proteins on RBC-NPs, right-sidedness of natural RBC membranes interfacing with synthetic polymer nanoparticles, sustained and retarded drug release of RBC-NPs as well as further surface modification of RBC-NPs for increased targeting of model cancer cell lines.

  17. Measuring skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution by laser ektacytometry

    SciTech Connect

    Nikitin, S Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Lugovtsov, A E; Ustinov, V D

    2014-08-31

    An algorithm is proposed for measuring the parameters of red blood cell deformability distribution based on laser diffractometry of red blood cells in shear flow (ektacytometry). The algorithm is tested on specially prepared samples of rat blood. In these experiments we succeeded in measuring the mean deformability, deformability variance and skewness of red blood cell deformability distribution with errors of 10%, 15% and 35%, respectively. (laser biophotonics)

  18. Non-invasive spectroscopy of transfusable red blood cells stored inside sealed plastic blood-bags.

    PubMed

    Buckley, K; Atkins, C G; Chen, D; Schulze, H G; Devine, D V; Blades, M W; Turner, R F B

    2016-03-01

    After being separated from (donated) whole blood, red blood cells are suspended in specially formulated additive solutions and stored (at 4 °C) in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) blood-bags until they are needed for transfusion. With time, the prepared red cell concentrate (RCC) is known to undergo biochemical changes that lower effectiveness of the transfusion, and thus regulations are in place that limit the storage period to 42 days. At present, RCC is not subjected to analytical testing prior to transfusion. In this study, we use Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy (SORS) to probe, non-invasively, the biochemistry of RCC inside sealed blood-bags. The retrieved spectra compare well with conventional Raman spectra (of sampled aliquots) and are dominated by features associated with hemoglobin. In addition to the analytical demonstration that SORS can be used to retrieve RCC spectra from standard clinical blood-bags without breaking the sterility of the system, the data reveal interesting detail about the oxygenation-state of the stored cells themselves, namely that some blood-bags unexpectedly contain measurable amounts of deoxygenated hemoglobin after weeks of storage. The demonstration that chemical information can be obtained non-invasively using spectroscopy will enable new studies of RCC degeneration, and points the way to a Raman-based instrument for quality-control in a blood-bank or hospital setting.

  19. Evaluation of an additive solution for preservation of canine red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Wardrop, K J; Owen, T J; Meyers, K M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of an additive preservative solution on canine red blood cell posttransfusion viability (PTV) and on selected canine red blood cell biochemical parameters was studied. One unit (450 mL) of blood was collected from 6 clinically normal dogs into the anticoagulant citrate phosphate dextrose, centrifuged, and the plasma removed. The red blood cells were then suspended in 100 mL of a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution and stored at 4 degrees C. Aliquots were removed for study at 1, 10, 20, 30, 37, and 44 days. The 24-hour PTV of autologous red blood cells was determined using a sodium chromate (51Cr) label. Red blood cell concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP), and pH were also determined. Canine red blood cell PTV, pH, ATP, and 2,3-DPG concentrations decreased during storage (P < .05). The PTV decreased from 94% using day 1 red blood cells to 80% and 75% using day 37 and day 44 red blood cells, respectively (P < .05). Although the mean PTV of the day 44 stored units equaled the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) minimum standard for human red blood cells, the PTV was substandard in 75% of the day 44 units. The FDA standard was exceeded in 83% of the day 37 units. It was concluded that 37-day-old canine red blood cells preserved with a saline, adenine, dextrose, and mannitol solution are of acceptable quality for transfusion.

  20. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation

    PubMed Central

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P.; Mañú-Pereira, María del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca2+ handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na+, K+, Ca2+) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca2+ cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca2+-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the patients to

  1. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P; Mañú-Pereira, María Del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca(2+) handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca(2+) cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca(2+)-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  2. Red Cell Properties after Different Modes of Blood Transportation.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Huisjes, Rick; Verhagen, Liesbeth P; Mañú-Pereira, María Del Mar; Llaudet-Planas, Esther; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Wang, Jue; Eichler, Hermann; Bogdanova, Anna; van Wijk, Richard; Vives-Corrons, Joan-Lluís; Kaestner, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Transportation of blood samples is unavoidable for assessment of specific parameters in blood of patients with rare anemias, blood doping testing, or for research purposes. Despite the awareness that shipment may substantially alter multiple parameters, no study of that extent has been performed to assess these changes and optimize shipment conditions to reduce transportation-related artifacts. Here we investigate the changes in multiple parameters in blood of healthy donors over 72 h of simulated shipment conditions. Three different anticoagulants (K3EDTA, Sodium Heparin, and citrate-based CPDA) for two temperatures (4°C and room temperature) were tested to define the optimal transportation conditions. Parameters measured cover common cytology and biochemistry parameters (complete blood count, hematocrit, morphological examination), red blood cell (RBC) volume, ion content and density, membrane properties and stability (hemolysis, osmotic fragility, membrane heat stability, patch-clamp investigations, and formation of micro vesicles), Ca(2+) handling, RBC metabolism, activity of numerous enzymes, and O2 transport capacity. Our findings indicate that individual sets of parameters may require different shipment settings (anticoagulants, temperature). Most of the parameters except for ion (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+)) handling and, possibly, reticulocytes counts, tend to favor transportation at 4°C. Whereas plasma and intraerythrocytic Ca(2+) cannot be accurately measured in the presence of chelators such as citrate and EDTA, the majority of Ca(2+)-dependent parameters are stabilized in CPDA samples. Even in blood samples from healthy donors transported using an optimized shipment protocol, the majority of parameters were stable within 24 h, a condition that may not hold for the samples of patients with rare anemias. This implies for as short as possible shipping using fast courier services to the closest expert laboratory at reach. Mobile laboratories or the travel of the

  3. Automatic analysis of microscopic images of red blood cell aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menichini, Pablo A.; Larese, Mónica G.; Riquelme, Bibiana D.

    2015-06-01

    Red blood cell aggregation is one of the most important factors in blood viscosity at stasis or at very low rates of flow. The basic structure of aggregates is a linear array of cell commonly termed as rouleaux. Enhanced or abnormal aggregation is seen in clinical conditions, such as diabetes and hypertension, producing alterations in the microcirculation, some of which can be analyzed through the characterization of aggregated cells. Frequently, image processing and analysis for the characterization of RBC aggregation were done manually or semi-automatically using interactive tools. We propose a system that processes images of RBC aggregation and automatically obtains the characterization and quantification of the different types of RBC aggregates. Present technique could be interesting to perform the adaptation as a routine used in hemorheological and Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories because this automatic method is rapid, efficient and economical, and at the same time independent of the user performing the analysis (repeatability of the analysis).

  4. SEM analysis of red blood cells in aged human bloodstains.

    PubMed

    Hortolà, P

    1992-08-01

    Mammal red blood cells (RBC) in bloodstains have been previously detected by light microscopy on stone tools from as early as 100,000 +/- 25,000 years ago. In order to evaluate the degree of morphological preservation of erythrocytes in bloodstains, an accidental human blood smear on white chert and several experimental bloodstains on hard substrates (the same stone-white chert; another type of stone-graywacke; a non-stone support-stainless steel), were stored in a room, in non-sterile and fluctuating conditions, for lengths of time ranging from 3 to 18 months. Afterwards, the specimens were coated with gold and examined by a Cambridge Stereoscan 120 scanning electron microscope. Results revealed a high preservation of RBC integrity, with the maintenance of several discocytary shapes, a low tendency to echinocytosis and a frequent appearance of a moon-like erythrocytary shape in the thinner areas of the bloodstains. PMID:1398371

  5. Simultaneous measurement of red blood cell aggregation and whole blood coagulation using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Yeom, Eunseop; Ha, Hojin; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-03-01

    This study aims to investigate the feasibility of using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS) for simultaneous monitoring of blood coagulation and red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. Using a 35-MHz ultrasound scanner, ultrasound speckle data were acquired from whole blood samples of three experimental groups of rats, including 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-treated, noncoagulation and normal control groups. The variations of blood echogenicity, the shape parameters of probability distribution of speckle intensity (skewness and kurtosis) and the correlation coefficient between two consecutive speckle data were calculated as a function of time starting from immediately after taking blood. The blood echogenicity increases rapidly to plateaus at the early stage of measurement for all the experimental groups caused by the formation of RBC aggregates. The DIDS-treated group exhibits the lowest echogenicity level due to the inhibitory effect of DIDS on RBC aggregation. The correlation analysis between consecutive speckle patterns seems to be useful to examine the variation of blood fluidity and the progress of clot formation. Whole blood coagulation is observed to be accelerated by DIDS treatment. In addition, the results of skewness and kurtosis analysis indicated that RBC aggregates may be disrupted during blood coagulation. The present study suggests that HFUS has good potential for simultaneous monitoring of RBC aggregation and blood coagulation to examine the relationship between them.

  6. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.

    1995-01-01

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  7. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  8. Overcoming blood shortages: red blood cell and platelet substitutes and membrane modifications.

    PubMed

    Davey, Richard J

    2004-03-01

    Blood shortages are increasingly common as the donor base declines and extensive restrictions on blood donation disqualify many donors. Red blood cell (RBC) and platelet substitutes have long been anticipated as alternatives to standard transfusions. However, difficulties in manufacturing, efficacy, and safety have slowed the development of these products. New understanding of the relationship between blood viscosity, oxygen transport, and vasoactivity have led to more effective RBC substitutes, several of which are in advanced clinical trials. In addition, creative approaches to RBC membrane modification, such as the enzymatic cleavage of ABH glycoproteins, may lead to a universal RBC. Advances in the understanding of platelet membrane behavior at low temperatures may lead to extended platelet storage at refrigerator temperatures. Standard transfusions of human RBCs and platelets will not be replaced soon. However, these new products will be a useful alternative for selected clinical applications and will lessen our dependence on our marginally adequate blood supply.

  9. Reduction of prion infectivity in packed red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Rodrigo; Buytaert-Hoefen, Kimberley A.; Gonzalez-Romero, Dennisse; Castilla, Joaquin; Hansen, Eric T.; Hlavinka, Dennis; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Soto, Claudio

    2008-12-12

    The link between a new variant form of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) and the consumption of prion contaminated cattle meat as well as recent findings showing that vCJD can be transmitted by blood transfusion have raised public health concerns. Currently, a reliable test to identify prions in blood samples is not available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possibility to remove scrapie prion protein (PrP{sup Sc}) and infectivity from red blood cell (RBC) suspensions by a simple washing procedure using a cell separation and washing device. The extent of prion removal was assessed by Western blot, PMCA and infectivity bioassays. Our results revealed a substantial removal of infectious prions ({>=}3 logs of infectivity) by all techniques used. These data suggest that a significant amount of infectivity present in RBC preparations can be removed by a simple washing procedure. This technology may lead to increased safety of blood products and reduce the risk of further propagation of prion diseases.

  10. Dynamic deformability of sickle red blood cells in microphysiological flow

    PubMed Central

    Alapan, Y.; Matsuyama, Y.; Little, J. A.; Gurkan, U. A.

    2016-01-01

    In sickle cell disease (SCD), hemoglobin molecules polymerize intracellularly and lead to a cascade of events resulting in decreased deformability and increased adhesion of red blood cells (RBCs). Decreased deformability and increased adhesion of sickle RBCs lead to blood vessel occlusion (vaso-occlusion) in SCD patients. Here, we present a microfluidic approach integrated with a cell dimensioning algorithm to analyze dynamic deformability of adhered RBC at the single-cell level in controlled microphysiological flow. We measured and compared dynamic deformability and adhesion of healthy hemoglobin A (HbA) and homozygous sickle hemoglobin (HbS) containing RBCs in blood samples obtained from 24 subjects. We introduce a new parameter to assess deformability of RBCs: the dynamic deformability index (DDI), which is defined as the time-dependent change of the cell’s aspect ratio in response to fluid flow shear stress. Our results show that DDI of HbS-containing RBCs were significantly lower compared to that of HbA-containing RBCs. Moreover, we observed subpopulations of HbS containing RBCs in terms of their dynamic deformability characteristics: deformable and non-deformable RBCs. Then, we tested blood samples from SCD patients and analyzed RBC adhesion and deformability at physiological and above physiological flow shear stresses. We observed significantly greater number of adhered non-deformable sickle RBCs than deformable sickle RBCs at flow shear stresses well above the physiological range, suggesting an interplay between dynamic deformability and increased adhesion of RBCs in vaso-occlusive events. PMID:27437432

  11. Erythropoietin reduces storage lesions and decreases apoptosis indices in blood bank red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Penuela, Oscar Andrés; Palomino, Fernando; Gómez, Lina Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent evidence shows a selective destruction of the youngest circulating red blood cells (neocytolysis) trigged by a drop in erythropoietin levels. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human erythropoietin beta on the red blood cell storage lesion and apoptosis indices under blood bank conditions. Methods Each one of ten red blood cell units preserved in additive solution 5 was divided in two volumes of 100 mL and assigned to one of two groups: erythropoietin (addition of 665 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin) and control (isotonic buffer solution was added). The pharmacokinetic parameters of erythropoietin were estimated and the following parameters were measured weekly, for six weeks: Immunoreactive erythropoietin, hemolysis, percentage of non-discocytes, adenosine triphosphate, glucose, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase, and annexin-V/esterase activity. The t-test or Wilcoxon's test was used for statistical analysis with significance being set for a p-value <0.05. Results Erythropoietin, when added to red blood cell units, has a half-life >6 weeks under blood bank conditions, with persistent supernatant concentrations of erythropoietin during the entire storage period. Adenosine triphosphate was higher in the Erythropoietin Group in Week 6 (4.19 ± 0.05 μmol/L vs. 3.53 ± 0.02 μmol/L; p-value = 0.009). The number of viable cells in the Erythropoietin Group was higher than in the Control Group (77% ± 3.8% vs. 71% ± 2.3%; p-value <0.05), while the number of apoptotic cells was lower (9.4% ± 0.3% vs. 22% ± 0.8%; p-value <0.05). Conclusions Under standard blood bank conditions, an important proportion of red blood cells satisfy the criteria of apoptosis. Recombinant human erythropoietin beta seems to improve storage lesion parameters and mitigate apoptosis. PMID:26969770

  12. Leukocyte transport by red blood cells in a microvessel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    A simulation model is used to study the transport of relatively large, spherical, and stiff white blood cells (leukocytes) by the relatively smaller and highly flexible red cell as they flow in the microcirculation. Their interaction dynamics are thought to be an important component of the inflammation response, in which leukocytes bind to the walls of blood vessels. The red cells are modeled in the simulations as highly deformable three-dimensional shells encasing a Newtonian fluid, and the viscous-flow equation is solved via a boundary integral formulation in which the cell shapes discretized by global spectral basis functions. For slow flow rates, it is found that the leukocyte is predominantly adjacent the vessel walls, whereas for faster flow rates this configuration appears to become unstable and the leukocyte traverses the whole vessel in a seemingly random fashion. For the straight round tubes simulated thus far, the stable leukocyte stand-off distance is always beyond the range of the binding molecules that capture it, which suggests that vessel inhomogeneities or interactions with other white cells are needed to create contact and thereby binding with the vessel walls.

  13. Tension of red blood cell membrane in simple shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omori, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Barthès-Biesel, D.; Salsac, A.-V.; Imai, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2012-11-01

    When a red blood cell (RBC) is subjected to an external flow, it is deformed by the hydrodynamic forces acting on its membrane. The resulting elastic tensions in the membrane play a key role in mechanotransduction and govern its rupture in the case of hemolysis. In this study, we analyze the motion and deformation of an RBC in a simple shear flow and the resulting elastic tensions on the membrane. The large deformation of the red blood cell is modelled by coupling a finite element method to solve the membrane mechanics and a boundary element method to solve the flows of the internal and external liquids. Depending on the capillary number Ca, ratio of the viscous to elastic forces, we observe three kinds of RBC motion: tumbling at low Ca, swinging at larger Ca, and breathing at the transitions. In the swinging regime, the region of the high principal tensions periodically oscillates, whereas that of the high isotropic tensions is almost unchanged. Due to the strain-hardening property of the membrane, the deformation is limited but the membrane tension increases monotonically with the capillary number. We have quantitatively compared our numerical results with former experimental results. It indicates that a membrane isotropic tension O(10-6 N/m) is high enough for molecular release from RBCs and that the typical maximum membrane principal tension for haemolysis would be O(10-4 N/m). These findings are useful to clarify not only the membrane rupture but also the mechanotransduction of RBCs.

  14. Transport of diseased red blood cells in the spleen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2012-11-01

    A major function of the spleen is to remove old and diseased red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties. We investigated this mechanical filtering mechanism by combining experiments and computational modeling, especially for red blood cells in malaria and sickle cell disease (SCD). First, utilizing a transgenic line for 3D confocal live imaging, in vitro capillary assays and 3D finite element modeling, we extracted the mechanical properties of both the RBC membrane and malaria parasites for different asexual malaria stages. Secondly, using a non-invasive laser interferometric technique, we optically measured the dynamic membrane fluctuations of SCD RBCs. By simulating the membrane fluctuation experiment using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) model, we retrieved mechanical properties of SCD RBCs with different shapes. Finally, based on the mechanical properties obtained from these experiments, we simulated the full fluid-structure interaction problem of diseased RBCs passing through endothelial slits in the spleen under different fluid pressure gradients using the DPD model. The effects of the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the cytoskeleton and the parasite on the critical pressure of splenic passage of RBCs were investigated separately. This work is supported by NIH and Singapore-MIT Alliance for Science and Technology (SMART).

  15. Vibrational modes of hemoglobin in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Martel, P; Calmettes, P; Hennion, B

    1991-02-01

    Equine red blood cells were washed in saline heavy water (2H2O) to exchange the hydrogen atoms of the non-hemoglobin components with deuterons. This led to novel neutron scattering measurements of protein vibrations within a cellular system and permitted a comparison with inelastic neutron scattering measurements on purified horse hemoglobin, either dry or wetted with 2H2O. As a function of wavevector transfer Q and the frequency transfer v the neutron response typified by the dynamic structure factor S(Q, v) was found to be similar for extracted and cellular hemoglobin at low and high temperatures. At 77 K, in the cells, a peak in S(Q, v) due to the protein was found near 0.7 THz, approximately half the frequency of a strong peak in the aqueous medium. Measurements at higher temperatures (170 and 230 K) indicated similar small shifts downwards in the peak frequencies of both components. At 260 K the low frequency component became predominantly quasielastic, but a significant inelastic component could still be ascribed to the aqueous scattering. Near 295 K the frequency responses of both components were similar and centered near zero. When scattering due to water is taken into account it appears that the protein neutron response in, or out of, red blood cells is little affected by hydration in the low frequency regime where Van der Waals forces are thought to be effective. PMID:1849028

  16. Depletion of membrane skeleton in red blood cell vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Iglic, A; Svetina, S; Zeks, B

    1995-01-01

    A possible physical interpretation of the partial detachment of the membrane skeleton in the budding region of the cell membrane and consequent depletion of the membrane skeleton in red blood cell vesicles is given. The red blood cell membrane is considered to consist of the bilayer part and the membrane skeleton. The skeleton is, under normal conditions, bound to the bilayer over its whole area. It is shown that, when in such conditions it is in the expanded state, some cell shape changes can induce its partial detachment. The partial detachment of the skeleton from the bilayer is energetically favorable if the consequent decrease of the skeleton expansion energy is larger than the corresponding increase of the bilayer-skeleton binding energy. The effect of shape on the skeleton detachment is analyzed theoretically for a series of the pear class shapes, having decreasing neck diameter and ending with a parent-daughter pair of spheres. The partial detachment of the skeleton is promoted by narrowing of the cell neck, by increasing the lateral tension in the skeleton and its area expansivity modulus, and by diminishing the attraction forces between the skeleton and the bilayer. If the radius of the daughter vesicle is sufficiently small relative to the radius of the parent cell, the daughter vesicle can exist either completely underlaid with the skeleton or completely depleted of the skeleton. PMID:7669905

  17. Red blood cell homeostasis: recognition of distinct types of damaged homologous red blood cells by a mouse macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Singer, J A; Morrison, M; Walker, W S

    1987-06-01

    The mouse macrophage (M phi) cell line IC-21 preferentially ingests a subpopulation of homologous red blood cells (MRBC) from normal mice. This subpopulation presumably bears the so-called transfusion lesion, a consequence of damage acquired during the drawing and processing of blood. To determine if all damaged MRBC were recognized by a common receptor site on IC-21 M phi, we prepared suspensions of MRBC damaged in vitro by treatment with tannic acid and compared the phagocytic uptake of these cells with those bearing the transfusion lesion. Trypsin treatment of IC-21 M phi rendered them unable to recognize MRBC bearing the transfusion lesion; but it had no effect on the uptake of tannic acid-damaged MRBC, showing that IC-21 M phi have separate recognition sites for these two populations of damaged MRBC. PMID:3474332

  18. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  19. Remote ischemia preconditioning increases red blood cell deformability through red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase activation.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Kollikowski, Alexander; Bloch, Wilhelm

    2016-09-12

    Remote ischemia preconditioning (rIPC), short cycles of ischemia (I) and reperfusion (R) of a region remote from the heart, protects against myocardial I/R injury. This effect is triggered by endothelial derived nitric oxide (NO) production. Red blood cells (RBC) are also capable of NO production and it is hypothesized that the beneficial effect of rIPC in terms of cardioprotection is strengthened by increased RBC dependent NO production and improved RBC function after rIPC maneuver. For this purpose, twenty male participants were subjected to four cycles of no-flow ischemia with subsequent reactive hyperemia within the forearm. Blood sampling and measurement of blood pressures and heart rate were carried out pre intervention, after each cycle and 15 min post intervention at both the non-treated and treated arm. These are the first results that show improved RBC deformability in the treated arm after rIPC cycles 1- 4 caused by significantly increased RBC-NO synthase activation. This in turn was associated to increased NO production in both arms after rIPC cycles 3 + 4. Also, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were decreased after rIPC. The findings lead to the conclusion that the cardioprotective effects associated with rIPC include improvement of the RBC-NOS/NO signaling in RBC.

  20. Analysis of Red Blood Cell Behavior in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Haruki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) is a main component of blood accounting for 40 percent in volume, and enclosed by a twodimensional hyper elastic membrane. RBCs strongly influence rheological properties and mass transport of blood. The deformation of RBCs in capillary and at narrowing is also important in considering mechano-transduction of RBCs and hemolysis, though it has not been clarified in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the behavior of a RBC flowing in a narrow tube. To carry out the fluid-structure interaction analysis, we coupled a boundary element method to analyze the velocity of the internal and external fluid with a finite element method to analyze the deformation of the membrane. The boundary element method has good calculation accuracy and its computational cost is low because three-dimensional flow filed can be calculated by a two-dimensional computational mesh. The background flow in a tube is pressure-driven Poiseuille flow. Additionally, to reduce the computational time, we implemented massive parallel computation by using GPUs. The results show that the deformation of a RBC is strongly affected by the Capillary number, which is the ratio of viscous force to the elastic force, radius of the tube, and the initial orientation.

  1. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices.

  2. Research Opportunities to Improve Neonatal Red Blood Cell Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ravi Mangal; Meyer, Erin K; Widness, John A

    2016-10-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a common and lifesaving therapy for anemic neonates and infants, particularly among those born prematurely or undergoing surgery. However, evidence-based indications for when to administer RBCs and adverse effects of RBC transfusion on important outcomes including necrotizing enterocolitis, survival, and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment remain uncertain. In addition, blood-banking practices for preterm and term neonates and infants have been largely developed using studies from older children and adults. Use of and refinements in emerging technologies and advances in biomarker discovery and neonatal-specific RBC transfusion databases may allow clinicians to better define and tailor RBC transfusion needs and practices to individual neonates. Decreasing the need for RBC transfusion and developing neonatal-specific approaches in the preparation of donor RBCs have potential for reducing resource utilization and cost, improving outcomes, and assuring blood safety. Finally, large donor-recipient-linked cohort studies can provide data to better understand the balance of the risks and benefits of RBC transfusion in neonates. These studies may also guide the translation of new research into best practices that can rapidly be integrated into routine care. This review highlights key opportunities in transfusion medicine and neonatology for improving the preparation and transfusion of RBCs into neonates and infants. We focus on timely, currently addressable knowledge gaps that can increase the safety and efficacy of preterm and term neonatal and infant RBC transfusion practices. PMID:27424006

  3. Single-cell measurement of red blood cell oxygen affinity

    PubMed Central

    Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Stokes, Chris; Higgins, John M.; Schonbrun, Ethan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is transported throughout the body by hemoglobin (Hb) in red blood cells (RBCs). Although the oxygen affinity of blood is well-understood and routinely assessed in patients by pulse oximetry, variability at the single-cell level has not been previously measured. In contrast, single-cell measurements of RBC volume and Hb concentration are taken millions of times per day by clinical hematology analyzers, and they are important factors in determining the health of the hematologic system. To better understand the variability and determinants of oxygen affinity on a cellular level, we have developed a system that quantifies the oxygen saturation, cell volume, and Hb concentration for individual RBCs in high throughput. We find that the variability in single-cell saturation peaks at an oxygen partial pressure of 2.9%, which corresponds to the maximum slope of the oxygen–Hb dissociation curve. In addition, single-cell oxygen affinity is positively correlated with Hb concentration but independent of osmolarity, which suggests variation in the Hb to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2–3 DPG) ratio on a cellular level. By quantifying the functional behavior of a cellular population, our system adds a dimension to blood cell analysis and other measurements of single-cell variability. PMID:26216973

  4. Measurement of interaction forces between red blood cells in aggregates by optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Maklygin, A Yu; Priezzhev, A V; Karmenian, A; Nikitin, Sergei Yu; Obolenskii, I S; Lugovtsov, Andrei E; Kisun Li

    2012-06-30

    We have fabricated double-beam optical tweezers and demonstrated the possibility of their use for measuring the interaction forces between red blood cells (erythrocytes). It has been established experimentally that prolonged trapping of red blood cells in a tightly focused laser beam does not cause any visible changes in their shape or size. We have measured the interaction between red blood cells in the aggregate, deformed by optical tweezers.

  5. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  6. Red blood cell extrudes nucleus and mitochondria against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Cheng, Jian; Xu, Fei; Chen, Yang-Er; Du, Jun-Bo; Yuan, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Yuan, Shu

    2011-07-01

    Mammal red blood cells (erythrocytes) contain neither nucleus nor mitochondria. Traditional theory suggests that the presence of a nucleus would prevent big nucleated erythrocytes to squeeze through these small capillaries. However, nucleus is too small to hinder erythrocyte deformation. And, there is no sound reason to abandon mitochondria for the living cells. Here, we found that mammal erythrocyte reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels kept stable under diabetes, ischemia reperfusion, and malaria conditions or in vitro sugar/heme treatments, whereas bird erythrocyte ROS levels increased dramatically in these circumstances. Nuclear and mitochondrial extrusion may help mammal erythrocytes to better adapt to high-sugar and high-heme conditions by limiting ROS generation. PMID:21698761

  7. Red blood cell clustering in Poiseuille microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Lanotte, Luca; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Misbah, Chaouqi; Guido, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) flowing in microcapillaries tend to associate into clusters, i.e., small trains of cells separated from each other by a distance comparable to cell size. This process is usually attributed to slower RBCs acting to create a sequence of trailing cells. Here, based on the first systematic investigation of collective RBC flow behavior in microcapillaries in vitro by high-speed video microscopy and numerical simulations, we show that RBC size polydispersity within the physiological range does not affect cluster stability. Lower applied pressure drops and longer residence times favor larger RBC clusters. A limiting cluster length, depending on the number of cells in a cluster, is found by increasing the applied pressure drop. The insight on the mechanism of RBC clustering provided by this work can be applied to further our understanding of RBC aggregability, which is a key parameter implicated in clotting and thrombus formation.

  8. Plasma and red blood cell fatty acids in peroxisomal disorders.

    PubMed

    Moser, A B; Jones, D S; Raymond, G V; Moser, H W

    1999-02-01

    The demonstration of abnormal levels of fatty acids or plasmalogens in plasma or red blood cells is key to the diagnosis of peroxisomal disorders. We report the levels of 62 fatty acids and plasmalogens in patients with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), Zellweger syndrome (ZS), neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy (NALD), and infantile Refsum disease (IRD), both at baseline and after dietary interventions. "Lorenzo's Oil" therapy in X-ALD normalizes the levels of saturated very long chain fatty acids in plasma, but leads to reduced levels of omega 6 and other omega 3 fatty acids, and requires monitoring and appropriate dietary supplements. Patients with ZS, NALD and IRD have reduced levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) which can be normalized by the oral administration of microencapsulated DHA and AA.

  9. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Red Blood Cell Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Quist, Erin; Koepsell, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare disorder caused by autoreactive red blood cell (RBC) antibodies that destroy RBCs. Although autoimmune hemolytic anemia is rare, RBC autoantibodies are encountered frequently and can complicate transfusion workups, impede RBC alloantibody identification, delay distribution of compatible units, have variable clinical significance that ranges from benign to life-threatening, and may signal an underlying disease or disorder. In this review, we discuss the common presenting features of RBC autoantibodies, laboratory findings, ancillary studies that help the pathologist investigate the clinical significance of autoantibodies, and how to provide appropriate patient care and consultation for clinical colleagues. Pathologists must be mindful of, and knowledgeable about, this entity because it not only allows for direct clinical management but also can afford an opportunity to preemptively treat an otherwise silent malignancy or disorder.

  10. Anisotropic light scattering of individual sickle red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Higgins, John M.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Suresh, Subra; Park, YongKeun

    2012-04-01

    We present the anisotropic light scattering of individual red blood cells (RBCs) from a patient with sickle cell disease (SCD). To measure light scattering spectra along two independent axes of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs with arbitrary orientation, we introduce the anisotropic Fourier transform light scattering (aFTLS) technique and measured both the static and dynamic anisotropic light scattering. We observed strong anisotropy in light scattering patterns of elongated-shaped sickle RBCs along its major axes using static aFTLS. Dynamic aFTLS analysis reveals the significantly altered biophysical properties in individual sickle RBCs. These results provide evidence that effective viscosity and elasticity of sickle RBCs are significantly different from those of the healthy RBCs.

  11. Blood sample stability at room temperature for counting red and white blood cells and platelets.

    PubMed

    Vogelaar, S A; Posthuma, D; Boomsma, D; Kluft, C

    2002-08-01

    Blood handling required for different cellular variables is different. In a practical setting of blood sampling approximately 4 h separated from the first analysis, we compared the analysis of blood cell variables at this 4-h point with analysis of blood stored for approximately 48 h (over the weekend) at room temperature. Blood was collected from 304 apparently healthy individuals aged between 17 and 70 years, with a female/male ratio of 1.8, in K3EDTA. Measurement was performed with a Beckman Coulter Counter Maxm. In addition to the comparison of the data and their correlation on the two time points, we investigated agreement between the data using analysis according to Bland and Altman. Counts of white and red blood cells and platelets were found stable over time and agreement of data was excellent. Platelet mean volume increased as expected between the two time points from 8.8 to 10.3 fl. The white blood cell subpopulations, however, changed over time with a decrease in neutrophils and monocytes and increases in lymphocytes and eosinophils. Apparently, ageing of the sample resulted in the alteration of certain cell characteristics leading to a change in automated cell classification without changing the total number of cells. Among the preanalytical variables recorded, only the time of the year and gender were found to be minor determinants (r < .25) of some of the differences between approximately 4 and approximately 48 h analysis delay. It is concluded that after storage at room temperature over approximately 48 h counts of red, total white cells, platelets and analysis of platelet volume can be combined in one assay session.

  12. Statistical estimation of red blood cell osmotic damage during cryoprotective agent removal from cryopreserved blood.

    PubMed

    Gong, Liangquan; Ding, Weiping; Ma, Yuncong; Sun, Sijie; Zhao, Gang; Gao, Dayong

    2013-10-01

    Statistical estimation of the osmotic damage of red blood cells (RBCs) during the removal of cryoprotective agents (CPAs) from cryopreserved blood has been a very difficult issue. In this paper, the discrete mass transfer model developed in our previous work is modified to study the volume variation of individual RBCs and thereby to estimate the osmotic damage of all RBCs statistically during CPA removal by the dilution-concentration method we proposed recently. The model is validated with respect to the experimental results either with or without RBCs. Then, it is used to investigate the effects of blood volume, hematocrit, blood and diluent flow rates on the osmotic damage of RBCs, as well as the washing time of CPAs. Our results show that both the increase of blood flow rates and the decrease of diluent flow rates can bring about a reduction in osmotic damage of RBCs; however, only the former can cause a decrease in the washing time of CPAs. The blood volume could also affect the osmotic damage of RBCs. For a given flow condition, there could exist an optimal blood volume range for the dilution-concentration system. The effect of blood volume could be alleviated by an increase in the dilution region volume. In addition, the osmotic damage of RBCs decreases as the hematocrit decreases. Therefore, in practice, the increase of blood flow rates is the best solution to reduce both the osmotic damage of RBCs and the washing time of CPAs simultaneously. A lower hematocrit in the cryopreserved blood and/or longer tubing in the dilution region are also recommended to achieve better performance for the dilution-concentration method. PMID:24835261

  13. Viable Bacteria Associated with Red Blood Cells and Plasma in Freshly Drawn Blood Donations

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Christian; Magnussen, Karin; Enevold, Christian; Nilsson, Martin; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Holmstrup, Palle; Nielsen, Claus Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Infection remains a leading cause of post-transfusion mortality and morbidity. Bacterial contamination is, however, detected in less than 0.1% of blood units tested. The aim of the study was to identify viable bacteria in standard blood-pack units, with particular focus on bacteria from the oral cavity, and to determine the distribution of bacteria revealed in plasma and in the red blood cell (RBC)-fraction. Design Cross-sectional study. Blood were separated into plasma and RBC-suspensions, which were incubated anaerobically or aerobically for 7 days on trypticase soy blood agar (TSA) or blue lactose plates. For identification colony PCR was performed using primers targeting 16S rDNA. Setting Blood donors attending Capital Region Blood Bank, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Hvidovre, Denmark, October 29th to December 10th 2013. Participants 60 donors (≥50 years old), self-reported medically healthy. Results Bacterial growth was observed on plates inoculated with plasma or RBCs from 62% of the blood donations. Growth was evident in 21 (35%) of 60 RBC-fractions and in 32 (53%) of 60 plasma-fractions versus 8 of 60 negative controls (p = 0.005 and p = 2.6x10-6, respectively). Propionibacterium acnes was found in 23% of the donations, and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 38%. The majority of bacteria identified in the present study were either facultative anaerobic (59.5%) or anaerobic (27.8%) species, which are not likely to be detected during current routine screening. Conclusions Viable bacteria are present in blood from donors self-reported as medically healthy, indicating that conventional test systems employed by blood banks insufficiently detect bacteria in plasma. Further investigation is needed to determine whether routine testing for anaerobic bacteria and testing of RBC-fractions for adherent bacteria should be recommended. PMID:25751254

  14. Regulation of red blood cell deformability is independent of red blood cell-nitric oxide synthase under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Grau, Marijke; Lauten, Alexander; Hoeppener, Steffen; Goebel, Bjoern; Brenig, Julian; Jung, Christian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Suhr, Frank

    2016-09-12

    The aim was to study impacts of mild to severe hypoxia on human red blood cell (RBC)-nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent NO production, protein S-nitrosylation and deformability.Ambient air oxygen concentration of 12 healthy subjects was step-wisely reduced from 20.95% to 16.21%, 12.35%, 10% and back to 20.95%. Additional in vitro experiments involved purging of blood (±sodium nitrite) with gas mixtures corresponding to in vivo intervention.Vital and hypoxia-associated parameters showed physiological adaptation to changing demands. Activation of RBC-NOS decreased with increasing hypoxia. RBC deformability, which is influenced by RBC-NOS activation, decreased under mild hypoxia, but surprisingly increased at severe hypoxia in vivo and in vitro. This was causatively induced by nitrite reduction to NO which increased S-nitrosylation of RBC α- and β-spectrins -a critical step to improve RBC deformability. The addition of sodium nitrite prevented decreases of RBC deformability under hypoxia by sustaining S-nitrosylation of spectrins suggesting compensatory mechanisms of non-RBC-NOS-produced NO.The results first time indicate a direct link between maintenance of RBC deformability under severe hypoxia by non-enzymatic NO production because RBC-NOS activation is reduced. These data improve our understanding of physiological mechanisms supporting adequate blood and, thus, oxygen supply to different tissues under severe hypoxia.

  15. Mechanical damage of red blood cells by rotary blood pumps: selective destruction of aged red blood cells and subhemolytic trauma.

    PubMed

    Sakota, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Ryuki; Sobajima, Hideo; Yokoyama, Naoyuki; Waguri, Satoshi; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Takatani, Setsuo

    2008-10-01

    In this study, mean cell volume (MCV), mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean cell hemoglobin (MCH) were measured to quantify RBC damage by rotary blood pumps. Six-hour hemolysis tests were conducted with a Bio-pump BPX-80, a Sarns 15200 roller pump, and a prototype mag-lev centrifugal pump (MedTech Heart) using fresh porcine blood circulated at 5 L/min against a 100 mm Hg head pressure. The temperature of the test and noncirculated control blood was maintained at 37 degrees C. The normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) of each pump was determined by measuring the plasma-free hemoglobin level. The MCV was measured with a Coulter counter, and MCHC was derived from total hemoglobin and hematocrit. MCH was derived from MCV and MCHC. A multivariance statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed statistically significant differences (n = 15, P < 0.05) in MCV, MCHC, and MCH between the blood sheared by the rotary blood pumps and the nonsheared control blood. Normalized to the control blood, the Bio-pump BPX-80 showed an MCV of 1.04 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.95 +/- 0.04, and an MCH of 0.98 +/- 0.02; the mag-lev MedTech Heart had an MCV of 1.02 +/- 0.02, an MCHC of 0.97 +/- 0.02, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01; and the roller pump exhibited an MCV of 1.03 +/- 0.03, an MCHC of 0.96 +/- 0.03, and an MCH of 0.99 +/- 0.01. Per 0.01 increase in NIH, the BPX-80 showed a normalized MCV change of +10.1% and a normalized MCHC change of -14.0%; the MedTech Heart demonstrated a +6.9% MCV and -9.5% MCHC change; and the roller pump had a +0.5% MCV and -0.6% MCHC change. Due to shear in the pump circuits, the RBC increased while the MCHC decreased. The likely mechanism is that older RBCs with smaller size and higher hemoglobin concentration were destroyed fast by the shear, leaving younger RBCs with larger size and lower hemoglobin concentration. Subhemolytic trauma caused the intracellular hemoglobin to decrease due to gradual hemoglobin leakage through the micropores formed in the thinned

  16. Fetal anaemia from red blood cell membrane defect and co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring.

    PubMed

    Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Charoenkwan, Pimlak; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee; Tongsong, Theera

    2015-07-27

    The case presented here is an example of hereditary red blood cell membrane defect with a co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring. This case is of an anaemic fetus that presented with isolated ascites at 18 weeks of gestation. Fetal blood analysis revealed abnormal shaped red blood cells. The same pattern of red blood cell morphology was also seen on paternal peripheral blood smear. Intrauterine blood transfusions were given twice to correct fetal anaemia. The fetus showed a good response to the transfusions and was delivered at term with mild anaemia and did not need blood transfusion after birth. This report describes a natural course of red blood cell membrane defect with co-inherited haemoglobin Constant Spring, indicating that the course of disease was more severe during fetal life. Intrauterine transfusion supported the transition of the fetus through the critical period in utero to a healthier life after birth.

  17. Raman spectroscopy of stored red blood cells: evaluating clinically-relevant biochemical markers in donated blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, Chad G.; Buckley, Kevin; Chen, Deborah; Schulze, H. G.; Devine, Dana V.; Blades, Michael W.; Turner, Robin F. B.

    2015-07-01

    Modern transfusion medicine relies on the safe, secure, and cost-effective delivery of donated red blood cells (RBCs). Once isolated, RBCs are suspended in a defined additive solution and stored in plastic blood bags in which, over time, they undergo chemical, physiological, and morphological changes that may have a deleterious impact on some patients. Regulations limit the storage period to 42 days and the cells do not routinely undergo analytical testing before use. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy to interrogate stored RBCs and we identify metabolic and cell-breakdown products, such as haemoglobin and membrane fragments, that build-up in the blood bags as the cells age. Our work points the way to the development of an instrument which could quickly and easily assess the biochemical nature of stored RBC units before they are transfused.

  18. Mach-Zehnder interferometer for separation of platelets from red blood cells using dielectrophoretics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shwetha, M.; Narayan, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this work, separation of platelets from red blood cells using Mach-Zehnder interferometer is shown using Dielectrophoretics (DEP). The proposed model demonstrates continuous separation of platelets from red blood cells. Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has two arms, in which sensing arm will sense according to the applied voltage and separate the platelets from mixed blood cells. The platelets and the red blood cells will flow in two outlets of MZI. Microfluidic device is used to separate the RBC's and the platelets from the mixed blood cells.

  19. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare.

  20. Red blood cell parameters in antenatal nonsickling hemoglobinopathy screening

    PubMed Central

    Bencaiova, Gabriela; Dapoto, Kristina; Zimmermann, Roland; Krafft, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective To find a hematological parameter and the cut-off level for identification of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in pregnant women. Materials and methods Venous blood samples of 849 women with singleton pregnancies were collected at the first visit. All women who met inclusion criteria were examined for nonsickling hemoglobinopathy. On the basis of the sensitivity and the specificity of different cut-off levels for hematological parameters, we calculated the optimal clinically practicable parameter for screening of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in pregnant women. Results On the basis of the sensitivity and the specificity, the best screening parameters for the identification of nonsickling hemoglobinopathies among nonanemic pregnant women are mean corpuscular volume (MCV) with cut-off ≤80 fL (Youden’s index 91.2%), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) <27.5 pg (Youden’s index 90.7%), and microcytosis (MRC) ≥3% (Youden’s index 90.2%). An analysis using receiver operating characteristic curves and the calculated Youden’s index showed that MCV ≤76 fL, MCH ≤24 pg, or MRC ≥10% are the best red blood cell indices for the screening of nonsickling hemoglobinopathy among anemic women with iron deficiency. Conclusion Our results suggest targeted screening for nonsickling hemoglobinopathies in nonanemic pregnant women with MCV ≤80 fL, MCH ≤27.5 pg, or MRC ≥3% and in anemic women with MCV ≤76 fL, MCH ≤24 pg, or MRC ≥10%. PMID:25914560

  1. Neonatal nucleated red blood cells in G6PD deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yeruchimovich, Mark; Shapira, Boris; Mimouni, Francis B; Dollberg, Shaul

    2002-05-01

    The objective of this study is to study the absolute number of nucleated red blood cells (RBC) at birth, an index of active fetal erythropoiesis, in infants with G6PD deficiency and in controls. We tested the hypothesis that hematocrit and hemoglobin would be lower, and absolute nucleated RBC counts higher, in the G6PD deficient and that these changes would be more prominent in infants exposed passively to fava bean through maternal diet. Thirty-two term infants with G6PD deficiency were compared with 30 term controls. Complete blood counts with manual differential counts were obtained within 12 hours of life. Absolute nucleated RBC and corrected leukocyte counts were computed from the Coulter results and the differential count. G6PD deficient patients did not differ from controls in terms of gestational age, birth weight, or Apgar scores or in any of the hematologic parameters studied, whether or not the mother reported fava beans consumption in the days prior to delivery. Although intrauterine hemolysis is possible in G6PD deficient fetuses exposed passively to fava beans, our study supports that such events must be very rare. PMID:12012283

  2. Piezo1 links mechanical forces to red blood cell volume

    PubMed Central

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Lukacs, Viktor; Ranade, Sanjeev S; Chien, Shu; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) experience significant mechanical forces while recirculating, but the consequences of these forces are not fully understood. Recent work has shown that gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated Piezo1 cation channels are associated with the dehydrating RBC disease xerocytosis, implicating a role of mechanotransduction in RBC volume regulation. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations result in RBC dehydration are unknown. In this study, we show that RBCs exhibit robust calcium entry in response to mechanical stretch and that this entry is dependent on Piezo1 expression. Furthermore, RBCs from blood-cell-specific Piezo1 conditional knockout mice are overhydrated and exhibit increased fragility both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Yoda1, a chemical activator of Piezo1, causes calcium influx and subsequent dehydration of RBCs via downstream activation of the KCa3.1 Gardos channel, directly implicating Piezo1 signaling in RBC volume control. Therefore, mechanically activated Piezo1 plays an essential role in RBC volume homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07370.001 PMID:26001274

  3. Piezo1 links mechanical forces to red blood cell volume.

    PubMed

    Cahalan, Stuart M; Lukacs, Viktor; Ranade, Sanjeev S; Chien, Shu; Bandell, Michael; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) experience significant mechanical forces while recirculating, but the consequences of these forces are not fully understood. Recent work has shown that gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated Piezo1 cation channels are associated with the dehydrating RBC disease xerocytosis, implicating a role of mechanotransduction in RBC volume regulation. However, the mechanisms by which these mutations result in RBC dehydration are unknown. In this study, we show that RBCs exhibit robust calcium entry in response to mechanical stretch and that this entry is dependent on Piezo1 expression. Furthermore, RBCs from blood-cell-specific Piezo1 conditional knockout mice are overhydrated and exhibit increased fragility both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that Yoda1, a chemical activator of Piezo1, causes calcium influx and subsequent dehydration of RBCs via downstream activation of the KCa3.1 Gardos channel, directly implicating Piezo1 signaling in RBC volume control. Therefore, mechanically activated Piezo1 plays an essential role in RBC volume homeostasis. PMID:26001274

  4. Blood chemistry values of juvenile red pacu (Piaractus brachypomus).

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kaori; Lewbart, Gregory A.; Smith, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    Blood samples were collected from 29 juvenile red pacu (Piaractus brachypomus), ornamental freshwater fish, to establish baseline blood chemistry values. Mean (minimum-maximum) values, obtained by automated bichromatic analysis and ion selective electrode analysis, were as follows: sodium, 150.4 (146-159) mmol/L; potassium, 3.93 (2.7-5.0) mmol/L; chloride, 138.7 (128-150) mmol/L; total CO2, 7.5 (6-10) mmol/L; albumin, 0.86 (0.5-1.0) g/dL; lactate dehydrogenase, 237.8 (65-692) IU/L; aspartate aminotransferase, 49.1 (0-125) IU/L; creatinine, 0.31 (0.2-0.4) mg/dL; calcium, 10.80 (9.5-12.5) mg/dL; anion gap, 6.89 (1.2-12.5) mmol/L; and phosphorus, 7.29 (4.1-8.9) mg/dL. PMID:12024315

  5. Manipulation of red blood cells with electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Esmaeeli, Asghar

    2009-11-01

    Manipulation of bioparticles and macromolecules is the central task in many biological and biotechnological processes. The current methods for physical manipulation takes advantage of different forces such as acoustic, centrifugal, magnetic, electromagnetic, and electric forces, as well as using optical tweezers or filtration. Among all these methods, however, the electrical forces are particularly attractive because of their favorable scale up with the system size which makes them well-suited for miniaturization. Currently the electric field is used for transportation, poration, fusion, rotation, and separation of biological cells. The aim of the current research is to gain fundamental understanding of the effect of electric field on the human red blood cells (RBCs) using direct numerical simulation. A front tracking/finite difference technique is used to solve the fluid flow and electric field equations, where the fluid in the cell and the blood (plasma) is modeled as Newtonian and incompressible, and the interface separating the two is treated as an elastic membrane. The behavior of RBCs is investigated as a function of the controlling parameters of the problem such as the strength of the electric field.

  6. Skeleton deformation of red blood cells during tank treading motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qiang; Peng, Zhangli

    2012-11-01

    By coupling a fluid-structure interaction algorithm with a three-level multiscale structural model, we simulate the tank treading responses of erythrocytes (red blood cells, or RBC) in shear flows. The fluid motion is depicted within the Stokes-flow framework, and is mathematically formulated with the boundary integral equations. The structural model takes into account the flexible connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton as well as the viscoelastic responses. The concentration of this study is on the transient process involving the development of the local area deformation of the protein skeleton. Under the assumption that the protein skeleton is stress-free in the natural biconcave configuration, our simulations indicate the following properties: (1) During tank treading motions it takes long time for significant area deformations to establish. For cells with diminished connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the protein skeleton (e.g. cells with mutations or defects), the relaxation time will be greatly reduced; (2) Deformations of the skeleton depend on the initial orientation of the cell with respect to the incoming flow; (3) The maximum area expansion occurs around the regions corresponding to the dimples in the original biconcave state; (4) Oscillations in cell geometry (breathing) and orientation (e.g. swinging) are observed. This work was supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute under award number R01HL092793.

  7. Nanoparticle encapsulation in red blood cells enables blood-pool magnetic particle imaging hours after injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmer, J.; Antonelli, A.; Sfara, C.; Tiemann, B.; Gleich, B.; Magnani, M.; Weizenecker, J.; Borgert, J.

