Science.gov

Sample records for plastic encapsulated parts

  1. Plastic encapsulated parts

    SciTech Connect

    Castillo, T.

    1994-10-01

    Plastic semiconductor packages were characterized as possible alternatives for canned devices, which are susceptible to internal shorts caused by conductive particles. Highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) as well as electrical and mechanical testing were conducted on plastic technology devices.

  2. The demise of plastic encapsulated microcircuit myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, E. B.; Agarwal, R. K.; Pecht, M.

    1994-10-01

    Production of microelectronic devices encapsulated in solid, molded plastic packages has rapidly increased since the early 1980's. Today, millions of plastic-encapsulated devices are produced daily. On the other hand, only a few million hermetic (cavity) packages are produced per year. Reasons for the increased use of plastic-encapsulated packages include cost, availability, size, weight, quality, and reliability. Markets taking advantage of this technology range from computers and telecommunications to automotive uses. Yet, several industries, the military in particular, will not accept such devices. One reason for this reluctance to use the best available commercial parts is a perceived risk of poor reliability, derived from antiquated military specifications, standards, and handbooks; other common justifications cite differing environments; inadequate screens; inadequate test data, and required government audits of suppliers' processes. This paper describes failure mechanisms associated with plastic encapsulation and their elimination. It provides data indicating the relative reliability of cavity and solid-encapsulated packaging, and presents possible approaches to assuring quality and reliability in the procuring and applying this successful commercial technology.

  3. Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) Reliability Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, M.

    2000-01-01

    It is reported by some users and has been demonstrated by others via testing and qualification that the quality and reliability of plastic-encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) manufactured today are excellent in commercial applications and closely equivalent, and in some cases superior to their hemetic counterparts.

  4. Plastic molds reduce cost of encapsulating electric cable connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knott, D.

    1964-01-01

    Resin casting of the aluminum master pattern forms a plastic mold for encapsulating a cable connector. An elastomer is injected into the mold and cured. The mold is disassembled leaving an elastomeric encapsulation around the connector.

  5. Critical concerns, solutions and guidelines for use of plastic encapsulated microcircuits for space flight applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Virmani, Nick; Shaw, Jack

    1997-01-01

    Some of the concerns and risk mitigation procedures for using plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) for space applications are discussed. Despite their advantages, PEMs cannot be implemented in all space applications by replacing military parts numbers with their commercial counterparts in product designs and part lists. The technical and procurement concerns are summarized, and suggestions for high reliability procurements are given. The ability to withstand deleterious environmental effects and to meet mission critical reliability is the key to the successful use of PEMs for space applications.

  6. Feasibility study of silicon nitride protection of plastic encapsulated semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, J. W.; Hall, T. C.; Erickson, J. J.; Gebhart, F. L.

    1979-01-01

    The application of low temperature silicon nitride protective layers on wire bonded integrated circuits mounted on lead frame assemblies is reported. An evaluation of the mechanical and electrical compatibility of both plasma nitride and photochemical silicon nitride (photonitride) passivations (parallel evaluations) of integrated circuits which were then encapsulated in plastic is described. Photonitride passivation is compatible with all wire bonded lead frame assemblies, with or without initial chip passivation. Plasma nitride passivation of lead frame assemblies is possible only if the chip is passivated before lead frame assembly. The survival rate after the environmental test sequence of devices with a coating of plasma nitride on the chip and a coating of either plasma nitride or photonitride over the assembled device is significantly greater than that of devices assembled with no nitride protective coating over either chip or lead frame.

  7. Different Approaches for Ensuring Performance/Reliability of Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerke, R. David; Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri; Moor, Andrew F.; Cooper, Kim A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs). Different approaches are addressed to ensure good performance and reliability of PEMs. The topics include: 1) Mitigating Risk; and 2) Program results.

  8. Development of design, qualification, screening, and application requirements for plastic encapsulated solid-state devices for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Test data were collected on 1035 plastic encapsulated devices and 75 hermetically scaled control group devices that were purchased from each of five different manufacturers in the categories of (1) low power Schottsky TTL (bipolar) digital circuits; (2) CMOS digital circuits; (3) operational amplifier linear circuits; and (4) NPN transistors. These parts were subjected to three different initial screening conditions, then to extended life testing, to determine any possible advantages or trends for any particular screen. Several tests were carried out in the areas of flammability testing, humidity testing, high pressure steam (auroclave) testing, and high temperature storage testing. Test results are presented. Procurement and application considerations for use of plastic encapsulated semiconductors are presented and a statistical analysis program written to study the log normal distributions resulting from life testing is concluded.

  9. Different Approaches for Ensuring Performance/Reliability of Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) in Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerke, R. David; Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri; Moor, Andrew F.; Cooper, Kim A.

    2000-01-01

    Engineers within the commercial and aerospace industries are using trade-off and risk analysis to aid in reducing spacecraft system cost while increasing performance and maintaining high reliability. In many cases, Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components, which include Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs), are candidate packaging technologies for spacecrafts due to their lower cost, lower weight and enhanced functionality. Establishing and implementing a parts program that effectively and reliably makes use of these potentially less reliable, but state-of-the-art devices, has become a significant portion of the job for the parts engineer. Assembling a reliable high performance electronic system, which includes COTS components, requires that the end user assume a risk. To minimize the risk involved, companies have developed methodologies by which they use accelerated stress testing to assess the product and reduce the risk involved to the total system. Currently, there are no industry standard procedures for accomplishing this risk mitigation. This paper will present the approaches for reducing the risk of using PEMs devices in space flight systems as developed by two independent Laboratories. The JPL procedure involves primarily a tailored screening with accelerated stress philosophy while the APL procedure is primarily, a lot qualification procedure. Both Laboratories successfully have reduced the risk of using the particular devices for their respective systems and mission requirements.

  10. Instructions for Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuit(PEM) Selection, Screening and Qualification.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Terry; Teverovsky, Alexander; Leidecker, Henning

    2002-01-01

    The use of Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs) is permitted on NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) spaceflight applications, provided each use is thoroughly evaluated for thermal, mechanical, and radiation implications of the specific application and found to meet mission requirements. PEMs shall be selected for their functional advantage and availability, not for cost saving; the steps necessary to ensure reliability usually negate any initial apparent cost advantage. A PEM shall not be substituted for a form, fit and functional equivalent, high reliability, hermetic device in spaceflight applications. Due to the rapid change in wafer-level designs typical of commercial parts and the unknown traceability between packaging lots and wafer lots, lot specific testing is required for PEMs, unless specifically excepted by the Mission Assurance Requirements (MAR) for the project. Lot specific qualification, screening, radiation hardness assurance analysis and/or testing, shall be consistent with the required reliability level as defined in the MAR. Developers proposing to use PEMs shall address the following items in their Performance Assurance Implementation Plan: source selection (manufacturers and distributors), storage conditions for all stages of use, packing, shipping and handling, electrostatic discharge (ESD), screening and qualification testing, derating, radiation hardness assurance, test house selection and control, data collection and retention.

  11. Analysis of field usage failure rate data for plastic encapsulated solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Survey and questionnaire techniques were used to gather data from users and manufacturers on the failure rates in the field of plastic encapsulated semiconductors. It was found that such solid state devices are being successfully used by commercial companies which impose certain screening and qualification procedures. The reliability of these semiconductors is now adequate to support their consideration in NASA systems, particularly in low cost systems. The cost of performing necessary screening for NASA applications was assessed.

  12. Experiences issues with plastic parts at cold temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandor, Mike; Agarwal, Shri

    2005-01-01

    Missions to MARS/planets/asteroids require electronic parts to operate and survive at extreme cold conditions. At extreme cold temperatures many types of cold related failures can occur. Office 514 is currently evaluating plastic parts under various cold temperature conditions and applications. Evaluations, screens, and qualifications are conducted on flight parts.

  13. Mold-filling experiments for validation of modeling encapsulation. Part 1, "wine glass" mold.

    SciTech Connect

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann

    2005-06-01

    The C6 project 'Encapsulation Processes' has been designed to obtain experimental measurements for discovery of phenomena critical to improving these processes, as well as data required in the verification and validation plan (Rao et al. 2001) for model validation of flow in progressively complex geometries. We have observed and recorded the flow of clear, Newtonian liquids and opaque, rheologically complex suspensions in two mold geometries. The first geometry is a simple wineglass geometry in a cylinder and is reported here in Part 1. The results in a more realistic encapsulation geometry are reported in Part 2.

  14. PEM-INST-001: Instructions for Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuit (PEM) Selection, Screening, and Qualification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander; Sahu, Kusum

    2003-01-01

    Potential users of plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs) need to be reminded that unlike the military system of producing robust high-reliability microcircuits that are designed to perform acceptably in a variety of harsh environments, PEMs are primarily designed for use in benign environments where equipment is easily accessed for repair or replacement. The methods of analysis applied to military products to demonstrate high reliability cannot always be applied to PEMs. This makes it difficult for users to characterize PEMs for two reasons: 1. Due to the major differences in design and construction, the standard test practices used to ensure that military devices are robust and have high reliability often cannot be applied to PEMs that have a smaller operating temperature range and are typically more frail and susceptible to moisture absorption. In contrast, high-reliability military microcircuits usually utilize large, robust, high-temperature packages that are hermetically sealed. 2. Unlike the military high-reliability system, users of PEMs have little visibility into commercial manufacturers proprietary design, materials, die traceability, and production processes and procedures. There is no central authority that monitors PEM commercial product for quality, and there are no controls in place that can be imposed across all commercial manufacturers to provide confidence to high-reliability users that a common acceptable level of quality exists for all PEMs manufacturers. Consequently, there is no guaranteed control over the type of reliability that is built into commercial product, and there is no guarantee that different lots from the same manufacturer are equally acceptable. And regarding application, there is no guarantee that commercial products intended for use in benign environments will provide acceptable performance and reliability in harsh space environments. The qualification and screening processes contained in this document are intended to

  15. Improved molding process ensures plastic parts of higher tensile strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C.

    1968-01-01

    Single molding process ensures that plastic parts /of a given mechanical design/ produced from a conventional thermosetting molding compound will have a maximum tensile strength. The process can also be used for other thermosetting compounds to produce parts with improved physical properties.

  16. Doses to LiF :Ti, Mg chips encapsulated in plastic extremity rings as a result of radon gas exposure.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Noon, Evan P; Rafique, Muhammad

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies measured the effects of (222)Rn on various thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). This study quantified the effects of (222)Rn on LiF : Ti,Mg chips encapsulated in plastic extremity rings. For 28 d, one batch of TLDs was left in a chamber with high radon levels, and another batch in a control chamber with normal background radon levels. A few TLDs in each batch were removed from the rings for direct exposure to the ambient air in each chamber. Passive continuous radon monitors (CRMs) recorded the (222)Rn levels. TLDs were processed using a third-party dosimetry company, CRM data were analysed, and the relationship between integrated (222)Rn concentration and TLD response was determined. The batch of TLDs in the experimental chamber showed a weak response to (222)Rn gas, which was in the order of 0.5 nSv Bq(-1) m(3) d(-1).

  17. Design consideration for design a flat and ring plastics part using Solidworks software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, M. A. M.; Faizal, K. M.; Salleh, M. S.; Sulaiman, M. A.; Mohamad, E.

    2015-12-01

    Various considerations on design of plastic injection moulded parts were applied in initial stage to prevent any defects of end products. Therefore, the objective of this project is to design the plastic injection moulded part by taking consideration on several factors such as draft angle, corner radius and location of gate. In this project, flat plastic part, ring plastic part, core inserts for flat and ring plastic part were designed using SolidWorks software. The plastic part was drawn in sketching mode then the 3D modeling of solid part was generated using various commands. Considerations of plastic part such as draft angle and corner radius with location of gate was considered in the design stage. Finally, it was successfully designed the two plastic parts with their respectively insert by using SolidWorks software. The flat plastic part and ring plastic part were designed for the purpose for future researches for study the weld lines, meld lines, air trapped and geometrical size of the product. Thus, by designing the flat plastic part and ring plastic part having core insert on each part, the completed mould design of two plate mould can be considered. This is because, plastic injection parts are needed to be designed properly in order to neglect any defect when the mould was made.

  18. Part weight verification between simulation and experiment of plastic part in injection moulding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amran, M. A. M.; Idayu, N.; Faizal, K. M.; Sanusi, M.; Izamshah, R.; Shahir, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the main objective is to determine the percentage difference of part weight between experimental and simulation work. The effect of process parameters on weight of plastic part is also investigated. The process parameters involved were mould temperature, melt temperature, injection time and cooling time. Autodesk Simulation Moldflow software was used to run the simulation of the plastic part. Taguchi method was selected as Design of Experiment to conduct the experiment. Then, the simulation result was validated with the experimental result. It was found that the minimum and maximum percentage of differential of part weight between simulation and experimental work are 0.35 % and 1.43 % respectively. In addition, the most significant parameter that affected part weight is the mould temperature, followed by melt temperature, injection time and cooling time.

  19. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    PubMed

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-04

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated.

  20. Embedded Heaters for Joining or Separating Plastic Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Melvin A., III

    2004-01-01

    A proposed thermal-bonding technique would make it possible to join or separate thermoplastic parts quickly and efficiently. The technique would eliminate the need for conventional welding or for such conventional fastening components as bolted flanges or interlocking hooks. The technique could be particularly useful in the sign industry (in which large quantities of thermoplastics are used) or could be used to join plastic pipes. A thin sheet of a suitable electrically conductive material would be formed to fit between two thermoplastic parts to be joined (see figure). The electrically conductive sheet and the two parts would be put together tightly, then an electrical current would be sent through the conductor to heat the thermoplastic locally. The magnitude of the current and the heating time would be chosen to generate just enough heat to cause the thermoplastic to adhere to both sides of the electrically conductive sheet. Optionally, the electrically conductive sheet could contain many small holes to provide purchase or to increase electrical resistance to facilitate the generation of heat. After thermal bonding, the electrically conductive sheet remains as an integral part of the structure. If necessary, the electrically conductive sheet can be reheated later to separate the joined thermoplastic parts.

  1. Bacterial Community Profiling of Plastic Litter in the Belgian Part of the North Sea.

    PubMed

    De Tender, Caroline A; Devriese, Lisa I; Haegeman, Annelies; Maes, Sara; Ruttink, Tom; Dawyndt, Peter

    2015-08-18

    Bacterial colonization of marine plastic litter (MPL) is known for over four decades. Still, only a few studies on the plastic colonization process and its influencing factors are reported. In this study, seafloor MPL was sampled at different locations across the Belgian part of the North Sea to study bacterial community structure using 16S metabarcoding. These marine plastic bacterial communities were compared with those of sediment and seawater, and resin pellets sampled on the beach, to investigate the origin and uniqueness of plastic bacterial communities. Plastics display great variation of bacterial community composition, while each showed significant differences from those of sediment and seawater, indicating that plastics represent a distinct environmental niche. Various environmental factors correlate with the diversity of MPL bacterial composition across plastics. In addition, intrinsic plastic-related factors such as pigment content may contribute to the differences in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, the differential abundance of known primary and secondary colonizers across the various plastics may indicate different stages of bacterial colonization, and may confound comparisons of free-floating plastics. Our studies provide insights in the factors that shape plastic bacterial colonization and shed light on the possible role of plastic as transport vehicle for bacteria through the aquatic environment.

  2. Process combinations for the manufacturing of metal-plastic hybrid parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drossel, W.-G.; Lies, C.; Albert, A.; Haase, R.; Müller, R.; Scholz, P.

    2016-03-01

    The usage of innovative lightweight materials and processing technologies gains importance in manifold industrial scopes. Especially for moving parts and mobility products the weight is decisively. The aerospace and automotive industries use light and high-strength materials to reduce weight and energy consumption and thereby improve the performance of their products. Composites with reinforced plastics are of particular importance. They offer a low density in combination with high specific stiffness and strength. A pure material substitution through reinforced plastics is still not economical. The approach of using hybrid metal-plastic structures with the principle of “using the right material at the right place” is a promising solution for the economical realization of lightweight structures with a high achievement potential. The article shows four innovative manufacturing possibilities for the realization of metal-plastic-hybrid parts.

  3. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 1: Encapsulation capacity and stability of inclusion complexes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-07-15

    This study investigated the effects of water-induced crystallization of amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin (α-CD) powder on CO2 encapsulation at 0.4-1.6 MPa pressure for 1-72 h through the addition of water (to reach to 13, 15 and 17% wet basis, w.b.) into amorphous α-CD powder prior to the encapsulation. The results showed that the α-CD encapsulation capacity was over 1 mol CO2/mol α-CD after pressurizing for longer than 48 h. The encapsulated CO2 concentration by the addition of water was considerably higher (p<0.05) than that of amorphous α-CD powder (5.51% MC, w.b.) without an addition of water and that of crystalline α-CD powders under the same MC and encapsulation conditions. A comparison of CO2 release properties (75% relative humidity, 25 °C) from complexed powders prepared from amorphous and crystalline α-CD powders under the same conditions is also presented.

  4. Multilayer injection moulding of thick-walled optical plastics parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Neuss, A.; Weber, M.; Walach, P.

    2014-05-01

    Optical components are often thick-walled. The cycle time of precise polymer optics with a wall thickness of more than 20 mm exceeds several minutes. The multilayer injection moulding or compression moulding lowers the cycle time and increases the quality of the moulded parts. For the production of multilayer moulded lenses the mould design plays an important role. An innovative mould concept is presented with the possiblity to produce double or triple layer lenses. To ensure the quality and the endurance of multilayer moulded optical components in their applications, the cohesion in the interface is important. Tensile shear tests show the ability of multilayer moulded parts with high cohesion values for optical applications.

  5. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  10. Encapsulate-and-peel: fabricating carbon nanotube CMOS integrated circuits in a flexible ultra-thin plastic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Pingqi; Zhang, Qing

    2014-02-01

    Fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT-TF) based integrated circuits (ICs) on soft substrates has been challenging due to several processing-related obstacles, such as printed/transferred SWNT-TF pattern and electrode alignment, electrical pad/channel material/dielectric layer flatness, adherence of the circuits onto the soft substrates etc. Here, we report a new approach that circumvents these challenges by encapsulating pre-formed SWNT-TF-ICs on hard substrates into polyimide (PI) and peeling them off to form flexible ICs on a large scale. The flexible SWNT-TF-ICs show promising performance comparable to those circuits formed on hard substrates. The flexible p- and n-type SWNT-TF transistors have an average mobility of around 60 cm2 V-1 s-1, a subthreshold slope as low as 150 mV dec-1, operating gate voltages less than 2 V, on/off ratios larger than 104 and a switching speed of several kilohertz. The post-transfer technique described here is not only a simple and cost-effective pathway to realize scalable flexible ICs, but also a feasible method to fabricate flexible displays, sensors and solar cells etc.

  11. Environmental impact of pyrolysis of mixed WEEE plastics part 1: Experimental pyrolysis data.

    PubMed

    Alston, Sue M; Clark, Allan D; Arnold, J Cris; Stein, Bridget K

    2011-11-01

    Growth in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) is posing increasing problems of waste management, partly resulting from its plastic content. WEEE plastics include a range of polymers, some of which can be sorted and extracted for recycling. However a nonrecyclable fraction remains containing a mixture of polymers contaminated with other materials, and pyrolysis is a potential means of recovering the energy content of this. In preparation for a life cycle assessment of this option, described in part 2 of this paper set, data were collected from trials using experimental pyrolysis equipment representative of a continuous commercial process operated at 800 °C. The feedstock contained acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene and high impact polystyrene with high levels of additives, and dense polymers including polyvinylchloride, polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, and polymethyl methacrylate. On average 39% was converted to gases, 36% to oils, and 25% remained as residue. About 35% of the gas was methane and 42% carbon monoxide, plus other hydrocarbons, oxygen and carbon dioxide. The oils were almost all aromatic, forming a similar mixture to fuel oil. The residue was mainly carbon with inorganic compounds from the plastic additives and most of the chlorine from the feedstock. The results showed that the process produced around 70% of the original plastic weight as potential fuel.

  12. ENCAPSULATED AEROSOLS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    acetate, polymerized rapidly and produced some polymer film encapsulation of the aerosol droplets. A two-stage microcapsule generator was designed...encapsulating material, the generator also produced microcapsules of dibutyl phosphite in polyethylene, nitrocellulose, and natural rubber.

  13. Finite plasticity in \\varvec{P}^top \\varvec{P}. Part I: constitutive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grandi, Diego; Stefanelli, Ulisse

    2017-01-01

    We address a finite-plasticity model based on the symmetric tensor \\varvec{P}^top \\varvec{P} instead of the classical plastic strain \\varvec{P}. Such a structure arises by assuming that the material behavior is invariant with respect to frame transformations of the intermediate configuration. The resulting variational model is lower dimensional, symmetric and based solely on the reference configuration. We discuss the existence of energetic solutions at the material-point level as well as the convergence of time discretizations. The linearization of the model for small deformations is ascertained via a rigorous evolution-Γ -convergence argument. The constitutive model is combined with the equilibrium system in Part II where we prove the existence of quasistatic evolutions and ascertain the linearization limit (Grandi and Stefanelli in 2016).

  14. Final Rule to Reduce Toxic Air Pollutants from Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page contains an August 2004 fact sheet with information regarding the final NESHAP for Surface Coating of Plastic Parts and Products. This document provides a summary of the information for the information for this regulation.

  15. Encapsulation Processing and Manufacturing Yield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of the ethyl vinyl acetate (EVA) encapsulation system is presented. This work is part of the materials baseline needed to demonstrate a 30 year module lifetime capability. Process and compound variables are both being studied along with various module materials. Results have shown that EVA should be stored rolled up, and enclosed in a plastic bag to retard loss of peroxide curing agents. The TBEC curing agent has superior shelf life and processing than the earlier Lupersol-101 curing agent. Analytical methods were developed to test for peroxide content, and experimental methodologies were formalized.

  16. The Suitability of 3D Printed Plastic Parts for Laboratory Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Bloom, Josh; Albertson, Robert; Gershman, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    3D printing has become popular for a variety of users including scientists and engineers interested in producing their own laboratory equipment. Pearce and his group have tested a variety of different objects, developed a library of open-source files for printing optics equipment and found a cost savings of up to 97% compared to the equivalent objects purchased commercially. In order to determine the suitability of 3D printed parts for our plasma physics laboratory, we measured the accuracy, strength, vacuum compatibility, and electrical properties of test pieces printed in PLA plastic. For example, samples could be printed with a dimensional accuracy on the order of 50 μm and had an average tensile strength of 60 MPa, similar to bulk plastic. For pressures greater than 10-6 torr a residual gas analyzer showed no increase above background until samples were heated to greater than 75°C. While clearly not for all applications, the flexibility of rapidly creating custom parts has led to the 3D printer becoming an invaluable resource in our laboratory.

  17. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Martensitic Transformation During Hot Stamping of Complex Structure Auto Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yuhan; Song, Yanli; Hua, Lin; Lu, Jue

    2017-02-01

    The ultra-high strength steel auto parts manufactured by hot stamping are widely applied for weight reduction and safety improvement. During the hot stamping process, hot forming and quenching are performed in one step wherein plastic deformation and phase transformation simultaneously take place and affect each other. Thereinto, the influence of deformation on martensitic transformation is of great importance. In the present paper, the influence of plastic deformation on martensitic transformation during hot stamping of complex structure auto parts was investigated. For this purpose, a B-pillar reinforced panel in B1500HS steel was manufactured by hot stamping, and the process was simulated by finite element software based on a thermo-mechanical-metallurgical coupled model. Considering various deformation degrees, the microstructures and mechanical properties at four typical locations of the hot stamped B-pillar reinforced panel were detected. The results show that the martensitic content and the microhardness increase with the increase in the deformation amount. There are two reasons causing this phenomenon: (1) the increase in mechanical driving force and (2) the increased probability of the martensitic nucleation at crystal defects. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicates the carbon enrichment in retained austenite which results from the carbon diffusion during the low-carbon martensite formation. Furthermore, the carbon content decreases with the increase in the deformation amount, because the deformation of austenite suppresses the carbon diffusion.

  18. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1990-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  19. Staged mold for encapsulating hazardous wastes

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1988-01-01

    A staged mold for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  20. Microelectronics plastic molded packaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Peterson, D.W.

    1997-02-01

    The use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) microelectronics for nuclear weapon applications will soon be reality rather than hearsay. The use of COTS for new technologies for uniquely military applications is being driven by the so-called Perry Initiative that requires the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) to accept and utilize commercial standards for procurement of military systems. Based on this philosophy, coupled with several practical considerations, new weapons systems as well as future upgrades will contain plastic encapsulated microelectronics. However, a conservative Department of Energy (DOE) approach requires lifetime predictive models. Thus, the focus of the current project is on accelerated testing to advance current aging models as well as on the development of the methodology to be used during WR qualification of plastic encapsulated microelectronics. An additional focal point involves achieving awareness of commercial capabilities, materials, and processes. One of the major outcomes of the project has been the definition of proper techniques for handling and evaluation of modern surface mount parts which might be used in future systems. This program is also raising the familiarity level of plastic within the weapons complex, allowing subsystem design rules accommodating COTS to evolve. A two year program plan is presented along with test results and commercial interactions during this first year.

  1. A Study of Notch Fatigue. Part III. Plastic Stress Analysis of Notches.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    3793 4 -I 1.5798,I0 N 4. 2.4Z94910’Nq (61a) U - -1( - 4.gI ;XIQ" N 4- 2.429(,X IO"S N o6 (61lb) At the next station and all remaining stations, xt...AD.0111 758 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/B 20/11 A STUDY OF NOTCH FATIGUE. PART III. PLASTIC STRESS ANALYSIS OF -ETC( U ) SEP 81 6 H LINDSEY...de It noeooeM and idemtify by Week mwkor) The stress and strain behavior at notch tips is analyzed with the view of using local values for fatigue

  2. PRESAGETM - Development and optimization studies of a 3D radiochromic plastic dosimeter - Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovics, J.; Guo, P.; Burgess, D.; Manzoor, A.; Oldham, M.

    2006-12-01

    In a previous paper we described the evaluation of seven different transparent plastics as dosimeter matrices along with six different leuco dyes as the radiochromic agent. Here we present the evaluation of the dosimeter sensitivity and post irradiation stability of an additional plastic matrix and five different leuco dyes.

  3. Catalytic thermal cracking of post-consumer waste plastics to fuels: Part 1 - Kinetics and optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to investigate thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of waste plastics such as prescription bottles (polypropylene/PP), high density polyethylene, landfill liners (polyethylene/PE), packing materials (polystyrene/PS), and foams (polyurethane/PU) into crude plastic...

  4. Are plastic heat exchangers feasible for solar water heaters? Part 2: Material choices

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, R.; Mantell, S.; Davidson, J.

    1999-07-01

    Development of low cost plastic heat exchangers for solar water heating depends, at least in part, on the suitability of polymers for this demanding environment. Since the heat exchanger is in contact with pressurized potable water, some technical issues must be addressed that are not necessarily relevant to the development of polymer-based collectors. These include long-term pressure and temperature capabilities; compatibility with municipal drinking water and propylene glycol, and compliance with applicable plumbing codes. In this paper, polymers that are most appropriate for this application are identified. Because polymer strength, stiffness, and thermal conductivity requirements depend on the heat exchanger design, no single polymer emerged as ideal for every heat exchanger component. Fiber reinforced PolyPhthalAmide (PPA) and PolyPhenylene Sulphide (PPS) are recommended for fittings and manifolds. Unreinforced high temperature nylon (HTN) is recommended for thin walled tubes (either straight or coiled). Cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) is also recommended for coiled tubes. The selection process was based on three criteria levels: (1) polymer compatibility with potable water, (2) polymer behavior in hot water or propylene glycol, and (3) polymer attributes such as strength, stiffness, thermal conductivity and cost.

  5. Plastic Surgery Training Worldwide: Part 1. The United States and Europe

    PubMed Central

    Kamali, Parisa; van Paridon, Maaike W.; Ibrahim, Ahmed M. S.; Paul, Marek A.; Winters, Henri A.; Martinot-Duquennoy, Veronique; Noah, Ernst Magnus; Pallua, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Background: Major differences exist in residency training, and the structure and quality of residency programs differ between different countries and teaching centers. It is of vital importance that a better understanding of the similarities and differences in plastic surgery training be ascertained as a means of initiating constructive discussion and commentary among training programs worldwide. In this study, the authors provide an overview of plastic surgery training in the United States and Europe. Methods: A survey was sent to select surgeons in 10 European countries that were deemed to be regular contributors to the plastic surgery literature. The questions focused on pathway to plastic surgery residency, length of training, required pretraining experience, training scheme, research opportunities, and examinations during and after plastic surgery residency. Results: Plastic surgery residency training programs in the United States differ from the various (selected) countries in Europe and are described in detail. Conclusions: Plastic surgery education is vastly different between the United States and Europe, and even within Europe, training programs remain heterogeneous. Standardization of curricula across the different countries would improve the interaction of different centers and facilitate the exchange of vital information for quality control and future improvements. The unique characteristics of the various training programs potentially provide a basis from which to learn and to gain from one another. PMID:27257571

  6. On the buckling of bars and plates in the plastic range. Part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benthem, J P

    1956-01-01

    A review is made of existing literature concerning comparison with experiment of various theoretical formulas for buckling of plates in the plastic region. The significance and relative merits of various theories are discussed.

  7. On the Taylor test, Part 3: A continuum mechanics code analysis of steady plastic wave propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Maudlin, P.J.; Foster, J.C. Jr.; Jones, S.E.

    1994-11-01

    Simple conservation relationships (``Jump`` conditions) in conjunction with postulated material constitutive behavior are applied to steady plastic strain waves propagating in problems of uniaxial stress and Taylor Cylinder Impact. These problems are simulated with a two-dimensional Lagrangian continuum mechanics code for numerically validating the Jump relationships as an accurate analytical representation of plastic wave propagation. The constitutive behavior used in this effort assumes isotropy and models the thermodynamic response with a Mie-Grunisen Equation-of-State and the mechanical response with the rate-dependent Johnson-Cook and MTS flow stress models. The Jump relationships successfully replicate the results produced by continuum code simulations of plastic wave propagation and provide a methodology for constructing mechanical constitutive models from experimental plastic wave speed information. Comparisons are also presented between experimental speeds from Taylor Cylinder Impact tests with Jump relationships and continuum code predictions, indicating that the above mentioned flow stress models may not accurately capture plastic wave propagation speeds in annealed and hardened copper.

  8. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites: Plasticity and damage mechanisms, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The inelastic deformation mechanisms for the SiC (SCS-6)/Ti-15-3 system were studied at 538 C (1000 F) using a combination of mechanical measurements and detailed microstructural examinations. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall MMC response, and to compare the room temperature and elevated temperature deformation behaviors. Four different laminates were studied: (0)8, (90)8,(+ or -45)2s, and (0/90)2s, with the primary emphasis on the unidirectional (0)8, and (90)8 systems. The elevated temperature responses were similar to those at room temperature, involving a two-stage elastic-plastic type of response for the (0)8 system, and a characteristic three-stage deformation response for the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s systems. The primary effects of elevated temperatures included: (1) reduction in the 'yield' and failure strengths; (2) plasticity through diffused slip rather than concentrated planar slip (which occurred at room temperature); and (3) time-dependent deformation. The inelastic deformation mechanism for the (0)8 MMC was dominated by plasticity at both temperatures. For the (90)8 and (+ or -45)2s MMCs, a combination of damage and plasticity contributed to the deformation at both temperatures.

  9. Inelastic Deformation of Metal Matrix Composites. Part 1; Plasticity and Damage Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. S.; Newaz, G. M.

    1992-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a Ti 15-3/SCS6 (SiC fiber) metal matrix composite (MMC) were investigated using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis. The objectives were to evaluate the contributions of plasticity and damage to the overall inelastic response, and to confirm the mechanisms by rigorous microstructural evaluations. The results of room temperature experiments performed on 0 degree and 90 degree systems primarily are reported in this report. Results of experiments performed on other laminate systems and at high temperatures will be provided in a forthcoming report. Inelastic deformation of the 0 degree MMC (fibers parallel to load direction) was dominated by the plasticity of the matrix. In contrast, inelastic deformations of the 90 degree composite (fibers perpendicular to loading direction) occurred by both damage and plasticity. The predictions of a continuum elastic plastic model were compared with experimental data. The model was adequate for predicting the 0 degree response; however, it was inadequate for predicting the 90 degree response largely because it neglected damage. The importance of validating constitutive models using a combination of mechanical measurements and microstructural analysis is pointed out. The deformation mechanisms, and the likely sequence of events associated with the inelastic deformation of MMCs, are indicated in this paper.

  10. PRESAGETM - Development and optimization studies of a 3D radiochromic plastic dosimeter - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamovics, J.; Jordan, K.; Dietrich, J.

    2006-12-01

    This paper studies the polymerization of six different transparent plastics as potential 3D dosimeter matrices. In addition, six different leuco dyes and sixteen different free radical initiators were evaluated. Finally, the photoreactivity of the dosimeter was studied so that the effect of exposure to UV could be minimized.

  11. Mitigating cutting-induced plasticity in the contour method, Part 2: Numerical analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Muránsky, O.; Hamelin, C. J.; Hosseinzadeh, F.; ...

    2016-02-10

    Cutting-induced plasticity can have a significant effect on the measurement accuracy of the contour method. The present study examines the benefit of a double-embedded cutting configuration that relies on self-restraint of the specimen, relative to conventional edge-crack cutting configurations. A series of finite element analyses are used to simulate the planar sectioning performed during double-embedded and conventional edge-crack contour cutting configurations. The results of numerical analyses are first compared to measured results to validate the cutting simulations. The simulations are then used to compare the efficacy of different cutting configurations by predicting the deviation of the residual stress profile frommore » an original (pre-cutting) reference stress field, and the extent of cutting-induced plasticity. Comparisons reveal that while the double-embedded cutting configuration produces the most accurate residual stress measurements, the highest levels of plastic flow are generated in this process. As a result, this cutting-induced plastic deformation is, however, largely confined to small ligaments formed as a consequence of the sample sectioning process, and as such it does not significantly affect the back-calculated residual stress field.« less

  12. Mitigating cutting-induced plasticity in the contour method, Part 2: Numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Muránsky, O.; Hamelin, C. J.; Hosseinzadeh, F.; Prime, M. B.

    2016-02-10

    Cutting-induced plasticity can have a significant effect on the measurement accuracy of the contour method. The present study examines the benefit of a double-embedded cutting configuration that relies on self-restraint of the specimen, relative to conventional edge-crack cutting configurations. A series of finite element analyses are used to simulate the planar sectioning performed during double-embedded and conventional edge-crack contour cutting configurations. The results of numerical analyses are first compared to measured results to validate the cutting simulations. The simulations are then used to compare the efficacy of different cutting configurations by predicting the deviation of the residual stress profile from an original (pre-cutting) reference stress field, and the extent of cutting-induced plasticity. Comparisons reveal that while the double-embedded cutting configuration produces the most accurate residual stress measurements, the highest levels of plastic flow are generated in this process. As a result, this cutting-induced plastic deformation is, however, largely confined to small ligaments formed as a consequence of the sample sectioning process, and as such it does not significantly affect the back-calculated residual stress field.

  13. Processing Ultra Fine Grained Net-Shaped MEMS Parts Using Severe Plastic Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Raab, Georgy I.; Estrin, Yuri; Zi, Aikaterini; Janecek, Milos

    2007-04-07

    This paper presents the results of investigation of the process of severe plastic deformation by means of ECAP method for producing the mini billets of pure aluminium. The strain state of the process and peculiarities of structure formation have been studied. The achieved results testify to the high efficiency of the process.

  14. Method for encapsulating hazardous wastes using a staged mold

    DOEpatents

    Unger, Samuel L.; Telles, Rodney W.; Lubowitz, Hyman R.

    1989-01-01

    A staged mold and method for stabilizing hazardous wastes for final disposal by molding an agglomerate of the hazardous wastes and encapsulating the agglomerate. Three stages are employed in the process. In the first stage, a first mold body is positioned on a first mold base, a mixture of the hazardous wastes and a thermosetting plastic is loaded into the mold, the mixture is mechanically compressed, heat is applied to cure the mixture to form a rigid agglomerate, and the first mold body is removed leaving the agglomerate sitting on the first mold base. In the second stage, a clamshell second mold body is positioned around the agglomerate and the first mold base, a powdered thermoplastic resin is poured on top of the agglomerate and in the gap between the sides of the agglomerate and the second mold body, the thermoplastic is compressed, heat is applied to melt the thermoplastic, and the plastic is cooled jacketing the agglomerate on the top and sides. In the third stage, the mold with the jacketed agglomerate is inverted, the first mold base is removed exposing the former bottom of the agglomerate, powdered thermoplastic is poured over the former bottom, the first mold base is replaced to compress the thermoplastic, heat is applied to melt the new thermoplastic and the top part of the jacket on the sides, the plastic is cooled jacketing the bottom and fusing with the jacketing on the sides to complete the seamless encapsulation of the agglomerate.