    2013-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new medical imaging approach that is based on the nonlinear magnetization response of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) injected into the blood stream. To date, real-time MPI of the bolus passage of an approved MRI SPIO contrast agent injected into the tail vein of living mice has been demonstrated. However, nanoparticles are rapidly removed from the blood stream by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Therefore, imaging applications for long-term monitoring require the repeated administration of bolus injections, which complicates quantitative comparisons due to the temporal variations in concentration. Encapsulation of SPIOs into red blood cells (RBCs) has been suggested to increase the blood circulation time of nanoparticles. This work presents first evidence that SPIO-loaded RBCs can be imaged in the blood pool of mice several hours after injection using MPI. This finding is supported by magnetic particle spectroscopy performed to quantify the iron concentration in blood samples extracted from the mice 3 and 24 h after injection of SPIO-loaded RBCs. Based on these results, new MPI applications can be envisioned, such as permanent 3D real-time visualization of the vessel tree during interventional procedures, bleeding monitoring after stroke, or long-term monitoring and treatment control of cardiovascular diseases.

  8. Mechanical properties of stored red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Alexandre de Thomaz, Andre; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; de Lourdes Barjas-Castro, Maria; Brandao, Marcelo M.; Saad, Sara T. O.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2005-08-01

    We have developed a method for measuring the red blood cell (RBC) membrane overall elasticity μ by measuring the deformation of the cells when dragged at a constant velocity through a plasma fluid by an optical tweezers. The deformability of erythrocytes is a critical determinant of blood flow in the microcirculation. We tested our method and hydrodynamic models, which included the presence of two walls, by measuring the RBC deformation as a function of drag velocity and of the distance to the walls. The capability and sensitivity of this method can be evaluated by its application to a variety of studies, such as, the measurement of RBC elasticity of sickle cell anemia patients comparing homozygous (HbSS), including patients taking hydroxyrea (HU) and heterozygous (HbAS) with normal donors and the RBC elasticity measurement of gamma irradiated stored blood for transfusion to immunosupressed patients as a function of time and dose. These studies show that the technique has the sensitivity to discriminate heterozygous and homozygous sickle cell anemia patients from normal donors and even follow the course of HU treatment of Homozygous patients. The gamma irradiation studies show that there is no significant change in RBC elasticity over time for up to 14 days of storage, regardless of whether the unit was irradiated or not, but there was a huge change in the measured elasticity for the RBC units stored for more than 21 days after irradiation. These finds are important for the assessment of stored irradiated RBC viability for transfusion purposes because the present protocol consider 28 storage days after irradiation as the limit for the RBC usage.

  9. Bio-inspired Cryo-ink Preserves Red Blood Cell Phenotype and Function during Nanoliter Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Assal, Rami El; Guven, Sinan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Gozen, Irep; Shafiee, Hadi; Dalbeyber, Sedef; Abdalla, Noor; Thomas, Gawain; Fuld, Wendy; Illigens, Ben M.W.; Estanislau, Jessica; Khoory, Joseph; Kaufman, Richard; Zylberberg, Claudia; Lindeman, Neal; Wen, Qi; Ghiran, Ionita; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Current red blood cell cryopreservation methods utilize bulk volumes, causing cryo-injury of cells, which results in irreversible disruption of cell morphology, mechanics, and function. An innovative approach to preserve human red blood cell morphology, mechanics, and function following vitrification in nanoliter volumes is developed using a novel cryo-ink integrated with a bio-printing approach. PMID:25047246

  10. Evaluation of red blood cell labelling methods based on a statistical model for red blood cell survival.

    PubMed

    Korell, Julia; Coulter, Carolyn V; Duffull, Stephen B

    2011-12-21

    The aim of this work is to compare different labelling methods that are commonly used to estimate the lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs), e.g. in anaemia of renal failure, where the effect of treatment with erythropoietin depends on the lifespan of RBCs. A previously developed model for the survival time of RBCs that accounts for plausible physiological processes of RBC destruction was used to simulate ideal random and cohort labelling methods for RBCs, as well as the flaws associated with these methods (e.g. reuse of label and loss of the label from the surviving RBCs). Random labelling with radioactive chromium and cohort labelling using heavy nitrogen were considered. Blood sampling times were determined for RBC survival studies using both labelling methods by applying the theory of optimal design. It was assessed whether the underlying parameter values of the model are estimable from these studies, and the precision of the parameter estimates were calculated. In theory, parameter estimation would be possible for both types of ideal labelling methods without flaws. However, flaws associated with random labelling are significant and not all parameters controlling RBC survival in the model can be estimated with good precision. In contrast, cohort labelling shows good precision in the parameter estimates even in the presence of reuse and prolonged incorporation of the label. A model based analysis of RBC survival studies is recommended in future to account for limitations in methodology as well as likely causes of RBC destruction. PMID:21945607

  11. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  12. P2X and P2Y receptor signaling in red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Sluyter, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purinergic signaling involves the activation of cell surface P1 and P2 receptors by extracellular nucleosides and nucleotides such as adenosine and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. P2 receptors comprise P2X and P2Y receptors, and have well-established roles in leukocyte and platelet biology. Emerging evidence indicates important roles for these receptors in red blood cells. P2 receptor activation stimulates a number of signaling pathways in progenitor red blood cells resulting in microparticle release, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptosis. Likewise, activation of P2 receptors in mature red blood cells stimulates signaling pathways mediating volume regulation, eicosanoid release, phosphatidylserine exposure, hemolysis, impaired ATP release, and susceptibility or resistance to infection. This review summarizes the distribution of P2 receptors in red blood cells, and outlines the functions of P2 receptor signaling in these cells and its implications in red blood cell biology. PMID:26579528

  13. West Nile virus adheres to human red blood cells in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Rios, Maria; Daniel, Sylvester; Chancey, Caren; Hewlett, Indira K; Stramer, Susan L

    2007-07-15

    Background. West Nile virus (WNV) is endemic in the United States. It is transmissible by blood transfusion, and the nation's blood supply is currently screened for WNV. Documented transmission of WNV infection through red blood cell (RBC) units in which the plasma co-component had a low viral load could be explained, in at least 1 instance, by cell-association of WNV; in this case, the RBC unit was released as negative by minipool nucleic acid testing (NAT) performed on plasma but was intermittently NAT-positive when subsequently tested as an individual sample. We hypothesized that a proportion of WNV bound to blood cells and was not measured by NAT performed on plasma samples. We have investigated whether WNV binds to RBCs, leading to reduction of WNV RNA detection by NAT performed on plasma samples.Methods. Equal volumes of leukoreduced RBCs and their corresponding plasma components from 20 blood donors with NAT results that were positive for WNV were tested in 5 replicates by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction TaqMan for WNV. In addition, aliquots from 8 of the RBC units were tested by infectivity assays using Vero cells.Results. The reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction TaqMan assay showed that the viral load in the RBC components exceeded that in the corresponding plasma units by 1 order of magnitude. In addition, viruses associated with the RBCs were infectious in Vero cell cultures.Conclusions. These observations reinforce the notion that extraction of viral RNA from whole blood could improve assay sensitivity for blood donor screening and further reduce the residual risk of WNV transmission through transfusion.

  14. Colloidal Properties of Nanoerythrosomes Derived from Bovine Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yuan-Chia; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Hoang, Dao; Bentley, William E; D'Souza, Warren D; Raghavan, Srinivasa R

    2016-01-12

    Liposomes are nanoscale containers that are typically synthesized from lipids using a high-shear process such as extrusion or sonication. While liposomes are extensively used in drug delivery, they do suffer from certain problems including limited colloidal stability and short circulation times in the body. As an alternative to liposomes, we explore a class of container structures derived from erythrocytes (red blood cells). The procedure involves emptying the inner contents of these cells (specifically hemoglobin) and resuspending the empty structures in buffer, followed by sonication. The resulting structures are termed nanoerythrosomes (NERs), i.e., they are membrane-covered nanoscale containers, much like liposomes. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) are employed for the first time to study these NERs. The results reveal that the NERs are discrete spheres (∼110 nm diameter) with a unilamellar membrane of thickness ∼4.5 nm. Remarkably, the biconcave disc-like shape of erythrocytes is also exhibited by the NERs under hypertonic conditions. Moreover, unlike typical liposomes, NERs show excellent colloidal stability in both buffer as well as in serum at room temperature, and are also able to withstand freeze-thaw cycling. We have explored the potential for using NERs as colloidal vehicles for targeted delivery. Much like conventional liposomes, NER membranes can be decorated with fluorescent or other markers, solutes can be encapsulated in the cores of the NERs, and NERs can be targeted to specifically bind to mammalian cells. Our study shows that NERs are a promising and versatile class of nanostructures. NERs that are harvested from a patient's own blood and reconfigured for nanomedicine can potentially offer several benefits including biocompatibility, minimization of immune response, and extended circulation time in the body. PMID:26684218

  15. Vesiculation of healthy and defective red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2015-07-01

    Vesiculation of mature red blood cells (RBCs) contributes to removal of defective patches of the erythrocyte membrane. In blood disorders, which are related to defects in proteins of the RBC membrane, vesiculation of the plasma membrane is intensified. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain RBC vesiculation but the exact underlying mechanisms and what determines the sizes of the vesicles are still not completely understood. In this work, we apply a two-component coarse-grained molecular dynamics RBC membrane model to study how RBC vesiculation is controlled by the membrane spontaneous curvature and by lateral compression of the membrane. Our simulation results show that the formation of small homogeneous vesicles with a diameter less than 40 nm can be attributed to a large spontaneous curvature of membrane domains. On the other hand, compression on the membrane can cause the formation of vesicles with heterogeneous composition and with sizes comparable with the size of the cytoskeleton corral. When spontaneous curvature and lateral compression are simultaneously considered, the compression on the membrane tends to facilitate formation of vesicles originating from curved membrane domains. We also simulate vesiculation of RBCs with membrane defects connected to hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) and to hereditary spherocytosis (HS). When the vertical connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the membrane skeleton is elevated, as in normal RBCs, multiple vesicles are shed from the compressed membrane with diameters similar to the cytoskeleton corral size. In HS RBCs, where the connectivity between the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton is reduced, larger-size vesicles are released under the same compression ratio as in normal RBCs. Lastly, we find that vesicles released from HE RBCs can contain cytoskeletal filaments due to fragmentation of the membrane skeleton while vesicles released from the HS RBCs are depleted of cytoskeletal filaments.

  16. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  17. Host cell remodeling by pathogens: the exomembrane system in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Sherling, Emma S; van Ooij, Christiaan

    2016-09-01

    Malaria is caused by infection of erythrocytes by parasites of the genus Plasmodium To survive inside erythrocytes, these parasites induce sweeping changes within the host cell, one of the most dramatic of which is the formation of multiple membranous compartments, collectively referred to as the exomembrane system. As an uninfected mammalian erythrocyte is devoid of internal membranes, the parasite must be the force and the source behind the formation of these compartments. Even though the first evidence of the presence these of internal compartments was obtained over a century ago, their functions remain mostly unclear, and in some cases completely unknown, and the mechanisms underlying their formation are still mysterious. In this review, we provide an overview of the different parts of the exomembrane system, describing the parasitophorous vacuole, the tubovesicular network, Maurer's clefts, the caveola-vesicle complex, J dots and other mobile compartments, and the small vesicles that have been observed in Plasmodium-infected cells. Finally, we combine the data into a simplified view of the exomembrane system and its relation to the alterations of the host erythrocyte. PMID:27587718

  18. Host cell remodeling by pathogens: the exomembrane system in Plasmodium-infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sherling, Emma S.; van Ooij, Christiaan

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection of erythrocytes by parasites of the genus Plasmodium. To survive inside erythrocytes, these parasites induce sweeping changes within the host cell, one of the most dramatic of which is the formation of multiple membranous compartments, collectively referred to as the exomembrane system. As an uninfected mammalian erythrocyte is devoid of internal membranes, the parasite must be the force and the source behind the formation of these compartments. Even though the first evidence of the presence these of internal compartments was obtained over a century ago, their functions remain mostly unclear, and in some cases completely unknown, and the mechanisms underlying their formation are still mysterious. In this review, we provide an overview of the different parts of the exomembrane system, describing the parasitophorous vacuole, the tubovesicular network, Maurer's clefts, the caveola-vesicle complex, J dots and other mobile compartments, and the small vesicles that have been observed in Plasmodium-infected cells. Finally, we combine the data into a simplified view of the exomembrane system and its relation to the alterations of the host erythrocyte. PMID:27587718

  19. Interactive cost of Plasmodium infection and insecticide resistance in the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Alout, Haoues; Dabiré, Roch K.; Djogbénou, Luc S.; Abate, Luc; Corbel, Vincent; Chandre, Fabrice; Cohuet, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance raises concerns for the control of vector-borne diseases. However, its impact on parasite transmission could be diverse when considering the ecological interactions between vector and parasite. Thus we investigated the fitness cost associated with insecticide resistance and Plasmodium falciparum infection as well as their interactive cost on Anopheles gambiae survival and fecundity. In absence of infection, we observed a cost on fecundity associated with insecticide resistance. However, survival was higher for mosquito bearing the kdr mutation and equal for those with the ace-1R mutation compared to their insecticide susceptible counterparts. Interestingly, Plasmodium infection reduced survival only in the insecticide resistant strains but not in the susceptible one and infection was associated with an increase in fecundity independently of the strain considered. This study provides evidence for a survival cost associated with infection by Plasmodium parasite only in mosquito selected for insecticide resistance. This suggests that the selection of insecticide resistance mutation may have disturbed the interaction between parasites and vectors, resulting in increased cost of infection. Considering the fitness cost as well as other ecological aspects of this natural mosquito-parasite combination is important to predict the epidemiological impact of insecticide resistance. PMID:27432257

  20. Depletion-mediated red blood cell aggregation in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Neu, Björn; Meiselman, Herbert J

    2002-11-01

    Polymer-induced red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is of current basic science and clinical interest, and a depletion-mediated model for this phenomenon has been suggested; to date, however, analytical approaches to this model are lacking. An approach is thus described for calculating the interaction energy between RBC in polymer solutions. The model combines electrostatic repulsion due to RBC surface charge with osmotic attractive forces due to polymer depletion near the RBC surface. The effects of polymer concentration and polymer physicochemical properties on depletion layer thickness and on polymer penetration into the RBC glycocalyx are considered for 40 to 500 kDa dextran and for 18 to 35 kDa poly (ethylene glycol). The calculated results are in excellent agreement with literature data for cell-cell affinities and with RBC aggregation-polymer concentration relations. These findings thus lend strong support to depletion interactions as the basis for polymer-induced RBC aggregation and suggest the usefulness of this approach for exploring interactions between macromolecules and the RBC glycocalyx. PMID:12414682

  1. Smoking and red blood cell phospholipid membrane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Murff, H J; Tindle, H A; Shrubsole, M J; Cai, Q; Smalley, W; Milne, G L; Swift, L L; Ness, R M; Zheng, W

    2016-09-01

    Smoking is associated with lower n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) concentrations; however, limited studies have accounted for dietary PUFA intake or whether tobacco dose or smoking duration influences this association. We measured red blood cell phospholipid (RBC) membrane concentrations of fatty acids in 126 current smokers, 311 former smokers, and 461 never smokers using gas liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry. Smokers had lower RBC membrane percentages of total n-3 LCPUFAs compared to former smokers or never smokers (median percent: 5.46, [interquartile range (IQR) 4.52, 6.28] versus 6.39; [IQR: 5.18, 7.85] versus 6.59; [IQR 5.34, 8.01]) (p<0.001) and this association remained after adjusting for dietary PUFA intake. Duration of smoking and cigarettes per day were not associated with RBC membrane n-3 LCPUFA differences. Smoking is associated with lower n-3 LCPUFA RBC membrane percentages and this association was not influenced by diet or smoking dose or duration. PMID:27637337

  2. Mechanical response of red blood cells entering a constriction

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Nancy F.; Ristenpart, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in a microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (∼30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We present detailed statistical analyses on the dynamics of each motion and demonstrate that the behavior is highly sensitive to the location of the RBC within the channel. We further demonstrate that the observed tumbling, twisting, and rolling rotations can be rationalized qualitatively in terms of rigid body mechanics. The detailed experimental statistics presented here should serve as a useful resource for modeling of RBC behavior under physiologically important flow conditions. PMID:25553197

  3. Chaotic dynamics of red blood cells in oscillating shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, Prosenjit; Cordasco, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    A 3D computational study of deformable red blood cells in dilute suspension and subject to sinusoidally oscillating shear flow is considered. It is observed that the cell exhibits either a periodic motion or a chaotic motion. In the periodic motion, the cell reverses its orientation either about the flow direction or about the flow gradient, depending on the initial conditions. In certain parameter range, the initial conditions are forgotten and the cells become entrained in the same sequence of horizontal reversals. The chaotic dynamics is characterized by a nonperiodic sequence of horizontal and vertical reversals, and swings. The study provides the first conclusive evidence of the chaotic dynamics of fully deformable cells in oscillating flow using a deterministic numerical model without the introduction of any stochastic noise. An analysis of the chaotic dynamics shows that chaos is only possible in certain frequency bands when the cell membrane can rotate by a certain amount allowing the cells to swing near the maximum shear rate. We make a novel observation that the occurrence of the vertical or horizontal reversal depends only on whether a critical angle, that is independent of the flow frequency, is exceeded at the instant of flow reversal.

  4. Red Blood Cell Dysfunction Induced by High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Unruh, Dusten; Srinivasan, Ramprasad; Benson, Tyler; Haigh, Stephen; Coyle, Danielle; Batra, Neil; Keil, Ryan; Sturm, Robert; Blanco, Victor; Palascak, Mary; Franco, Robert S.; Tong, Wilson; Chatterjee, Tapan; Hui, David Y.; Davidson, W. Sean; Aronow, Bruce J.; Kalfa, Theodosia; Manka, David; Peairs, Abigail; Blomkalns, Andra; Fulton, David J.; Brittain, Julia E.; Weintraub, Neal L.; Bogdanov, Vladimir Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-fat diet (HFD) promotes endothelial dysfunction and proinflammatory monocyte activation, which contribute to atherosclerosis in obesity. We investigated whether HFD also induces the dysfunction of red blood cells (RBCs), which serve as a reservoir for chemokines via binding to Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC). Methods and Results A 60% HFD for 12 weeks, which produced only minor changes in lipid profile in C57/BL6 mice, markedly augmented the levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 bound to RBCs, which in turn stimulated macrophage migration through an endothelial monolayer. Levels of RBC-bound KC were also increased by HFD. These effects of HFD were abolished in DARC−/− mice. In RBCs from HFD-fed wild-type and DARC−/− mice, levels of membrane cholesterol and phosphatidylserine externalization were increased, fostering RBC-macrophage inflammatory interactions and promoting macrophage phagocytosis in vitro. When labeled ex vivo and injected into wild-type mice, RBCs from HFD-fed mice exhibited ≈3-fold increase in splenic uptake. Finally, RBCs from HFD-fed mice induced increased macrophage adhesion to the endothelium when they were incubated with isolated aortic segments, indicating endothelial activation. Conclusions RBC dysfunction, analogous to endothelial dysfunction, occurs early during diet-induced obesity and may serve as a mediator of atherosclerosis. These findings may have implications for the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in obesity, a worldwide epidemic. PMID:26467254

  5. Of macrophages and red blood cells; a complex love story

    PubMed Central

    de Back, Djuna Z.; Kostova, Elena B.; van Kraaij, Marian; van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages tightly control the production and clearance of red blood cells (RBC). During steady state hematopoiesis, approximately 1010 RBC are produced per hour within erythroblastic islands in humans. In these erythroblastic islands, resident bone marrow macrophages provide erythroblasts with interactions that are essential for erythroid development. New evidence suggests that not only under homeostasis but also under stress conditions, macrophages play an important role in promoting erythropoiesis. Once RBC have matured, these cells remain in circulation for about 120 days. At the end of their life span, RBC are cleared by macrophages residing in the spleen and the liver. Current theories about the removal of senescent RBC and the essential role of macrophages will be discussed as well as the role of macrophages in facilitating the removal of damaged cellular content from the RBC. In this review we will provide an overview on the role of macrophages in the regulation of RBC production, maintenance and clearance. In addition, we will discuss the interactions between these two cell types during transfer of immune complexes and pathogens from RBC to macrophages. PMID:24523696

  6. Amyloid β Levels in Human Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiko, Takehiro; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Satoh, Akira; Tsuduki, Tsuyoshi; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is hypothesized to play a key role by oxidatively impairing the capacity of red blood cells (RBCs) to deliver oxygen to the brain. These processes are implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although plasma Aβ has been investigated thoroughly, the presence and distribution of Aβ in human RBCs are still unclear. In this study, we quantitated Aβ40 and Aβ42 in human RBCs with ELISA assays, and provided evidence that significant amounts of Aβ could be detected in RBCs and that the RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. The RBC Aβ levels increased with aging. On the other hand, providing an antioxidant supplement (astaxanthin, a polar carotenoid) to humans was found to decrease RBC Aβ as well as oxidative stress marker levels. These results suggest that plasma Aβ40 and Aβ42 bind to RBCs (possibly with aging), implying a pathogenic role of RBC Aβ. Moreover, the data indicate that RBC Aβ40 and Aβ42 may constitute biomarkers of AD. As a preventive strategy, therapeutic application of astaxanthin as an Aβ-lowering agent in RBCs could be considered as a possible anti-dementia agent. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN42483402 PMID:23166730

  7. Diamond Blackfan anemia: a disorder of red blood cell development.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Steven R; Lipton, Jeffrey M

    2008-01-01

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited hypoplastic anemia that typically presents in the first year of life. The genes identified to date that are mutated in DBA encode ribosomal proteins, and in these cases ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency gives rise to the disease. The developmental timing of DBA presentation suggests that the changes in red blood cell production that occur around the time of birth trigger a pathophysiological mechanism, likely linked to defective ribosome synthesis, which precipitates the hematopoietic phenotype. Variable presentation of other clinical phenotypes in DBA patients indicates that other developmental pathways may also be affected by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and that the involvement of these pathways is influenced by modifier genes. Understanding the molecular basis for the developmental timing of DBA presentation promises to shed light on a number of baffling features of this disease. This chapter also attempts to demonstrate how the marriage of laboratory and clinical science may enhance each and permit insights into human disease that neither alone can accomplish.

  8. Glutaraldehyde fixation of sodium transport in dog red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, J.C.

    1984-11-01

    The large increase in passive Na flux that occurs when dog red blood cells are caused to shrink is amiloride sensitive and inhibited when Cl is replaced by nitrate or thiocyanate. Activation and deactivation of this transport pathway by manipulation of cell volume is reversible. Brief treatment of the cells with 0.01-0.03% glutaraldehyde can cause the shrinkage-activated transporter to become irreversibly activated or inactivated, depending on the volume of the cells at the time of glutaraldehyde exposure. Thus, if glutaraldehyde is applied when the cells are shrunken, the amiloride-sensitive Na transporter is activated and remains so regardless of subsequent alterations in cell volume. If the fixative is applied to swollen cells, no amount of subsequent shrinkage will turn on the Na pathway. In its fixed state, the activated transporter is fully amiloride sensitive, but it is no longer inhibited when Cl is replaced by thiocyanate. The action of glutaraldehyde thus allows one to dissect the response to cell shrinkage into two phases. Activation of the pathway is affected by anions and is not prevented by amiloride. Once activated and fixed, the anion requirement disappears. Amiloride inhibits movement of Na through the activated transporter. These experiments demonstrate how a chemical cross-linking agent may be used to study the functional properties of a regulable transport pathway.

  9. Twisting of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Nancy; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the dynamic response of red blood cells (RBCs) to hydrodynamic stress has focused on linear velocity profiles. Relatively little experimental work has examined how individual RBCs respond to pressure driven flow in more complex geometries, such as the flow at the entrance of a capillary. Here, we establish the mechanical behaviors of healthy RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a narrow constriction. We pumped RBCs through a constriction in an ex vivo microfluidic device and used high speed video to visualize and track the flow behavior of more than 4,400 RBCs. We show that approximately 85% of RBCs undergo one of four distinct modes of motion: stretching, twisting, tumbling, or rolling. Intriguingly, a plurality of cells (~30%) exhibited twisting (rotation around the major axis parallel to the flow direction), a mechanical behavior that is not typically observed in linear velocity profiles. We examine the mechanical origin of twisting using, as a limiting case, the equations of motion for rigid ellipsoids, and we demonstrate that the observed rotation is qualitatively consistent with rigid body theory.

  10. Modeling of Red Blood Cells and Related Spleen Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhangli; Pivkin, Igor; Dao, Ming

    2011-11-01

    A key function of the spleen is to clear red blood cells (RBCs) with abnormal mechanical properties from the circulation. These abnormal mechanical properties may be due to RBC aging or RBC diseases, e.g., malaria and sickle cell anemia. Specifically, 10% of RBCs passing through the spleen are forced to squeeze into the narrow slits between the endothelial cells, and stiffer cells which get stuck are killed and digested by macrophages. To investigate this important physiological process, we employ three different approaches to study RBCs passage through these small slits, including analytical theory, Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation and Multiscale Finite Element Method (MS-FEM). By applying the analytical theory, we estimate the critical limiting geometries RBCs can pass. By using the DPD method, we study the full fluid-structure interaction problem, and compute RBC deformation under different pressure gradients. By employing the MS-FEM approach, we model the lipid bilayer and the cytoskeleton as two distinct layers, and focus on the cytoskeleton deformation and the bilayer-skeleton interaction force at the molecular level. Finally the results of these three approaches are compared to each other and correlated to the experimental observations.

  11. Red blood cell aggregation and microcirculation in rat cremaster muscle.

    PubMed

    Vicaut, E; Hou, X; Decuypère, L; Taccoen, A; Duvelleroy, M

    1994-01-01

    Using intravital microscopy of the rat cremaster muscle, we studied the effects of changing red blood cell (RBC) aggregation on RBC arteriolar velocity and perfused capillary density (PCD). To modify RBC aggregation, 2 and/or 10% dextran (molecular weights 40,000, 70,000 or 480,000) or fresh rat plasma was infused into adult male rats via a normovolemic hemodilution procedure. The high-molecular-weight dextrans (70,000 and 480,000) both induced RBC hyperaggregation associated with similar dose-dependent decreases in RBC arteriolar velocity (30 and 40% for dextran concentrations of 2 and 10%, respectively) and in PCD (35 and 37%, respectively, for the two concentrations). Conversely, with 40,000 molecular weight dextran or plasma, we observed a 30% increase in RBC arteriolar velocity, but no change in PCD or hyperaggregation. Intravenous injection of the antiaggregating drug troxerutin (10(-3) M), either before or after 2% dextran 70,000, significantly inhibited the effects of this dextran on RBC arteriolar velocity and on PCD. We conclude that RBC hyperaggregation can lead to changes in both arteriolar velocity and PCD and may, therefore, impair tissue oxygenation.

  12. Deformation of red blood cells using acoustic radiation forces

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Puja; Hill, Martyn; Glynne-Jones, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic radiation forces have been used to manipulate cells and bacteria in a number of recent microfluidic applications. The net force on a cell has been subject to careful investigation over a number of decades. We demonstrate that the radiation forces also act to deform cells. An ultrasonic standing wave field is created in a 0.1 mm glass capillary at a frequency of 7.9 MHz. Using osmotically swollen red-blood cells, we show observable deformations up to an aspect ratio of 1.35, comparable to deformations created by optical tweezing. In contrast to optical technologies, ultrasonic devices are potentially capable of deforming thousands of cells simultaneously. We create a finite element model that includes both the acoustic environment of the cell, and a model of the cell membrane subject to forces resulting from the non-linear aspects of the acoustic field. The model is found to give reasonable agreement with the experimental results, and shows that the deformation is the result of variation in an acoustic force that is directed outwards at all points on the cell membrane. We foresee applications in diagnostic devices, and in the possibility of mechanically stimulating cells to promote differentiation and physiological effects. PMID:25379070

  13. Dynamic modes of red blood cells in oscillatory shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The dynamics of red blood cells (RBCs) in oscillatory shear flow was studied using differential equations of three variables: a shape parameter, the inclination angle θ , and phase angle ϕ of the membrane rotation. In steady shear flow, three types of dynamics occur depending on the shear rate and viscosity ratio. (i) tank-treading (TT): ϕ rotates while the shape and θ oscillate. (ii) tumbling (TB): θ rotates while the shape and ϕ oscillate. (iii) intermediate motion: both ϕ and θ rotate synchronously or intermittently. In oscillatory shear flow, RBCs show various dynamics based on these three motions. For a low shear frequency with zero mean shear rate, a limit-cycle oscillation occurs, based on the TT or TB rotation at a high or low shear amplitude, respectively. This TT-based oscillation well explains recent experiments. In the middle shear amplitude, RBCs show an intermittent or synchronized oscillation. As shear frequency increases, the vesicle oscillation becomes delayed with respect to the shear oscillation. At a high frequency, multiple limit-cycle oscillations coexist. The thermal fluctuations can induce transitions between two orbits at very low shear amplitudes. For a high mean shear rate with small shear oscillation, the shape and θ oscillate in the TT motion but only one attractor exists even at high shear frequencies. The measurement of these oscillatory modes is a promising tool for quantifying the viscoelasticity of RBCs, synthetic capsules, and lipid vesicles.

  14. Characterization of red blood cells with multiwavelength transmission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M; Huffman, Debra E; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H

    2015-01-01

    Multiwavelength transmission (MWT) spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs). The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R (2) > 0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites' development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states.

  15. Human red blood cells deformed under thermal fluid flow.

    PubMed

    Foo, Ji-Jinn; Chan, Vincent; Feng, Zhi-Qin; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2006-03-01

    The flow-induced mechanical deformation of a human red blood cell (RBC) during thermal transition between room temperature and 42.0 degrees C is interrogated by laser tweezer experiments. Based on the experimental geometry of the deformed RBC, the surface stresses are determined with the aid of computational fluid dynamics simulation. It is found that the RBC is more deformable while heating through 37.0 degrees C to 42.0 degrees C, especially at a higher flow velocity due to a thermal-fluid effect. More importantly, the degree of RBC deformation is irreversible and becomes softer, and finally reaches a plateau (at a uniform flow velocity U > 60 microm s(-1)) after the heat treatment, which is similar to a strain-hardening dominated process. In addition, computational simulated stress is found to be dependent on the progression of thermotropic phase transition. Overall, the current study provides new insights into the highly coupled temperature and hydrodynamic effects on the biomechanical properties of human erythrocyte in a model hydrodynamic flow system.

  16. Characterization of Red Blood Cells with Multiwavelength Transmission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Serebrennikova, Yulia M.; Huffman, Debra E.; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2015-01-01

    Multiwavelength transmission (MWT) spectroscopy was applied to the investigation of the morphological parameters and composition of red blood cells (RBCs). The MWT spectra were quantitatively analyzed with a Mie theory based interpretation model modified to incorporate the effects of the nonsphericity and orientation of RBCs. The MWT spectra of the healthy and anemic samples were investigated for the RBC indices in open and blinded studies. When MWT performance was evaluated against a standard reference system, very good agreement between two methods, with R2 > 0.85 for all indices studied, was demonstrated. The RBC morphological parameters were used to characterize three types of anemia and to draw an association between RBC morphology and anemia severity. The MWT spectra of RBCs infected with malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum at different life cycle stages were analyzed for RBC morphological parameters. The changes in the RBC volume, surface area, aspect ratio, and hemoglobin composition were used to trace the morphological and compositional alterations in the infected RBCs occurring with parasites' development and to provide insights into parasite-host interactions. The MWT method was shown to be reliable for determination of the RBC morphological parameters and to be valuable for identification of the RBC pathologic changes and disease states. PMID:25654099

  17. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. Materials and methods RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. Results P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. Discussion RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3. PMID:26674824

  18. Pleomorphic Structures in Human Blood Are Red Blood Cell-Derived Microparticles, Not Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Adam J.; Gray, Warren D.; Schroeder, Max; Yi, Hong; Taylor, Jeannette V.; Dillard, Rebecca S.; Ke, Zunlong; Wright, Elizabeth R.; Stephens, David; Roback, John D.; Searles, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are a common, life-saving therapy for many patients, but they have also been associated with poor clinical outcomes. We identified unusual, pleomorphic structures in human RBC transfusion units by negative-stain electron microscopy that appeared identical to those previously reported to be bacteria in healthy human blood samples. The presence of viable, replicating bacteria in stored blood could explain poor outcomes in transfusion recipients and have major implications for transfusion medicine. Here, we investigated the possibility that these structures were bacteria. Results Flow cytometry, miRNA analysis, protein analysis, and additional electron microscopy studies strongly indicated that the pleomorphic structures in the supernatant of stored RBCs were RBC-derived microparticles (RMPs). Bacterial 16S rDNA PCR amplified from these samples were sequenced and was found to be highly similar to species that are known to commonly contaminate laboratory reagents. Conclusions These studies suggest that pleomorphic structures identified in human blood are RMPs and not bacteria, and they provide an example in which laboratory contaminants may can mislead investigators. PMID:27760197

  19. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.

  20. A strong antibody reacting with enzyme modified E positive red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Heistø, H; Fagerhol, M K

    1979-01-01

    A high titer antibody was discovered in a healthy young man of blood group A1 R2r. The antibody strongly agglutinated all E positive red blood cells including his own, which had been modified by papain, ficin and bromelin, but only very weakly when modified by trypsin. The antibody was shown to be an IgM antibody. It did not react with unmodified red blood cells.

  1. A strong antibody reacting with enzyme modified E positive red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Heistø, H; Fagerhol, M K

    1979-01-01

    A high titer antibody was discovered in a healthy young man of blood group A1 R2r. The antibody strongly agglutinated all E positive red blood cells including his own, which had been modified by papain, ficin and bromelin, but only very weakly when modified by trypsin. The antibody was shown to be an IgM antibody. It did not react with unmodified red blood cells. PMID:116398

  2. Using red blood cell genomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, Jill M

    2015-01-01

    Blood types (blood group antigens) are heritable polymorphic antigenic molecules on the surface of blood cells. These were amongst the first human Mendelian traits identified, and the genetic basis of nearly all of the hundreds of blood types is known. Clinical laboratory methods have proven useful to identify selected blood group gene variants, and use of genetic blood type information is becoming widespread. However, the breadth and complexity of clinically relevant blood group genetic variation poses challenges. With recent advances in next-generation sequencing technologies, a more comprehensive DNA sequence-based genetic blood typing approach is now feasible. This chapter introduces the practitioner to high-resolution genetic blood typing beginning with an overview of the genetics of blood group antigens, the clinical problem of allosensitization, current blood type testing methods, and then discussion of next-generation sequencing and its application to the problem of genetic blood typing. PMID:26637717

  3. A semi-mechanistic red blood cell survival model provides some insight into red blood cell destruction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Korell, Julia; Duffull, Stephen B

    2013-08-01

    Most mathematical models developed for the survival of haematological cell populations, in particular red blood cells (RBCs), follow the principle of parsimony. They focus on the predominant destruction mechanism of age-related cell death (senescence) and do not account for within subject variability in the RBC lifespan. However, assessment of the underlying physiological destruction mechanisms can be of interest in pathological conditions that affect RBC survival, for example sickle cell anaemia or anaemia of chronic kidney disease. We have previously proposed a semi-mechanistic RBC survival model which accounts for four different types of RBC destruction mechanisms. In this work, it is shown that the proposed model in combination with informative RBC survival data is able to provide a deeper insight into RBC destruction mechanisms. The proposed model was applied in a non-linear mixed effect modelling framework to biotin derived RBC survival data available from literature. Three mechanisms were estimable based on the available data of twelve subjects, including random destruction, senescence and destruction due to delayed failure. It was possible to identify three subjects with a decreased RBC survival in the study population. These three subjects all showed differences in the contribution of the estimated destruction mechanisms: an increased random destruction, versus an accelerated senescence, versus a combination of both.

  4. Diffusional water permeability of mammalian red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Benga, G; Borza, T

    1995-12-01

    An extensive programme of comparative nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of the membrane diffusional permeability for water (Pd) and of the activation energy (Ea,d) of this process in red blood cells (RBCs) from 21 mammalian species was carried out. On the basis of Pd, these species could be divided into three groups. First, the RBC's from humans, cow, sheep and "large" kangaroos (Macropus giganteus and Macropus rufus) had Pd values approximately 5 x 10(-3) cm/s at 25 degrees and 7 x 10(-3) cm/s at 37 degrees C. The RBCs from other marsupial species, mouse, rat, guinea pig and rabbit, had Pd values roughly twice higher, whereas echidna RBCs were twice lower than human RBCs. The value of Ea,d was in most cases correlated with the values of Pd. A value of Ea,d approximately 26 kJ/mol was found for the RBCs from humans and the species having similar Pd values. Low values of Ea,d (ranging from 15 to 22 kJ/mol) appeared to be associated with relatively high values of Pd. The highest values of Ea,d (33 kJ/mol) was found in echidna RBCs. This points to specialized channels for water diffusion incorporated in membrane proteins; a relatively high water permeability of the RBC membrane could be due to a greater number of channel proteins. There are, however, situations where a very high water permeability of RBCs is associated with a high value of Ea,d (above 25 kJ/mol) as in the case of RBCs from mouse, rat and tree kangaroo. Moreover, it was found that Pd in different species was positively correlated to the RBC membrane phosphatidylcholine and negatively correlated to the sphingomyelin content. This suggests that in addition to the number of channel proteins, other factors are involved in the water permeability of the RBC membrane.

  5. Red blood cell sodium transport in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Ulrik Lütken; Kiszka-Kanowitz, Marianne; Bendtsen, Flemming; Henriksen, Jens H

    2016-09-01

    Patients with advanced cirrhosis have abnormal sodium homoeostasis. The study was undertaken to quantify the sodium transport across the plasma membrane of red blood cells (RBC) in patients with cirrhosis. RBC efflux and influx of sodium were studied in vitro with tracer (22) Na(+) according to linear kinetics in 24 patients with cirrhosis and 14 healthy controls. The sodium efflux was modified by ouabain (O), furosemide (F) and a combination of O and F (O + F). RBC sodium was significantly decreased (4·6 versus control 6·3 mmol l(-1) , P<0·001) and directly related to serum sodium (r = 0·57, P<0·05). The RBC fractional sodium efflux was higher in patients with cirrhosis (+46%, P<0·01) compared to controls. Inhibition in both high (145 mmol l(-1) )- and low (120 mmol l(-1) )-sodium buffers showed that the F-insensitive sodium efflux was twice as high in cirrhosis as in controls (P = 0·03-0·007), especially the O-sensitive, F-insensitive efflux was increased (+ 225%, P = 0·01-0·006). Fractional F-sensitive transport was normal in cirrhosis. RBC sodium influx was largely normal in cirrhosis. In conclusion, RBC sodium content is reduced in patients with cirrhosis with a direct relation to serum sodium. Increased RBC sodium efflux is especially related to ouabain-sensitive, furosemide-insensitive transport and thus most likely due to upregulated activity of the sodium-potassium pump. The study gives no evidence to an altered intracellular/extracellular sodium ratio or to a reduced fractional furosemide-sensitive sodium transport in cirrhosis.

  6. Measuring red blood cell aggregation forces using double optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Heloise P; Fontes, Adriana; Thomaz, André; Castro, Vagner; Cesar, Carlos L; Barjas-Castro, Maria L

    2013-04-01

    Classic immunohematology approaches, based on agglutination techniques, have been used in manual and automated immunohematology laboratory routines. Red blood cell (RBC) agglutination depends on intermolecular attractive forces (hydrophobic bonds, Van der Walls, electrostatic forces and hydrogen bonds) and repulsive interactions (zeta potential). The aim of this study was to measure the force involved in RBC aggregation using double optical tweezers, in normal serum, in the presence of erythrocyte antibodies and associated to agglutination potentiator solutions (Dextran, low ionic strength solution [LISS] and enzymes). The optical tweezers consisted of a neodymium:yattrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser beam focused through a microscope equipped with a minicam, which registered the trapped cell image in a computer where they could be analyzed using a software. For measuring RBC aggregation, a silica bead attached to RBCs was trapped and the force needed to slide one RBC over the other, as a function of the velocities, was determined. The median of the RBC aggregation force measured in normal serum (control) was 1 × 10(-3) (0.1-2.5) poise.cm. The samples analyzed with anti-D showed 2 × 10(-3) (1.0-4.0) poise.cm (p < 0.001). RBC diluted in potentiator solutions (Dextran 0.15%, Bromelain and LISS) in the absence of erythrocyte antibodies, did not present agglutination. High adherence was observed when RBCs were treated with papain. Results are in agreement with the imunohematological routine, in which non-specific results are not observed when using LISS, Dextran and Bromelain. Nevertheless, false positive results are frequently observed in manual and automated microplate analyzer using papain enzyme. The methodology proposed is simple and could provide specific information with the possibility of meansuration regarding RBC interaction.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Red Blood Cell Mechanics and Blood Flow in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Lei, Huan; Caswell, Bruce; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George E.

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) infected by a Plasmodium parasite in malaria may lose their membrane deformability with a relative membrane stiffening more than ten-fold in comparison with healthy RBCs leading to potential capillary occlusions. Moreover, infected RBCs are able to adhere to other healthy and parasitized cells and to the vascular endothelium resulting in a substantial disruption of normal blood circulation. In the present work, we simulate infected RBCs in malaria using a multiscale RBC model based on the dissipative particle dynamics method, coupling scales at the sub-cellular level with scales at the vessel size. Our objective is to conduct a full validation of the RBC model with a diverse set of experimental data, including temperature dependence, and to identify the limitations of this purely mechanistic model. The simulated elastic deformations of parasitized RBCs match those obtained in optical-tweezers experiments for different stages of intra-erythrocytic parasite development. The rheological properties of RBCs in malaria are compared with those obtained by optical magnetic twisting cytometry and by monitoring membrane fluctuations at room, physiological, and febrile temperatures. We also study the dynamics of infected RBCs in Poiseuille flow in comparison with healthy cells and present validated bulk viscosity predictions of malaria-infected blood for a wide range of parasitemia levels (percentage of infected RBCs with respect to the total number of cells in a unit volume). PMID:22144878

  8. Cinnamomum zeylanicum extract on the radiolabelling of blood constituents and the morphometry of red blood cells: in vitro assay.

    PubMed

    Benarroz, M O; Fonseca, A S; Rocha, G S; Frydman, J N G; Rocha, V C; Pereira, M O; Bernardo-Filho, M

    2008-02-01

    Effects of Cinnamomum zeylanicum (cinnamon) on the labelling of blood constituents with technetium-99m(99mTc) and on the morphology of red blood cells were studied. Blood samples from Wistar rats were incubated with cinnamon extract for 1 hour or with 0.9% NaCl, as control. Labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc was performed. Plasma (P) and blood cells (BC), soluble (SF-P and SF-BC) and insoluble (IF-P and IF-BC) fractions were separated. The radioactivity in each fraction was counted and the percentage of radioactivity incorporated (%ATI) was calculated. Blood smears were prepared, fixed, stained and the qualitative and quantitative morphological analysis of the red blood cells was evaluated. The data showed that the cinnamon extract decreased significantly (p<0.05) the %ATI on BC, IF-P and IF-BC. No modifications were verified on shape of red blood cells. Cinnamon extracts could alter the labelling of blood constituents with 99mTc, and although our results were obtained with animals, precaution is suggested in interpretations of nuclear medicine examinations involving the labelling of blood constituents in patients who are using cinnamon.

  9. Theoretical models for near forward light scattering by a Plasmodium falciparum infected red blood cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. K.

    2012-12-01

    A number of experimental elastic light scattering studies have been performed in the past few years with the aim of developing automated in vivo tools for differentiating a healthy red blood cell from a Plasmodium falciparum infected cell. This paper examines some theoretical aspects of the problem. An attempt has been made to simulate the scattering patterns of healthy as well as infected individual red blood cells. Two models, namely, a homogeneous sphere model and a coated sphere model have been considered. The scattering patterns predicted by these models are examined. A possible method for discriminating infected red blood cells from healthy ones has been suggested.

  10. Dynamics of red blood cells and vesicles in microchannels of oscillating width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunmüller, S.; Schmid, L.; Franke, T.

    2011-05-01

    We have studied the dynamics of red blood cells and fluid lipid vesicles in hydrodynamic flow fields created by microchannels with periodically varying channel width. For red blood cells we find a transition from a regime with oscillating tilt angle and fixed shape to a regime with oscillating shape with increasing flow velocity. We have determined the crossover to occur at a critical ratio Ly/vm≈2.2 × 10 - 3 s with channel width Ly and red blood cell velocity vm. These oscillations are superposed by shape transitions from a discocyte to a slipper shape at low velocities and a slipper to parachute transition at high flow velocities.

  11. Pyruvate effects on red blood cells during in vitro cardiopulmonary bypass with dogs' blood.

    PubMed

    Gou, DaMing; Tan, HongJing; Cai, HuiJun; Zhou, FangQiang

    2012-11-01

    To investigate the effects of pyruvate (Pyr) on adenosine triphosphate (ATP), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) in red blood cells (RBCs) during the cardiopulmonary bypass procedure (CPB), blood, 500 mL, was collected from each of 10 healthy dogs (weight 12-18 kg). The blood was divided into two parts (250 mL each) and randomly assigned into the control group (Group C, n = 10) or the Pyr group (Group P, n = 10). The blood was commingled with an equal volume of 0.9% NaCl and pyruvated isotonic solution (Pyr 50 mM) in the extracorporeal circuit in the two groups, respectively. The CPB procedure was fixed at 120 min, and the transferring flow was 4 L/min. Contents of ATP in RBCs, eNOS activities, and NO productions in plasma were measured before CPB and during CPB at 30, 60, 90, and 120 min in both groups. The ATP level, eNOS activity, and NO production were not different prior to CPB between the two groups. A decline of ATP levels was shown in both groups but remained significantly higher in Group P than in Group C at the same time points during in vitro CPB (P < 0.01). Values of eNOS and NO were significantly increased in Group C but markedly reduced in Group P during CPB, compared with pre-CPB (P < 0.01). The CPB procedure significantly damaged dogs' RBCs in the ATP level, eNOS activity, and NO production, in vitro, but Pyr effectively protected RBCs in these functions during CPB. Pyr would be clinically protective for RBCs during CPB.

  12. Visualization of cutaneous hemangioma with Tc-99m tagged red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Vujic, I.; Spicer, K.M.

    1981-10-01

    Scintigraphy with Tc-99m labeled red blood cells (RBCs) was used to evaluate a patient with a large cutaneous hemangioma. The usefulness of this procedure when combined with arteriography is discussed.

  13. AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS BLOOD PROGRAM AWARD GROUP - LEFT TO RIGHT - SEATED - JOHN S BROWN - MISS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1956-01-01

    AMERICAN NATIONAL RED CROSS BLOOD PROGRAM AWARD GROUP - LEFT TO RIGHT - SEATED - JOHN S BROWN - MISS ELEANOR KIPLINGER - DR SHARP - JESSIE SHEWARD - DR VICTORY - FIRST ROW - GORDON ROMIG - ROBERT BRIGADOI - MIKE VACCARO - ALFRED VALERINO -

  14. Safe extension of red blood cell storage life at 4{degree}C

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1996-04-01

    The project sought to develop methods to extend the storage life of red blood cells. Extended storage would allow donor to self or autologous transfusion, expand and stabilize the blood supply, reduce the cost of medical care and eliminate the risk of transfusion related infections, including a spectrum of hepatitides (A, B and C) and HIV. The putative cause of red blood cell spoilage at 4 C has been identified as oxidative membrane damage resulting from deoxyhemoglobin and its denaturation products including hemichrome, hemin and Fe{sup 3+}. Trials with carbon monoxide, which is a stabilizer of hemoglobin, have produced striking improvement of red blood cell diagnostics for cells stored at 4 C. Carbonmonoxy hemoglobin is readily converted to oxyhemoglobin by light in the presence of oxygen. These findings have generated a working model and an approach to identify the best protocols for optimal red cell storage and hemoglobin regeneration.

  15. Particle Method Computation of the Red Blood Cell Motion in Malaria Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Takami; Imai, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2010-09-01

    We developed a numerical model of blood flow in malaria infection. Our model was based on a particle method. All the components of blood were represented by finite number of particles. The membrane of red blood cells was modeled by triangular network of membrane particles. Stretch resistance and bending resistance were considered. The force generated by the deformation of membrane was substituted into the force term of Navier-Stokes equations only for membrane particles. The malaria parasite was assumed as a rigid object. Some interesting behavior of the infected and healthy red blood cells were simulated.

  16. Research opportunities in loss of red blood cell mass in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, J. M.; Fisher, K. D.

    1985-01-01

    Decreases of red blood cell mass and plasma volume have been observed consistently following manned space flights. Losses of red cell mass by United States astronauts have averaged 10 to 15% (range: 2 to 21%). Based on postflight estimates of total hemoglobin, Soviet cosmonauts engaged in space missions lasting from 1 to 7 months have exhibited somewhat greater losses. Restoration of red cell mass requires from 4 to 6 weeks following return to Earth, regardless of the duration of space flight.

  17. Hydrogen ion dynamics in human red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Swietach, Pawel; Tiffert, Teresa; Mauritz, Jakob M A; Seear, Rachel; Esposito, Alessandro; Kaminski, Clemens F; Lew, Virgilio L; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2010-12-15

    Our understanding of pH regulation within red blood cells (RBCs) has been inferred mainly from indirect experiments rather than from in situ measurements of intracellular pH (pH(i)). The present work shows that carboxy-SNARF-1, a pH fluorophore, when used with confocal imaging or flow cytometry, reliably reports pH(i) in individual, human RBCs, provided intracellular fluorescence is calibrated using a 'null-point' procedure. Mean pH(i) was 7.25 in CO(2)/HCO(3)(-)-buffered medium and 7.15 in Hepes-buffered medium, and varied linearly with extracellular pH (slope of 0.77). Intrinsic (non-CO(2)/HCO(3)(-)-dependent) buffering power, estimated in the intact cell (85 mmol (l cell)(-1) (pH unit)(-1) at resting pH(i)), was somewhat higher than previous estimates from cell lysates (50-70 mmol (l cell)(-1) (pH unit)(-1)). Acute displacement of pH(i) (superfusion of weak acids/bases) triggered rapid pH(i) recovery. This was mediated via membrane Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchange (the AE1 gene product), irrespective of whether recovery was from an intracellular acid or base load, and with no evident contribution from other transporters such as Na(+)/H(+) exchange. H(+)-equivalent flux through AE1 was a linear function of [H(+)](i) and reversed at resting pH(i), indicating that its activity is not allosterically regulated by pH(i), in contrast to other AE isoforms. By simultaneously monitoring pH(i) and markers of cell volume, a functional link between membrane ion transport, volume and pH(i) was demonstrated. RBC pH(i) is therefore tightly regulated via AE1 activity, but modulated during changes of cell volume. A comparable volume-pH(i) link may also be important in other cell types expressing anion exchangers. Direct measurement of pH(i) should be useful in future investigations of RBC physiology and pathology. PMID:20962000

  18. Direct In Vivo Electrochemical Detection of Haemoglobin in Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Rou Jun; Peng, Weng Kung; Han, Jongyoon; Pumera, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of iron ion in haemoglobin provides insight to the chemical activity in the red blood cell which is important in the field of hematology. Herein, the detection of haemoglobin in human red blood cells on glassy carbon electrode (GC) was demonstrated. Red blood cells or raw blood cells was immobilized on a glassy carbon electrode surface with Nafion films employed to sandwich the layer of biological sample firmly on the electrode surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) analyses revealed a well-defined reduction peak for haemoglobin at about -0.30 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) at the red blood cell (GC-Nf-RBC-3Nf) and blood (GC-Nf-B-3Nf) film modified GCE in a pH 3.5 phosphate buffer solution. We further demonstrated that the complex biological conditions of a human red blood cell displayed no interference with the detection of haemoglobin. Such findings shall have an implication on the possibilities of studying the electrochemical behaviour of haemoglobin directly from human blood, for various scientific and clinical purposes.

  19. Comparison of instruments for investigation of microcirculatory blood flow and red blood cell concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Doherty, Jim; McNamara, Paul; Clancy, Neil T.; Enfield, Joey G.; Leahy, Martin J.

    2009-05-01

    The use of laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) and laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI) is well known in the noninvasive investigation of microcirculatory blood flow. This work compares the two techniques with the recently developed tissue viability (TiVi) imaging system, which is proposed as a useful tool to quantify red blood cell concentration in microcirculation. Three systems are evaluated with common skin tests such as the use of vasodilating and vasoconstricting drugs (methlynicotinate and clobetasol, respectively) and a reactive hyperaemia maneuver (using a sphygmomanometer). The devices investigated are the laser Doppler line scanner (LDLS), the laser speckle perfusion imager (FLPI)-both from Moor Instruments (Axminster, United Kingdom)-and the TiVi imaging system (WheelsBridge AB, Linköping, Sweden). Both imaging and point scanning by the devices are used to quantify the provoked reactions. Perfusion images of vasodilatation and vasoconstriction are acquired with both LDLS and FLPI, while TiVi images are acquired with the TiVi imager. Time acquisitions of an averaged region of interest are acquired for temporal studies such as the reactive hyperaemia. In contrast to the change in perfusion over time with pressure, the TiVi imager shows a different response due its measurement of blood concentration rather than perfusion. The responses can be explained by physiological understanding. Although the three devices sample different compartments of tissue, and output essentially different variables, comparisons can be seen between the three systems. The LDLS system proves to be suited to measurement of perfusion in deeper vessels, while FLPI and TiVi showed sensitivity to more superficial nutritional supply. LDLS and FLPI are insensitive to the action of the vasoconstrictor, while TiVi shows the clear boundaries of the reaction. Assessment of the resolution, penetration depth, and acquisition rate of each instrument show complimentary features that should

  20. Blood analyte sensing using fluorescent dye-loaded red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Sarah C.; Shao, Xiaole; Cooley, Nicholas; Milanick, Mark A.; Glass, Timothy E.; Meissner, Kenith E.

    2014-02-01

    Measurement of blood analytes provides crucial information about a patient's health. Some such analytes, such as glucose in the case of diabetes, require long-term or near-continuous monitoring for proper disease management. However, current monitoring techniques are far from ideal: multiple-per-day finger stick tests are inconvenient and painful for the patient; implantable sensors have short functional life spans (i.e., 3-7 days). Due to analyte transporters on red blood cell (RBC) membranes that equilibrate intracellular and extracellular analyte levels, RBCs serve as an attractive alternative for encapsulating analyte sensors. Once reintroduced to the blood stream, the functionalized RBCs may continue to live for the remainder of their life span (120 days for humans). They are biodegradable and biocompatible, thereby eliminating the immune system response common for many implanted devices. The proposed sensing system utilizes the ability of the RBCs to swell in response to a decrease in the osmolarity of the extracellular solution. Just before lysis, they develop small pores on the scale of tens of nanometers. While at low temperature, analyte-sensitive dyes in the extracellular solution diffuse into the perforated RBCs and become entrapped upon restoration of temperature and osmolarity. Since the fluorescent signal from the entrapped dye reports on changes in the analyte level of the extracellular solution via the RBC transporters, interactions between the RBCs and the dye are critical to the efficacy of this technique. In this work, we study the use of a near infrared pH sensitive dye encapsulated within RBCs and assess the ability to measure dye fluorescence in vivo.

  1. Use of remote blood releasing system for red cell transfusion in hospice care center

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok Ying; Leung, Rock Yuk Yan; Cheung, Ka Chi; Lam, Clarence; Koo, Eleanor; Ng, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It is quite common to have advanced cancer or end-stage renal disease patients for regular or even frequent blood transfusion in palliative care. However, due to geographical reason in some hospice centers, blood transfusion is sometimes difficult if blood bank is closed during non-office hour or not available. Methods: Here, we reported a new blood releasing system, that is, remote blood releasing system, that could be used safely by nursing staff alone when the blood bank was closed during the night time and holiday. Results: On-call nursing staff could collect red cells successful in these two cases. Conclusion: The new blood releasing system seems useful. However, larger sample sizes and longer period of study are required to estimate its efficacy and safety. The provision of antibody-positive red cells and platelet remained a limitation of this system. PMID:27489720

  2. Design of an automated algorithm for labeling cardiac blood pool in gated SPECT images of radiolabeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hebert, T.J. |; Moore, W.H.; Dhekne, R.D.; Ford, P.V.; Wendt, J.A.; Murphy, P.H.; Ting, Y.

    1996-08-01

    The design of an automated computer algorithm for labeling the cardiac blood pool within gated 3-D reconstructions of the radiolabeled red blood cells is investigated. Due to patient functional abnormalities, limited resolution, and noise, certain spatial and temporal features of the cardiac blood pool that one would anticipate finding in every study are not present in certain frames or with certain patients. The labeling of the cardiac blood pool requires an algorithm that only relies upon features present in all patients. The authors investigate the design of a fully-automated region growing algorithm for this purpose.

  3. Biological effects of the electrostatic field: red blood cell-related alterations of oxidative processes in blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harutyunyan, Hayk A.; Sahakyan, Gohar V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine activities of pro-/antioxidant enzymes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and oxidative modification of proteins and lipids in red blood cells (RBCs) and blood plasma of rats exposed to electrostatic field (200 kV/m) during the short (1 h) and the long periods (6 day, 6 h daily). Short-term exposure was characterized by the increase of oxidatively damaged proteins in blood of rats. This was strongly expressed in RBC membranes. After long-term action, RBC content in peripheral blood was higher than in control ( P < 0.01) and the attenuation of prooxidant processes was shown.

  4. Radiolabeled red blood cells: status, problems, and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radionuclidic labels for red cells can be divided into two main categories - cohort or pulse labels, and random labels. The random labels are incorporated into circulating cells of all ages and the labeling process is usually carried out in vitro. The red cell labels in predominant use involve random labeling and employ technetium-99m, chromium-51, indium-111, and gallium-68, roughly in that order. The extent of usefulness depends on the properties of the label such as the half-life, decay mode, and in-vivo stability, etc. Labeled cells can be used for red cell survival measurements when the half-life of the radionuclide is sufficiently long. The major portion of this article deals with random labels.

  5. The Effect of Pulsatile Versus Nonpulsatile Blood Flow on Viscoelasticity and Red Blood Cell Aggregation in Extracorporeal Circulation

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chi Bum; Kang, Yang Jun; Kim, Myoung Gon; Yang, Sung; Lim, Choon Hak; Son, Ho Sung; Kim, Ji Sung; Lee, So Young; Son, Kuk Hui; Sun, Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) can induce alterations in blood viscoelasticity and cause red blood cell (RBC) aggregation. In this study, the authors evaluated the effects of pump flow pulsatility on blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation. Methods Mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to two groups: a nonpulsatile pump group (n=6) or a pulsatile pump group (n=6). After ECC was started at a pump flow rate of 80 mL/kg/min, cardiac fibrillation was induced. Blood sampling was performed before and at 1, 2, and 3 hours after ECC commencement. To eliminate bias induced by hematocrit and plasma, all blood samples were adjusted to a hematocrit of 45% using baseline plasma. Blood viscoelasticity, plasma viscosity, hematocrit, arterial blood gas analysis, central venous O2 saturation, and lactate were measured. Results The blood viscosity and aggregation index decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC and then remained low during ECC in both groups, but blood elasticity did not change during ECC. Blood viscosity, blood elasticity, plasma viscosity, and the aggregation index were not significantly different in the groups at any time. Hematocrit decreased abruptly 1 hour after ECC in both groups due to dilution by the priming solution used. Conclusion After ECC, blood viscoelasticity and RBC aggregation were not different in the pulsatile and nonpulsatile groups in the adult dog model. Furthermore, pulsatile flow did not have a more harmful effect on blood viscoelasticity or RBC aggregation than nonpulsatile flow. PMID:27298790

  6. Light scattering by red blood cells in ektacytometry: Fraunhofer versus anomalous diffraction.

    PubMed

    Streekstra, G J; Hoekstra, A G; Nijhof, E J; Heethaar, R M

    1993-05-01

    In the present literature on ektacytometry, small angle light scattering by ellipsoidal red blood cells is commonly approximated by Fraunhofer diffraction. Calculations on a sphere with the size and relative refractive index of a red cell, however, show that Fraunhofer diffraction deviates significantly from exact Mie theory. Anomalous diffraction is found to be a much better approximation. The anomalous diffraction theory is used to calculate the intensity distribution of the light scattered by an ellipsoidally deformed red blood cell. The derived expression shows that the ellipticity of isointensity curves in forward scattered light are equal to the ellipticity of the red blood cell. The theoretical expression is fitted to the intensity patterns measured with an ektacytometer. For the small observation angles used in ektacytometry, the experimental results confirm the validity of the anomalous diffraction approach.

  7. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test. PMID:27185543

  8. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

  9. Detection of an ileal cavernous hemangioma by technetium-99m red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Holloway, H.; Johnson, J.; Sandler, M.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with arteriovenous malformations of the bowel may have multiple symptoms secondary to chronic blood loss. A case of ileal cavernous hemangioma detected by Tc-99m labeled red blood cell imaging in the absence of active gastrointestinal bleeding is presented.

  10. Clinical evaluation of a /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell survival test for in vivo blood compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Dharkar, D.D.; Wahner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Modified red blood cell survival studies with use of 51Cr were performed in three groups of subjects. Group 1 consisted of normal subjects who were given labeled autologous blood, group 2 were subjects in need of blood transfusions and given labeled ABO and Rh crossmatch-compatible blood, and group 3 were patients in need of blood transfusion but in whom problems arose in finding compatible blood. The results of the studies suggest that for patients with blood compatibility problems, normal red blood cell survival values at 1 hour do not exclude the possibility of severe hemolysis 24 hours later. Thus, if a 1-hour test result is normal, the procedure should be extended routinely to 24 hours. Moreover, the test can be used to evaluate the clinical importance of antibodies. We showed that anti-Yka and anti-Lan were clinically significant, but high-titer, low-avidity antibodies, anti-Kna, anti-I, and anti-HI were clinically insignificant in the cases studied. This finding emphasizes the importance of an in vivo test for the final compatibility evaluation in complicated blood replacement problems.

  11. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-04-29

    A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

  12. Mechanical and electrical properties of red blood cells using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, A.; Barjas Castro, M. L.; Brandão, M. M.; Fernandes, H. P.; Thomaz, A. A.; Huruta, R. R.; Pozzo, L. Y.; Barbosa, L. C.; Costa, F. F.; Saad, S. T. O.; Cesar, C. L.

    2011-04-01

    Optical tweezers are a very sensitive tool, based on photon momentum transfer, for individual, cell by cell, manipulation and measurements, which can be applied to obtain important properties of erythrocytes for clinical and research purposes. Mechanical and electrical properties of erythrocytes are critical parameters for stored cells in transfusion centers, immunohematological tests performed in transfusional routines and in blood diseases. In this work, we showed methods, based on optical tweezers, to study red blood cells and applied them to measure apparent overall elasticity, apparent membrane viscosity, zeta potential, thickness of the double layer of electrical charges and adhesion in red blood cells.

  13. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall. PMID:26822224

  14. Flow structures and red blood cell dynamics in arteriole of dilated or constricted cross section.

    PubMed

    Gambaruto, Alberto M

    2016-07-26

    Vessel with 'circular' or 'star-shaped' cross sections are studied, representing respectively dilated or constricted cases where endothelial cells smoothly line or bulge into the lumen. Computational haemodynamics simulations are carried out on idealised periodic arteriole-sized vessels, with red blood cell 'tube' hematocrit value=24%. A further simulation of a single red blood cell serves for comparison purposes. The bulk motion of the red blood cells reproduces well-known effects, including the presence of a cell-free layer and the apparent shear-thinning non-Newtonian rheology. The velocity flow field is analysed in a Lagrangian reference frame, relative to any given red blood cell, hence removing the bulk coaxial motion and highlighting instead the complex secondary flow patterns. An aggregate formation becomes apparent, continuously rearranging and dynamic, brought about by the inter-cellular fluid mechanics interactions and the deformability properties of the cells. The secondary flow field induces a vacillating radial migration of the red blood cells. At different radial locations, the red blood cells express different residence times, orientation and shape. The shear stresses exerted by the flow on the vessel wall are influenced by the motion of red blood cells, despite the presence of the cell-free layer. Spatial (and temporal) variations of wall shear stress patters are observed, especially for the 'circular' vessel. The 'star-shaped' vessel bears considerable stress at the protruding endothelial cell crests, where the stress vectors are coaxially aligned. The bulging endothelial cells hence regularise the transmission of stresses on the vessel wall.

  15. Modelling and rapid simulation of multiple red blood cell light scattering.

    PubMed

    Zohdi, T I; Kuypers, F A

    2006-12-22

    The goal of this work is to develop a computational framework to rapidly simulate the light scattering response of multiple red blood cells. Because the wavelength of visible light (3.8 x 10(-7) m < or = lambda < or = 7.2 x 10(-7) m) is approximately an order of magnitude smaller than the diameter of a typical red blood cell scatterer (d approximately 8 x 10(-6) m), geometric ray-tracing theory is applicable, and can be used to quickly ascertain the amount of optical energy, characterized by the Poynting vector, that is reflected and absorbed by multiple red blood cells. The overall objective is to provide a straightforward approach that can be easily implemented by researchers in the field, using standard desktop computers. Three-dimensional examples are given to illustrate the approach and the results compare quite closely to experiments on blood samples conducted at the Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI).

  16. Lattice Boltzmann Simulation of Healthy and Defective Red Blood Cell Settling in Blood Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Z; Rahnama, M; Jafari, S

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to study sedimentation of a red blood cell (RBC) in a plasma-filled tube numerically. Such behaviors are studied for a healthy and a defective cell which might be created due to human diseases, such as diabetes, sickle-cell anemia, and hereditary spherocytosis. Flow-induced deformation of RBC is obtained using finite-element method (FEM), while flow and fluid-membrane interaction are handled using lattice Boltzmann (LB) and immersed boundary methods (IBMs), respectively. The effects of RBC properties as well as its geometry and orientation on its sedimentation rate are investigated and discussed. The results show that decreasing frontal area of an RBC and/or increasing tube diameter results in a faster settling. Comparison of healthy and diabetic cells reveals that less cell deformability leads to slower settling. The simulation results show that the sicklelike and spherelike RBCs have lower settling velocity as compared with a biconcave discoid cell. PMID:26926169

  17. Blood bank issues associated with red cell exchanges in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Sarode, Ravindra; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2006-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) patients are prone to develop complications that include stroke, acute chest syndrome, and other crises. Some of these complications require chronic transfusion therapy or red cell exchange (RCE), either for therapeutic or prophylactic reasons. Due to a discrepancy of red cell antigens between African Americans and Caucasians (majority blood donors), the incidence of alloantibody formation is very high, which makes it difficult to find compatible red cell units, especially for urgent RCE. Some of the above conditions require immediate oxygen delivery to the tissues. Thus, SCD patients undergoing RCE should receive red blood cells with special attributes that include matching for Rh and Kell blood group antigens; RBCs should be fresh in order to provide (1) immediate oxygen delivery and (2) longer surviving cells to reduce the interval between RCE. Also, these units should be pre-storage leukoreduced to prevent febrile non-hemolytic reactions and screened for sickle cell traits to avoid transfusing red cells containing HbS. This requires a concerted effort between the apheresis unit, the local blood bank, and the central blood supplier. PMID:17177280

  18. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Suemori, Shin-ichiro; Wada, Hideho; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Tsujioka, Takayuki; Sugihara, Takashi; Tohyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS). However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF) cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95). Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells.

  19. Analysis of Hereditary Elliptocytosis with Decreased Binding of Eosin-5-maleimide to Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suemori, Shin-ichiro; Wada, Hideho; Nakanishi, Hidekazu; Tsujioka, Takayuki; Sugihara, Takashi; Tohyama, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    Flow cytometric test for analyzing the eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) binding to red blood cells has been believed to be a specific method for diagnosing hereditary spherocytosis (HS). However, it has been reported that diseases other than HS, such as hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP) and Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), which are forms in the category of hereditary elliptocytosis (HE), show decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. We analyzed EMA binding to red blood cells in 101 healthy control subjects and 42 HS patients and obtained a mean channel fluorescence (MCF) cut-off value of 36.4 (sensitivity 0.97, specificity 0.95). Using this method, we also analyzed 12 HE patients. Among them, four HE patients showed the MCF at or below the cut-off value. It indicates that some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. Two of these four HE patients were classified as common HE, and two were spherocytic HE with reduced spectrin. This study demonstrates that, in addition to patients with HPP or SAO, some HE patients have decreased EMA binding to red blood cells. PMID:26557672

  20. [Development and challenge of modified hemoglobins as red blood cell substitutes].

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiu-Ling

    2006-01-01

    The problems of blood shortage and the virus infection risk of blood transfusion have promoted the study of blood substitutes. Modified hemoglobin has become the focus of the challenges research because of its excellent oxygen carrying ability. To overcome the toxicity effect on direct use of purified native hemoglobin, various modification technologies have been developed, including diaspirin cross-linking, glutaraldehyde polymerization, O-raffinose polymerization, polyethylene glycol conjugation, liposome encapsulation and biodegradable polymer encapsulation. Some of the products have been in clinical trials, and one of the products has been approved in a country for clinical use. Research on red blood cell substitutes in China has also developed fast. This paper provides an overview of the history and current status in development of different hemoglobin-based red blood cell substitutes, especially the problems encountered, the challenges faced, and the prospects in future.

  1. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tong; Rongin, Uwitije; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-02-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensional motions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial position of the cells, the hematocrit, and the membrane deformability. In addition, a cell free region around the tip of the confluence was observed. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with existing experimental findings. This study may provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of hemodynamic behavior of micro-scale blood flow.

  2. A micro-scale simulation of red blood cell passage through symmetric and asymmetric bifurcated vessels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tong; Rongin, Uwitije; Xing, Zhongwen

    2016-01-01

    Blood exhibits a heterogeneous nature of hematocrit, velocity, and effective viscosity in microcapillaries. Microvascular bifurcations have a significant influence on the distribution of the blood cells and blood flow behavior. This paper presents a simulation study performed on the two-dimensional motions and deformation of multiple red blood cells in microvessels with diverging and converging bifurcations. Fluid dynamics and membrane mechanics were incorporated. Effects of cell shape, hematocrit, and deformability of the cell membrane on rheological behavior of the red blood cells and the hemodynamics have been investigated. It was shown that the blood entering the daughter branch with a higher flow rate tended to receive disproportionally more cells. The results also demonstrate that red blood cells in microvessels experienced lateral migration in the parent channel and blunted velocity profiles in both straight section and daughter branches, and this effect was influenced by the shape and the initial position of the cells, the hematocrit, and the membrane deformability. In addition, a cell free region around the tip of the confluence was observed. The simulation results are qualitatively consistent with existing experimental findings. This study may provide fundamental knowledge for a better understanding of hemodynamic behavior of micro-scale blood flow. PMID:26830454

  3. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    SciTech Connect

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. )

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  4. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs. PMID:24836371

  5. Osmotic tolerance limits of red blood cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Zhurova, Mariia; Lusianti, Ratih E; Higgins, Adam Z; Acker, Jason P

    2014-08-01

    Effective methods for long-term preservation of cord red blood cells (RBCs) are needed to ensure a readily available supply of RBCs to treat fetal and neonatal anemia. Cryopreservation is a potential long-term storage strategy for maintaining the quality of cord RBCs for the use in intrauterine and neonatal transfusion. However, during cryopreservation, cells are subjected to damaging osmotic stresses during cryoprotectant addition and removal and freezing and thawing that require knowledge of osmotic tolerance limits in order to optimize the preservation process. The objective of this study was to characterize the osmotic tolerance limits of cord RBCs in conditions relevant to cryopreservation, and compare the results to the osmotic tolerance limits of adult RBCs. Osmotic tolerance limits were determined by exposing RBCs to solutions of different concentrations to induce a range of osmotic volume changes. Three treatment groups of adult and cord RBCs were tested: (1) isotonic saline, (2) 40% w/v glycerol, and (3) frozen-thawed RBCs in 40% w/v glycerol. We show that cord RBCs are more sensitive to shrinkage and swelling than adult RBCs, indicating that osmotic tolerance limits should be considered when adding and removing cryoprotectants. In addition, freezing and thawing resulted in both cord and adult RBCs becoming more sensitive to post-thaw swelling requiring that glycerol removal procedures for both cell types ensure that cell volume excursions are maintained below 1.7 times the isotonic osmotically active volume to attain good post-wash cell recovery. Our results will help inform the development of optimized cryopreservation protocol for cord RBCs.

  6. Optically-driven red blood cell rotor in linearly polarized laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Manas; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Sood, A. K.

    2005-11-01

    We have constructed a dual trap optical tweezers set-up around an inverted microscope where both the traps can be independently controlled and manipulated in all the three dimensions. Here we report our observations on rotation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a linearly polarized optical trap. Red blood cells deform and become twisted in hypertonic phosphate buffer saline and when trapped, experience an unbalanced radiation pressure force. The torque generated from the unbalanced force causes the trapped RBC to rotate. Addition of Ca^{++} ions in the solution, keeping the osmolarity same, makes the cell membranes stiffer and the cells deform less. Thus the speed of rotation of the red blood cells can be controlled, as less deformation and in turn less asymmetry in shape produces less torque under the radiation pressure resulting in slower rotation at the same laser power.

  7. Ex-vivo expansion of red blood cells: How real for transfusion in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Masselli, Elena; Varricchio, Lilian; Whitsett, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Blood transfusion is indispensable for modern medicine. In developed countries, the blood supply is adequate and safe but blood for alloimmunized patients is often unavailable. Concerns are increasing that donations may become inadequate in the future as the population ages prompting a search for alternative transfusion products. Improvements in culture conditions and proof-of-principle studies in animal models have suggested that ex-vivo expanded red cells may represent such a product. Compared to other cell therapies transfusion poses the unique challenge of requiring great cell doses (2.5 × 1012 cells vs 107 cells). Although production of such cell numbers is theoretically possible, current technologies generate red cells in numbers sufficient only for safety studies. It is conceived that by the time these studies will be completed, technical barriers to mass cell production will have been eliminated making transfusion with ex-vivo generated red cells a reality. PMID:22177597

  8. Quantitative Absorption Cytometry for Measuring Red Blood Cell Hemoglobin Mass and Volume

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrun, Ethan; Malka, Roy; Di Caprio, Giuseppe; Schaak, Diane; Higgins, John M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an optical system, called the quantitative absorption cytometer (QAC), to measure the volume and hemoglobin mass of red blood cells flowing through a microfluidic channel. In contrast to clinical hematology analyzers, where cells are sphered in order for both volume and hemoglobin to be measured accurately, the QAC measures cells in their normal physiological shape. Human red blood cells are suspended in a refractive index-matching absorbing buffer, driven through a microfluidic channel, and imaged using a transmission light microscope onto a color camera. A red and a blue LED illuminate cells and images at each color are used to independently retrieve cell volume and hemoglobin mass. This system shows good agreement with red blood cell indices retrieved by a clinical hematology analyzer and in fact measures a smaller coefficient of variation of hemoglobin concentration. In addition to cell indices, the QAC returns height and mass maps of each measured cell. These quantitative images are valuable for analyzing the detailed morphology of individual cells as well as statistical outliers found in the data. We also measured red blood cells in hypertonic and hypotonic buffers to quantify the correlation between volume and hemoglobin mass under osmotic stress. Because this method is invariant to cell shape, even extremely nonspherical cells in hypertonic buffers can be measured accurately. PMID:24677669

  9. New diffractometric equations and data processing algorithm for laser ektacytometry of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, S. Yu.; Ustinov, V. D.; Yurchuk, Yu. S.; Lugovtsov, A. E.; Lin, M. D.; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The problem of measuring the deformability of red blood cells in shear flow by laser diffractometry (ektacytometry) is considered. New diffractometric equations are obtained, which relate the parameters of the diffraction pattern to the characteristics of the erythrocyte ensemble, such as mean deformability as well as width and asymmetry of the erythrocytes distribution in deformability. A feature of these equations is that they include only geometric parameters of the diffraction pattern but do not contain its energy parameters. Basing on these equations, we propose a new data processing algorithm for the laser ektacytometry of red blood cells.

  10. Use of a solid phase red blood cell adherence method for pretransfusion platelet compatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Rachel, J M; Summers, T C; Sinor, L T; Plapp, F V

    1988-07-01

    A solid phase red blood cell adherence method has been used for platelet antibody detection and crossmatching for refractory platelet recipients. Patient sera were first screened for HLA or platelet-specific antibodies, then crossmatched with potential apheresis platelet donors. The overall correlation of platelet crossmatch results with transfusion outcome was 97% in patients with no evidence of nonimmune platelet destruction. The solid phase red blood cell adherence method provided a feasible and effective alternative to HLA matching as a means of donor selection for refractory platelet recipients. The speed and simplicity of this method may allow most hospital laboratories to perform platelet antibody screening before routine platelet transfusions.

  11. Hyperkalemia after irradiation of packed red blood cells: Possible effects with intravascular fetal transfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thorp, J.A.; Plapp, F.V.; Cohen, G.R.; Yeast, J.D.; O'Kell, R.T.; Stephenson, S. )

    1990-08-01

    Plasma potassium, calcium, and albumin concentrations in irradiated blood, and in fetal blood before and after transfusion, were measured. Dangerously high plasma potassium levels were observed in some units of irradiated packed red blood cells (range, 13.9 to 66.5 mEq/L; mean, 44.7 mEq/L) and could be one possible explanation for the high incidence of fetal arrhythmia associated with fetal intravascular transfusion. There are many factors operative in the preparation of irradiated packed red blood cells that may predispose to high potassium levels: the age of the red blood cells, the number of procedures used to concentrate the blood, the duration of time elapsed from concentration, the duration of time elapsed from irradiation, and the hematocrit. Use of fresh blood, avoidance of multiple packing procedures, limiting the hematocrit in the donor unit to less than or equal to 80%, and minimizing the time between concentration, irradiation and transfusion may minimize the potassium levels, and therefore making an additional washing procedure unnecessary.

  12. Effect of exercise on erythrocyte count and blood activity concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Konstom, M.A.; Tu'meh, S.; Wynne, J.; Beck, J.R.; Kozlowski, J.; Holman, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The effects of exercise on blood radiotracer concentration after technetium-99m in vivo red blood cell labeling was studied. After red blood cell labeling, 13 subjects underwent maximal supine bicycle exercise. Radioactivity, analyzed with a well counter, was measured in heparinized venous blood samples drawn at rest and during peak exercise. Changes in activity were compared with changes in erythrocyte count. Activity and erythrocyte counts increased in erythrocyte count (r=0.78), but did not correlate with either duration of exercise or maximal heart rate. Twenty minutes after termination of exercise, activity and erythrocyte count had decreased from peak exercise values but remained higher than preexercise values. In nine nonexercised control subjects, samples drawn 20 minutes apart showed no change in activity or in erythrocyte count. It was concluded that exercise increases blood activity, primarily because of an increase in erythrocyte count. During radionuclide ventriculography, blood activity must be measured before and after any intervention, particularly exercise, before a change in left ventricular activity can be attributed to a change in left ventricular volume.

  13. Direct detection of red blood cell fragments: a new flow cytometric method to evaluate hemolysis in blood pumps.

    PubMed

    Linneweber, J; Chow, T W; Takano, T; Maeda, T; Nonaka, K; Schulte-Eistrup, S; Kawahito, S; Elert, O; Moake, J L; Nosé, Y

    2001-01-01

    Pump induced hemolysis is presently evaluated by measuring plasma free hemoglobin (fHb). However, this method has disadvantages because quantification of fHb depends on hematocrit (HCT) and hemoglobin (Hb) levels. The aim of this work was to devise a hemoglobin independent method, capable of quantifying cell trauma directly by measuring the number of red blood cell (RBC) fragments. Whole blood flow cytometry was used to quantify circulating RBC fragments derived from a roller pump (Sarns, Inc. Model 2 M 6,002) and a centrifugal pump (Gyro C1E3, Kyocera Corp.). The pumps were tested in a mock circuit for 2 hr (5 L/min flow against 100 mm Hg pressure head). Red blood cell fragments were quantified by a phycoerythrin (PE) labeled glycophorin A antibody specific for erythrocytes. Red blood cell fragments were smaller than the intact RBC population and overlapped in size with the platelet population (based on forward- and side-light scattering measurements). For the roller pump, the values for RBC fragments increased from 1,090 +/- 260/microl at 0 min to 14,880 +/- 5,900/microl after 120 min. In contrast, using the centrifugal pump, there was little increase in RBC fragments (from 730 +/- 270/microl at 0 min to 1,400 +/- 840/microl after 120 min). Flow cytometry can be used for the rapid, sensitive, hemoglobin independent evaluation of pump induced RBC trauma.

  14. ["As white as snow, as red as blood..."].

    PubMed

    Petrilli, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the tale of Biancaneve and the seven dwarfs, by Grimm, used by the Author as a background to discuss the metaphorical function performed by blood images into the psychological relationship between parents and children. This allows a description of a feminine character which, already present in Greek mythology, at the origins of the Western civilization, has been apparently lost in the forthcoming Western cultural history, nonetheless strongly surviving in the construction of the consciousness and soul of women.

  15. Blood Thixotropy in Patients with Sickle Cell Anaemia: Role of Haematocrit and Red Blood Cell Rheological Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Waltz, Xavier; Romana, Marc; Hardy-Dessources, Marie-Dominique; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Connes, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We compared the blood thixotropic/shear-thinning properties and the red blood cells’ (RBC) rheological properties between a group of patients with sickle cell anaemia (SS) and healthy individuals (AA). Blood thixotropy was determined by measuring blood viscosity with a capillary viscometer using a “loop” protocol: the shear rate started at 1 s−1 and increased progressively to 922 s−1 and then re-decreased to the initial shear rate. Measurements were performed at native haematocrit for the two groups and at 25% and 40% haematocrit for the AA and SS individuals, respectively. RBC deformability was determined by ektacytometry and RBC aggregation properties by laser backscatter versus time. AA at native haematocrit had higher blood thixotropic index than SS at native haematocrit and AA at 25% haematocrit. At 40% haematocrit, SS had higher blood thixotropic index than AA. While RBC deformability and aggregation were lower in SS than in AA, the strength of RBC aggregates was higher in the former population. Our results showed that 1) anaemia is the main modulator of blood thixtropy and 2) the low RBC deformability and high RBC aggregates strength cause higher blood thixotropy in SS patients than in AA individuals at 40% haematocrit, which could impact blood flow in certain vascular compartments. PMID:25502228

  16. Screening for intermediate and severe forms of thalassaemia in discarded red blood cells: optimization and feasibility.

    PubMed

    George, Elizabeth; Lai, Mei I; Teh, Lai Kuan; Ramasamy, Rajesh; Goh, Ern Huei; Asokan, Kamalan; Tan, J A M A; Vasudevan, Maithili; Low, Sharon

    2011-12-01

    Detection and quantification of Hb subtypes of human blood is integral to presumptive identification of thalassaemias. It has been used in neonatal screening of thalassaemia and Hb variants. The use of discarded red blood cells following processing of the cord blood for stem cells provides readily available diagnostic material for thalassaemia screening. In this study, we determined the range of Hb subtypes in 195 consecutive cord blood samples collected for cord blood banking. The 'cord blood samples' analysed were those of the remaining red blood cells after the cord blood was processed for stem cell storage. Quantification of Hb subtypes by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was done on BioRad Variant II Hb testing system. Only 73 (36.5%) of the samples could be analyzed neat without dilution. With a 1:300 dilution with wash solution the acceptable area as recommended by the manufacturer for reading of a C-gram within the 1 to 3 million ranges were achieved in all. Eighteen (9%) 12 showed classical Hb Barts (y4) prerun peaks were confirmed by Sebia Hydrasys automated Hb gel electrophoresis and quantified by Sebia Capillarys 2 capillary electrophoresis. Only 1 (0.5%) was presumptively identified with HbH disease. Due to the limited number of samples no beta-thalassaemia major, Hb E beta-thalassaemia and Hb Barts hydrops fetalis were found. The HPLC assay was possible at a cost US$ 5 per sample and a turnover time of 10 samples per hour without technical difficulties. This study reports an effective and valuable protocol for thalassaemia screening in red blood cells which would otherwise be discarded during cord blood processing. Cord blood with severe and intermediate forms of thalassaemia can be preselected and not stored. PMID:22390095

  17. Reflectance confocal microscopy of red blood cells: simulation and experiment (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeidan, Adel; Yeheskely-Hayon, Daniella; Minai, Limor; Yelin, Dvir

    2016-03-01

    The properties of red blood cells are a remarkable indicator of the body's physiological condition; their density could indicate anemia or polycythemia, their absorption spectrum correlates with blood oxygenation, and their morphology is highly sensitive to various pathologic states including iron deficiency, ovalocytosis, and sickle cell disease. Therefore, measuring the morphology of red blood cells is important for clinical diagnosis, providing valuable indications on a patient's health. In this work, we simulated the appearance of normal red blood cells under a reflectance confocal microscope and discovered unique relations between the cells' morphological parameters and the resulting characteristic interference patterns. The simulation results showed good agreement with in vitro reflectance confocal images of red blood cells, acquired using spectrally encoded flow cytometry (SEFC) that imaged the cells during linear flow and without artificial staining. By matching the simulated patterns to the SEFC images of the cells, the cells' three-dimensional shapes were evaluated and their volumes were calculated. Potential applications include measurement of the mean corpuscular volume, cell morphological abnormalities, cell stiffness under mechanical stimuli, and the detection of various hematological diseases.

  18. Organochlorine contaminants in loggerhead sea turtle blood: extraction techniques and distribution among plasma and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Keller, J M; Kucklick, J R; McClellan-Green, P D

    2004-02-01

    Few studies have described the organochlorine (OC) contaminant concentrations found in sea turtle tissues. These studies have relied on the opportunistic sampling of either eggs or tissues from stranded carcasses. In this study, the use of whole blood samples as well as both blood components (plasma and red blood cells) were examined as a non-destructive alternative for monitoring OCs in free-ranging loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta). Blood samples were collected from juvenile loggerhead sea turtles (n = 12) captured in Core Sound, North Carolina, USA and analyzed for 55 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and 24 OC pesticides by gas chromatography with electron capture detection and mass spectrometry. Using pooled loggerhead sea turtle whole blood, three different liquid:liquid extraction techniques were compared. Results were similar in terms of recovery of internal standards, lipids, and OC concentrations. An extraction technique, employing formic acid and 1:1 methyl-tert-butyl-ether: hexane, was found to be satisfactory. This method was applied to the extraction of OCs from whole blood, plasma, and red blood cell (RBC) samples from five loggerhead sea turtles. Plasma contained the highest OC concentrations on a wet mass basis, followed by whole blood and RBCs. The majority of each OC compound was found in the plasma rather than the RBCs, suggesting that OC compounds preferentially partition into the plasma. On average (SD), 89.4% (3.1 %) of total PCBs, 83.4% (11.9%) of total chlordanes, 74.3% (15.1%) of mirex, 72.6% (4.8%) of total DDTs, and 80.1% (16.6%) of dieldrin were found in the plasma. The concentrations of total PCBs, mirex, total chlordanes, and total DDTs measured in both components of the blood significantly correlated to those in whole blood. These are the first reported OC concentrations in sea turtle blood. They were found to be similar to previously reported levels in blood components of humans and of reptiles from relatively clean

  19. Concise Review: Production of Cultured Red Blood Cells from Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the Western world, the volunteer-based collection system covers most transfusion needs, but transient shortages regularly develop and blood supplies are vulnerable to potentially major disruptions. The production of cultured red blood cells from stem cells is slowly emerging as a potential alternative. The various cell sources, the niche applications most likely to reach the clinic first, and some of the remaining technical issues are reviewed here. PMID:23283554

  20. ["As white as snow, as red as blood..."].

    PubMed

    Petrilli, Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    The paper deals with the tale of Biancaneve and the seven dwarfs, by Grimm, used by the Author as a background to discuss the metaphorical function performed by blood images into the psychological relationship between parents and children. This allows a description of a feminine character which, already present in Greek mythology, at the origins of the Western civilization, has been apparently lost in the forthcoming Western cultural history, nonetheless strongly surviving in the construction of the consciousness and soul of women. PMID:17152589

  1. Sphero-echinocytosis of human red blood cells caused by snake, red-back spider, bee and blue-ringed octopus venoms and its inhibition by snake sera.

    PubMed

    Flachsenberger, W; Leigh, C M; Mirtschin, P J

    1995-06-01

    It was found that bee (Apis mellifera) venom, red-back spider (Latrodectus mactans) venom, blue-ringed octopus (Hapalochlaena maculosa) venom, ten different snake venoms, phospholipase A2 and four snake toxins caused sphero-echinocytosis of human red blood cells at 200 ng/ml. Most venoms and toxins lost the ability to deform human red blood cells when their components of less than mol. wt 10,000 were applied. In a number of cases the sphero-echinocytotic effect was also inhibited by blood sera of Notechis scutatus and Pseudonaja textilis. PMID:7676470

  2. EVALUATION OF RED BLOOD CELL INDICES RELATED DISORDERS AMONG ELIGIBLE BLOOD DONORS AT THE UNIVERSITI PUTRA MALAYSIA (UPM).

    PubMed

    Riahi, Shahrzad; Mei, I Lai; Idris, Fariddh Binti; George, Elizabeth; Noor, Sabariah Md

    2015-09-01

    Pre-donation screening declarations and hemoglobin (Hb) testing are measures used to determine the quality of donated blood. The copper sulphate (CuSo4) method used to screen for blood abnormalities can give inaccurate results if strict quality control is not applied. Blood donors who are carriers of thalassemia and those with mild iron deficiency anemia (IDA) are usually asymptomatic and frequently missed at blood donation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the red blood cell (RBC) indices related disorders among blood donors who were deemed qualified to donate blood after screening with CuSo4 method. One hundred fifty-eight volunteer blood donors at the Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), who had passed the CuSo4 screening method, were recruited for this study. Their bloods specimens were examined with a complete blood count. Subjects with a low mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) level were examined further by checking a serum ferritin level, Hb quantification, and molecular analysis to examine for common RBC disorders. Fourteen point six percent of subjects had a low Hb level, two (1.3%) had IDA and four (2.5%) had thalassemia or some other hemoglobinopathy. Using a MCH level < 27 pg as a cut-off point, 58 subjects (36.7%) had suspected IDA, thalassemia or some other hemoglobinopathy. Eight point nine percent of subjects with a normal Hb level had thalassemia, and 3.8% had IDA. Malaysia has a high prevalence of thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies. Pre-donation accurate screening is crucial to protect the quality of blood transfusion products. Public education regarding RBC disorders especially among blood donors is important. PMID:26863862

  3. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brust, M.; Aouane, O.; Thiébaud, M.; Flormann, D.; Verdier, C.; Kaestner, L.; Laschke, M. W.; Selmi, H.; Benyoussef, A.; Podgorski, T.; Coupier, G.; Misbah, C.; Wagner, C.

    2014-03-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These persistent aggregates should strongly affect cell distribution and blood perfusion in the microvasculature, with putative implications for blood disorders even within apparently asymptomatic subjects.

  4. A fluid-particle interaction method for blood flow with special emphasis on red blood cell aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Xing, Zhongwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a fluid-particle interaction algorithm using the distributed Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain method. The application of this method to the numerical investigation of motion and aggregation of red blood cells in two-dimensional microvessels is discussed. The cells are modelled as rigid biconcave-shaped neutrally buoyant particles. The aggregating force between two cells is derived from a Morse type potential function. The cell-cell interaction is coupled with the fluid-cell interaction through a time splitting scheme. Simulation results of multiple red blood cells in Poiseuille flow are presented. Because of its modular nature, this algorithm is applicable to a large class of problems involving the processes of particle aggregation and fluid-particle interaction.

  5. Stem Cell Physics. Laser Manipulation of Blood Types: Laser-Stripping-Away of Red Blood Cell Surface Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-03-01

    A novel mechanism of importance for the transfusion medicine[2] is proposed. The interaction of ultrashort wavelength multilaser beams with the flowing blood thin films can lead to a conversion of blood types A, B, and AB into O type.[3] The stripping away of antigens is done by the scanning-multiple-lasers of a high repetition rate in the blue-purple frequency domain. The guiding-lasers are in the red-green frequency domain. The laser force, (parametric interaction with the antigen eigen-oscillation),[4] upon the antigen protein molecule must exceed its weight. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, La Jolla, CA.

  6. Red blood cell fatty acid composition and the metabolic syndrome: NHLBI GOLDN study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different fatty acids may vary in their effect on the metabolic syndrome (MetS). We tested whether fatty acid classes measured in red blood cells (RBC) are associated with the MetS or its components. Included were men (n=497, 49+/-16 y) and women (n=539, 48+/-16 y) from 187 families in the Genetics ...

  7. Hemoglobin Aggregation in Single Red Blood Cells of Sickle Cell Anemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishio, Izumi; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Sun, Shao-Tang; Imanishi, Yuri; Tsuyoshi Ohnishi, S.

    1983-06-01

    A laser light scattering technique was used to observe the extent of hemoglobin aggregation in solitary red blood cells of sickle cell anemia. Hemoglobin aggregation was confirmed in deoxygenated cells. The light scattering technique can also be applied to cytoplasmic studies of any biological cell.

  8. Investigating the fluid mechanics behind red blood cell-induced lateral platelet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting; they adhere to damaged tissue and release chemicals that activate other platelets. Yet in order to adhere, platelets must first come into contact with the injured vessel wall. Under arterial flow conditions, platelets have an enhanced concentration near blood vessel walls. This non-uniform cell distribution depends on the fluid dynamics of blood as a heterogeneous medium. We use a parallelized lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to solve the flow dynamics of red cells and platelets in a periodic 2D vessel with no-slip boundary conditions. Red cells are treated as biconcave immersed boundary objects with isotropic Skalak membrane tension and an internal viscosity five times that of the surrounding plasma. Using this method we analyze the influence of shear rate, hematocrit, and red cell membrane properties on lateral platelet motion. We find that the effective diffusion of platelets is significantly lower near the vessel wall compared to the center of the vessel. Insight gained from this work could lead to significant improvements to current models for platelet adhesion where the presence of red blood cells is neglected due to computational intensity.

  9. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells. PMID:26013297

  10. Isoelectric focusing of red blood cells in a density gradient stabilized column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Miller, T. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Ficoll and cell application pH on red blood cell electrophoretic mobility and focusing pH were investigated by focusing cells in a density gradient stabilized column. Sample loading, cell dispersion, column conductivity, resolution of separation, and the effect of Ampholines were examined.

  11. Metabolic profiling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells during proliferation and differentiation into red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daud, Hasbullah; Browne, Susan; Al-Majmaie, Rasoul; Murphy, William; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2016-01-25

    An understanding of the metabolic profile of cell proliferation and differentiation should support the optimization of culture conditions for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) proliferation, differentiation, and maturation into red blood cells. We have evaluated the key metabolic parameters during each phase of HSPC culture for red blood cell production in serum-supplemented (SS) and serum-free (SF) conditions. A simultaneous decrease in growth rate, total protein content, cell size, and the percentage of cells in the S/G2 phase of cell cycle, as well as an increase in the percentage of cells with a CD71(-)/GpA(+) surface marker profile, indicates HSPC differentiation into red blood cells. Compared with proliferating HSPCs, differentiating HSPCs showed significantly lower glucose and glutamine consumption rates, lactate and ammonia production rates, and amino acid consumption and production rates in both SS and SF conditions. Furthermore, extracellular acidification was associated with late proliferation phase, suggesting a reduced cellular metabolic rate during the transition from proliferation to differentiation. Under both SS and SF conditions, cells demonstrated a high metabolic rate with a mixed metabolism of both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in early and late proliferation, an increased dependence on OXPHOS activity during differentiation, and a shift to glycolytic metabolism only during maturation phase. These changes indicate that cell metabolism may have an important impact on the ability of HSPCs to proliferate and differentiate into red blood cells.

  12. Automatic tracking of red blood cells in micro channels using OpenCV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Vânia; Rodrigues, Pedro J.; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to developan automatic method able to track red blood cells (RBCs) trajectories flowing through a microchannel using the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV). The developed method is based on optical flux calculation assisted by the maximization of the template-matching product. The experimental results show a good functional performance of this method.

  13. Stimulation of calcium-sodium exchange in dog red blood cells by hemolysis and resealing.

    PubMed

    Parker, J C

    1988-09-01

    Osmotic hemolysis and resealing greatly increase calcium influx in dog red blood cells. The resealed ghosts show a saturable calcium entry pathway with complex kinetics. As expected for a calcium-sodium exchanger, calcium uptake is stimulated by internal sodium and inhibited by external sodium. Compared to fresh, intact red cells the resealed ghost calcium-sodium exchanger is less responsive to quinidine and to alterations in medium tonicity. The differences in calcium uptake rate among cells from different donors are minimized in the ghost preparation. There are several ways to stimulate sodium-dependent calcium movements in these cells, of which hemolysis-resealing is the most potent. The results of these and previous studies suggest that dog red blood cells have a latent capacity for calcium-sodium exchange. PMID:3415988

  14. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  15. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  16. Carbonic anhydrase activity in the red blood cells of sea level and high altitude natives.

    PubMed

    Gamboa, J; Caceda, R; Gamboa, A; Monge-C, C

    2000-01-01

    Red blood cell carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity has not been studied in high altitude natives. Because CA is an intraerythocytic enzyme and high altitude natives are polycythemic, it is important to know if the activity of CA per red cell volume is different from that of their sea level counterparts. Blood was collected from healthy subjects living in Lima (150m) and from twelve subjects from Cerro de Pasco (4330m), and hematocrit and carbonic anhydrase activity were measured. As expected, the high altitude natives had significantly higher hematocrits than the sea level controls (p = 0.0002). No difference in the CA activity per milliliter of red cells was found between the two populations. There was no correlation between the hematocrit and CA activity.

  17. Vesicles and red blood cells in flow: From individual dynamics to rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlahovska, Petia M.; Podgorski, Thomas; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2009-11-01

    The rheology of suspensions of soft particles, such as red blood cells, is a long-standing problem in science and engineering due to the complex interplay between deformable microstructure and the macroscale flow. The major challenge stems from the free-boundary nature of the particle interface. Lipid bilayer membranes that envelop cells and vesicles are particularly complex interfaces because of their unusual mechanics: the molecularly thin membrane is a highly-flexible incompressible fluid sheet. As a result, particles made of closed lipid bilayers (red cells and vesicles) can exhibit richer dynamics than would capsules and drops. We overview the key experimental observations and recent advances in the theoretical modeling of the vesicles and red blood cells in flow. To cite this article: P.M. Vlahovska et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  18. Kit for the rapid preparation of .sup.99m Tc red blood cells

    DOEpatents

    Richards, Powell; Smith, Terry D.