  15. The exponentiated Hencky-logarithmic strain energy: part III—coupling with idealized multiplicative isotropic finite strain plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Patrizio; Ghiba, Ionel-Dumitrel

    2016-03-01

    We investigate an immediate application in finite strain multiplicative plasticity of the family of isotropic volumetric-isochoric decoupled strain energies F mapsto W_eH(F):= widehat{W}_eH(U) := μ/k e^{k | dev_n log {U}|^2}+κ/2 {widehat{k}} e^{widehat{k} [ tr(log U)]^2}&quad if& det F > 0, + ∞ & quad if & det F ≤ 0, based on the Hencky-logarithmic (true, natural) strain tensor {log U} . Here, {μ > 0} is the infinitesimal shear modulus, {κ=2 μ+3λ/3 > 0} is the infinitesimal bulk modulus with λ the first Lamé constant, {k,widehat{k}} are additional dimensionless material parameters, {F=nabla \\varphi} is the gradient of deformation, {U=√{F^T F}} is the right stretch tensor, and dev n {log {U} =log {U}-1/n tr(log {U})\\cdot{1}} is the deviatoric part of the strain tensor {log U} . Based on the multiplicative decomposition {F=F_e F_p} , we couple these energies with some isotropic elasto-plastic flow rules {F_p {dt}/[F_p^{-1}]in-partial χ(dev_3 Σe)} defined in the plastic distortion F p , where {partial χ} is the subdifferential of the indicator function {χ} of the convex elastic domain {E_e({Σe},1/3{σ}_{y}^2)} in the mixed-variant {Σe} -stress space, {Σe=F_e^T D_{F_e}W_iso(F_e)} , and {W_iso(F_e)} represents the isochoric part of the energy. While {W_eH} may loose ellipticity, we show that loss of ellipticity is effectively prevented by the coupling with plasticity, since the ellipticity domain of {W_eH} on the one hand and the elastic domain in {Σe} -stress space on the other hand are closely related. Thus, the new formulation remains elliptic in elastic unloading at any given plastic predeformation. In addition, in this domain, the true stress-true strain relation remains monotone, as observed in experiments.

  16. A assessment of the plastic Thermafil obturation technique. Part 1. Radiographic evaluation of adaptation and placement.

    PubMed

    Gutmann, J L; Saunders, W P; Saunders, E M; Nguyen, L

    1993-05-01

    Adaptation and placement of alpha-phase gutta-percha delivered with a plastic core-carrier, Thermafil, was compared to the lateral condensation of gutta-percha in a specific tooth model. Fifty-one mandibular molar roots with separate canals, patent canal orifices and curvatures greater than 15 degrees were cleaned and shaped with K-files and 2.5% sodium hypochlorite to a size 30 at the apex, and flared with Hedstrom files to create a continuously tapering funnel preparation. Canals were randomly obturated with Sealapex root canal sealer and either alpha-phase gutta-percha on a plastic Thermafil carrier, or standard beta-phase gutta-percha with lateral condensation. Roots were radiographed from the proximal and evaluated by three examiners, based on established criteria for overall material adaptation, apical adaptation, and filling material extrusion. Thermafil provided a statistically significant better overall canal obturation (P < 0.001), while, in the apical third, both techniques were not significantly different (P > 0.05). When the apical orifice was patent there was a significant propensity for the extrusion of filling materials beyond the apex (P < 0.001) with the Thermafil technique.

  17. Development of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, degradable polymeric carrier for osteogenic cell populations. Part 3. Proliferation and differentiation of encapsulated marrow stromal osteoblasts cultured on crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate).

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard G; McGonigle, Joseph S; Yaszemski, Michael J; Yasko, Alan W; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporary encapsulation of rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in crosslinked gelatin microparticles on long-term cell proliferation and phenotypic expression for microparticles placed on crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composites using N-vinyl pyrollidinone (N-VP) as a crosslinking agent over a 28 day time period. Encapsulated cells (ECs) were seeded on actively crosslinking PPF composites 6 min after initiation of the crosslinking reaction, and also on fully crosslinked PPF composites and tissue culture polystyrene controls, with a cell seeding density of 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm2. Composites prepared with three PPF:N-VP ratios were examined: 1:0.5, 1:0.1, and 1:0.05. Samples were taken at specified time points and analyzed by DNA, 3H-thymidine, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and calcium assays, and the measurements were compared with those for nonencapsulated cells (NCs). The results showed that encapsulated marrow stromal cells exhibited much higher viability, proliferation, and phenotypic expression when placed on crosslinking PPF composites than NCs. The assay results for ECs on crosslinking PPF composites were also similar to those on fully crosslinked PPF composites. The data further demonstrated that the PPF:N-VP ratio had no effect on the viability, proliferation, or phenotypic expression of the ECs. These results suggest that cells encapsulated in crosslinked gelatin microparticles may be part of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, biodegradable polymeric composite for bone tissue engineering applications.

  18. Development of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, degradable polymeric carrier for osteogenic cell populations. Part 1. Encapsulation of marrow stromal osteoblasts in surface crosslinked gelatin microparticles.

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard G; Yaszemski, Michael J; Yasko, Alan W; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated the temporary encapsulation of rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in surface crosslinked gelatin microparticles. Cells were encapsulated in uncrosslinked gelatin microparticles of average diameter of 630 microm containing approximately 53 cells. Gelatin microparticles were crosslinked to shell thicknesses of approximately 75 microm via exposure to 1 mM dithiobis(succinimidylpropionate) (DSP) solution for 15 min or 5 mm DSP solution for 5 min for the production of microparticles dispersing approximately 60 min after placement into a physiologic fluid at 37 degrees C. Formed microparticles were placed into culture wells at a cell seeding density of 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm2 and, following the degradation and/or dissolution of gelatin, the cells were cultured in the presence of osteogenic supplements for 28 days. Samples were taken at specified time points and analyzed by a DNA assay for cell number and a 3H-thymidine incorporation assay for proliferative potential. Samples were also obtained and analyzed at several time points by alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and mineralization assays for early and late phenotypic expression markers of osteoblastic differentiation. The measurements from the different assays for encapsulated cells (EC) in uncrosslinked and crosslinked gelatin microparticles were normalized with the cell numbers from the DNA assay and compared with those for nonencapsulated control cells. The results demonstrated that the marrow stromal cells survived the encapsulation procedure in uncrosslinked gelatin microparticles and also retained their proliferative potential and osteoblastic phenotype over a 28 day period, although at a slightly lower level than the nonencapsulated cells. The results further showed that the marrow stromal cells survived the encapsulation in crosslinked gelatin microparticles prepared via exposure to 5mm DSP for 5 min and also retained their proliferative potential and osteoblastic phenotype over a 28 day

  19. Module encapsulation technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    The identification and development techniques for low-cost module encapsulation materials were reviewed. Test results were displayed for a variety of materials. The improved prospects for modeling encapsulation systems for life prediction were reported.

  20. Encapsulation of CO2 into amorphous alpha-cyclodextrin powder at different moisture contents - Part 2: Characterization of complexed powders and determination of crystalline structure.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thao M; Howes, Tony; Jack, Kevin S; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize CO2-α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) inclusion complexes produced from amorphous α-CD powder at moisture contents (MC) close to or higher than the critical level of crystallization (e.g. 13, 15 and 17% MC on wet basis, w.b.) at 0.4 and 1.6MPa pressure for 72h. The results of (13)C NMR, SEM, DSC and X-ray analyses showed that these MC levels were high enough to induce crystallization of CO2-α-CD complexed powders during encapsulation, by which amount of CO2 encapsulated by amorphous α-CD powder was significantly increased. The formation of inclusion complexes were well confirmed by results of FTIR and (13)C NMR analyses through an appearance of a peak associated with CO2 on the FTIR (2334cm(-1)) and NMR (125.3ppm) spectra. Determination of crystal packing patterns of CO2-α-CD complexed powders showed that during crystallization, α-CD molecules were arranged in cage-type structure in which CO2 molecules were entrapped in isolated cavities.

  1. Cell encapsulation via microtechnologies.

    PubMed

    Kang, AhRan; Park, JiSoo; Ju, Jongil; Jeong, Gi Seok; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2014-03-01

    The encapsulation of living cells in a variety of soft polymers or hydrogels is important, particularly, for the rehabilitation of functional tissues capable of repairing or replacing damaged organs. Cellular encapsulation segregates cells from the surrounding tissue to protect the implanted cell from the recipient's immune system after transplantation. Diverse hydrogel membranes have been popularly used as encapsulating materials and permit the diffusion of gas, nutrients, wastes and therapeutic products smoothly. This review describes a variety of methods that have been developed to achieve cellular encapsulation using microscale platform. Microtechnologies have been adopted to precisely control the encapsulated cell number, size and shape of a cell-laden polymer structure. We provide a brief overview of recent microtechnology-based cell encapsulation methods, with a detailed description of the relevant processes. Finally, we discuss the current challenges and future directions likely to be taken by cell microencapsulation approaches toward tissue engineering and cell therapy applications.

  2. Germanium detector vacuum encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, N. W.; Malone, D. F.; Pehl, R. H.; Cork, C. P.; Luke, P. N.; Landis, D. A.; Pollard, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an encapsulation technology that should significantly improve the viability of germanium gamma-ray detectors for a number of important applications. A specialized vacuum chamber has been constructed in which the detector and the encapsulating module are processed in high vacuum. Very high vacuum conductance is achieved within the valveless encapsulating module. The detector module is then sealed without breaking the chamber vacuum. The details of the vacuum chamber, valveless module, processing, and sealing method are presented.

  3. Solar cell encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Amitava (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor); Yavrouian, Andre H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A polymer syrup for encapsulating solar cell assemblies. The syrup includes uncrosslinked poly(n-butyl)acrylate dissolved in n-butyl acrylate monomer. Preparation of the poly(n-butyl)acrylate and preparation of the polymer syrup is disclosed. Methods for applying the polymer syrup to solar cell assemblies as an encapsulating pottant are described. Also included is a method for solar cell construction utilizing the polymer syrup as a dual purpose adhesive and encapsulating material.

  4. Characterization Methods of Encapsulates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhibing; Law, Daniel; Lian, Guoping

    Food active ingredients can be encapsulated by different processes, including spray drying, spray cooling, spray chilling, spinning disc and centrifugal co-extrusion, extrusion, fluidized bed coating and coacervation (see Chap. 2 of this book). The purpose of encapsulation is often to stabilize an active ingredient, control its release rate and/or convert a liquid formulation into a solid which is easier to handle. A range of edible materials can be used as shell materials of encapsulates, including polysaccharides, fats, waxes and proteins (see Chap. 3 of this book). Encapsulates for typical industrial applications can vary from several microns to several millimetres in diameter although there is an increasing interest in preparing nano-encapsulates. Encapsulates are basically particles with a core-shell structure, but some of them can have a more complex structure, e.g. in a form of multiple cores embedded in a matrix. Particles have physical, mechanical and structural properties, including particle size, size distribution, morphology, surface charge, wall thickness, mechanical strength, glass transition temperature, degree of crystallinity, flowability and permeability. Information about the properties of encapsulates is very important to understanding their behaviours in different environments, including their manufacturing processes and end-user applications. E.g. encapsulates for most industrial applications should have desirable mechanical strength, which should be strong enough to withstand various mechanical forces generated in manufacturing processes, such as mixing, pumping, extrusion, etc., and may be required to be weak enough in order to release the encapsulated active ingredients by mechanical forces at their end-user applications, such as release rate of flavour by chewing. The mechanical strength of encapsulates and release rate of their food actives are related to their size, morphology, wall thickness, chemical composition, structure etc. Hence

  5. Are plastic heat exchangers feasible for solar water heaters? Part 1: A review of the technology, codes and standards, and commercial products

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.; Oberreit, D.; Liu, W.; Mantell, S.

    1999-07-01

    As a first step toward assessing the possibility of using plastic heat exchangers in solar water heating systems, the authors present product design specifications for water-to-water and antifreeze-to-water heat exchangers, review the plumbing codes and standards as they apply to use of heat exchangers and polymer components, and discuss the suitability of commercially available plastic heat exchangers. Analysis of overall heat transfer shows that a counterflow, tube-in-shell heat exchanger made of thin wall plastic tubes is capable of meeting the thermal requirements of a solar water heating system with less than a 50% increase in heat transfer surface area compared to a commercial copper heat exchanger. The plumbing codes allow use of approved polymer heat exchangers or piping in domestic solar water heating systems. Single wall heat exchangers can be used with a non-toxic heat transfer fluid, such as propylene glycol. Unfortunately, commercially available plastic heat exchangers are either prohibitively expensive, too small, or incapable of withstanding the pressure and temperature requirements of this application. A review of polymer materials for this application is given in part 2 of this paper.

  6. Thermoplastic encapsulation of waste surrogates by high-shear mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Lageraaen, P.R.; Kalb, P.D.; Patel, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a robust, extrusion-based polyethylene encapsulation process applicable to a wide range of solid and aqueous low-level radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. However, due to the broad range of physical and chemical properties of waste materials, pretreatment of these wastes is often required to make them amenable to processing with polyethylene. As part of the scope of work identified in FY95 {open_quotes}Removal and Encapsulation of Heavy Metals from Ground Water,{close_quotes} EPA SERDP No. 387, that specifies a review of potential thermoplastic processing techniques, and in order to investigate possible pretreatment alternatives, BNL conducted a vendor test of the Draiswerke Gelimat (thermokinetic) mixer on April 25, 1995 at their test facility in Mahwah, NJ. The Gelimat is a batch operated, high-shear, high-intensity fluxing mixer that is often used for mixing various materials and specifically in the plastics industry for compounding additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers.

  7. Ultrasonic encapsulation - A review.

    PubMed

    Leong, Thomas S H; Martin, Gregory J O; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2017-03-01

    Encapsulation of materials in particles dispersed in water has many applications in nutritional foods, imaging, energy production and therapeutic/diagnostic medicine. Ultrasonic technology has been proven effective at creating encapsulating particles and droplets with specific physical and functional properties. Examples include highly stable emulsions, functional polymeric particles with environmental sensitivity, and microspheres for encapsulating drugs for targeted delivery. This article provides an overview of the primary mechanisms arising from ultrasonics responsible for the formation of these materials, highlighting examples that show promise particularly in the development of foods and bioproducts.

  8. Y-12 Development Organization technical progress report period ending March 1, 1995. Part 5, Ceramics/plastics/carbon materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Northcutt, W.G. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    The preparation of small-scale-Production crucibles by plasma-spraying of TRIBOCOR onto niobium is continuing. Microwave heat-treatment of this size crucible has been demonstrated successfully. Conventional plasma-spray coating appears to offer advantages over ``vacuum`` plasma-spraying for preparing the coatings. Encapsulant/stucco ``shells`` for ``casketing`` boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) or silicon carbide (SiC) results in consistent attainment of the necessary {ge}2100C processing temperatures for these nonoxide materials. Gelcasting is an excellent technique for making shapes with both B{sub 4}C and SiC. Tiles of B{sub 4}C were prepared and will be microwave sintered soon.

  9. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 1; Stringer-Feet Imperfections and Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Song, Kyongchan; Elliott, Kenny B.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Warren, Jerry E.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear stress analyses are performed for the external hat-shaped stringers (or stiffeners) on the intertank portion of the Space Shuttle s external tank. These stringers are subjected to assembly strains when the stringers are initially installed on an intertank panel. Four different stringer-feet configurations including the baseline flat-feet, the heels-up, the diving-board, and the toes-up configurations are considered. The assembly procedure is analytically simulated for each of these stringer configurations. The location, size, and amplitude of the strain field associated with the stringer assembly are sensitive to the assumed geometry and assembly procedure. The von Mises stress distributions from these simulations indicate that localized plasticity will develop around the first eight fasteners for each stringer-feet configuration examined. However, only the toes-up configuration resulted in high assembly hoop strains.

  10. Elastic-Plastic Nonlinear Response of a Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer. Part 2; Thermal and Mechanical Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Warren, Jerry E.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Song, Kyongchan; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2012-01-01

    Elastic-plastic, large-deflection nonlinear thermo-mechanical stress analyses are performed for the Space Shuttle external tank s intertank stringers. Detailed threedimensional finite element models are developed and used to investigate the stringer s elastic-plastic response for different thermal and mechanical loading events from assembly through flight. Assembly strains caused by initial installation on an intertank panel are accounted for in the analyses. Thermal loading due to tanking was determined to be the bounding loading event. The cryogenic shrinkage caused by tanking resulted in a rotation of the intertank chord flange towards the center of the intertank, which in turn loaded the intertank stringer feet. The analyses suggest that the strain levels near the first three fasteners remain sufficiently high that a failure may occur. The analyses also confirmed that the installation of radius blocks on the stringer feet ends results in an increase in the stringer capability.

  11. Encapsulation with structured triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipids provide excellent materials to encapsulate bioactive compounds for food and pharmaceutical applications. Lipids are renewable, biodegradable, and easily modified to provide additional chemical functionality. The use of structured lipids that have been modified with photoactive properties are ...

  12. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOEpatents

    Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2013-11-12

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  13. Damage effect on the fracture toughness of nodular cast iron: Part I. Damage characterization and plastic flow stress modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, M. J.; Prioul, C.; François, D.

    1997-11-01

    After chemical, morphological, and mechanical characterization of ductile cast iron, the damage mechanisms were studied by tensile tests inside the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The evolutions of Young’s modulus and of Poisson’s ratio were measured in uniaxial tensile tests. Compression tests were used to measure the pressure sensitivity coefficient of the flow stress. The damage is produced by early initiation of cavities at the pole cap of graphite nodules by debonding of the interface, followed by the growth of cavities. The mechanical behavior was modeled in the elastic region by calculating the Hashin-Shtrickman bounds. This provided the elastic constants for the graphite nodules. The plastic behavior was modeled by considering that the graphite nodules were replaced by voids. The critical interfacial stress for debonding was determined by analytical as well as by finite-element calculations. The growth rate of cavities was deduced from the evolution of the Poisson’s ratio and was compared with predictions from Gurson’s potential. The stress-strain behavior could be modeled either by extension of the Mori-Tanaka analysis in the plastic range or by finite-element computations. This allowed a fair prediction of the observed behavior.

  14. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Plastic Surgery KidsHealth > For Teens > Plastic Surgery Print A ... her forehead lightened with a laser? What Is Plastic Surgery? Just because the name includes the word " ...

  15. Review of encapsulation technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Shaulis, L.

    1996-09-01

    The use of encapsulation technology to produce a compliant waste form is an outgrowth from existing polymer industry technology and applications. During the past 12 years, the Department of Energy (DOE) has been researching the use of this technology to treat mixed wastes (i.e., containing hazardous and radioactive wastes). The two primary encapsulation techniques are microencapsulation and macroencapsulation. Microencapsulation is the thorough mixing of a binding agent with a powdered waste, such as incinerator ash. Macroencapsulation coats the surface of bulk wastes, such as lead debris. Cement, modified cement, and polyethylene are the binding agents which have been researched the most. Cement and modified cement have been the most commonly used binding agents to date. However, recent research conducted by DOE laboratories have shown that polyethylene is more durable and cost effective than cements. The compressive strength, leachability, resistance to chemical degradation, etc., of polyethylene is significantly greater than that of cement and modified cement. Because higher waste loads can be used with polyethylene encapsulant, the total cost of polyethylene encapsulation is significantly less costly than cement treatment. The only research lacking in the assessment of polyethylene encapsulation treatment for mixed wastes is pilot and full-scale testing with actual waste materials. To date, only simulated wastes have been tested. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site had planned to conduct pilot studies using actual wastes during 1996. This experiment should provide similar results to the previous tests that used simulated wastes. If this hypothesis is validated as anticipated, it will be clear that polyethylene encapsulation should be pursued by DOE to produce compliant waste forms.

  16. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    Encapsulation materials for solar cells were investigated. The different phases consisted of: (1) identification and development of low cost module encapsulation materials; (2) materials reliability examination; and (3) process sensitivity and process development. It is found that outdoor photothermal aging devices (OPT) are the best accelerated aging methods, simulate worst case field conditions, evaluate formulation and module performance and have a possibility for life assessment. Outdoor metallic copper exposure should be avoided, self priming formulations have good storage stability, stabilizers enhance performance, and soil resistance treatment is still effective.

  17. Stretchability of encapsulated electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Liu, Z. J.; Song, J.; Huang, Y.; Hwang, K.-C.; Zhang, Y. W.; Rogers, J. A.

    2011-08-01

    Stretchable and flexible electronics offer the performance of conventional wafer-based systems but can be stretched like a rubber band, twisted like a rope, and bent over a pencil. Such a technology offers new application opportunities, in areas of surgical and diagnostic implements that naturally integrate with the human body to provide advanced capabilities, to curvilinear devices such as hemispherical "eyeball" cameras. In practice, stretchable and flexible electronic systems require encapsulation layers to provide mechanical and environmental protection. This paper establishes a simple, analytical model for the optimal design of encapsulation.

  18. Encapsulation materials research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1985-01-01

    The successful use of outdoor mounting racks as an accelerated aging technique (these devices are called optal reactors); a beginning list of candidate pottant materials for thin-film encapsulation, which process at temperatures well below 100 C; and description of a preliminary flame retardant formulation for ethylene vinyl acetate which could function to increase module flammability ratings are presented.

  19. Wet Winding Improves Coil Encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    Wet-winding process encapsulates electrical coils more uniformily than conventional processes. Process requires no vacuum pump and adapts easily to existing winding machines. Encapsulant applied to each layer of wire as soon as added to coil. Wet-winding process eliminates voids, giving more uniformly encapsulated coil.

  20. Comparison between Palm Oil Derivative and Commercial Thermo-Plastic Binder System on the Properties of the Stainless Steel 316L Sintered Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, R.; Azmirruddin, M.; Wei, G. C.; Fong, L. K.; Abdullah, N. I.; Omar, K.; Muhamad, M.; Muhamad, S.

    2010-03-01

    Binder system is one of the most important criteria for the powder injection molding (PIM) process. Failure in the selection of the binder system will affect on the final properties of the sintered parts. The objectives of this studied is to develop a novel binder system based on the local natural resources and environmental friendly binder system from palm oil derivative which is easily available and cheap in our country of Malaysia. The novel binder that has been developed will be replaced the commercial thermo-plastic binder system or as an alternative binder system. The results show that the physical and mechanical properties of the final sintered parts fulfill the Metal Powder Industries Federation (MPIF) standard 35 for PIM parts. The biocompatibility test using cell osteosarcoma (MG63) and vero fibroblastic also shows that the cell was successfully growth on the sintered stainless steel 316L parts indicate that the novel binder was not toxic. Therefore, the novel binder system based on palm oil derivative that has been developed as a binder system fulfills the important criteria for the binder system in PIM process.

  1. Biaxial ratcheting and cyclic plasticity for Bree-type loading. Part 2: Comparison between finite element analysis and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nadarajah, C.; Ng, H.W.

    1996-05-01

    In Part 1 of this two part (Ng and Nadarajah, 1996), the results of an extensive program of finite element analyses were described. The problem being considered is the phenomenon of ratcheting and cyclic stress-strain hysteresis loop behavior in a thin-walled cylinder subject to cyclic thermal stress and sustained internal pressure. The purpose of Part 2 is to compare the finite element results with two analytical solutions and review the applicability of the latter as a design procedure for assessment of these types of structures. The comparison shows that the ratcheting to shake-down boundaries based on F.E. and analytical models are in close agreement. The hoop ratcheting rates predicted by the uniaxial model enveloped the F.E. and biaxial models, while for the axial ratcheting rates, the F.E. results are upper bound.

  2. New frontiers for encapsulation in the chemical industry.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Brenda; Song, Ziyuan; Li, Jun; Zimmerman, Steven C; Cheng, Jianjun; Moore, Jeffrey S; Harris, Keith; Katz, Joshua S

    2015-04-01

    Encapsulation of actives comprises an area of exploration undergoing rapid growth in both academic and industrial research settings. Encapsulation processes are employed as a part of product synthesis processes for improved efficiency, enhanced stability, active ingredient compatibility, increased safety, targeted delivery, and novel performance of the end product. Such technical benefits enable producers to offer products with increased formulation complexity, access new markets, differentiate products, and improve compatibility and stability, while meeting consumer demands with improved performance, reduced costs, and new actives. In this review, we highlight several emerging academic areas of encapsulation that we believe have specific relevance to industrial formulation, with a focus on three primary areas: supramolecular encapsulation, aqueous self-assembled systems, and emulsion-based capsules. The goal of this review is to help identify the major challenges facing encapsulation technology adoption in the chemical industry, bringing focus and maximizing the potential value of ongoing research efforts.

  3. High-Performance CCSDS Encapsulation Service Implementation in FPGA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clare, Loren P.; Torgerson, Jordan L.; Pang, Jackson

    2010-01-01

    The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) Encapsulation Service is a convergence layer between lower-layer space data link framing protocols, such as CCSDS Advanced Orbiting System (AOS), and higher-layer networking protocols, such as CFDP (CCSDS File Delivery Protocol) and Internet Protocol Extension (IPE). CCSDS Encapsulation Service is considered part of the data link layer. The CCSDS AOS implementation is described in the preceding article. Recent advancement in RF modem technology has allowed multi-megabit transmission over space links. With this increase in data rate, the CCSDS Encapsulation Service needs to be optimized to both reduce energy consumption and operate at a high rate. CCSDS Encapsulation Service has been implemented as an intellectual property core so that the aforementioned problems are solved by way of operating the CCSDS Encapsulation Service inside an FPGA. The CCSDS En capsula tion Service in FPGA implementation consists of both packetizing and de-packetizing features

  4. Photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baum, B.; Willis, P. W.; Cuddihy, E. C.

    1981-01-01

    Candidate materials for the construction of cost-effective solar cell flat array modules are reviewed. Fabrication goals include electricity production at $.70/W with a lifetime of 20 yr. Research is currently directed toward low cost encapsulants and substrates for the cells, and outer covers which resist weathering. Ethylene/vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) at $.09/sq ft has displayed the most promising results as the encapsulant laminate when subjected to peroxide cross-linking to prevent melting. EVA accepts the addition of antioxidants, quenchers, absorbers, and stabilizers. Wood is favored as the rigid substrate due to cost, while top covers in substrate modules comprise candidate acrylic and polyvinyl fluoride films and a copolymer. Finally, fiberglass mat is placed between the substrate and the EVA pottant as a mechanical support and for electrical insulation.

  5. Plastics Pollution Control Technology Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    various machines, the plastics processor, the pulper, and the compactor, being developed to address the plastics problem firsthand. The Dialogue...incinerators themselves may not be a part of the Navy’s solution to the plastics problem , the space that the incinerators occupy will be useful. It is the... plastics problem although they believe that the Navy will not be in compliance by 1993. They suggested that a change in the law which will allow them to keep

  6. Development of an injectable, in situ crosslinkable, degradable polymeric carrier for osteogenic cell populations. Part 2. Viability of encapsulated marrow stromal osteoblasts cultured on crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate).

    PubMed

    Payne, Richard G; McGonigle, Joseph S; Yaszemski, Michael J; Yasko, Alan W; Mikos, Antonios G

    2002-11-01

    The effect of temporary encapsulation of rat marrow stromal osteoblasts in crosslinked gelatin microparticles on cell viability and proliferation was investigated in this study for microparticles placed on a crosslinking poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF) composite over a 7 day time period. Encapsulated cells were seeded on crosslinking PPF composites at times up to 10 min following initiation of the crosslinking reaction, and also on fully crosslinked PPF composites and tissue culture polystyrene controls, with a cell seeding density of 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm2. The crosslinked PPF composite exhibited an average gel point of 10.3 min and an average maximum crosslinking temperature of 47.5 degrees C. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed by DNA and 3H-thymidine assays and the results were compared with those for nonencapsulated cells. The results showed that the addition time of cells to a crosslinking PPF composite had a large effect on cell viability and proliferation for both encapsulated and nonencapsulated cells with more surviving cells added at later time points. Most importantly, the temporary encapsulation of cells significantly enhanced cell viability at earlier time points. The data indicate that the presence of gelatin microparticles does not affect the crosslinking of a PPF composite. They further suggest that the temporary encapsulation of cells in crosslinked gelatin microparticles may preserve the viability of cells contained in an actively crosslinking PPF composite used as an injectable polymeric scaffold serving also as a carrier for osteogenic cell populations.

  7. All-plastic, miniature, digital fluorescence microscope for three part white blood cell differential measurements at the point of care

    PubMed Central

    Forcucci, Alessandra; Pawlowski, Michal E.; Majors, Catherine; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2015-01-01

    Three-part differential white blood cell counts are used for disease diagnosis and monitoring at the point-of-care. A low-cost, miniature achromatic microscope was fabricated for identification of lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in samples of whole blood stained with acridine orange. The microscope was manufactured using rapid prototyping techniques of diamond turning and 3D printing and is intended for use at the point-of-care in low-resource settings. The custom-designed microscope requires no manual adjustment between samples and was successfully able to classify three white blood cell types (lymphocytes, granulocytes, and monocytes) using samples of peripheral whole blood stained with acridine orange. PMID:26601006

  8. Plastic Jellyfish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2000-01-01

    Presents an environmental science activity designed to enhance students' awareness of the hazards of plastic waste for wildlife in aquatic environments. Discusses how students can take steps to reduce the effects of plastic waste. (WRM)

  9. Selective encapsulation by Janus particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Ruth, Donovan; Gunton, James D.; Rickman, Jeffrey M.

    2015-06-28

    We employ Monte Carlo simulation to examine encapsulation in a system comprising Janus oblate spheroids and isotropic spheres. More specifically, the impact of variations in temperature, particle size, inter-particle interaction range, and strength is examined for a system in which the spheroids act as the encapsulating agents and the spheres as the encapsulated guests. In this picture, particle interactions are described by a quasi-square-well patch model. This study highlights the environmental adaptation and selectivity of the encapsulation system to changes in temperature and guest particle size, respectively. Moreover, we identify an important range in parameter space where encapsulation is favored, as summarized by an encapsulation map. Finally, we discuss the generalization of our results to systems having a wide range of particle geometries.

  10. Encapsulation of graphene in Parylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoblin, Grigory; Sun, Jie; Yurgens, August

    2017-01-01

    Graphene encapsulated between flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) demonstrates the highest known mobility of charge carriers. However, the technology is not scalable to allow for arrays of devices. We are testing a potentially scalable technology for encapsulating graphene where we replace hBN with Parylene while still being able to make low-ohmic edge contacts. The resulting encapsulated devices show low parasitic doping and a robust Quantum Hall effect in relatively low magnetic fields <5 T.

  11. JPL encapsulation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P.

    1986-01-01

    A detailed summary of the diverse encapsulation materials and techniques that evolved to meet the cost goals of the Flat-plate Solar Array (FSA) Project is presented. A typical solar cell now consists of low iron glass, two layers of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) polymers, a porous space, primers/adhesives, a back cover of Tedlar, and a gasket/seal for a volume cost of $1.30/sq ft. This compares well with the project goal of $1.40/sq ft.

  12. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  13. Encapsulation of Liquids Via Extrusion--A Review.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Various encapsulation techniques are known for pharmaceutical applications. Extrusion is of minor importance. However, extrusion is used to obtain granules with encapsulate liquid active ingredients (AI) like essential oils and flavours for food applications since decades. Many of these AIs can be used for agrochemical, home care, and pharmaceutical products, too. Thus, the focus of this review is on the interdisciplinary presentation and evaluation of the available knowledge about the encapsulation process via extrusion. The desired microcapsule structure is discussed at the outset. The microcapsule is compared to the alternative glassy solid solution system, before an overview of suitable excipients is given. In the next section the development of the extrusion technique, used for encapsulation processes, is presented. Thereby, the focus is on encapsulation using twin-screw extruders. Additionally, the influence of the downstream processes on the products is discussed, too. The understanding of the physical processes during extrusion is essential for specifically adjustment of the desired product properties and thus, highlighted in this paper. Unfortunately not all processes, especially the mixing process, are well studied. Suggestions for further studies, to improve process understanding and product quality, are given, too. The last part of this review focuses on the characterization of the obtained granules, especially AI content, encapsulation efficiency, and storage stability. In conclusion, extrusion is a standard technique for flavour encapsulation, but future studies, may lead to more (pharmaceutical) applications and new products.

  14. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  15. Micro-Encapsulation of Probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiners, Jean-Antoine

    Micro-encapsulation is defined as the technology for packaging with the help of protective membranes particles of finely ground solids, droplets of liquids or gaseous materials in small capsules that release their contents at controlled rates over prolonged periods of time under the influences of specific conditions (Boh, 2007). The material encapsulating the core is referred to as coating or shell.

  16. Encapsulation of Aroma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuidam, Nicolaas Jan; Heinrich, Emmanuel

    Flavor is one of the most important characteristics of a food product, since people prefer to eat only food products with an attractive flavor (Voilley and Etiévant 2006). Flavor can be defined as a combination of taste, smell and/or trigeminal stimuli. Taste is divided into five basic ones, i.e. sour, salty, sweet, bitter and umami. Components that trigger the so-called gustatory receptors for these tastes are in general not volatile, in contrast to aroma. Aroma molecules are those that interact with the olfactory receptors in the nose cavity (Firestein 2001). Confusingly, aroma is often referred to as flavor. Trigeminal stimuli cause sensations like cold, touch, and prickling. The current chapter only focuses on the encapsulation of the aroma molecules.

  17. Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Tommy G.

    This curriculum guide is designed to assist junior high schools industrial arts teachers in planning new courses and revising existing courses in plastics technology. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: introduction to production technology; history and development of plastics; safety; youth leadership,…

  18. Application of Thermo-Mechanical Measurements of Plastic Packages for Reliability Evaluation of PEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Thermo-mechanical analysis (TMA) is typically employed for measurements of the glass transition temperature (Tg) and coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) in molding compounds used in plastic encapsulated microcircuits (PEMs). Application of TMA measurements directly to PEMs allows anomalies to be revealed in deformation of packages with temperature, and thus indicates possible reliability concerns related to thermo-mechanical integrity and stability of the devices. In this work, temperature dependencies of package deformation were measured in several types of PEMs that failed environmental stress testing including temperature cycling, highly accelerated stress testing (HAST) in humid environments, and bum-in (BI) testing. Comparison of thermo-mechanical characteristics of packages and molding compounds in the failed parts allowed for explanation of the observed failures. The results indicate that TMA of plastic packages might be used for quality evaluation of PEMs intended for high-reliability applications.

  19. A composite-appropriate integration method of thick functional components in fibre-reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippatos, A.; Höhne, R.; Kliem, M.; Gude, M.

    2016-03-01

    The use of integrated structural health monitoring systems for critical composite parts, such as wind turbine blades, fuselage and wing parts, is an promising approach to guarantee a safe and efficient operational lifetime of such components. Therefore, the integration of thick functional components like sensors, actuators and electronic components is often necessary. An optimal integration of such components should be ensured without material imperfections in the composite structure, i.e. voids and resin rich areas, and failure of the functional components. In this paper, first investigations were undertaken for a basic understanding of the mechanical performance of a fibre reinforced plastic component with integrated functional elements. The influence of different materials and treatment methods for the encapsulation of electronic components was experimentally investigated under static and dynamic loading tests. By means of a parametric finite element model, the effects of an encapsulation and various parameters such as the shape and orientation of the electronic components were examined. Several encapsulation variants were investigated in order to minimise the chance of failure initiations. Based both on experimental and numerical results, a preferred composite integration concept was selected for an electronic board and some first recommendations for an optimal integration were derived.

  20. Sclerosing Encapsulating Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman O.

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing encapsulating peritonitis (SEP) is a rare chronic inflammatory condition of the peritoneum with an unknown aetiology. Also known as abdominal cocoon, the condition occurs when loops of the bowel are encased within the peritoneal cavity by a membrane, leading to intestinal obstruction. Due to its rarity and non-specific clinical features, it is often misdiagnosed. The condition presents with recurrent episodes of small bowel obstruction and can be idiopathic or secondary; the latter is associated with predisposing factors such as peritoneal dialysis or abdominal tuberculosis. In the early stages, patients can be managed conservatively; however, surgical intervention is necessary for those with advanced stage intestinal obstruction. A literature review revealed 118 cases of SEP; the mean age of these patients was 39 years and 68.0% were male. The predominant presentation was abdominal pain (72.0%), distension (44.9%) or a mass (30.5%). Almost all of the patients underwent surgical excision (99.2%) without postoperative complications (88.1%). PMID:27226904

  1. Gravity Probe B Encapsulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) space vehicle is being encapsulated atop the Delta II launch vehicle. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Russ Underwood, Lockheed Martin Corporation).

  2. UV aging and outdoor exposure correlation for EVA PV encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Charles G.; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Woods, Joseph T.

    2013-09-01

    A widely cited approximation in the solar industry is that "one week of xenon arc weather-o-meter exposure is equivalent to one year of field exposure." This statement is a generalization of test data generated in the mid-1990s as part of the NREL managed PVMaT-3 project. This approximation was based entirely upon yellowing of first generation EVA-based encapsulants in two different accelerated test conditions, xenon arc and mirror accelerated outdoor aging. First generation EVA encapsulants were developed by STR under the JPL solar project (1975-1986) and exhibit yellowing (or browning) with exposure to UV and heat. This yellowing mechanism was understood and resolved with newer generation EVA encapsulation products introduced in late 1990s. Modules were manufactured at the end of the PVMaT-3 project that included both older and newer generation encapsulants. Those modules were on a two-axis tracker in Arizona from 1996 to 2012 and are now undergoing diagnostic tests. Older generation standard-cure encapsulant used in these modules exhibited severe browning over cells and the modules exhibit approximate power loss of about two percent per year. This same standard cure encapsulant material has been tested with updated xenon arc exposure methods and optical transmission tests to estimate the loss in power due only to browning and reduction in light transmission.

  3. Development of DBD plasma actuators: The double encapsulated electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erfani, Rasool; Zare-Behtash, Hossein; Hale, Craig; Kontis, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Plasma actuators are electrical devices that generate a wall bounded jet without the use of any moving parts. For aerodynamic applications they can be used as flow control devices to delay separation and augment lift on a wing. The standard plasma actuator consists of a single encapsulated (ground) electrode. The aim of this project is to investigate the effect of varying the number and distribution of encapsulated electrodes in the dielectric layer. Utilising a transformer cascade, a variety of input voltages are studied for their effect. In the quiescent environment of a Faraday cage the velocity flow field is recorded using particle image velocimetry. Through understanding of the mechanisms involved in producing the wall jet and the importance of the encapsulated electrode a novel actuator design is proposed. The actuator design distributes the encapsulated electrode throughout the dielectric layer. The experiments have shown that actuators with a shallow initial encapsulated electrode induce velocities greater than the baseline case at the same voltage. Actuators with a deep initial encapsulated electrode are able to induce the highest velocities as they can operate at higher voltages without breakdown of the dielectric.

  4. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  5. Technology of mammalian cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Uludag, H; De Vos, P; Tresco, P A

    2000-08-20

    Entrapment of mammalian cells in physical membranes has been practiced since the early 1950s when it was originally introduced as a basic research tool. The method has since been developed based on the promise of its therapeutic usefulness in tissue transplantation. Encapsulation physically isolates a cell mass from an outside environment and aims to maintain normal cellular physiology within a desired permeability barrier. Numerous encapsulation techniques have been developed over the years. These techniques are generally classified as microencapsulation (involving small spherical vehicles and conformally coated tissues) and macroencapsulation (involving larger flat-sheet and hollow-fiber membranes). This review is intended to summarize techniques of cell encapsulation as well as methods for evaluating the performance of encapsulated cells. The techniques reviewed include microencapsulation with polyelectrolyte complexation emphasizing alginate-polylysine capsules, thermoreversible gelation with agarose as a prototype system, interfacial precipitation and interfacial polymerization, as well as the technology of flat sheet and hollow fiber-based macroencapsulation. Four aspects of encapsulated cells that are critical for the success of the technology, namely the capsule permeability, mechanical properties, immune protection and biocompatibility, have been singled out and methods to evaluate these properties were summarized. Finally, speculations regarding future directions of cell encapsulation research and device development are included from the authors' perspective.

  6. Plastic Surgery Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... PRS GO PSN PSEN GRAFT Contact Us News Plastic Surgery Statistics Plastic surgery procedural statistics from the ... Plastic Surgery Statistics 2005 Plastic Surgery Statistics 2016 Plastic Surgery Statistics Stats Report 2016 National Clearinghouse of ...

  7. High reliability plastic packaging for microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, J.N.; Peterson, D.W.; Hsia, A.H.; Tuck, M.

    1997-07-01

    Goal was Assembly Test Chips (ATCs) which could be used for evaluating plastic encapsulation technologies. Circuits were demonstrated for measuring Au-Al wirebond and Al metal corrosion failure rates during accelerated temperature and humidity testing. The test circuits on the ATC02.5 chip were very sensitive to extrinsic or processing induced failure rates. Accelerated aging experiments were conducted with unpassivated triple track Al structures on the ATC02.6 chip; the unpassivated tracks were found to be very sensitive to particulate contamination. Some modifications to existing circuitry were suggested. The piezoresistive stress sensing circuitry designed for the ATC04 test chip was found suitable for determining the change in the state of mechanical stress at the die when both initial and final measurements were made near room temperature (RT). Attempt to measure thermal stress between RT and a typical polymer glass transition temperature failed because of excessive die resistor- substrate leakage currents at the high temperature end; suitable circuitry changes were developed to overcome this problem. One temperature and humidity experiment was conducted with Sandia developed static radom access memory parts to examine non-corrosion CMOS failures; this objective was not achieved, but corrosion failure at the metal to Si contacts on the die surface could be detected. This 2-year effort resulted in new designs for test circuits which could be used on an advanced ATC for reliability assessment in Defense Programs electronics development projects.

  8. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson's ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson's ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  9. Tensile properties of epoxy encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Wischmann, K.B.; Stavig, M.E.

    1993-02-01

    Tensile properties were measured for nineteen different formulations of epoxy encapsulating materials. Formulations were of different combinations of two neat resins (Epon 828 and Epon 826, with and without CTBN modification), three fillers (ALOX, GNM and mica) and four hardeners (Z, DEA, DETDA-SA and ANH-2). Five of the formulations were tested at -55, -20, 20 and 60C, one formulation at -55, 20 and 71C; and the remaining formulations at 20C. Complete stress-strain curves are presented along with tables of tensile strength, initial modulus and Poisson`s ratio. The stress-strain responses are nonlinear and are temperature dependent. The reported data provide information for comparing the mechanical properties of encapsulants containing the suspected carcinogen Shell Z with the properties of encapsulants containing noncarcinogenic hardeners. Also, calculated shear moduli, based on measured tensile moduli and Poisson`s ratio, are in very good agreement with reported shear moduli from experimental torsional pendulum tests.

  10. Encapsulation of amylase in colloidosomes.

    PubMed

    Keen, Polly H R; Slater, Nigel K H; Routh, Alexander F

    2014-03-04

    Aqueous core colloidosomes encapsulating the enzyme amylase were manufactured with a shell comprising polymer latex particles of diameter 153 nm. The colloidosomes were sealed with calcium carbonate by precipitation between an inner phase of Na2CO3 and an outer phase of CaCl2. This seal allowed the retention of small molecules, such as dyes, as well as larger enzyme molecules, for several months. The encapsulated material could be released by dissolution of the CaCO3 with acid, upon a large dilution in water, or by applying a sufficient shear. The degree of release could be controlled since the greater the mass of CaCO3 precipitated onto the colloidosome shell, the greater the dilution or shear required to achieve release. The calcium carbonate seal protected encapsulated amylase from the detrimental effects of components in a liquid laundry detergent for several months so that, on triggered release, the enzyme retained its high activity.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber Reinforced Composites. A State-of-the-Art Survey. Volume 1. NDE of Graphite Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Composites. Part 1. Radiography and Ultrasonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    composites (Ref. 1) and by the can be large, and secondary operations can be mini- Army on glass fiber reinforced composites (Ref. 2). This mized. Composites...structural characteristics of ceramic materials, and updates of carbon/carbon com- composites. posites and glass fiber reinforced composites. Because of...the large amount of literature available on graphite While glass fiber reinforced plastic composites fiber reinforced composites, this particular volume

  12. Plastic Bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Bruce K

    2016-09-01

    Plastic bronchitis is an uncommon and probably underrecognized disorder, diagnosed by the expectoration or bronchoscopic removal of firm, cohesive, branching casts. It should not be confused with purulent mucous plugging of the airway as seen in patients with cystic fibrosis or bronchiectasis. Few medications have been shown to be effective and some are now recognized as potentially harmful. Current research directions in plastic bronchitis research include understanding the genetics of lymphatic development and maldevelopment, determining how abnormal lymphatic malformations contribute to cast formation, and developing new treatments.

  13. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1995-08-22

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

  14. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1993-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  15. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, Michael S.

    1995-01-01

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  16. Plastics Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document contains 16 units to consider for use in a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of plastics technician. All the units listed will not necessarily apply to every situation or tech prep consortium, nor will all the competencies within each unit be appropriate. Several units appear within each specific occupation and would…

  17. Tests of Solar-Array Encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.; Oda, K. L.; Chung, S. Y.; Smith, M. V.; Gupta, A.

    1986-01-01

    Materials tested for degradation by heat and light. Report presents early results of continuing series of photothermal aging tests of some candidate encapsulating materials for solar photovoltaic modules. Objectives of testing program: contribute to development of durable, low-cost encapsulants and predict lifetimes of encapsulated photovoltaic modules placed outdoors. Toward these ends, tests designed to reveal physical and chemical degradation mechanisms that affect encapsulants.

  18. Asbestos: The Case for Encapsulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russek, William F.

    1980-01-01

    Encapsulation has proven to be the safest, surest, and most permanent method of treating sprayed asbestos on ceilings and walls. Federal aid is available to help pay for inspection of school buildings for asbestos and for asbestos removal. (Author/MLF)

  19. Microbes encapsulated within crosslinkable polymers

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Liu, Ying; Rafailovich, Miriam H

    2013-02-05

    The invention relates to porous films comprising crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. Viable microbes are encapsulated within the crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers. The crosslinked electrospun hydrogel fibers are water insoluble and permeable. The invention also relates to methods of making and using such porous films.

  20. Efficiencies in alginate encapsulation of vegetative explants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The goal of this study was to improve a non-mechanized bulk encapsulation technique to standardize encapsulation procedures and reduce the labor time compared to encapsulating individual nodes. Four mm-long nodal segments from Stage II cultures of Hibiscus moscheutos L. ‘Lord Baltimore’ were encapsu...

  1. Recommended practices for encapsulating high voltage assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tankisley, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Preparation and encapsulation of high voltage assemblies are considered. Related problems in encapsulating are brought out in these instructions. A test sampling of four frequently used encapsulating compounds is shown in table form. The purpose of this table is to give a general idea of the working time available and the size of the container required for mixing and de-aerating.

  2. GLASS FIBER REINFORCED PLASTICS,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Contents: Fibrous glass fillers Binders used in the glass plastic industry Method of manufacturing glass plastics and glass plastic articles Properties of fiberglass Primary areas for use of glass fibre reinforced plastics

  3. Method of making thermally removable polymeric encapsulants

    DOEpatents

    Small, James H.; Loy, Douglas A.; Wheeler, David R.; McElhanon, James R.; Saunders, Randall S.

    2001-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable encapsulant by heating a mixture of at least one bis(maleimide) compound and at least one monomeric tris(furan) or tetrakis(furan) compound at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a gel and cooling the gel to form the thermally-removable encapsulant. The encapsulant can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C., preferably in a polar solvent. The encapsulant can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the encapsulant for component repair, modification or quality control.

  4. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  5. Plastic bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Singhi, Anil Kumar; Vinoth, Bharathi; Kuruvilla, Sarah; Sivakumar, Kothandam

    2015-01-01

    Plastic bronchitis, a rare but serious clinical condition, commonly seen after Fontan surgeries in children, may be a manifestation of suboptimal adaptation to the cavopulmonary circulation with unfavorable hemodynamics. They are ominous with poor prognosis. Sometimes, infection or airway reactivity may provoke cast bronchitis as a two-step insult on a vulnerable vascular bed. In such instances, aggressive management leads to longer survival. This report of cast bronchitis discusses its current understanding. PMID:26556975

  6. Modeling powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines: II. Experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Khawam, Ammar; Schultz, Leon

    2011-12-15

    A theoretical model was previously derived to predict powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines. The theoretical basis of the model was discussed earlier. In this part; the model was evaluated experimentally using two powder formulations with substantially different flow behavior. Encapsulation experiments were performed using a Zanasi encapsulation machine under two sets of experimental conditions. Model predicted outcomes such as encapsulation fill weight and plug height were compared to those experimentally obtained. Results showed a high correlation between predicted and actual outcomes demonstrating the model's success in predicting the encapsulation of both formulations. The model is a potentially useful in silico analysis tool that can be used for capsule dosage form development in accordance to quality by design (QbD) principles.

  7. Factors Influencing the Quality of Encapsulation in Rock Bolting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Naj; Craig, Peter; Mirzaghorbanali, Ali; Nemcik, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Bolt installation quality is influenced by various factors, some are well known and others are less recognised. A programme of field and laboratory studies was undertaken to examine various factors of relevance to the load transfer mechanism between the bolt, resin and rock to ensure test methods truly represent field performance. Short encapsulation tests were undertaken as part of the Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP) funded project (C21011) with the ultimate aim of developing standard test methods for assessing bolt encapsulation with chemical resin anchor installations. The field study consisted of a series of Short Encapsulation Pull Tests (SEPT) carried out in three mines with different geological conditions to determine the most representative and practical method of SEPT. Additional field work included installation of bolts into threaded steel tubes for subsequent removal and laboratory evaluation. A series of pull tests was carried out by installing bolts in overhead rig mounted sandstone block, cast in concrete with controlled encapsulation length. Factors of importance considered included; borehole diameter, resin annulus thickness, installation time (including bolt spin to the back and "spin at back"), the effect of gloving and hole over drill. It was found that the borehole diameter had a detrimental effect on the encapsulation bonding strength. Bolt installation time of approximately 10 s constituted an acceptable time for effective bolt installation and within the resin manufacturers recommended time of 14 s. Maintaining constant length of encapsulation was paramount for obtaining consistency and repeatability of the test results. Finally, a numerical simulation study was carried out to assess the capabilities of FLAC 2D software in simulating the pull testing of rock bolts.

  8. Recent progress on thin-film encapsulation technologies for organic electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Duan; Yang, Yong-Qiang; Chen, Zheng; Tao, Ye; Liu, Yun-Fei

    2016-03-01

    Among the advanced electronic devices, flexible organic electronic devices with rapid development are the most promising technologies to customers and industries. Organic thin films accommodate low-cost fabrication and can exploit diverse molecules in inexpensive plastic light emitting diodes, plastic solar cells, and even plastic lasers. These properties may ultimately enable organic materials for practical applications in industry. However, the stability of organic electronic devices still remains a big challenge, because of the difficulty in fabricating commercial products with flexibility. These organic materials can be protected using substrates and barriers such as glass and metal; however, this results in a rigid device and does not satisfy the applications demanding flexible devices. Plastic substrates and transparent flexible encapsulation barriers are other possible alternatives; however, these offer little protection to oxygen and water, thus rapidly degrading the devices. Thin-film encapsulation (TFE) technology is most effective in preventing water vapor and oxygen permeation into the flexible devices. Because of these (and other) reasons, there has been an intense interest in developing transparent barrier materials with much lower permeabilities, and their market is expected to reach over 550 million by 2025. In this study, the degradation mechanism of organic electronic devices is reviewed. To increase the stability of devices in air, several TFE technologies were applied to provide efficient barrier performance. In this review, the degradation mechanism of organic electronic devices, permeation rate measurement, traditional encapsulation technologies, and TFE technologies are presented.

  9. Encapsulation of new active ingredients.

    PubMed

    Onwulata, C I

    2012-01-01

    The organic construct consumed as food comes packaged in units that carry the active components and protect the entrapped active materials until delivered to targeted human organs. The packaging and delivery role is mimicked in the microencapsulation tools used to deliver active ingredients in processed foods. Microencapsulation efficiency is balanced against the need to access the entrapped nutrients in bioavailable forms. Encapsulated ingredients boosted with bioactive nutrients are intended for improved health and well-being and to prevent future health problems. Presently, active ingredients are delivered using new techniques, such as hydrogels, nanoemulsions, and nanoparticles. In the future, nutraceuticals and functional foods may be tailored to individual metabolic needs and tied to each person's genetic makeup. Bioactive ingredients provide health-enhancing nutrients and are protected through encapsulation processes that shield the active ingredients from deleterious environments.

  10. Photovoltaic module bypass diode encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The design and processing techniques necessary to incorporate bypass diodes within the module encapsulant are presented. The Semicon PN junction diode cells were selected. Diode junction to heat spreader thermal resistance measurements, performed on a variety of mounted diode chip types and sizes, have yielded values which are consistently below 1 deg C per watt, but show some instability when thermally cycled over the temperature range from -40 to 150 deg C. Three representative experimental modules, each incorporating integral bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies of various sizes, were designed. Thermal testing of these modules enabled the formulation of a recommended heat spreader plate sizing relationship. The production cost of three encapsulated bypass diode/heat spreader assemblies were compared with similarly rated externally mounted packaged diodes. It is concluded that, when proper designed and installed, these bypass diode devices will improve the overall reliability of a terrestrial array over a 20 year design lifetime.

  11. Liposome encapsulation of chelating agents

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh Erh

    1976-01-13

    A method for transferring a chelating agent across a cellular membrane by encapsulating the charged chelating agent within liposomes and carrying the liposome-encapsulated chelating agent to the cellular membrane where the liposomes containing the chelating agent will be taken up by the cells, thereby transferring the chelating agent across the cellular membrane. A chelating agent can be introduced into the interior of a cell of a living organism wherein the liposomes will be decomposed, releasing the chelating agent to the interior of the cell. The released chelating agent will complex intracellularly deposited toxic heavy metals, permitting the more soluble metal complex to transfer across the cellular membrane from the cell and subsequently be removed from the living organism.

  12. Plastic Clamp Retains Clevis Pin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortes, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    Plastic clamp requires no special installation or removal tools. Clamp slips easily over end of pin. Once engaged in groove, holds pin securely. Installed and removed easily without special tools - screwdriver or putty knife adequate for prying out of groove. Used to retain bearings, rollers pulleys, other parts that rotate. Applications include slowly and intermittently rotating parts in appliances.

  13. Determination of constitutive properties fromspherical indentation data using neural networks. Part i:the case of pure kinematic hardening in plasticity laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, N.; Tsakmakis, Ch.

    1999-06-01

    In this paper the power of neural networks in identifying material parameters fromdata obtained by spherical indentation is demonstrated for an academic problem (pure kinematichardening, given Youngs modulus) . To obtain a data basis for the training and validation of theneural network, numerous finite element simulations were carried out for various sets of materialparameters. The constitutive model describing finite deformation plasticity is formulated withnonlinear kinematic hardening of Armstrong-Frederick type. It was shown by Huber and Tsakmakis, 1998a that the depth-load response of a cyclic indentation process, consisting ofloading, unloading and reloading of the indenter displays a typical hysteresis loop for givenmaterial parameters. The inverse problem of leading the depth-load response back to the relatedparameters in the constitutive equations is solved using a neutral network.

  14. Encapsulant materials and associated devices

    DOEpatents

    Kempe, Michael D; Thapa, Prem

    2011-03-08

    Compositions suitable for use as encapsulants are described. The inventive compositions include a high molecular weight polymeric material, a curing agent, an inorganic compound, and a coupling agent. Optional elements include adhesion promoting agents, colorants, antioxidants, and UV absorbers. The compositions have desirable diffusivity properties, making them suitable for use in devices in which a substantial blocking of moisture ingress is desired, such as photovoltaic (PV) modules.

  15. Encapsulant materials and associated devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, Michael D; Thapa, Prem

    2012-05-22

    Compositions suitable for use as encapsulants are described. The inventive compositions include a high molecular weight polymeric material, a curing agent, an inorganic compound, and a coupling agent. Optional elements include adhesion promoting agents, colorants, antioxidants, and UV absorbers. The compositions have desirable diffusivity properties, making them suitable for use in devices in which a substantial blocking of moisture ingress is desired, such as photovoltaic (PV) modules.

  16. Hydrophobin-Encapsulated Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Shohei; Sandiford, Lydia; Cooper, Maggie; Rosca, Elena V; Ahmad Khanbeigi, Raha; Fairclough, Simon M; Thanou, Maya; Dailey, Lea Ann; Wohlleben, Wendel; von Vacano, Bernhard; de Rosales, Rafael T M; Dobson, Peter J; Owen, Dylan M; Green, Mark

    2016-02-01

    The phase transfer of quantum dots to water is an important aspect of preparing nanomaterials that are suitable for biological applications, and although numerous reports describe ligand exchange, very few describe efficient ligand encapsulation techniques. In this report, we not only report a new method of phase transferring quantum dots (QDs) using an amphiphilic protein (hydrophobin) but also describe the advantages of using a biological molecule with available functional groups and their use in imaging cancer cells in vivo and other imaging applications.

  17. Reviewing the use of ethylcellulose, methylcellulose and hypromellose in microencapsulation. Part 1: materials used to formulate microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Rogers, True L; Wallick, Dave

    2012-02-01

    This review highlights references where ethylcellulose, methylcellulose and hypromellose were used to make microcapsules. The review has been divided into three parts. This first part discusses various materials used to formulate microcapsules, such as the three encapsulating polymers as well as protective colloids, plasticizers and surfactants. The second part covers the various techniques used to make microcapsules, such as temperature-induced phase separation, emulsion solvent evaporation, solvent evaporation, film coating, and others. The third part covers the various applications for which microcapsules are used, such as modified release, improved efficacy and safety, taste- and odor-masking, and others. It is hoped that formulators can use Part 1 as a guide to the literature documenting formulation of microcapsules made from these encapsulating polymers. SciFinder was utilized to identify the pertinent literature. SciFinder leverages literature databases, such as Chemical Abstracts Service Registry and Medline. A total of 379 references were identified during the review. The need for a three-part review reflects the extensive amount of literature identified concerning these three encapsulating polymers.

  18. Process for Encapsulating Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    A process for growing protein crystals encapsulated within membranes has been invented. This process begins with the encapsulation of a nearly saturated aqueous protein solution inside semipermeable membranes to form microcapsules. The encapsulation is effected by use of special formulations of a dissolved protein and a surfactant in an aqueous first liquid phase, which is placed into contact with a second, immiscible liquid phase that contains one or more polymers that are insoluble in the first phase. The second phase becomes formed into the semipermeable membranes that surround microglobules of the first phase, thereby forming the microcapsules. Once formed, the microcapsules are then dehydrated osmotically by exposure to a concentrated salt or polymer solution. The dehydration forms supersaturated solutions inside the microcapsules, thereby enabling nucleation and growth of protein crystals inside the microcapsules. By suitable formulation of the polymer or salt solution and of other physical and chemical parameters, one can control the rate of transport of water out of the microcapsules through the membranes and thereby create physicochemical conditions that favor the growth, within each microcapsule, of one or a few large crystals suitable for analysis by x-ray diffraction. The membrane polymer can be formulated to consist of low-molecular-weight molecules that do not interfere with the x-ray diffraction analysis of the encapsulated crystals. During dehydration, an electrostatic field can be applied to exert additional control over the rate of dehydration. This protein-crystal-encapsulation process is expected to constitute the basis of protein-growth experiments to be performed on the space shuttle and the International Space Station. As envisioned, the experiments would involve the exposure of immiscible liquids to each other in sequences of steps under microgravitational conditions. The experiments are expected to contribute to knowledge of the precise

  19. Thermal modeling of an epoxy encapsulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, R.G.; Schutt, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The encapsulation of components is a widely used process at Sandia National Laboratories for packaging components to withstand structural loads. Epoxy encapsulants are also used for their outstanding dielectric strength characteristics. The production of high voltage assemblies requires the encapsulation of ceramic and electrical components (such as transformers). Separation of the encapsulant from internal contact surfaces or voids within the encapsulant itself in regions near the mold base have caused high voltage breakdown failures during production testing. In order to understand the failure mechanisms, a methodology was developed to predict both the thermal response and gel front progression of the epoxy the encapsulation process. A thermal model constructed with PATRAN Plus (1) and solved with the P/THERMAL (2) analysis system was used to predict the thermal response of the encapsulant. This paper discusses the incorporation of an Arrhenius kinetics model into Q/TRAN (2) to model the complex volumetric heat generation of the epoxy during the encapsulation process. As the epoxy begins to cure, it generates heat and shrinks. The total cure time of the encapsulant (transformation from a viscous liquid to solid) is dependent on both the initial temperature and the entire temperature history. Because the rate of cure is temperature dependent, the cure rate accelerates with a temperature increase and, likewise, the cure rate is quenched if the temperature is reduced. The temperature and conversion predictions compared well against experimental data. The thermal simulation results were used to modify the temperature cure process of the encapsulant and improve production yields.

  20. Applications of ethylene vinyl acetate as an encapsulation material for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Coulbert, C. D.; Liang, R. H.; Gupta, A.; Willis, P.; Baum, B.

    1983-01-01

    Terrestrial photovoltaic modules must undergo substantial reductions in cost in order to become economically attractive as practical devices for large scale production of electricity. Part of the cost reductions must be realized by the encapsulation materials that are used to package, protect, and support the solar cells, electrical interconnects, and other ancillary components. As many of the encapsulation materials are polymeric, cost reductions necessitate the use of low cost polymers. The performance and status of ethylene vinyl acetate, a low cost polymer that is being investigated as an encapsulation material for terrestrial photovoltaic modules, are described.

  1. Application for Approval of Modification for the 105-KE Basin Encapsulation Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This application is being submitted to US EPA pursuant to Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61.07, amended. The encapsulation activity will consist of the activities necessary to complete encapsulation of the fuel elements and sludge in 105-KE basin, a storage basin for irradiated N Reactor fuel in Hanford 100-K Area; it currently stores 1,150 MTU of N Reactor irradiated fuel elements transferred to the basin from 1975 through 1989. The application presents the chemical and physical processes relating to the encapsulation activity, source term, expected annual emissions, radionuclide control and monitoring equipment, and projected dose to the maximally exposed individual.

  2. Characterization and Prediction of Flow Behavior in High-Manganese Twinning Induced Plasticity Steels: Part II. Jerky Flow and Instantaneous Strain Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed-Akbari, A.; Mishra, A. K.; Mayer, J.; Bleck, W.

    2012-05-01

    The jerky and smooth flow curves in high-manganese twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steels were investigated by comparing Fe-Mn-C and Fe-Mn-Al-C systems. The pronounced serrations on the flow curves of Fe-Mn-C TWIP steel, produced during tensile testing at 300 K (27 °C) and 373 K (100 °C), were shown to be the result of localized high-temperature Portevin Le-Chatelier (PLC) bands moving across the gage length throughout the deformation. The speed of the PLC bands and their temperature effects were found to be strongly dependent on the applied strain rate, which was controlled by adjusting the cross-head speed of the tensile testing machine. The localized temperature-dependent stacking fault energy (SFE) variations resulting from the PLC effect and adiabatic heating were analyzed and compared for both slow and fast deformation rates. The instabilities in the measured logarithmic strain values caused by jerky flow could cause the local strain rate to deviate systematically from the targeted (applied) strain rate. These instabilities are better observed by calculating the instantaneous strain rate (ISR) values for each instant of deformation along the entire gage length. Finally, a new type of diagram was developed by plotting the true stress against the ISR values. From the diagram, the onset of different mechanisms, such as deformation twinning, nonpronounced, and pronounced serrations, could be marked precisely.

  3. Encapsulation methods for organic electrical devices

    DOEpatents

    Blum, Yigal D.; Chu, William Siu-Keung; MacQueen, David Brent; Shi, Yijian

    2013-06-18

    The disclosure provides methods and materials suitable for use as encapsulation barriers in electronic devices. In one embodiment, for example, there is provided an electroluminescent device or other electronic device encapsulated by alternating layers of a silicon-containing bonding material and a ceramic material. The encapsulation methods provide, for example, electronic devices with increased stability and shelf-life. The invention is useful, for example, in the field of microelectronic devices.

  4. Eugenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles: I. Thermal stability improvement of eugenol through encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Woranuch, Sarekha; Yoksan, Rangrong

    2013-07-25

    The objective of the present work was to improve the thermal stability of eugenol by encapsulating into chitosan nanoparticles via an emulsion-ionic gelation crosslinking method. The influences of the initial eugenol content and tripolyphosphate (TPP) concentration on the loading capacity (LC), encapsulation efficiency (EE), morphology and surface charge of the eugenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were also investigated. LC and EE tended to increase with increasing initial eugenol content and decreasing TPP concentration. Particles with LC of 12% and EE of 20% exhibited a spherical shape with an average size of less than 100 nm. Thermal stability of the encapsulated eugenol was verified through its extrusion at 155°C with a model plastic, i.e. thermoplastic flour (TPF). TPF containing encapsulated eugenol showed 8-fold higher remaining eugenol content and 2.7-fold greater radical scavenging activity than that containing naked eugenol. The results suggest the possible use of eugenol-loaded chitosan nanoparticles as antioxidants in bioactive plastics for food packaging.

  5. Liposome-encapsulated actinomycin for cancer chemotherapy

    DOEpatents

    Rahman, Yueh-Erh; Cerny, Elizabeth A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for chemotherapy of malignant tumors by injection of antitumor drugs. The antitumor drug is encapsulated within liposomes and the liposomes containing the encapsulated drug are injected into the body. The encapsulated drug penetrates into the tumor cells where the drug is slowly released and induces degeneration and death of the tumor cells, while any toxicity to the host body is reduced. Liposome encapsulation of actinomycin D has been found to be particularly effective in treating cancerous abdominal tumors, while drastically reducing the toxicity of actinomycin D to the host.

  6. Laboratory evaluation of PCBs encapsulation method ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Effectiveness and limitations of the encapsulation method for reducing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations in indoor air and contaminated surface have been evaluated in the laboratory study. Ten coating materials such as epoxy and polyurethane coatings, latex paint, and petroleum-based paint were tested in small environmental chambers to rank the encapsulants by their resistance to PCB sorption and estimate the key parameters required by a barrier model. Wipe samples were collected from PCB contaminated surface encapsulated with the coating materials to rank the encapsulants by their resistance to PCB migration from the source. A barrier model was used to calculate the PCB concentrations in the sources and the encapsulant layers, and at the exposed surfaces of the encapsulant and in the room air at different times. The performance of the encapsulants was ranked by those concentrations and PCB percent reductions. Overall, the three epoxy coatings performed better than the other coatings. Both the experimental results and the mathematical modeling showed that selecting proper encapsulants can effectively reduce the PCB concentrations at the exposed surfaces. The encapsulation method is most effective for contaminated surfaces that contain low levels of PCBs. This study answers some of these questions by using a combination of laboratory testing and mathematical modeling. The results should be useful to mitigation engineers, building owners and managers

  7. Escitalopram affects cytoskeleton and synaptic plasticity pathways in a rat gene-environment interaction model of depression as revealed by proteomics. Part II: environmental challenge.

    PubMed

    Piubelli, Chiara; Vighini, Miriam; Mathé, Aleksander A; Domenici, Enrico; Carboni, Lucia

    2011-07-01

    Large-scale investigations aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanism of action of antidepressant treatment are achievable through the application of proteomic technologies. We performed a proteomic study on the Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL), a genetically selected rat model of depression, and the control Flinders Resistant Line (FRL). To evaluate gene-environment interactions, FSL and FRL animals were separated from their mothers for 3 h from postnatal days 2 to 14 (maternal separation; MS), since early-life trauma is considered an important antecedent of depression. All groups received either escitalopram (Esc) admixed to food pellets (25 mg/kg.d) or vehicle for 1 month. Protein extracts from prefrontal/frontal cortex and hippocampus were separated by 2D electrophoresis. Proteins differentially modulated were identified by mass spectrometry. Bioinformatics analyses were performed to discover gene ontology terms associated with the modulated proteins. This paper was focused on the modifications induced by the environmental challenge of MS, both on the predisposed genetic background and on the resistant phenotype. The combination between Esc treatment and MS was investigated by comparing the MS, Esc-treated rats with rats subjected to each single procedure. In MS rats, antidepressant treatment influenced mainly proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism in FSL rats and in vesicle-mediated transport in FRL rats. When studying the interaction between Esc and MS vs. non-separated rats, proteins playing a role in cytoskeleton organization, neuronal development, vesicle-mediated transport and synaptic plasticity were identified. The results provide further support to the available reports that antidepressant treatment affects intracellular pathways and also suggest new potential targets for future therapeutic intervention.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm growth inhibition on medical plastic materials by immobilized esterases and acylase.

    PubMed

    Kisch, Johannes Martin; Utpatel, Christian; Hilterhaus, Lutz; Streit, Wolfgang R; Liese, Andreas

    2014-09-05

    Biofilms are matrix-encapsulated cell aggregates that cause problems in technical and health-related areas; for example, 65 % of all human infections are biofilm associated. This is mainly due to their ameliorated resistance against antimicrobials and immune systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a biofilm-forming organism, is commonly responsible for nosocomial infections. Biofilm development is partly mediated by signal molecules, such as acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) in Gram-negative bacteria. We applied horse liver esterase, porcine kidney acylase, and porcine liver esterase; these can hydrolyze AHLs, thereby inhibiting biofilm formation. As biofilm infections are often related to foreign material introduced into the human body, we immobilized the enzymes on medical plastic materials. Biofilm formation was quantified by Crystal Violet staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy, revealing up to 97 % (on silicone), 54 % (on polyvinyl chloride), and 77 % (on polyurethane) reduced biomass after 68 h growth.

  9. Alginate-Encapsulation for the Improved Hypothermic Preservation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Swioklo, Stephen; Constantinescu, Andrei; Connon, Che J

    2016-03-01

    Despite considerable progress within the cell therapy industry, unmet bioprocessing and logistical challenges associated with the storage and distribution of cells between sites of manufacture and the clinic exist. We examined whether hypothermic (4°C-23°C) preservation of human adipose-derived stem cells could be improved through their encapsulation in 1.2% calcium alginate. Alginate encapsulation improved the recovery of viable cells after 72 hours of storage. Viable cell recovery was highly temperature-dependent, with an optimum temperature of 15°C. At this temperature, alginate encapsulation preserved the ability for recovered cells to attach to tissue culture plastic on rewarming, further increasing its effect on total cell recovery. On attachment, the cells were phenotypically normal, displayed normal growth kinetics, and maintained their capacity for trilineage differentiation. The number of cells encapsulated (up to 2 × 10(6) cells per milliliter) did not affect viable cell recovery nor did storage of encapsulated cells in a xeno-free, serum-free,current Good Manufacturing Practice-grade medium. We present a simple, low-cost system capable of enhancing the preservation of human adipose-derived stem cells stored at hypothermic temperatures, while maintaining their normal function. The storage of cells in this manner has great potential for extending the time windows for quality assurance and efficacy testing, distribution between the sites of manufacture and the clinic, and reducing the wastage associated with the limited shelf life of cells stored in their liquid state.

  10. Review of potential processing techniques for the encapsulation of wastes in thermoplastic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, B.R.; Lageraaen, P.R.; Kalb, P.D.

    1995-08-01

    Thermoplastic encapsulation has been extensively studied at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) Environmental and Waste Technology Center (EWTC) as a waste encapsulation technology applicable to a wide range of waste types including radioactive, hazardous and mixed wastes. Encapsulation involves processing thermoplastic and waste materials into a waste form product by heating and mixing both materials into a homogeneous molten mixture. Cooling of the melt results in a solid monolithic waste form in which contaminants have been completely surrounded by a polymer matrix. Heating and mixing requirements for successful waste encapsulation can be met using proven technologies available in various types of commercial equipment. Processing techniques for thermoplastic materials, such as low density polyethylene (LDPE), are well established within the plastics industry. The majority of commercial polymer processing is accomplished using extruders, mixers or a combination of these technologies. Extruders and mixers are available in a broad range of designs and are used during the manufacture of consumer and commercial products as well as for compounding applications. Compounding which refers to mixing additives such as stabilizers and/or colorants with polymers, is analogous to thermoplastic encapsulation. Several processing technologies were investigated for their potential application in encapsulating residual sorbent waste in selected thermoplastic polymers, including single-screw extruders, twin-screw extruders, continuous mixers, batch mixers as well as other less conventional devices. Each was evaluated based on operational ease, quality control, waste handling capabilities as well as degree of waste pretreatment required. Based on literature review, this report provides a description of polymer processing technologies, a discussion of the merits and limitations of each and an evaluation of their applicability to the encapsulation of sorbent wastes.