    1976-01-01

    A method and sample kit for the preparation of .sup.99m Tc-labeled red blood cells in a closed, sterile system. A partially evacuated tube, containing a freeze-dried stannous citrate formulation with heparin as an anticoagulant, allows whole blood to be automatically drawn from the patient. The radioisotope is added at the end of the labeling sequence to minimize operator exposure. Consistent 97% yields in 20 minutes are obtained with small blood samples. Freeze-dried kits have remained stable after five months.

  19. Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1997-01-01

    Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

  20. Effect of blood bank storage on the rheological properties of male and female donor red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Daly, Amanda; Raval, Jay S; Waters, Jonathan H; Yazer, Mark H; Kameneva, Marina V

    2014-01-01

    It was previously demonstrated that red blood cell (RBC) deformability progressively decreases during storage along with other changes in RBC mechanical properties. Recently, we reported that the magnitude of changes in RBC mechanical fragility associated with blood bank storage in a variety of additive solutions was strongly dependent on the donor gender [15]. Yet, the potential dependence of changes in the deformability and relaxation time of stored blood bank RBCs on donor gender is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of donor gender and blood bank storage on RBC deformability and relaxation time through the measurement of RBC suspension viscoelasticity. Packed RBC units preserved in AS-5 solution from 12 male and 12 female donors (three from each ABO group) were obtained from the local blood center and tested at 1, 4 and 7 weeks of storage at 1-6°C. At each time point, samples were aseptically removed from RBC units and hematocrit was adjusted to 40% before assessment of cell suspension viscoelasticity. RBC suspensions from both genders demonstrated progressive increases (p < 0.05) in viscosity, elasticity and relaxation time at equivalent shear rates over seven weeks of storage indicating a decrease in RBC deformability. No statistically significant differences in RBC deformability or relaxation time were observed between male and female RBCs at any storage time. The decrease in RBC deformability during blood bank storage may reduce tissue perfusion and RBC lifespan in patients receiving blood bank RBCs.

  1. Effects of nitric oxide and its congeners on sickle red blood cell deformability

    PubMed Central

    Belanger, Andrea M.; Keggi, Christian; Kanias, Tamir; Gladwin, Mark T.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sickle cell disease is characterized by hemoglobin (Hb) polymerization upon deoxygenation. Polymerization causes the sickle cells to become rigid and misshapen (sickling). Red blood cell (RBC) dehydration greatly increases polymerization. Cycles of sickling and unsickling cause an influx of calcium that leads to loss of potassium via the calcium-activated Gardos channel which dehydrates the cells leading to increased polymerization. In this study effects of NO and its congeners on RBC deformability were examined, focusing on sickle red blood cells. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS Red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease and from non-patients were exposed to various compounds that release NO or its congeners. Intracellular calcium was increased using a calcium ionophore or cycling of oxygen tension for sickle red blood cells. Deformability was measured by laser-assisted osmotic gradient ektacytometry. RESULTS Consistent with a previous report, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was found to protect against calcium-induced loss of deformability in normal red blood cells, but (contrary to some previous reports) no effect of any NO donors was observed when calcium influx was not induced. Importantly, in studies of deoxygenation-induced dehydration of sickle RBCs, SNP resulted in substantial improvements in deformability (p=0.036) and hydration (p=0.024). Sodium nitrite showed similar trends. SNP was shown to have no effect on calcium influx, but reduced potassium efflux. CONCLUSION These data suggest SNP and perhaps certain nitrogen oxides (like nitrite) inhibit the Gardos channel and may be able to protect sickle cells from dehydration and thereby improve outcome in the disease. PMID:25912054

  2. Immunoelectrophoresis of red blood cells performed on microcapillary chips.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Takanori; Ujiie, Tatekazu; Shinbashi, Satomi; Okuda, Tomoko; Horiike, Yasuhiro

    2002-07-01

    Immunoanalysis of blood cells on a microcapillary electrophoresis (nuCE) chip has been studied using sheep erythrocytes (ShE) as an example. Two different buffer solutions, the phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and the gelatin veronal buffer (GVB) were examined in regard to the electrokinetic transport behavior of ShE suspended in these solutions inside the rectangular channel engraved on a quartz chip. This clarified two advantages of the use of GVB for on-chip cell electrophoresis: gelatin coatings prevent (i) nonspecific sticking of ShE on the channel wall, and cause (ii) an appreciable reduction in the zeta potential of the wall suppressing the electroosmotic flow of the buffer solution. As a result ShE suspended in the GVB can smoothly migrate from the cathode to the anode, which is the opposite flow direction of immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies under the physiological pH condition of 7.4. Based on these results, on-chip capillary cell immunoelectrophoresis of ShE and rabbit anti ShE antibodies (IgG) have been proposed and successfully accomplished using the GVB. It is demonstrated that the variation of the cell migration velocity originating from the change in the surface charge after binding antibodies is applicable to the fast detection of immune reactions and also to single-cell typing.

  3. Contamination of salvaged maternal blood by amniotic fluid and fetal red cells during elective Caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, I.; Faulds, J.; Ralph, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background Cell salvage in obstetrics is still a controversial subject and has yet to be fully embraced. The aim of this exploratory study was to measure amniotic fluid (AF), heparin, and fetal red cell contamination of washed filtered salvaged maternal blood and to investigate differences based on the number of suction devices used. Methods Patients undergoing elective Caesarean section were assigned alternately to one of two groups. In Group 1, all blood and AF was collected with one suction. In Group 2, AF was aspirated to waste with a second separate suction device before collection of any blood. Results In both groups, alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), squames cells, and heparin were significantly reduced (P<0.001) by the washing and filtering process. Mean AFP levels post-filtration were 2.58 IU ml−1 in Group 1 and 3.53 IU ml−1 in Group 2. Squames cells were completely removed in all but two cases. Fetal red blood cells were still present in the final product, range 0.13–4.35%. In Group 1, haemoglobin and haematocrit were higher than in Group 2, with lower white blood cell, AFP, and fetal red cell counts. Conclusions This study adds to the growing body of evidence that there is little or no possibility for AF contamination to enter the re-infusion system when used in conjunction with a leucodepletion filter. PMID:18515817

  4. Red blood cell antioxidant enzymes in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed Central

    De La Paz, M A; Zhang, J; Fridovich, I

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Oxidative damage has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether red blood cell antioxidant enzyme activity correlates with severity of aging maculopathy in affected individuals. METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from 54 patients with varying severity of aging maculopathy and 12 similarly aged individuals with normal ophthalmoscopic examination. Macular findings were graded according to a modification of the method described for the Age-Related Eye Disease Study. (AREDS). The activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase were measured in red blood cells. Haemoglobin content of whole blood was measured, and enzyme activity was determined per mg haemoglobin. RESULTS: Multiple regression analysis and ordinal logistic regression analysis were performed to determine whether antioxidant enzyme activity was associated with severity of ARMD. No significant association between disease severity of ARMD and antioxidant enzyme activity was identified for any of the enzymes. CONCLUSION: These results do not provide evidence for a relation between oxidative stress, as measured by antioxidant enzyme activity in red blood cells, and disease severity in ARMD. PMID:8695567

  5. Red Blood Cells Initiate Leukocyte Rolling in Postcapillary Expansions: A Lattice Boltzmann Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chenghai; Migliorini, Cristiano; Munn, Lance L.

    2003-01-01

    Leukocyte rolling on the vascular endothelium requires initial contact between leukocytes circulating in the blood and the vessel wall. Although specific adhesion mechanisms are involved in leukocyte-endothelium interactions, adhesion patterns in vivo suggest other rheological mechanisms also play a role. Previous studies have proposed that the abundance of leukocyte rolling in postcapillary venules is due to interactions between red blood cells (RBCs) and leukocytes as they enter postcapillary expansions, but the details of the fluid dynamics have not been elucidated. We have analyzed the interactions of red and white blood cells as they flow from a capillary into a postcapillary venule using a lattice Boltzmann approach. This technique provides the complete solution of the flow field and quantification of the particle-particle forces in a relevant geometry. Our results show that capillary-postcapillary venule diameter ratio, RBC configuration, and RBC shape are critical determinants of the initiation of cell rolling in postcapillary venules. The model predicts that an optimal configuration of the trailing red blood cells is required to drive the white blood cell to the wall. PMID:12829477

  6. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization.

  7. 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy in evaluating focal liver lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, S.A.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-07-01

    To determine the accuracy of blood-pool imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas, 39 patients with various focal hepatic lesions were studied. The diagnoses in these patients were made by biopsy, angiography, surgical exploration, or clinical stability for a minimum of 14 months. The diagnoses were: hemangiomas (13 patients), hepatoma (three), metastases (19), abscesses (two), and liver cysts (two). After modified in vivo labeling of red blood cells with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of 99mTc pertechnetate, an initial flow study and early (1-15 min) and delayed (1-2 hr) static images were obtained. Increased blood-pool activity with a discordant flow pattern was seen in 11 of 13 patients with hemangiomas. False-negative scans occurred in two hemangiomas with extensive fibrosis. Two of three hepatomas had increased blood-pool activity associated with increased flow in a pattern identical to the increased blood-pool activity. None of the metastatic, abscess, or cystic lesions had increased blood-pool activity at any time after injection. It is concluded that 99mTc red blood cell imaging can distinguish hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions.

  8. Scattering of a laser beam on a wet blood smear and measurement of red cell size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchuk, Yu S.; Ustinov, V. D.; Nikitin, S. Yu; Priezzhev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    We report an automated laser system that allows the red cell size distribution to be measured. Experiments are performed on laser light scattering by a suspension of oriented red blood cells (a wet blood smear). Based on an analysis of the angular distribution of light intensity in the diffraction pattern, we have restored the red cell size distribution. The average diameter of a red blood cell is determined with an error of less than 1%, and the spread of red blood cells in size – with an error of about 20%. We discuss the problems of photometry and processing of diffraction patterns, preparing blood samples and data processing algorithms, including methods for solving the inverse scattering problem.

  9. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Red Blood Cell Units in Different Whole Blood Processing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bhagirath, Vinai C.; Heddle, Nancy M.; Liu, Yang; Eikelboom, John W.; Liaw, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Whole blood donations in Canada are processed by either the red cell filtration (RCF) or whole blood filtration (WBF) methods, where leukoreduction is potentially delayed in WBF. Fresh WBF red blood cells (RBCs) have been associated with increased in-hospital mortality after transfusion. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is released by neutrophils prior to leukoreduction, degraded during RBC storage, and is associated with adverse patient outcomes. We explored cfDNA levels in RBCs prepared by RCF and WBF and different storage durations. Methods. Equal numbers of fresh (stored ≤14 days) and older RBCs were sampled. cfDNA was quantified by spectrophotometry and PicoGreen. Separate regression models determined the association with processing method and storage duration and their interaction on cfDNA. Results. cfDNA in 120 RBC units (73 RCF, 47 WBF) were measured. Using PicoGreen, WBF units overall had higher cfDNA than RCF units (p = 0.0010); fresh WBF units had higher cfDNA than fresh RCF units (p = 0.0093). Using spectrophotometry, fresh RBC units overall had higher cfDNA than older units (p = 0.0031); fresh WBF RBCs had higher cfDNA than older RCF RBCs (p = 0.024). Conclusion. Higher cfDNA in fresh WBF was observed compared to older RCF blood. Further study is required for association with patient outcomes. PMID:27774338

  10. Effects of various arterial infusion solutions on red blood cells in the newborn

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J.; Derleth, D.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To examine in vitro the effects of brief contact with various infusion solutions on red blood cells from newborn infants, as occurs in the "waste" syringe during routine blood sampling from umbilical artery catheters. The mixture of blood and solution in the "waste" syringe is usually reinfused into the baby. Reinfused red blood cells may be damaged by the infusion solution. It is hypothesised that an isotonic amino acid solution would cause no red blood cell agglutination and no more haemolysis than many commonly used solutions.
METHODS—Blood was obtained from the placentas of 15 normal term babies. Haemolysis was estimated by measuring plasma (free) haemoglobin after mock blood sampling. Agglutination was measured semiquantitatively by direct observation.
RESULTS—A 0.25% normal saline solution caused 5.4% haemolysis, significantly more than all the other fluids tested. There was less haemolysis with 0.25% normal saline when there was complete mixing of blood and solution within the "waste" syringe. Normal saline and isotonic sodium acetate solutions caused < 0.1% haemolysis, significantly less than all the other fluids tested. The isotonic amino acid solution caused 0.8% haemolysis, which is similar to that caused by the remaining solutions tested. Agglutination was seen with isotonic dextrose and with the two isotonic amino acid solutions containing cysteine.
CONCLUSIONS—Isotonic amino acid solution (without added cysteine) caused no agglutination and the same or less haemolysis than many commonly used solutions and may offer advantages in nutrition and fluid balance.

 PMID:10952708

  11. Controlled Microfluidic Environment for Dynamic Investigation of Red Blood Cell Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mehri, Rym; Mavriplis, Catherine; Fenech, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Blood, as a non-Newtonian biofluid, represents the focus of numerous studies in the hemorheology field. Blood constituents include red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets that are suspended in blood plasma. Due to the abundance of the RBCs (40% to 45% of the blood volume), their behavior dictates the rheological behavior of blood especially in the microcirculation. At very low shear rates, RBCs are seen to assemble and form entities called aggregates, which causes the non-Newtonian behavior of blood. It is important to understand the conditions of the aggregates formation to comprehend the blood rheology in microcirculation. The protocol described here details the experimental procedure to determine quantitatively the RBC aggregates in microcirculation under constant shear rate, based on image processing. For this purpose, RBC-suspensions are tested and analyzed in 120 x 60 µm poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS) microchannels. The RBC-suspensions are entrained using a second fluid in order to obtain a linear velocity profile within the blood layer and thus achieve a wide range of constant shear rates. The shear rate is determined using a micro Particle Image Velocimetry (µPIV) system, while RBC aggregates are visualized using a high speed camera. The videos captured of the RBC aggregates are analyzed using image processing techniques in order to determine the aggregate sizes based on the images intensities. PMID:26065667

  12. Peripheral Red Blood Cell Split Chimerism as a Consequence of Intramedullary Selective Apoptosis of Recipient Red Blood Cells in a Case of Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marziali, Marco; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid; Fraboni, Daniela; Paciaroni, Katia; Gallucci, Cristiano; Alfieri, Cecilia; Roveda, Andrea; De Angelis, Gioia; Cardarelli, Luisa; Ribersani, Michela; Andreani, Marco; Lucarelli, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic cellular gene therapy through hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only radical cure for congenital hemoglobinopathies like thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Persistent mixed hematopoietic chimerism (PMC) has been described in thalassemia and sickle cell anemia. Here, we describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl who had received bone marrow transplant for sickle cell anemia. After the transplant, the patient showed 36% donor hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, whereas in the peripheral blood there was evidence of 80% circulating donor red blood cells (RBC). The analysis of apoptosis at the Bone Marrow level suggests that Fas might contribute to the cell death of host erythroid precursors. The increase in NK cells and the regulatory T cell population observed in this patient suggests that these cells might contribute to the condition of mixed chimerism. PMID:25408852

  13. Application of 30-MHz acoustic scattering to the study of human red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, M.S.; Apfel, R.E.; Wardlaw, S.C.

    1988-04-01

    A technique for simultaneously measuring the scattering amplitude of individual particles at two angles is applied to human red blood cells. Using a Rayleigh scattering model, the density and compressibility of the cells may be determined given a priori knowledge of their volume. A calibration method relying on measurements of the bulk properties of particle suspensions is described. Red cell properties in hypotonic and hypertonic hosts are compared with a homogeneous mixture model, and a linear relation between hemoglobin content and scattering amplitude at a 90 deg scattering angle is established.

  14. Mapping viscoelastic properties of healthy and pathological red blood cells at the nanoscale level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciasca, G.; Papi, M.; di Claudio, S.; Chiarpotto, M.; Palmieri, V.; Maulucci, G.; Nocca, G.; Rossi, C.; de Spirito, M.

    2015-10-01

    In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic response of red blood cells to mechanical stimuli is crucial to fully understand deformability changes under pathological conditions. However, the typical erythrocyte biconcave shape hints to a complex and intrinsically heterogeneous mechanical response that must be investigated by using probes at the nanoscale level. In this work, the local viscoelastic behaviour of healthy and pathological red blood cells was probed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Our results clearly show that the RBC stiffness is not spatially homogeneous, suggesting a strong correlation with the erythrocyte biconcave shape. Moreover, our nanoscale mapping highlights the key role played by viscous forces, demonstrating that RBCs do not behave as pure elastic bodies. The fundamental role played by viscous forces is further strengthened by the comparison between healthy and pathological (diabetes mellitus) RBCs. It is well known that pathological RBCs are usually stiffer than the healthy ones. Our measures unveil a more complex scenario according to which the difference between normal and pathological red blood cells does not merely lie in their stiffness but also in a different dynamical response to external stimuli that is governed by viscous forces.In order to pass through the microcirculation, red blood cells (RBCs) need to undergo extensive deformations and to recover the original shape. This extreme deformability is altered by various pathological conditions. On the other hand, an altered RBC deformability can have major effects on blood flow and can lead to pathological implications. The study of the viscoelastic

  15. Time-resolved optical spectroscopic quantification of red blood cell damage caused by cardiovascular devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakota, D.; Sakamoto, R.; Sobajima, H.; Yokoyama, N.; Yokoyama, Y.; Waguri, S.; Ohuchi, K.; Takatani, S.

    2008-02-01

    Cardiovascular devices such as heart-lung machine generate un-physiological level of shear stress to damage red blood cells, leading to hemolysis. The diagnostic techniques of cell damages, however, have not yet been established. In this study, the time-resolved optical spectroscopy was applied to quantify red blood cell (RBC) damages caused by the extracorporeal circulation system. Experimentally, the fresh porcine blood was subjected to varying degrees of shear stress in the rotary blood pump, followed with measurement of the time-resolved transmission characteristics using the pico-second pulses at 651 nm. The propagated optical energy through the blood specimen was detected using a streak camera. The data were analyzed in terms of the mean cell volume (MCV) and mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) measured separately versus the energy and propagation time of the light pulses. The results showed that as the circulation time increased, the MCV increased with decrease in MCHC. It was speculated that the older RBCs with smaller size and fragile membrane properties had been selectively destroyed by the shear stress. The time-resolved optical spectroscopy is a useful technique in quantifying the RBCs' damages by measuring the energy and propagation time of the ultra-short light pulses through the blood.

  16. Qualitative assessment of red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nubesh S.; Luke, Roji; Soman, Rino Roopak; Krishna, Praveen M.; Safar, Iqbal P.; Swaminathan, Senthil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Anemia of chronic disease is defined as anemia occurring in chronic infections and inflammatory conditions that is not caused by marrow deficiencies or other diseases and in the presence of adequate iron stores and vitamins. The present case control study was aimed to assess the red blood cell parameters for signs of anemia in patients with mild, moderate, and severe chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A simple random sampling method was used to select 80 healthy male patients, who were divided into four groups based on full mouth periodontal examination as follows: group I patients comprised the control group (n = 20), which included patients with a clinically healthy periodontium, group II patients (n = 20) were diagnosed with mild chronic periodontitis, group III (n = 20) included moderate chronic periodontitis patients, and patients with severe chronic periodontitis formed group IV (n = 20). Laboratory blood investigations included total number of erythrocytes, hemoglobin concentration, packed cell volume, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. Results: Data analysis showed a statistically significant decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in different grades of periodontitis. Conclusion: Results of the present study show a substantial decrease in red blood cell parameters with increase in the severity of periodontal destruction. PMID:26759801

  17. Evaluating red-cockaded woodpeckers for exposure to West Nile Virus and blood parasites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusek, R.J.; Richardson, D.; Egstad, K.F.; Heisey, Dennis M.

    2006-01-01

    A marked decline in the Picoides borealis (Red-cockaded Woodpecker [RCW]) population at Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, MS, was observed in 2002. Demographic changes - including absence of hatch-year birds, decreases in size of known groups, and loss of known groups-were identified during annual fall surveys and are uncharacteristic of RCW populations. In 2003, a serosurvey of 28 adult RCWs was conducted to investigate the presence of West Nile virus (WNV) exposure in the population, possibly providing insight into whether WNV may have been responsible for this decline. Blood smears were also examined from these birds for blood parasites. We found no evidence of West Nile virus exposure or blood parasites in any of the RCWs sampled. Further monitoring of the RCW population and WNV activity in other species at Noxubee NWR is recommended to further evaluate the potential role of WNV and blood parasites in their decline.

  18. Atypical appearance of an hepatic hemangioma with technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Larcos, G.; Farlow, D.C.; Gruenewald, S.M.; Antico, V.F. )

    1989-11-01

    Three-phase 99mTc red blood cell scintigraphy is an established technique for distinguishing hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions. The most widely recognized feature is the perfusion to blood-pool mismatch characterized by decreased or normal arterial perfusion, with lesion activity which progressively increases over 1-2 hr. Although increased arterial vascularity of hemangiomas has been described, such cases either involved small portions of the lesion only or occurred in lesions not conclusively proven to be hemangiomas. We report a case of an angiography proven hemangioma with increased arterial vascularity involving a significant portion of the lesion as well as intense early blood-pool activity similar to that seen on delayed imaging. This case emphasizes the diverse appearance of hepatic hemangiomas using 99mTc blood cell scintigraphy.

  19. Occlusion of Small Vessels by Malaria-Infected Red Blood Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Huan; Fedosov, Dmitry; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George

    2010-11-01

    We use dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method to study malaria-infected red blood cells (i-RBC). We have developed a multi-scale model to describe both static and dynamic properties of RBCs. With this model, we study the adhesive interaction between RBCs as well as the interaction between the Plasmodium falciparum (Pf)-parasitized cells and a vessel wall coated with purified ICAM-1. In this talk, we will discuss the effect of the Pf-parasitized malaria cell on the flow resistance of the blood flow at different parasetimia levels. The blood flow in malaria disease shows high flow resistance as compared with the healthy case due to both the stiffening of the i-RBCs (up to ten times) as well as the adhesion dynamics. For certain sizes of of small vessels, the malaria-infected cells can even lead to occlusion of the blood flow, in agreement with recent experiments.

  20. In vivo Measurement of Red Blood Cell Deformation and Velocity in Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jae Hong; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Minamiyama, Motomu; Okamoto, Koji

    2004-11-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) which plays an important role in oxygen transportation changes its shape as it flows along the arteriole and capillary. In this study, in order to investigate blood rheology, RBCs deformation, RBCs velocity and capillary diameter in a mesenteric capillary were measured with high spatial and temporal resolutions. Blood flow images were captured using intravital microscope equipped with a high-speed camera system at 2000 frames/sec. The relationships between a deformation index of RBC, RBC velocity and capillary diameter were investigated. The averaged deformation index (DI) of RBC in the mesenteric capillary showed 1.55 with the averaged diameter of the capillary 6.2 micro m and the average velocity 1.85 mm/sec. As increasing the velocity or decreasing the diameter, DI usually increased. The results indicated that RBCs deformed into parachute-like shapes depending on the blood flow velocity and capillary diameter.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency alters erythroblastic island formation, steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Stuart T.; Midwinter, Robyn G.; Coupland, Lucy A.; Kong, Stephanie; Berger, Birgit S.; Yeo, Jia Hao; Andrade, Osvaldo Cooley; Cromer, Deborah; Suarna, Cacang; Lam, Magda; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Chong, Beng H.; Parish, Christopher R.; Stocker, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 is critical for iron recycling during red blood cell turnover, whereas its impact on steady-state erythropoiesis and red blood cell lifespan is not known. We show here that in 8- to 14-week old mice, heme oxygenase-1 deficiency adversely affects steady-state erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. This is manifested by a decrease in Ter-119+-erythroid cells, abnormal adhesion molecule expression on macrophages and erythroid cells, and a greatly diminished ability to form erythroblastic islands. Compared with wild-type animals, red blood cell size and hemoglobin content are decreased, while the number of circulating red blood cells is increased in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, overall leading to microcytic anemia. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases oxidative stress in circulating red blood cells and greatly decreases the frequency of macrophages expressing the phosphatidylserine receptor Tim4 in bone marrow, spleen and liver. Heme oxygenase-1 deficiency increases spleen weight and Ter119+-erythroid cells in the spleen, although α4β1-integrin expression by these cells and splenic macrophages positive for vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 are both decreased. Red blood cell lifespan is prolonged in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice compared with wild-type mice. Our findings suggest that while macrophages and relevant receptors required for red blood cell formation and removal are substantially depleted in heme oxygenase-1 deficient mice, the extent of anemia in these mice may be ameliorated by the prolonged lifespan of their oxidatively stressed erythrocytes. PMID:25682599

  2. Total three-dimensional imaging of phase objects using defocusing microscopy: Application to red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roma, P. M. S.; Siman, L.; Amaral, F. T.; Agero, U.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce Defocusing Microscopy (DM), a bright-field optical microscopy technique able to perform total three-dimensional (3D) imaging of transparent objects. By total 3D imaging, we mean the determination of the actual shapes of the upper and lower surfaces of a phase object. We propose a methodology using DM and apply it to red blood cells subject to different osmolality conditions: hypotonic, isotonic, and hypertonic solutions. For each situation, the shapes of the upper and lower cell surface-membranes (lipid bilayer/cytoskeleton) are completely recovered, displaying the deformation of red blood cell (RBC) surfaces due to adhesion on the glass-substrate. The axial resolution of our technique allowed us to image surface-membranes separated by distances as small as 300 nm. Finally, we determine the volume, surface area, sphericity index, and RBC refractive index for each osmotic condition.

  3. Radionuclide-labeled red blood cell imaging of vascular malformations in children

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, G.M.; Bolton, L.L.; Miller, J.H.; Reinisch, J.F.; Nichter, L.S.

    1988-09-01

    Vascular malformations, particularly in the absence of cutaneous changes, can be difficult to distinguish from other soft tissue masses in children. We have used technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell scintigraphy to study 47 lesions in 43 children. Thirty-nine lesions showed increased flow and were, therefore, diagnosed as vascular malformations. Subsequent biopsy of 10 of these lesions confirmed that diagnosis. The other 29 lesions with increased flow were followed for 10 months to 5 years and the clinical course was consistent with vascular malformation in every case. Eight lesions showed no increased flow on technetium scan. One of these subsequently proved to be a hemangioma. The others have turned out not to be vascular malformations. Therefore, in our experience, the technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell scan has had 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity in diagnosing vascular malformations in children.

  4. Paper-based analytical devices for electrochemical study of the breathing process of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiang-Yun; Wu, Ling-Ling; Pan, Zhong-Qin; Shi, Chuan-Guo; Bao, Ning; Gu, Hai-Ying

    2015-04-01

    Herein we utilized the filter paper to physically trap red blood cells (RBC) to observe the breathing process of red blood cells based on the permeability of the filter paper. By integrating double-sided conductive carbon tape as the working electrodes, the device could be applied to monitor electrochemical responses of RBC for up to hundreds of minutes. The differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) peak currents increased under oxygen while decreased under nitrogen, indicating that RBC could take in and release oxygen. Further studies demonstrated that the RBC suspension could more effectively take in oxygen than the solution of hemoglobin and the supernatant of RBC, suggesting the natural advantage of RBC on oxygen transportation. This study implied that simple paper-based analytical devices might be effectively applied in the study of gas-participating reactions and biochemical detections.

  5. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy. PMID:26846309

  6. Technetium labelled red blood cell scintigraphy in the diagnosis of intestinal haemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, M. H.; Neoptolemos, J. P.; Watkin, E. M.; Cosgriff, P.; Barrie, W. W.

    1985-01-01

    99m-Technetium labelled red blood cell scintigraphy was used in the investigation of 15 adult patients with suspected small or large bowel bleeding requiring at least five units of blood (mean 14.3 units) and one neonate with rectal bleeding. Scintigraphy was found to be an accurate method of detecting the site of haemorrhage and was superior to angiography. This technique may be of particular value in patients with profuse colonic haemorrhage when the view at colonoscopy is poor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3872094

  7. Effects of Poloxamer 188 on red blood cell membrane properties in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Sandor, Barbara; Marin, Mickaël; Lapoumeroulie, Claudine; Rabaï, Miklos; Lefevre, Sophie D; Lemonne, Nathalie; El Nemer, Wassim; Mozar, Anaïs; Français, Olivier; Le Pioufle, Bruno; Connes, Philippe; Le Van Kim, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is the main acute complication in sickle cell anaemia (SS) and several clinical trials are investigating different drugs to improve the clinical severity of SS patients. A phase III study is currently exploring the profit of Velopoloxamer in SS during VOCs. We analysed, in-vitro, the effect of poloxamer (P188) on red blood cell (RBC) properties by investigating haemorheology, mechanical and adhesion functions using ektacytometry, microfluidics and dynamic adhesion approaches, respectively. We show that poloxamer significantly reduces blood viscosity, RBC aggregation and adhesion to endothelial cells, supporting the beneficial use of this molecule in SS therapy.

  8. Quasi-elastic light scattering studies of membrane motion in single red blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tishler, R B; Carlson, F D

    1987-01-01

    Studies of red blood cells (RBCs) and RBC ghosts, using a quasi-elastic light scattering (QELS) microscope spectrometer, have identified the membrane as the primary source of the light scattering signal. This is the first report in which motion of the cell membrane has been demonstrated to be the primary source of the QELS signal from a cell. Cytoplasmic changes induced in the RBC by varying the osmotic strength of the medium were also detected using this technique. Comparison of the data from white blood cells (WBCs) with the RBC data demonstrated significant differences between different types of cells. PMID:3607216

  9. Photometric determination of phenomenological correlation between osmotic behavior and hemolysis of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, X S; Kamino, K

    1995-01-01

    The osmotic behavior of red blood cells from a human and from several other mammalian species was studied by photometric measurements. When red blood cells were suspended in sodium chloride solutions with various osmotic concentrations, the optical density at 620 nm was reciprocally related to the relative volume of the red cells. Thus, we evaluated the osmotic volume changes in the red cells from optical density measurements. The Boyle-van't Hoff relation was applicable to the osmotic behavior of red cells which responded as a complete osmometer in hypertonic and slightly hypotonic (lower than about 240 mOsm) solutions. Also, we examined the rheological correlation between osmotic volume changes and hemolysis. Osmotic hemolysis occurred corresponding to breakdown of the Boyle-van't Hoff relation in hypotonic solutions. The critical osmotic concentration for the breakdown of the Boyle-van't Hoff relation was that for osmotic hemolysis. In Na2SO4 solutions, although the critical osmotic concentration shifted towards a smaller value, the critical volume for the breakdown of the Boyle-van't Hoff relation and for osmotic hemolysis was maintained at a constant value, indicating that the onset of osmotic hemolysis depends exclusively upon the critical volume. In the samples from a human, the critical volume for the onset of hemolysis was estimated to be 1.25 +/- 0.05 in the ratio to the normal volume in iso-osmotic solution. From these obtained results, it is suggested that the red cell behaves in hypotonic solutions as a viscoelastic body of the type represented by the Voigt model, and the viscoelastic breakdown of the membrane results in osmotic hemolysis in hypotonic solution. PMID:8713172

  10. Species determination using the red blood cells morphometry in domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Adili, Nezar; Melizi, Mohamed; Belabbas, Hadj

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This investigation is placed in the context of continuity of a preliminary study already published; it was conducted in cattle, sheep, goats, horses, and dogs; the main aim is to reveal and develop criteria for the animal species determination based on the morphometric parameters of red blood cells. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were taken from the jugular vein; and the smears were confectioned on slides immediately after the blood collection and stained according to the May-Gründwald Giemsa method. For the morphometric study, three parameters were considered which are: The diameter, the circumference, and the surface of erythrocytes; and measurements were achieved using the OPTIKATM Vision Pro software. Statistical analysis was performed by both analysis of variances and Student’s t analytical tests. Results: The recorded data showed that the three morphometric parameters of red blood cells are higher in dogs followed, respectively, by those of horses, cattle, and sheep, whereas, the goats have the lowest ones. In addition, the obtained results allowed us to propose new reference values for the circumference and the surface of erythrocyte in considered species. Conclusion: This investigation permit concluding that from a drop of blood it is possible to characterize the different animal species, taking into account the diameter, the circumference, and the surface of erythrocytes. PMID:27733796

  11. /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell scintigraphy in evaluating focal liver lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinowitz, S.A.; McKusick, K.A.; Strauss, H.W.

    1984-07-01

    To determine the accuracy of blood-pool imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas, 39 patients with various focal hepatic lesions were studied. The diagnoses in these patients were made by biopsy, angiography, surgical exploration, or clinical stability for a minimum of 14 months. The diagnoses were: hemangiomas (13 patients), hepatoma (three), metastases (19), abscesses (two), and liver cysts (two). After modified in vivo labeling of red blood cells with 20 mCi (740 MBq) of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate, an initial flow study and early (1-15 min) and delayed (1-2 hr) static images were obtained. Increased blood-pool activity with a discordant flow pattern was seen in 11 of 13 patients with hemangiomas. False-negative scans occurred in two hemangiomas with extensive fibrosis. None of the metastatic, abscess, or cystic lesions had increased blood-pool activity at any time after injection. It is concluded that /sup 99m/Tc red blood cell imaging can distinguish hemangiomas from other focal liver lesions.

  12. Open Gradient Magnetic Red Blood Cell Sorter Evaluation on Model Cell Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Lee R.; Nehl, Franzisca; Dorn, Jenny; Chalmers, Jeffrey J.; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    The emerging applications of biological cell separation to rare circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and separation from blood rely on efficient methods of red blood cell (RBC) debulking. The two most widely used methods of centrifugation and RBC lysis have been associated with the concomitant significant losses of the cells of interest (such as progenitor cells or circulating tumor cells). Moreover, RBC centrifugation and lysis are not well adapted to the emerging diagnostic applications, relying on microfluidics and micro-scale total analytical systems. Therefore, magnetic RBC separation appears a logical alternative considering the high iron content of the RBC (normal mean 105 fg) as compared to the white blood cell iron content (normal mean 1.6 fg). The typical magnetic forces acting on a RBC are small, however, as compared to typical forces associated with centrifugation or the forces acting on synthetic magnetic nanoparticles used in current magnetic cell separations. This requires a significant effort in designing and fabricating a practical magnetic RBC separator. Applying advanced designs to the low cost, high power permanent magnets currently available, and building on the accumulated knowledge of the immunomagnetic cell separation methods and devices, an open gradient magnetic red blood cell (RBC) sorter was designed, fabricated and tested on label-free cell mixtures, with potential applications to RBC debulking from whole blood samples intended for diagnostic tests. PMID:24910468

  13. Effects of storage on irradiated red blood cells: An in-vitro and in-vivo study. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Knoll, S.E.

    1991-08-01

    Irradiation of red blood cell units has recently become a topic of special concern as the result of increasing reports of graft versus host disease in immunocompetent blood transfusion recipients. This study was designed to evaluate the potassium elevations observed in stored irradiated red blood cells and to evaluate the in vivo survival of stored irradiated red blood cells using a dog model. In the in vitro study ten units of human CPDA-1 packed red blood cells were made into paired aliquots; one aliquot of each pair was irradiated with 3000 rads of gamma radiation and the potassium content measured at points throughout 35 days of storage. A significant increase in potassium levels in the irradiated aliquots was observed from the first day after irradiation and continued through the entire storage period.

  14. Continuous and noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring reduces red blood cell transfusion during neurosurgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Awada, Wael N; Mohmoued, Maher F; Radwan, Tarek M; Hussien, Gomaa Z; Elkady, Hany W

    2015-12-01

    Continuous, noninvasive hemoglobin (SpHb) monitoring provides clinicians with the trending of changes in hemoglobin, which has the potential to alter red blood cell transfusion decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of SpHb monitoring on blood transfusions in high blood loss surgery. In this prospective cohort study, eligible patients scheduled for neurosurgery were enrolled into either a Control Group or an intervention group (SpHb Group). The Control Group received intraoperative hemoglobin monitoring by intermittent blood sampling when there was an estimated 15% blood loss. If the laboratory value indicated a hemoglobin level of ≤10 g/dL, a red blood cell transfusion was started and continued until the estimated blood loss was replaced and a laboratory hemoglobin value was >l0 g/dL. In the SpHb Group patients were monitored with a Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter for continuous noninvasive hemoglobin values. Transfusion was started when the SpHb value fell to ≤l0 g/dL and was continued until the SpHb was ≥l0 g/dL. Blood samples were taken pre and post transfusion. Percent of patients transfused, average amount of blood transfused in those who received transfusions and the delay time from the hemoglobin reading of <10 g/dL to the start of transfusion (transfusion delay) were compared between groups. The trending ability of SpHb, and the bias and precision of SpHb compared to the laboratory hemoglobin were calculated. Compared to the Control Group, the SpHb Group had fewer units of blood transfused (1.0 vs 1.9 units for all patients; p ≤ 0.001, and 2.3 vs 3.9 units in patients receiving transfusions; p ≤ 0.0 l), fewer patients receiving >3 units (32 vs 73%; p ≤ 0.01) and a shorter time to transfusion after the need was established (9.2 ± 1.7 vs 50.2 ± 7.9 min; p ≤ 0.00 l). The absolute accuracy of SpHb was 0.0 ± 0.8 g/dL and trend accuracy yielded a coefficient of determination of 0.93. Adding SpHb monitoring to

  15. Continuous and noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring reduces red blood cell transfusion during neurosurgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Awada, Wael N; Mohmoued, Maher F; Radwan, Tarek M; Hussien, Gomaa Z; Elkady, Hany W

    2015-12-01

    Continuous, noninvasive hemoglobin (SpHb) monitoring provides clinicians with the trending of changes in hemoglobin, which has the potential to alter red blood cell transfusion decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of SpHb monitoring on blood transfusions in high blood loss surgery. In this prospective cohort study, eligible patients scheduled for neurosurgery were enrolled into either a Control Group or an intervention group (SpHb Group). The Control Group received intraoperative hemoglobin monitoring by intermittent blood sampling when there was an estimated 15% blood loss. If the laboratory value indicated a hemoglobin level of ≤10 g/dL, a red blood cell transfusion was started and continued until the estimated blood loss was replaced and a laboratory hemoglobin value was >l0 g/dL. In the SpHb Group patients were monitored with a Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter for continuous noninvasive hemoglobin values. Transfusion was started when the SpHb value fell to ≤l0 g/dL and was continued until the SpHb was ≥l0 g/dL. Blood samples were taken pre and post transfusion. Percent of patients transfused, average amount of blood transfused in those who received transfusions and the delay time from the hemoglobin reading of <10 g/dL to the start of transfusion (transfusion delay) were compared between groups. The trending ability of SpHb, and the bias and precision of SpHb compared to the laboratory hemoglobin were calculated. Compared to the Control Group, the SpHb Group had fewer units of blood transfused (1.0 vs 1.9 units for all patients; p ≤ 0.001, and 2.3 vs 3.9 units in patients receiving transfusions; p ≤ 0.0 l), fewer patients receiving >3 units (32 vs 73%; p ≤ 0.01) and a shorter time to transfusion after the need was established (9.2 ± 1.7 vs 50.2 ± 7.9 min; p ≤ 0.00 l). The absolute accuracy of SpHb was 0.0 ± 0.8 g/dL and trend accuracy yielded a coefficient of determination of 0.93. Adding SpHb monitoring to

  16. Characterizations of individual human red blood cells from patients with diabetes mellitus (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, SangYun; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, HyunJoo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    We systematically measure the morphological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties of individual human red blood cells (RBCs) from patients with diabetes mellitus using quantitative phase imaging technique to characterize the diabetic red cells with respect to those of the healthy. The 3-D refractive index tomograms and 2-D dynamic membrane fluctuation maps of individual RBCs are reconstructed from a set of the retrieved complex optical fields at various laser incidence angles using the Common-path diffraction optical tomography, from which volume, surface area, sphericity, hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, Hb content, and membrane fluctuation are obtained simultaneously. The correlative relations among the retrieved red cell indices of diabetic and healthy RBCs are also investigated with capabilities of individual cell measurement. As expected, there are no significant alterations in morphologies (cellular volumes, surface area, and sphericity) between diabetic and healthy RBCs. However, despite the minute mean corpuscular Hb differences in cell blood count datasheet, the measured Hb concentrations and Hb contents of diabetic RBCs are statistically higher than those of healthy RBCs, which might be related to the glycation of Hb molecules by hyperglycemia. Meanwhile, the membrane fluctuations of diabetic RBCs are clearly diminished compared to healthy red cells, implying the significantly decreased RBC deformability. In particular, it seems that the membrane fluctuations have mild negative relationships with the reported HbA1c levels.

  17. Electrophoretic characterization of aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, kidney cells, lynphocytes and chamber coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Ground-based electrokinetic data on the electrophoresis flight experiment to be flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project experiment MA-011 are stipulated. Aldehyde-fixed red blood cells, embryonic kidney cells and lymphocytes were evaluated by analytical particle electrophoresis. The results which aided in the interpretation of the final analysis of the MA-011 experiment are documented. The electrophoresis chamber surface modifications, the buffer, and the material used in the column system are also discussed.

  18. Simultaneous determination of size and refractive index of red blood cells by light scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, N.; Buddhiwant, P.; Uppal, A.; Majumder, S.K.; Patel, H.S.; Gupta, P.K.

    2006-02-20

    We present a fast and accurate approach for simultaneous determination of both the mean diameter and refractive index of a collection of red blood cells (RBCs). The approach uses the peak frequency of the power spectrum and the corresponding phase angle obtained by performing Fourier transform on the measured angular distribution of scattered light to determine these parameters. Results on the measurement of two important clinical parameters, the mean cell volume and mean cell hemoglobin concentration of a collection of RBCs, are presented.

  19. Detection of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells by optical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauritz, Jakob M. A.; Tiffert, Teresa; Seear, Rachel; Lautenschläger, Franziska; Esposito, Alessandro; Lew, Virgilio L.; Guck, Jochen; Kaminski, Clemens F.

    2010-05-01

    We present the application of a microfluidic optical cell stretcher to measure the elasticity of malaria-infected red blood cells. The measurements confirm an increase in host cell rigidity during the maturation of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The device combines the selectivity and sensitivity of single-cell elasticity measurements with a throughput that is higher than conventional single-cell techniques. The method has potential to detect early stages of infection with excellent sensitivity and high speed.

  20. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  1. Lipopolysaccharide from Proteus mirabilis O29 induces changes in red blood cell membrane lipids and proteins.

    PubMed

    Gwoździński, Krzysztof; Pieniazek, Anna; Kaca, Wiesław

    2003-03-01

    Alterations in red blood cell (RBC) plasma membranes, i.e. in lipids and proteins, and osmotic fragility of these cells after treatment with Proteus mirabilis O29 endotoxin (lipolysaccharide (LPS)) were examined using a spin labelling method. At the highest concentration of LPS, insignificantly decreased fluidity of membrane lipids was observed. Changes in conformation of membrane proteins were determined by two covalently bound spin labels, 4-maleimido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (MSL) and 4-iodoacetamido-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (ISL). The analysis of spectra of MSL and ISL showed modifications in membrane proteins in red blood cells treated with the highest concentration of lipopolysaccharide. On the other hand, in the case of isolated membranes, disturbances in membrane were observed for all concentrations of LPS. The alterations in membrane lipids and proteins are paralleled in a significant rise in osmotic fragility of RBCs upon endotoxin treatment. These results provide experimental evidence that P. mirabilis O29 LPS causes deleterious changes in membranes of human red blood cells. They show that action of lipopolysaccharide mainly concerns the membrane cytoskeleton. PMID:12531246

  2. Plasmolysis, red blood cell partitioning, and plasma protein binding of etofibrate, clofibrate, and their degradation products.

    PubMed

    Altmayer, P; Garrett, E R

    1983-11-01

    Etofibrate (I), the ethylene glycol diester of clofibric and nicotinic acids, degrades almost equally through both half-esters with half-lives of approximately 10 and 1 min in fresh dog and human plasma, respectively. The nicotinate V degrades with half-lives of approximately 12 hr and 50 min in fresh dog and human plasma, respectively. Ester III and clofibrate VI degrade by saturable Michaelis-Menten kinetics in fresh human plasma, with similar maximum initial rates and respective terminal first-order half-lives of 12 and 26 min. Tetraethyl pyrophosphate at 100 micrograms/ml inhibited human plasma and red blood cell esterases permitting plasma protein binding and red blood cell partitioning studies. The red blood cell-plasma water partition coefficient was 5.4 for 0.2-80 micrograms/ml of I. Clofibrate (VI) showed a saturable erythrocyte partitioning that decreased from 7.8 (10 micrograms/ml) to 1 (50 micrograms/ml). The strong binding of I and VI to ultrafiltration membranes necessitated the determination of their plasma protein binding by the method of variable plasma concentrations of erythrocyte suspensions to give 96.6% (0.2-80 micrograms/ml) and 98.2% (13.6-108.4 micrograms/ml) binding, respectively. Methods for the determination of the parameters of saturable and nonsaturable plasma protein binding for unstable and membrane-binding drugs by the method of variable plasma concentrations in partitioning erythrocyte suspensions are presented.

  3. Equilibrium physics breakdown reveals the active nature of red blood cell flickering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turlier, Herve; Fedosov, Dmitry; Auth, Thorsten; Gov, Nir S.; Sykes, Cecile; Joanny, Jean-Francois; Gompper, Gerhard; Betz, Timo

    2015-03-01

    Red blood cell membrane flickering stimulated an abundant biological, biophysical and biochemical literature over the past 50 years. While the phenomenon has been interpreted as thermal fluctuations of the cell membrane, recent results suggest the involvement of metabolic processes. However, to date there is no direct and conclusive evidence that an active force drives membrane flickering. By comparing membrane undulations and active microrheology measurements on single human erythrocytes, we show that flickering is partly driven by an active metabolic process, as it does not satisfy the equilibrium fluctuation-dissipation relation on timescales slower than 100ms. Analytical and numerical models of the red blood cell reproduce experimental results. The analytical model assumes that membrane activity results from reversible binding of the elastic spectrin network to the lipid bilayer and predicts active fluctuations to increase with local curvature and extensional prestress in the cytoskeleton. Our mean-field calculation shows that the strength and kinetics of the binding activity regulates thereupon both passive and active mechanical properties of the red blood cell. Numerical simulations explore other possible origins of active forces on the membrane and predict coherent timescales for the molecular underlying metabolic processes.

  4. Influence of Dietary Capsaicin on Redox Status in Red Blood Cells During Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prabhanshu; Chand, Subhash; Chandra, Pranjal; Maurya, Pawan Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is a major pungent compound found in hot peppers of the plant genus Capsicum. In vitro effects of dietary capsaicin on redox status in red blood cells during human aging have been explored. Methods: Total antioxidant potential of capsaicin was evaluated using Ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) assay. GSH was measured as per standard protocol. The in vitro effect of capsaicin was evaluated by incubation of the cells in the assay medium with 10-5M capsaicin (final concentration) for 60 min at 37°C. Results: Treatment with capsaicin (10-5M) caused a significant (p < 0.01) increase in GSH level in all age groups. Reduced glutathione (GSH) / Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio measures the redox status of the red blood cell. Significant increase in GSH level due to capsaicin, shift the GSH/GSSG ratio, thus alters the redox status of the cell. Conclusion: The results conclusively prove the efficacy of the antioxidant property of capsaicin and its role in modulating the redox status of red blood cells. This evidence suggests that dietary factors that act as antioxidants to increase GSH level may contribute to a protective effect against age related diseases. This antioxidant effect may, in part, explain the high consumption of capsicum in certain regions of the world. PMID:26819932

  5. Red blood cell micromanipulation with elliptical laser beam profile optical tweezers in different osmolarity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyratou, E.; Makropoulou, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this work optical tweezers with elliptical beam profiles have been developed in order to examine the effect of optical force on fresh red blood cells (RBC) in isotonic, hypertonic and hypotonic buffer solutions. Considering that the optical force depends essentially on the cell surface and the cytoplasmic refractive index, it is obvious that biochemical modifications associated with different states of the cell will influence its behaviour in the optical trap. Line optical tweezers were used to manipulate simultaneously more than one red blood cell. After we have been manipulated a RBC with an elliptical laser beam profile in an isotonic or hypertonic buffer, we noticed that it rotates by itself when gets trapped by optical tweezers and undergoes folding. Further shape deformations can be observed attributed to the competition between alignment and rotational torque which are transferred by laser light to the cell. In hypotonic buffer RBCs become spherical and do not rotate or fold since the resultant force due to rays emerging from diametrically opposite points of the cell leads to zero torque. Manipulation of fresh red blood cells in isotonic solution by line optical tweezers leads to folding and elongation of trapped RBCs. Membrane elasticity properties such as bending modulus can be estimated by measuring RBC's folding time in function with laser power.