  11. Snapshot in surgery: intraperitoneal encapsulated fat necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Han Boon; Arab, Nahlah; Teo, Lynette; Lieske, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 66-year-old man with rectal cancer was found to have an incidental ring-like lesion in the left rectovesical pouch. Histology revealed an encapsulated fat necrosis. Intraperitoneal encapsulated fat necroses are postulated to be a result of infarcted epiploic appendages resulting in a free-floating lesion. PMID:25767714

  12. Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria in biopolymeric system.

    PubMed

    Huq, Tanzina; Khan, Avik; Khan, Ruhul A; Riedl, Bernard; Lacroix, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation of probiotic bacteria is generally used to enhance the viability during processing, and also for the target delivery in gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics are used with the fermented dairy products, pharmaceutical products, and health supplements. They play a great role in maintaining human health. The survival of these bacteria in the human gastrointestinal system is questionable. In order to protect the viability of the probiotic bacteria, several types of biopolymers such as alginate, chitosan, gelatin, whey protein isolate, cellulose derivatives are used for encapsulation and several methods of encapsulation such as spray drying, extrusion, emulsion have been reported. This review focuses on the method of encapsulation and the use of different biopolymeric system for encapsulation of probiotics.

  13. Limonene encapsulation in freeze dried gellan systems.

    PubMed

    Evageliou, Vasiliki; Saliari, Dimitra

    2017-05-15

    The encapsulation of limonene in freeze-dried gellan systems was investigated. Surface and encapsulated limonene content was determined by measurement of the absorbance at 252nm. Gellan matrices were both gels and solutions. For a standard gellan concentration (0.5wt%) gelation was induced by potassium or calcium chloride. Furthermore, gellan solutions of varying concentrations (0.25-1wt%) were also studied. Limonene was added at two different concentrations (1 and 2mL/100g sample). Gellan gels encapsulated greater amounts of limonene than solutions. Among all gellan gels, the KCl gels had the greater encapsulated limonene content. However, when the concentration of limonene was doubled in these KCl gels, the encapsulated limonene decreased. The surface limonene content was significant, especially for gellan solutions. The experimental conditions and not the mechanical properties of the matrices were the dominant factor in the interpretation of the observed results.

  14. Encapsulation of orange terpenes investigating a plasticisation extrusion process.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Extrusion is widely used for flavour encapsulation. However, there is a lack of process understanding. This study is aimed at improving the understanding of a counter rotating twin screw extrusion process. Orange terpenes as model flavour, maltodextrin and sucrose as matrix materials, and a water feed rate between 4.0% and 5.7% were applied. Product temperatures < 80 °C and specific mechanical energy inputs <260 Wh/kg resulted. Amorphous and partly crystalline samples were obtained. The loss of crystalline sucrose was linked to a dissolution process of the sugar in the available water amount. Melting of the excipients did not arise, resulting in a plasticisation extrusion process. Maximally 67% of the flavour was retained (corresponding to a 4.1% product flavour load). The flavour loss correlated with insufficient mixing during the process and flavour evaporation after extrusion. Based on these results, recommendations for an improved encapsulation process are given.

  15. Wire Bond Encapsulation for the CMS Forward Pixel Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higginbotham, Sam; CMS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The Phase 1 upgrade of the pixel tracker for the CMS experiment will require the assembly of approximately 1000 modules consisting of pixel sensors bump bonded to readout chips. Electrical connections between the custom readout chips and support ASIC's that constitute the front-end of the pixel data acquisition system are made via wire bonds to a thin printed circuit board. Part of the assembly process carried out at Purdue University includes the partial encapsulation of the wire bonds for mechanical protection, prevention of electrolytic corrosion, and to damp oscillations due to Lorentz forces from transient current pulses in large magnetic fields. We present the details of the robotic assembly process which allows the deposition of the viscous encapsulant compound with 100 micron precision.

  16. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  17. Wetting and free surface flow modeling for potting and encapsulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Carlton, F.; Brooks, Michael J. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Graham, Alan Lyman; Noble, David F. ); Notz, Patrick K.; Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mahoney, Leo James; Baer, Thomas A.; Berchtold, Kathryn (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian; Wilkes, Edward Dean; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Givler, Richard C.; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Cote, Raymond O.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Grillet, Anne Mary; Kraynik, Andrew Michael

    2007-06-01

    As part of an effort to reduce costs and improve quality control in encapsulation and potting processes the Technology Initiative Project ''Defect Free Manufacturing and Assembly'' has completed a computational modeling study of flows representative of those seen in these processes. Flow solutions are obtained using a coupled, finite-element-based, numerical method based on the GOMA/ARIA suite of Sandia flow solvers. The evolution of the free surface is solved with an advanced level set algorithm. This approach incorporates novel methods for representing surface tension and wetting forces that affect the evolution of the free surface. In addition, two commercially available codes, ProCAST and MOLDFLOW, are also used on geometries representing encapsulation processes at the Kansas City Plant. Visual observations of the flow in several geometries are recorded in the laboratory and compared to the models. Wetting properties for the materials in these experiments are measured using a unique flowthrough goniometer.

  18. Feasibility Study of Solar Dome Encapsulation of Photovoltaic Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The technical and economic advantages of using air-supported plastic enclosures to protect flat plate photovoltaic arrays are described. Conceptual designs for a fixed, latitude-tilt array and a fully tracking array were defined. Detailed wind loads and strength analyses were performed for the fixed array. Detailed thermal and power output analyses provided array performance for typical seasonal and extreme temperature conditions. Costs of each design as used in a 200 MWe central power station were defined from manufacturing and material cost estimates. The capital cost and cost of energy for the enclosed fixed-tilt array were lower than for the enclosed tracking array. The enclosed fixed-tilt array capital investment was 38% less, and the levelized bus bar energy cost was 26% less than costs for a conventional, glass-encapsulated array design. The predicted energy cost for the enclosed fixed array was 79 mills/kW-h for direct current delivered to the power conditioning units.

  19. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III; Kallis, J. M.; Trucker, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and structural analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate encapsulation systems were selected for qualification testing.

  20. Point contacts in encapsulated graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Handschin, Clevin; Fülöp, Bálint; Csonka, Szabolcs; Makk, Péter; Blanter, Sofya; Weiss, Markus; Schönenberger, Christian; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2015-11-02

    We present a method to establish inner point contacts with dimensions as small as 100 nm on hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene heterostructures by pre-patterning the top-hBN in a separate step prior to dry-stacking. 2- and 4-terminal field effect measurements between different lead combinations are in qualitative agreement with an electrostatic model assuming point-like contacts. The measured contact resistances are 0.5–1.5 kΩ per contact, which is quite low for such small contacts. By applying a perpendicular magnetic field, an insulating behaviour in the quantum Hall regime was observed, as expected for inner contacts. The fabricated contacts are compatible with high mobility graphene structures and open up the field for the realization of several electron optical proposals.

  1. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials section, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1984-06-01

    Tests for chemical structure, material properties, water absorption, aging and curing agent of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) and UV absorption studies are carried out. A computer model was developed for thermal optical modeling, to investigate dependence between module operating temperature and solar insolation, and heat dissapation behavior. Structural analyses were performed in order to determine the stress distribution under wind and heat conditions. Curves are shown for thermal loading conditions. An electrical isolation was carried out to investigate electrical stress aging of non-metallic encapsulation materials and limiting material flaws, and to develop a computer model of electrical fields and stresses in encapsulation materials. In addition, a mathematical model was developed and tests were conducted to predict hygroscopic and thermal expansion and contraction on a plastic coated wooden substrate. Thermal cycle and humidity freezing cycle tests, partial discharge tests, and hail impact tests were also carried out. Finally, the effects of soiling on the surface of photovoltaic modules were investigated. Two antisoiling coatings, a fluorinated silane and perflourodecanoic acid were considered.

  2. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials section, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    Tests for chemical structure, material properties, water absorption, aging and curing agent of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) and UV absorption studies are carried out. A computer model was developed for thermal optical modeling, to investigate dependence between module operating temperature and solar insolation, and heat dissapation behavior. Structural analyses were performed in order to determine the stress distribution under wind and heat conditions. Curves are shown for thermal loading conditions. An electrical isolation was carried out to investigate electrical stress aging of non-metallic encapsulation materials and limiting material flaws, and to develop a computer model of electrical fields and stresses in encapsulation materials. In addition, a mathematical model was developed and tests were conducted to predict hygroscopic and thermal expansion and contraction on a plastic coated wooden substrate. Thermal cycle and humidity freezing cycle tests, partial discharge tests, and hail impact tests were also carried out. Finally, the effects of soiling on the surface of photovoltaic modules were investigated. Two antisoiling coatings, a fluorinated silane and perflourodecanoic acid were considered.

  3. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R.; Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C.

    1992-12-31

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component`s protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  4. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, R. S.; Lagasse, R. R.; Guess, T. R.; Plazek, D. J.; Bero, C.

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e.g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies.

  5. A cure shrinkage model for analyzing the stresses and strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, R.S.; Lagasse, R.R.; Guess, T.R. ); Plazek, D.J.; Bero, C. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    Electrical component assemblies are encapsulated to provide delicate parts with voltage isolation and protection against damage caused by shock, vibration, and harsh atmospheric environments. During cure, thermosetting resins shrink and harden simultaneously. If the natural deformation of the resin is constrained by adhesion to the mold or to relatively stiff embedded components, cure shrinkage stresses are generated in the encapsulant. Subsequent cooling or thermal cycling produces additional stresses that are caused by the mismatches in thermal strains among the materials in the encapsulated assembly. Although cure shrinkage stresses frequently are neglected because they are considerably smaller than thermal stresses, cure shrinkage stresses can cause delamination or fractures in the encapsulant, since the partially cured resin is not as tough as the fully cured material. Cracks generated during cure can compromise performance (e. g., permit dielectric breakdown), degrade a component's protection, and grow under subsequent thermal cycling producing residual stresses that differ from those found in uncracked assemblies. 3 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Natural rubber nanocomposites using polystyrene-encapsulated nanosilica prepared by differential microemulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuayjuljit, Saowaroj; Boonmahitthisud, Anyaporn

    2010-09-01

    In this study, nanocomposites of natural rubber (NR) and polystyrene (PS)-encapsulated nanosilica were prepared by latex compounding method. The nanolatex of PS-encapsulated silica was synthesized via in situ differential microemulsion polymerization. The resulted hybrid nanoparticles showed core-shell morphology with an average diameter of 40 nm. The silica hybrid nanoparticles were subsequently used as filler for the NR nanocomposite. The properties of NR were found to be improved as a result of the incorporation of PS-encapsulated nanosilica at 3 and 3-9 parts per hundred rubber (phr) for tensile strength and modulus at 300% strain, respectively, except the elongation at break, and up to 9 phr for flammability. The results from dynamic mechanical analyzer showed that the elastic properties of NR near the glass transition temperature increased with the inclusion of increasing concentration of the PS-encapsulated nanosilica, causing by the semi-interpenetrating nanostructure in the NR nanocomposites.

  7. Encapsulation effects on carbonaceous aerosol light absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Onasch, T.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E.; Mazzoleni, C.

    2010-03-15

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds (plumes containing soot byproducts from automobiles, biomass burning, wood-burning kitchen stoves, and coal-fired power plants) will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve insights into the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated, and denuded conditions were conducted. This poster presents data on black carbon (BC) light absorption measured by Photothermal Interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007). In addition to examining nascent BC—to provide a baseline measurement—encapsulation with varying thicknesses of either dioctyl sebacate (DOS) or sulfuric acid was conducted to glean insights into the interplay between particle mixing state and optical properties. Additionally, some experiments were carried out where BC was coated and then denuded. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a

  8. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    DOEpatents

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  9. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  10. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  11. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  12. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  13. 49 CFR 192.375 - Service lines: Plastic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Service lines: Plastic. 192.375 Section 192.375... § 192.375 Service lines: Plastic. (a) Each plastic service line outside a building must be installed... terminate above ground level and outside the building, if— (i) The above ground level part of the...

  14. Growth of FePt encapsulated carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yuji Kaneko, Tetsuya; Hori, Kenta; Takase, Sho; Sato, Hideki; Maeda, Kohji; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Kato, Takeshi; Iwata, Satoshi; Jimbo, Mutsuko

    2014-03-15

    FePt encapsulated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition using an Fe/Pt bilayer catalyst. The CNTs were grown according to the base growth model. Selected area electron diffraction results revealed that the encapsulated particles were A1-FePt, L1{sub 0}-FePt, and Fe{sub 3}PtC. The crystal structures of particles found at the root parts of CNTs were not able to be identified, however. The layered structure of catalytic films seemed to be responsible for the difference in Pt content between particles found at tip and root parts of CNTs. Approximately 60% of CNTs grown at 800 °C had particles at their tip parts, compared to only 30% when the growth temperature was 700 °C, indicating that higher process temperatures promote particle encapsulation in CNTs.

  15. Integral Glass Encapsulation for Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Tobin, R. G.; Kreisman, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    Work reported was performed during the period from August 1977 to December 1978. The program objective was to continue the development of electrostatic bonding (ESB) as an encapsulation technique for terrestrial cells. Economic analyses shows that this process can be a cost-effective method of producing reliable, long lifetime solar modules. When considered in sufficient volume, both material and equipment costs are competitive with conventional encapsulation systems. In addition, the possibility of integrating cell fabrication into the encapsulation process, as in the case of the preformed cell contacts discussed in this report, offers the potential of significant overall systems cost reduction.

  16. Hermetic encapsulation technique for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deminet, C.; Horne, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    A concept is presented for encapsulating solar cells between two layers of glass either individually, in panels, or in a continuous process. The concept yields an integral unit that is hermetically sealed and that is tolerant to high temperature thermal cycling and to particulate radiation. Data are presented on both high temperature solar cells and special glasses that soften at low temperatures for use with the concept. The results of encapsulating experiments are presented which show the successful application of the concept to the special high temperature cells. The mechanical feasibility of encapsulating 2 mil cells between two layers of 2 mil glass is also demonstrated.

  17. Safe epoxy encapsulant for high voltage magnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Formula 456, an aliphatic amine cured epoxy for impregnating coils and high voltage transformers. Sandia has evaluated a number of MDA-free epoxy encapsulants which relied on either anhydride or other aromatic amine curing agents. The use of aliphatic amine curing agents was more recently evaluated and has resulted in the definition of Formula 456 resin. Methylene dianiline (MDA) has been used for more than 20 years as the curing agent for various epoxy formulations throughout the Department of Energy and much of industry. Sandia National Laboratories began the process of replacing MDA with other formulations because of regulations imposed by OSHA on the use of MDA. OSHA has regulated MDA because it is a suspect carcinogen. Typically the elimination of OSHA-regulated materials provides a rare opportunity to qualify new formulations in a range of demanding applications. It was important to take full advantage of that opportunity, although the associated materials qualification effort was costly. Small high voltage transformers are one of those demanding applications. The successful implementation of the new formulation for high reliability transformers will be described. The test results that demonstrate the parts are qualified for use in DOE weapon systems will be presented.

  18. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  19. Ice encapsulation protects rather than disturbs the freezing lichen.

    PubMed

    Bjerke, J W

    2009-03-01

    Arctic and alpine terricolous lichens are adapted to harsh environments and are tolerant to extremely low temperatures when metabolically inactive. However, there are reports indicating that freezing can be lethal to metabolically active lichens. With a projected warmer and more unstable climate, winter precipitation at high latitudes will fall more frequently as rain, causing snowmelt and encapsulating terricolous lichens in ice or exposing them to large temperature fluctuations. Lichens are a major winter food source for reindeer in most parts of the circumpolar region. A laboratory experiment tested how three hydrated reindeer forage lichen species covered by snow, encapsulated in ice, or uncovered responded to storage at freezing temperatures and subsequent warming. Photosynthetic performance (maximal fluorescence of dark-adapted samples and net photosynthetic rates) was significantly lower in lichens not insulated by snow or ice, whereas there were few differences between the snow and ice treatments. It is suggested that snow and ice provide sufficiently moist environments to improve extracellular and reduce intracellular ice nucleation activity. Ice encapsulation, which is often lethal to vascular plants, did not have any negative effects on the studied lichens. The results indicate that complete snow and ice melt followed by refreezing can be detrimental to terricolous lichen ecosystems. Reduced lichen biomass will have a negative effect both on reindeer winter survival and the indigenous peoples who herd reindeer.

  20. Sol-gel encapsulation for controlled drug release and biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jonathan

    The main focus of this dissertation is to investigate the use of sol-gel encapsulation of biomolecules for controlled drug release and biosensing. Controlled drug release has advantages over conventional therapies in that it maintains a constant, therapeutic drug level in the body for prolonged periods of time. The anti-hypertensive drug Captopril was encapsulated in sol-gel materials of various forms, such as silica xerogels and nanoparticles. The primary objective was to show that sol-gel silica materials are promising drug carriers for controlled release by releasing Captopril at a release rate that is within a therapeutic range. We were able to demonstrate desired release for over a week from Captopril-doped silica xerogels and overall release from Captopril-doped silica nanoparticles. As an aside, the antibiotic Vancomycin was also encapsulated in these porous silica nanoparticles and desired release was obtained for several days in-vitro. The second part of the dissertation focuses on immobilizing antibodies and proteins in sol-gel to detect various analytes, such as hormones and amino acids. Sol-gel competitive immunoassays on antibody-doped silica xerogels were used for hormone detection. Calibration for insulin and C-peptide in standard solutions was obtained in the nM range. In addition, NASA-Ames is also interested in developing a reagentless biosensor using bacterial periplasmic binding proteins (bPBPs) to detect specific biomarkers, such as amino acids and phosphate. These bPBPs were doubly labeled with two different fluorophores and encapsulated in silica xerogels. Ligand-binding experiments were performed on the bPBPs in solution and in sol-gel. Ligand-binding was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the two fluorophores on the bPBP. Titration data show that one bPBP has retained its ligand-binding properties in sol-gel.

  1. Laboratory evaluation of PCBs encapsulation method

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effectiveness and limitations of the encapsulation method for reducing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations in indoor air and contaminated surface have been evaluated in the laboratory study. Ten coating materials such as epoxy and polyurethane coatings, latex paint, a...

  2. Lipid encapsulated phenolic compounds by fluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities with applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a phenolic compound present in grain crops and lignocellulose biomass, was encapsulated with saturated triglycerides using a laboratory fluidizer. Stability of t...

  3. Statistical modeling of single target cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Moon, SangJun; Ceyhan, Elvan; Gurkan, Umut Atakan; Demirci, Utkan

    2011-01-01

    High throughput drop-on-demand systems for separation and encapsulation of individual target cells from heterogeneous mixtures of multiple cell types is an emerging method in biotechnology that has broad applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, genomics, and cryobiology. However, cell encapsulation in droplets is a random process that is hard to control. Statistical models can provide an understanding of the underlying processes and estimation of the relevant parameters, and enable reliable and repeatable control over the encapsulation of cells in droplets during the isolation process with high confidence level. We have modeled and experimentally verified a microdroplet-based cell encapsulation process for various combinations of cell loading and target cell concentrations. Here, we explain theoretically and validate experimentally a model to isolate and pattern single target cells from heterogeneous mixtures without using complex peripheral systems.

  4. Commercial Parts Technology Qualification Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Many high-reliability systems, including space systems, use selected commercial parts (including Plastic Encapsulated Microelectronics or PEMs) for unique functionality, small size, low weight, high mechanical shock resistance, and other factors. Predominantly this usage is subjected to certain 100% tests (typically called screens) and certain destructive tests usually (but not always) performed on the flight lot (typically called qualification tests). Frequently used approaches include those documented in EEE-INST-002 and JPL DocID62212 (which are sometimes modified by the particular aerospace space systems manufacturer). In this study, approaches from these documents and several space systems manufacturers are compared to approaches from a launch systems manufacturer (SpaceX), an implantable medical electronics manufacturer (Medtronics), and a high-reliability transport system process (automotive systems). In the conclusions section, these processes are outlined for all of these cases and presented in tabular form. Then some simple comparisons are made. In this introduction section, the PEM technology qualification process is described, as documented in EEE-INST-002 (written by the Goddard Space Flight Center, GSFC), as well as the somewhat modified approach employed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Approaches used at several major NASA contractors are also described

  5. Encapsulation of isohexenylnaphthazarins in cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Assimopoulou, A N; Papageorgiou, V P

    2004-05-01

    Naturally occurring isohexenylnaphthazarins (IHN), such as Alkannin, Shikonin (A/S) and their derivatives, are potent pharmaceutical substances with a wide spectrum of biological activity. In the present study, inclusion complexes of alkannin and shikonin commercial samples and IHN derivatives in the form of an oily extract of Alkanna tinctoria roots were formed with beta-cyclodextrin (CD) and beta-HPCD. These complexes were investigated to evaluate the effect of complexation on their aqueous solubility, decoloration, and also the percentage of polymeric A/S and IHN derivatives enclosed in the CDs cavity, since these decrease the active monomeric IHN. Both beta-CD and beta-HPCD increased the aqueous solubility of A/S and IHN derivatives and thus inclusion complexes can be used as drug delivery systems for A/S in both internal (capsules, tablets) and external hydrophilic pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations (creams, gels, sprays) with enhanced bioavailability. The inclusion complexes formed had a pale purple colour, contributing to the partial decoloration of the A/S and thus of the fi nal pharmaceutical preparations. Finally, CDs selectively included more monomeric and less polymeric IHN, compared with the initial each time sample that is encapsulated; thus inclusion complexes may present enhanced biological activity.

  6. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles

    PubMed Central

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of “crowding effect” which is the entropic interaction in the cell. PMID:26752650

  7. Asymmetrical Polyhedral Configuration of Giant Vesicles Induced by Orderly Array of Encapsulated Colloidal Particles.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Yuno; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Giant vesicles (GVs) encapsulating colloidal particles by a specific volume fraction show a characteristic configuration under a hypertonic condition. Several flat faces were formed in GV membrane with orderly array of inner particles. GV shape changed from the spherical to the asymmetrical polyhedral configuration. This shape deformation was derived by entropic interaction between inner particles and GV membrane. Because a part of inner particles became to form an ordered phase in the region neighboring the GV membrane, free volume for the other part of particles increased. Giant vesicles encapsulating colloidal particles were useful for the model of "crowding effect" which is the entropic interaction in the cell.

  8. Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma of the Trunk: A Case Report and Review of Palisaded Encapsulated Neuroma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    Palisaded encapsulated neuroma is a rare, benign cutaneous tumor. It most commonly presents as a solitary, flesh-colored, dome-shaped nodule affecting the face. However, albeit rarely, palisaded encapsulated neuroma may also appear on the trunk, genitals, or extremities. We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a male patient who presented with a palisaded encapsulated neuroma on his left flank. In addition, we review the characteristics of patients with truncal palisaded encapsulated neuromas and summarize the clinical and histologic differential diagnosis of this tumor. PMID:27630799

  9. Encapsulated Thermoelectric Modules for Advanced Thermoelectric Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, Mitsuru; Jinushi, Takahiro; Ishijima, Zenzo

    2014-06-01

    An encapsulated thermoelectric (TE) module consists of a vacuum-tight stainless-steel container in which an SiGe or BiTe TE module is encapsulated. This construction enables maximum performance and durability because: the thermal expansion mismatch between the hot and cold sides of the container can be accommodated by a sliding sheet in the container; the TE module inside is always kept in a vacuum environment, therefore no oxidation can occur; and the pressure difference between the inside and outside of the container reduces thermal contact resistance inside the container. Our encapsulated SiGe module features higher operating temperature—up to 650°C for both hot and cold sides. Other high-temperature modules and conventional BiTe modules, including both-sides and one-side skeleton types, have been encapsulated. Several variants of the encapsulated module are available. Encapsulated thermoelectric modules with integrated coolers contain cooling panels through which water can pass. If the module hot side is heated by a radiating heat source (radiation coupling) or convection of a hot gas or fluid (convection coupling), no pressing force on the module is necessary. It therefore features minimum contact resistance with the cooling duct, because no pressure is applied, maximum TE power, and minimum installation cost. Another, larger, variant is a quadruple flexible container in which four modules (each of maximum size 40 mm × 40 mm) are encapsulated. These encapsulated modules were used in a powder metallurgy furnace and were in use for more than 3000 h. Application to cryogenic temperatures simulating the liquid nitrogen gas vaporizer has been also attempted.

  10. Use of recycled plastics in concrete: A critical review.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lei; Ozbakkaloglu, Togay

    2016-05-01

    Plastics have become an essential part of our modern lifestyle, and the global plastic production has increased immensely during the past 50years. This has contributed greatly to the production of plastic-related waste. Reuse of waste and recycled plastic materials in concrete mix as an environmental friendly construction material has drawn attention of researchers in recent times, and a large number of studies reporting the behavior of concrete containing waste and recycled plastic materials have been published. This paper summarizes the current published literature until 2015, discussing the material properties and recycling methods of plastic and the influence of plastic materials on the properties of concrete. To provide a comprehensive review, a total of 84 studies were considered, and they were classified into sub categories based on whether they dealt with concrete containing plastic aggregates or plastic fibers. Furthermore, the morphology of concrete containing plastic materials is described in this paper to explain the influence of plastic aggregates and plastic fibers on the properties of concrete. The properties of concretes containing virgin plastic materials were also reviewed to establish their similarities and differences with concrete containing recycled plastics.

  11. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  12. Micellar Polymer Encapsulation of Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Besic, Sabina; Minteer, Shelley D

    2017-01-01

    Although enzymes are highly efficient and selective catalysts, there have been problems incorporating them into fuel cells. Early enzyme-based fuel cells contained enzymes in solution rather than immobilized on the electrode surface. One problem utilizing an enzyme in solution is an issue of transport associated with long diffusion lengths between the site of bioelectrocatalysis and the electrode. This issue drastically decreases the theoretical overall power output due to the poor electron conductivity. On the other hand, enzymes immobilized at the electrode surface have eliminated the issue of poor electron conduction due to close proximity of electron transfer between electrode and the biocatalyst. Another problem is inefficient and short term stability of catalytic activity within the enzyme that is suspended in free flowing solution. Enzymes in solutions are only stable for hours to days, whereas immobilized enzymes can be stable for weeks to months and now even years. Over the last decade, there has been substantial research on immobilizing enzymes at electrode surfaces for biofuel cell and sensor applications. The most commonly used techniques are sandwich or wired. Sandwich techniques are powerful and successful for enzyme immobilization; however, the enzymes optimal activity is not retained due to the physical distress applied by the polymer limiting its applications as well as the non-uniform distribution of the enzyme and the diffusion of analyte through the polymer is slowed significantly. Wired techniques have shown to extend the lifetime of an enzyme at the electrode surface; however, this technique is very hard to master due to specific covalent bonding of enzyme and polymer which changes the three-dimensional configuration of enzyme and with that decreases the optimal catalytic activity. This chapter details encapsulation techniques where an enzyme will be immobilized within the pores/pockets of the hydrophobically modified micellar polymers such as

  13. 76 FR 51922 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maryland; Adoption of Plastic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... of Plastic Parts and Business Machines Coating Standards AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Coating, and adds new COMAR 26.11.19.07-2, Plastic Parts and Business Machines Coating. Maryland's SIP... by EPA's Control Techniques Guidelines (CTG) for Miscellaneous Metal and Plastic Parts Coatings...

  14. Recovering automotive plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This article reports on the results of a study on increasing the recycling of plastics in automobiles. Plastics are being used in increasing amounts in vehicles and new methods of retrieving these plastics for recycling are needed to reduce the amount of automotive shredder residue that is currently being sent to residues. The study concentrated on increasing the ease of disassembly and contaminant removal.

  15. Plastics in Building.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeist, Irving, Ed.

    The evaluation and use of plastics in the construction industry are explained. The contributors offer extensive, timely, and thoroughly researched data on the chemistry, properties, functions, engineering behavior, and specific applications of plastics to building requirements. The major subjects discussed in depth are--(1) the role of plastics in…

  16. Processing of plastics

    PubMed Central

    Spaak, Albert

    1975-01-01

    An overview is given of the processing of plastic materials from the handling of polymers in the pellet and powder form to manufacturing of a plastic fabricated product. Various types of equipment used and melt processing ranges of various polymer formulations to make the myriad of plastic products that are commercially available are discussed. PMID:1175556

  17. Tomorrow's Plastic World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macdonald, Averil

    2005-01-01

    Far from being just cheap packaging materials, plastics may be the materials of tomorrow. Plastic can conduct electricity, and this opens up a host of high-tech possibilities in the home and in energy generation. These possibilities are discussed here along with how plastic can be recycled and perhaps even grown.

  18. Photothermal degradation studies of encapsulants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The reliability physics program at JPL is outlined. The overall objectives and approaches are given in the program. The objectives, approaches and conclusions are given for two specific parts of the programs. These two parts are mechanistic studies of photothermal degradation and performance characteristics of materials with respect to photothermal stresses.

  19. Encapsulation in the food industry: a review.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, B F; Kermasha, S; Alli, I; Mulligan, C N

    1999-05-01

    Encapsulation involves the incorporation of food ingredients, enzymes, cells or other materials in small capsules. Applications for this technique have increased in the food industry since the encapsulated materials can be protected from moisture, heat or other extreme conditions, thus enhancing their stability and maintaining viability. Encapsulation in foods is also utilized to mask odours or tastes. Various techniques are employed to form the capsules, including spray drying, spray chilling or spray cooling, extrusion coating, fluidized bed coating, liposome entrapment, coacervation, inclusion complexation, centrifugal extrusion and rotational suspension separation. Each of these techniques is discussed in this review. A wide variety of foods is encapsulated--flavouring agents, acids bases, artificial sweeteners, colourants, preservatives, leavening agents, antioxidants, agents with undesirable flavours, odours and nutrients, among others. The use of encapsulation for sweeteners such as aspartame and flavours in chewing gum is well known. Fats, starches, dextrins, alginates, protein and lipid materials can be employed as encapsulating materials. Various methods exist to release the ingredients from the capsules. Release can be site-specific, stage-specific or signalled by changes in pH, temperature, irradiation or osmotic shock. In the food industry, the most common method is by solvent-activated release. The addition of water to dry beverages or cake mixes is an example. Liposomes have been applied in cheese-making, and its use in the preparation of food emulsions such as spreads, margarine and mayonnaise is a developing area. Most recent developments include the encapsulation of foods in the areas of controlled release, carrier materials, preparation methods and sweetener immobilization. New markets are being developed and current research is underway to reduce the high production costs and lack of food-grade materials.

  20. USE OF RECYCLED POLYMERS FOR ENCAPSULATION OF RADIOACTIVE, HAZARDOUS AND MIXED WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    LAGERRAAEN,P.R.; KALB,P.D.

    1997-11-01

    Polyethylene encapsulation is a waste treatment technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory using thermoplastic polymers to safely and effectively solidify hazardous, radioactive and mixed wastes for disposal. Over 13 years of development and demonstration with surrogate wastes as well as actual waste streams on both bench and full scale have shown this to be a viable and robust technology with wide application. Process development efforts have previously focused on the use of virgin polymer feedstocks. In order to potentially improve process economics and serve to lessen the municipal waste burden, recycled polymers were investigated for use as encapsulating agents. Recycled plastics included low-density polyethylene, linear low-density polyethylene, high-density polyethylene and polypropylene, and were used as a direct substitute for or blended together with virgin resin. Impacts on processing and final waste form performance were examined.

  1. Evolutionary plasticity determination by orthologous groups distribution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic plasticity may be understood as the ability of a functional gene network to tolerate alterations in its components or structure. Usually, the studies involving gene modifications in the course of the evolution are concerned to nucleotide sequence alterations in closely related species. However, the analysis of large scale data about the distribution of gene families in non-exclusively closely related species can provide insights on how plastic or how conserved a given gene family is. Here, we analyze the abundance and diversity of all Eukaryotic Clusters of Orthologous Groups (KOG) present in STRING database, resulting in a total of 4,850 KOGs. This dataset comprises 481,421 proteins distributed among 55 eukaryotes. Results We propose an index to evaluate the evolutionary plasticity and conservation of an orthologous group based on its abundance and diversity across eukaryotes. To further KOG plasticity analysis, we estimate the evolutionary distance average among all proteins which take part in the same orthologous group. As a result, we found a strong correlation between the evolutionary distance average and the proposed evolutionary plasticity index. Additionally, we found low evolutionary plasticity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes associated with inviability and Mus musculus genes associated with early lethality. At last, we plot the evolutionary plasticity value in different gene networks from yeast and humans. As a result, it was possible to discriminate among higher and lower plastic areas of the gene networks analyzed. Conclusions The distribution of gene families brings valuable information on evolutionary plasticity which might be related with genetic plasticity. Accordingly, it is possible to discriminate among conserved and plastic orthologous groups by evaluating their abundance and diversity across eukaryotes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof Manyuan Long, Hiroyuki Toh, and Sebastien Halary. PMID:21586164

  2. Encapsulation layer design and scalability in encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Muxi; Fang, Yichen; Wang, Zongwei; Chen, Gong; Pan, Yue; Yang, Xue; Yin, Minghui; Yang, Yuchao; Li, Ming; Cai, Yimao; Huang, Ru

    2016-05-01

    Here we propose a novel encapsulated vertical 3D RRAM structure with each resistive switching cell encapsulated by dielectric layers, contributing to both the reliability improvement of individual cells and thermal disturbance reduction of adjacent cells due to the effective suppression of unwanted oxygen vacancy diffusion. In contrast to the traditional vertical 3D RRAM, encapsulated bar-electrodes are adopted in the proposed structure substituting the previous plane-electrodes, thus encapsulated resistive switching cells can be naturally formed by simply oxidizing the tip of the metal bar-electrodes. In this work, TaO x -based 3D RRAM devices with SiO2 and Si3N4 as encapsulation layers are demonstrated, both showing significant advantages over traditional unencapsulated vertical 3D RRAM. Furthermore, it was found thermal conductivity and oxygen blocking ability are two key parameters of the encapsulation layer design influencing the scalability of vertical 3D RRAM. Experimental and simulation data show that oxygen blocking ability is more critical for encapsulation layers in the relatively large scale, while thermal conductivity becomes dominant as the stacking layers scale to the sub-10 nm regime. Finally, based on the notable impacts of the encapsulation layer on 3D RRAM scaling, an encapsulation material with both excellent oxygen blocking ability and high thermal conductivity such as AlN is suggested to be highly desirable to maximize the advantages of the proposed encapsulated structure. The findings in this work could pave the way for reliable ultrahigh-density storage applications in the big data era.

  3. Biodegradability of Plastics

    PubMed Central

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P.; Ugwu, Charles U.; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-01-01

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed. PMID:19865515

  4. Biodegradability of plastics.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, Yutaka; Calabia, Buenaventurada P; Ugwu, Charles U; Aiba, Seiichi

    2009-08-26

    Plastic is a broad name given to different polymers with high molecular weight, which can be degraded by various processes. However, considering their abundance in the environment and their specificity in attacking plastics, biodegradation of plastics by microorganisms and enzymes seems to be the most effective process. When plastics are used as substrates for microorganisms, evaluation of their biodegradability should not only be based on their chemical structure, but also on their physical properties (melting point, glass transition temperature, crystallinity, storage modulus etc.). In this review, microbial and enzymatic biodegradation of plastics and some factors that affect their biodegradability are discussed.

  5. Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity: introduction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Kevin; Stryker, Michael

    2017-03-05

    Hebbian plasticity is widely considered to be the mechanism by which information can be coded and retained in neurons in the brain. Homeostatic plasticity moves the neuron back towards its original state following a perturbation, including perturbations produced by Hebbian plasticity. How then does homeostatic plasticity avoid erasing the Hebbian coded information? To understand how plasticity works in the brain, and therefore to understand learning, memory, sensory adaptation, development and recovery from injury, requires development of a theory of plasticity that integrates both forms of plasticity into a whole. In April 2016, a group of computational and experimental neuroscientists met in London at a discussion meeting hosted by the Royal Society to identify the critical questions in the field and to frame the research agenda for the next steps. Here, we provide a brief introduction to the papers arising from the meeting and highlight some of the themes to have emerged from the discussions.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity'.

  6. HEPES-stabilized encapsulation of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Suo, Zhiyong; Yang, Xinghong; Avci, Recep; Kellerman, Laura; Pascual, David W; Fries, Marc; Steele, Andrew

    2007-01-30

    Most bacteria, planktonic and sessile, are encapsulated inside loosely bound extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) in their physiological environment. Imaging a bacterium with its capsule requires lengthy sample preparation to enhance the capsular contrast. In this study, Salmonella typhimurium was investigated using atomic force microscopy for a practical means of imaging an encapsulated bacterium in air. The investigation further aimed to determine the relation between the buffers used for preparing the bacterium and the preservation of the capsular material surrounding it. It was observed that rinsing bacteria with HEPES buffer could stabilize and promote capsule formation, while rinsing with PBS, Tris, or glycine removes most of the capsular EPS. For bacteria rinsed with HEPES and air-dried, the height images showed only the contour of the capsular material, while the phase and amplitude images presented the detailed structures of the bacterial surface, including the flagella encapsulated inside the capsular EPS. The encapsulation was attributed to the cross-linking of the acidic exopolysaccharides mediated by the piperazine moiety of HEPES through electrostatic attraction. This explanation is supported by encapsulated bacteria observed for samples rinsed with N,N'-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine solution and by the presence of entrapped HEPES within the dry capsular EPS suggested by micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  7. Sol-gel method for encapsulating molecules

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Ashley, Carol S.; Bhatia, Rimple; Singh, Anup K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for encapsulating organic molecules, and in particular, biomolecules using sol-gel chemistry. A silica sol is prepared from an aqueous alkali metal silicate solution, such as a mixture of silicon dioxide and sodium or potassium oxide in water. The pH is adjusted to a suitably low value to stabilize the sol by minimizing the rate of siloxane condensation, thereby allowing storage stability of the sol prior to gelation. The organic molecules, generally in solution, is then added with the organic molecules being encapsulated in the sol matrix. After aging, either a thin film can be prepared or a gel can be formed with the encapsulated molecules. Depending upon the acid used, pH, and other processing conditions, the gelation time can be from one minute up to several days. In the method of the present invention, no alcohols are generated as by-products during the sol-gel and encapsulation steps. The organic molecules can be added at any desired pH value, where the pH value is generally chosen to achieve the desired reactivity of the organic molecules. The method of the present invention thereby presents a sufficiently mild encapsulation method to retain a significant portion of the activity of the biomolecules, compared with the activity of the biomolecules in free solution.

  8. Encapsulation of Natural Polyphenolic Compounds; a Review

    PubMed Central

    Munin, Aude; Edwards-Lévy, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Natural polyphenols are valuable compounds possessing scavenging properties towards radical oxygen species, and complexing properties towards proteins. These abilities make polyphenols interesting for the treatment of various diseases like inflammation or cancer, but also for anti-ageing purposes in cosmetic formulations, or for nutraceutical applications. Unfortunately, these properties are also responsible for a lack in long-term stability, making these natural compounds very sensitive to light and heat. Moreover, polyphenols often present a poor biodisponibility mainly due to low water solubility. Lastly, many of these molecules possess a very astringent and bitter taste, which limits their use in food or in oral medications. To circumvent these drawbacks, delivery systems have been developed, and among them, encapsulation would appear to be a promising approach. Many encapsulation methods are described in the literature, among which some have been successfully applied to plant polyphenols. In this review, after a general presentation of the large chemical family of plant polyphenols and of their main chemical and biological properties, encapsulation processes applied to polyphenols are classified into physical, physico-chemical, chemical methods, and other connected stabilization methods. After a brief description of each encapsulation process, their applications to polyphenol encapsulation for pharmaceutical, food or cosmetological purposes are presented. PMID:24309309

  9. Approaches to encapsulation of flexible CIGS cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, L. C.; Gross, M. E.; Graff, G. L.; Kundu, S. N.; Chu, Xi; Lin, Steve

    2008-08-01

    Thin-film solar cells based on CIGS are being considered for large scale power plants as well as building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) applications. Past studies indicate that CIGS cells degrade rapidly when exposed to moisture. As a result, an effective approach to encapsulation is required for CIGS cells to satisfy the international standard IEC 61646. CIGS modules fabricated for use in large power plants can be encapsulated with glass sheets on the top and bottom surfaces and can be effectively sealed around the edges. In the case of BIPV applications, however, it is desirable to utilize CIGS cells grown on flexible substrates, both for purposes of achieving reduced weight and for cases involving non-flat surfaces. For these cases, approaches to encapsulation must be compatible with the flexible substrate requirement. Even in the case of large power plants, the glass-to-glass approach to encapsulation may eventually be considered too costly. We are investigating encapsulation of flexible CIGS cells by lamination. Sheets of PET or PEN coated with multilayer barrier coatings are used to laminate the flexible cells. Results are discussed for laminated cells from two CIGS manufacturers. In both cases, the cell efficiency decreases less than 10% after 1000 hours of exposure to an environment of 85°C/85%RH. This paper discusses these two approaches, and reviews results for uncoated cells and mini-modules fabricated by the former Shell Solar Industries (SSI).

  10. Degradation of Silicone Encapsulants in CPV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Can; Miller, David C.; Tappan, Ian A.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-11-21

    High efficiency multijunction solar cells in terrestrial concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules are becoming an increasingly cost effective and viable option in utility scale power generation. As with other utility scale photovoltaics, CPV modules need to guarantee operational lifetimes of at least 25 years. The reliability of optical elements in CPV modules poses a unique materials challenge due to the increased UV irradiance and enhanced temperature cycling associated with concentrated solar flux. The polymeric and thin film materials used in the optical elements are especially susceptible to UV damage, diurnal temperature cycling and active chemical species from the environment. We used fracture mechanics approaches to study the degradation modes including: the adhesion between the encapsulant and the cell or secondary optical element; and the cohesion of the encapsulant itself. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of materials degradation under elevated stress conditions is critical for commercialization of CPV technology and can offer unique insights into degradation modes in similar encapsulants used in other photovoltaic modules.

  11. Evaluation of Encapsulant Materials for PV Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M.

    2010-01-01

    Encapsulant materials used in PV modules serve multiple purposes. They physically hold components in place, provide electrical insulation, optically couple superstrate materials (e.g., glass) to PV cells, protect components from mechanical stress by mechanically de-coupling components via strain relief, and protect materials from corrosion. To do this, encapsulants must adhere well to all surfaces, remain compliant, and transmit light after exposure to temperature, humidity, and UV radiation histories. Encapsulant materials by themselves do not completely prevent water vapour ingress [1-3], but if they are well adhered, they will prevent the accumulation of liquid water providing protection against corrosion as well as electrical shock. Here, a brief review of some of the polymeric materials under consideration for PV applications is provided, with an explanation of some of their advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Encapsulant selection and durability testing experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1985-01-01

    The Flat Plate Solar Array Project (FSA) has established technically challenging cost and service life goals for photovoltaic modules. These goals are a cost of $70 sq m and an expected 30 years of service life in an outdoor weathering environment. out of the cost goal, $14 sq m is allocated for encapsulation materials, which includes the cost of a structural panel. At FSA's inception in 1975, the cumulative cost of encapsulation materials in popular use, such as room temperature vulcanized (RTV) silicones, aluminum panels, etc., greatly exceeded $14/sq m. Accordingly, it became necessary to identify and/or develop new materials and new material technologies to achieve the goals. Many of these new materials are low cost polymers that satisfy module engineering and encapsulation processing requirements but unfortunately are not intrinsically weather stable. This necessitates identifying lifetime and/or weathering deficiencies inherent in these low cost materials and developing specific approaches to enhancing weather stability.

  13. Nonlinear response to ultrasound of encapsulated microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Fernández, J

    2012-08-01

    The acoustic backscatter of encapsulated gas-filled microbubbles immersed in a weak compressible liquid and irradiated by ultrasound fields of moderate to high pressure amplitudes is investigated theoretically. The problem is formulated by considering, for the viscoelastic shell of finite thickness, an isotropic hyperelastic neo-Hookean model for the elastic contribution in addition to a Newtonian viscous component. First and second harmonic scattering cross-sections have been evaluated and the quantitative influence of the driving pressure amplitude on the harmonic resonance frequencies for different initial equilibrium bubble sizes and for different encapsulating physical properties has been determined. Conditions for optimal second harmonic imaging have been also investigated and some regions in the parameters space where the second harmonic intensity is dominant over the fundamental have been identified. Results have been obtained for albumin, lipid and polymer encapsulating shells, respectively.

  14. Nondestructive Assay Options for Spent Fuel Encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, Stephen J.; Jansson, Peter

    2014-10-02

    This report describes the role that nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques and systems of NDA techniques may have in the context of an encapsulation and deep geological repository. The potential NDA needs of an encapsulation and repository facility include safeguards, heat content, and criticality. Some discussion of the facility needs is given, with the majority of the report concentrating on the capability and characteristics of individual NDA instruments and techniques currently available or under development. Particular emphasis is given to how the NDA techniques can be used to determine the heat production of an assembly, as well as meet the dual safeguards needs of 1) determining the declared parameters of initial enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time and 2) detecting defects (total, partial, and bias). The report concludes with the recommendation of three integrated systems that might meet the combined NDA needs of the encapsulation/repository facility.

  15. Composition and method for encapsulating photovoltaic devices

    DOEpatents

    Pern, Fu-Jann

    2000-01-01

    A composition and method for encapsulating a photovoltaic device which minimizes discoloration of the encapsulant. The composition includes an ethylene-vinyl acetate encapsulant, a curing agent, an optional ultraviolet light stabilizer, and/or an optional antioxidant. The curing agent is preferably 1,1-di-(t-butylperoxy)-3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexane; the ultraviolet light stabilizer is bis-(N-octyloxy-tetramethyl) piperidinyl sebacate and the antioxidant is selected from the group consisting of tris (2,4-di-tert-butylphenyl) phosphite, tetrakis methylene (3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate) methane, octadecyl 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate, and 2,2'-ethylidene bis(4,6-di-t-butylphenyl) fluorophosponite. The composition is applied to a solar cell then cured. The cured product contains a minimal concentration of curing-generated chromophores and resists UV-induced degradation.

  16. Nanocellulose-alginate hydrogel for cell encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Minsung; Lee, Dajung; Hyun, Jinho

    2015-02-13

    TEMPO-oxidized bacterial cellulose (TOBC)-sodium alginate (SA) composites were prepared to improve the properties of hydrogel for cell encapsulation. TOBC fibers were obtained using a TEMPO/NaBr/NaClO system at pH 10 and room temperature. The fibrillated TOBCs mixed with SA were cross-linked in the presence of Ca(2+) solution to form hydrogel composites. The compression strength and chemical stability of the TOBC/SA composites were increased compared with the SA hydrogel, which indicated that TOBC performed an important function in enhancing the structural, mechanical and chemical stability of the composites. Cells were successfully encapsulated in the TOBC/SA composites, and the viability of cells was investigated. TOBC/SA composites can be a potential candidate for cell encapsulation engineering.

  17. Cells as factories for humanized encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Mao, Zhengwei; Cartier, Regis; Hohl, Anja; Farinacci, Maura; Dorhoi, Anca; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Mulvaney, Paul; Ralston, John; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Möhwald, Helmuth; Wang, Dayang

    2011-05-11

    Biocompatibility is of paramount importance for drug delivery, tumor labeling, and in vivo application of nanoscale bioprobes. Until now, biocompatible surface processing has typically relied on PEGylation and other surface coatings, which, however, cannot minimize clearance by macrophages or the renal system but may also increase the risk of chemical side effects. Cell membranes provide a generic and far more natural approach to the challenges of encapsulation and delivery in vivo. Here we harness for the first time living cells as "factories" to manufacture cell membrane capsules for encapsulation and delivery of drugs, nanoparticles, and other biolabels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the built-in protein channels of the new capsules can be utilized for controlled release of encapsulated reagents.

  18. Approaches to Encapsulation of Flexible CIGS Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Larry C.; Gross, Mark E.; Graff, Gordon L.; Kundu, Sambhu N.; Chu, Xi; Lin, Steve

    2008-07-16

    Thin-film solar cells based on CIGS are being considered for large scale power plants as well as building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) applications. Past studies indicate that CIGS cells degrade rapidly when exposed to moisture. As a result, an effective approach to encapsulation is required for CIGS cells to satisfy the international standard IEC 61646. CIGS modules fabricated for use in large power plants can be encapsulated with glass sheets on the top and bottom surfaces and can be effectively sealed around the edges. In the case of BIPV applications, however, it is desirable to utilize CIGS cells grown on flexible substrates, both for purposes of achieving reduced weight and for cases involving non-flat surfaces. For these cases, approaches to encapsulation must be compatible with the flexible substrate requirement. Even in the case of large power plants, the glass-to-glass approach to encapsulation may eventually be considered too costly. We are investigating encapsulation of flexible CIGS cells by lamination. Sheets of PET or PEN coated with multilayer barrier coatings are used to laminate the flexible cells. Results are discussed for laminated cells from two CIGS manufacturers. In both cases, the cell efficiency decreases less than 10% after 1000 hours of exposure to an environment of 85C/85%RH. This paper discusses these two approaches, reviews results achieved with cells and mini-modules fabricated by the former Shell Solar, Industries (SSI) stressed at 60C/90%RH (60/90), and recent studies of encapsulated IEC cells subjected to an environment of 85ºC/85%RH (85/85).

  19. Assessment of bioburden encapsulated in bulk materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Newlin, Laura; Chung, Shirley Y.; Ellyin, Raymond

    2016-05-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) imposes bioburden limitations on all spacecraft destined for solar system bodies that might harbor evidence of extant or extinct life. The subset of microorganisms trapped within solid materials during manufacture and assembly is referred to as encapsulated bioburden. In the absence of spacecraft-specific data, NASA relies on specification values to estimate total spacecraft encapsulated bioburden, typically 30 endospores/cm3 or 300 viable cells/cm3 in non-electronic materials. Specification values for endospores have been established conservatively, and represent no less than an order of magnitude greater abundance than that derived from empirical assessments of actual spacecraft materials. The goal of this study was to generate data germane to determining whether revised bulk encapsulated material values (lower than those estimated by historical specifications) tailored specifically to the materials designated in modern-day spacecraft design could be used, on a case-by-case basis, to comply with planetary protection requirements. Organic materials having distinctly different chemical properties and configurations were selected. This required more than one experimental and analytical approach. Filtration was employed for liquid electrolytes, lubricants were suspended in an aqueous solution and solids (wire and epoxy sealant) were cryogenically milled. The final data characteristic for all bioburden estimates was microbial colony formation in rich agar growth medium. To assess survival potential, three non-spore-forming bacterial cell lines were systematically encapsulated in an epoxy matrix, liberated via cryogenic grinding, and cultured. Results suggest that bulk solid materials harbor significantly fewer encapsulated microorganisms than are estimated by specification values. Lithium-ion battery electrolyte reagents housed fewer than 1 CFU/cm3. Results also demonstrated that non-spore-forming microorganisms

  20. Epoxy Foam Encapsulants: Processing and Dielectric Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Linda Domeier; Marion Hunter

    1999-01-01

    The dielectric performance of epoxy foams was investigated to determine if such materials might provide advantages over more standard polyurethane foams in the encapsulation of electronic assemblies. Comparisons of the dielectric characteristics of epoxy and urethane encapsulant foams found no significant differences between the two resin types and no significant difference between as-molded and machined foams. This study specifically evaluated the formulation and processing of epoxy foams using simple methylhydrosiloxanes as the flowing agent and compared the dielectric performance of those to urethane foams of similar density.

  1. Temperature responsive hydroxypropyl cellulose for encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heitfeld, Kevin A.; Guo, Tingtai; Yang, George; Schaefer, Dale W.

    2009-08-26

    This work focuses on the use of temperature responsive gels (TRGs) (polymeric hydrogels with a large temperature-dependent change in volume) for flavor retention at cooking temperatures. Specifically, we have studied a gel with a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that swells at low temperatures and collapses at high temperatures. In the collapsed state, the polymer acts as a transport barrier, keeping the volatile flavors inside. We have successfully synthesized a cellulose gel that exhibits this volume change and have encapsulated an oil phase inside the gel. The flavor-loaded encapsulated oil exhibited an increased release time when compared to similar gelatin capsules.

  2. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  3. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOEpatents

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  4. Liposomal encapsulated anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Hofheinz, Ralf-Dieter; Gnad-Vogt, Senta Ulrike; Beyer, Ulrich; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    Among several drug delivery systems, liposomal encapsulated anti-cancer agents represent an advanced and versatile technology. Several formulations of liposomal anthracyclines are approved, e.g. for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (pegylated and non-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin) or AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (pegylated liposomal doxorubicin and liposomal daunorubicin). Meanwhile, virtually all anti-cancer drugs have been encapsulated in liposomes using different technologies. This review will summarize preclinical and clinical data of approved and exemplary emerging liposomal anti-cancer agents.

  5. How Plastics Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Louis

    2013-03-01

    We encounter plastics every day, but despite their widespread use, amazing range of properties, and basic scientific underpinnings, most physicists--like most people--know relatively little about plastics. In contrast to hard crystalline and amorphous solids (e.g., metals, salts, ceramics, and glasses), we take plastics for granted, select them carelessly, and examine them more closely only on a need-to-know basis. By ignoring plastics until we need them, however, we risk not knowing what we don't know and using the wrong ones. To repurpose a familiar advertisement, ``there's a plastic for that.'' This talk will review some of the basic physics and science of plastics. It will examine the roles of temperature, order, intermolecular forces, entanglements, and linkages in plastics, and how those issues affect the properties of a given plastic. We'll stop along the way to recognize a few of the more familiar plastics, natural and synthetic, and explain some of their mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. The talk will conclude by explaining the remarkable properties of a plastic that has been largely misunderstood since its discovery 70 years ago: Silly Putty.

  6. Encapsulation and Controlled Release of Heparin from Electrospun Poly(L-Lactide-co-ε-Caprolactone) Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Li, Xiaoqiang; Liu, Yinan; Su, Qianqian; Qiang, Marcus Lim Wei; Mo, Xiumei

    2011-01-01

    Poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) nanofibers with heparin incorporated were successfully fabricated by coaxial electrospinning. The morphologies of electrospun nanofibers were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a significant decrease in fiber diameter was observed with increasing heparin concentration. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated that coaxial electrospinning could generate core-shell structure nanofibers which have the potential to encapsulate drugs (heparin in this study) into the core part of nanofibers. Approximately 80% of the encapsulated heparin was sustainedly and stably released from the fibrous composite in 14 days by a diffusion/erosion coupled mechanism. The release behavior of heparin from blend electrospun nanofibers was also studied and showed an obvious burst release in the initial stage. An in vitro proliferation test was conducted to study the effect of heparin released from nanofibers, and the results suggest that the heparin maintains its bioactivity after encapsulating with and delivery through coaxially electrospun fibers.

  7. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) Interim Status Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). WESF is located within the 225B Facility in the 200 East Area on the Hanford Facility. Although this document is prepared based on Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G requirements, closure of the storage unit will comply with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 regulations pursuant to Section 5.3 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Action Plan (Ecology et al. 1996). Because the intention is to clean close WESF, postclosure activities are not applicable to this interim status closure plan. To clean close the storage unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left onsite at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or environmentally is impracticable, the interim status closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. WESF stores cesium and strontium encapsulated salts. The encapsulated salts are stored in the pool cells or process cells located within 225B Facility. The dangerous waste is contained within a double containment system to preclude spills to the environment. In the unlikely event that a waste spill does occur outside the capsules, operating methods and administrative controls require that waste spills be cleaned up promptly and completely, and a notation made in the operating record. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. The information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge.

  8. Our plastic age.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Richard C; Swan, Shanna H; Moore, Charles J; vom Saal, Frederick S

    2009-07-27

    Within the last few decades, plastics have revolutionized our daily lives. Globally we use in excess of 260 million tonnes of plastic per annum, accounting for approximately 8 per cent of world oil production. In this Theme Issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, we describe current and future trends in usage, together with the many benefits that plastics bring to society. At the same time, we examine the environmental consequences resulting from the accumulation of waste plastic, the effects of plastic debris on wildlife and concerns for human health that arise from the production, usage and disposal of plastics. Finally, we consider some possible solutions to these problems together with the research and policy priorities necessary for their implementation.

  9. Therapeutic cell encapsulation techniques and applications in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Steele, J A M; Hallé, J-P; Poncelet, D; Neufeld, R J

    2014-04-01

    The encapsulation of therapeutic cells permits the implantation of allogeneic and xenogeneic cells for the regulation of certain physiological processes damaged by the death or senescence of host tissues. The encapsulation of pancreatic cells for the treatment of diabetes is emphasized; however, many of the techniques are applicable to a wide array of mammalian cell applications. The summary of both established and novel encapsulation techniques, clinical trials, and commercial product developments highlights the metered but steady pace of therapeutic cell encapsulation towards implementation.

  10. Plastics and health risks.

    PubMed

    Halden, Rolf U

    2010-01-01

    By 2010, the worldwide annual production of plastics will surpass 300 million tons. Plastics are indispensable materials in modern society, and many products manufactured from plastics are a boon to public health (e.g., disposable syringes, intravenous bags). However, plastics also pose health risks. Of principal concern are endocrine-disrupting properties, as triggered for example by bisphenol A and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). Opinions on the safety of plastics vary widely, and despite more than five decades of research, scientific consensus on product safety is still elusive. This literature review summarizes information from more than 120 peer-reviewed publications on health effects of plastics and plasticizers in lab animals and humans. It examines problematic exposures of susceptible populations and also briefly summarizes adverse environmental impacts from plastic pollution. Ongoing efforts to steer human society toward resource conservation and sustainable consumption are discussed, including the concept of the 5 Rs--i.e., reduce, reuse, recycle, rethink, restrain--for minimizing pre- and postnatal exposures to potentially harmful components of plastics.

  11. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Deanin, R D

    1975-01-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products. PMID:1175566

  12. Additives in plastics.

    PubMed

    Deanin, R D

    1975-06-01

    The polymers used in plastics are generally harmless. However, they are rarely used in pure form. In almost all commercial plastics, they are "compounded" with monomeric ingredients to improve their processing and end-use performance. In order of total volume used, these monomeric additives may be classified as follows: reinforcing fibers, fillers, and coupling agents; plasticizers; colorants; stabilizers (halogen stabilizers, antioxidants, ultraviolet absorbers, and biological preservatives); processing aids (lubricants, others, and flow controls); flame retardants, peroxides; and antistats. Some information is already available, and much more is needed, on potential toxicity and safe handling of these additives during processing and manufacture of plastics products.

  13. Prepolymer Syrup for Encapsulating Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, A.; Ingham, J. D.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1982-01-01

    Clear polymer syrup, made by disolving n-butyl acrylate prepolymer in monomer, used to encapsulate solar cells by any of three standard processes (dipping, multiple coating, or automated machine coating). Use of cyclohexane instead of methanol/water solvent during initial polymerization stage maintains high molecular weight and raises yield of linear polymer to essentially 100 percent.

  14. Liposome-Encapsulated Hemoglobin for Emergency Resuscitation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    have infused liposome -encapsulated amphotericin B to treat patients with systemic fungal infections. Their formulation includes 30% dimyristoyl...procedure, including exploring new industrial-scale methodologies for liposome manufacture. In addition we have focused on basic problems of biophysics...circulation persistance of this new formulation , as produced by the Microfluidizer, is obviously necessary. The influence of negatively-charged lipids on

  15. Magic ferritin: A novel chemotherapeutic encapsulation bullet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simsek, Ece; Akif Kilic, Mehmet

    2005-05-01

    The dissociation of apoferritin into subunits at pH 2 followed by its reformation at pH 7.4 in the presence of doxorubicin-HCl gives rise to a solution containing five doxorubicin-HCl molecules trapped within the apoferritin. This is the first report showing that ferritin can encapsulate an anti-cancer drug into its cavity.

  16. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2006-04-11

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  17. Encapsulation method for maintaining biodecontamination activity

    DOEpatents

    Rogers, Robert D.; Hamilton, Melinda A.; Nelson, Lee O.; Benson, Jennifer; Green, Martin J.; Milner, Timothy N.

    2002-01-01

    A method for maintaining the viability and subsequent activity of microorganisms utilized in a variety of environments to promote biodecontamination of surfaces. One application involves the decontamination of concrete surfaces. Encapsulation of microbial influenced degradation (MID) microorganisms has shown that MID activity is effectively maintained under passive conditions, that is, without manual addition of moisture or nutrients, for an extended period of time.

  18. Stability of lipid encapsulated ferulic acid particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Encapsulation of bioactive compounds by a solid lipid matrix provides stability and a mechanism for controlled release in formulated products. Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and have applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a common pheno...

  19. Testing Protocol for Module Encapsulant Creep (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.; Miller, D. C.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S. R.; Moseley, J. M.; Shah, Q.; Tamizhmani, G.; Sakurai, K.; Inoue, M.; Doi, T.; Masuda, A.

    2012-02-01

    Recently there has been an interest in the use of thermoplastic encapsulant materials in photovoltaic modules to replace chemically crosslinked materials, e.g., ethylene-vinyl acetate. The related motivations include the desire to: reduce lamination time or temperature; use less moisture-permeable materials; or use materials with better corrosion characteristics. However, the use of any thermoplastic material in a high-temperature environment raises safety and performance concerns, as the standardized tests currently do not expose the modules to temperatures in excess of 85C, yet modules may experience temperatures above 100C in operation. Here we constructed eight pairs of crystalline-silicon modules and eight pairs of glass/encapsulation/glass mock modules using different encapsulation materials of which only two were designed to chemically crosslink. One module set was exposed outdoors with insulation on the back side in Arizona in the summer, and an identical set was exposed in environmental chambers. High precision creep measurements and performance measurements indicate that despite many of these polymeric materials being in the melt state at some of the highest outdoor temperatures achievable, very little creep was seen because of their high viscosity, temperature heterogeneity across the modules, and in the case of the crystalline-silicon modules, the physical restraint of the backsheet. These findings have very important implications for the development of IEC and UL qualification and safety standards, and in regards to the necessary level of cure during the processing of crosslinking encapsulants.

  20. Method for foam encapsulating laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1977-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser fusion targets are made by positioning a fusion fuel-filled sphere within a mold cavity of suitable configuration and dimensions, and then filling the cavity with a material capable of producing a low density, microcellular foam, such as cellulose acetate dissolved in an acetone-based solvent. The mold assembly is dipped into an ice water bath to gel the material and thereafter soaked in the water bath to leach out undesired components, after which the gel is frozen, then freeze-dried wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into a low-density microcellular foam, thereafter the resulting foam encapsulated target is removed from the mold cavity. The fuel-filled sphere is surrounded by foam having a thickness of about 10 to 100 .mu.m, a cell size of less than 2 .mu.m, and density of 0.065 to 0.6 .times. 10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3. Various configured foam-encapsulated targets capable of being made by this encapsulation method are illustrated.

  1. Antidiabetic Activity from Gallic Acid Encapsulated Nanochitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purbowatiningrum; Ngadiwiyana; Ismiyarto; Fachriyah, E.; Eviana, I.; Eldiana, O.; Amaliyah, N.; Sektianingrum, A. N.

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) has become a health problem in the world because it causes death. One of the phenolic compounds that have antidiabetic activity is gallic acid. However, the use of this compound still provides unsatisfactory results due to its degradation during the absorption process. The solution offered to solve the problem is by encapsulated it within chitosan nanoparticles that serve to protect the bioactive compound from degradation, increases of solubility and delivery of a bioactive compound to the target site by using freeze-drying technique. The result of chitosan nanoparticle’s Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) showed that chitosan nanoparticle’s size is uniform and it is smaller than chitosan. The value of encapsulation efficiency (EE) of gallic acid which encapsulated within chitosan nanoparticles is about 50.76%. Inhibition test result showed that gallic acid-chitosan nanoparticles at 50 ppm could inhibite α-glucosidase activity in 28.87% with 54.94 in IC50. So it can be concluded that gallic acid can be encapsulated in nanoparticles of chitosan and proved that it could inhibit α-glucosidase.

  2. Encapsulation Processing and Manufacturing Yield Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, P. B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of encapsulation processing and a manufacturing productivity analysis for photovoltaic cells are discussed. The goals were: (1) to understand the relationships between both formulation variables and process variables; (2) to define conditions required for optimum performance; (3) to predict manufacturing yield; and (4) to provide documentation to industry.

  3. Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity: introduction

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Hebbian plasticity is widely considered to be the mechanism by which information can be coded and retained in neurons in the brain. Homeostatic plasticity moves the neuron back towards its original state following a perturbation, including perturbations produced by Hebbian plasticity. How then does homeostatic plasticity avoid erasing the Hebbian coded information? To understand how plasticity works in the brain, and therefore to understand learning, memory, sensory adaptation, development and recovery from injury, requires development of a theory of plasticity that integrates both forms of plasticity into a whole. In April 2016, a group of computational and experimental neuroscientists met in London at a discussion meeting hosted by the Royal Society to identify the critical questions in the field and to frame the research agenda for the next steps. Here, we provide a brief introduction to the papers arising from the meeting and highlight some of the themes to have emerged from the discussions. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity’. PMID:28093560

  4. Encapsulation of Organic Chemicals within a Starch Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wing, R. E.; Shasha, B. S.

    1983-01-01

    Three experiments demonstrating the feasibility of encapsulating liquids within a starch matrix are described, including encapsulation of linseed oil using the zanthate method and of turpentine and butylate using the calcium adduct procedure. Encapsulated materials, including pesticides, are slowly released from the resulting matrix. Considers…

  5. Neural Plasticity: For Good and Bad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, A. R.

    The brain's ability to change its organization and function is necessary for normal development of the nervous system and it makes it possible to adapt to changing demands but it can also cause disorders when going awry. This property, known as neural plasticity, is only evident when induced, very much like genes. Plastic changes may be programmed and providing a ``midcourse correction" during childhood development. If that is not executed in the normal way severe developmental disorders such as autism may results. Normal development of functions and anatomical organization of the brain and the spinal cord depend on appropriate sensory stimulation and motor activations. So-called enriched sensory environments have been shown to be beneficial for cognitive development and enriched acoustic environment may even slow the progression of age-related hearing loss. It is possible that the beneficial effect of physical exercise is achieved through activation of neural plasticity. The beneficial effect of training after trauma to the brain or spinal cord is mainly achieved through shifting functions from damaged brain area to other parts of the central nervous system and adapting these parts to take over the functions that are lost. This is accomplished through activation of neural plasticity. Plastic changes can also be harmful and cause symptoms and signs of disorders such as some forms of chronic pain (central neuropathic pain) and severe tinnitus. We will call such disorders ``plasticity disorders".

  6. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures. PMID:26516921

  7. Biocompatible Hydrogels for Microarray Cell Printing and Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Datar, Akshata; Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-10-26

    Conventional drug screening processes are a time-consuming and expensive endeavor, but highly rewarding when they are successful. To identify promising lead compounds, millions of compounds are traditionally screened against therapeutic targets on human cells grown on the surface of 96-wells. These two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayers are physiologically irrelevant, thus, often providing false-positive or false-negative results, when compared to cells grown in three-dimensional (3D) structures such as hydrogel droplets. However, 3D cell culture systems are not easily amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS), thus inherently low throughput, and requiring relatively large volume for cell-based assays. In addition, it is difficult to control cellular microenvironments and hard to obtain reliable cell images due to focus position and transparency issues. To overcome these problems, miniaturized 3D cell cultures in hydrogels were developed via cell printing techniques where cell spots in hydrogels can be arrayed on the surface of glass slides or plastic chips by microarray spotters and cultured in growth media to form cells encapsulated 3D droplets for various cell-based assays. These approaches can dramatically reduce assay volume, provide accurate control over cellular microenvironments, and allow us to obtain clear 3D cell images for high-content imaging (HCI). In this review, several hydrogels that are compatible to microarray printing robots are discussed for miniaturized 3D cell cultures.

  8. A method to tune the shape of protein-encapsulated polymeric microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alteriis, Renato De; Vecchione, Raffaele; Attanasio, Chiara; Gregorio, Maria De; Porzio, Massimiliano; Battista, Edmondo; Netti, Paolo A.

    2015-07-01

    Protein encapsulation technologies of polymeric microspheres currently in use have been optimized to effectively protect their “protein cargo” from inactivation occurring in biological environments, preserving its bioactivity during release up to several weeks. The scenario of protein delivery would greatly benefit by strategies enabling the production of non-spherical particles. Herein we report an easy and effective stamp-based method to produce poly-lactic-glycolic-acid (PLGA) microparticles encapsulating Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) of different shapes. We demonstrate that PLGA microspheres can be deformed at room temperature exploiting solvent/non-solvent plasticization in order to preserve the properties of the starting microspheres. This gentle method allows the production of shaped particles that provide a prolonged release of VEGF in active form, as verified by an angiogenic assay. The retention of the biological activity of an extremely labile molecule, i.e. VEGF, lets us hypothesize that a wide variety of drug and protein encapsulated polymeric microspheres can be processed using this method.

  9. Interface controlled plastic flow modelled by strain gradient plasticity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardoen, Thomas; Massart, Thierry J.

    The resistance to plastic flow in metals is often dominated by the presence of interfaces which interfere with dislocation nucleation and motion. Interfaces can be static such as grain and phase boundaries or dynamic such as new boundaries resulting from a phase transformation. The interface can be hard and fully impenetrable to dislocations, or soft and partly or fully transparent. The interactions between dislocations and interfaces constitute the main mechanism controlling the strength and strain hardening capacity of many metallic systems especially in very fine microstructures with a high density of interfaces. A phenomenological strain gradient plasticity theory is used to introduce, within a continuum framework, higher order boundary conditions which empirically represent the effect of interfaces on plastic flow. The strength of the interfaces can evolve during the loading in order to enrich the description of their response. The behaviour of single and dual phase steels, with possible TRIP effect, accounting for the interactions with static and dynamic boundaries, is addressed, with a specific focus on the size dependent strength and ductility balance. The size dependent response of weak precipitate free zones surrounding grain boundaries is treated as an example involving more than one microstructural length scale.

  10. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To increase global market share and value the US cotton industry needs to supply cotton lint that is free of contamination. Removing plastic contamination first requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to validate a custom Ion Mobility Spectrometer (IM...

  11. Detecting plastics in seedcotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The US cotton industry wants to increase market share and value by supplying pure cotton. Removing contamination requires developing a means to detect plastics in seedcotton. This study was conducted to determine if Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be used to find small amounts of plastic in ...

  12. Biodegradation of plastics.

    PubMed

    Shimao, M

    2001-06-01

    Widespread studies on the biodegradation of plastics have been carried out in order to overcome the environmental problems associated with synthetic plastic waste. Recent work has included studies of the distribution of synthetic polymer-degrading microorganisms in the environment, the isolation of new microorganisms for biodegradation, the discovery of new degradation enzymes, and the cloning of genes for synthetic polymer-degrading enzymes.

  13. Encapsulation of Enzymes and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, Gabrie M. H.

    A large part of formulated peptides and proteins, e.g., enzymes used as food ingredients, are formulated in a liquid form. Often, they are dissolved in water to which glycerol or sorbitol is added to reduce the water activity of the liquid, thus reducing the change of microbial growth. Still, there are reasons to formulate them in a solid form. Often, these reasons are stability, since a dry formulation is often much better than liquid formulations, and less transportation cost, since less mass is transported if one gets rid of the liquid; however, most of the times, the reason is that the product is mixed with a solid powder. Here, a liquid addition would lead to lump formation.

  14. Track recording plastic compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarle, Gregory (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    Improved nuclear track recording plastic compositions are provided which exhibit greatly decreased surface roughness when etched to produce visible tracks of energetic nuclear particles which have passed into and/or through said plastic. The improved compositions incorporate a small quantity of a phthalic acid ester into the major plastic component which is derived from the polymerization of monomeric di-ethylene glycol bis allyl carbonate. Di-substituted phthalic acid esters are preferred as the added component, with the further perference that the ester substituent has a chain length of 2 or more carbon atoms. The inclusion of the phthalic acid ester to an extent of from about 1-2% by weight of the plastic compositions is sufficient to drastically reduce the surface roughness ordinarily produced when the track recording plastic is contacted by etchants.

  15. American Society of Plastic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... that instill confidence. Do Your Homework Patient Safety Plastic Surgery When you choose a doctor who is ... to procedure selector Why Choose A Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Choose a board-certified plastic surgeon and ...