  6. Lisdexamfetamine prodrug activation by peptidase-mediated hydrolysis in the cytosol of red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Johannah; Pennick, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX) is approved as a once-daily treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in children, adolescents, and adults in some countries. LDX is a prodrug comprising d-amphetamine covalently linked to l-lysine via a peptide bond. Following oral administration, LDX is rapidly taken up from the small intestine by active carrier-mediated transport, probably via peptide transporter 1. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the peptide bond to release d-amphetamine has previously been shown to occur in human red blood cells but not in several other tissues. Here, we report that LDX hydrolytic activity resides in human red blood cell lysate and cytosolic extract but not in the membrane fraction. Among several inhibitors tested, a protease inhibitor cocktail, bestatin, and ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid each potently inhibited d-amphetamine production from LDX in cytosolic extract. These results suggest that an aminopeptidase is responsible for hydrolytic cleavage of the LDX peptide bond, although purified recombinant aminopeptidase B was not able to release d-amphetamine from LDX in vitro. The demonstration that aminopeptidase-like activity in red blood cell cytosol is responsible for the hydrolysis of LDX extends our understanding of the smooth and consistent systemic delivery of d-amphetamine by LDX and the long daily duration of efficacy of the drug in relieving the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. PMID:25489246

  7. Multiplexed fluidic plunger mechanism for the measurement of red blood cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Myrand-Lapierre, Marie-Eve; Deng, Xiaoyan; Ang, Richard R; Matthews, Kerryn; Santoso, Aline T; Ma, Hongshen

    2015-01-01

    The extraordinary deformability of red blood cells gives them the ability to repeatedly transit through the microvasculature of the human body. The loss of this capability is part of the pathology of a wide range of diseases including malaria, hemoglobinopathies, and micronutrient deficiencies. We report on a technique for multiplexed measurements of the pressure required to deform individual red blood cell through micrometer-scale constrictions. This measurement is performed by first infusing single red blood cells into a parallel array of ~1.7 μm funnel-shaped constrictions. Next, a saw-tooth pressure waveform is applied across the constrictions to squeeze each cell through its constriction. The threshold deformation pressure is then determined by relating the pressure-time data with the video of the deformation process. Our key innovation is a self-compensating fluidic network that ensures identical pressures are applied to each cell regardless of its position, as well as the presence of cells in neighboring constrictions. These characteristics ensure the consistency of the measurement process and robustness against blockages of the constrictions by rigid cells and debris. We evaluate this technique using in vitro cultures of RBCs infected with P. falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, to demonstrate the ability to profile the deformability signature of a heterogeneous sample. PMID:25325848

  8. Shear Stress induced Stretching of Red Blood Cells by Oscillating Bubbles within a Narrow Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Mohammadzadeh, Milad; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Claus-Dieter Ohl Team

    2013-11-01

    The flow pattern, especially the boundary layer caused by the expanding/contracting bubble in a narrow gap (15 μm) and the resultant stretching of red blood cells is investigated in this work. High speed recordings show that a red blood cell (biconcave shape, thickness of 1-2 μm) can be elongated to five times its original length by a laser-induced cavitation bubble within the narrow gap. However, flexible cancer cells in suspension (RKO, spherical shape, diameter of 10-15 μm) are hardly elongated under the same experimental condition. We hypothesize that the shear stress at the boundary layer is crucial for this elongation to occur. Therefore, in order to resolve the related fluid dynamics, we conducted numerical simulations using the finite element method (Fluent). The rapidly expanding/contracting vapor bubble is successfully modeled by employing viscosity and surface tension. The transient pressure inside the bubble and the velocity profile of the flow is obtained. We observe strong shear near the upper and lower boundary during the bubble oscillation. The flow fields are compared with analytical solutions to transient and pulsating flows in 2D. In the experiment the red blood cells sit within the lower boundary layer, thus are probably elongated by this strong shear flow. In contrast, the spherical cancer cells are of comparable size to the gap height so that they are lesser affected by this boundary layer flow.

  9. Interpretation of low-level Plasmodium infection rates determined by ELISA for anophelines (Diptera: Culicidae) from Egyptian oases.

    PubMed

    Kenawy, M A; Beier, J C; Asiago, C M; el Said, S E; Roberts, C R

    1990-07-01

    Plasmodium infection rates determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were compared for Anopheles sergentii (Theobald) and An. multicolor Cambouliu in Siwa Oasis, Egypt, an area with low-level Plasmodium vivax transmission, and in Bahariya and Farafra, two other Egyptian oases which appear to be free of malaria. Initial testing indicated that 4.4% (23 of 518) and 0.8% (4 of 518) of the An. sergentii were positive for P. vivax and P. falciparum, respectively, and that 1.4% (1 of 71) of the An. multicolor were positive for P. falciparum. However, after two confirmational tests, only 1.2% (6 of 518) of the An. sergentii remained consistently positive for P. vivax. Initial ELISA absorbance was not a useful predictor of potential false positive reactions in the P. vivax assay. Paradoxically, the six ELISA-positive An. sergentii were from the two malaria-free oases. This study raises the question of whether ELISA-positive reactions for anopheline vector species provides unequivocal evidence for transmission in areas of low malaria endemicity.

  10. Radionuclide-labeled red blood cells: current status and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Chervu, L.R.

    1984-04-01

    Radiolabeling of red cells and their clinical and research application in nuclear medicine constitute an area of continued interest and steady growth during the past two decades. Technetium-/sup 99/m-labeled red cells in particular have revolutionized the field of cardiovascular nuclear medicine by making possible the external evaluation of various heart parameters with minimum radiation dose or trauma to the patient. Among other areas of study that use /sup 99/mTc -RBC are blood pool imaging, detection of vascular malformations, red cell mass determination, detection of gastrointestinal bleeding, and of hemangiomas. Heat-damaged /sup 99/mTc -RBC find application in spleen imaging, accessory spleen localization, detection of GI bleeding, and in other areas. A critical evaluation is presented of the various in vitro and in vivo labeling techniques that are currently available for red cell labeling. Even though the presently used procedures provide satisfactory labeled preparations, ideal radioisotopic RBC labels remain to be developed. Intermediate (2-3 days) as well as long-lived (approximately 30 days) radionuclidic labels are highly desirable for a number of clinical procedures where /sup 99/mTc is not useful due to its short half-life. New approaches such as the use of radiolabeled antibodies to red cell antigens, or labeling specific receptor sites in the cell may lead to substantial improvements in the labeling methodology and could yield labeled cells with the least damage and maximum in vivo stability.

  11. Study of damage to red blood cells exposed to different doses of γ-ray irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Deyi; Peng, Mingxi; Zhang, Zhe; Dong, Guofei; Zhang, Yiqin; Yu, Hongwei

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aims of this research were to study alterations in the ultrastructure of red blood cells, the changes in concentrations of plasma electrolytes and the killing effect of lymphocytes in samples of blood exposed to different doses of γ-ray irradiation. Materials and methods. Blood samples were treated with different doses of γ-ray irradiation and then preserved for different periods. Specimens were prepared for standard electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. At the same time, changes in the concentrations of Na+, K+ and Cl− and pH values in the plasma as well as Fas and FasL expression of lymphocytes before and after irradiation were determined. Results. The proportions of reversibly and irreversibly transformed cells, for example, echinocytes, sphero-echinocytes, and degenerated forms, increased with increasing doses of irradiation and storage period, while the number of discocyte shaped red blood cells decreased. The change in K+ concentration was greater than that of Na+ or Cl− after irradiation and was dosage-dependent. Plasma pH was influenced by different doses of radiation and storage time. After exposure to 137Cs γ-irradiation, the expression of both Fas and FasL in lymphocytes differed significantly from that in the control group: the expression was positively correlated with irradiation dose (r=0.95, 0.96), but no significant difference in the Fas/FasL ratio was observed (P>0.05). Discussion. We conclude that the ultrastructure of red blood cells is not changed obviously by irradiation with some doses of γ-rays and various periods of storage. However, irradiation does have some dose-dependent and time-dependent adverse effects on the erythrocytes. PMID:22682338

  12. Controlled lecithin release from a hierarchical architecture on blood-contacting surface to reduce hemolysis of stored red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiang; Fan, Qunfu; Ye, Wei; Hou, Jianwen; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-06-25

    Hemolysis of red blood cells (RBCs) caused by implant devices in vivo and nonpolyvinyl chloride containers for RBC preservation in vitro has recently gained much attention. To develop blood-contacting biomaterials with long-term antihemolysis capability, we present a facile method to construct a hydrophilic, 3D hierarchical architecture on the surface of styrene-b-(ethylene-co-butylene)-b-styrene elastomer (SEBS) with poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)/lecithin nano/microfibers. The strategy is based on electrospinning of PEO/lecithin fibers onto the surface of poly [poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] [P(PEGMEMA)]-modified SEBS, which renders SEBS suitable for RBC storage in vitro. We demonstrate that the constructed 3D architecture is composed of hydrophilic micro- and nanofibers, which transforms to hydrogel networks immediately in blood; the controlled release of lecithin is achieved by gradual dissolution of PEO/lecithin hydrogels, and the interaction of lecithin with RBCs maintains the membrane flexibility and normal RBC shape. Thus, the blood-contacting surface reduces both mechanical and oxidative damage to RBC membranes, resulting in low hemolysis of preserved RBCs. This work not only paves new way to fabricate high hemocompatible biomaterials for RBC storage in vitro, but provides basic principles to design and develop antihemolysis biomaterials for implantation in vivo.

  13. [In vitro generation of blood red cells from stem cells: a sketch of the future].

    PubMed

    Mazurier, Christelle; Douay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Human adult pluripotent stem cells, stem cells of embryonic origin and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS) provide cellular sources for new promising regenerative medicine approaches. Because these cells can be patient-specific, they allow considering a personalized medicine appropriate to the diagnosis of each. The generation of cultured red blood cells (cRBC) derived from stem cells is emblematic of personalized medicine. Indeed, these cells have the advantage of being selected according to a blood phenotype of interest and they may provide treatments to patients in situation of impossible transfusion (alloimmunized patients, rare phenotypes). Essential progresses have established proof of concept for this approach, still a concept some years ago. From adult stem cells, all steps of upstream research were successfully achieved, including the demonstration of the feasibility of injection into human. This leads us to believe that Red Blood Cells generated in vitro from stem cells will be the future players of blood transfusion. However, although theoretically ideal, these stem cells raise many biological challenges to overcome, although some tracks are identified. PMID:27286576

  14. Automated microscopy system for detection and genetic characterization of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravkin, Ilya; Temov, Vladimir

    1998-04-01

    The detection and genetic analysis of fetal cells in maternal blood will permit noninvasive prenatal screening for genetic defects. Applied Imaging has developed and is currently evaluating a system for semiautomatic detection of fetal nucleated red blood cells on slides and acquisition of their DNA probe FISH images. The specimens are blood smears from pregnant women (9 - 16 weeks gestation) enriched for nucleated red blood cells (NRBC). The cells are identified by using labeled monoclonal antibodies directed to different types of hemoglobin chains (gamma, epsilon); the nuclei are stained with DAPI. The Applied Imaging system has been implemented with both Olympus BX and Nikon Eclipse series microscopes which were equipped with transmission and fluorescence optics. The system includes the following motorized components: stage, focus, transmission, and fluorescence filter wheels. A video camera with light integration (COHU 4910) permits low light imaging. The software capabilities include scanning, relocation, autofocusing, feature extraction, facilities for operator review, and data analysis. Detection of fetal NRBCs is achieved by employing a combination of brightfield and fluorescence images of nuclear and cytoplasmic markers. The brightfield and fluorescence images are all obtained with a single multi-bandpass dichroic mirror. A Z-stack of DNA probe FISH images is acquired by moving focus and switching excitation filters. This stack is combined to produce an enhanced image for presentation and spot counting.

  15. Frequencies of red blood cell major blood group antigens and phenotypes in the Chinese Han population from Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Ma, C; Sun, X; Guan, X; Zhang, X; Saldanha, J; Chen, L; Wang, D

    2016-08-01

    Alloantibodies directed to red blood cell (RBC) antigens play an important role in alloimmune-mediated haemolytic transfusion reactions and haemolytic disease of the foetus and newborn. The frequencies and phenotypes of RBC antigens are different in populations from different geographic areas and races. However, the data on major blood group antigens in the Chinese Han population from Mainland China are still very limited; thus, we aimed to investigate them in this study. A total of 1412 unrelated voluntary Chinese Han blood donors were randomly recruited. All donors were typed for blood group antigens: D, C, c, E, e, C(w) , Jk(a) , Jk(b) ,M, N, S, s, Le(a) , Le(b) , K, k. Kp(a) , Kp(b) , Fy(a) , Fy(b) , Lu(a) , Lu(b) , P1 and Di(a) using serological technology. Calculations of antigen and phenotype frequencies were expressed as percentages and for allele frequencies under the standard assumption of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Amongst the Rh antigens, D was the most common (98.94%) followed by e (92.28%), C (88.81%), c (58.43%), E (50.78%) and C(w) (0.07%) with DCe/DCe (R1 R1 , 40.72%) being the most common phenotype. In the Kell blood group system, k was present in 100% of the donors and a rare phenotype, Kp (a+b+), was found in 0.28% of the donors. For the Kidd and Duffy blood group systems, Jk (a+b+) and Fy (a+b-) were the most common phenotypes (44.05% and 84.35%, respectively). In the MNS blood group system, M+N+S-s+ (45.54%) was the most common, whereas M+N-S-s- and M-N+S-s- were not found. The rare Lu (a-b-) and Lu (a+b+) phenotypes were identified in 0.43% and 1.13% of the donors, respectively. Le(a) and Le(b) were seen in 17.92% and 63.03% of donors, respectively. The frequency of Di(a) was 4.75%, which was higher than in the Chinese population in Taiwan region or the Caucasian and Black populations (P < 0.0001). This study systematically describes the frequencies of 24 blood group antigens in the Chinese Han population from Mainland China. The data can

  16. Two-Dimensional Computational Flow Analysis and Frictional Characteristics Model for Red Blood Cell under Inclined Centrifuge Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funamoto, Kenichi; Hayase, Toshiyuki; Shirai, Atsushi

    Simplified two-dimensional flow analysis is performed in order to simulate frictional characteristics measurement of red blood cells moving on a glass plate in a medium with an inclined centrifuge microscope. Computation under various conditions reveals the influences of parameters on lift, drag, and moment acting on a red blood cell. Among these forces, lift appears only when the cell is longitudinally asymmetric. By considering the balance of forces, the frictional characteristics of the red blood cell are modeled as the sum of Coulomb friction and viscous drag. The model describes the possibility that the red blood cell deforms to expand in the front side in response to the inclined centrifugal force. When velocity exceeds some critical value, the lift overcomes the normal centrifugal force component, and the thickness of the plasma layer between the cell and the glass plate increases from the initial value of the plasma protein thickness.

  17. Design of microfluidic channels for magnetic separation of malaria-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Tao; Martin, Andrea Blue; Gandini, Alberto; Aubry, Nadine; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F.

    2016-01-01

    This study is motivated by the development of a blood cell filtration device for removal of malaria-infected, parasitized red blood cells (pRBCs). The blood was modeled as a multi-component fluid using the computational fluid dynamics discrete element method (CFD-DEM), wherein plasma was treated as a Newtonian fluid and the red blood cells (RBCs) were modeled as soft-sphere solid particles which move under the influence of drag, collisions with other RBCs, and a magnetic force. The CFD-DEM model was first validated by a comparison with experimental data from Han et al. 2006 (Han and Frazier 2006) involving a microfluidic magnetophoretic separator for paramagnetic deoxygenated blood cells. The computational model was then applied to a parametric study of a parallel-plate separator having hematocrit of 40% with a 10% of the RBCs as pRBCs. Specifically, we investigated the hypothesis of introducing an upstream constriction to the channel to divert the magnetic cells within the near-wall layer where the magnetic force is greatest. Simulations compared the efficacy of various geometries upon the stratification efficiency of the pRBCs. For a channel with nominal height of 100 µm, the addition of an upstream constriction of 80% improved the proportion of pRBCs retained adjacent to the magnetic wall (separation efficiency) by almost 2 fold, from 26% to 49%. Further addition of a downstream diffuser reduced remixing, hence improved separation efficiency to 72%. The constriction introduced a greater pressure drop (from 17 to 495 Pa), which should be considered when scaling-up this design for a clinical-sized system. Overall, the advantages of this design include its ability to accommodate physiological hematocrit and high throughput – which is critical for clinical implementation as a blood-filtration system. PMID:27761107

  18. Continuum- and particle-based modeling of shapes and dynamics of red blood cells in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Li,, Xuejin; Vlahovska, Petia M.

    2012-01-01

    We review recent advances in multiscale modeling of the mechanics of healthy and diseased red blood cells (RBCs), and blood flow in the microcirculation. We cover the traditional continuum-based methods but also particle-based methods used to model both the RBCs and the blood plasma. We highlight examples of successful simulations of blood flow including malaria and sickle cell anemia. PMID:23230450

  19. Early diagnosis of diabetic vascular complications: impairment of red blood cell deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Sehyun; Ku, Yunhee; Park, Cheol-Woo; Suh, Jang-Soo

    2006-02-01

    Reduced deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) may play an important role on the pathogenesis of chronic vascular complications of diabetes mellitus. However, available techniques for measuring RBC deformability often require washing process after each measurement, which is not optimal for day-to-day clinical use at point of care. The objectives of the present study are to develop a device and to delineate the correlation of impaired RBC deformability with diabetic nephropathy. We developed a disposable ektacytometry to measure RBC deformability, which adopted a laser diffraction technique and slit rheometry. The essential features of this design are its simplicity (ease of operation and no moving parts) and a disposable element which is in contact with the blood sample. We studied adult diabetic patients divided into three groups according to diabetic complications. Group I comprised 57 diabetic patients with normal renal function. Group II comprised 26 diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Group III consisted of 30 diabetic subjects with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis. According to the renal function for the diabetic groups, matched non-diabetic groups were served as control. We found substantially impaired red blood cell deformability in those with normal renal function (group I) compared to non-diabetic control (P = 0.0005). As renal function decreases, an increased impairment in RBC deformability was found. Diabetic patients with chronic renal failure (group II) when compared to non-diabetic controls (CRF) had an apparently greater impairment in RBC deformability (P = 0.07). The non-diabetic cohort (CRF), on the other hand, manifested significant impairment in red blood cell deformability compared to healthy control (P = 0.0001). The newly developed slit ektacytometer can measure the RBC deformability with ease and accuracy. In addition, progressive impairment in cell deformability is associated with renal function loss in all

  20. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  1. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  2. Red cell antigen prevalence predicted by molecular testing in ethnic groups of South Texas blood donors.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Lorena I; Smith, Linda A; Jones, Scott; Beddard, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunization to red blood cell antigens is seen in patients receiving chronic blood transfusion. Knowing the prevalence of blood group antigens of the different ethnicities of South Texas donors can provide better management of rare blood inventory for patients in this geographical area. A total of 4369 blood donors were tested and analyzed for various antigens in the following blood group systems: ABO, Rh, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, MNS, Lutheran, Dombrock, Landsteiner-Wiener, Diego, Colton, and Scianna. Donors tested to be group 0 or A were serologically tested for the Rh (C, E, c, e) antigens. Those that tested as presumably R1R1, R2R2, or Ror were then genotyped. Donors constituted three major ethnicities: black (18.3%), Hispanic (36.3%), and Caucasian (41.1%); ethnicities comprised of Asian, American Indian, multiracial, and other accounted for the remaining donors (4.3%). The most likely common Rh phenotype for each ethnicity is as follows: black -Ror (44.4%), Hispanic -R1R1 (59.0%), and Caucasian -R1R1 (38.9%). The prevalence of Kell, Duffy, and Kidd blood group system antigens in black and Caucasian donors is comparable with published reports for the entire U.S. The black South Texas donor population had an 8.8 percent increase in prevalence of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype as compared with these published reports; the Hispanic South Texas donor population had a prevalence of 36.1 percent of the Fy(a+b-) phenotype. Regarding the Diego blood group system, the Hispanic donor population in South Texas had a prevalence of 93.5 percent for the Di(a-b+) phenotype as compared with published reports for the entire U.S. (>99.9%). The Hispanic population had a prevalence of 7.9 percent of donors testing as M-N+S-s+ as compared with 20.2 percent and 15.6 percent for black and Caucasian donors, respectively. This study helped us determine the prevalence of each of the blood group antigens in the South Texas donor population to establish and maintain adequate rare inventory of

  3. A model for oxygen-dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single red blood cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongrong; Yi, Ji; Chen, Siyu; Zhang, Hao F.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-03-01

    The oxygen-dependent absorption of hemoglobin provides the fundamental contrast for all label-free techniques measuring blood oxygenation. When hemoglobin is packaged into red blood cells (RBCs), the structure of the cells creates light scattering which also depends on the absorption based on the Kramers-Kronig relationship. Thus a proper characterization of the optical behaviors of blood has been a key to any accurate measurement of blood oxygenation, particularly at the capillary level where RBCs are dispersed individually in contrast to a densely packed whole blood. Here we provided a theoretical model under Born Approximation to characterize the oxygen dependent backscattering spectroscopic contrast from single RBCs. Using this theoretical model, we conducted simulations on both oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs with different sizes for standard and possible deformed cell geometries in blood flow, all which suggested similar backscattering spectroscopic contrast and were confirmed by Mie Theory and experiments using visible Optical Coherence Tomography (visOCT). As long as the cell size satisfies Gaussian distribution with a coefficient variance (C.V.) large enough, there is clear absorption contrast between the backscattering spectra of oxygenated and deoxygenated single RBCs calculated by this model, so oxygen saturation can then be characterized. Thus, this theoretical model can be extended to extract absorption features of other scattering particles as long as they satisfy Born Approximation.

  4. Red Blood Cell Antigen Genotyping for Sickle Cell Disease, Thalassemia, and Other Transfusion Complications.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Ross M; Chou, Stella T

    2016-10-01

    Since the discovery of the ABO blood group in the early 20th century, more than 300 blood group antigens have been categorized among 35 blood group systems. The molecular basis for most blood group antigens has been determined and demonstrates tremendous genetic diversity, particularly in the ABO and Rh systems. Several blood group genotyping assays have been developed, and 1 platform has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a "test of record," such that no phenotype confirmation with antisera is required. DNA-based red blood cell (RBC) phenotyping can overcome certain limitations of hemagglutination assays and is beneficial in many transfusion settings. Genotyping can be used to determine RBC antigen phenotypes in patients recently transfused or with interfering allo- or autoantibodies, to resolve discrepant serologic typing, and/or when typing antisera are not readily available. Molecular RBC antigen typing can facilitate complex antibody evaluations and guide RBC selection for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), thalassemia, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. High-resolution RH genotyping can identify variant RHD and RHCE in patients with SCD, which have been associated with alloimmunization. In the future, broader access to cost-efficient, high-resolution RBC genotyping technology for both patient and donor populations may be transformative for the field of transfusion medicine. PMID:27345938

  5. Record And Analysis Of High-Speed Photomicrography On Rheology Of Red Blood Cells In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Zhang; Yuju, Lin; Jizong, Wu; Qiang, Wang; Guishan, Li; Ni, Liang

    1989-06-01

    Microcirculation is the basic functional unit of blood circulation in human body. The oxygen needed and the carbon dioxide discharged in human body were accomplished in the case of flow and deformation of red blood cells (RBC) in capillaries. The rheology of RBC performs an important function for maintaining normal blood irrigation and nutritional metabolism. Obviously, for blood irrigation, dynamic mechanism of RBC, blood cell microrheology, law of mivrocirculation and cause of disease, it has very important significance to study quantitatively the rheology of RBC in the capillaries of live animal. In recent years, Tianjin University, cooperating with the Institute of Hematology, used the method of high speed photomicrography to record the flow states of RBC in the capillaries of the hamster cheek pouch and the frog web. Some systems were assembled through the study of luminous energy transmission, illumination system and optical match. These systems included the microhigh-speed camera system, the microhighspeed video recorder system and the microhighspeed camera system combining with an image enhancement tube. Some useful results were obtained by the photography of the flow states of RBC, film analysis and data processing. These results provided the beneficial data for the dynamic mechanism that RBC were deformed by the different blood flow field.

  6. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. III. Mechanical analysis for large contact areas.

    PubMed Central

    Berk, D.; Evans, E.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method and analysis are introduced which provide direct quantitation of the strength of adhesive contact for large agglutinin-bonded regions between macroscopically smooth membrane capsules (e.g., red blood cells). The approach yields intrinsic properties for separation of adherent regions independent of mechanical deformation of the membrane capsules during detachment. Conceptually, the micromechanical method involves one rigid test-capsule surface (in the form of a perfect sphere) held fixed by a micropipette and a second deformable capsule maneuvered with another micropipette to force contact with the test capsule. Only the test capsule is bound with agglutinin so that the maximum number of cross-bridges can be formed without steric interference. Following formation of a large adhesion region by mechanical impingement, the deformable capsule is detached from the rigid capsule surface by progressive aspiration into the micropipette. For the particular case modeled here, the deformable capsule is assumed to be a red blood cell which is preswollen by slight osmotic hydration before the test. The caliber of the detachment pipette is chosen so that the capsule will form a smooth cylindrical "piston" inside the pipette as it is aspirated. Because of the high flexibility of the membrane, the capsule naturally seals against the tube wall by pressurization even though it does not adhere to the glass. This arrangement maintains perfect axial symmetry and prevents the membrane from folding or buckling. Hence, it is possible to rigorously analyze the mechanics of deformation of the cell body to obtain the crucial "transducer" relation between pipette suction force and the membrane tension applied directly at the perimeter of the adhesive contact. Further, the geometry of the cell throughout the detachment process is predicted which provides accurate specification of the contact angle theta c between surfaces at the perimeter of the contact. A full analysis

  7. Hyperemic peripheral red marrow in a patient with sickle cell anemia demonstrated on Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography

    SciTech Connect

    Heiden, R.A.; Locko, R.C.; Stent, T.R. )

    1991-03-01

    A 25-year-old gravid woman, homozygous for sickle cell anemia, with a history of recent deep venous thrombosis, was examined using Tc-99m labeled red blood cell venography for recurrent thrombosis. Although negative for thrombus, the study presented an unusual incidental finding: the patient's peripheral bone marrow was hyperemic in a distribution consistent with peripheral red bone marrow expansion. Such a pattern has not been documented before using this technique. This report supports other literature that has demonstrated hyperemia of peripheral red bone marrow in other hemolytic anemias. This finding may ultimately define an additional role of scintigraphy in assessing the pathophysiologic status of the sickle cell patient.

  8. Zoonotic Bartonella species in fleas and blood from red foxes in Australia.

    PubMed

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; Fleming, Patricia A; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-12-01

    Bartonella are arthropod-borne, fastidious, Gram-negative, and aerobic bacilli distributed by fleas, lice, sand flies, and, possibly, ticks. The zoonotic Bartonella species, Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae, which are the causes of cat scratch disease and endocarditis in humans, have been reported from cats, cat fleas, and humans in Australia. However, to date, there has been no report of B. henselae or B. clarridgeiae in Australian wild animals and their ectoparasites. B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae were detected in fleas (Ctenocephalides felis) from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), an introduced pest animal species in Australia, and only B. clarridgeiae was detected in blood from one red fox. Phylogenetic analysis of the ribosomal intergenic spacer region revealed that the B. henselae detected in the current study were related to B. henselae strain Houston-1, a major pathogenic strain in humans in Australia, and confirmed the genetic distinctness of B. clarridgeiae. The identification and characterization of Bartonella species in red foxes in the Southwest of Western Australia suggests that red foxes may act as reservoirs of infection for animals and humans in this region. PMID:21919728

  9. Use of red blood cell membranes to evaluate the antioxidant potential of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Gabriella; Dachà, Marina; Potenza, Lucia; Ranieri, Annamaria; Scattino, Claudia; Castagna, Antonella; Bergamini, Ettore

    2014-06-01

    Antioxidant phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables of a vegetarian diet may account for the reduced risk of aging and stress oxidative associated diseases. In this study, a simple, rapid and accurate new bioassay for the determination of the antioxidant activity of purified or crude plant extracts and thier interactions is described, based on the fluorimetric determination of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) released by UV-B radiated red blood cell (RBC) ghosts. Pure resveratrol, white and red wine and pomegranate juice (PJ) were used as antioxidant source to test the biological method. TBARS production is a function of radiation time, the number of RBC ghosts in the radiated sample and the loaded antioxidant. The antioxidant activity of resveratrol was detected at a submicromolar concentration range [0.02 μg/mL-0.1 μmol/L]. The activity of red wine was almost 10 times higher than that of white wine, and PJ juice had the highest activity. Submaximal protective effects of PJ and red wine were additive. PMID:24682659

  10. Measuring cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells over blood storage using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Lee, Sangyun; Ji, Misuk; Kim, Kyoohyun; Son, Yonghak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Yongkeun

    2016-10-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusions. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1 (CPDA-1). With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements for 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and progressive alterations of stored RBCs. Our results show that stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within two weeks which was accompanied by significant decreases in cell deformability and cell surface area, and increases in sphericity. However, the stored RBCs with CPDA-1 maintained their morphology and deformability for up to 6 weeks.

  11. Red Blood Cell Membrane as a Biomimetic Nanocoating for Prolonged Circulation Time and Reduced Accelerated Blood Clearance.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lang; Bu, Lin-Lin; Xu, Jun-Hua; Cai, Bo; Yu, Guang-Tao; Yu, Xiaolei; He, Zhaobo; Huang, Qinqin; Li, Andrew; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Liu, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Jun; Wang, Hao; Wang, Tza-Huei; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2015-12-01

    For decades, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) has been widely incorporated into nanoparticles for evading immune clearance and improving the systematic circulation time. However, recent studies have reported a phenomenon known as "accelerated blood clearance (ABC)" where a second dose of PEGylated nanomaterials is rapidly cleared when given several days after the first dose. Herein, we demonstrate that natural red blood cell (RBC) membrane is a superior alternative to PEG. Biomimetic RBC membrane-coated Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (Fe(3)O(4) @RBC NPs) rely on CD47, which is a "don't eat me" marker on the RBC surface, to escape immune clearance through interactions with the signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRP-α) receptor. Fe(3)O(4) @RBC NPs exhibit extended circulation time and show little change between the first and second doses, with no ABC suffered. In addition, the administration of Fe(3)O(4) @RBC NPs does not elicit immune responses on neither the cellular level (myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs)) nor the humoral level (immunoglobulin M and G (IgM and IgG)). Finally, the in vivo toxicity of these cell membrane-camouflaged nanoparticles is systematically investigated by blood biochemistry, hematology testing, and histology analysis. These findings are significant advancements toward solving the long-existing clinical challenges of developing biomaterials that are able to resist both immune response and rapid clearance. PMID:26488923

  12. Measuring cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells over blood storage using quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Ji, Misuk; Kim, Kyoohyun; Son, YongHak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusions. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called citrate phosphate dextrose adenine-1 (CPDA-1). With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements for 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and progressive alterations of stored RBCs. Our results show that stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within two weeks which was accompanied by significant decreases in cell deformability and cell surface area, and increases in sphericity. However, the stored RBCs with CPDA-1 maintained their morphology and deformability for up to 6 weeks. PMID:27698484

  13. [The effect of low-intensity red and infrared laser radiation on the rat arterial and deoxygenated blood].

    PubMed

    Timoshenko, T E; Dvoretskiĭ, D P

    2010-10-01

    In vitro experiments the effect of low-intensity red or near-infrared laser irradiation on the blood samples (1.5 ml from abdominal aorta of Wistar rats) were studied. The diode laser light (lambda = 650 nm or 808 nm, power density 15.6 mW/cm2, duration 15 min) were used. In some experiments the deoxygenated blood as object for comparison with arterial blood was chosen. Under red laser irradiation we observed a significant increase of average volume of erythrocytes as well as mean amount of free (disaggregated) leukocytes especially in case of the deoxygenated blood. At the same time the concentration of Ca2+ and Na+ were decreased. The effects of infrared laser irradiation on indices mentioned above were not significant. We believe that red low-intensity laser irradiation on the blood is an important factor for theological properties in the field of microcirculation.

  14. Capacity for red blood cell aggregation is higher in athletic mammalian species than in sedentary species.

    PubMed

    Popel, A S; Johnson, P C; Kameneva, M V; Wild, M A

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to show that two rheological parameters, red blood cell (RBC) sedimentation rate and apparent blood viscosity at low shear rate, characterizing the degree of RBC aggregation, correlate significantly with the maximal mass-specific rate of oxygen consumption or aerobic capacity (VO2max). Comparisons were made within two groups of similarly sized athletic and sedentary species: group 1, pronghorn antelope, dog, goat, and sheep; and group 2, horse and cow. The pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) is one of the most athletic mammals, and we have obtained data on the rheological properties of blood from this species for the first time. The values of apparent viscosity at hematocrit = 40% and shear rate = 0.277 s-1 measured in a rotational viscometer were 59.5, 42.6, and 9.1 cP for antelope, dog, and sheep blood, respectively, and 55.3 and 11.5 cP for horse and cow blood, respectively. The viscosity values for antelope, dog, and sheep blood can be correlated with aerobic capacity: ln viscosity = 4.48-106.3 VO2(-1)max (r2 = 0.998; P < 0.05). The values of RBC sedimentation rate at hematocrit = 40% were 12.8, 7.0, and 0 mm/h for antelope, dog, and sheep blood, respectively, and 45.3 and 0.1 mm/h for horse and cow blood, respectively. Therefore, the data showed that the athletic species exhibit a consistently higher degree of RBC aggregation than do the corresponding nonathletic species. PMID:7836201

  15. STUDIES OF THE HEMOLYSIS OF RED BLOOD CELLS BY MUMPS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Soule, David W.; Marinetti, Guido V.; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1959-01-01

    Hemolysis of chicken red blood cells by mumps virus is associated with the release of sphingomyelin from the stromal lipoprotein and the destruction of 65 per cent of the sphingomyelin of the red cell stroma. However, the virus had no effect on isolated phosphatides extracted from the erythrocytes. The hemolytic action of the virus and changes in sphingomyelin content of the erythrocytes fail to occur at a pH of 6.0. The viral hemolysis of human erythrocytes is not associated with similar alterations in their content of sphingomyelin. The absence of lecithin from sheep erythrocytes, which are also lysed by mumps virus, is additional evidence that a viral lecithinase is not associated with the hemolytic property of mumps virus. Mumps virus concentrated from the amniotic fluid of viral infected chick embryos contains about 7 per cent phosphatide, 60 per cent of which is sphingomyelin. PMID:13664871

  16. Cerebral blood flow and red cell delivery in normal subjects and in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, R.L.; Roth, J.G.; Woody, D.C. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was determined in 77 normal females and 53 normal males of different ages and in 26 men and 45 women with multiple sclerosis by the inhalation of radioactive Xe133 method. In the normal subjects the CBF was relatively high in the teens and fell, at first rapidly and then slowly in both sexes with age. During adult life the flow in females was significantly higher than in males. The delivery of packed red cells (RCD) was determined by multiplying the CBF by the percentage concentration of red cells (HCT). The RCD for both sexes was nearly the same. In the patients with multiple sclerosis there occurred a progressive generalized decrease in CBF and in RCD with age which was significantly greater than observed in normal subjects. The rate of decrease in CBF and RCD correlated directly with the rate of progress of the disease.

  17. Severe immune haemolysis in a group A recipient of a group O red blood cell unit.

    PubMed

    Barjas-Castro, M L; Locatelli, M F; Carvalho, M A; Gilli, S O; Castro, V

    2003-08-01

    Haemolysis caused by passive ABO antibodies is a rare transfusional complication. We report a case of severe haemolytic reaction in a 38-year-old man (blood group A) with lymphoma who had received one red blood cell (RBC) unit group O. After transfusion of 270 mL, the patient experienced fever, dyspnoea, chills and back pain. On the following morning he was icteric and pale. Haptoglobin was inferior to 5.8 mgdL(-1), haemoglobin was not increased and lactate dehydrogenase was elevated. Haemolysis was evident on observation of the patient's post-transfusion samples. The recipient's red cells developed a positive direct antiglobulin test and Lui elution showed anti-A coated the cells. Fresh donor serum had an anti-A titre of 1024, which was not reduced by treating the serum with dithiothreitol. Donor isoagglutinin screening has been determined by microplate automated analyser and showed titre higher than 100. Physicians should be aware of the risk of haemolysis associated with ABO-passive antibodies. There is generally no agreement justifying the isoagglutinin investigation prior to transfusion. However, automated quantitative isoagglutinin determination could be part of the modern donor testing process, mainly in blood banks where identical ABO group units (platelets or phenotyped RBCs) are not available owing to limited supply.

  18. Red blood cell lysate modulates the expression of extracellular matrix proteins in dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Amir; Li, Yunyuan; Kilani, Ruhangiz T; Ghahary, Aziz

    2012-11-01

    During the early stage of wound healing process, blood clots can be served as a temporary extracellular matrix (ECM) to let skin cell migration and proliferation. The red blood cells are generally thought as inert bystanders in the early and inflammatory phase of wound healing. Here, we provide evidence that red blood cells (RBC) also play an important role in modulation of key ECM components such as type-I collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, fibronectin, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this study, we used western blot analysis and showed a significant increase in the level of MMP-1, 2, 3. Furthermore, we found that RBC lysate significantly down-regulates type-I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin while up-regulates fibronectin expression in dermal fibroblasts. To further explore the mechanism by which RBC lysate modulates MMP-1 expression, the effect of inhibitors for three MAPK signaling pathways on RBC inducing MMP-1 expression by dermal fibroblasts were tested. The result showed that the inhibitor of ERK1/2 could abrogate the stimulatory effect of RBC lysate on MMP-1 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Consistently, RBC treatment results in an increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation in dermal fibroblast. In conclusion, these findings suggest that RBC lysate can modulate the expression of MMPs and key ECM components which are important in healing process.

  19. Analysis of short RNAs in the malaria parasite and its red blood cell host.

    PubMed

    Rathjen, Tina; Nicol, Clare; McConkey, Glenn; Dalmay, Tamas

    2006-10-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an RNA degradation process that involves short, double-stranded RNAs (dsRNA) as sequence specificity factors. The natural function of the RNAi machinery is to generate endogenous short double-stranded RNAs to regulate gene expression. It has been shown that treatment of Plasmodium falciparum, the etiologic agent of malaria, with dsRNA induces degradation of the corresponding microRNA (miRNA), yet typical RNAi-associated genes have not been identifiable in the parasite genome. To clarify this discrepancy we set out to clone short RNAs from P. falciparum-infected red blood cells and from purified parasites. We did not find any short RNA that was not a rRNA or tRNA fragment. Indeed, only known human miRNAs were isolated in parasite preparations indicating that very few if any short RNAs exist in P. falciparum. This suggests a different mechanism than classical RNAi in observations of dsRNA-mediated degradation. Of the human miRNAs identified, the human miRNA mir-451 accumulates at a very high level in both infected and healthy red blood cells. Interestingly, mir-451 was not detectable in a series of immortalised cell lines representing progenitor stages of all major blood lineages, suggesting that mir-451 may play a role in the differentiation of erythroid cells.

  20. Biomechanical properties of red blood cells in health and disease towards microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Tomaiuolo, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) possess a unique capacity for undergoing cellular deformation to navigate across various human microcirculation vessels, enabling them to pass through capillaries that are smaller than their diameter and to carry out their role as gas carriers between blood and tissues. Since there is growing evidence that red blood cell deformability is impaired in some pathological conditions, measurement of RBC deformability has been the focus of numerous studies over the past decades. Nevertheless, reports on healthy and pathological RBCs are currently limited and, in many cases, are not expressed in terms of well-defined cell membrane parameters such as elasticity and viscosity. Hence, it is often difficult to integrate these results into the basic understanding of RBC behaviour, as well as into clinical applications. The aim of this review is to summarize currently available reports on RBC deformability and to highlight its association with various human diseases such as hereditary disorders (e.g., spherocytosis, elliptocytosis, ovalocytosis, and stomatocytosis), metabolic disorders (e.g., diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, obesity), adenosine triphosphate-induced membrane changes, oxidative stress, and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. Microfluidic techniques have been identified as the key to develop state-of-the-art dynamic experimental models for elucidating the significance of RBC membrane alterations in pathological conditions and the role that such alterations play in the microvasculature flow dynamics. PMID:25332724

  1. Red blood cell transfusion practices in very low birth weight infants in 1990s postsurfactant era.

    PubMed Central

    Beeram, M. R.; Krauss, D. R.; Riggs, M. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purposes of this study are (1) to evaluate the practice of red blood cell transfusions in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (between 501 to 1500 g) during the postsurfactant era of the 1990s; and (2) to evaluate if there is a decreasing trend in red cell transfusions in the 1990s. Database and medical records of VLBW infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) between January 1990 and December 1995 at Scott & White Clinic, Temple, Texas, were reviewed. Five hundred twenty-seven infants were admitted to the NICU, excluding 5 infants that were transferred out for possible cardiac surgery or for other reasons. Fifty one (9.7%) of these infants died prior to discharge. Hence, data from 476 survivors were reviewed for red blood cell (RBC) transfusions. Transfusions were given at the discretion of the attending neonatologist. None of the infants received erythropoietin. Of the 476 infants, 289 (61%) received RBC transfusions during the hospital stay, with 2.7+/-3.6 transfusions per infant with a volume of 40.5+/-50.4 mL/kg. Smaller infants required significantly more transfusions compared to larger infants when divided into 250-g subgroups. No statistically significant difference was noted in the number of RBC transfusions per infant or number of infants transfused during the 6-year period from year to year. We conclude that VLBW infants in the 1990s postsurfactant era required 2.7 RBC transfusions per infant, on average, with the smallest infants requiring the most transfusions. These data will be helpful to counsel mothers in preterm labor regarding the need of transfusions for each birth weight category. Red cell transfusion practice has not changed over this 6-year period in the 1990s. Additional measures such as erythropoietin or even stricter transfusion criteria may be necessary to decrease transfusions further. However, safety of such measures should be carefully evaluated. PMID:11688921

  2. [Structure of red blood cell and peripheral blood lymphocytes membranes in children--residents of contaminated areas in the remote period of Chernobyl].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E I; Vdovenko, V Iu; Litvinets, O M

    2013-06-01

    We applied scanning electron microscope to study of surface architectonics of erythrocytes and lymphocytes peripheral blood in children born after the Chernobyl accident and living in conditions of chronic incorporation 137Cs. We found significant changes in surface structure membranes of red blood cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes in the basic childrens group compared with control one. The most striking changes were in children with levels incorporated 137Cs from 6845 to 16522 Bq.

  3. [Structure of red blood cell and peripheral blood lymphocytes membranes in children--residents of contaminated areas in the remote period of Chernobyl].

    PubMed

    Stepanova, E I; Vdovenko, V Iu; Litvinets, O M

    2013-06-01

    We applied scanning electron microscope to study of surface architectonics of erythrocytes and lymphocytes peripheral blood in children born after the Chernobyl accident and living in conditions of chronic incorporation 137Cs. We found significant changes in surface structure membranes of red blood cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes in the basic childrens group compared with control one. The most striking changes were in children with levels incorporated 137Cs from 6845 to 16522 Bq. PMID:25095676

  4. Differentiation of focal intrahepatic lesions with 99mTc-red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.A.; Marks, D.S.; Sandler, M.A.; Shetty, P.

    1983-03-01

    The appearance of focal hepatic lesions on 99mTc-sulfur colloid images is nonspecific. As it is important to distinguish hemangiomas from other lesions prior to biopsy, a prospective study was performed using 99mTc-labeled red blood cells. Dynamic perfusion and delayed blood-pool images (1-2 hours) were obtained and lesion activity categorized as increased, equal, or decreased compared with the liver. Of 21 patients studied, 9 (43%) had one or more hepatic hemangiomas, and 8 of these 9 patients (89%) demonstrated increased blood-pool activity. The 12 nonhemangiomatous lesions consisted of 7 metastatic tumors, 2 hepatomas, 1 cirrhotic nodule, and 2 hepatic cysts. None of these 12 patients had increased activity on delayed blood-pool images. Early dynamic images of hepatic hemangiomas demonstrated variable activity (vascularity) and were not useful in differentiating hemangiomas from other lesions. Sensitivity was 89% and specificity 100%. Although liver enzymes are usually normal with hepatic hemangiomas, they may also be normal in metastatic disease. The authors recommend that delayed blood-pool imaging be performed prior to biopsy, particularly in patients without a known primary tumor or those with normal liver enzyme levels.

  5. Differentiation of focal intrahepatic lesions with /sup 99m/Tc-red blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, M.A.; Marks, D.S.; Sandler, M.A.; Shetty, P.

    1983-03-01

    The appearance of focal hepatic lesions on /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid images is nonspecific. As it is important to distinguish hemangiomas from other lesions prior to biopsy, a prospective study was performed using /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells. Dynamic perfusion and delayed blood-pool images (1-2 hours) were obtained and lesion activity categorized as increased, equal, or decreased compared with the liver. Of 21 patients studied, 9 (43%) had one or more hepatic hemangiomas, and 8 of these 9 patients (89%) demonstrated increased blood-pool activity. The 12 nonhemangiomatous lesions consisted of 7 metastatic tumors, 2 hepatomas, 1 cirrhotic nodule, and 2 hepatic cysts. None of these 12 patients had increased activity on delayed blood-pool images. Early dynamic images of hepatic hemangiomas demonstrated variable activity (vascularity) and were not useful in differentiating hemangiomas from other lesions. Sensitivity was 89% and specificity 100%. Although liver enzymes are usually normal with hepatic hemangiomas, they may also be normal in metastatic disease. The authors recommend that delayed blood-pool imaging be performed prior to biopsy, particularly in patients without a known primary tumor or those with normal liver enzyme levels.

  6. Static magnetic fields affect capillary flow of red blood cells in striated skin muscle.

    PubMed

    Brix, Gunnar; Strieth, Sebastian; Strelczyk, Donata; Dellian, Marc; Griebel, Jürgen; Eichhorn, Martin E; Andrā, Wilfried; Bellemann, Matthias E

    2008-01-01

    Blood flowing in microvessels is one possible site of action of static magnetic fields (SMFs). We evaluated SMF effects on capillary flow of red blood cells (RBCs) in unanesthetized hamsters, using a skinfold chamber technique for intravital fluorescence microscopy. By this approach, capillary RBC velocities (v(RBC)), capillary diameters (D), arteriolar diameters (D(art)), and functional vessel densities (FVD) were measured in striated skin muscle at different magnetic flux densities. Exposure above a threshold level of about 500 mT resulted in a significant (P < 0.001) reduction of v(RBC) in capillaries as compared to the baseline value. At the maximum field strength of 587 mT, v(RBC) was reduced by more than 40%. Flow reduction was reversible when the field strength was decreased below the threshold level. In contrast, mean values determined at different exposure levels for the parameters D, D(art), and FVD did not vary by more than 5%. Blood flow through capillary networks is affected by strong SMFs directed perpendicular to the vessels. Since the influence of SMFs on blood flow in microvessels directed parallel to the field as well as on collateral blood supply could not be studied, our findings should be carefully interpreted with respect to the setting of safety guidelines.

  7. Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman

    PubMed Central

    Janko, Marek; Stark, Robert W.; Zink, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Changes in elasticity and structures of red blood cells (RBCs) are important indicators of disease, and this makes them interesting for medical studies. In forensics, blood analyses represent a crucial part of crime scene investigations. For these reasons, the recovery and analysis of blood cells from ancient tissues is of major interest. In this study, we show that RBCs were preserved in Iceman tissue samples for more than 5000 years. The morphological and molecular composition of the blood corpuscle is verified by atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The cell size and shape approximated those of healthy, dried, recent RBCs. Raman spectra of the ancient corpuscle revealed bands that are characteristic of haemoglobin. Additional vibrational modes typical for other proteinaceous fragments, possibly fibrin, suggested the formation of a blood clot. The band intensities, however, were approximately an order of magnitude weaker than those of recent RBCs. This fact points to a decrease in the RBC-specific metalloprotein haemoglobin and, thus, to a degradation of the cells. Together, the results show the preservation of RBCs in the 5000 year old mummy tissue and give the first insights into their degradation. PMID:22552923

  8. Preservation of 5300 year old red blood cells in the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Janko, Marek; Stark, Robert W; Zink, Albert

    2012-10-01

    Changes in elasticity and structures of red blood cells (RBCs) are important indicators of disease, and this makes them interesting for medical studies. In forensics, blood analyses represent a crucial part of crime scene investigations. For these reasons, the recovery and analysis of blood cells from ancient tissues is of major interest. In this study, we show that RBCs were preserved in Iceman tissue samples for more than 5000 years. The morphological and molecular composition of the blood corpuscle is verified by atomic force microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The cell size and shape approximated those of healthy, dried, recent RBCs. Raman spectra of the ancient corpuscle revealed bands that are characteristic of haemoglobin. Additional vibrational modes typical for other proteinaceous fragments, possibly fibrin, suggested the formation of a blood clot. The band intensities, however, were approximately an order of magnitude weaker than those of recent RBCs. This fact points to a decrease in the RBC-specific metalloprotein haemoglobin and, thus, to a degradation of the cells. Together, the results show the preservation of RBCs in the 5000 year old mummy tissue and give the first insights into their degradation.

  9. Association of nucleated red blood cells with mortality in critically ill dogs.

    PubMed

    Müller, M; Dörfelt, R; Hamacher, L; Wess, G

    2014-11-22

    The occurrence of nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) in the peripheral blood of critically ill human patients is associated with increased mortality. In dogs, the presence of NRBCs in peripheral blood has been used as a sensitive and specific marker of complications and outcome associated with heatstroke. However, no study has investigated their prevalence in critically ill dogs. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of NRBCs in the peripheral blood, and to evaluate their occurrence as a prognostic factor in critically ill dogs. One hundred and one dogs were prospectively included; the presence of NRBCs was studied on a daily basis from the time of admission until day 3 in the intensive care unit (or less if discharged or death occurred earlier). Dogs fulfilled at least two systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria and suffered from various diseases. Survival was defined as being alive 28 days postdischarge from hospital. In 42 dogs, NRBCs were detected at least once; 59 patients were NRBC negative. Mortality was significantly higher in NRBC-positive than NRBC-negative patients (54.8 v 30.5 per cent) (P=0.014). However, this association was not present when anaemic dogs were excluded from the analysis. Detection of NRBCs in the peripheral blood may be an indicator for regenerative anaemia and may have potential for use as a prognostic tool or in addition to established scoring systems in critically ill dogs.

  10. Tc-99m-labeled red blood cells for the measurement of red cell mass in newborn infants: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Linderkamp, O.; Betke, K.; Fendel, H.; Klemm, J.; Lorenzen, K.; Riegel, K.P.

    1980-07-01

    In vitro and in vivo investigations were performed to examine the binding of Tc-99m to neonatal red blood cells (RBC). Labeling efficiency was about 90%, and unbound Tc-99m less than 3% after one washing, in premature and full-term newborns and in children. Thus presence of high percentages of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) did not influence the labeling of RBCs with Tc-99m. RBCs of 11 newborns were hemolysed and the distribution of Tc-99m on RBC components was analyzed. Although Hb F percentage averaged (60.0 +- 8.10)% (s.d.), only (11.9 +- 3.7)% of Tc-99m was bound by Hb F, whereas (45.0 +- 6.1)% was associated with Hb A. RBC membranes bound (13.7 +- 4.3)% and (29.3 +- 4.0)% were found unbound in hemolysates. These results indicate that Tc-99m preferentially binds to beta chains. In vivo equilibration of Tc-99m RBCs and of albumin labeled with Evans blue was investigated in five newborn infants. Tc-99m RBCs were stable in each case during the first hour after injection. Elution of Tc-99m from RBCs was (3.4 +- 1.5)% per h. Body-to-venous hematocrit ratio averaged 0.86 +- 0.03.

  11. [Optimization of trehalose loading in red blood cells before freeze-drying].

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Liu, Jing-Han; Ouyang, Xi-Lin; Chen, Lin-Feng; Che, Ji

    2007-04-01

    The key points for better protection of trehalose in freeze-drying red blood cells (RBCs) are to resolve non-osmosis of trehalose to red blood cells and to make cytoplasmic trehalose to reach effective concentration. This study was aimed to investigate the regularity of loading RBCs with trehalose, screen out optimal loading condition and evaluate the effect of trehalose on physico-chemical parameters of RBCs during the period of loading. The cytoplasmic trehalose concentration in red blood cells, free hemoglobin and ATP level were determined at different incubation temperatures (4, 22 and 37 degrees C), different trehaolse concentrations (0, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000 mmol/L) and different incubation times (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours), the cytoplasmic trehalose, free hemoglobin (FHb), hemoglobin (Hb) and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) in fresh RBCs and RBCs stored for 72 hours at 4 degrees C were compared, when loading condition was ensured. The results showed that with increase of incubation temperature, time and extracellular trehalose concentration, the loading of trehalose in RBCs also increased. Under the optimal loading condition, cytoplasmic trehalose concentration and free hemoglobin level of fresh RBCs and RBCs stored for 72 hours at 4 degrees C were 65.505 +/- 6.314 mmol/L, 66.2 +/- 5.002 mmol/L and 6.567 +/- 2.568 g/L, 16.168 +/- 3.922 g/L respectively. It is concluded that the most optimal condition of loading trehalose is that fresh RBCs incubate in 800 mmol/L trehalose solution for 8 hours at 37 degrees C. This condition can result in a efficient cytoplasmic trehalose concentration. The study provides an important basis for long-term preservation of RBCs. PMID:17493359

  12. Red blood cell deformability and aggregation behaviour in different animal species.

    PubMed

    Plasenzotti, R; Stoiber, B; Posch, M; Windberger, U

    2004-01-01

    Comparative animal studies showed the wide variation of whole blood and plasma viscosity, and erythrocyte aggregation among mammalian species. Whole blood viscosity and red blood cell aggregation is influenced by red cell fluidity. To evaluate differences in erythrocyte deformability in mammals, three species were investigated, whose erythrocytes have a different aggregation property: horse, as a species with high, dog with medium, and sheep with almost unmeasurable aggregation tendency. Erythrocyte deformability was tested ektacytometrically (Elongation Index [EI], LORCA, Mechatronics, Hoorn, Netherlands) at shear stresses from 0.30 to 53.06 Pa. Equine erythrocytes showed EI-values from 0.047 at low shear stress to 0.541 at high shear stress. The EI from dog's erythrocytes ranged from 0.035 to 0.595. Sheep's erythrocytes had an EI of 0.005 at low and 0.400 at high shear stress. Although it might be presumed from the aggregation property that horse had the highest EI among the three species, the EI of canine erythrocytes exceeded the value in horses by 10% at high shear stress. Further, equine erythrocytes started to deform at higher shear stresses (1.69 Pa) than did canine and ovine cells, whose EI increased continuously with increasing shear stress. At moderate shear stress (1-5 Pa) deformability was even higher in the sheep than in the horse. However, at shear stresses higher than 5.34 Pa, equine red cell elongation clearly exceeded the values of sheep. We conclude that erythrocyte elongation is different between the animal species, not clearly linked with the aggregation property, and that the degree of deformability at various shear stresses is species-specific.

  13. Carboxylated nanodiamonds inhibit γ-irradiation damage of human red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santacruz-Gomez, K.; Silva-Campa, E.; Melendrez-Amavizca, R.; Teran Arce, F.; Mata-Haro, V.; Landon, P. B.; Zhang, C.; Pedroza-Montero, M.; Lal, R.

    2016-03-01

    Nanodiamonds when carboxylated (cNDs) act as reducing agents and hence could limit oxidative damage in biological systems. Gamma (γ)-irradiation of whole blood or its components is required in immunocompetent patients to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). However, γ-irradiation of blood also deoxygenates red blood cells (RBCs) and induces oxidative damage, including abnormalities in cellular membranes and hemolysis. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we examined the effect of cNDs on γ-irradiation mediated deoxygenation and morphological damage of RBCs. γ-Radiation induced several morphological phenotypes, including stomatocytes, codocytes and echinocytes. While stomatocytes and codocytes are reversibly damaged RBCs, echinocytes are irreversibly damaged. AFM images show significantly fewer echinocytes among cND-treated γ-irradiated RBCs. The Raman spectra of γ-irradiated RBCs had more oxygenated hemoglobin patterns when cND-treated, resembling those of normal, non-irradiated RBCs, compared to the non-cND-treated RBCs. cND inhibited hemoglobin deoxygenation and morphological damage, possibly by neutralizing the free radicals generated during γ-irradiation. Thus cNDs have the therapeutic potential to preserve the quality of stored blood following γ-irradiation.Nanodiamonds when carboxylated (cNDs) act as reducing agents and hence could limit oxidative damage in biological systems. Gamma (γ)-irradiation of whole blood or its components is required in immunocompetent patients to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD). However, γ-irradiation of blood also deoxygenates red blood cells (RBCs) and induces oxidative damage, including abnormalities in cellular membranes and hemolysis. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy, we examined the effect of cNDs on γ-irradiation mediated deoxygenation and morphological damage of RBCs. γ-Radiation induced several

  14. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  15. Torque-generating malaria-infected red blood cells in an optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, J. A.; Roy, S.; Dharmadhikari, A. K.; Sharma, S.; Mathur, Deepak

    2004-03-01

    We have used optical tweezers to trap normal and Plasmodiuminfected red blood cells (iRBCs). Two different facets of the behavior of RBCs in infrared light fields emerge from our experiments. Firstly, while the optical field modifies both types of RBCs in the same fashion, by folding the original biconcave disk into a rod-like shape, iRBCs rotate with linearly polarized light whereas normal RBCs do not. Secondly, and in the context of known molecular motors, our measurements indicate that the torque of rotating iRBCs is up to three orders of magnitude larger.

  16. Prediction of non-inertial focusing of red blood cells in Poiseuille flow

    PubMed Central

    Hariprasad, Daniel S.; Secomb, Timothy W.

    2016-01-01

    The motions of a red blood cell in Poiseuille flows in a range of channel widths are simulated using a two-dimensional model. For a range of initial off-centerline distances in a 12-μm channel, cell trajectories converge to a specific off-centerline position and exhibit tank-treading motions. This behavior coexists with initial positions that lead to migration towards the centerline. The predicted off-centerline focusing effect is shown to depend on the curvature of the flow profile and on interactions with both solid boundaries. PMID:26465557

  17. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-11-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level.

  18. Kinetics of red blood cell aggregation: an example of geometric polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Perelson, A.S.; Samsel, R.W.

    1984-04-02

    The kinetics of the process by which red blood cells aggregate into long cylindrical, and sometimes branched, structures called rouleaux is studied within the framework of both reversible and irreversible addition and condensation polymerization reactions. However, unlike usual polymer kinetics, here we take into account the geometry of the subunits and the geometry of the growing structure. Geometric factors such as the amount of reactive wall area influence the probability of branching and hence the final shape of the aggregate. The inclusion of loop formation reactions is shown to be crucial in obtaining physically realistic equilibrium solutions of the kinetic equations. 11 references, 3 figures.

  19. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Strategies in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Roubinian, Nareg; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Anemia in patients with malignancy is common as a consequence of their disease and treatment. Substantial progress has been made in the management of anemia with red blood cell transfusion in acute conditions, such as bleeding and infection, through the performance of large clinical trials. These trials suggest that transfusion at lower hemoglobin thresholds (restrictive transfusion ∼7-8 g/dL) is safe and in some cases superior to higher transfusion thresholds (liberal transfusion ∼9-10 g/dL). However, additional studies are needed in patients with malignancy to understand best practice in relation to quality of life as well as clinical outcomes. PMID:27112994

  20. Static and dynamic light scattering of healthy and malaria-parasite invaded red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongkeun; Diez-Silva, Monica; Fu, Dan; Popescu, Gabriel; Choi, Wonshik; Barman, Ishan; Suresh, Subra; Feld, Michael S.

    2010-03-01

    We present the light scattering of individual Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized human red blood cells (Pf-RBCs), and demonstrate progressive alterations to the scattering signal arising from the development of malaria-inducing parasites. By selectively imaging the electric fields using quantitative phase microscopy and a Fourier transform light scattering technique, we calculate the light scattering maps of individual Pf-RBCs. We show that the onset and progression of pathological states of the Pf-RBCs can be clearly identified by the static scattering maps. Progressive changes to the biophysical properties of the Pf-RBC membrane are captured from dynamic light scattering.

  1. Profiling individual human red blood cells using common-path diffraction optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngchan; Shim, Hyoeun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, Hyunjoo; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, Yongkeun

    2014-10-01

    Due to its strong correlation with the pathophysiology of many diseases, information about human red blood cells (RBCs) has a crucial function in hematology. Therefore, measuring and understanding the morphological, chemical, and mechanical properties of individual RBCs is a key to understanding the pathophysiology of a number of diseases in hematology, as well as to opening up new possibilities for diagnosing diseases in their early stages. In this study, we present the simultaneous and quantitative measurement of the morphological, chemical, and mechanical parameters of individual RBCs employing optical holographic microtomography. In addition, it is demonstrated that the correlation analyses of these RBC parameters provide unique information for distinguishing and understanding diseases.

  2. The response of the metabolic network of the red blood cell to pyruvate kinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoliang; Lu, Zuhong

    2005-01-01

    The response of the metabolic network of human red blood cell is investigated using the E-Cell simulation system when pyruvate kinase (PK) is deficient. The results that several downstream metabolites of the glycolysis pathway accumulate are in a good agreement with experimental data reported in literatures. This accumulation results in the reaction that phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes reversing its direction. Mathematical analysis to the simulation results shows that the PGK-catalyzing reaction reversing its direction happens simultaneously with an abrupt change of the second derivative of the ATP quantity. PMID:17282332

  3. Autologous Doping with Cryopreserved Red Blood Cells - Effects on Physical Performance and Detection by Multivariate Statistics.

    PubMed

    Malm, Christer B; Khoo, Nelson S; Granlund, Irene; Lindstedt, Emilia; Hult, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of erythropoietin (EPO) simplified blood doping in sports, but improved detection methods, for EPO has forced cheating athletes to return to blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion with cryopreserved red blood cells (RBCs) is the method of choice, because no valid method exists to accurately detect such event. In endurance sports, it can be estimated that elite athletes improve performance by up to 3% with blood doping, regardless of method. Valid detection methods for autologous blood doping is important to maintain credibility of athletic performances. Recreational male (N = 27) and female (N = 11) athletes served as Transfusion (N = 28) and Control (N = 10) subjects in two different transfusion settings. Hematological variables and physical performance were measured before donation of 450 or 900 mL whole blood, and until four weeks after re-infusion of the cryopreserved RBC fraction. Blood was analyzed for transferrin, iron, Hb, EVF, MCV, MCHC, reticulocytes, leucocytes and EPO. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and pattern recognition using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Projections of Latent Structures (OPLS) discriminant analysis (DA) investigated differences between Control and Transfusion groups over time. Significant increase in performance (15 ± 8%) and VO2max (17 ± 10%) (mean ± SD) could be measured 48 h after RBC re-infusion, and remained increased for up to four weeks in some subjects. In total, 533 blood samples were included in the study (Clean = 220, Transfused = 313). In response to blood transfusion, the largest change in hematological variables occurred 48 h after blood donation, when Control and Transfused groups could be separated with OPLS-DA (R2 = 0.76/Q2 = 0.59). RBC re-infusion resulted in the best model (R2 = 0.40/Q2 = 0.10) at the first sampling point (48 h), predicting one false positive and one false negative. Over all, a 25% and 86% false positives ratio was

  4. Autologous Doping with Cryopreserved Red Blood Cells - Effects on Physical Performance and Detection by Multivariate Statistics.

    PubMed

    Malm, Christer B; Khoo, Nelson S; Granlund, Irene; Lindstedt, Emilia; Hult, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of erythropoietin (EPO) simplified blood doping in sports, but improved detection methods, for EPO has forced cheating athletes to return to blood transfusion. Autologous blood transfusion with cryopreserved red blood cells (RBCs) is the method of choice, because no valid method exists to accurately detect such event. In endurance sports, it can be estimated that elite athletes improve performance by up to 3% with blood doping, regardless of method. Valid detection methods for autologous blood doping is important to maintain credibility of athletic performances. Recreational male (N = 27) and female (N = 11) athletes served as Transfusion (N = 28) and Control (N = 10) subjects in two different transfusion settings. Hematological variables and physical performance were measured before donation of 450 or 900 mL whole blood, and until four weeks after re-infusion of the cryopreserved RBC fraction. Blood was analyzed for transferrin, iron, Hb, EVF, MCV, MCHC, reticulocytes, leucocytes and EPO. Repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and pattern recognition using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Projections of Latent Structures (OPLS) discriminant analysis (DA) investigated differences between Control and Transfusion groups over time. Significant increase in performance (15 ± 8%) and VO2max (17 ± 10%) (mean ± SD) could be measured 48 h after RBC re-infusion, and remained increased for up to four weeks in some subjects. In total, 533 blood samples were included in the study (Clean = 220, Transfused = 313). In response to blood transfusion, the largest change in hematological variables occurred 48 h after blood donation, when Control and Transfused groups could be separated with OPLS-DA (R2 = 0.76/Q2 = 0.59). RBC re-infusion resulted in the best model (R2 = 0.40/Q2 = 0.10) at the first sampling point (48 h), predicting one false positive and one false negative. Over all, a 25% and 86% false positives ratio was

  5. Hydrodynamic instability in a magnetically driven suspension of paramagnetic red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kashevsky, B E; Zholud, A M; Kashevsky, S B

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the magnetically driven motion in suspensions of paramagnetic particles. Our object is diluted deoxygenated whole blood with paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs). We use direct observations in a closed vertical Hele-Shaw channel, and a well-defined magnetic force field applied horizontally in the channel plane. At very low cell concentrations, we register single-particle motion mode, track individual cells and determine their hydrodynamic and magnetic characteristics. Above 0.2 volume percent concentration, we observe local swirls and a global transient quasi-periodic vortex structure, intensifying with increasing cell concentration, but surprisingly this does not influence the time and purity of the magnetic extraction of RBCs. Our observations shed light on the behavioral complexity of magnetically driven submagnetic suspensions, an important issue for the emerging microfluidic technology of direct magnetic cell separation and intriguing for the mechanics of particulate soft matter. PMID:26212385

  6. Deformation and dynamics of red blood cells in flow through cylindrical microchannels.

    PubMed

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Peltomäki, Matti; Gompper, Gerhard

    2014-06-28

    The motion of red blood cells (RBCs) in microcirculation plays an important role in blood flow resistance and in the cell partitioning within a microvascular network. Different shapes and dynamics of RBCs in microvessels have been previously observed experimentally including the parachute and slipper shapes. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations to predict the phase diagram of shapes and dynamics of RBCs in cylindrical microchannels, which serve as idealized microvessels, for a wide range of channel confinements and flow rates. A rich dynamical behavior is found, with snaking and tumbling discocytes, slippers performing a swinging motion, and stationary parachutes. We discuss the effects of different RBC states on the flow resistance, and the influence of RBC properties, characterized by the Föppl-von Kármán number, on the shape diagram. The simulations are performed using the same viscosity for both external and internal fluids surrounding a RBC; however, we discuss how the viscosity contrast would affect the shape diagram.

  7. Influence of red blood cell clustering on phase separation in capillary networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorski, Thomas; Boucly, Celine; Coupier, Gwennou

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the flow of red blood cell suspensions in microfluidic bifurcations and capillary networks. At strong degrees of confinement, such as those encountered in the microcirculation, phase separation takes place at bifurcations of the network, leading to strong heterogeneities and fluctuations of the hematocrit (blood cell concentration). We highlight the influence of the mechanical properties of cells : an increase of membrane or cytoplasm rigidity, as can happen in pathologies such as sickle cell disease tends to reduce the phase separation. The influence of the attractive interaction between cells, that leads to clustering (rouleau formation) was also investigated by varying the concentration of macromolecules in the solution (dextran or fibrinogen). We show that hydrodynamic stresses in bifurcations can lead to rupture of clusters at a critical speed which increases with interaction energy. Overall, the clustering phenomenon tends to increase phase separation and hematocrit heterogeneities.

  8. Volumetric measurement of human red blood cells by MOSFET-based microfluidic gate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinhong; Ai, Ye; Cheng, Yuanbing; Li, Chang Ming; Kang, Yuejun; Wang, Zhiming

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we present a MOSFET-based (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) microfluidic gate to characterize the translocation of red blood cells (RBCs) through a gate. In the microfluidic system, the bias voltage modulated by the particles or biological cells is connected to the gate of MOSFET. The particles or cells can be detected by monitoring the MOSFET drain current instead of DC/AC-gating method across the electronic gate. Polystyrene particles with various standard sizes are utilized to calibrate the proposed device. Furthermore, RBCs from both adults and newborn blood sample are used to characterize the performance of the device in distinguishing the two types of RBCs. As compared to conventional DC/AC current modulation method, the proposed device demonstrates a higher sensitivity and is capable of being a promising platform for bioassay analysis. PMID:25349117

  9. Hydrodynamic instability in a magnetically driven suspension of paramagnetic red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Kashevsky, B E; Zholud, A M; Kashevsky, S B

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the magnetically driven motion in suspensions of paramagnetic particles. Our object is diluted deoxygenated whole blood with paramagnetic red blood cells (RBCs). We use direct observations in a closed vertical Hele-Shaw channel, and a well-defined magnetic force field applied horizontally in the channel plane. At very low cell concentrations, we register single-particle motion mode, track individual cells and determine their hydrodynamic and magnetic characteristics. Above 0.2 volume percent concentration, we observe local swirls and a global transient quasi-periodic vortex structure, intensifying with increasing cell concentration, but surprisingly this does not influence the time and purity of the magnetic extraction of RBCs. Our observations shed light on the behavioral complexity of magnetically driven submagnetic suspensions, an important issue for the emerging microfluidic technology of direct magnetic cell separation and intriguing for the mechanics of particulate soft matter.

  10. Mononuclear cells from a rare blood donor, after freezing under good manufacturing practice conditions, generate red blood cells that recapitulate the rare blood phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Masiello, Francesca; Tirelli, Valentina; Sanchez, Massimo; van den Akker, Emile; Girelli, Gabriella; Marconi, Maurizio; Villa, Maria Antonietta; Rebulla, Paolo; Hashmi, Gazala; Whitsett, Carolyn; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultured red blood cells (cRBCs) from cord blood (CB) have been proposed as transfusion products. Whether buffy-coats discarded from blood donations (AB) may be used to generate cRBCs for transfusion has not been investigated. Study Design and Methods Erythroid progenitor cell content and numbers and blood group antigen profiles of erythroblasts (ERYs) and cRBCs generated in Human Erythroid Massive Amplification (HEMA) culture by CB (n=7) and AB (n=33, three females, three males, one AB with rare blood antigens cryopreserved using CB protocols) were compared. Results Variability was observed both in progenitor cell content (2-fold) and number of ERYs generated (1-log) by CB and AB in HEMA. The average progenitor cell contents of the subset of AB and CB analyzed were similar. AB generated numbers of ERYs 3-times lower (p<0.01) than CB in HEMA containing fetal bovine serum but similar to CB in HEMA containing human proteins. Female AB contained 2-times less (p<0.05) erythroid progenitor cells but generated numbers of ERYs similar to those generated by male AB. Cryopreserved AB with a rare blood group phenotype and shipped to another laboratory generated great numbers of ERYs, 90% of which matured into cRBCs. Blood group antigen expression was consistent with the donor genotype for ERYs generated both by CB and AB but concordant with that of native RBCs only for cells derived from AB. Conclusion Buffy-coats from regular donors, including a donor with rare phenotypes stored under conditions established for CB, are not inferior to CB for the generation of cRBCs. PMID:24004289

  11. LEAD STUDIES : III. THE EFFECTS OF LEAD ON RED BLOOD CELLS. PART 1. CHANGES IN HEMOLYSIS.

    PubMed

    Aub, J C; Reznikoff, P; Smith, D E

    1924-07-31

    It appears, from the investigations in other laboratories, that the anemia observed in cases of lead poisoning is due to destruction of blood rather than to diminished production of blood. The method of poisoning cells in vitro with lead was adopted in order to study this phenomenon, and distinct effects were thereby obtained, even when only 0.001 mg. of lead is added to approximately 5 billion washed red corpuscles. In order to obtain optimum results the usual dosage employed was ten times this or 0.01 mg. per 5 billion cells. The following changes were observed in cells so treated. 1. Such a marked increase in the resistance to hypotonic salt solution develops that complete hemolysis does not occur until the cells are exposed to a saline solution of 0.05 per cent. Untreated cells are completely hemolyzed in 0.25 or 0.225 per cent saline. 2. This reaction is quantitative and varies with the concentration of lead used. Under the conditions of our experiments this phenomenon seems to be unique. The effects of arsenic are very slight in comparison. 3. While from this reaction it may be concluded that lead increases cellular resistance, it also appears that it shortens the life of blood cells. This may be demonstrated by the much more rapid appearance of hemolysis than normal when the cells are merely allowed to stand in Ringer solution of any dilution. 4. In rabbits with acute lead poisoning these same phenomena may be noted in vivo. 5. Both phenomena may be changed in vitro by varying the time and temperature of the reaction and the concentration of lead, as Fici has already pointed out. 6. If normal cells stand in Ringer solution for 6 hours something diffuses into the solution which largely reduces the action of lead. After repeated washing these cells react with lead in the usual manner. 7. Small amounts of serum react with lead and eliminate its effects. Red blood cells, treated with a mixture of lead and blood serum, show normal hemolysis in hypotonic salt

  12. Body surface area: a predictor of response to red blood cell transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Man, Louise; Tahhan, H Raymond

    2016-01-01

    A current focus of transfusion medicine is a judicious strategy in transfusion of blood products. Unfortunately, our ability to predict hemoglobin (Hgb) response to transfusion has been limited. The objective of this study was to determine variability of response to red blood cell transfusion and to predict which patients will have an Hgb rise higher or lower than that predicted by the long-standing convention of “one and three”. This was a retrospective chart review in a single hospital. Data for 167 consecutive patient encounters were reviewed. The dataset was randomly divided into derivation and validation subsets with no significant differences in characteristics. DeltaHgb was defined as posttransfusion Hgb minus pre-transfusion Hgb per red blood cell unit. We classified all the patients in both the subsets as “high responders” (DeltaHgb >1 g/dL) or as “low responders” (DeltaHgb ≤1 g/dL). In univariate analysis, age, sex, body weight, estimated blood volume, and body surface area were significantly associated with response category (P<0.05). Different multivariate regression models were tested using the derivation subset. The probability of being a high responder was best calculated using the logarithmic formula eH / (1 + eH), where H is B0 + (B1 × variable 1) + (B2 × variable 2). Bis are coefficients of the models. On validation, the model H=6.5–(3.3 × body surface area), with the cutoff probability of 0.5, was found to correctly classify patients into high and low responders in 69% of cases (sensitivity 84.6%, specificity 43.8%). This model may equip clinicians to make more appropriate transfusion decisions and serve as a springboard for further research in transfusion medicine. PMID:27703400

  13. Men with Sickle Cell Anemia and Priapism Exhibit Increased Hemolytic Rate, Decreased Red Blood Cell Deformability and Increased Red Blood Cell Aggregate Strength

    PubMed Central

    Cita, Kizzy-Clara; Brureau, Laurent; Lemonne, Nathalie; Billaud, Marie; Connes, Philippe; Ferdinand, Séverine; Tressières, Benoit; Tarer, Vanessa; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Blanchet, Pascal; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between priapism in men with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and hemorheological and hemolytical parameters. Materials and Methods Fifty-eight men with SCA (median age: 38 years) were included; 28 who had experienced priapism at least once during their life (priapism group) and 30 who never experienced this complication (control group). Twenty-two patients were treated with hydroxycarbamide, 11 in each group. All patients were at steady state at the time of inclusion. Hematological and biochemical parameters were obtained through routine procedures. The Laser-assisted Optical Rotational Cell Analyzer was used to measure red blood cell (RBC) deformability at 30 Pa (ektacytometry) and RBC aggregation properties (laser backscatter versus time). Blood viscosity was measured at a shear rate of 225 s-1 using a cone/plate viscometer. A principal component analysis was performed on 4 hemolytic markers (i.e., lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT), total bilirubin (BIL) levels and reticulocyte (RET) percentage) to calculate a hemolytic index. Results Compared to the control group, patients with priapism exhibited higher ASAT (p = 0.01), LDH (p = 0.03), RET (p = 0.03) levels and hemolytic indices (p = 0.02). Higher RBC aggregates strength (p = 0.01) and lower RBC deformability (p = 0.005) were observed in patients with priapism compared to controls. After removing the hydroxycarbamide-treated patients, RBC deformability (p = 0.01) and RBC aggregate strength (p = 0.03) were still different between the two groups, and patients with priapism exhibited significantly higher hemolytic indices (p = 0.01) than controls. Conclusion Our results confirm that priapism in SCA is associated with higher hemolytic rates and show for the first time that this complication is also associated with higher RBC aggregate strength and lower RBC deformability. PMID:27145183

  14. Current topics in red cell biology: report on the Red Cell Special Interest Group meeting held at NHS Blood and Transplant Bristol on 30 October 2015.

    PubMed

    Bullock, T; Bruce, L J; Ridgwell, K

    2016-08-01

    The Red Cell Special Interest Group (SIG) meeting, hosted by the British Blood Transfusion Society, provides an annual forum for the presentation of UK- and European-based red cell research. The 2015 meeting was held on Friday 30 October at the National Health Service Blood & Transplant (NHSBT) facility in Filton, Bristol and provided an exciting and varied programme on the themes of erythropoiesis, malaria biology and pathophysiology and red cells properties in stress and disease. Ten speakers presented on these topics over the course of one day. The meeting was well attended by over 90 delegates. Posters were presented during the lunch break, and abstracts from the posters are published at the end of this issue.

  15. A new challenge for malaria control in Brazil: asymptomatic Plasmodium infection--a review.

    PubMed

    Coura, José Rodrigues; Suárez-Mutis, Martha; Ladeia-Andrade, Simone

    2006-05-01

    The evolution of malaria in Brazil, its morbidity, the malaria control programs, and the new challenges for these programs in the light of the emergence of asymptomatic infection in the Amazon region of Brazil were reviewed. At least six Brazilian research groups have demonstrated that asymptomatic infection by Plasmodium is an important impediment to malaria control, among mineral prospectors in Mato Grosso and riverside communities in Rondônia and, in our group, in the middle and upper reaches of the Negro river, in the state of Amazonas. Likewise, other researchers have studied the problem among indigenous communities in the Colombian, Peruvian, and Venezuelan parts of the Amazon basin, adjacent to Brazil. The frequency of positive results from the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) among asymptomatic individuals has ranged from 20.4 to 49.5%, and the presence of Plasmodium in the thick blood smears, from 4.2 to 38.5%. Infection with Anopheles darlingi has also been demonstrated by xenodiagnosis among asymptomatic patients with positive PCR results. If a mean of 25% is taken for the asymptomatic infection caused by Plasmodium sp. in the Amazon region of Brazil, malaria control will be difficult to achieve in that region with the measures currently utilized for such control. PMID:16862314

  16. Predictive value of red blood cell distribution width for coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiyan; Fu, Songling; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Jian; Gao, Lichao; Zhu, Weihua; Gong, Fangqi

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that elevated red blood cell distribution width is associated with poor outcome in cardiovascular diseases. In order to assess the predictive value of red blood cell distribution width, before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins, for coronary artery lesions in patient with Kawasaki disease, we compared 83 patients with coronary artery lesions and 339 patients without coronary artery lesions before treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin. Clinical, echocardiographic, and biochemical values were evaluated along with red blood cell distribution width. A total of 422 consecutive patients with Kawasaki disease were enrolled into our study. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the optimal red blood cell distribution width cut-off value for predicting coronary artery lesions was 14.55% (area under the curve was 0.721; p=0.000); eighty-three patients (19.7%) had coronary artery lesions, and 70% of the patients with coronary artery lesions had red blood cell distribution width level >14.55%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that fever duration >14 days (odds ratio was 3.42, 95% confidence interval was 1.27-9.22; p=0.015), intravenous immunoglobulin resistance (odds ratio was 2.33, 95% confidence interval was 1.02-5.29; p=0.04), and red blood cell distribution width >14.55% (odds ratio was 3.49, 95% confidence interval was 2.01-6.05; p=0.000) were independent predictors of coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease. In Conclusion, red blood cell distribution width may be helpful for predicting coronary artery lesions in patients with Kawasaki disease.

  17. Relationship between red blood cell lipid peroxidation, plasma hemoglobin, and red blood cell osmotic resistance before and after vitamin E supplementation in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, R; Taccone-Gallucci, M; Mazzarella, V; Bandino, D; Citti, G; Elli, M; Giardini, O; Casciani, C U

    1986-06-01

    It has been reported that increased peroxidation of the polyunsaturated fatty acids in the erythrocyte membranes is one of the causes of chronic hemolysis in uremic patients on hemodialysis and that therapeutic doses of vitamin E are effective in reducing peroxidation, improving the hematocrit. The present study shows how the reduced peroxidation, induced by a course with therapeutic doses of vitamin E, is paralleled by a significant reduction of plasma hemoglobin concentrations at the end of the dialysis and by a significant improvement of erythrocyte osmotic resistance. The findings lead to the suggestion that the administration of tocopherol to patients on chronic hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease may be beneficial in improving anemia, acting via a reduction of lipid peroxidation of the red blood cell membranes. Whether this can reduce the need for the transfusions can be assessed only with a longitudinal long-term study, which is also necessary to determine whether the preliminary findings of this report have important clinical applications. PMID:3741199

  18. Low Red Blood Cell Vitamin C Concentrations Induce Red Blood Cell Fragility: A Link to Diabetes Via Glucose, Glucose Transporters, and Dehydroascorbic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Hongbin; Li, Hongyan; Wang, Yu; Niyyati, Mahtab; Wang, Yaohui; Leshin, Jonathan; Levine, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to prevent diabetic microvascular angiopathy focus on the vascular endothelium. Because red blood cells (RBCs) are less deformable in diabetes, we explored an original concept linking decreased RBC deformability to RBC ascorbate and hyperglycemia. We characterized ascorbate concentrations from human and mouse RBCs and plasma, and showed an inverse relationship between RBC ascorbate concentrations and deformability, measured by osmotic fragility. RBCs from ascorbate deficient mice were osmotically sensitive, appeared as spherocytes, and had decreased β-spectrin. These aberrancies reversed with ascorbate repletion in vivo. Under physiologic conditions, only ascorbate's oxidation product dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), a substrate for facilitated glucose transporters, was transported into mouse and human RBCs, with immediate intracellular reduction to ascorbate. In vitro, glucose inhibited entry of physiologic concentrations of dehydroascorbic acid into mouse and human RBCs. In vivo, plasma glucose concentrations in normal and diabetic mice and humans were inversely related to respective RBC ascorbate concentrations, as was osmotic fragility. Human RBC β-spectrin declined as diabetes worsened. Taken together, hyperglycemia in diabetes produced lower RBC ascorbate with increased RBC rigidity, a candidate to drive microvascular angiopathy. Because glucose transporter expression, DHA transport, and its inhibition by glucose differed for mouse versus human RBCs, human experimentation is indicated. PMID:26870799

  19. Defected red blood cell membranes and direct correlation with the uraemic milieu: the connection with the decreased red blood cell lifespan observed in haemodialysis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamopoulos, D.; Grapsa, E.; Manios, E.; Gogola, V.; Bakirtzi, N.

    2012-12-01

    Together with impaired production of erythropoietin and iron deficiency, the decreased lifespan of red blood cells (RBCs) is a main factor contributing to the chronic anaemia observed in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Atomic force microscopy is employed in this work to thoroughly survey the membrane of intact RBCs (iRBCs) of HD patients in comparison to those of healthy donors, aiming to obtain direct information on the structural status of RBCs that can be related to their decreased lifespan. We observed that the iRBC membrane of the HD patients is overpopulated with extended circular defects, termed ‘orifices’, that have typical dimension ranging between 0.2 and 1.0 μm. The ‘orifice’ index—that is, the mean population of ‘orifices’ per top membrane surface—exhibits a pronounced relative increase of order 54 ± 12% for the HD patients as compared to healthy donors. Interestingly, for the HD patients, the ‘orifice’ index, which relates to the structural status of the RBC membrane, correlates strongly with urea concentration, which is a basic index of the uraemic milieu. Thus, these results indicate that the uraemic milieu downgrades the structural status of the RBC membrane, possibly triggering biochemical processes that result in their premature elimination from the circulation. This process could decrease the lifespan of RBCs, as observed in HD patients.

  20. Delivering nanoparticles to lungs while avoiding liver and spleen through adsorption on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gupta, Vivek; Zern, Blaine J; Pan, Daniel; Zakrewsky, Michael; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-12-23

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are one of the most widely investigated approaches for developing novel therapies for a variety of diseases. However, rapid clearance and poor targeting limit their clinical utility. Here, we describe an approach to harness the flexibility, circulation, and vascular mobility of red blood cells (RBCs) to simultaneously overcome these limitations (cellular hitchhiking). A noncovalent attachment of nanoparticles to RBCs simultaneously increases their level in blood over a 24 h period and allows transient accumulation in the lungs, while reducing their uptake by liver and spleen. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles exhibited ∼3-fold increase in blood persistence and ∼7-fold higher accumulation in lungs. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles improved lung/liver and lung/spleen nanoparticle accumulation by over 15-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Accumulation in lungs is attributed to mechanical transfer of particles from the RBC surface to lung endothelium. Independent tracing of both nanoparticles and RBCs in vivo confirmed that RBCs themselves do not accumulate in lungs. Attachment of anti-ICAM-1 antibody to the exposed surface of NPs that were attached to RBCs led to further increase in lung targeting and retention over 24 h. Cellular hitchhiking onto RBCs provides a new platform for improving the blood pharmacokinetics and vascular delivery of nanoparticles while simultaneously avoiding uptake by liver and spleen, thus opening the door for new applications.

  1. The significant blood resistance to lung nitric oxide transfer lies within the red cell.

    PubMed

    Borland, Colin; Bottrill, Fiona; Jones, Aled; Sparkes, Chris; Vuylsteke, Alain

    2014-01-01

    The lung nitric oxide (NO) diffusing capacity (DlNO) mainly reflects alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm). However, blood resistance has been shown in vitro and in vivo. To explore whether this resistance lies in the plasma, the red blood cell (RBC) membrane, or in the RBC interior, we measured the NO diffusing capacity (Dno) in a membrane oxygenator circuit containing ∼1 liter of horse or human blood exposed to 14 parts per million NO under physiological conditions on 7 separate days. We compared results across a 1,000-fold change in extracellular diffusivity using dextrans, plasma, and physiological salt solution. We halved RBC surface area by comparing horse and human RBCs. We altered the diffusive resistance of the RBC interior by adding sodium nitrite converting oxyhemoglobin to methemoglobin. Neither increased viscosity nor reduced RBC size reduced Dno. Adding sodium nitrite increased methemoglobin and was associated with a steady fall in Dno (P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained at NO concentrations found in vivo. The RBC interior appears to be the site of the blood resistance.

  2. Alterations in Red Blood Cell Deformability during Storage: A Microfluidic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cluitmans, Judith C. A.; Chokkalingam, Venkatachalam; Janssen, Arno M.; Brock, Roland; Huck, Wilhelm T. S.; Bosman, Giel J. C. G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) undergo extensive deformation when travelling through the microcapillaries. Deformability, the combined result of properties of the membrane-cytoskeleton complex, the surface area-to-volume ratio, and the hemoglobin content, is a critical determinant of capillary blood flow. During blood bank storage and in many pathophysiological conditions, RBC morphology changes, which has been suggested to be associated with decreased deformability and removal of RBC. While various techniques provide information on the rheological properties of stored RBCs, their clinical significance is controversial. We developed a microfluidic approach for evaluating RBC deformability in a physiologically meaningful and clinically significant manner. Unlike other techniques, our method enables a high-throughput determination of changes in deformation capacity to provide statistically significant data, while providing morphological information at the single-cell level. Our data show that, under conditions that closely mimic capillary dimensions and flow, the capacity to deform and the capacity to relax are not affected during storage in the blood bank. Our data also show that altered cell morphology by itself does not necessarily affect deformability. PMID:25295273

  3. Nanodefects of membranes cause destruction of packed red blood cells during long-term storage.

    PubMed

    Kozlova, Еlena; Chernysh, Аleksandr; Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Оlga; Kuzovlev, Аrtem

    2015-10-01

    Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are used for blood transfusion. PRBC were stored for 30 days under 4 °С in hermetic blood bags with CPD anticoagulant-preservative solution. Hematocrit was 50-55%. The distortions of PRBC membranes nanostructure and cells morphology during storage were studied by atomic force microscopy. Basic measurements were performed at the day 2, 6, 9, 16, 23 and 30 of storage and additionally 2-3 days after it. Topological defects occurred on RBC membranes by day 9. They appeared as domains with grain-like structures ("grains") sized up to 200 nm. These domains were appeared in almost all cells. Later these domains merged and formed large defects on cells. It was the formation of domains with the "grains" which was onset process leading eventually to destruction of PRBC. Possible mechanisms of transformation of PRBC and their membrane are related to the alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. During this storage period potassium ions and lactat concentrations increased, pH decreased, intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione diminished in the preservative solution. Changes of PRBC morphology were detected within the entire period of PRBC storage. Discocytes predominated at the days 1 and 2. By day 30 PRBC transformed into irreversible echinocytes and spheroechinocytes. Study of defects of membranes nanostructure may form the basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC. This method may allow to work out the best recommendations for blood transfusion.

  4. Modeling the Behavior of Red Blood Cells within the Caudal Vein Plexus of Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Djukic, Tijana R.; Karthik, Swapna; Saveljic, Igor; Djonov, Valentin; Filipovic, Nenad

    2016-01-01

    Due to the important biological role of red blood cells (RBCs) in vertebrates, the analysis of reshaping and dynamics of RBCs motion is a critical issue in physiology and biomechanics. In this paper the behavior of RBCs within the immature capillary plexus during embryonic development of zebrafish has been analyzed. Relying on the fact that zebrafish embryos are small and optically transparent, it is possible to image the blood flow. In this way the anatomy of blood vessels is monitored along with the circulation throughout their development. Numerical simulations were performed using a specific numerical model that combines fluid flow simulation, modeling of the interaction of individual RBCs immersed in blood plasma with the surrounding fluid and modeling the deformation of individual cells. The results of numerical simulations are in accordance with the in vivo observed region of interest within the caudal vein plexus of the zebrafish embryo. Good agreement of results demonstrates the capabilities of the developed numerical model to predict and analyze the motion and deformation of RBCs in complex geometries. The proposed model (methodology) will help to elucidate different rheological and hematological related pathologies and finally to design better treatment strategies. PMID:27774070

  5. The wall traction induced by flowing red blood cells in model microvessels and its potential mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Jonathan; Vermot, Julien

    2013-11-01

    There is evidence in early embryonic development, even well before advective oxygen transport is important, that the presence of red bloods cells per se trigger essential steps of normal vascular development. For example, showed that sequestration of blood cells early in the development of a mouse, such that the hematocrit is reduced, suppresses normal vascular network development. Vascular development also provides a model for remodeling and angiogenesis. We consider the transient stresses associated with blood cells flowing in model microvessels of comparable diameter to those at early stages of development (6 μm to 12 μm). A detailed simulation tool is used to show that passing blood cells present a significant fluctuating traction signature on the vessel wall, well above the mean stresses. This is particularly pronounced for slow flows (<= 50 μm/s) or small diameters (<= 7 μm), for which root-mean-square wall traction fluctuations can exceed their mean. These events potentially present mechanotranduction triggers that direct development or remodeling. Attenuation of such fluctuating tractions by a viscoelastic endothelial glycocalyx layer is also considered. NSF supported.

  6. Measuring electrical and mechanical properties of red blood cells with a double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; Pozzo, Liliana d. Y.; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-08-01

    The fluid lipid bilayer viscoelastic membrane of red blood cells (RBC) contains antigen glycolproteins and proteins which can interact with antibodies to cause cell agglutination. This is the basis of most of the immunohematologic tests in blood banks and the identification of the antibodies against the erythrocyte antigens is of fundamental importance for transfusional routines. The negative charges of the RBCs creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. The first counterions cloud strongly binded moving together with the RBC is called the compact layer. This report proposes the use of a double optical tweezers for a new procedure for measuring: (1) the apparent membrane viscosity, (2) the cell adhesion, (3) the zeta potential and (4) the compact layer's size of the charges formed around the cell in the electrolytic solution. To measure the membrane viscosity we trapped silica beads strongly attached to agglutinated RBCs and measured the force to slide one RBC over the other as a function of the relative velocity. The RBC adhesion was measured by slowly displacing two RBCs apart until the disagglutination happens. The compact layer's size was measured using the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied voltage and the zeta potential was obtained by measuring the terminal velocity after releasing the RBC from the optical trap at the last applied voltage. We believe that the methodology here proposed can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  7. Massive transfusion protocol activation does not result in preferential use of older red blood cells.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Lauren M; Triulzi, Darrell J; Cramer, James; Zuckerbraun, Brian S; Sperry, Jason L; Peitzman, Andrew B; Raval, Jay S; Neal, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Widespread, anecdotal belief exists that patients receiving massive transfusion, particularly those for whom a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) is activated, are more likely to receive older red blood cells (RBCs). Retrospective review of blood bank records from calendar year 2011 identified 131 patients emergently issued ≥10 RBC units (emergency release (ER)) prior to obtaining a type and screen. This cohort was subclassified based on whether there was MTP activation. For comparison, 176 identified patients transfused with ≥10 RBC units in a routine fashion over 24 hours represented the nonemergency release (nER) cohort. Though the median age of ER RBCs was 5 days older than nER RBCs (ER 20, nER 15 days, P < 0.001), both fell within the third week of storage. Regardless of MTP activation, transfused ER RBCs had the same median age (MTP 20, no-MTP 20 days, P = 0.069). In the ER cohort, transition to type-specific blood components increased the median age of transfused RBC units from 17 to 36 days (P < 0.001). These data refute the anecdotal belief that MTP activation results in transfusion of older RBCs. However, upon transition to type-specific blood components, the age of RBCs enters a range in which it is hypothesized that there may be a significant effect of storage age on clinical outcomes.

  8. Prevalence and distribution of human Plasmodium infection in Federally Administrative Tribal Areas of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Irfan; Qureshi, Naveeda Akhtar; Afzal, Muhammad; Shaheen, Nargis; Ali, Abid; Ashraf, Asma

    2016-09-01

    About 3.6 million Pashtun and over 1.5 million immigrants from Afghanistan live in the federally administered tribal areas (FATA) on the border between Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province and southern Afghanistan. Although malaria cases are common in FATA, no detailed studies have yet been performed to reveal the actual status of malaria in the local population and epidemiological data are insufficient to elucidate the actual incidence. A malariometric survey of 691 patients of all ages and genders in seven agencies (districts) in FATA was carried out in 2013 using whole blood samples. Microscopically confirmed positive species were subjected to nested-PCR for the reconfirmation and detection of four species of Plasmodium causing human malaria. Of the 626 PCR positive cases, 81.1% were P. vivax, 13.8% P. falciparum and 4.9% mixed species containing both P. vivax and P. falciparum. P. malariae and P. ovale and were not found in any analysis. Sixty-five microscopic positive samples were identified as negative by PCR. The incidence of P. vivax ranged from 10.4% in Orakzai Agency to 22.8% in North Waziristan Agency. The prevalence of P. falciparum ranged from 1.3% in Orakzai Agency to 4.7% in North Waziristan, and Khyber Agency had the highest prevalence of 1.7% of mixed species. In FATA, P. vivax and P. falciparum are the main causative agents of malaria, while mixed species infections are also prevalent with varying transmission intensities. In addition, Estimates of malaria incidence shows that variation in the incidence, frequency and species composition of malarial parasites is high. PMID:27447217

  9. Oxidative processes in red blood cells from normal and diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Bryszewska, M; Zavodnik, I B; Niekurzak, A; Szosland, K

    1995-10-01

    The oxidation processes in normal and diabetic erythrocytes after cell exposure to H2O2 and t-butyl hydroperoxide, as well as the effect of malondialdehyde (a stable end product of lipid peroxidation) on erythrocyte membrane structure and stability were studied. The malondialdehyde level began to increase only after oxidation of most of the red blood cell glutathione by peroxides. The activation energy of malondialdehyde was 53 +/- 7 kj/mol. Sodium azide inhibited the oxidation processes induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide. The modification of erythrocytes by malondialdehyde decreased the fluidity of the membrane lipid bilayer measured by fluorescence anisotropy and increased the osmotic stability of the cells. The level of endogenous thiobarbituric acid-reactive species was higher and antioxidative activity was lower in diabetic cells. It seems likely that oxidation processes and accumulation of malondialdehyde can contribute directly to changes in the properties of ¿diabetic¿ red blood cells and may cause the development of long-term complications. PMID:8673018

  10. Rheological and electrical properties of red blood cells and their ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Akeson, S.P.

    1982-11-01

    This work is a biophysical study of red blood cells and their membranes, at both the single cell and population levels. The primary research tool employed is resistive pulse spectroscopy (RPS), an outgrowth and extension of traditional electronic particle counting and sizing. Through the interaction of single cells with a sizing transducer, novel information on the additional properties of osmotic hemolysis has traditionally been defined by the loss of hemoglobin, in response to reduced osmotic pressure, as measured spectroscopically. Previous work has shown that in a mixed population of hemolyzing cells, ghosts can be etected as being more deformable, and hence distinctly smaller-appearing objects, than the remaining intact cells. It is demonstrated by kinetic studies that changes which occur in the rheological and electrical properties of ghosts are independent phenomena. Included in the analysis is the explicit calculation of ghost and intact spherocyte resistivity after integrated into a proposed model of osmotic hemolysis based on known red blood cell membrane and cytoplasmic properties.

  11. Mechanical interactions between ice crystals and red blood cells during directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, H; Rubinsky, B

    1994-10-01

    Experiments in which red blood cells were frozen on a directional solidification stage under a microscope show that there is a mechanical interaction between ice crystals and cells in which cells are pushed and deformed by the ice crystals. The mechanical interaction occurs during freezing of cells in physiological saline and is significantly inhibited by the addition of 20% v/v glycerol to the solution. The addition of osmotically insignificant quantities of antifreeze proteins from the winter flounder or ocean pout to the physiological saline with 20% v/v glycerol generates strong mechanical interactions between the ice and the cells. The cells were destroyed during freezing in physiological saline, survived freezing in physiological saline with glycerol, and were completely destroyed by the addition of antifreeze proteins to the solution with glycerol. The difference in cell survival through freezing and thawing appears to be related, in part, to the habit of ice crystal growing in the suspension of red blood cells and the nature of mechanical interaction between the ice crystal and the cells. This suggests that mechanical damage may be a factor during cryopreservation of cells.