  16. Development of recycled plastic composites for structural applications from CEA plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Agrim

    Plastic waste from consumer electronic appliances (CEAs) such as computer and printer parts including Polystyrene (PS), Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS), Polystyrene (PS) and PC/ABS were collected using handheld FTIR Spectrophotometer. The blends of these plastics with High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) are manufactured under special processing conditions in a single screw compounding injection molding machine. The blends are thermoplastics have high stiffness and strength, which may enhance the mechanical properties of HDPE like tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, tensile break and tensile yield. These composites have a potential to be used for the future application of recycled plastic lumber, thus replacing the traditional wood lumber.

  17. Hebbian plasticity requires compensatory processes on multiple timescales.

    PubMed

    Zenke, Friedemann; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2017-03-05

    We review a body of theoretical and experimental research on Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity, starting from a puzzling observation: while homeostasis of synapses found in experiments is a slow compensatory process, most mathematical models of synaptic plasticity use rapid compensatory processes (RCPs). Even worse, with the slow homeostatic plasticity reported in experiments, simulations of existing plasticity models cannot maintain network stability unless further control mechanisms are implemented. To solve this paradox, we suggest that in addition to slow forms of homeostatic plasticity there are RCPs which stabilize synaptic plasticity on short timescales. These rapid processes may include heterosynaptic depression triggered by episodes of high postsynaptic firing rate. While slower forms of homeostatic plasticity are not sufficient to stabilize Hebbian plasticity, they are important for fine-tuning neural circuits. Taken together we suggest that learning and memory rely on an intricate interplay of diverse plasticity mechanisms on different timescales which jointly ensure stability and plasticity of neural circuits.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity'.

  18. Stabilization and encapsulation of photosensitive resveratrol within yeast cell.

    PubMed

    Shi, Guorong; Rao, Liqun; Yu, Huazhong; Xiang, Hua; Yang, Hua; Ji, Runa

    2008-02-12

    The photosensitive resveratrol was successfully encapsulated in yeast cells for the first time, as characterized by FT-IR spectra, fluorescence and confocal micrographs of the yeast cells, resveratrol and microcapsules. The release characteristic of the obtained yeast-encapsulated resveratrol in simulated gastric fluid was evaluated, and its storage stability as a powder was investigated at 25 degrees C/75% relative humidity (RH), 25 degrees C/90% RH and 60 degrees C under the laboratory fluorescent lighting conditions (ca. 300 lx) or in the dark. Also, the scavenging capacity of yeast-encapsulated resveratrol on DPPH radical was compared with that of non-encapsulated resveratrol. It could be demonstrated clearly that no chemical changes occurred during the encapsulation. Besides, the DPPH radical-scavenging activity increased after the encapsulation. In addition, the yeast-encapsulated resveratrol exhibited good stability, and its bioavailability was enhanced as a result of increased solubility of resveratrol and sustained releasing.

  19. Laminated Graphene Films for Flexible Transparent Thin Film Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong-Kyu; Park, Min-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kwon, Sung-Joo; Jeong, Su-Hun; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-06-15

    We introduce a simple, inexpensive, and large-area flexible transparent lamination encapsulation method that uses graphene films with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) buffer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The number of stacked graphene layers (nG) was increased from 2 to 6, and 6-layered graphene-encapsulation showed high impermeability to moisture and air. The graphene-encapsulated polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) had stable operating characteristics, and the operational lifetime of encapsulated PLEDs increased as nG increased. Calcium oxidation test data confirmed the improved impermeability of graphene-encapsulation with increased nG. As a practical application, we demonstrated large-area flexible organic light emitting diodes (FOLEDs) and transparent FOLEDs that were encapsulated by our polymer/graphene encapsulant.

  20. Revision of the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation - 12510

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Maurice; Kennedy, James E.; Ridge, Christianne; Lowman, Donald; Cochran, John

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulation governing low-level waste (LLW) disposal, 'Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste', 10 CFR Part 61, establishes a waste classification system based on the concentration of specific radionuclides contained in the waste. The regulation also states, at 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8), that, 'the concentration of a radionuclide (in waste) may be averaged over the volume of the waste, or weight of the waste if the units are expressed as nanocuries per gram'. The NRC's Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation provides guidance on averaging radionuclide concentrations in waste under 10 CFR 61.55(a)(8) when classifying waste for disposal. In 2007, the NRC staff proposed to revise the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is an NRC guidance document for averaging and classifying wastes under 10 CFR 61. The Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation is used by nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensees and sealed source users, among others. In addition, three of the four U.S. LLW disposal facility operators are required to honor the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation as a licensing condition. In 2010, the Commission directed the staff to develop guidance regarding large scale blending of similar homogenous waste types, as described in SECY-10-0043 as part of its Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation revision. The Commission is improving the regulatory approach used in the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation by moving towards a making it more risk-informed and performance-based approach, which is more consistent with the agency's regulatory policies. Among the improvements to the Branch Technical Position on Concentration Averaging and Encapsulation

  1. Phenotypic plasticity and experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Garland, Theodore; Kelly, Scott A

    2006-06-01

    Natural or artificial selection that favors higher values of a particular trait within a given population should engender an evolutionary response that increases the mean value of the trait. For this prediction to hold, the phenotypic variance of the trait must be caused in part by additive effects of alleles segregating in the population, and also the trait must not be too strongly genetically correlated with other traits that are under selection. Another prediction, rarely discussed in the literature, is that directional selection should favor alleles that increase phenotypic plasticity in the direction of selection, where phenotypic plasticity is defined as the ability of one genotype to produce more than one phenotype when exposed to different environments. This prediction has received relatively little empirical attention. Nonetheless, many laboratory experiments impose selection regimes that could allow for the evolution of enhanced plasticity (e.g. desiccation trials with Drosophila that last for several hours or days). We review one example that involved culturing of Drosophila on lemon for multiple generations and then tested for enhanced plasticity of detoxifying enzymes. We also review an example with vertebrates that involves selective breeding for high voluntary activity levels in house mice, targeting wheel-running behavior on days 5+6 of a 6-day wheel exposure. This selection regime allows for the possibility of wheel running itself or subordinate traits that support such running to increase in plasticity over days 1-4 of wheel access. Indeed, some traits, such as the concentration of the glucose transporter GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle, do show enhanced plasticity in the selected lines over a 5-6 day period. In several experiments we have housed mice from both the Selected (S) and Control (C) lines with or without wheel access for several weeks to test for differences in plasticity (training effects). A variety of patterns were observed, including

  2. POLYESTER GLASS PLASTICS FOR SHIPBUILDING,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    POLYESTER PLASTICS , SHIP HULLS), (*SHIP HULLS, POLYESTER PLASTICS ), GLASS TEXTILES, REINFORCING MATERIALS, SHIP STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS, COMPOSITE MATERIALS, PROCESSING, CHEMISTRY, HANDBOOKS, BINDERS, USSR

  3. Nano-encapsulated PCM via Pickering Emulsification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Lecheng; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jia, Lisi; Sam Mannan, M.; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-08-01

    We designed a two-step Pickering emulsification procedure to create nano-encapsulated phase changing materials (NEPCMs) using a method whose simplicity and low energy consumption suggest promise for scale-up and mass production. Surface-modified amphiphilic zirconium phosphate (ZrP) platelets were fabricated as the Pickering emulsifiers, nonadecane was chosen as the core phase change material (PCM), and polystyrene, the shell material. The resultant capsules were submicron in size with remarkable uniformity in size distribution, which has rarely been reported. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterization showed that the capsulation efficiency of NEPCMs, and they were found to be thermal stable, as characterized by the DSC data for the sample after 200 thermal cycles. NEPCMs exhibit superior mechanical stability and mobility when compared with the well-developed micro-encapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs). NEPCMs find useful applications in thermal management, including micro-channel coolants; solar energy storage media; building temperature regulators; and thermal transfer fabrics.

  4. Design documentation: Krypton encapsulation preconceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, D.A.

    1994-10-01

    US EPA regulations limit the release of Krypton-85 to the environment from commercial facilities after January 1, 1983. In order to comply with these regulations, Krypton-85, which would be released during reprocessing of commercial nuclear fuel, must be collected and stored. Technology currently exists for separation of krypton from other inert gases, and for its storage as a compressed gas in steel cylinders. The requirements, which would be imposed for 100-year storage of Krypton-85, have led to development of processes for encapsulation of krypton within a stable solid matrix. The objective of this effort was to provide preconceptual engineering designs, technical evaluations, and life cycle costing data for comparison of two alternate candidate processes for encapsulation of Krypton-85. This report has been prepared by The Ralph M. Parsons Company for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Encapsulation of PV cells using silicone materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, W. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of silicone materials as thin conformal coatings for the protection of photovoltaic cells is investigated. Five silicone materials ranging from soft elastomers to high modulus resins were evaluated after exposure to UV radiation, outdoor weathering, thermal cycling at high humidity and temperature cycling from -40 C to 90 C. The effects of these tests were monitored by periodically measuring the output of two-cell circuit strings encapsulated with the various materials, and one exceptional silicone coating for which no significant changes in cell output were noted after 300 days was chosen as the best of the candidates. Because only a thin coating of the substance is needed, material costs 60% lower than those of previous encapsulants are now possible.

  6. New trends in encapsulation of liposoluble vitamins.

    PubMed

    Gonnet, M; Lethuaut, L; Boury, F

    2010-09-15

    Liposoluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K) and carotenoids have many benefits on health. They are provided mainly by foods. At pharmacological doses, they can also be used to treat skin diseases, several types of cancer or decrease oxidative stress. These molecules are sensitive to oxidation, thus encapsulation might constitute an appropriate mean to preserve their properties during storage and enhance their physiological potencies. Formulation processes have been adapted for sensitive molecule, limiting their exposure to high temperature, light or oxygen. Each administration pathway, oral, systemic, topical, transdermal and local, requires different particle sizes and release profile. Encapsulation can lead to greater efficiency allowing smaller administration doses thus diminishing potential hypervitaminosis syndrome appearance and side effects. Carrier formulation can be based on vitamin dissolution in lipid media and its stabilization by surfactant mixture, on its entrapment in a matrix or molecular system. Suitability of each type of carrier will be discussed for each pathway.

  7. Zeolite encapsulation of H/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.; Lakner, J.F.

    1982-08-01

    Experiments with H/sub 2/ have shown that it is possible to encapsulate gases in the structure of certain molecular sieves. This method may offer a better means of temporarily storing and disposing of tritium over some others presently in use. The method may also prove safer, and may enable isotope separation, and removal of /sup 3/He. Initial experiments were performed with H/sub 2/ to screen potential candidates for use with tritium.

  8. Cinnamomum casia Extract Encapsulated Nanochitosan as Antihypercholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngadiwiyana; Purbowatiningrum; Fachriyah, Enny; Ismiyarto

    2017-02-01

    Atherosclerosis vascular disease with clinical manifestations such as cardiovascular disease and stroke are the leading cause of death in Indonesia. One solution to these problems is a natural antihypercholesterol medicine by utilizing Cinnamomum casia extract. However, the use of natural extracts to lower blood cholesterol levels do not provide optimal results because it is possible that the active components of extract have been degraded/damaged during the absorption process. So that, we need to do the research to get a combination of chitosan nanoparticles-Cinnamomum casia. extract as a compound which has an antihypercholesterol activity through the in vitro study. Modification of natural extracts encapsulated nanochitosan be a freshness in this study, which were conducted using the method of inclusion. The combination of both has the dual function of protecting the natural extracts from degradation and deliver the natural extracts to the target site. Analysis of nanochitosan using the Particle Size Analyzer (PSA) shows the particle size of synthesis product that is equal to 64.9 nm. Encapsulation efficiency of Cinnamomum casia extract-Chitosan Nanoparticles known through UV-VIS spectrophotometry test and obtained the efficiency encapsulation percentage of 84.93%. Zeta Potential at 193,3 mv that chitosan appropriate for a delivery drug. Antihypercholesterol activity tested in vitro assay that showed the extract-nanoparticle chitosan in concentration 150 ppm gave the highest cholesterol decreasing level in the amount of 49.66% w/v. So it can be concluded that Cinnamomum casia extract can be encapsulated in nanoparticles of chitosan and proved that it has a cholesterol-lowering effect through the in vitro study.

  9. Encapsulated guest-host dynamics: guest rotational barriers and tumbling as a probe of host interior cavity space.

    PubMed

    Mugridge, Jeffrey S; Szigethy, Géza; Bergman, Robert G; Raymond, Kenneth N

    2010-11-17

    The supramolecular host assembly [Ga(4)L(6)](12-) (1; L = 1,5-bis[2,3-dihydroxybenzamido]naphthalene) encapsulates cationic guest molecules within its hydrophobic cavity and catalyzes a variety of chemical transformations within its confined interior space. Despite the well-defined structure, the host ligand framework and interior cavity are very flexible and 1 can accommodate a wide range of guest shapes and sizes. These observations raise questions about the steric effects of confinement within 1 and how encapsulation fundamentally changes the motions of guest molecules. Here we examine the motional dynamics (guest bond rotation and tumbling) of encapsulated guest molecules to probe the steric consequences of encapsulation within host 1. Encapsulation is found to increase the Ph-CH(2) bond rotational barrier for ortho-substituted benzyl phosphonium guest molecules by 3 to 6 kcal/mol, and the barrier is found to depend on both guest size and shape. The tumbling dynamics of guests encapsulated in 1 were also investigated, and here it was found that longer, more prolate-shaped guest molecules tumble more slowly in the host cavity than larger but more spherical guest molecules. The prolate guests reduce the host symmetry from T to C(1) in solution at low temperatures, and the distortion of the host framework that is in part responsible for this symmetry reduction is observed directly in the solid state. Analysis of guest motional dynamics is a powerful method for interrogating host structure and fundamental host-guest interactions.

  10. Cell as a factory for humanized encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Zhengwei; Wang, Dayang

    2012-03-01

    Variety efforts are being made to develop colloidal based drug delivery systems (DDSs), which encapsulate cytotoxic drug in a vehicle and release them in a controlled manner. However, the synthetic carriers developed thus far are hampered by rapidly clearance in the body, for example by phagocytes, possibly due to the non-natural surface characteristics in terms of chemistry, morphology, and mechanics. To circumvent this important challenge, we have exploited living mammalian cells as factories to encapsulate drugs in "natural vesicles". These natural vesicles are termed cell membrane capsules (CMCs), because they maintain the major membrane structure and functions as well as cytosolic proteins of the parental cells. We demonstrate that CMCs act as unique delivery vehicles, in which encapsulated substances can be processed stepwise by cellular enzymes and then be selectively released through protein channels built-in the membrane, in a controlled and sustained manner. The preliminary study investigating the macrophage response to CMCs indicated the potential of CMCs to avoid attack by the immune system.

  11. Water encapsulation in a polyoxapolyaza macrobicyclic compound.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Pedro; Delgado, Rita; Groves, Patrick; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M; Brandão, Paula; Félix, Vítor

    2012-08-17

    A new heteroditopic macrobicyclic compound (t(2)pN(5)O(3)) containing two separate polyoxa and polyaza compartments was synthesized in good yield through a [1 + 1] "tripod-tripod coupling" strategy. The X-ray crystal structure of H(3)t(2)pN(5)O(3)(3+) revealed the presence of one encapsulated water molecule accepting two hydrogen bonds from two protonated secondary amines and donating a hydrogen bond to one amino group. The acid-base behavior of the compound was studied by potentiometry at 298.2 K in aqueous solution and at ionic strength 0.10 M in KCl. The results revealed unusual protonation behavior, namely a surprisingly low fourth protonation constant contrary to what was expected for the compound. (1)H NMR and DOSY experiments, as well as molecular modeling studies, showed that the water encapsulation and the conformation observed in the solid state are retained in solution. The strong binding of the encapsulated water molecule, reinforced by the cooperative occurrence of a trifurcated hydrogen bond at the polyether compartment of the macrobicycle, account for the very low log K(4)(H) value obtained.

  12. Liquid encapsulated float zone process and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Frazier, Donald O. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor); Vlasse, Marcus (Inventor); Facemire, Barbara R. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    The process and apparatus for growing crystals using float zone techniques are described. A rod of crystalline materials is disposed in a cylindrical container, leaving a space between the rod and container walls. This space is filled with an encapsulant, selected to have a slightly lower melting point than the crystalline material. The rod is secured to a container end cap at one end and to a shaft at its other end. A piston slides over the rod and provides pressure to prevent loss of volatile components upon melting of the rod. Prior to melting the rod the container is first heated to melt the encapsulant, with any off-gas from this step being vented to a cavity behind the piston. The piston moves slightly forward owing to volume change upon melting of the encapsulant, and the vent passageway is closed. The container is then moved longitudinally through a heated zone to progressively melt sections of the rod as in conventional float zone processes. The float zone technique may be used in the microgravity environment of space.

  13. Encapsulation-free controlled release: Electrostatic adsorption eliminates the need for protein encapsulation in PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pakulska, Malgosia M.; Elliott Donaghue, Irja; Obermeyer, Jaclyn M.; Tuladhar, Anup; McLaughlin, Christopher K.; Shendruk, Tyler N.; Shoichet, Molly S.

    2016-01-01

    Encapsulation of therapeutic molecules within polymer particles is a well-established method for achieving controlled release, yet challenges such as low loading, poor encapsulation efficiency, and loss of protein activity limit clinical translation. Despite this, the paradigm for the use of polymer particles in drug delivery has remained essentially unchanged for several decades. By taking advantage of the adsorption of protein therapeutics to poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles, we demonstrate controlled release without encapsulation. In fact, we obtain identical, burst-free, extended-release profiles for three different protein therapeutics with and without encapsulation in PLGA nanoparticles embedded within a hydrogel. Using both positively and negatively charged proteins, we show that short-range electrostatic interactions between the proteins and the PLGA nanoparticles are the underlying mechanism for controlled release. Moreover, we demonstrate tunable release by modifying nanoparticle concentration, nanoparticle size, or environmental pH. These new insights obviate the need for encapsulation and offer promising, translatable strategies for a more effective delivery of therapeutic biomolecules. PMID:27386554

  14. Electrospun chitosan microspheres for complete encapsulation of anionic proteins: controlling particle size and encapsulation efficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Suk; Kim, Younghee; Kang, Jihyun; Jeong, Seo Young; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2013-06-01

    Electrospinning was employed to fabricate chitosan microspheres by a single-step encapsulation of proteins without organic solvents. Chitosan in acetic acid was electrospun toward a grounded sodium carbonate solution at various electric potential and feeding rates. Electrospun microspheres became insoluble and solidified in the sodium carbonate solution by neutralization of chitosan acetate. When the freeze-dried microspheres were examined by scanning electron microscopy, the small particle size was obtained at higher voltages. This is explained by the chitosan droplet size at the electrospinning needle was clearly controllable by the electric potential. The recovery yield of chitosan microspheres was dependent on the concentration of chitosan solution due to the viscosity is the major factor affecting formation of chitosan droplet during curling of the electrospinning jets. For protein encapsulation, fluorescently labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) was codissolved with chitosan in the solution and electrospun. At higher concentration of sodium carbonate solution and longer solidification time in the solution, the encapsulation efficiency of the protein was confirmed to be significantly high. The high encapsulation efficiency was achievable by instant solidification of microspheres and electrostatic interactions between chitosan and BSA. Release profiles of BSA from the microspheres showed that the protein release was faster in acidic solution due to dissolution of chitosan. Reversed-phase chromatography of the released fractions confirmed that exposure of BSA to acidic solution during the electrospinning did not result in structural changes of the encapsulated protein.

  15. From Oil to Plastic. Young Discovery Library Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brice, Raphaelle

    This book is written for children ages 5 through 10. Part of a series designed to develop their curiosity, fascinate them and educate them, this volume explains in text and pictures how plastic is made from oil, the problems with this nearly indestructible material, and the future of plastics. Topics include: (1) formation of oil; (2) history of…

  16. Manufacturable plastic microfluidic valves using thermal actuation.

    PubMed

    Pitchaimani, Karthik; Sapp, Brian C; Winter, Adam; Gispanski, Austin; Nishida, Toshikazu; Hugh Fan, Z

    2009-11-07

    A low-cost, manufacturable, thermally actuated, plastic microfluidic valve has been developed. The valve contains an encapsulated, temperature-sensitive fluid, which expands, deflecting a thin elastomeric film into a fluidic channel to control fluid flow. The power input for thermal expansion of each microfluidic valve can be controlled using a printed circuit board (PCB)-based controller, which is suitable for mass production and large-scale integration. A plastic microfluidic device with such valves was fabricated using compression molding and thermal lamination. The operation of the valves was investigated by measuring a change in the microchannel's ionic conduction current mediated by the resistance variation corresponding to the deflection of the microvalve. Valve closing was also confirmed by the disappearance of fluorescence when a fluorescent solution was displaced in the valve region. Valve operation was characterized for heater power ranging from 36 mW to 80 mW. When the valve was actuating, the local channel temperature was 10 to 19 degrees C above the ambient temperature depending on the heater power used. Repetitive valve operations (up to 50 times) have been demonstrated with a flow resulting from a hydrostatic head. Valve operation was tested for a flow rate of 0.33-4.7 microL/min.

  17. Mechanical plasticity of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Navid; Gerum, Richard; Kuhn, Michael; Spörrer, Marina; Lippert, Anna; Schneider, Werner; Aifantis, Katerina E.; Fabry, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Under mechanical loading, most living cells show a viscoelastic deformation that follows a power law in time. After removal of the mechanical load, the cell shape recovers only incompletely to its original undeformed configuration. Here, we show that incomplete shape recovery is due to an additive plastic deformation that displays the same power-law dynamics as the fully reversible viscoelastic deformation response. Moreover, the plastic deformation is a constant fraction of the total cell deformation and originates from bond ruptures within the cytoskeleton. A simple extension of the prevailing viscoelastic power-law response theory with a plastic element correctly predicts the cell behaviour under cyclic loading. Our findings show that plastic energy dissipation during cell deformation is tightly linked to elastic cytoskeletal stresses, which suggests the existence of an adaptive mechanism that protects the cell against mechanical damage.

  18. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  19. A Plastic Menagerie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadley, Mary Jane

    2010-01-01

    Bobble heads had become quite popular, depicting all sorts of sports figures, animals, and even presidents. In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made bobble head sculptures out of empty plastic drink bottles. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  20. Strain avalanches in plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argon, A. S.

    2013-09-01

    Plastic deformation at the mechanism level in all solids occurs in the form of discrete thermally activated individual stress relaxation events. While there are clear differences in mechanisms between dislocation mediated events in crystalline solids and by individual shear transformations in amorphous metals and semiconductors, such relaxation events interact strongly to form avalanches of strain bursts. In all cases the attendant distributions of released energy as amplitudes of acoustic emissions, or in serration amplitudes in flow stress, the levels of strain bursts are of fractal character with fractal exponents in the range from -1.5 to -2.0, having the character of phenomena of self-organized criticality, SOC. Here we examine strain avalanches in single crystals of ice, hcp metals, the jerky plastic deformations of nano-pillars of fcc and bcc metals deforming in compression, those in the plastic flow of bulk metallic glasses, all demonstrating the remarkable universality of character of plastic relaxation events.

  1. Dreaming in plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhov, Marianna; Andelman, David; Shikler, Rafi

    2008-07-01

    Plastic is one of the most versatile materials available. It is cheap, flexible and easy to process, and as a result it is all around us - from our computer keyboards to the soles of our shoes. One of its most common applications is as an insulating coating for electric wires; indeed, plastic is well known for its insulating characteristics. It came as something of a surprise, therefore, when in the late 1970s a new generation of plastics was discovered that displayed exactly the opposite behaviour - the ability to conduct electricity. In fact, plastics can be made with a whole range of conductivities - there are polymer materials that behave like semiconductors and there are those that can conduct as well as metals. This discovery sparked a revolution in the electronics community, and three decades of research effort is now yielding a range of stunning new applications for this ubiquitous material.

  2. Physics in Plastics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ken

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the increasing role of the physicist in plastics technology. Relationships of molecular structure to material behavior, design which is related to the material, and the practical problems of fabricating a material into an article are included. (HM)

  3. Laser cutting plastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Van Cleave, R.A.

    1980-08-01

    A 1000-watt CO/sub 2/ laser has been demonstrated as a reliable production machine tool for cutting of plastics, high strength reinforced composites, and other nonmetals. More than 40 different plastics have been laser cut, and the results are tabulated. Applications for laser cutting described include fiberglass-reinforced laminates, Kevlar/epoxy composites, fiberglass-reinforced phenolics, nylon/epoxy laminates, ceramics, and disposable tooling made from acrylic.

  4. Cryopreservation of embryogenic cell suspensions by encapsulation-vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhenfang; Chen, Long; Zhao, Bing; Zhu, Yongxing; Wang, Qiaochun

    2012-01-01

    Encapsulation-vitrification and encapsulation-dehydration are two newly developed techniques for cryopreservation of embryogenic cell suspensions. Here, we describe the two protocols using grapevine (Vitis) as a model plant. Cell suspensions at the exponential growth stage cultured in a cell suspension maintenance medium are encapsulated to form beads, each being about 4 mm in diameter and containing 25% cells. In the encapsulation-vitrification procedure, the beads are stepwise precultured in increasing concentrations of sucrose medium up to 0.75 M, with 1 day for each concentration. The precultured beads are treated with a loading solution for 60 min and then dehydrated with plant vitrification solution 2 at 0°C for 270 min before a direct immersion in liquid nitrogen. Following cryostorage, the beads are rapidly rewarmed at 40°C for 3 min and then unloaded with 1 M sucrose solution for 30 min. In the encapsulation-dehydration procedure, the beads are precultured in increasing concentrations of sucrose medium up to 1 M, with 1 day for each concentration, and then maintained on 1 M sucrose medium for 3 days. The precultured beads are dehydrated for 6 h under a sterile air flow, prior to rapid freezing in liquid nitrogen. The freezing and rewarming procedures are the same as used in the encapsulation-vitrification technique. The unloaded beads from encapsulation-vitrification and rewarmed beads from encapsulation-dehydration are postcultured on a recovery medium for 3 days at 25°C in the dark for survival. Surviving cells are transferred to a regrowth medium to induce cell proliferation. Embryogenic cell suspensions are reestablished by suspending the cells in a cell suspension maintenance medium maintained on a gyratory shaker at 25°C in the dark. For plant regeneration, surviving cells are transferred from the recovery medium to an embryo maturation medium and maintained at 25°C under light conditions. Embryos at the torpedo stage are cultured on a rooting

  5. Hebbian plasticity requires compensatory processes on multiple timescales

    PubMed Central

    Gerstner, Wulfram

    2017-01-01

    We review a body of theoretical and experimental research on Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity, starting from a puzzling observation: while homeostasis of synapses found in experiments is a slow compensatory process, most mathematical models of synaptic plasticity use rapid compensatory processes (RCPs). Even worse, with the slow homeostatic plasticity reported in experiments, simulations of existing plasticity models cannot maintain network stability unless further control mechanisms are implemented. To solve this paradox, we suggest that in addition to slow forms of homeostatic plasticity there are RCPs which stabilize synaptic plasticity on short timescales. These rapid processes may include heterosynaptic depression triggered by episodes of high postsynaptic firing rate. While slower forms of homeostatic plasticity are not sufficient to stabilize Hebbian plasticity, they are important for fine-tuning neural circuits. Taken together we suggest that learning and memory rely on an intricate interplay of diverse plasticity mechanisms on different timescales which jointly ensure stability and plasticity of neural circuits. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity’. PMID:28093557

  6. The Need for Plastics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Society of Plastics Engineers, Inc., Stamford, CT.

    In view of a lack of trained personnel in the industry, the Plastics Education Foundation proposes that educators (1) add more plastics programs, (2) establish plastics engineering degrees at appropriate 4-year institutions, (3) add plastics processing technology to current engineering curricula, and (4) interest younger students in courses and/or…

  7. In situ crosslinkable elastomeric hydrogel for long-term cell encapsulation for cardiac applications.

    PubMed

    Komeri, Remya; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-12-01

    The regenerative therapy of tissues relays on successful cell transplantation and engraftment. Soft hydrogel carriers are employed to protect transplanted cells from harmful microenvironment in soft tissue regeneration. Herein an injectable, porous, biodegradable, bioresorbable, and elastomeric hydrogel fabricated from poly(propylene fumarate-co-sebacate-co-ethylene glycol) crosslinked with PEGDA for cardiomyoblast encapsulation was reported. The hydrogel retains adequate mechanical property in the range of native myocardium even after 30 days of degradation (49 ± 0.008 kPa). The hydrogel shows maximum extensibility without collapsing even under 60% compression. The hydrogel retains 70.58% equilibrium water content, wide internal porosity, and slow bulk degradation favorable for cell carriers. The cardiomyoblast cells encapsulated in hydrogel retains viability even after 30 days of culture. The long-term viability and proliferation studies of encapsulated cells in the hydrogel substantiate the suitability of hydrogel microenvironment for cell survival. The present hydrogel is a potential cell carrier with favorable physical and biological properties for cell encapsulation for cardiac applications. The candidate hydrogels perform better than the other reported elastomeric hydrogels fabricated for cell therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2936-2944, 2016.

  8. Flat-plate solar array project. Volume 7: Module encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of the Encapsulation Task was to develop, demonstrate, and qualify photovoltaic (PV) module encapsulation systems that would provide 20 year (later decreased to 30 year) life expectancies in terrestrial environments, and which would be compatible with the cost and performance goals of the Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project. The scope of the Encapsulation Task included the identification, development, and evaluation of material systems and configurations required to support and protect the optically and electrically active solar cell circuit components in the PV module operating environment. Encapsulation material technologies summarized include the development of low cost ultraviolet protection techniques, stable low cost pottants, soiling resistant coatings, electrical isolation criteria, processes for optimum interface bonding, and analytical and experimental tools for evaluating the long term durability and structural adequacy of encapsulated modules. Field testing, accelerated stress testing, and design studies have demonstrated that encapsulation materials, processes, and configurations are available that meet the FSA cost and performance goals.

  9. Encapsulation Thermogenic Preadipocytes for Transplantation into Adipose Tissue Depots

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lu; Shen, Qiwen; Mao, Zhongqi; Lee, L. James; Ziouzenkova, Ouliana

    2015-01-01

    Cell encapsulation was developed to entrap viable cells within semi-permeable membranes. The engrafted encapsulated cells can exchange low molecular weight metabolites in tissues of the treated host to achieve long-term survival. The semipermeable membrane allows engrafted encapsulated cells to avoid rejection by the immune system. The encapsulation procedure was designed to enable a controlled release of bioactive compounds, such as insulin, other hormones, and cytokines. Here we describe a method for encapsulation of catabolic cells, which consume lipids for heat production and energy dissipation (thermogenesis) in the intra-abdominal adipose tissue of obese mice. Encapsulation of thermogenic catabolic cells may be potentially applicable to the prevention and treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Another potential application of catabolic cells may include detoxification from alcohols or other toxic metabolites and environmental pollutants. PMID:26066392

  10. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E.; Carroll, W.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    Encapsulation material system requirements, material selection criteria, and the status and properties of encapsulation materials and processes available are presented. Technical and economic goals established for photovoltaic modules and encapsulation systems and their status are described. Available encapsulation technology and data are presented to facilitate design and material selection for silicon flat plate photovoltaic modules, using the best materials available and processes optimized for specific power applications and geographic sites. The operational and environmental loads that encapsulation system functional requirements and candidate design concepts and materials that are identified to have the best potential to meet the cost and performance goals for the flat plate solar array project are described. Available data on encapsulant material properties, fabrication processing, and module life and durability characteristics are presented.

  11. A preliminary assessment of field transport experiments using encapsulated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Petrich, C.R.; Knaebel, D.B.; Ralston, D.R.; Crawford, R.L.; Stormo, K.E.

    1995-12-31

    Microencapsulation of nonindigenous degradative organisms is a technique that enhances microorganism survival. An intermediate-scale field tracer test was conducted to evaluate the transport of encapsulated-cell microbeads and other particles in a shallow, confined, heterogeneous aquifer consisting of unconsolidated silts, sands, and gravels under induced-gradient, uniform flow conditions. Tracers included bromide; 2-, 5-, and 15-{micro}m-diameter polystyrene microspheres; and encapsulated Flavobacterium microbeads ranging in diameter from approximately 2 to 80 {micro}m. Results suggest that aquifer heterogeneity was a dominant factor in bromide- and particle-transport patterns. Encapsulated-cell migration appeared to be retarded with respect to the bromide and microsphere tracers. Results of this study also indicate that encapsulated-cell particle sizes and encapsulation material characteristics may be important factors affecting the transport of encapsulated cells in a subsurface environment.

  12. Homeostatic plasticity mechanisms in mouse V1.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Megumi; Stryker, Michael P

    2017-03-05

    Mechanisms thought of as homeostatic must exist to maintain neuronal activity in the brain within the dynamic range in which neurons can signal. Several distinct mechanisms have been demonstrated experimentally. Three mechanisms that act to restore levels of activity in the primary visual cortex of mice after occlusion and restoration of vision in one eye, which give rise to the phenomenon of ocular dominance plasticity, are discussed. The existence of different mechanisms raises the issue of how these mechanisms operate together to converge on the same set points of activity.This article is part of the themed issue 'Integrating Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity'.

  13. [The history of pediatric plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Glicenstein, J

    2016-10-01

    The history of pediatric plastic surgery is linked to that of paediatrics. Until the early 19th century, there was no children's hospital. Only some operations were performed before the discovery of anesthesia, aseptic and antisepsis: cleft lip repair, amputation for polydactyly. Many operations were described in the 19th century for cleft lip and palate repair, hypospadias, syndactylies. The first operation for protruding ears was performed in 1881. Pediatric plastic surgery is diversified in the 2nd half of the 20th century: cleft lip and palate, burns, craniofacial surgery, hand surgery become separate parts of the speciality.

  14. Intravital imaging of dendritic spine plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sau Wan Lai, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Recent works have suggested that the structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines have been associated with information coding and memories. Advances in imaging and labeling techniques enable the study of dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of dendritic spine plasticity in the neocortex. I will introduce imaging tools for studying spine dynamics and will further review current findings on spine structure and function under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28243511

  15. Encapsulation of hazardous wastes into agglomerates

    SciTech Connect

    Guloy, A.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using the cementitious properties and agglomeration characteristics of coal conversion byproducts to encapsulate and immobilize hazardous waste materials. The intention was to establish an economical way of co-utilization and co-disposal of wastes. In addition, it may aid in the eradication of air pollution problems associated with the fine-powdery nature of fly ash. Encapsulation into agglomerates is a novel approach of treating toxic waste. Although encapsulation itself is not a new concept, existing methods employ high-cost resins that render them economically unfeasible. In this investigation, the toxic waste was contained in a concrete-like matrix whereby fly ash and other cementitious waste materials were utilized. The method incorporates the principles of solidification, stabilization and agglomeration. Another aspect of the study is the evaluation of the agglomeration as possible lightweight aggregates. Since fly ash is commercially used as an aggregate, it would be interesting to study the effect of incorporating toxic wastes in the strength development of the granules. In the investigation, the fly ash self-cementation process was applied to electroplating sludges as the toxic waste. The process hoped to provide a basis for delisting of the waste as hazardous and, thereby greatly minimize the cost of its disposal. Owing to the stringent regulatory requirements for hauling and disposal of hazardous waste, the cost of disposal is significant. The current practice for disposal is solidifying the waste with portland cement and dumping the hardened material in the landfill where the cost varies between $700--950/ton. Partially replacing portland cement with fly ash in concrete has proven beneficial, therefore applying the same principles in the treatment of toxic waste looked very promising.

  16. Novel Metal Encapsulated Silicon Cage Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2002-03-01

    The discovery of novel nano-forms of carbon such as fullerenes and nanotubes created much interest in the search for similar novel structures of silicon for applications in nano-devices. However, these cage structures are not stable for silicon. Small silicon clusters having upto about 20 atoms are found to have prolate structures in which a 10-atom unit plays an important role. Here we report results of new findings(Vijay Kumar and Yoshiyuki Kawazoe, ``Metal-Encapsulated Fullerenelike and Cubic Caged Clusters of Silicon", Phys. Rev. Lett., 87[4] (2001), 045503-1-045503-4.) on a rich variety of caged silicon clusters that are realized by encapsulating a metal atom. The shape and size of these new clusters depend upon the metal atom which also determines their properties. As silicon is the most important material for devices, these findings offer new opportunities to design novel nano-silicon based devices. The results have been obtained by performing computer experiments using ab initio calculations in an effort to stabilize a silicon cage of 20 atoms. We have tried several metal atoms and used a cage shrinking approach. These led to the findings of fullerene and cubic type stable symmetric clusters in the range of 14 to 16 silicon atoms, depending on the encapsulated metal atom. A Frank-Kasper polyhedron, M@Si16 is found to be of lowest energy for M = Ti and Hf with exceptionally large gaps of about 2.35 eV that lie in the optical region. Further studies have been done to stabilize the smallest fullerene shape of 20 silicon atoms and to develop assemblies of clusters to form more interesting nano-scale structures like wires, which might be useful industrially to realize conducting atomic lines covered by semiconductor tubes.