  12. The activation of the sodium pump in pig red blood cells by internal and external cations.

    PubMed

    Brand, S C; Whittam, R

    1985-05-30

    A study has been made with pig red blood cells of the activation of the sodium pump by internal and external cations. Cell Na and K concentrations were altered using a PCMBS cation loading procedure. The procedure was characterised for resultant ionic conditions, maintenance of ATP levels and fragility. The activation of the sodium pump by external K was measured in cells suspended in choline (Na-free) solutions. External Cs was used as a substitute for K and elicited lower rates of pump activity. Both the Vmax and apparent Km for 42K influx and 134Cs influx increased as internal Na concentration was raised (within the non-saturating range). Vmax/apparent Km ratios for cation influx were constant. Raising external Cs concentration exerted a similar influence on pump activation by internal Na: both the maximum pump velocity and the apparent Na-site dissociation constant (K'Na) increased. The results provide evidence for a transmembrane connection between cation binding sites on opposite faces of the membrane and are consistent with a consecutive model for the sodium pump in pig red blood cells. PMID:2581622

  13. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments. PMID:27431921

  14. Detection and quantification of subtle changes in red blood cell density using a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Felton, Edward J; Velasquez, Anthony; Lu, Shulin; Murphy, Ryann O; ElKhal, Abdala; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Sharda, Anish; Ghiran, Ionita C

    2016-08-16

    Magnetic levitation has emerged as a technique that offers the ability to differentiate between cells with different densities. We have developed a magnetic levitation system for this purpose that distinguishes not only different cell types but also density differences in cells of the same type. This small-scale system suspends cells in a paramagnetic medium in a capillary placed between two rare earth magnets, and cells levitate to an equilibrium position determined solely by their density. Uniform reference beads of known density are used in conjunction with the cells as a means to quantify their levitation positions. In one implementation images of the levitating cells are acquired with a microscope, but here we also introduce a cell phone-based device that integrates the magnets, capillary, and a lens into a compact and portable unit that acquires images with the phone's camera. To demonstrate the effectiveness of magnetic levitation in cell density analysis we carried out levitation experiments using red blood cells with artificially altered densities, and also levitated those from donors. We observed that we can distinguish red blood cells of an anemic donor from those that are healthy. Since a plethora of disease states are characterized by changes in cell density magnetic cell levitation promises to be an effective tool in identifying and analyzing pathologic states. Furthermore, the low cost, portability, and ease of use of the cell phone-based system may potentially lead to its deployment in low-resource environments.

  15. Abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles of patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Baró, L.; Hermoso, J. C.; Núñez, M. C.; Jiménez-Rios, J. A.; Gil, A.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated total plasma fatty acid concentrations and percentages, and the fatty acid profiles for the different plasma lipid fractions and red blood cell lipids, in 17 patients with untreated colorectal cancer and 12 age-matched controls with no malignant diseases, from the same geographical area. Cancer patients had significantly lower total plasma concentrations of saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives than healthy controls; when the values were expressed as relative percentages, cancer patients had significantly higher proportions of oleic acid and lower levels of linoleic acid than controls. With regard to lipid fractions, cancer patients had higher proportions of oleic acid in plasma phospholipids, triglycerides and cholesterol esters, and lower percentages of linoleic acid and its derivatives. On the other hand, alpha-linolenic acid was significantly lower in triglycerides from cancer patients and tended to be lower in phospholipids. Its derivatives also tended to be lower in phospholipids and triglycerides from cancer patients. Our findings suggest that colorectal cancer patients present abnormalities in plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles characterized by lower amounts of most saturated, monounsaturated and essential fatty acids and their polyunsaturated derivatives, especially members of the n-6 series, than their healthy age-matched counterparts. These changes are probably due to metabolic changes caused by the illness per se but not to malnutrition. PMID:9667678

  16. [A survey on distribution of red cell blood group systems in naxi and primi ethnic groups].

    PubMed

    Xiao, C; Hao, L; Zhang, W; Tao, Y; Zhou, Z; Du, R

    1995-01-01

    A survey of distribution of red cell blood group systems, including ABO, MNSs, Rh and P, was carried out on the Naxi and Primi ethnic groups in Yunnan province. The results based on 104 cases in each of the two ethnic groups showed that both Naxi and Primi possessed a high gene frequency r of 0.6082 and 0.6882, respectively, with gene frequency p = q. The gene frequency m of Naxi (0.8509) was found to be very high among the populations studied in China until now, only next to that of Lizu (0.8709). The most common phenotype of Rh system was CcDE- in both Naxi and Primi, with a quite high cDE frequency. No case of Rh negative was observed in the two ethnic groups. The P1 in Naxi approximated to that in Primi. The red cell blood group systems and their genetic distances suggested that the Naxi and Primi was genetically close to ethnic groups of North China, but different from those of South China. This fact suggests that these two ethnics groups originated from the North China.

  17. Influence of inflammatory and lipidic parameters on red blood cell distribution width in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Sarnago, Ana; Fuster, Oscar; Alis, Rafael; Romagnoli, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a routine red blood cell count parameter which has been shown to be associated with inflammatory parameters. Recently, some authors proposed that RDW seems to be a marker of an adverse lipidic profile. In order to clarify whether RDW is related to inflammation, plasma lipids, or both, we determined anthropometric, hematimetric, inflammatory and lipidic parameters in 1111 healthy subjects. RDW correlated directly with age, body mass index (BMI), inflammatory parameters (plasma viscosity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, leukocyte and neutrophil count), and inversely with iron and hematimetric parameters (P <  0.05). When subjects were divided according to gender, RDW correlated inversely with triglycerides only in women (P <  0.05). When subjects were classified into RDW-quartiles, increased RDW values were accompanied by decreased serum iron levels and hematimetric indices (P <  0.01), whereas age and inflammatory markers increased according to RDW-quartiles (P <  0.001 and P <  0.05, respectively). However, plasma lipids did not change with increasing RDW-quartiles (P >  0.05). In the linear regression analysis, age, hemoglobin, MCV (beta coefficient: 0.202, -0.234, -0.316, P <  0.001) and fibrinogen (beta coefficient: 0.059, P = 0.048) were the only independent predictors of RDW. The present study indicates that RDW is associated with inflammatory markers and hematimetric indices, but not with plasma lipid levels in a healthy population. PMID:25159489

  18. Fluctuations of coupled fluid and solid membranes with application to red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    The fluctuation spectra and the intermembrane interaction of two membranes at a fixed average distance are investigated. Each membrane can either be a fluid or a solid membrane, and in isolation, its fluctuations are described by a bare or a wave-vector-dependent bending modulus, respectively. The membranes interact via their excluded-volume interaction; the average distance is maintained by an external, homogeneous pressure. For strong coupling, the fluctuations can be described by a single, effective membrane that combines the elastic properties. For weak coupling, the fluctuations of the individual, noninteracting membranes are recovered. The case of a composite membrane consisting of one fluid and one solid membrane can serve as a microscopic model for the plasma membrane and cytoskeleton of the red blood cell. We find that, despite the complex microstructure of bilayers and cytoskeletons in a real cell, the fluctuations with wavelengths λ≳400nm are well described by the fluctuations of a single, polymerized membrane (provided that there are no inhomogeneities of the microstructure). The model is applied to the fluctuation data of discocytes (“normal” red blood cells), a stomatocyte, and an echinocyte. The elastic parameters of the membrane and an effective temperature that quantifies active, metabolically driven fluctuations are extracted from the experiments.

  19. Effect of superposition and masking between red blood cell autoantibodies and alloantibodies.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Wang, D Q

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the law of superposition and masking between autoantibodies and alloantibodies, and to ensure the detection of alloantibodies and to improve the safety of warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia patients. Eight kinds of commercial IgG red blood cell antibody reagents were serially diluted, and 3 kinds of antibodies at dilutions showing a continuous gradual decline in agglutination strength with the corresponding antigen red blood cells were treated as the target antibodies. Anti-D and anti-M were treated as simulated autoantibodies, and anti-Fya was treated as a simulated alloantibody. Four concentrations, 4+, 3+, 2+ and 1+, of autoantibodies and three concentrations, 3+, 2+ and 1+, of alloantibodies were combined, and 12 kinds of hybrid antibodies were detected and evaluated by the anti-human globulin micro-column gel assay. When the simulated strong autoantibody (4+) was used, the alloantibodies (3+, 2+, 1+) had no effect on the final agglutination strength; when the strength of agglutination produced by the simulated autoantibody was less than 4+, and at the same time there were alloantibodies (3+, 2+, 1+), the differences in agglutination strength with a panel of RBCs could be clearly observed. Strong autoantibodies (4+) can exert a masking effect, leading to alloantibodies being undetected; autoantibodies less than 4+, will produce the superimposed effect with alloantibodies, resulting in differences in agglutination strength. PMID:25036516

  20. Probing orientation and rotation of red blood cells in optical tweezers by digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardenas, Nelson; Yu, Lingfeng; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of red blood cells (RBC) with optical tweezers has been found to differ under varied physiological and pathological conditions as compared to its normal conditions. Earlier, we reported difference in rotation of trapped RBC in hypertonic conditions for detection of malaria infection. Disk-like RBC when trapped in optical tweezers get oriented in the vertical plane to maximize interaction with trapping beam. However, classical bright field, phase contrast or epifluorescence microscopy cannot confirm its orientation, thus leading to ambiguous conclusions such as folding of RBC during trapping by some researchers. Now, with use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM), we achieved high axial sensitivity that confirmed orientation of trapped red blood cell. Further, DHM enabled quantitative phase imaging of RBC under hypertonic condition. Dynamic changes of rotating RBC under optical tweezers at different trapping laser power were evaluated by the use of DHM. The deviation from linear dependence of rotation speed of RBC on laser power, was attributed towards deformation of RBC shape due to higher laser power (or speed).

  1. Surface-emitting superconductor laser spectroscopy for characterizing normal and sickled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Gourley, M.F.

    1995-02-01

    We have developed a new intracavity laser technique that uses a living or a fixed cell as an integral component of the laser. The cells are placed on an AlGaAs/GaAs surface-emitting semiconductor wafer and covered with a glass dielectric mirror to form a laser resonator. In this arrangement, the cells serve as optical waveguides (or lens elements) to confine (or focus) light generated in the resonator by the semiconductor. Because of the high transparency, the cells aid the lasing process to generate laser light. This ultra sensitive laser provides a novel imaging/spectroscopic technique for histologic examination which we demonstrate with normal and sickled human red blood cells. Extremely high contrast microscopic images of the cells are observed near 830-850 nm. These images correspond to electromagnetic modes of cell structures and are sensitive to shape of the cell. Using a high resolution spectrometer, we resolve the light emitted from these images into very narrow spectral peaks associated with the lasing modes. Analysis of the spectra reveals that the distribution of peaks is quite different for normal and sickled red blood cells. This technique, in a more developed form, may be useful for the rapid analysis of other kinds of normal and abnormal cells.

  2. Potassium influx in human neonatal red blood cells. Partition into its major components.

    PubMed

    Serrani, R E; Venera, G; Gioia, I A; Corchs, J L

    1990-03-01

    The potassium influx in human neonatal red blood cells (nRBC) shows an approximately 25% lower value compared to the total potassium influx in adult red blood cells (aRBC). The ouabain-sensitive potassium influx component represents approximately 70-75% of the total potassium influx for both types of cells but with an absolute value significantly lower in nRBC. In nRBC, the half maximum inhibitory effect for ouabain was obtained at a 10(-9) M concentration. The ouabain-insensitive nRBC potassium influx fractions showed two components: (i) a bumetanide-sensitive component, significantly lower than that of aRBC, (ii) a ouabain-bumetanide-insensitive (leak) component with a similar value in both cell types. The sum of the ouabain-sensitive and furosemide-sensitive components amounted in nRBC to a greater value than the total potassium influx. This behaviour could be interpreted as a superposition of the action of the inhibitors on the components affected.

  3. Spatially variant red blood cell crenation in alternating current non-uniform fieldsa

    PubMed Central

    An, Ran; Wipf, David O.; Minerick, Adrienne R.

    2014-01-01

    Alternating-current (AC) electrokinetics involve the movement and behaviors of particles or cells. Many applications, including dielectrophoretic manipulations, are dependent upon charge interactions between the cell or particle and the surrounding medium. Medium concentrations are traditionally treated as spatially uniform in both theoretical models and experiments. Human red blood cells (RBCs) are observed to crenate, or shrink due to changing osmotic pressure, over 10 min experiments in non-uniform AC electric fields. Cell crenation magnitude is examined as functions of frequency from 250 kHz to 1 MHz and potential from 10 Vpp to 17.5 Vpp over a 100 μm perpendicular electrode gap. Experimental results show higher peak to peak potential and lower frequency lead to greater cell volume crenation up to a maximum volume loss of 20%. A series of experiments are conducted to elucidate the physical mechanisms behind the red blood cell crenation. Non-uniform and uniform electrode systems as well as high and low ion concentration experiments are compared and illustrate that AC electroporation, system temperature, rapid temperature changes, medium pH, electrode reactions, and convection do not account for the crenation behaviors observed. AC electroosmotic was found to be negligible at these conditions and AC electrothermal fluid flows were found to reduce RBC crenation behaviors. These cell deformations were attributed to medium hypertonicity induced by ion concentration gradients in the spatially nonuniform AC electric fields. PMID:24753734

  4. Analysis of enzymopathies in the human red blood cells by constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Durmuş Tekir, Saliha; Cakir, Tunahan; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2006-10-01

    The human red blood cell (RBC) metabolism is investigated by calculating steady state fluxes using constraint-based stoichiometric modeling approaches. For the normal RBC metabolism, flux balance analysis (FBA) is performed via optimization of various alternative objective functions, and the maximization of production of ATP and NADPH is found to be the primary objective of the RBC metabolism. FBA and two novel approaches, minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA) and regulatory on-off minimization (ROOM), which can describe the behavior of the metabolic networks in case of enzymopathies, are applied to observe the relative changes in the flux distribution of the deficient network. The deficiencies in several enzymes in RBC metabolism are investigated and the flux distributions are compared with the non-deficient FBA distribution to elucidate the metabolic changes in response to enzymopathies. It is found that the metabolism is mostly affected by the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) enzymopathies, whereas the effects of the deficiency in DPGM on the metabolism are negligible. These stoichiometric modeling results are found to be in accordance with the experimental findings in the literature related to metabolic behavior of the human red blood cells, showing that human RBC metabolism can be modeled stoichiometrically. PMID:16987707

  5. Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Eipl, K; Nakabiito, C; Bwogi, K; Motevalli, M; Roots, A; Blagg, L; Jackson, J B

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. De-identified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups 0, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%)were negative forD, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity.

  6. Red blood cells stored for increasing periods produce progressive impairments in nitric oxide–mediated vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Jason T.; El-Ali, Alexander M.; Newman, James L.; Karatela, Sulaiman; Predmore, Benjamin L.; Lefer, David J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Clinical outcomes in transfused patients may be affected by the duration of blood storage, possibly due to red blood cell (RBC)-mediated disruption of nitric oxide (NO) signaling, a key regulator of vascular tone and blood flow. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS AS-1 RBC units stored up to 42 days were sampled at selected storage times. Samples were added to aortic rings ex vivo, a system where NO-mediated vasodilation could be experimentally controlled. RESULTS RBC units showed storage-dependent changes in plasma hemoglobin (Hb), RBC 2,3-diphosphoglycerate acid, and RBC adenosine triphosphate conforming to expected profiles. When freshly collected (Day 0) blood was added to rat aortic rings, methacholine (MCh) stimulated substantial NO-mediated vasodilation. In contrast, MCh produced no vasodilation in the presence of blood stored for 42 days. Surprisingly, the vasoinhibitory effects of stored RBCs were almost totally mediated by RBCs themselves: removal of the supernatant did not attenuate the inhibitory effects, while addition of supernatant alone to the aortic rings only minimally inhibited MCh-stimulated relaxation. Stored RBCs did not inhibit vasodilation by a direct NO donor, demonstrating that the RBC-mediated vasoinhibitory mechanism did not work by NO scavenging. CONCLUSIONS These studies have revealed a previously unrecognized vasoinhibitory activity of stored RBCs, which is more potent than the described effects of free Hb and works through a different mechanism that does not involve NO scavenging but may function by reducing endothelial NO production. Through this novel mechanism, transfusion of small volumes of stored blood may be able to disrupt physiologic vasodilatory responses and thereby possibly cause adverse clinical outcomes. PMID:23480490

  7. Age of red blood cells and mortality in the critically ill

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In critically ill patients, it is uncertain whether exposure to older red blood cells (RBCs) may contribute to mortality. We therefore aimed to evaluate the association between the age of RBCs and outcome in a large unselected cohort of critically ill patients in Australia and New Zealand. We hypothesized that exposure to even a single unit of older RBCs may be associated with an increased risk of death. Methods We conducted a prospective, multicenter observational study in 47 ICUs during a 5-week period between August 2008 and September 2008. We included 757 critically ill adult patients receiving at least one unit of RBCs. To test our hypothesis we compared hospital mortality according to quartiles of exposure to maximum age of RBCs without and with adjustment for possible confounding factors. Results Compared with other quartiles (mean maximum red cell age 22.7 days; mortality 121/568 (21.3%)), patients treated with exposure to the lowest quartile of oldest RBCs (mean maximum red cell age 7.7 days; hospital mortality 25/189 (13.2%)) had an unadjusted absolute risk reduction in hospital mortality of 8.1% (95% confidence interval = 2.2 to 14.0%). After adjustment for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III score, other blood component transfusions, number of RBC transfusions, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and cardiac surgery, the odds ratio for hospital mortality for patients exposed to the older three quartiles compared with the lowest quartile was 2.01 (95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 3.77). Conclusions In critically ill patients, in Australia and New Zealand, exposure to older RBCs is independently associated with an increased risk of death. PMID:21496231

  8. Ionic and osmotic equilibria of human red blood cells treated with nystatin

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Human red blood cells have been incubated in the presence of nystatin, which allows Na and K, as well as Cl and pH to equilibrate rapidly when cell volume is set with external impermeant sucrose. The intracellular mean ionic activity coefficients, relative to values in the extracellular solution, for KCl and NaCl are 1.01 +/- 0.02 and 0.99 +/- 0.02 (SD, n = 10), respectively, and are independent of external pH, pH o, and of [sucrose]o. With nystatin the dependence of red cell volume on [sucrose]o deviates from ideal osmotic behavior by as much as a factor of three. A virial equation for the osmotic coefficient, phi, of human hemoglobin, Hb, accounts for the cell volumes, and is the same as that which describes Adair's measurements of phi Hb for Hb isolated from sheep and ox bloods. In the presence of nystatin the slope of the acid-base titration curve of the cells is independent of cell volume, implying that the charge on impermeant cellular solutes is independent of Hb concentration at constant pH. By modifying the Jacobs-stewart equations (1947. J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 30: 79--103) with the osmotic coefficients of Hb and of salts, a nonideal thermodynamic model has been devised which predicts equilibrium Donnan ratios and red cell volume from the composition of the extracellular solution and from certain parameters of the cells. In addition to accounting for the dependence of cell volume on osmotic pressure, the model also describes accurately the dependence of Donnan ratios and cell volumes on pHo either in the presence or absence of nystatin. PMID:490141

  9. Role of transfused red blood cells for shock and coagulopathy within remote damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Doctor, Allan

    2014-05-01

    The philosophy of damage control resuscitation (DCR) and remote damage control resuscitation (RDCR) can be summarized by stating that the goal is to prevent death from hemorrhagic shock by "staying out of trouble instead of getting out of trouble." In other words, it is preferred to arrest the progression of shock, rather than also having to reverse this condition after significant tissue damage and organ injury cascades are established. Moreover, to prevent death from exsanguination, a balanced approach to the treatment of both shock and coagulopathy is required. This was military doctrine during World War II, but seemed to be forgotten during the last half of the 20th century. Damage control resuscitation and RDCR have revitalized the approach, but there is still more to learn about the most effective and safe resuscitative strategies to simultaneously treat shock and hemorrhage. Current data suggest that our preconceived notions regarding the efficacy of standard issue red blood cells (RBCs) during the hours after transfusion may be false. Standard issue RBCs may not increase oxygen delivery and may in fact decrease it by disturbing control of regional blood flow distribution (impaired nitric oxide processing) and failing to release oxygen, even when perfusing hypoxic tissue (abnormal oxygen affinity). Standard issue RBCs may assist with hemostasis but appear to have competing effects on thrombin generation and platelet function. If standard issue or RBCs of increased storage age are not optimal, then are there alternatives that will allow for an efficacious and safe treatment of shock while also supporting hemostasis? Studies are required to determine if fresh RBCs less than 7 to 10 days provide an outcome advantage. A resurgence in the study of whole blood stored at 4°C for up to 10 days also holds promise. Two randomized controlled trials in humans have indicated that following transfusion with either whole blood stored at 4°C or platelets stored at 4

  10. Interactions of dendritic glycopolymer with erythrocytes, red blood cell ghosts and membrane enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Janaszewska, Anna; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte; Bryszewska, Maria; Maly, Jan

    2015-12-30

    Interactions between maltose functionalized hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s (95% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI A; 33% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI B) and red blood cells (RBCs) and between red blood cell membranes were investigated. We monitored the degree of hemolysis, the change in cell shape, the influence of polymers on the fluidity of the cell membrane and some cell membrane enzymes to determine their possible cytotoxic impact on them. To observe the extent of hemolysis, the RBCs were incubated with different concentrations of Mal-PEIs. The first significant lysis of RBCs was observed after 6h of incubation. Prolongation of the incubation time increased the number of ruptured cells. Moreover, we observed that Mal-PEI B was more hemolytic than Mal-PEI A in buffer solution. In contrast, an incubation of RBCs with Mal-PEIs in human plasma significantly decreased the hemolytic process and showed higher hemolytic property of Mal-PEI A compared to Mal-PEI B. Also several changes in the shape of the RBCs occurred after incubation with Mal-PEIs. Some of the erythrocytes shrank (echinocytes), but their morphology generally remained unchanged during the incubation. As shown by fluorescence experiments, both polymers induced the increase of fluidity of RBCs membranes. In summary, both types of hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s were practically non-hemolytic even at high polymer concentrations. Mal-PEI B was slightly more noxious than the Mal-PEI A in a buffer solution, while in blood plasma, the situation was opposite. Decrease of Na+/K+ ATPase and total ATPase enzymes activity was related with molecule size and number of maltose groups on the surface of molecule. The low hemolytic properties only observed at higher concentration (100μM and 400μM) indicated that Mal-PEIs are promising macromolecules in the area of drug delivery systems. PMID:26498371

  11. Interactions of dendritic glycopolymer with erythrocytes, red blood cell ghosts and membrane enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Janaszewska, Anna; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte; Bryszewska, Maria; Maly, Jan

    2015-12-30

    Interactions between maltose functionalized hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s (95% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI A; 33% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI B) and red blood cells (RBCs) and between red blood cell membranes were investigated. We monitored the degree of hemolysis, the change in cell shape, the influence of polymers on the fluidity of the cell membrane and some cell membrane enzymes to determine their possible cytotoxic impact on them. To observe the extent of hemolysis, the RBCs were incubated with different concentrations of Mal-PEIs. The first significant lysis of RBCs was observed after 6h of incubation. Prolongation of the incubation time increased the number of ruptured cells. Moreover, we observed that Mal-PEI B was more hemolytic than Mal-PEI A in buffer solution. In contrast, an incubation of RBCs with Mal-PEIs in human plasma significantly decreased the hemolytic process and showed higher hemolytic property of Mal-PEI A compared to Mal-PEI B. Also several changes in the shape of the RBCs occurred after incubation with Mal-PEIs. Some of the erythrocytes shrank (echinocytes), but their morphology generally remained unchanged during the incubation. As shown by fluorescence experiments, both polymers induced the increase of fluidity of RBCs membranes. In summary, both types of hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s were practically non-hemolytic even at high polymer concentrations. Mal-PEI B was slightly more noxious than the Mal-PEI A in a buffer solution, while in blood plasma, the situation was opposite. Decrease of Na+/K+ ATPase and total ATPase enzymes activity was related with molecule size and number of maltose groups on the surface of molecule. The low hemolytic properties only observed at higher concentration (100μM and 400μM) indicated that Mal-PEIs are promising macromolecules in the area of drug delivery systems.

  12. Hyperventilation and blood acid-base balance in hypercapnia exposed red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus).

    PubMed

    Ern, Rasmus; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Hyperventilation is a common response in fish exposed to elevated water CO2. It is believed to lessen the respiratory acidosis associated with hypercapnia by lowering arterial PCO2, but the contribution of hyperventilation to blood acid-base compensation has yet to be quantified. Hyperventilation may also increase the flux of irons across the gill epithelium and the cost of osmoregulation, owing to the osmo-respiratory compromise. Therefore, hypercapnia exposed fish may increase standard metabolic rate (SMR) leaving less energy for physiological functions such as foraging, migration, growth and reproduction. Here we show that gill ventilation, blood PCO2 and total blood [CO2] increased in red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) exposed to 1000 and 5000 µatm water CO2, and that blood PCO2 and total blood [CO2] decrease in fish during hypoxia induced hyperventilation. Based on these results we estimate the ventilatory contributions to total acid-base compensation in 1000 and 5000 µatm water CO2. We find that S. ocellatus only utilize a portion of its ventilatory capacity to reduce the acid-base disturbance in 1000 µatm water CO2. SMR was unaffected by both salinity and hypercapnia exposure indicating that the cost of osmoregulation is small relative to SMR, and that the lack of increased ventilation in 1000 µatm water CO2 despite the capacity to do so is not due to an energetic tradeoff between acid-base balance and osmoregulation. Therefore, while ocean acidification may impact ventilatory parameters, there will be little impact on the overall energy budget of S. ocellatus. PMID:26922790

  13. Blood serum and BSA, but neither red blood cells nor hemoglobin can support vitellogenesis and egg production in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Kristina K.; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the major vector of dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya viruses that put millions of people in endemic countries at risk. Mass rearing of this mosquito is crucial for strategies that use modified insects to reduce vector populations and transmission of pathogens, such as sterile insect technique or population replacement. A major problem for vector mosquito mass rearing is the requirement of vertebrate blood for egg production since it poses significant costs as well as potential health hazards. Also, regulations for human and animal use as blood source can pose a significant obstacle. A completely artificial diet that supports egg production in vector mosquitoes can solve this problem. In this study, we compared different blood fractions, serum and red blood cells, as dietary protein sources for mosquito egg production. We also tested artificial diets made from commercially available blood proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hemoglobin). We found that Ae. aegypti performed vitellogenesis and produced eggs when given whole bovine blood, serum, or an artificial diet containing BSA. Conversely, egg production was impaired after feeding of the red blood cell fraction or an artificial diet containing only hemoglobin. We also found that egg viability of serum-fed mosquitoes were comparable to that of whole blood and an iron supplemented BSA meal produced more viable eggs than a meal containing BSA alone. Our results indicate that serum proteins, not hemoglobin, may replace vertebrate blood in artificial diets for mass mosquito rearing. PMID:26020000

  14. Blood serum and BSA, but neither red blood cells nor hemoglobin can support vitellogenesis and egg production in the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Kristina K; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Hansen, Immo A

    2015-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the major vector of dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya viruses that put millions of people in endemic countries at risk. Mass rearing of this mosquito is crucial for strategies that use modified insects to reduce vector populations and transmission of pathogens, such as sterile insect technique or population replacement. A major problem for vector mosquito mass rearing is the requirement of vertebrate blood for egg production since it poses significant costs as well as potential health hazards. Also, regulations for human and animal use as blood source can pose a significant obstacle. A completely artificial diet that supports egg production in vector mosquitoes can solve this problem. In this study, we compared different blood fractions, serum and red blood cells, as dietary protein sources for mosquito egg production. We also tested artificial diets made from commercially available blood proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hemoglobin). We found that Ae. aegypti performed vitellogenesis and produced eggs when given whole bovine blood, serum, or an artificial diet containing BSA. Conversely, egg production was impaired after feeding of the red blood cell fraction or an artificial diet containing only hemoglobin. We also found that egg viability of serum-fed mosquitoes were comparable to that of whole blood and an iron supplemented BSA meal produced more viable eggs than a meal containing BSA alone. Our results indicate that serum proteins, not hemoglobin, may replace vertebrate blood in artificial diets for mass mosquito rearing.

  15. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-11-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  16. Flow of a circulating tumor cell and red blood cells in microvessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    Quantifying the behavior of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood stream is of fundamental importance for understanding metastasis. Here, we investigate the flow mode and velocity of CTCs interacting with red blood cells (RBCs) in various sized microvessels. The flow of leukocytes in microvessels has been described previously; a leukocyte forms a train with RBCs in small microvessels and exhibits margination in large microvessels. Important differences in the physical properties of leukocytes and CTCs result from size. The dimensions of leukocytes are similar to those of RBCs, but CTCs are significantly larger. We investigate numerically the size effects on the flow mode and the cell velocity, and we identify similarities and differences between leukocytes and CTCs. We find that a transition from train formation to margination occurs when (R -a ) /tR≈1 , where R is the vessel radius, a is the cell radius, and tR is the thickness of RBCs, but that the motion of RBCs differs from the case of leukocytes. Our results also show that the velocities of CTCs and leukocytes are larger than the average blood velocity, but only CTCs move faster than RBCs for microvessels of R /a ≈1.5 -2.0 . These findings are expected to be useful not only for understanding metastasis, but also for developing microfluidic devices.

  17. Human red blood cell aging: correlative changes in surface charge and cell properties.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yao-Xiong; Wu, Zheng-Jie; Mehrishi, Jitendra; Huang, Bao-Tian; Chen, Xing-Yao; Zheng, Xin-Jing; Liu, Wen-Jing; Luo, Man

    2011-12-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) during microcirculation, aging and storage, lose N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA) and other biomaterials thereby altering cell structures, some properties and functions. Such cell damage very likely underlies the serious adverse effects of blood transfusion. However, a controversy has remained since 1961-1977 as to whether with aging, the RBCs, suffering loss of NANA, do have a decreased charge density. Any correlation between the changes in the cell properties with cell aging is also not clear. Therefore, to remove the ambiguity and uncertainty, we carried out multiparameteric studies on Percoll fractions of blood of 38 volunteers (lightest-young-Y-RBCs, densest-old-O-RBCs, two middle fractions).We found that there were striking differences between the properties of Y-RBCs and O-RBCs. The ζ-potential of Y-RBCs decreased gradually with aging. Studies in parallel on RBC fractions incubated with both positively charged quantum dots and Sambucus Nigra-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) along with their ζ-potentials provide for the first time direct visual evidence about the lesser amount of charge density and NANA on O-RBCs, and a collinear decrease in their respective ζ-potentials. Close correlation was found between the surface charge on an aging RBC and its structure and functions, from the cell morphology, the membrane deformability to the intracellular Hb structure and oxidation ability. This quantitative approach not only clarifies the picture but also has implications in biology and medicine.

  18. Serotonin Is a Key Factor for Mouse Red Blood Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Amireault, Pascal; Bayard, Elisa; Launay, Jean-Marie; Sibon, David; Le Van Kim, Caroline; Colin, Yves; Dy, Michel; Hermine, Olivier; Côté, Francine

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine originally purified from blood as a vasoactive agent. In nonneuronal tissues, its presence is linked with the expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) that catalyzes the rate-limiting step of its synthesis. Targeted disruption in mice of the TPH1 gene results in very low levels of circulating 5-HT. Previous analysis of the TPH1 knockout (TPH1−/−) mouse revealed that they develop a phenotype of macrocytic anemia with a reduced half-life of their circulating red blood cells (RBC). In this study, to establish whether the observed reduced half-life of TPH1−/− RBC is an intrinsic or an extrinsic characteristic, we compared their survival to RBC isolated from wild-type mice. Both in vivo and in vitro data converge to demonstrate an extrinsic protective effect of 5-HT since presence of 5-HT in the RBC environment protects RBC from senescence. The protective effect played by 5-HT is not mediated through activation of a classical pharmacological pathway as no 5-HT receptors were detected on isolated RBC. Rather, 5-HT acts as an effective antioxidant since reduction of 5-HT circulating levels are associated with a decrease in the plasma antioxidant capacity. We further demonstrate a link between oxidation and the removal of damaged RBC following transfusion, as supplementation with 5-HT improves RBC post-transfusion survival in a mouse model of blood banking. PMID:24358245

  19. Inertia-dependent dynamics of three-dimensional vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Wang, Shu Qi; He, Long; Xu, Feng; Bai, Bo Feng

    2013-10-28

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation study of the effect of inertia on the dynamics of vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) has not been reported. Here, we developed a 3D model based on the front tracking method to investigate how inertia affects the dynamics of spherical/non-spherical vesicles and biconcave-shaped RBCs with the Reynolds number ranging from 0.1 to 10. The results showed that inertia induced non-spherical vesicles transitioned from tumbling to swinging, which was not observed in previous 2D models. The critical viscosity ratio of inner/outer fluids for the tumbling–swinging transition remarkably increased with an increasing Reynolds number. The deformation of vesicles was greatly enhanced by inertia, and the frequency of tumbling and tank-treading was significantly decreased by inertia. We also found that RBCs can transit from tumbling to steady tank-treading through the swinging regime when the Reynolds number increased from 0.1 to 10. These results indicate that inertia needs to be considered at moderate Reynolds number (Re ~ 1) in the study of blood flow in the human body and the flow of deformable particle suspension in inertial microfluidic devices. The developed 3D model provided new insights into the dynamics of RBCs under shear flow, thus holding great potential to better understand blood flow behaviors under normal/disease conditions.

  20. An extended convection diffusion model for red blood cell-enhanced transport of thrombocytes and leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, S. J.; Antaki, J. F.

    2009-10-01

    Transport phenomena of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs) are fundamental to the processes of vascular disease and thrombosis. Unfortunately, the dilute volume occupied by these cells is not amenable to fluid-continuum modeling, and yet the cell count is large enough that modeling each individual cell is impractical for most applications. The most feasible option is to treat them as dilute species governed by convection and diffusion; however, this is further complicated by the role of the red blood cell (RBC) phase on the transport of these cells. We therefore propose an extended convection-diffusion (ECD) model based on the diffusive balance of a fictitious field potential, Ψ, that accounts for the gradients of both the dilute phase and the local hematocrit. The ECD model was applied to the flow of blood in a tube and between parallel plates in which a profile for the RBC concentration field was imposed and the resulting platelet concentration field predicted. Compared to prevailing enhanced-diffusion models that dispersed the platelet concentration field, the ECD model was able to simulate a near-wall platelet excess, as observed experimentally. The extension of the ECD model depends only on the ability to prescribe the hematocrit distribution, and therefore may be applied to a wide variety of geometries to investigate platelet-mediated vascular disease and device-related thrombosis.

  1. Red blood cell membrane camouflaged magnetic nanoclusters for imaging-guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Rui; Fang, Xiaoling; Wang, Xiaofei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Wuli; Sha, Xianyi

    2016-06-01

    Along with intrinsic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advantages, iron oxide nanomaterials capable of photothermal conversion have been reported very recently and have again raised great interest in their designs among biomedical researchers. However, like other inorganic nanomaterials, high macrophage uptake, short blood retention time and unfavorable biodistributions have strongly hampered their applications in vivo. To solve these problems, a rational design of red blood cell (RBC) membrane camouflaged iron oxide magnetic clusters (MNC@RBCs) is presented in this paper. Our data show that by simply introducing an "ultra-stealth" biomimetic coating to iron oxide magnetic nanoclusters (MNCs), MNC@RBCs maintain the imaging and photothermal functionalities inherited from MNCs cores while achieving much lower nonspecific macrophage uptake and dramatically altered fate in vivo. MNC@RBCs with superior prolonged blood retention time, preferred high tumor accumulation and relatively lowered liver biodistribution are demonstrated when injected intravenously in mice, leading to greatly enhanced photothermal therapeutic efficacy by a single treatment without further magnetic force manipulation. Our study illustrates a well prepared integration of MNCs and RBCs, exploiting advantages of both functionalities within a single unit and suggests a promising future for iron-based nanomaterials application in vivo. PMID:27031929

  2. A study of red blood cell deformability in diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smart, Thomas J.; Richards, Christopher J.; Bhatnagar, Rhythm; Pavesio, Carlos; Agrawal, Rupesh; Jones, Philip H.

    2015-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus (DM) in which high blood sugar levels cause swelling, leaking and occlusions in the blood vessels of the retina, often resulting in a loss of sight. The microvascular system requires red blood cells (RBCs) to undergo significant cellular deformation in order to pass through vessels whose diameters are significantly smaller than their own. There is evidence to suggest that DM impairs the deformability of RBCs, and this loss of deformability has been associated with diabetic kidney disease (or nephropathy) - another microvascular complication of DM. However, it remains unclear whether reduced deformability of RBCs correlates with the presence of DR. Here we present an investigation into the deformability of RBCs in patients with diabetic retinopathy using optical tweezers. To extract a value for the deformability of RBCs we use a dual-trap optical tweezers set-up to stretch individual RBCs. RBCs are trapped directly (i.e. without micro-bead handles), so rotate to assume a `side-on' orientation. Video microscopy is used to record the deformation events, and shape analysis software is used to determine parameters such as initial and maximum RBC length, allowing us to calculate the deformability for each RBC. A small decrease in deformability of diabetes cells subject to this stretching protocol is observed when compared to control cells. We also report on initial results on three dimensional imaging of individual RBCs using defocussing microscopy.

  3. Investigation of diseases through red blood cells' shape using photoacoustic response technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Deblina; Gorey, Abhijeet; Chen, Goerge C. K.; Sharma, Norman; Vasudevan, Srivathsan

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a non-invasive real-time technique, widely applied to many biomedical imaging studies in the recent years. While most of these studies have been focussed on obtaining an image after reconstruction, various features of time domain signal (e.g. amplitude, width, rise and relaxation time) would provide very high sensitivity in detecting morphological changes in cells during a biological study. Different haematological disorders (e.g., sickle cell anaemia, thalassemia) exhibit significant morphological cellular changes. In this context, this study explores the possibility of utilizing the developed photoacoustic response technique to apply onto blood samples. Results of our preliminary study demonstrate that there is a significant change in signal amplitude due to change in concentration of the blood. Thus it shows the sensitivity of the developed photoacoustic technique towards red blood cell count (related to haematological disease like anaemia). Subsequently, morphological changes in RBC (i.e. swollen and shrunk compared to normal RBC) induced by hypotonic and hypertonic solutions respectively were also experimented. The result shows a distinct change in PA signal amplitude. This would serve as a diagnostic signature for many future studies on cellular morphological disorders.

  4. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Victoria, E J; Pierce, S W; Branks, M J; Masouredis, S P

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10% (dog, 2.6%; rhesus monkey, 7.4%), consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3. Unlike RBC autoantibodies from antiglobulin-positive normal blood donors

  5. IgG red blood cell autoantibodies in autoimmune hemolytic anemia bind to epitopes on red blood cell membrane band 3 glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Victoria, E.J.; Pierce, S.W.; Branks, M.J.; Masouredis, S.P. )

    1990-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) autoantibodies from patients with IgG warm-type autoimmune hemolytic anemia were labeled with iodine 125 and their RBC binding behavior characterized. Epitope-bearing RBC membrane polypeptides were identified after autoantibody immunoprecipitation of labeled membranes and immunoblotting. Immunoaffinity isolation of labeled membrane proteins with 12 different IgG hemolytic autoantibodies with protein A-agarose revealed a major polypeptide at Mr 95 to 110 kd, which coelectrophoresed on sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a membrane component isolated with sheep IgG anti-band 3. Immunoprecipitation studies with chymotrypsinized RBCs resulted in the recovery of two labeled membrane polypeptides with molecular weights characteristically resulting from the chymotryptic fragmentation of band 3. Immunoblotting with sheep IgG anti-band 3 of the immunoprecipitated polypeptides confirmed that hemolytic autoantibody binding led to recovery of band 3 or its fragments. Two 125I-labeled IgG hemolytic autoantibodies showed binding behavior consistent with epitope localization on band 3. The labeled RBC autoantibodies bound immunospecifically to all types of human RBC tested, including those of rare Rh type (Rh-null, D--) at a site density of approximately 10(6) per RBC. The 125I-IgG in two labeled autoantibodies was 84% and 92% adsorbable by human and higher nonhuman primate RBCs. Antigen-negative animal RBC bound less than 10%, consistent with immunospecific RBC binding. IgG-1 was the major subclass in five autoantibodies tested; one of six fixed complement; and autoantibody IgG appeared polyclonal by isoelectric focusing. We conclude that IgG eluted from RBCs of patients with autoimmune hemolytic anemia consists predominantly of a single totally RBC-adsorbable antibody population that binds to antigenic determinants on band 3.

  6. Experimental erythrocyte autoantibodies. V. Induction and suppression of red blood cell autoantibodies in mice injected with rat bromelain-treated red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cox, K O; McAuliffe, A

    1983-10-01

    Mice injected with rat red blood cells (RBC), or rat bromelain-treated (brom) RBC, produce RBC autoantibodies and suppressor cells that specifically inhibit the autoimmune response without inhibiting the net production of antibodies against rat RBC. It has been investigated whether suppressor cells induced by injections of rat RBC are effective in preventing autoantibody production induced by rat brom RBC and vice versa. Autoantibodies were induced in C3H mice by weekly ip injections, each 0.2 ml, of a 6% suspension of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibody production was assayed using Coombs' test. Suppressor cells were present in the spleens of mice positive in Coombs' tests and were shown by intravenous injections of 40 X 10(6) viable cells per mouse into untreated syngeneic mice 18 hr before the first injection of rat RBC or rat brom RBC. Autoantibodies eluted from mice positive in Coombs' tests after injections of rat RBC or brom RBC were absorbed by either type of rat RBC but not by RBC from sheep. This suggests that rat RBC and rat brom RBC display antigens that are similar, if not identical, to autoantigens on the mouse RBC. Spleen cells from mice injected with rat RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by both rat RBC and rat brom RBC. In contrast, spleen cells from mice injected with rat brom RBC suppressed autoantibodies induced by rat brom RBC but not those induced by unmodified rat RBC. This differential suppression may be due to the removal from rat RBC, by bromelain, of a suppressor site and/or autoantigens of some specificities. Thus rat brom RBC may not induce the total range of specificities of autoantibodies, and of suppressor cells, induced by rat RBC.

  7. Effect of Model Type on the Accuracy of Polarization and Nephelometric Measurements of Red-Blood-Cell Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeiko, M. M.; Smunev, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of using different mathematical models of a red blood cell on the accuracy of the measured average volume for a population of red blood cells was evaluated. The accuracy was estimated based on regression equations between the retrieved microphysical and measured optical properties. Models of a sphere, oblate spheroid, and biconcave discoid represented as a disc with rounded edges and concavities in the middle were analyzed. It was shown that the error of the regression equations when determining the average red-blood-cell volume using the biconcave discoid model was 1%; spheroid, ~8%; and sphere, ~21%. The error of the average volume due to the model is a few percent for the spheroid and ~20% for the sphere.

  8. A Lattice Boltzmann Fictitious Domain Method for Modeling Red Blood Cell Deformation and Multiple-Cell Hydrodynamic Interactions in Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xing; Lin, Guang; Zou, Jianfeng; Fedosov, Dmitry A.

    2013-07-20

    To model red blood cell (RBC) deformation in flow, the recently developed LBM-DLM/FD method ([Shi and Lim, 2007)29], derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain methodthe fictitious domain method, is extended to employ the mesoscopic network model for simulations of red blood cell deformation. The flow is simulated by the lattice Boltzmann method with an external force, while the network model is used for modeling red blood cell deformation and the fluid-RBC interaction is enforced by the Lagrange multiplier. To validate parameters of the RBC network model, sThe stretching numerical tests on both coarse and fine meshes are performed and compared with the corresponding experimental data to validate the parameters of the RBC network model. In addition, RBC deformation in pipe flow and in shear flow is simulated, revealing the capacity of the current method for modeling RBC deformation in various flows.

  9. Interaction of different extracts of Primula heterochroma Stapf. with red blood cell membrane lipids and proteins: antioxidant and antihemolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Setzer, William N; Alinezhad, Heshmatollah; Zare, Mahboobeh; Naqinezhad, Alireza

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to plants as potent natural drugs for their ameliorative roles against free-radical-mediated oxidative stress. Therefore, their interactions with cell membrane lipids and proteins, which generally serve as primary targets of lipid peroxidation, are of much interest. In the current investigation, in vitro and ex vivo studies are performed in order to estimate possible effects of different extracts of Primula heterochroma Stapf. on red blood cell membranes of rat erythrocytes using colorimetric methods. The results indicate that binding of the extracts to lipids and proteins of red blood cell membranes both significantly inhibits lipid peroxidation, and also increases red blood cell integrity against hemolysis. Moreover, a polyphenol extract, in particular, demonstrates notable antihemolytic activity in hydrogen peroxide-induced hemolysis model (IC(50) = 199.49 ± 9.1 μg ml(-1)).

  10. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion. Nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; Pasman, Suzanne A.; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.

    2008-07-01

    Recently, we derived equations relating the flow of adult red blood cells through a placental arterio-venous anastomosis with intra-uterine and post-natal measured adult hemoglobin concentrations. In this letter, we re-derived the equations, now including a more realistic nonlinear decay of adult red blood cells, and re-evaluated the measurement accuracy of the arterio-venous flow and the lifetime of the red blood cells.

  11. Three-dimensional refractive index tomograms and deformability of individual human red blood cells from cord blood of newborn infants and maternal blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, HyunJoo; Ahn, Taegyu; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Sangyun; Kook, Song-yi; Lee, Dongheon; Suh, In Bum; Na, Sunghun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-11-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from the cord blood of newborn infants have distinctive functions in fetal and infant development. To systematically investigate the biophysical characteristics of individual cord RBCs in newborn infants, a comparative study was performed on RBCs from the cord blood of newborn infants and from adult mothers or nonpregnant women using optical holographic microtomography. Optical measurements of the distributions of the three-dimensional refractive indices and the dynamic membrane fluctuations of individual RBCs were used to investigate the morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties of cord, maternal, and adult RBCs at the individual cell level. The volume and surface area of the cord RBCs were significantly larger than those of the RBCs from nonpregnant women, and the cord RBCs had more flattened shapes than that of the RBCs in adults. In addition, the hemoglobin (Hb) content in the cord RBCs from newborns was significantly higher. The Hb concentration in the cord RBCs was higher than that in the nonpregnant women or maternal RBCs, but they were within the physiological range of adults. Interestingly, the amplitudes of the dynamic membrane fluctuations in cord RBCs were comparable to those in nonpregnant women and maternal RBCs, suggesting that the deformability of cord RBCs is similar to that of healthy RBCs in adults.

  12. Three-dimensional refractive index tomograms and deformability of individual human red blood cells from cord blood of newborn infants and maternal blood.