  17. Analysis of Double-encapsulated Fuel Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Hales, Jason Dean; Medvedev, Pavel G; Novascone, Stephen Rhead; Perez, Danielle Marie; Williamson, Richard L

    2014-09-01

    In an LWR fuel rod, the cladding encapsulates the fuel, contains fission products, and transfers heat directly to the water coolant. In some situations, it may be advantageous to separate the cladding from the coolant through use of a secondary cladding or capsule. This may be done to increase confidence that the fuel or fission products will not mix with the coolant, to provide a mechanism for controlling the rod temperature, or to place multiple experimental rodlets within a single housing. With an axisymmetric assumption, it is possible to derive closed-form expressions for the temperature profile in a fuel rod using radially-constant thermal conductivity in the fuel. This is true for both a traditional fuel-cladding rod and a double-encapsulated fuel (fuel, cladding, capsule) configuration. Likewise, it is possible to employ a fuel performance code to analyse both a traditional and a double-encapsulated fuel. In the case of the latter, two sets of gap heat transfer conditions must be imposed. In this work, we review the equations associated with radial heat transfer in a cylindrical system, present analytic and computational results for a postulated power and gas mixture history for IFA-744, and describe the analysis of the AFC-2A, 2B metallic fuel alloy experiments at the Advanced Test Reactor, including the effect of a release of fission products into the cladding-capsule gap. The computational results for these two cases were obtained using BISON, a fuel performance code under development at Idaho National Laboratory.

  18. Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-02-01

    Polymeric encapsulation materials are typically used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) modules to protect the cell from the field environment. Because it is physically located adjacent to the cell, the encapsulation is exposed to a high optical flux, often including light in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) wavelengths. The durability of encapsulants used in CPV modules is critical to the technology, but is presently not well understood. This work seeks to identify the appropriate material types, field-induced failure mechanisms, and factors of influence (if possible) of polymeric encapsulation. These results will ultimately be weighed against those of future qualification and accelerated life test procedures.

  19. Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Muller, M.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2011-04-01

    Presented at the 7th International Conference on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (CPV-7), 4-6 April 2011, Las Vegas, Nevada. Many concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems use a polymeric encapsulant to couple an optical component and/or coverglass to the cell. In that location, the encapsulation improves the transmission of concentrated optical flux through interfaces(s) while protecting the cell from the environment. The durability of encapsulation materials, however, is not well established relative to the desired service life of 30 years. Therefore, we have initiated a screen test to identify the field-induced failure modes for a variety of popular PV encapsulation materials.

  20. Photovoltaic module encapsulation design and materials selection. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.

    1984-06-01

    This is Volume II of Photovoltaic Module Encapsulation Design and Materials Selection: a periodically updated handbook of encapsulation technology, developed with the support of the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project (FSA), managed for the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Volume II describes FSA encapsulation technology developed between June 1, 1982, and January 1, 1984. Emphasis during this period shifted from materials development to demonstration of reliability and durability in an outdoor environment; the updated information in this volume reflects the developing technology base related to both reliability and encapsulation process improvements.

  1. [Encapsulating hepatocytes with chitosan in physiological conditions].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhang; Zhang, Bao; Yan, Xiluan; Lao, Xuejun; Yu, Hanry

    2006-10-01

    Prepared from 15.3% N-acetylated chitosan (FNC), half N-acetylated chitosan (HNC) possesses a good solubility in a weak basic solution, guaranteeing the formation of microcapsules by the coacervating reaction between HNC and methacrylic acid (MAA)-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA)-methyl methacrylate (MMA) (MAA-HEMA-MMA) terpolymer under physiological conditions. When hepatocytes were encapsulated in such 3-dimensional microenvironment, as compared to monolayer culture, cell functions, including P450 activity, urea production and albumin release, were well supported. The prepared microcapsules have good mechanical stability and permeability.

  2. Integral glass encapsulation for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding has been used to join silicon solar cells to borosilicate glass without the aid of any organic binders or adhesives. The results of this investigation have been to demonstrate, without question, the feasibility of this process as an encapsulation technique. The potential of ESB for terrestrial solar arrays was clearly shown. The process is fast, reproducible, and produces a permanent bond between glass and silicon that is stronger than the silicon itself. Since this process is a glass sealing technique requiring no organics it makes moisture tight sealing of solar cells possible.

  3. Integral glass encapsulation for solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, G. A.

    1981-01-01

    Electrostatic bonding technology, an encapsulation technique for terrestrial solar array was developed. The process produces full integral, hermetic bonds with no adhesives or pottants. Panels of six solar cells on a simple glass superstrate were produced. Electrostatic bonding for making the cell front contact was also developed. A metal mesh is trapped into contact with the cell front during the bonding process. Six cell panels using the bonded mesh as the only cell front contact were produced. The possibility of using lower cost glass, with a higher thermal expansion mismatch to silicon, by making lower temperature bonds is developed. However, this requires a planar surface cell.

  4. Stabilization and encapsulation of magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawni, Issmat Al; Garcia, Ricardo; Youssef, Sami; Abboud, Maher; Podlecki, Jean; Habchi, Roland

    2016-12-01

    The goal is to stabilize magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) in order to prepare them for encapsulation and to obtain a core-shell structure. Magnetite NPs were obtained by a co-precipitation method and then treated with different stabilizing agents in order to get a full dispersion in an aqueous medium. The dispersed particles were then coated with silica using a TEOS solution. The samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, TEM, EDX analysis, and FTIR measurements. The particles are the basis of a core-shell structure where a potential polymer or drug could be anchored on the surface.

  5. Trichinella: differing effects of antigens from encapsulated and non-encapsulated species on in vitro nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Andrade, M Amparo; Siles-Lucas, Mar; López-Abán, Julio; Nogal-Ruiz, Juan José; Pérez-Arellano, José Luis; Martínez-Fernández, Antonio R; Muro, Antonio

    2007-01-19

    Trichinellosis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease affecting a wide variety of animals, including man. Non-encapsulated and encapsulated species diverge with respect to their developmental strategies. Little is known at the molecular level about parasite-derived mediators responsible for host muscle cell transformation occurring during trichinellosis. In this context, host-parasite relationships in Trichinella-infected animals could be related to different host-immune and cell mediators, e.g. nitric oxide (NO). Here, we investigate the stimulatory/inhibitory role of L1 antigens from four encapsulated (T. spiralis, T. britovi, T. nelsoni and T. nativa) and one non-encapsulated (T. pseudospiralis) Trichinella species on NO production from rat macrophages in vitro. Our results demonstrate that encapsulated and non-encapsulated Trichinella species differ in their capacity to stimulate the secretion of NO from host macrophages. Biological significance of these differences should be further assessed in the available experimental models.

  6. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, Stephen R.; Anderson, Kenneth B.; Song, Kang; Yuchs, Steven E.; Marshall, Christopher L.

    1998-01-01

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  7. 75 FR 68972 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Tissue Adhesive With...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 878 Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery..., 21 CFR part 878 is amended as follows: PART 878--GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES 0 1....

  8. Plastics in Our Lives. What We Make. Science and Technology Education in Philippine Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philippines Univ., Quezon City. Inst. for Science and Mathematics Education Development.

    This module, recommended for third or fourth year high school students, consists of three parts. The first part (entitled "Knowing Plastics") gives some background information regarding the origin of plastics, their chemical and physical properties, and the different available types. The second part (entitled "Shaping…

  9. The plasticity of clays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Group, F.F.

    1905-01-01

    (1) Sand injures plasticity little at first because the grains are suspended in a plastic mass. It is only when grains are abundant enough to come in contact with their neighbors, that the effect becomes serious, and then both strength and amount of possible flow are injured. (2) Certain rare organic colloids increase the plasticity by rendering the water viscous. (3) Fineness also tends to increase plasticity. (4) Plane surfaces (plates) increase the amount of possible flow. They also give a chance for lubrication by thinner films, thus increasing the friction of film, and the strength of the whole mass. The action of plates is thus twofold ; but fineness may be carried to such an extent as to break up plate-like grains into angular fragments. The beneficial effects of plates are also decreased by the fact that each is so closely surrounded by others in the mass. (5) Molecular attraction is twofold in increasing plasticity. As the attraction increases, the coherence and strength of the mass increase, and the amount of possible deformation before crumbling also increases. Fineness increases this action by requiring more water. Colloids and crystalloids in solution may also increase the attraction. It is thus seen to be more active than any other single factor.

  10. Neuroimmune regulation of homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pribiag, Horia; Stellwagen, David

    2014-03-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity refers to a set of negative-feedback mechanisms that are used by neurons to maintain activity within a functional range. While it is becoming increasingly clear that homeostatic regulation of synapse function is a key principle in the nervous system, the molecular details of this regulation are only beginning to be uncovered. Recent evidence implicates molecules classically associated with the peripheral immune system in the modulation of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. In particular, the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, class I major histocompatibility complex, and neuronal pentraxin 2 are essential in the regulation of the compensatory synaptic response that occurs in response to prolonged neuronal inactivity. This review will present and discuss current evidence implicating neuroimmune molecules in the homeostatic regulation of synapse function. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity'.

  11. Microglia in neuronal plasticity: Influence of stress.

    PubMed

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Madore, Charlotte; Nadjar, Agnes; Joffre, Corinne; Wohleb, Eric S; Layé, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has previously been regarded as an immune-privileged site with the absence of immune cell responses but this dogma was not entirely true. Microglia are the brain innate immune cells and recent findings indicate that they participate both in CNS disease and infection as well as facilitate normal CNS function. Microglia are highly plastic and play integral roles in sculpting the structure of the CNS, refining neuronal circuitry and connectivity, and contribute actively to neuronal plasticity in the healthy brain. Interestingly, psychological stress can perturb the function of microglia in association with an impaired neuronal plasticity and the development of emotional behavior alterations. As a result it seemed important to describe in this review some findings indicating that the stress-induced microglia dysfunction may underlie neuroplasticity deficits associated to many mood disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'.

  12. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  13. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800...

  14. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  15. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment...: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required in §§ 63.5800...

  16. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Wwww of... - Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63 Protection of Environment... Pollutants: Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Pt. 63, Subpt. WWWW, Table 2 Table 2 to Subpart WWWW of Part 63—Compliance Dates for New and Existing Reinforced Plastic Composites Facilities As required...

  17. Nano-encapsulated PCM via Pickering Emulsification

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuezhen; Zhang, Lecheng; Yu, Yi-Hsien; Jia, Lisi; Sam Mannan, M.; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2015-01-01

    We designed a two-step Pickering emulsification procedure to create nano-encapsulated phase changing materials (NEPCMs) using a method whose simplicity and low energy consumption suggest promise for scale-up and mass production. Surface-modified amphiphilic zirconium phosphate (ZrP) platelets were fabricated as the Pickering emulsifiers, nonadecane was chosen as the core phase change material (PCM), and polystyrene, the shell material. The resultant capsules were submicron in size with remarkable uniformity in size distribution, which has rarely been reported. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterization showed that the capsulation efficiency of NEPCMs, and they were found to be thermal stable, as characterized by the DSC data for the sample after 200 thermal cycles. NEPCMs exhibit superior mechanical stability and mobility when compared with the well-developed micro-encapsulated phase change materials (MEPCMs). NEPCMs find useful applications in thermal management, including micro-channel coolants; solar energy storage media; building temperature regulators; and thermal transfer fabrics. PMID:26278332

  18. Encapsulation of Volatile Compounds in Silk Microparticles.

    PubMed

    Elia, Roberto; Guo, Jin; Budijono, Stephanie; Normand, Valery; Benczédi, Daniel; Omenetto, Fiorenzo; Kaplan, David L

    2015-07-01

    Various techniques have been employed to entrap fragrant oils within microcapsules or microparticles in the food, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries for improved stability and delivery. In the present work we describe the use of silk protein microparticles for encapsulating fragrant oils using ambient processing conditions to form an all-natural biocompatible matrix. These microparticles are stabilized via physical crosslinking, requiring no chemical agents, and are prepared with aqueous and ambient processing conditions using polyvinyl alcohol-silk emulsions. The particles were loaded with fragrant oils via direct immersion of the silk particles within an oil bath. The oil-containing microparticles were coated using alternating silk and polyethylene oxide layers to control the release of the oil from the microspheres. Particle morphology and size, oil loading capacity, release rates as well as silk-oil interactions and coating treatments were characterized. Thermal analysis demonstrated that the silk coatings can be tuned to alter both retention and release profiles of the encapsulated fragrance. These oil containing particles demonstrate the ability to adsorb and controllably release oils, suggesting a range of potential applications including cosmetic and fragrance utility.

  19. Yellowing reaction in encapsulant of photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Shigekuni, T.; Kumano, M.

    1997-12-31

    To clarify the mechanism of the yellowing reaction in encapsulant used for photovoltaic (PV) modules, a low molecular weight substance in EVA (Ethylene vinyl acetate) under accelerated weathering test (Dew cycle test, 1000 hours) with yellow change and virgin EVA were extracted with methanol. Extracts were chemically analyzed by GCIR (Gas Chromatography Infrared-Ray spectroscopic analysis), GC-AED (Gas Chromatography Atomic Emission Detector), and FDMS (Field Desorption Mass Spectroscopy). The conditions of this accelerated test were based on JIS-K9117. The analysis results showed that 2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methyl phenol of antioxidant and 2-hydroxy-4-octoxy-benzophenone of UV absorbent were consumed after the weathering test and that 3,5-di-t-butyl-4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde having yellow color was newly produced. A mechanism of the yellowing reaction in encapsulant was presented here that 2,6-di-t-N-O radical from Bis-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidinyl sebacate to produce 3,5 di-t-butyl-4-hydroxy benzaldehyde.

  20. FBG sensor of breathing encapsulated into polydimethylsiloxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajkus, Marcel; Nedoma, Jan; Siska, Petr; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    The technology of Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) belongs to the most widespread fiber-optic sensors. They are used for measuring a large number of physical and chemical quantities. Small size, immunity to electromagnetic interference, high sensitivity and a principle of information encoding about the measurement value into spectral characteristics causes usability of FBG sensors in medicine for monitoring vital signs such as temperature, blood pressure, pulse, and respiration. An important factor is the use of an inert material for the encapsulation of Bragg gratings in this area. A suitable choice is a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer having excellent thermal and elastic properties. Experimental results describe the creation of FBG sensory prototype for monitoring breathing in this paper. The sensor is realized by encapsulation of Bragg grating into PDMS. The FBG sensor is mounted on the elastic contact strap which encircles the chest of the patient. This tension leads to a spectral shift of the reflected light from the FBG. For measurement, we used a broadband light source Light-Emitting Diode (LED) with central wavelength 1550 nm and optical spectrum analyzer.

  1. Consumer hazards of plastics.

    PubMed Central

    Wiberg, G S

    1976-01-01

    The modern consumer is exposed to a wide variety of plastic and rubber products in his day to day life: at home, work, school, shopping, recreation and play, and transport. A large variety of toxic sequellae have resulted from untoward exposures by many different routes: oral, dermal, inhalation, and parenteral. Toxic change may result from the plastic itself, migration of unbound components and additives, chemical decomposition or toxic pyrolysis products. The type of damage may involve acute poisoning, chronic organ damage, reproductive disorders, and carcinogenic, mutagenic and teratogenic episodes. Typical examples for all routes are cited along with the activites of Canadian regulatory agencies to reduce both the incidence and severity of plastic-induced disease. PMID:1026409

  2. Developmental plasticity and language: A comparative perspective

    PubMed Central

    Griebel, Ulrike; Pepperberg, Irene; Oller, D. Kimbrough

    2016-01-01

    The growing field of evo-devo is increasingly demonstrating the complexity of steps involved in genetic, intracellular regulatory, and extracellular environmental control of the development of phenotypes. A key result of such work is an account for the remarkable plasticity of organismal form in many species based on relatively minor changes in regulation of highly conserved genes and genetic processes. Accounting for behavioral plasticity is of similar potential interest but has received far less attention. Of particular interest is plasticity in communication systems, where human language represents an ultimate target for research. The present paper considers plasticity of language capabilities in a comparative framework, focusing attention on examples of a remarkable fact: Whereas there exist design features of mature human language that have never been observed to occur in nonhumans in the wild, many of these features can be developed to notable extents when nonhumans are enculturated through human training (especially with intensive social interaction). These examples of enculturated developmental plasticity across extremely diverse taxa suggest, consistent with the evo-devo theme of highly conserved processes in evolution, that human language is founded in part on cognitive capabilities that are indeed ancient and that even modern humans show self-organized emergence of many language capabilities in the context of rich enculturation, built on the special social/ecological history of the hominin line. Human culture can thus be seen as a regulatory system encouraging language development in the context of a cognitive background with many highly conserved features. PMID:27003391

  3. Finite-element-method study of stresses on simulated electronic components encapsulated in polystyrene-bead foam

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, G.D.

    1981-03-01

    As part of an encapsulant evaluation for a high voltage electronic assembly, the linear elastic finite element method computer code SASL was used to calculate the stress distribution in an axisymmetric solder joint under load. A simulated electronic component in the form of a thumb tack was used as a physical model to calculate lead wire loads when encapsulated in 0.6 g/cm/sup 3/ polystyrene bead form. The calculated lead wire loads disagreed with previous experimental data. Reanalysis of those data revealed nonlinear effects which were not adequately modeled in the SASL calculation.

  4. Accelerated/abbreviated test methods, study 4 of task 3 (encapsulation) of the low-cost silicon solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolyer, J. M.; Mann, N. R.

    1978-01-01

    Inherent weatherability is controlled by the three weather factors common to all exposure sites: insolation, temperature, and humidity. Emphasis was focused on the transparent encapsulant portion of miniature solar cell arrays by eliminating weathering effects on the substrate and circuitry (which are also parts of the encapsulant system). The most extensive data were for yellowing, which were measured conveniently and precisely. Considerable data also were obtained on tensile strength. Changes in these two properties after outdoor exposure were predicted very well from accelerated exposure data.

  5. Increased efficiency using the encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis thaliana shoot tips were successfully cryopreserved using encapsulation-dehydration cryopreservation methods. Between one and seven shoot tips were encapsulated within 4 mm calcium-alginate beads. Beads were formed in the presence of 2 M glycerol+0.4M sucrose. The time required to mak...

  6. Storage of nuclear materials by encapsulation in fullerenes

    DOEpatents

    Coppa, Nicholas V.

    1994-01-01

    A method of encapsulating radioactive materials inside fullerenes for stable long-term storage. Fullerenes provide a safe and efficient means of disposing of nuclear waste which is extremely stable with respect to the environment. After encapsulation, a radioactive ion is essentially chemically isolated from its external environment.

  7. Photovoltaic-module encapsulation design and materials selection: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cuddihy, E.; Carroll, W.; Coulbert, C.; Gupta, A.; Liang, R.

    1982-06-01

    Encapsulation-material system requirements, material-selection criteria, and the status and properties of encapsulation materials and processes available to the module manufacturer are presented in detail. Technical and economic goals established for photovoltaic modules and encapsulation systems and their status are described for material suppliers to assist them in assessing the suitability of materials in their product lines and the potential of new-material products. A comprehensive discussion of available encapsulation technology and data is presented to facilitate design and material selection for silicon flat-plate photovoltaic modules, using the best materials available and processes optimized for specific power applications and geographic sites. A basis is provided for specifying the operational and environmental loads that encapsulation material systems must resist. Potential deployment sites for which cost effectiveness may be achieved at a module price much greater than $0.70/W/sub p/, are also considered; data on higher-cost encapsulant materials and processes that may be in use and other material candidates that may be justified for special application are discussed. Described are encapsulation-system functional requirements and candidate design concepts and materials that have been identified and analyzed as having the best potential to meet the cost and performance goals for the Flat-Plate Solar Array Project. The available data on encapsulant material properties, fabrication processing, and module life and durability characteristics are presented.

  8. Encapsulation optimization of lemon balm antioxidants in calcium alginate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Najafi-Soulari, Samira; Shekarchizadeh, Hajar; Kadivar, Mahdi

    2016-11-01

    Calcium alginate hydrogel beads were used to encapsulate lemon balm extract. Chitosan layer was used to investigate the effect of hydrogel coating. To determine the interactions of antioxidant compounds of extract with encapsulation materials and its stability, microstructure of hydrogel beads was thoroughly monitored using scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Total polyphenols content and antiradical activity of lemon balm extract were also evaluated before and after encapsulation. Three significant parameters (lemon balm extract, sodium alginate, and calcium chloride concentrations) were optimized by response surface methodology to obtain maximum encapsulation efficiency. The FTIR spectra showed no interactions between extract and polymers as there were no new band in spectra of alginate hydrogel after encapsulation of active compounds of lemon balm extract. The antioxidant activity of lemon balm extract did not change after encapsulation. Therefore, it was found that alginate is a suitable material for encapsulation of natural antioxidants. Sodium alginate solution concentration, 1.84%, lemon balm extract concentration, 0.4%, and calcium chloride concentration, 0.2% was determined to be the optimum condition to reach maximum encapsulation efficiency.

  9. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1983-01-01

    The analytical methodology for advanced encapsulation designs for the development of photovoltaic modules is presented. Analytical models are developed to test optical, thermal, electrical and structural properties of the various encapsulation systems. Model data is compared to relevant test data to improve model accuracy and develop general principles for the design of photovoltaic modules.

  10. Encapsulation of essential oils in zein nanosperical particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Essential oils, oregano, red thyme, and cassia (100% pure oil), were encapsulated by phase separation into zein particles. Typical yields were between 65% and 75% of product. Encapsulation efficiency of all oils was 87% except for cassia oil which was 49%. Loading efficiency of all oils was 22% exce...

  11. Personality Plasticity, Healthy Aging, and Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Mroczek, Daniel K.

    2014-01-01

    This commentary on the special series on Conscientiousness and Healthy Aging focuses on several topics brought up in this collection of papers. One is the promise of personality interventions. Despite skepticism on the part of some, such interventions may ultimately prove successful. This is in part because of similarities between personality dimensions and cognitive dimensions, and in part due to evidence showing personality is more dynamic and plastic than once believed. The commentary concludes with a discussion of the role of longitudinal investigations to inform interventions. PMID:24773109

  12. Studies of encapsulant materials for terrestrial solar-cell arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carmichael, D. C. (Compiler)

    1975-01-01

    Study 1 of this contract is entitled ""Evaluation of World Experience and Properties of Materials for Encapsulation of Terrestrial Solar-Cell Arrays.'' The approach of this study is to review and analyze world experience and to compile data on properties of encapsulants for photovoltaic cells and for related applications. The objective of the effort is to recommend candidate materials and processes for encapsulating terrestrial photovoltaic arrays at low cost for a service life greater than 20 years. The objectives of Study 2, ""Definition of Encapsulant Service Environments and Test Conditions,'' are to develop the climatic/environmental data required to define the frequency and duration of detrimental environmental conditions in a 20-year array lifetime and to develop a corresponding test schedule for encapsulant systems.

  13. Encapsulated graphene field-effect transistors for air stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos Kymissis, Ioannis; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2015-03-16

    In this work, we report the fabrication of encapsulated graphene field effects transistors (GFETs) with excellent air stability operation in ambient environment. Graphene's 2D nature makes its electronics properties very sensitive to the surrounding environment, and thus, non-encapsulated graphene devices show extensive vulnerability due to unintentional hole doping from the presence of water molecules and oxygen limiting their performance and use in real world applications. Encapsulating GFETs with a thin layer of parylene-C and aluminum deposited on top of the exposed graphene channel area resulted in devices with excellent electrical performance stability for an extended period of time. Moisture penetration is reduced significantly and carrier mobility degraded substantially less when compared to non-encapsulated control devices. Our CMOS compatible encapsulation method minimizes the problems of environmental doping and lifetime performance degradation, enabling the operation of air stable devices for next generation graphene-based electronics.

  14. Consideration of encapsulants for photovoltaic arrays in terrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.; Carroll, W. F.

    1977-01-01

    Long-term survivability of photovoltaic arrays and components in terrestrial environments will require development of adequate protective systems. Highly considered are polymeric encapsulants, a method which was successfully employed in space and aerospace applications to protect critical electrical circuitry. To be employable, however, the polymer encapsulants must themselves be chemically and mechanically resistant to failure in terrestrial service. Chemical resistance includes stability to the degrading actions of ultraviolet light, oxygen, moisture and elevated temperatures in sun rich areas. Programs are underway to identify and develop chemically stable encapsulant candidates. Chemical considerations aside, mechanical failures of the encapsulants must also be avoided in array designs. This paper discusses design considerations for avoiding mechanical failures of polymeric encapsulants, with emphasis on biaxial properties, thermal fatigue, and anisotropy and nonhomogeneity of material properties. The general principles to be presented evolved from actual failures of polymeric materials in engineering applications. Also included are brief remarks on the permeability of polymer materials to atmospheric gases.

  15. Glass as encapsulation for low-cost photovoltaic solar arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    In photovoltaic systems, the encapsulant material that protects the solar cells should be highly transparent and very durable. Glass satisfies these two criteria and is considered a primary candidate for low-cost, photovoltaic encapsulation systems. In this paper, various aspects of glass encapsulation are treated that are important for the designer of photovoltaic systems. Candidate glasses and available information defining the state of the art of glass encapsulation materials and processes for automated, high volume production of terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications are presented. The desired characteristics of glass encapsulation are (1) low degradation rates, (2) high transmittance, (3) high reliability, (4) low-cost, and (5) high annual production capacity. The glass design areas treated herein include the types of glass, sources, prices, physical properties and glass modifications, such as antireflection coatings.

  16. Solubility, photostability and antifungal activity of phenylpropanoids encapsulated in cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Miriana; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Bourdon, Natacha; Laruelle, Frédéric; Fontaine, Joël; Auezova, Lizette; Greige-Gerges, Hélène; Fourmentin, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    Effects of the encapsulation in cyclodextrins (CDs) on the solubility, photostability and antifungal activities of some phenylpropanoids (PPs) were investigated. Solubility experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of CDs on PPs aqueous solubility. Loading capacities and encapsulation efficiencies of freeze-dried inclusion complexes were determined. Moreover, photostability assays for both inclusion complexes in solution and solid state were performed. Finally, two of the most widespread phytopathogenic fungi, Fusarium oxysporum and Botrytis cinerea, were chosen to examine the antifungal activity of free and encapsulated PPs. Results showed that encapsulation in CDs significantly increased the solubility and photostability of studied PPs (by 2 to 17-fold and 2 to 44-fold, respectively). Free PPs revealed remarkable antifungal properties with isoeugenol showing the lowest half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of mycelium growth and spore germination inhibition. Encapsulated PPs, despite their reduced antifungal activity, could be helpful to solve drawbacks such as solubility and stability.

  17. Plastics in Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergandine, David R.; Holm, D. Andrew

    The materials in this curriculum supplement, developed for middle school or high school science classes, present solid waste problems related to plastics. The set of curriculum materials is divided into two units to be used together or independently. Unit I begins by comparing patterns in solid waste from 1960 to 1990 and introducing methods for…

  18. Hydrodynamic Elastic Magneto Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, M. L.; Levatin, J. A.

    1985-02-01

    The HEMP code solves the conservation equations of two-dimensional elastic-plastic flow, in plane x-y coordinates or in cylindrical symmetry around the x-axis. Provisions for calculation of fixed boundaries, free surfaces, pistons, and boundary slide planes have been included, along with other special conditions.

  19. Preserving in Plastic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahla, James

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps for casting insects in permanent molds prepared from commercially available liquid plastic. Also describes dry mountings in glass, acrylic, and petri dishes. The rationale for specimen use, hints for producing quality results, purchasing information, and safety precautions are considered. (DH)

  20. Plastics (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Videos Games Experiments For Teachers Home ... Pollutants Natural Disasters Drinking Water Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses Water Cycle Water Treatment Plastics The Basics Plastics play a ...

  1. Brain plasticity-based therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Merzenich, Michael M.; Van Vleet, Thomas M.; Nahum, Mor

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review article is to summarize how the neuroscience of brain plasticity, exploiting new findings in fundamental, integrative and cognitive neuroscience, is changing the therapeutic landscape for professional communities addressing brain-based disorders and disease. After considering the neurological bases of training-driven neuroplasticity, we shall describe how this neuroscience-guided perspective distinguishes this new approach from (a) the more-behavioral, traditional clinical strategies of professional therapy practitioners, and (b) an even more widely applied pharmaceutical treatment model for neurological and psychiatric treatment domains. With that background, we shall argue that neuroplasticity-based treatments will be an important part of future best-treatment practices in neurological and psychiatric medicine. PMID:25018719

  2. Rheological and Mechanical Considerations for Photovoltaic Encapsulants

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.

    2005-11-01

    Photovoltaic (pv) devices are encapsulated in polymeric materials not only for corrosion protection, but also for mechanical support. Even though ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) suffers from having both glass and melting phase transitions at temperatures experienced under environmental exposure, its low cost and good optical transmission made EVA the most commonly used material for PV modules. These transitions, however, cause EVA to embrittle at low temperatures (~ -15 deg C) and to be very soft at high temperatures (>40 deg C). From mechanical considerations, one would prefer a material that was relatively unchanged under a wide temperature range. This would produce a more predictable and reliable package. These concerns are likely to become more important as silicon based cells are made thinner.

  3. Encapsulated liquid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture.

    PubMed

    Vericella, John J; Baker, Sarah E; Stolaroff, Joshuah K; Duoss, Eric B; Hardin, James O; Lewicki, James; Glogowski, Elizabeth; Floyd, William C; Valdez, Carlos A; Smith, William L; Satcher, Joe H; Bourcier, William L; Spadaccini, Christopher M; Lewis, Jennifer A; Aines, Roger D

    2015-02-05

    Drawbacks of current carbon dioxide capture methods include corrosivity, evaporative losses and fouling. Separating the capture solvent from infrastructure and effluent gases via microencapsulation provides possible solutions to these issues. Here we report carbon capture materials that may enable low-cost and energy-efficient capture of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymer microcapsules composed of liquid carbonate cores and highly permeable silicone shells are produced by microfluidic assembly. This motif couples the capacity and selectivity of liquid sorbents with high surface area to facilitate rapid and controlled carbon dioxide uptake and release over repeated cycles. While mass transport across the capsule shell is slightly lower relative to neat liquid sorbents, the surface area enhancement gained via encapsulation provides an order-of-magnitude increase in carbon dioxide absorption rates for a given sorbent mass. The microcapsules are stable under typical industrial operating conditions and may be used in supported packing and fluidized beds for large-scale carbon capture.

  4. MARINER 10 SPACE PROBE UNDERGOES ENCAPSULATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    After complete check out, technicians prepare to encapsulate Mariner 10, the spacecraft that will be launched toward the planets Venus and Mercury in early November. The Mariner 10 project includes two first: First use of one planet's (Venus') gravitational field to propel a spacecraft onto another; and first exploration of Mercury. The spacecraft weighs 1,100 pounds, including 170 pounds of scientific equipment. Two television cameras aboard Mariner 10 are expected to take 8,000 pictures of the two planets, and six scientific experiments will return information on solar wind, magnetic fields, charged particles, temperature emissions, radio signals, and atmospheric conditions. Mariner will be launched atop Atlas/Centaur 34, from NASA Complex 36B at Cape Kennedy, Fla.

  5. Knowledge Encapsulation Framework for Collaborative Social Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cowell, Andrew J.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Marshall, Eric J.; McGrath, Liam R.

    2009-03-24

    This paper describes the Knowledge Encapsulation Framework (KEF), a suite of tools to enable knowledge inputs (relevant, domain-specific facts) to modeling and simulation projects, as well as other domains that require effective collaborative workspaces for knowledge-based task. This framework can be used to capture evidence (e.g., trusted material such as journal articles and government reports), discover new evidence (covering both trusted and social media), enable discussions surrounding domain-specific topics and provide automatically generated semantic annotations for improved corpus investigation. The current KEF implementation is presented within a wiki environment, providing a simple but powerful collaborative space for team members to review, annotate, discuss and align evidence with their modeling frameworks. The novelty in this approach lies in the combination of automatically tagged and user-vetted resources, which increases user trust in the environment, leading to ease of adoption for the collaborative environment.

  6. Boron nitride encapsulated graphene infrared emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, H. R.; Zossimova, E.; Mahlmeister, N. H.; Lawton, L. M.; Luxmoore, I. J.; Nash, G. R.

    2016-03-01

    The spatial and spectral characteristics of mid-infrared thermal emission from devices containing a large area multilayer graphene layer, encapsulated using hexagonal boron nitride, have been investigated. The devices were run continuously in air for over 1000 h, with the emission spectrum covering the absorption bands of many important gases. An approximate solution to the heat equation was used to simulate the measured emission profile across the devices yielding an estimated value of the characteristic length, which defines the exponential rise/fall of the temperature profile across the device, of 40 μm. This is much larger than values obtained in smaller exfoliated graphene devices and reflects the device geometry, and the increase in lateral heat conduction within the devices due to the multilayer graphene and boron nitride layers.

  7. Encapsulation in polymer nanofibers by electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataphinan, Woraphon; Dabney, Sally; Smith, Daniel; Reneker, Darrell

    2002-03-01

    Electrospinning is a process which produces fine fibers. Electrospinning utilizes an electrical force on the surface of a polymer solution or polymer melt to overcome the surface tension and produce a very thin charged jet. Electrospinning produces fibers with diameters in the range of nanometers to microns in a short time. Small insoluble particles that were dispersed to the solution were electrospun in nanofibers. Those particles were encapsulated in the dry nanofiber. Polymer nanofibers and nonwoven mats of nanofibers provided the matrix that supports such additives. Several useful substances were incorporated into electrospun fibers. Zinc oxide, silver sulfadiozine, living cells, gold particles, carbon nanofibers, and pollens were all capsulated into nanofiber by electrospinning. Polymers that dissolve in the same solvent are electrospun easily, forming nanofibers with separated phases. Optical and electron microscopes were employed to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.

  8. Encapsulating Urban Traffic Rhythms into Road Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junjie; Wei, Dong; He, Kun; Gong, Hang; Wang, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Using road GIS (geographical information systems) data and travel demand data for two U.S. urban areas, the dynamical driver sources of each road segment were located. A method to target road clusters closely related to urban traffic congestion was then developed to improve road network efficiency. The targeted road clusters show different spatial distributions at different times of a day, indicating that our method can encapsulate dynamical travel demand information into the road networks. As a proof of concept, when we lowered the speed limit or increased the capacity of road segments in the targeted road clusters, we found that both the number of congested roads and extra travel time were effectively reduced. In addition, the proposed modeling framework provided new insights on the optimization of transport efficiency in any infrastructure network with a specific supply and demand distribution. PMID:24553203

  9. Surface conduction in encapsulated topological gated structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshko, Yury; Korzhovska, Inna; Zhao, Lukas; Arefe, Ghidewon; Konczykowski, Marcin; Krusin-Elbaum, Lia

    2015-03-01

    In three-dimensional (3D) topological insulators (TIs), the surface Dirac fermions intermix with the conducting bulk, thereby complicating access to the low-energy surface charge transport or magnetic response. The subsurface 2D states of bulk origin are vulnerable to bandbending due to surface adatoms, a band modification thought to be responsible for the `ageing' effect. To minimize this effect, we have developed an inert environment mechanical exfoliation technique to fabricate transistor-like gated structures in which prototypical binary TIs as well as ultra-low bulk carrier density ternaries (such as Bi2Te2Se) were encapsulated by thin h-BN layers, with electrical contacts made using exfoliated graphene. The effects of electrostatic tuning by the gate bias voltage on surface conductivity as a function of thickness of the TI layers and the variation with disorder will be presented. Supported by NSF-DMR-1312483, and DOD-W911NF-13-1-0159.