    PubMed

    Park, HyunJoo; Ahn, Taegyu; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, Sangyun; Kook, Song-Yi; Lee, Dongheon; Suh, In Bum; Na, Sunghun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from the cord blood of newborn infants have distinctive functions in fetal and infant development. To systematically investigate the biophysical characteristics of individual cord RBCs in newborn infants, a comparative study was performed on RBCs from the cord blood of newborn infants and from adult mothers or nonpregnant women using optical holographic microtomography. Optical measurements of the distributions of the three-dimensional refractive indices and the dynamic membrane fluctuations of individual RBCs were used to investigate the morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties of cord, maternal, and adult RBCs at the individual cell level. The volume and surface area of the cord RBCs were significantly larger than those of the RBCs from nonpregnant women, and the cord RBCs had more flattened shapes than that of the RBCs in adults. In addition, the hemoglobin (Hb) content in the cord RBCs from newborns was significantly higher. The Hb concentration in the cord RBCs was higher than that in the nonpregnant women or maternal RBCs, but they were within the physiological range of adults. Interestingly, the amplitudes of the dynamic membrane fluctuations in cord RBCs were comparable to those in nonpregnant women and maternal RBCs, suggesting that the deformability of cord RBCs is similar to that of healthy RBCs in adults. PMID:26259511

  13. A Prospective Study on Red Blood Cell Transfusion Related Hyperkalemia in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shahzad; Ali Baig, Mahadi; Chang, Christopher; Dabas, Ridhima; Akhtar, Mallika; Khan, Areej; Nemani, Krishna; Alani, Rahima; Majumder, Omran; Gazizova, Natalya; Biswas, Shaluk; Patel, Priyeshkumar; Al-Hilli, Jaffar A.; Shad, Yasar; Berger, Barbara J.; Zaman, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion-associated hyperkalemic cardiac arrest is a serious complication in patients receiving packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Mortality from hyperkalemia increases with large volumes of PRBC transfusion, increased rate of transfusion, and the use of stored PRBCs. Theoretically, hyperkalemia may be complicated by low cardiac output, acidosis, hyperglycemia, hypocalcemia, and hypothermia. In this study, we focus on transfusion-related hyperkalemia involving only medical intensive care unit (MICU) patients. Method This prospective observational study focuses on PRBC transfusions among MICU patients greater than 18 years of age. Factors considered during each transfusion included patient’s diagnosis, indication for transfusion, medical co-morbidities, acid-base disorders, K+ levels before and after each PRBC transfusion, age of stored blood, volume and rate of transfusion, and other adverse events. We used Pearson correlation and multivariate analysis for each factor listed above and performed a logistic regression analysis. Results Between June 2011 and December 2011, 125 patients received a total of 160 units of PRBCs. Median age was 63 years (22 - 92 years). Seventy-one (57%) were females. Sixty-three patients (50%) had metabolic acidosis, 75 (60%) had acute renal failure (ARF), and 12 (10%) had end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Indications for transfusion included septic shock (n = 65, 52%), acute blood loss (n = 25, 20%), non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (n = 25, 20%) and preparation for procedures (n = 14, 11%). Baseline K+ value was 3.9 ± 1.1 mEq/L compared to 4.3 ± 1.2 mEq/L post-transfusion respectively (P = 0.9). During this study period, 4% of patients developed hyperkalemia (K+ 5.5 mEq/L or above). The mean change of serum potassium in patients receiving transfusion ≥ 12 days old blood was 4.1 ± 0.4 mEq/L compared to 4.8 ± 0.3 mEq/L (mean ± SD) in patients receiving blood 12 days or less old. Sixty

  14. Total haemoglobin mass and red blood cell profile in endurance-trained and non-endurance-trained adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Gert; Bärtsch, Peter; Friedmann-Bette, Birgit

    2011-11-01

    To evaluate differences in total haemoglobin mass (tHb mass) and in red blood cell profile between elite endurance-trained (END) and non-endurance-trained (nEND) male and female adolescent athletes, tHb mass (CO rebreathing) and specific variables of red blood cell profile (haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit, erythrocyte indices) were determined in 59 elite junior athletes (29 END, 30 nEND). We hypothesized that at the age of 15-17 years, regular endurance training might induce a significant increase in tHb mass and changes in red blood cell profile. Therefore, all parameters were again determined after 6, 12 and 18 months in a subset of 27 subjects (17 END, 10 nEND). In END, tHb mass related to body weight was ~15% greater than in nEND (11.2 ± 1.6  vs. 9.7 ± 1.3 g kg(-1), P < 0.001), whereas no significant differences were observed for the red blood cell profile. In both groups, tHb mass related to body weight and the variables of red blood cell profile had not changed significantly after 6, 12 and 18 months of regular training. In conclusion, in elite junior athletes, differences in tHb mass between END and nEND were similar, however, smaller compared with previously in adult athletes reported values. At the age of 15-17 years, 18 months of regular training did not induce significant changes in tHb mass beyond alterations explained by physical growth and also variables of red blood cell profile did not change significantly.

  15. Quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells using phase-shifting white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Mehta, Dalip; Srivastava, Vishal

    2012-11-01

    We report quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs) using phase-shifting interference microscopy. Five phase-shifted white light interferograms are recorded using colour charge coupled device camera. White light interferograms were decomposed into red, green, and blue colour components. The phase-shifted interferograms of each colour were then processed by phase-shifting analysis and phase maps for red, green, and blue colours were reconstructed. Wavelength dependent refractive index profiles of RBCs were computed from the single set of white light interferogram. The present technique has great potential for non-invasive determination of refractive index variation and morphological features of cells and tissues.

  16. Red blood cells protect endothelial cells against H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated but not hyperoxia-induced damage

    SciTech Connect

    Tsan, M.F.; White, J.E.

    1988-07-01

    We studied the effect of intact red blood cells on the exogenous H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated damage as well as on the hyperoxia-induced injury of cultured endothelial cells. Red blood cells protected endothelial cells against H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated injury efficiently, but had no effect on the hyperoxia-induced damage. Failure of red blood cells to protect endothelial cells against hyperoxia-induced injury was not due to hemolysis. Furthermore, hyperoxia-exposed red blood cells were still capable of protecting endothelial cells against H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-mediated damage.

  17. Levels of linoleate and arachidonate in red blood cells of healthy individuals and patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Homa, S T; Belin, J; Smith, A D; Monro, J A; Zilkha, K J

    1980-01-01

    The major fatty acids were measured in total lipid extracts of red blood cells from 23 control subjects and 31 patients with multiple sclerosis. In the healthy control subjects an inverse correlation (r = -0.83) was found between the percentages of linoleate and arachidonate. In the patients such an inverse correlation was not found. The results suggest an abnormality in the red blood cells of patients with multiple sclerosis specifically with regard to the regulation of the relative amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, and this has implications for the possible treatment of multiple sclerosis with dietary supplements. PMID:7359147

  18. Systematic coarse-graining of spectrin-level red blood cell models

    PubMed Central

    Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2013-01-01

    We present a rigorous procedure to derive coarse-grained red blood cell (RBC) models, which yield accurate mechanical response. Based on a semi-analytic theory the linear and nonlinear elastic properties of healthy and infected RBCs in malaria can be matched with those obtained in optical tweezers stretching experiments. The present analysis predicts correctly the membrane Young’s modulus in contrast to about 50% error in predictions by previous models. In addition, we develop a stress-free model which avoids a number of pitfalls of existing RBC models, such as non-smooth or poorly controlled equilibrium shape and dependence of the mechanical properties on the initial triangulation quality. Here we employ dissipative particle dynamics for the implementation but the proposed model is general and suitable for use in many existing continuum and particle-based numerical methods. PMID:24353352

  19. Increased rigidity of red blood cell membrane in young spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Chabanel, A; Schachter, D; Chien, S

    1987-12-01

    The micropipette test was used to study the effects of age on the elasticity of red blood cell (RBC) membrane in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY), ranging from 3 to 23 weeks of age. The development of hypertension in the SHR started at 3 weeks and was fully established at 7 to 8 weeks. In the developmental phase of hypertension (3-5 weeks), the SHR showed a significant increase in RBC membrane elastic modulus (i.e., a decrease in RBC membrane deformability) when compared with the age-matched normotensive control rats (WKY). After the establishment of hypertension (7-8 weeks), however, the deformability of the RBC membrane of SHR improved and became comparable to that of the WKY. These results indicate that abnormal erythrocyte membrane elasticity is an early event in SHR and that adaptive recovery occurs when hypertension is fully developed.

  20. Shape transitions of fluid vesicles and red blood cells in capillary flows

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of fluid vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) in cylindrical capillary flow is studied by using a three-dimensional mesoscopic simulation approach. As flow velocity increases, a model RBC is found to transit from a nonaxisymmetric discocyteto an axisymmetric parachute shape (coaxial with the flow axis), while a fluid vesicle is found to transit from a discocyte to a prolate ellipsoid. Both shape transitions reduce the flow resistance. The critical velocities of the shape transitions are linearly dependent on the bending rigidity and on the shear modulus of the membrane. Slipper-like shapes of the RBC model are observed around the transition velocities. Our results are in good agreement with experiments on RBCs. PMID:16186506

  1. Curcuma longa extract as a histological dye for collagen fibres and red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Avwioro, O G; Onwuka, S K; Moody, J O; Agbedahunsi, J M; Oduola, T; Ekpo, O E; Oladele, A A

    2007-01-01

    Crude ethanolic extract and column chromatographic fractions of the Allepey cultivar of Curcuma longa Roxb, commonly called turmeric (tumeric) in commerce, were used as a stain for tissue sections. Staining was carried out under basic, acidic and neutral media conditions. Inorganic and organic dissolution solvents were used. The stain was used as a counterstain after alum and iron haematoxylins. C. longa stained collagen fibres, cytoplasm, red blood cells and muscle cells yellow. It also stained in a fashion similar to eosin, except for its intense yellow colour. Preliminary phytochemical evaluation of the active column fraction revealed that it contained flavonoids, free anthraquinone and deoxy sugar. A cheap, natural dye can thus be obtained from C. longa. PMID:17451535

  2. Giant Host Red Blood Cell Membrane Mimicking Polymersomes Bind Parasite Proteins and Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Thamboo, Sagana; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that needs to be addressed using innovative approaches to counteract spread of drug resistance and to establish or optimize vaccination strategies. With our approach, we aim for a dual action with drug- and 'vaccine-like' activity against malaria. By inhibiting entry of malaria parasites into host red blood cells (RBCs) - using polymer vesicle-based (polymersome) nanomimics of RBC membranes - the life cycle of the parasite is interrupted and the exposed parasites are accessible to the host immune system. Here, we describe how host cell-sized RBC membrane mimics, formed with the same block copolymers as nanomimics, also bind the corresponding malaria parasite ligand and whole malaria parasites, similar to nanomimics. This was demonstrated using fluorescence imaging techniques and confirms the suitability of giant polymersomes (GUVs) as simple mimics for RBC membranes.

  3. Deformability-based red blood cell separation in deterministic lateral displacement devices—A simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Timm

    2014-01-01

    We show, via three-dimensional immersed-boundary-finite-element-lattice-Boltzmann simulations, that deformability-based red blood cell (RBC) separation in deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices is possible. This is due to the deformability-dependent lateral extension of RBCs and enables us to predict a priori which RBCs will be displaced in a given DLD geometry. Several diseases affect the deformability of human cells. Malaria-infected RBCs, for example, tend to become stiffer than their healthy counterparts. It is therefore desirable to design microfluidic devices which can detect diseases based on the cells' deformability fingerprint, rather than preparing samples using expensive and time-consuming biochemical preparation steps. Our findings should be helpful in the development of new methods for sorting cells and particles by deformability. PMID:25584112

  4. COMPETITION FOR RED BLOOD CELLS CAN ENHANCE PLASMODIUM VIVAX PARASITEMIA IN MIXED-SPECIES MALARIA INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    MCQUEEN, PHILIP G.; MCKENZIE, F. ELLIS

    2008-01-01

    We assess the consequences of competition for red blood cells (RBCs) in co-infections with the two major agents of human malaria, Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum, using differential equations to model the population dynamics of RBCs and parasites. P. vivax parasitizes only the youngest RBCs, but this can reduce the broader RBC population susceptible to P. falciparum. We found that competition for RBCs typically causes one species to suppress the other, depending on their relative reproduction rates and timing of inoculation. However, if the species’ reproduction rates are nearly equal, transient increases in RBC production stimulated by the presence of P. falciparum may boost P. vivax parasitemia above its single-species infection level. Conversely, P. falciparum parasitemia is rarely enhanced above its single-species level. Furthermore, transients in RBC production can induce coupled oscillations in the parasitemia of both species. These results are remarkably robust to changes in model parameters. PMID:16837717

  5. Shape quantification of single red blood cells based on their scattering patterns from microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gert; Artmann, Gerhard

    1995-02-01

    The differentiation between discocytic and stomatocytic red blood cell (RBC) shape using conventional microscopic imaging and image analysis tools is still on a very poor level. A procedure to differentiate the degree of stomatocytic shape changes was developed. We obtained multiple microscopic images of the same RBCs settled on a human albumin coated cover slip. The images were acquired when the microscope objective was subsequently focused through the cell layer. At equidistant horizontal planes (z-axis) below, within, and above the microscopic focal plane the light intensity distribution was considered. Using a model based on light refraction, we calculated the intensity distribution of the planes which are out of focus. Using this tool we are able to differentiate RBC shapes precisely. On the other hand, using this model from and the light intensity distributions of different focal planes, we are able to reconstruct the shape of one single RBC located in the optical axis of the microscope.

  6. Analysis of red blood cell deformation under fast shear flow for better estimation of hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masanori; Bessho, Sadao; Wada, Shigeo

    2014-01-01

    We examined the deformation behavior of a red blood cell (RBC) in various flow fields to determine whether the extent of RBC deformation is correlated with the shear stress used as a hemolysis index. The RBC model was introduced to a simple shear flow (Couette flow) and to slightly complex flows (unsteady shear flows and stenosed flows). The RBC deformation was assessed by the maximum first principal strain over the RBC membrane and compared with the shear stress. Although the results were consistent under steady Couette flow, this was not the case under unsteady Couette flow or stenosed flow due to the viscoelastic nature of the RBC deformation caused by fluid forces. These results suggest that there is a limitation in accurately estimating the mechanical damage of RBCs solely from a macroscopic flow field, indicating the necessity of taking into account the dynamic deformation of RBCs to provide a better estimation of hemolysis.

  7. Particle-based simulations of red blood cells-A review.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ting; Phan-Thien, Nhan; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2016-07-26

    Particle-based methods have been increasingly attractive for solving biofluid flow problems, because of the ease and flexibility in modeling complex structure fluids afforded by the methods. In this review, we focus on popular particle-based methods widely used in red blood cell (RBC) simulations, including dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). We introduce their basic ideas and formulations, and present their applications in RBC simulations which are divided into three classes according to the number of RBCs in the simulation: a single RBC, two or multiple RBCs, and RBC suspension. Furthermore, we analyze their advantages and disadvantages. On weighing the pros and cons of the methods, a combination of the immersed boundary (IB) method and some forms of smoothed dissipative particle hydrodynamics (SDPD) methods may be required to deal effectively with RBC simulations. PMID:26706718

  8. Extensive gastric varices demonstrated by technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, W.J.; Domstad, P.A.; Loh, F.G.; Pulmano, C.

    1987-04-01

    An alcohol abuse patient complicated by chronic pancreatitis had splenic vein thrombosis leading to gastric varices and underwent abdominal Tc-99m red blood cell scintigraphy. First pass study, sequential images up to 1 hour, and a 2.5 hour image showed abnormal radioactivity in the left side of the abdomen and midabdomen. In 24 hour images, the high level of activity in the left side persisted; in addition, there was accumulation of radioactivity in the cecum, ascending, transverse colon, the splenic flexure, and descending colon. A splenectomy was performed and during the surgical procedure, a large dilated vein in the greater omentum was noted. It is reemphasized that delayed imaging up to 24 hours is important when the results of earlier images are equivocal or negative.

  9. Damage induced in red blood cells by infrared optical trapping: an evaluation based on elasticity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Moura, Diógenes S.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the damage caused to optically trapped red blood cells (RBCs) after 1 or 2 min of exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser beams at 785 or 1064 nm. Damage was quantified by measuring cell elasticity using an automatic, real-time, homemade, optical tweezer system. The measurements, performed on a significant number (hundreds) of cells, revealed an overall deformability decrease up to ˜104% after 2 min of light exposure, under 10 mW optical trapping for the 785-nm wavelength. Wavelength dependence of the optical damage is attributed to the light absorption by hemoglobin. The results provided evidence that RBCs have their biomechanical properties affected by NIR radiation. Our findings establish limits for laser applications with RBCs.

  10. Holographic analysis on deformation and restoration of malaria-infected red blood cells by antimalarial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hyeokjun; Ha, Young-Ran; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-11-01

    Malaria parasites induce morphological, biochemical, and mechanical changes in red blood cells (RBCs). Mechanical variations are closely related to the deformability of individual RBCs. The deformation of various RBCs, including healthy and malaria-infected RBCs (iRBCs), can be directly observed through quantitative phase imaging (QPI). The effects of chloroquine treatment on the mechanical property variation of iRBCs were investigated using time-resolved holographic QPI of single live cells on a millisecond time scale. The deformabilities of healthy RBCs, iRBCs, and drug-treated iRBCs were compared, and the effect of chloroquine on iRBC restoration was experimentally examined. The present results are beneficial to elucidate the dynamic characteristics of iRBCs and the effect of the antimalarial drug on iRBCs.

  11. Dihydrochalcones and homoisoflavanes from the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon's blood).

    PubMed

    Su, Xiao-Qin; Song, Yue-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Huo, Hui-Xia; Huang, Zheng; Zheng, Jiao; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yun-Fang; Xiao, Wei; Li, Jun; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-12-01

    Two new dihydrochalcones, 4-hydroxy-2,4'-dimethoxydihydrochalcone (1) and 3,4'-dihydroxy-2,4,6-trimethoxydihydrochalcone (2), and a new homoisoflavane, 7,3'-dihydroxy-8,4'-dimethoxyhomoisoflavane (3), along with 12 known compounds (4-15), were isolated from the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon's blood). Their structures were assigned by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Diversity of cleavage pathways were proposed for dihydrochalcones and homoisoflavanes based on the mass spectroscopic behaviors of those identified compounds using hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. All the compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, and compound 9 exhibited mild inhibition of NO production in this assay with IC₅₀ value of 50.3 μM. PMID:25218969

  12. Full-field velocity imaging of red blood cells in capillaries with spatiotemporal demodulation autocorrelation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyi; Zeng, Yaguang; Dong, Nannan; Liao, Riwei; Yang, Guojian

    2016-03-01

    We propose a full-field optical method for the label-free and quantitative mapping of the velocities of red blood cells (RBCs) in capillaries. It integrates spatiotemporal demodulation and an autocorrelation algorithm, and measures RBC velocity according to the ratio of RBC length to lag time. Conventionally, RBC length is assumed to be a constant and lag time is taken as a variable, while our method treats both of them as variables. We use temporal demodulation and the Butterworth spatial filter to separate RBC signal from background signal, based on which we obtain the RBC length by image segmentation and lag time by autocorrelation analysis. The RBC velocity calculated now is more accurate. The validity of our method is verified by an in vivo experiment on a mouse ear. Owing to its higher image signal-to-noise ratio, our method can be used for mapping RBC velocity in the turbid tissue case.

  13. Dihydrochalcones and homoisoflavanes from the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon's blood).

    PubMed

    Su, Xiao-Qin; Song, Yue-Lin; Zhang, Jing; Huo, Hui-Xia; Huang, Zheng; Zheng, Jiao; Zhang, Qian; Zhao, Yun-Fang; Xiao, Wei; Li, Jun; Tu, Peng-Fei

    2014-12-01

    Two new dihydrochalcones, 4-hydroxy-2,4'-dimethoxydihydrochalcone (1) and 3,4'-dihydroxy-2,4,6-trimethoxydihydrochalcone (2), and a new homoisoflavane, 7,3'-dihydroxy-8,4'-dimethoxyhomoisoflavane (3), along with 12 known compounds (4-15), were isolated from the red resin of Dracaena cochinchinensis (Chinese dragon's blood). Their structures were assigned by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Diversity of cleavage pathways were proposed for dihydrochalcones and homoisoflavanes based on the mass spectroscopic behaviors of those identified compounds using hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. All the compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, and compound 9 exhibited mild inhibition of NO production in this assay with IC₅₀ value of 50.3 μM.

  14. Effect of Strain Rate on the Mechanical Behavior of Red Blood Cells Entering a Constriction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2014-11-01

    Most work on the effect of hydrodynamic stress on red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on linear velocity profiles. Microfluidic devices have provided a means to examine the mechanical behavior of RBCs undergoing a sudden increase in shear stress at the entrance of a constriction, with previous work primarily focused on a fixed constriction taper angle and corresponding hydrodynamic strain rate. Here we investigate the effect of strain rate on the stretching dynamics exhibited by RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. Systematic variations in the constriction taper angle allow the strain rate to be precisely tuned, and high speed video yields precise measurements of the corresponding RBC deformations. We demonstrate that maximal RBC stretching occurs at an intermediate constriction taper angle, despite the lower magnitude of the strain rate. We interpret the results in terms of the time integral of the elongational strain rate, and we discuss the implications for shear-induced mechanotransduction.

  15. Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopy of red blood cells and Plasmodium falciparum trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Tuckermann, Rudolf; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Ly, Vanalysa; McNaughton, Don; Wood, Bayden R

    2007-09-01

    Methods to probe the molecular structure of living cells are of paramount importance in understanding drug interactions and environmental influences in these complex dynamical systems. The coupling of an acoustic levitation device with a micro-Raman spectrometer provides a direct molecular probe of cellular chemistry in a containerless environment minimizing signal attenuation and eliminating the affects of adhesion to walls and interfaces. We show that the Raman acoustic levitation spectroscopic (RALS) approach can be used to monitor the heme dynamics of a levitated 5 microL suspension of red blood cells and to detect hemozoin in malaria infected cells. The spectra obtained have an excellent signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate for the first time the utility of the technique as a diagnostic and monitoring tool for minute sample volumes of living animal cells. PMID:17713610

  16. Computational fluid dynamics of aggregating red blood cells in postcapillary venules

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Bong; Kim, Sangho; Johnson, Paul C.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2011-01-01

    Aggregate formation of red blood cells (RBCs) in a postcapillary venular bifurcation is investigated with three-dimensional computer simulations using the Chimera grid method. Interaction energy between the RBCs is modelled by a depletion interaction theory; RBCs are modelled as rigid oblate ellipsoids. The cell–cell interactions of RBCs are strongly dependent on vessel geometry and shear rates. The experimental data on vessel geometry, pseudoshear rates, and Dextran concentration obtained in our previous in vivo RBC aggregation study in postcapillary venules of the rat spinotrapezius muscle were used to simulate RBC aggregation. The computational results were compared to the experimental results from the in vivo study. The results show that cells have a larger tendency to form an aggregate under reduced flows. Aggregate formation also depends on the angle and location of the cells before they enter the bifurcation region. Comparisons with experimental data are discussed. PMID:19675976

  17. Role of Calcium in Phosphatidylserine Externalisation in Red Blood Cells from Sickle Cell Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Erwin; Rees, David Charles; Gibson, John Stanley

    2011-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine exposure occurs in red blood cells (RBCs) from sickle cell disease (SCD) patients and is increased by deoxygenation. The mechanisms responsible remain unclear. RBCs from SCD patients also have elevated cation permeability, and, in particular, a deoxygenation-induced cation conductance which mediates Ca2+ entry, providing an obvious link with phosphatidylserine exposure. The role of Ca2+ was investigated using FITC-labelled annexin. Results confirmed high phosphatidylserine exposure in RBCs from SCD patients increasing upon deoxygenation. When deoxygenated, phosphatidylserine exposure was further elevated as extracellular [Ca2+] was increased. This effect was inhibited by dipyridamole, intracellular Ca2+ chelation, and Gardos channel inhibition. Phosphatidylserine exposure was reduced in high K+ saline. Ca2+ levels required to elicit phosphatidylserine exposure were in the low micromolar range. Findings are consistent with Ca2+ entry through the deoxygenation-induced pathway (Psickle), activating the Gardos channel. [Ca2+] required for phosphatidylserine scrambling are in the range achievable in vivo. PMID:21490763

  18. Gellan sulfate inhibits Plasmodium falciparum growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Recuenco, Frances Cagayat; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Ishiwa, Akiko; Enomoto-Rogers, Yukiko; Fundador, Noreen Grace V.; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Iwanaga, Tatsuya; Murakoshi, Fumi; Gong, Haiyan; Inomata, Atsuko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Iwata, Tadahisa; Kato, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Here, we assessed the sulfated derivative of the microbial polysaccharide gellan gum and derivatives of λ and κ-carrageenans for their ability to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 and Dd2 growth and invasion of red blood cells in vitro. Growth inhibition was assessed by means of flow cytometry after a 96-h exposure to the inhibitors and invasion inhibition was assessed by counting ring parasites after a 20-h exposure to them. Gellan sulfate strongly inhibited invasion and modestly inhibited growth for both P. falciparum 3D7 and Dd2; both inhibitory effects exceeded those achieved with native gellan gum. The hydrolyzed λ-carrageenan and oversulfated κ-carrageenan were less inhibitory than their native forms. In vitro cytotoxicity and anticoagulation assays performed to determine the suitability of the modified polysaccharides for in vivo studies showed that our synthesized gellan sulfate had low cytotoxicity and anticoagulant activity. PMID:24740150

  19. Improved lectin-mediated immobilization of human red blood cells in superporous agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Gottschalk, Ingo; Gustavsson, Per Erik; Ersson, Bo; Lundahl, Per

    2003-01-25

    A new type of agarose bead, superporous agarose, was used as a gel support for immobilization of human red blood cells (RBCs) mediated by wheat germ lectin. The number of immobilized cells was similar to that obtained with commercial wheat germ lectin-agarose but the cell stability appeared to be superior. This allowed improved frontal affinity chromatographic analyses of cytochalasin B (CB)-binding to the glucose transporter GLUT1 which established a ratio of one CB-binding site per GLUT1 dimer for both plain RBCs or those treated with different poly amino acids. The measured dissociation constants, 70+/-14 nM for CB and 12+/-3 mM for glucose binding to GLUT1, are similar to those reported earlier.

  20. Quantitative microscopy and nanoscopy of sickle red blood cells performed by wide field digital interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaked, Natan T.; Satterwhite, Lisa L.; Telen, Marilyn J.; Truskey, George A.; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    We have applied wide-field digital interferometry (WFDI) to examine the morphology and dynamics of live red blood cells (RBCs) from individuals who suffer from sickle cell anemia (SCA), a genetic disorder that affects the structure and mechanical properties of RBCs. WFDI is a noncontact, label-free optical microscopy approach that can yield quantitative thickness profiles of RBCs and measurements of their membrane fluctuations at the nanometer scale reflecting their stiffness. We find that RBCs from individuals with SCA are significantly stiffer than those from a healthy control. Moreover, we show that the technique is sensitive enough to distinguish classes of RBCs in SCA, including sickle RBCs with apparently normal morphology, compared to the stiffer crescent-shaped sickle RBCs. We expect that this approach will be useful for diagnosis of SCA and for determining efficacy of therapeutic agents.

  1. Free radical-mediated platelet activation by hemoglobin released from red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Iuliano, L; Violi, F; Pedersen, J Z; Praticò, D; Rotilio, G; Balsano, F

    1992-12-01

    It is known that the rate of thrombus formation depends on interaction between platelets and erythrocytes, but the mechanism of this process has remained obscure. We here show that nanomolar levels of hemoglobin released from damaged red blood cells can induce platelet aggregation. The molecular mechanism is not receptor-based, but involves oxidation of oxyhemoglobin by platelet-derived hydrogen peroxide, with subsequent generation of a small unknown free radical species, detected by ESR spectroscopy. Methemoglobin and carbon monoxide-treated hemoglobin are unable to cause platelet activation or radical formation. The aggregation of platelets induced by hemoglobin is completely blocked by catalase or radical scavengers. These findings indicate a role for a novel extracellular free radical second messenger in the activation of platelets.

  2. Damage induced in red blood cells by infrared optical trapping: an evaluation based on elasticity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Marcos A. S.; Moura, Diógenes S.; Fontes, Adriana; de Araujo, Renato E.

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the damage caused to optically trapped red blood cells (RBCs) after 1 or 2 min of exposure to near-infrared (NIR) laser beams at 785 or 1064 nm. Damage was quantified by measuring cell elasticity using an automatic, real-time, homemade, optical tweezer system. The measurements, performed on a significant number (hundreds) of cells, revealed an overall deformability decrease up to ˜104% after 2 min of light exposure, under 10 mW optical trapping for the 785-nm wavelength. Wavelength dependence of the optical damage is attributed to the light absorption by hemoglobin. The results provided evidence that RBCs have their biomechanical properties affected by NIR radiation. Our findings establish limits for laser applications with RBCs.

  3. Deformation of a single red blood cell in bounded Poiseuille flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2012-11-01

    An immersed boundary method (IBM) combined with the elastic spring model is applied to investigate the deformation of a single red blood cell (RBC) in two-dimensional bounded Poiseuille flows. The equilibrium shape of the cell under flow depends on the swelling ratio ((s*)), the initial angle of the long axis of the cell at the centerline (ϕ), the maximum velocity of the flow (umax), the membrane bending stiffness of the RBC (kb), and the height of the microchannel(H). Two motions of oscillation and vacillating breathing of the RBC are observed in narrow channel considered here. The strength of the vacillating-breathing motion depends on degree of confinement and umax. For the different kb, the RBC obtains the same equilibrium shape for the same capillary number. Parachute shape and bullet-like shape, depending on the angle ϕ, coexist for the elliptic shape cell with lower umax in a narrower channel. NSF Grant No. DMS-0914788.

  4. Shape transitions of fluid vesicles and red blood cells in capillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Hiroshi; Gompper, Gerhard

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of fluid vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) in cylindrical capillary flow is studied by using a three-dimensional mesoscopic simulation approach. As flow velocity increases, a model RBC is found to transit from a nonaxisymmetric discocyteto an axisymmetric parachute shape (coaxial with the flow axis), while a fluid vesicle is found to transit from a discocyte to a prolate ellipsoid. Both shape transitions reduce the flow resistance. The critical velocities of the shape transitions are linearly dependent on the bending rigidity and on the shear modulus of the membrane. Slipper-like shapes of the RBC model are observed around the transition velocities. Our results are in good agreement with experiments on RBCs. mesoscale hydrodynamics simulation | microfluidics | shape transformations

  5. Numerical simulation of the transient shape of the red blood cell in microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xing; Wang, Shuanglian; Zhang, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    The transient shape of a red blood cell (RBC) in a microcapillary flow is simulated under different initial conditions, including various axis orientations and centroid locations, using the LBM-DLM/FD method, which is derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain method. Although the terminal velocity is not sensitive to the initial configuration, the evolution of the velocity and the shape are determined by the initial conditions. The parachute and the slipper shape are the most probable shapes for a deformed RBC in the flow. An RBC with an initial axis orientation of 90 degrees exhibits a more complicated deformation. RBCs have a tendency to move to the centerline of a tube if an offset between the RBC centroid and the centerline exists. Our numerical results are validated by experiments, and some details beyond the experiment are provided.

  6. Combined Simulation and Experimental Study of Large Deformation of Red Blood Cells in Microfluidic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, David J.; Pivkin, Igor; Wong, Sophie Y.; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Dao, Ming; Karniadakis, George Em; Suresh, Subra

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the biophysical characteristics of healthy human red blood cells (RBCs) traversing microfluidic channels with cross-sectional areas as small as 2.7 × 3 μm. We combine single RBC optical tweezers and flow experiments with corresponding simulations based on dissipative particle dynamics (DPD), and upon validation of the DPD model, predictive simulations and companion experiments are performed in order to quantify cell deformation and pressure–velocity relationships for different channel sizes and physiologically relevant temperatures. We discuss conditions associated with the shape transitions of RBCs along with the relative effects of membrane and cytosol viscosity, plasma environments, and geometry on flow through microfluidic systems at physiological temperatures. In particular, we identify a cross-sectional area threshold below which the RBC membrane properties begin to dominate its flow behavior at room temperature; at physiological temperatures this effect is less profound. PMID:21240637

  7. Biophysical Properties of Lumbricus terrestris Erythrocruorin and Its Potential Use as a Red Blood Cell Substitute.

    PubMed

    Elmer, Jacob; Palmer, Andre F

    2012-01-01

    Previous generations of hemoglobin (Hb)-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) have been plagued by key biophysical limitations that result in severe side-effects once transfused in vivo, including protein instability, high heme oxidation rates, and nitric oxide (NO) scavenging. All of these problems emerge after mammalian Hbs are removed from red blood cells (RBCs) and used for HBOC synthesis/formulation. Therefore, extracellular Hbs (erythrocruorins) from organisms which lack RBCs might serve as better HBOCs. This review focuses on the erythrocruorin of Lumbricus terrestris (LtEc), which has been shown to be extremely stable, resistant to oxidation, and may interact with NO differently than mammalian Hbs. All of these beneficial properties show that LtEc is a promising new HBOC which warrants further investigation. PMID:24956515

  8. Change in spectrum of Brownian fluctuations of optically trapped red blood cells due to malarial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraogi, Vishal; Padmapriya, P.; Paul, Apurba; Tatu, Utpal S.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-05-01

    We study the properties of single red blood cells (RBCs) held in an optical-tweezers trap. We observe a change in the spectrum of Brownian fluctuations between RBCs from normal and malaria-infected samples. The change, caused by infection-induced structural changes in the cell, appears as a statistical increase in the mean (by 25%) and standard deviation (by 200%) of the corner frequency measured over ~100 cells. The increase is observed even though the ensemble of cells being measured consists mostly of cells that do not actually host the parasite, but are from an infected pool. This bystander effect appears to vindicate other observations that infected cells can affect the biomechanical properties of uninfected cells. The change is also observed to be independent of the stage of infection and its duration, highlighting its potential for disease detection.

  9. On the birefringence of healthy and malaria-infected red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Basu, Himanish; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2013-12-01

    The birefringence of a red blood cell (RBC) is quantitatively monitored as it becomes infected by a malarial parasite. Large changes occur in the cell's refractive index at different stages of malarial infection. The observed rotation of an optically trapped, malaria-infected RBC is not a simple function of shape distortion: the malarial parasite is found to itself exercise a profound influence on the rotational dynamics by inducing stage-specific birefringence. Our measurements shed new light on the competition between shape- and form-birefringence in RBCs. We demonstrate the possibility of using birefringence to establish very early stages of infected parasites and of assessing various factors that contribute to birefringence in normal and infected cells. Our results have implications for the development and use of noninvasive techniques of quantifying changes in cell properties induced by malaria disease pathology.

  10. Effects of red cell transfusion on cardiac output and blood flow velocities in cerebral and gastrointestinal arteries in premature infants.

    PubMed Central

    Nelle, M; Höcker, C; Zilow, E P; Linderkamp, O

    1994-01-01

    Anaemia may increase the risk of tissue hypoxia in preterm infants. The effect of transfusion on circulation was studied in 33 preterm infants with a mean (SD) gestational age of 29 (5) weeks (range 26-34), birth weight 1153 (390) g (range 520-1840), and postnatal age of 48 (21) days (range 19-100). Packed cell volume, blood viscosity (capillary viscometer), cardiac output, and cerebral blood flow velocities in the internal carotid artery, anterior cerebral artery, and coeliac trunk (Doppler ultrasound) were determined before and after transfusion of 10 ml/kg of packed red blood cells. Transfusion increased packed cell volume from a mean (SD) 0.27 (0.45) to 0.37 (0.48). Mean arterial blood pressure did not change while heart rate decreased significantly from 161 (14) l/min to 149 (12). Cardiac output decreased from 367 (93) ml/kg/min to 311 (74) due to decrease in stroke volume from 2.28 (0.57) ml/kg to 2.14 (0.46) and in heart rate. There was a significant increase in systemic red cell transport (cardiac output times packed cell volume) by 17%, systemic flow resistance (blood pressure to cardiac output ratio) by 23%, and blood viscosity by 33%. Vascular hindrance (flow resistance to blood viscosity ratio) did not change significantly, thereby suggesting that neither vasoconstriction nor vasodilation occurred with transfusion. After transfusion blood flow velocities decreased significantly in the anterior cerebral artery by 23%, in the internal carotid artery by 8%, and in the coeliac trunk by 12%. Red cell transport estimated as products of blood flow velocities times packed cell volume increased significantly by 25% in the internal carotid artery and by 21% in the coeliac trunk. These results indicate that red cell transfusion improved systemic oxygen transport as well as oxygen transport in the internal carotid artery and coeliac trunk. PMID:8092871

  11. Segmentation of blood vessels from red-free and fluorescein retinal images.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Perez, M Elena; Hughes, Alun D; Thom, Simon A; Bharath, Anil A; Parker, Kim H

    2007-02-01

    The morphology of the retinal blood vessels can be an important indicator for diseases like diabetes, hypertension and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Thus, the measurement of changes in morphology of arterioles and venules can be of diagnostic value. Here we present a method to automatically segment retinal blood vessels based upon multiscale feature extraction. This method overcomes the problem of variations in contrast inherent in these images by using the first and second spatial derivatives of the intensity image that gives information about vessel topology. This approach also enables the detection of blood vessels of different widths, lengths and orientations. The local maxima over scales of the magnitude of the gradient and the maximum principal curvature of the Hessian tensor are used in a multiple pass region growing procedure. The growth progressively segments the blood vessels using feature information together with spatial information. The algorithm is tested on red-free and fluorescein retinal images, taken from two local and two public databases. Comparison with first public database yields values of 75.05% true positive rate (TPR) and 4.38% false positive rate (FPR). Second database values are of 72.46% TPR and 3.45% FPR. Our results on both public databases were comparable in performance with other authors. However, we conclude that these values are not sensitive enough so as to evaluate the performance of vessel geometry detection. Therefore we propose a new approach that uses measurements of vessel diameters and branching angles as a validation criterion to compare our segmented images with those hand segmented from public databases. Comparisons made between both hand segmented images from public databases showed a large inter-subject variability on geometric values. A last evaluation was made comparing vessel geometric values obtained from our segmented images between red-free and fluorescein paired images with the latter as the "ground truth

  12. Study of red blood cell alloimmunization in multitransfused thalassemic children of Jammu region

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena; Kapoor, Raman; Kumar, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Thalassemia is one of the most common genetic disorder of hemoglobin synthesis in Jammu region. Although RBC transfusion is life saving for these patients, it may be associated with some complications like RBC alloimmunization. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and the most common alloantibodies involved. Material and Methods: This was a descriptive study involving a total of 70 thalassemic patients in the age range of 2-17 years receiving regular blood transfusions, registered at SMGS Blood Bank, Jammu. Relevant clinical and laboratory data was collected with reference to age at the start of transfusions, total number of transfusions received and splenectomy status. Antibodies screening, antibody identification, and cross matching was done on allpatient samples included in the study, during the period between November 2009 and October 2010. Results: In this study, a total of six alloantibodies six patients (8.5%) and one autoantibody (1.42%) was detected. All identified alloantibodies belonged to Rh system (i.e. anti-E, in 3 patients (50%), anti D, in one patient (16.66%)) and Kell system (anti-K, in two patients (33.34%)). Higher frequency of alloimmunization was found, with increase in number of transfusions and in those who received transfusions after 1 year of age. Alloimmunization was not significantly associated with gender and splenectomy status (P-value > 0.05). Conclusion: Red cell alloantibodies developed in 8.5% of thalassemic patients and 1.42% had autoantibodies. The most common alloantibodies identified were anti Rh system antibodies (anti-E and anti-D) present in 50% and 16.66% of patients respectively. Alloimmunization is not an uncommon problem faced by blood banks and finding compatible units for regularly transfused thalassemic patients may become very difficult. In order to reduce alloimmunization, a policy for performing extended red cell phenotyping of these patients is essential and

  13. Studies in red blood cell preservation: 4. Plasma vesicle hemoglobin exceeds free hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Greenwalt, T J; McGuinness, C G; Dumaswala, U J

    1991-01-01

    Studies were designed to find out how much of the plasma hemoglobin ( Hb) in whole blood was in microvesicles and how much was free Hb after 21 days of storage in citrate-phosphate-dextrose anticoagulant and to determine the effect of the plasticizer, di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP). The total plasma Hb in polyolefin (PO) containers without DEHP was much higher than in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) with the plasticizer (p = 0.004). Less than 30% of the Hb was in free solution in either type of container. The addition of 300 micrograms/ml of DEHP to the plasma in the PO containers resulted in marked reduction in the microvesiculation (p less than 0.01) but did not affect the level of free Hb. RBC hypotonic fragility and morphology scores were significantly improved. It is concluded that microvesiculation contributes more to plasma Hb concentration than free Hb during storage. Some hemolysis of red blood cells (RBC) is expected during blood bank storage. It has been shown that part of the hemoglobin (Hb) in the suspending medium is free and part is encapsulated in microvescicles shed by the RBC [1]. The amount of hemolysis and microvesiculation that occurs has been noted to be less when blood is stored in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) containers in which di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) is used as the plasticizer [1]. The DEHP that leaches into the plasma has been shown to decrease hemolysis, microvesiculation, and the increase in osmotic fragility which RBC undergo during refrigerated storage [2-9].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1949704

  14. Nanodefects of membranes cause destruction of packed red blood cells during long-term storage

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlova, Elena; Chernysh, Aleksandr; Moroz, Victor; Sergunova, Victoria; Gudkova, Olga; Kuzovlev, Artem

    2015-10-01

    Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are used for blood transfusion. PRBC were stored for 30 days under 4 °C in hermetic blood bags with CPD anticoagulant-preservative solution. Hematocrit was 50–55%. The distortions of PRBC membranes nanostructure and cells morphology during storage were studied by atomic force microscopy. Basic measurements were performed at the day 2, 6, 9, 16, 23 and 30 of storage and additionally 2–3 days after it. Topological defects occurred on RBC membranes by day 9. They appeared as domains with grain-like structures (“grains”) sized up to 200 nm. These domains were appeared in almost all cells. Later these domains merged and formed large defects on cells. It was the formation of domains with the “grains” which was onset process leading eventually to destruction of PRBC. Possible mechanisms of transformation of PRBC and their membrane are related to the alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. During this storage period potassium ions and lactat concentrations increased, pH decreased, intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione diminished in the preservative solution. Changes of PRBC morphology were detected within the entire period of PRBC storage. Discocytes predominated at the days 1 and 2. By day 30 PRBC transformed into irreversible echinocytes and spheroechinocytes. Study of defects of membranes nanostructure may form the basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC. This method may allow to work out the best recommendations for blood transfusion. - Highlights: • Domains with “grains” are formed on membranes surface on 9–16 days of PRBC storage. • The development of domains is the reason of irreversible changes of PRBC structure. • The origin of domains is the consequence of alterations of spectrin cytoskeleton. • Study of nanostructure may form basis of assessing the quality of the stored PRBC.

  15. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks.

  16. A dynamic model of oxygen transport from capillaries to tissue with moving red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Lücker, Adrien; Weber, Bruno; Jenny, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Most oxygen required to support the energy needs of vertebrate tissues is delivered by diffusion from microvessels. The presence of red blood cells (RBCs) makes blood flow in the microcirculation highly heterogeneous. Additionally, flow regulation mechanisms dynamically respond to changes in tissue energy demand. These spatiotemporal variations directly affect the supply of oxygen to parenchymal cells. Due to various limiting assumptions, current models of oxygen transport cannot fully capture the consequences of complex hemodynamic effects on tissue oxygenation and are often not suitable for studying unsteady phenomena. With our new approach based on moving RBCs, the impact of blood flow heterogeneity on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) in the tissue can be quantified. Oxygen transport was simulated using parachute-shaped solid RBCs flowing through a capillary. With the use of a conical tissue domain with radii 19 and 13 μm, respectively, our computations indicate that Po2 at the RBC membrane exceeds Po2 between RBCs by 30 mmHg on average and that the mean plasma Po2 decreases by 9 mmHg over 50 μm. These results reproduce well recent intravascular Po2 measurements in the rodent brain. We also demonstrate that instantaneous variations of capillary hematocrit cause associated fluctuations of tissue Po2. Furthermore, our results suggest that homogeneous tissue oxygenation requires capillary networks to be denser on venular side than on arteriolar side. Our new model for oxygen transport will make it possible to quantify in detail the effects of blood flow heterogeneity on tissue oxygenation in realistic capillary networks. PMID:25398979

  17. Packed Red Blood Cells Are an Abundant and Proximate Potential Source of Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zwemer, Charles F.; Davenport, Robertson D.; Gomez-Espina, Juan; Blanco-Gonzalez, Elisa; Whitesall, Steven E.; D'Alecy, Louis G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We determined, for packed red blood cells (PRBC) and fresh frozen plasma, the maximum content, and ability to release the endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethylarginine (LNMMA). Background ADMA and LNMMA are near equipotent NOS inhibitors forming blood’s total NOS inhibitory content. The balance between removal from, and addition to plasma determines their free concentrations. Removal from plasma is by well-characterized specific hydrolases while formation is restricted to posttranslational protein methylation. When released into plasma they can readily enter endothelial cells and inhibit NOS. Fresh rat and human whole blood contain substantial protein incorporated ADMA however; the maximum content of ADMA and LNMMA in PRBC and fresh frozen plasma has not been determined. Methods We measured total (free and protein incorporated) ADMA and LNMMA content in PRBCs and fresh frozen plasma, as well as their incubation induced release, using HPLC with fluorescence detection. We tested the hypothesis that PRBC and fresh frozen plasma contain substantial inhibitory methylarginines that can be released chemically by complete in vitro acid hydrolysis or physiologically at 37°C by enzymatic blood proteolysis. Results In vitro strong-acid-hydrolysis revealed a large PRBC reservoir of ADMA (54.5 ± 9.7 µM) and LNMMA (58.9 ± 28.9 μM) that persisted over 42-d at 6° or -80°C. In vitro 5h incubation at 37°C nearly doubled free ADMA and LNMMNA concentration from PRBCs while no change was detected in fresh frozen plasma. Conclusion The compelling physiological ramifications are that regardless of storage age, 1) PRBCs can rapidly release pathologically relevant quantities of ADMA and LNMMA when incubated and 2) PRBCs have a protein-incorporated inhibitory methylarginines reservoir 100 times that of normal free inhibitory methylarginines in blood and thus could represent a clinically relevant and proximate

  18. [Preliminary study on xenotransfusion from porcine red blood cell into Rhesus monkey].

    PubMed

    Tan, Ying-Xia; Ji, Shou-Ping; Lu, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Li, Li-Li; Gong, Feng; Zhang, Jin-Guo; Zhang, Yang-Pei

    2006-02-01

    In order to study the possibility of xenotransfusion from porcine red blood cell (pRBC) to primate, the antigens on pRBC surface were modified to make it more compatible to primate sera. Porcine RBCs were subjected to both enzymatic removal of membrane alpha-Gal antigens with recombinant alpha-galactosidase (AGL) and covalent attachment of succinimid propionate-linked methoxypolyethyleneglycol (mPEG-SPA) to camouflage non-alphaGal antigens. The effects of double modifications were determinated by hemagglutination and clinical cross-match testing with rhesus sera. In vivo clearance rates and safety of modified pRBCs were measured after it was transfused into Rhesus monkey with or without immunosuppressant treatment. The validity of pRBC was detected in exsanguine Rhesus monkey model. The results showed that AGL could effectively remove alpha-Gal xenoantigens on pRBC membrane and reduce hemagglutination. The combination of mPEG modification with AGL treatment could significantly increased compatibility between pRBCs and Rhesus monkey sera. Modified pRBCs were detectable in Rhesus monkey blood at 12 hours after transfusion, and their survival time was 40 hours in the immunosuppressant-treated Rhesus monkey. In vivo survival rates of pRBCs were 38% in exsanguine Rhesus monkey at 8 hours after transfusion, and during that time, the hemoglobin and hematocrit of Rhesus monkey were maintained at the same level as before it lost blood. It is concluded that the modified pRBC can be safely transfused into Rhesus monkey and relieve the anemic symptom exsanguine Rhesus monkey. It suggested that pRBC can be hopefully used as a blood substitute for primate and human in the future.

  19. Red blood cell membrane viscoelasticity, agglutination and zeta potential measurements with double optical tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontes, Adriana; Fernandes, Heloise P.; Barjas-Castro, Maria L.; de Thomaz, André A.; de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Barbosa, Luiz C.; Cesar, Carlos L.

    2006-02-01

    The red blood cell (RBC) viscoelastic membrane contains proteins and glycolproteins embedded in, or attached, to a fluid lipid bilayer and are negatively charged, which creates a repulsive electric (zeta) potential between the cells and prevents their aggregation in the blood stream. There are techniques, however, to decrease the zeta potential to allow cell agglutination which are the basis of most of the tests of antigen-antibody interactions in blood banks. This report shows the use of a double optical tweezers to measure RBC membrane viscosity, agglutination and zeta potential. In our technique one of the optical tweezers trap a silica bead that binds strongly to a RBC at the end of a RBCs rouleaux and, at the same time, acts as a pico-Newton force transducer, after calibration through its displacement from the equilibrium position. The other optical tweezers trap the RBC at the other end. To measure the membrane viscosity the optical force is measured as a function of the velocity between the RBCs. To measure the adhesion the tweezers are slowly displaced apart until the RBCs disagglutination happens. The RBC zeta potential is measured in two complimentary ways, by the force on the silica bead attached to a single RBC in response to an applied electric field, and the conventional way, by the measurement of terminal velocity of the RBC after released from the optical trap. These two measurements provide information about the RBC charges and, also, electrolytic solution properties. We believe this can improve the methods of diagnosis in blood banks.

  20. Red cell and platelet concentrates from blood collected into half-strength citrate anticoagulant: improved maintenance of red cell 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in half-citrate red cells.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, A; Douglas, S; James, J; Whyte, G

    1992-01-01

    This study confirms previous work suggesting equivalent in vitro properties in blood components prepared from donations collected into half-citrate preservative (HCPD) compared to components derived from donations collected into standard citrate-phosphate-dextrose (CPD) preservatives. In addition, red cell products harvested from HCPD donations showed significantly improved maintenance of pH over storage, and this was reflected in improved maintenance of intracellular 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). This effect was observed in whole blood and in red cells suspended in a phosphate-containing additive solution (Tuta AAS). Collection into HCPD also improved 2,3-DPG maintenance in red cell concentrates processed following an 18-hour hold at 22 degrees C. These improvements were less pronounced in red cells suspended in a non-phosphate-containing medium (Fenwal Adsol) in which a higher pH was maintained even in units collected in CPD. Platelets harvested from HCPD blood and suspended in plasma showed equivalent quality to platelets from standard donations. Some deterioration of platelet properties was observed when HCPD platelets were stored in a non-citrate synthetic medium. Together with data indicating improved coagulation factor stability, these results suggest that collection into HCPD improves stored blood quality and may also allow logistical benefits in blood component preparation.