  10. Reducing Navy Marine Plastic Pollution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-28

    pollution. Plastic debris from ships is littering beaches, and killing and debilitating fish and wildlife because they are ingesting plastic , or because...they are becoming entangled in plastic debris . While no one is purposefully causing these impacts, the effects are becoming more pronounced. In the...generate support for shipboard and service-wide activities. The recommendations in this section call for disseminating information about the plastic debris

  11. Liposomal Encapsulated Rhodomyrtone: A Novel Antiacne Drug

    PubMed Central

    Chorachoo, Julalak; Amnuaikit, Thanaporn; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodomyrtone isolated from the leaves of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities. Since rhodomyrtone is insoluble in water, it is rather difficult to get to the target sites in human body. Liposome exhibited ability to entrap both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds and easily penetrate to the target site. The present study aimed to develop a novel liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone formulations. In addition, characterization of liposome, stability profiles, and their antiacne activity were performed. Three different formulations of total lipid concentrations 60, 80, and 100 μmol/mL were used. Formulation with 60 μmol/mL total lipid (phosphatidylcholine from soybean and cholesterol from lanolin in 4 : 1, w/w) exhibited the highest rhodomyrtone encapsulation efficacy (65.47 ± 1.7%), average particle size (209.56 ± 4.8 nm), and ζ-potential (–41.19 ± 1.3 mV). All formulations demonstrated good stability when stored for 2 months in dark at 4°C as well as room temperature. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration values of liposomal formulation against 11 clinical bacterial isolates and reference strains ranged from 1 to 4 and from 4 to 64 μg/mL, respectively, while those of rhodomyrtone were 0.25–1 and 0.5–2 μg/mL, respectively. The MIC and MBC values of liposome formulation were more effective than topical drugs against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. PMID:23762104

  12. Liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone: a novel antiacne drug.

    PubMed

    Chorachoo, Julalak; Amnuaikit, Thanaporn; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang P

    2013-01-01

    Rhodomyrtone isolated from the leaves of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa possesses antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant activities. Since rhodomyrtone is insoluble in water, it is rather difficult to get to the target sites in human body. Liposome exhibited ability to entrap both hydrophilic and hydrophobic compounds and easily penetrate to the target site. The present study aimed to develop a novel liposomal encapsulated rhodomyrtone formulations. In addition, characterization of liposome, stability profiles, and their antiacne activity were performed. Three different formulations of total lipid concentrations 60, 80, and 100  μ mol/mL were used. Formulation with 60  μ mol/mL total lipid (phosphatidylcholine from soybean and cholesterol from lanolin in 4 : 1, w/w) exhibited the highest rhodomyrtone encapsulation efficacy (65.47 ± 1.7%), average particle size (209.56 ± 4.8 nm), and ζ -potential (-41.19 ± 1.3 mV). All formulations demonstrated good stability when stored for 2 months in dark at 4°C as well as room temperature. Minimal inhibitory concentration and minimal bactericidal concentration values of liposomal formulation against 11 clinical bacterial isolates and reference strains ranged from 1 to 4 and from 4 to 64  μ g/mL, respectively, while those of rhodomyrtone were 0.25-1 and 0.5-2  μ g/mL, respectively. The MIC and MBC values of liposome formulation were more effective than topical drugs against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

  13. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    DOEpatents

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1998-04-28

    A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate. 3 figs.

  14. The genetics of phenotypic plasticity in nematode feeding structures

    PubMed Central

    Dardiry, Mohannad; Lenuzzi, Masa; Namdeo, Suryesh; Renahan, Tess; Sieriebriennikov, Bogdan; Werner, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity has been proposed as an ecological and evolutionary concept. Ecologically, it can help study how genes and the environment interact to produce robust phenotypes. Evolutionarily, as a facilitator it might contribute to phenotypic novelty and diversification. However, the discussion of phenotypic plasticity remains contentious in parts due to the absence of model systems and rigorous genetic studies. Here, we summarize recent work on the nematode Pristionchus pacificus, which exhibits a feeding plasticity allowing predatory or bacteriovorous feeding. We show feeding plasticity to be controlled by developmental switch genes that are themselves under epigenetic control. Phylogenetic and comparative studies support phenotypic plasticity and its role as a facilitator of morphological novelty and diversity. PMID:28298309

  15. Experience-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity in neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Whitt, Jessica L.; Petrus, Emily; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    The organism’s ability to adapt to the changing sensory environment is due in part to the ability of the nervous system to change with experience. Input and synapse specific Hebbian plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), are critical for sculpting the nervous system to wire its circuit in tune with the environment and for storing memories. However, these synaptic plasticity mechanisms are innately unstable and require another mode of plasticity that maintains homeostasis to allow neurons to function within a desired dynamic range. Several modes of homeostatic adaptation are known, some of which work at the synaptic level. This review will focus on the known mechanisms of experience-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity in the neocortex and their potential function in sensory cortex plasticity. PMID:23466332

  16. Plastics for Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Jack

    1977-01-01

    Describes three plastics projects (which involve making a styrene fishing bobber, an acrylic salad fork and spoon set, and acetate shrink art) designed to provide elementary level students an opportunity to work with plastics and to learn about careers in plastics production and distribution. (TA)

  17. A QSPR for the plasticization efficiency of polyvinylchloride plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Chandola, Mridula; Marathe, Sujata

    2008-01-01

    A simple quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) for correlating the plasticization efficiency of 25 polyvinylchloride (PVC) plasticizers was obtained using molecular modeling. The plasticizers studied were-aromatic esters (phthalate, terephthalate, benzoate, trimellitate), aliphatic esters (adipate, sebacate, azelate), citrates and a phosphate. The low temperature flex point, Tf, of plasticized polyvinylchloride resins was considered as an indicator of plasticization efficiency. Initially, we attempted to predict plasticization efficiency of PVC plasticizers from physical and structural descriptors derived from the plasticizer molecule alone. However, the correlation of these descriptors with Tf was not very good with R=0.78 and r2=0.613. This implied that the selected descriptors were unable to predict all the interactions between PVC and plasticizer. Hence, to account for these interactions, a model containing two polyvinylchloride (PVC) chain segments along with a plasticizer molecule in a simulation box was constructed, using molecular mechanics. A good QSPR equation correlating physical and structural descriptors derived from the model to Tf of the plasticized resins was obtained with R=0.954 and r2=0.909.

  18. Plastics disassembly versus bulk recycling: engineering design for end-of-life electronics resource recovery.

    PubMed

    Rios, Pedro; Stuart, Julie Ann; Grant, Ed

    2003-12-01

    Annual plastic flows through the business and consumer electronics manufacturing supply chain include nearly 3 billion lb of high-value engineering plastics derived from petroleum. The recovery of resource value from this stream presents critical challenges in areas of materials identification and recycling process design that demand new green engineering technologies applied together with life cycle assessment and ecological supply chain analysis to create viable plastics-to-plastics supply cycles. The sustainable recovery of potentially high-value engineering plastics streams requires that recyclers either avoid mixing plastic parts or purify later by separating smaller plastic pieces created in volume reduction (shredding) steps. Identification and separation constitute significant barriers in the plastics-to-plastics recycling value proposition. In the present work, we develop a model that accepts randomly arriving electronic products to study scenarios by which a recycler might identify and separate high-value engineering plastics as well as metals. Using discrete eventsimulation,we compare current mixed plastics recovery with spectrochemical plastic resin identification and subsequent sorting. Our results show that limited disassembly with whole-part identification can produce substantial yields in separated streams of recovered engineering thermoplastics. We find that disassembly with identification does not constitute a bottleneck, but rather, with relatively few workers, can be configured to pull the process and thus decrease maximum staging space requirements.

  19. Alternative approach of cell encapsulation by Volvox spheres.

    PubMed

    Teong, Benjamin; Manousakas, Ioannis; Chang, Shwu Jen; Huang, Han Hsiang; Ju, Kuen-Cheng; Kuo, Shyh Ming

    2015-10-01

    Volvox sphere is a bio-mimicking concept of a biomaterial structure design able to encapsulate chemicals, drugs and/or cells. The aim of this study was to prepare Volvox spheres encapsulating AML12 liver cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) via a high voltage electrostatic field system. The results demonstrated that AML12 liver cells and MSCs could be successfully encapsulated into the inner spheres and the outer sphere of the Volvox spheres. The improved cell viability of MSCs was achieved by the addition of collagen and polyethylene glycol into the preparation components of the Volvox spheres. Collagen material potentially provides extracellular matrix-like structure for cell adhesion while polyethylene glycol provides a void/loose space for permeability of metabolites. The encapsulated MSCs were able to differentiate into hepatocytes or hepatocyte-like cells and express liver cell markers including albumin, alpha feto-protein and cytokeratin 18. The encapsulated cells secreted albumin to about 140 ng on day 14. Based on these observations, we conclude that Volvox spheres can be used as an alternative approach to encapsulate multiple types of cells, here AML12 hepatocyte cell line and MSCs. Nevertheless, efforts are still needed to improve the viability of the encapsulated cells and increase the differentiation of MSCs into functional liver cells.

  20. Pseudotumoral encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous degeneration.

    PubMed

    Felipo, F; Vaquero, M; del Agua, C

    2004-09-01

    An extraordinary case of encapsulated fat necrosis characterized by its large size, diffuse formation of pseudomembranes, and tendency to recur after excision is reported. A 67-year-old Caucasian woman suffering from morbid obesity was admitted for diagnosis and surgical treatment of a soft tissue mass showing a longest diameter of 14 cm and lying adjacently to the scar from previous appendicectomy. Histopathologic features were consistent with a nodular-cystic encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous transformation. Eight months after surgery, a new larger mass (longest diameter of 18 cm) sharing identical histopathologic features appeared in the same location. Encapsulated fat necrosis is a well-defined entity even though several names have been proposed for this condition, including mobile encapsulated lipoma, encapsulated necrosis, or nodular-cystic fat necrosis. Its pathogenesis seems to be related to ischemic changes secondary to previous trauma. It may occasionally show degenerative changes, including dystrophic calcifications and presence of pseudomembranes. To our knowledge, these are the first reported cases of encapsulated fat necrosis presenting as lesions of such size and showing diffuse formation of pseudomembranes; these particular features made diagnosis difficult and led to consideration of a wide range of potential diagnostic possibilities. This case expands the clinico-pathologic spectrum of membranocystic fat necrosis, including the potential ability of this subcutaneous fatty tissue abnormality to recur after surgical excision. Felipo F, Vaquero M, del Agua C. Pseudotumoral encapsulated fat necrosis with diffuse pseudomembranous degeneration.

  1. Designing green plasticizers: influence of alkyl chain length on biodegradation and plasticization properties of succinate based plasticizers.

    PubMed

    Erythropel, Hanno C; Dodd, Patrick; Leask, Richard L; Maric, Milan; Cooper, David G

    2013-04-01

    Phthalate diesters such as di (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) are considered ubiquitous contaminants and are poorly biodegraded in the environment. Moreover, both the parent compound and stable metabolites such as mono (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) are linked to several negative impacts on the environment and human health. Earlier work established that saturated diester compounds, such as succinates, showed better biodegradation characteristics and comparable plasticizer properties compared to DEHP. In this work we examine the effect of alkyl chain length of succinate molecules on plasticizer and biodegradation properties. This included both the side chains (n-ethyl to n-octyl) as well as substituents on the middle part of the succinate molecule. We showed that the common soil bacterium Rhodococcus rhodocrous could rapidly break down all unsubstituted succinates, without the appearance of stable metabolites. Furthermore, the organisms used the plasticizer metabolites as carbon source. The introduction of a large cyclohexyl substituent on the succinate resulted in a poorer degradation rate. Glass Transition Temperature (Tg) measurements were performed to evaluate plasticizer properties and showed that longer side chains reduced the Tg more efficiently, while large cyclohexyl substituents on the succinate decreased this effect. However, all compounds performed better or equal to DEHP at reducing the Tg.

  2. 77 FR 54930 - Carlyle Plastics and Resins, Formerly Known as Fortis Plastics, A Subsidiary of Plastics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... Employment and Training Administration Carlyle Plastics and Resins, Formerly Known as Fortis Plastics, A Subsidiary of Plastics Acquisitions Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Shelley... Adjustment Assistance on July 3, 2012, applicable to workers and former workers of workers of Fortis...

  3. Respiratory muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Katharine L; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2005-07-28

    Plasticity of respiratory muscles must be considered in the context of their unique physiological demands. The continuous rhythmic activation of respiratory muscles makes them among the most active in the body. Respiratory muscles, especially the diaphragm, are non-weight-bearing, and thus, in contrast to limb muscles, are not exposed to gravitational effects. Perturbations in normal activation and load known to induce plasticity in limb muscles may not cause similar adaptations in respiratory muscles. In this review, we explore the structural and functional properties of the diaphragm muscle and their response to alterations in load and activity. Overall, relatively modest changes in diaphragm structural and functional properties occur in response to perturbations in load or activity. However, disruptions in the normal influence of phrenic innervation by frank denervation, tetrodotoxin nerve block and spinal hemisection, induce profound changes in the diaphragm, indicating the substantial trophic influence of phrenic motoneurons on diaphragm muscle.

  4. Stress-gradient plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Srinath S.; Curtin, W. A.

    2011-01-01

    A new model, stress-gradient plasticity, is presented that provides unique mechanistic insight into size-dependent phenomena in plasticity. This dislocation-based model predicts strengthening of materials when a gradient in stress acts over dislocation source–obstacle configurations. The model has a physical length scale, the spacing of dislocation obstacles, and is validated by several levels of discrete-dislocation simulations. When incorporated into a continuum viscoplastic model, predictions for bending and torsion in polycrystalline metals show excellent agreement with experiments in the initial strengthening and subsequent hardening as a function of both sample-size dependence and grain size, when the operative obstacle spacing is proportional to the grain size. PMID:21911403

  5. [Prediction of Encapsulation Temperatures of Copolymer Films in Photovoltaic Cells Using Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques and Chemometrics].

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Chen, Yong-ming; Yao, Zhi-lei

    2015-11-01

    A novel method of combination of the chemometrics and the hyperspectral imaging techniques was presented to detect the temperatures of Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate copolymer (EVA) films in photovoltaic cells during the thermal encapsulation process. Four varieties of the EVA films which had been heated at the temperatures of 128, 132, 142 and 148 °C during the photovoltaic cells production process were used for investigation in this paper. These copolymer encapsulation films were firstly scanned by the hyperspectral imaging equipment (Spectral Imaging Ltd. Oulu, Finland). The scanning band range of hyperspectral equipemnt was set between 904.58 and 1700.01 nm. The hyperspectral dataset of copolymer films was randomly divided into two parts for the training and test purpose. Each type of the training set and test set contained 90 and 10 instances, respectively. The obtained hyperspectral images of EVA films were dealt with by using the ENVI (Exelis Visual Information Solutions, USA) software. The size of region of interest (ROI) of each obtained hyperspectral image of EVA film was set as 150 x 150 pixels. The average of reflectance hyper spectra of all the pixels in the ROI was used as the characteristic curve to represent the instance. There kinds of chemometrics methods including partial least squares regression (PLSR), multi-class support vector machine (SVM) and large margin nearest neighbor (LMNN) were used to correlate the characteristic hyper spectra with the encapsulation temperatures of of copolymer films. The plot of weighted regression coefficients illustrated that both bands of short- and long-wave near infrared hyperspectral data contributed to enhancing the prediction accuracy of the forecast model. Because the attained reflectance hyperspectral data of EVA materials displayed the strong nonlinearity, the prediction performance of linear modeling method of PLSR declined and the prediction precision only reached to 95%. The kernel-based forecast models were

  6. Phenotypic plasticity in sex pheromone production in Bicyclus anynana butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Emilie; Monteiro, Antónia; Yew, Joanne Y.

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity refers to the environmental control of phenotypes. Cues experienced during development (developmental plasticity) or during adulthood (acclimatization) can both affect adult phenotypes. Phenotypic plasticity has been described in many traits but examples of developmental plasticity in physiological traits, in particular, remain scarce. We examined developmental plasticity and acclimatization in pheromone production in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana in response to rearing temperature. B. anynana lives in the African tropics where warm rearing temperatures of the wet season produce active males that court and females that choose, whereas cooler temperatures of the dry season lead to choosy less active males and courting females. We hypothesized that if male pheromone production is costly, it should be reduced in the dry season form. After describing the ultrastructure of pheromone producing cells, we showed that dry season males produced significantly less sex pheromones than wet season males, partly due to acclimatization and partly due to developmental plasticity. Variation in levels of one of the compounds is associated with differential regulation of a pheromone biosynthetic enzyme gene. This plasticity might be an adaptation to minimize pheromone production costs during the stressful dry season. PMID:27966579

  7. Phenotypic plasticity in sex pheromone production in Bicyclus anynana butterflies.

    PubMed

    Dion, Emilie; Monteiro, Antónia; Yew, Joanne Y

    2016-12-14

    Phenotypic plasticity refers to the environmental control of phenotypes. Cues experienced during development (developmental plasticity) or during adulthood (acclimatization) can both affect adult phenotypes. Phenotypic plasticity has been described in many traits but examples of developmental plasticity in physiological traits, in particular, remain scarce. We examined developmental plasticity and acclimatization in pheromone production in the butterfly Bicyclus anynana in response to rearing temperature. B. anynana lives in the African tropics where warm rearing temperatures of the wet season produce active males that court and females that choose, whereas cooler temperatures of the dry season lead to choosy less active males and courting females. We hypothesized that if male pheromone production is costly, it should be reduced in the dry season form. After describing the ultrastructure of pheromone producing cells, we showed that dry season males produced significantly less sex pheromones than wet season males, partly due to acclimatization and partly due to developmental plasticity. Variation in levels of one of the compounds is associated with differential regulation of a pheromone biosynthetic enzyme gene. This plasticity might be an adaptation to minimize pheromone production costs during the stressful dry season.

  8. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with engineering plastics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.

    1993-12-01

    23 plastics have been subjected to immersion studies using 7 different lubricants at 60 C and 100 C, and 10 different refrigerants at ambient and 60 C. In the first part of the study, 22 hermetic stress crack-creep rupture test chambers were used to determine dynamic effects of a constant dead weight load on plastic test bars immersed at 20 C in a 40% refrigerant 32 ISOVG branched acid polyolester lubricant. The creep modulus data of the 10 refrigerants, using a dead weight load of 25% of ultimate tensile, are compared to values for air and HCFC-22. In the second part, the plastic test bars were aged for 14 d at constant refrigerant pressure 300 psia with 17 refrigerant lubricant combinations at 150 C. Additional evaluations were conducted to elucidate the effects of temperature, refrigerant, and lubricant on the plastics. At 150 C, high acid formation (high TAN) was further examined with dehydrated plastics. These evaluations indicate that dehydrating the plastics reduced, but did not eliminate, high TAN values and that heat alone caused the lost physicals. Alternative HFC refrigerants had little impact on plastics; some polyolester lubricants caused identifiable changes.

  9. Compensatory plasticity: time matters

    PubMed Central

    Lazzouni, Latifa; Lepore, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Plasticity in the human and animal brain is the rule, the base for development, and the way to deal effectively with the environment for making the most efficient use of all the senses. When the brain is deprived of one sensory modality, plasticity becomes compensatory: the exception that invalidates the general loss hypothesis giving the opportunity of effective change. Sensory deprivation comes with massive alterations in brain structure and function, behavioral outcomes, and neural interactions. Blind individuals do as good as the sighted and even more, show superior abilities in auditory, tactile and olfactory processing. This behavioral enhancement is accompanied with changes in occipital cortex function, where visual areas at different levels become responsive to non-visual information. The intact senses are in general used more efficiently in the blind but are also used more exclusively. New findings are disentangling these two aspects of compensatory plasticity. What is due to visual deprivation and what is dependent on the extended use of spared modalities? The latter seems to contribute highly to compensatory changes in the congenitally blind. Short-term deprivation through the use of blindfolds shows that cortical excitability of the visual cortex is likely to show rapid modulatory changes after few minutes of light deprivation and therefore changes are possible in adulthood. However, reorganization remains more pronounced in the congenitally blind. Cortico-cortical pathways between visual areas and the areas of preserved sensory modalities are inhibited in the presence of vision, but are unmasked after loss of vision or blindfolding as a mechanism likely to drive cross-modal information to the deafferented visual cortex. The development of specialized higher order visual pathways independently from early sensory experience is likely to preserve their function and switch to the intact modalities. Plasticity in the blind is also accompanied with

  10. New perspectives in plastic biodegradation.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Alex

    2011-06-01

    During the past 50 years new plastic materials, in various applications, have gradually replaced the traditional metal, wood, leather materials. Ironically, the most preferred property of plastics--durability--exerts also the major environmental threat. Recycling has practically failed to provide a safe solution for disposal of plastic waste (only 5% out of 1 trillion plastic bags, annually produced in the US alone, are being recycled). Since the most utilized plastic is polyethylene (PE; ca. 140 million tons/year), any reduction in the accumulation of PE waste alone would have a major impact on the overall reduction of the plastic waste in the environment. Since PE is considered to be practically inert, efforts were made to isolate unique microorganisms capable of utilizing synthetic polymers. Recent data showed that biodegradation of plastic waste with selected microbial strains became a viable solution.

  11. Plastic footwear for leprosy.

    PubMed

    Antia, N H

    1990-03-01

    The anaesthetic foot in leprosy poses the most major problem in the rehabilitation of its patients. Various attempts have been made to produce protective footwear such as the microcellular rubber-car-tyre sandals. Unfortunately these attempts have had little success on a large scale because of the inability to produce them in large numbers and the stigma attached to such unusual footwear. While such footwear may be superior to the 'tennis' shoe in protecting the foot from injury by the penetration of sharp objects, it fails to distribute the weight-bearing forces which is the major cause of plantar damage and ulceration in the anaesthetic foot. This can be achieved by providing rigidity to the sole, as demonstrated by the healing of ulcers in plaster of paris casts or the rigid wooden clog. A new type of moulded plastic footwear has been evolved in conjunction with the plastic footwear industry which provides footwear that can be mass produced at a low price and which overcomes the stigma of leprosy. Controlled rigidity is provided by the incorporation of a spring steel shank between the sponge insole and the hard wearing plastic sole. Trials have demonstrated both the acceptability of the footwear and its protective effects as well as its hard wearing properties.

  12. Respiratory muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Gransee, Heather M; Mantilla, Carlos B; Sieck, Gary C

    2012-04-01

    Muscle plasticity is defined as the ability of a given muscle to alter its structural and functional properties in accordance with the environmental conditions imposed on it. As such, respiratory muscle is in a constant state of remodeling, and the basis of muscle's plasticity is its ability to change protein expression and resultant protein balance in response to varying environmental conditions. Here, we will describe the changes of respiratory muscle imposed by extrinsic changes in mechanical load, activity, and innervation. Although there is a large body of literature on the structural and functional plasticity of respiratory muscles, we are only beginning to understand the molecular-scale protein changes that contribute to protein balance. We will give an overview of key mechanisms regulating protein synthesis and protein degradation, as well as the complex interactions between them. We suggest future application of a systems biology approach that would develop a mathematical model of protein balance and greatly improve treatments in a variety of clinical settings related to maintaining both muscle mass and optimal contractile function of respiratory muscles.

  13. Probiotic encapsulation technology: from microencapsulation to release into the gut.

    PubMed

    Gbassi, Gildas K; Vandamme, Thierry

    2012-02-06

    Probiotic encapsulation technology (PET) has the potential to protect microorgansisms and to deliver them into the gut. Because of the promising preclinical and clinical results, probiotics have been incorporated into a range of products. However, there are still many challenges to overcome with respect to the microencapsulation process and the conditions prevailing in the gut. This paper reviews the methodological approach of probiotics encapsulation including biomaterials selection, choice of appropriate technology, in vitro release studies of encapsulated probiotics, and highlights the challenges to be overcome in this area.

  14. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) singly encapsulated cesium chloride capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, W.W.

    1997-05-22

    Three nonstandard Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) cesium chloride capsules are being shipped from WESF (225B building) to the 324 building. They would normally be shipped in the Beneficial Uses Shipping System (BUSS) cask under its US Department of Energy (DOE) license (DOE 1996), but these capsules are nonstandard: one has a damaged or defective weld in the outer layer of encapsulation, and two have the outer encapsulation removed. The 3 capsules, along with 13 other capsules, will be overpacked in the 324 building to meet the requirements for storage in WESF`s pool.

  15. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells.

    PubMed

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V

    2002-04-02

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  16. Probiotic Encapsulation Technology: From Microencapsulation to Release into the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Gbassi, Gildas K.; Vandamme, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic encapsulation technology (PET) has the potential to protect microorgansisms and to deliver them into the gut. Because of the promising preclinical and clinical results, probiotics have been incorporated into a range of products. However, there are still many challenges to overcome with respect to the microencapsulation process and the conditions prevailing in the gut. This paper reviews the methodological approach of probiotics encapsulation including biomaterials selection, choice of appropriate technology, in vitro release studies of encapsulated probiotics, and highlights the challenges to be overcome in this area. PMID:24300185

  17. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1982-01-01

    An analytical methodology for advanced encapsulation designs was developed. From these methods design sensitivities are established for the development of photovoltaic module criteria and the definition of needed research tasks. Analytical models were developed to perform optical, thermal, electrical and analyses on candidate encapsulation systems. From these analyses several candidate systems were selected for qualification testing. Additionally, test specimens of various types are constructed and tested to determine the validity of the analysis methodology developed. Identified deficiencies and/or discrepancies between analytical models and relevant test data are corrected. Prediction capability of analytical models is improved. Encapsulation engineering generalities, principles, and design aids for photovoltaic module designers is generated.

  18. Poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel microstructures encapsulating living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koh, Won-Gun; Revzin, Alexander; Pishko, Michael V.

    2002-01-01

    We present an easy and effective method for the encapsulation of cells inside PEG-based hydrogel microstructures fabricated using photolithography. High-density arrays of three-dimensional microstructures were created on substrates using this method. Mammalian cells were encapsulated in cylindrical hydrogel microstructures of 600 and 50 micrometers in diameter or in cubic hydrogel structures in microfluidic channels. Reducing lateral dimension of the individual hydrogel microstructure to 50 micrometers allowed us to isolate 1-3 cells per microstructure. Viability assays demonstrated that cells remained viable inside these hydrogels after encapsulation for up to 7 days.

  19. Development of glass encapsulation techniques for terrestrial photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, P. R.; Tobin, R. G.; Landis, G. A.; Kreisman, W. S.; Nowlan, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Two parallel development programs for terrestrial solar cell module encapsulation and fabrication are reviewed, including the status of electrostatic bonding as an encapsulation technique. Current designs of electrostatically bonded modules are discussed, fabrication of which is now routine. The design of a high-efficiency module is presented, for which performance reliability features are discussed. This design is compatible with later generation changes such as the introduction of encapsulation by electrostatic bonding. Application of wire mesh contacts by electrostatic bonding has resulted in I-V curve fill factors of 0.74. Cell designs that would allow existing Pyrex glass to be used in electrostatically bonded modules are presented.

  20. Plastics in automobiles. (Latest citations from Materials Business File). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic to replace metallic parts in automobiles. Citations discuss the advantages of easy assembly, part consolidation, weight savings, durability, aesthetics, and economics. Examples of specific applications, types of plastic and their formulation are included. (Contains a minimum of 187 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Plastics in automobiles. (Latest citations from Materials Business file). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic to replace metallic parts in automobiles. Citations discuss the advantages of easy assembly, part consolidation, weight savings, durability, aesthetics, and economics. Examples of specific applications, types of plastic and their formulation are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. 75 FR 70112 - Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery Devices; Classification of Non-Powered Suction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 878 Medical Devices; General and Plastic Surgery...--GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES 0 1. The authority citation for 21 CFR part 878 continues to read...

  3. Interfacial interactions between plastic particles in plastics flotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Gu, Guo-hua; Fu, Jian-gang; Lin, Qing-quan; Liu, You-nian

    2015-12-01

    Plastics flotation used for recycling of plastic wastes receives increasing attention for its industrial application. In order to study the mechanism of plastics flotation, the interfacial interactions between plastic particles in flotation system were investigated through calculation of Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) function, Lewis acid-base (AB) Gibbs function, and the extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek potential energy profiles. The results showed that van der Waals force between plastic particles is attraction force in flotation system. The large hydrophobic attraction, caused by the AB Gibbs function, is the dominant interparticle force. Wetting agents present significant effects on the interfacial interactions between plastic particles. It is found that adsorption of wetting agents promotes dispersion of plastic particles and decreases the floatability. Pneumatic flotation may improve the recovery and purity of separated plastics through selective adsorption of wetting agents on plastic surface. The relationships between hydrophobic attraction and surface properties were also examined. It is revealed that there exists a three-order polynomial relationship between the AB Gibbs function and Lewis base component. Our finding provides some insights into mechanism of plastics flotation.

  4. Neuronal plasticity and seasonal reproduction in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lehman, Michael N.; Ladha, Zamin; Coolen, Lique M.; Hileman, Stanley M.; Connors, John M.; Goodman, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal reproduction represents a naturally occurring example of functional plasticity in the adult brain since it reflects changes in neuroendocrine pathways controlling GnRH secretion and, in particular, the responsiveness of GnRH neurons to estradiol negative feedback. Structural plasticity within this neural circuitry may, in part, be responsible for seasonal switches in the negative feedback control of GnRH secretion that underlies annual reproductive transitions. In this paper, we review evidence for structural changes in the circuitry responsible for seasonal inhibition of GnRH secretion in sheep. These include changes in synaptic inputs onto GnRH neurons, as well as onto dopamine neurons in the A15 cell group, a nucleus that play a key role in estradiol negative feedback. We also present preliminary data suggesting a role for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors as an early mechanistic step in the plasticity that accompanies seasonal reproductive transitions in the sheep. Finally, we review recent evidence suggesting that kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus constitute a critical intermediary in the control of seasonal reproduction. While a majority of the data for a role of neuronal plasticity in seasonal reproduction has come from the sheep model, the players and principles are likely to have relevance for reproduction in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans, and in both health and disease. PMID:21143669

  5. Developmental plasticity in child growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Ze'ev

    2011-01-01

    The ability of a given genotype to produce different phenotypes in response to different environments is termed "plasticity," and is part of the organism's "adaptability" to environmental cues. The expressions of suites of genes, particularly during development or life history transitions, probably underlie the fundamental plasticity of an organism. Plasticity in developmental programming has evolved in order to provide the best chances of survival and reproductive success to organisms under changing environments. Environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology, child growth and maturation, and long-term health and longevity. Developmental origins of health and disease and life history transitions are purported to use placental, nutritional, and endocrine cues for setting long-term biological, mental, and behavioral strategies for child growth and maturation in response to local ecological and/or social conditions. The window of developmental plasticity extends from conception to early childhood, and even beyond to the transition from juvenility to adolescence, and could be transmitted transgenerationally. It involves epigenetic responses to environmental changes, which exert their effects during life history phase transitions.

  6. Neuronal plasticity and seasonal reproduction in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Michael N; Ladha, Zamin; Coolen, Lique M; Hileman, Stanley M; Connors, John M; Goodman, Robert L

    2010-12-01

    Seasonal reproduction represents a naturally occurring example of functional plasticity in the adult brain as it reflects changes in neuroendocrine pathways controlling gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and, in particular, the responsiveness of GnRH neurons to estradiol negative feedback. Structural plasticity within this neural circuitry may, in part, be responsible for seasonal switches in the negative feedback control of GnRH secretion that underlie annual reproductive transitions. We review evidence for structural changes in the circuitry responsible for seasonal inhibition of GnRH secretion in sheep. These include changes in synaptic inputs onto GnRH neurons, as well as onto dopamine neurons in the A15 cell group, a nucleus that plays a key role in estradiol negative feedback. We also present preliminary data suggesting a role for neurotrophins and neurotrophin receptors as an early mechanistic step in the plasticity that accompanies seasonal reproductive transitions in sheep. Finally, we review recent evidence suggesting that kisspeptin cells of the arcuate nucleus constitute a critical intermediary in the control of seasonal reproduction. Although a majority of the data for a role of neuronal plasticity in seasonal reproduction has come from the sheep model, the players and principles are likely to have relevance for reproduction in a wide variety of vertebrates, including humans, and in both health and disease.

  7. Amphibious fishes: evolution and phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia A; Turko, Andy J

    2016-08-01

    Amphibious fishes spend part of their life in terrestrial habitats. The ability to tolerate life on land has evolved independently many times, with more than 200 extant species of amphibious fishes spanning 17 orders now reported. Many adaptations for life out of water have been described in the literature, and adaptive phenotypic plasticity may play an equally important role in promoting favourable matches between the terrestrial habitat and behavioural, physiological, biochemical and morphological characteristics. Amphibious fishes living at the interface of two very different environments must respond to issues relating to buoyancy/gravity, hydration/desiccation, low/high O2 availability, low/high CO2 accumulation and high/low NH3 solubility each time they traverse the air-water interface. Here, we review the literature for examples of plastic traits associated with the response to each of these challenges. Because there is evidence that phenotypic plasticity can facilitate the evolution of fixed traits in general, we summarize the types of investigations needed to more fully determine whether plasticity in extant amphibious fishes can provide indications of the strategies used during the evolution of terrestriality in tetrapods.

  8. The spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine enhances anti-biofilm efficiency through an effective releasing mode and close microbial interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wong, Chi-Hin; Ng, Tsz-Wing; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    We reported two forms (sphere and wire) of newly fabricated chlorhexidine (CHX)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and investigated their releasing capacities and anti-biofilm efficiencies. The interactions of the blank MSNs with planktonic oral microorganisms were assessed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The anti-biofilm effects of the two forms of nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX were examined by 2,3-bis (2-methoxy- 4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide. The profiles of biofilm penetration were analyzed by fluorescent-labeled MSNs using confocal microscopy and ImageJ. The spherical MSNs with an average diameter of 265 nm exhibited a larger surface area and faster CHX-releasing rate than the MSN wires. The field emission scanning electron microscopy images showed that both shaped MSNs enabled to attach and further fuse with the surfaces of testing microbes. Meanwhile, the nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX could enhance the anti-biofilm efficiency with reference to its free form. Notably, the spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX presented with a greater anti-biofilm capacity than the wire nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX, partly due to their difference in physical property. Furthermore, the relatively even distribution and homogeneous dispersion of spherical MSNs observed in confocal images may account for the enhanced penetration of spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX into the microbial biofilms and resultant anti-biofilm effects. These findings reveal that the spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX could preferably enhance its anti-biofilm efficiency through an effective releasing mode and close interactions with microbes. PMID:27330290

  9. The spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated chlorhexidine enhances anti-biofilm efficiency through an effective releasing mode and close microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Wong, Chi-Hin; Ng, Tsz-Wing; Zhang, Cheng-Fei; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    We reported two forms (sphere and wire) of newly fabricated chlorhexidine (CHX)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), and investigated their releasing capacities and anti-biofilm efficiencies. The interactions of the blank MSNs with planktonic oral microorganisms were assessed by field emission scanning electron microscopy. The anti-biofilm effects of the two forms of nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX were examined by 2,3-bis (2-methoxy- 4-nitro-5-sulfo-phenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide. The profiles of biofilm penetration were analyzed by fluorescent-labeled MSNs using confocal microscopy and ImageJ. The spherical MSNs with an average diameter of 265 nm exhibited a larger surface area and faster CHX-releasing rate than the MSN wires. The field emission scanning electron microscopy images showed that both shaped MSNs enabled to attach and further fuse with the surfaces of testing microbes. Meanwhile, the nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX could enhance the anti-biofilm efficiency with reference to its free form. Notably, the spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX presented with a greater anti-biofilm capacity than the wire nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX, partly due to their difference in physical property. Furthermore, the relatively even distribution and homogeneous dispersion of spherical MSNs observed in confocal images may account for the enhanced penetration of spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX into the microbial biofilms and resultant anti-biofilm effects. These findings reveal that the spherical nanoparticle-encapsulated CHX could preferably enhance its anti-biofilm efficiency through an effective releasing mode and close interactions with microbes.

  10. Use of a passive equilibration methodology to encapsulate cisplatin into preformed thermosensitive liposomes.

    PubMed

    Woo, Janet; Chiu, Gigi N C; Karlsson, Göran; Wasan, Ellen; Ickenstein, Ludger; Edwards, Katarina; Bally, Marcel B

    2008-02-12

    A conventional, cholesterol-containing liposome formulation of cisplatin has demonstrated insignificant activity in clinical trials, due in part, to insufficient release of encapsulated content following localization within solid tumors. For this reason, the development of a triggered release liposome formulation is desirable. In this report, cisplatin was encapsulated into lysolipid-containing thermosensitive liposomes (LTSL) using a novel technique, which relies on the equilibration of cisplatin across the liposomal membrane at temperatures above the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature (TC) of the bulk phospholipid. Mild heating and drug loading into LTSL did not induce morphological changes of the liposomes. In vitro data demonstrated that >95% of encapsulated cisplatin was released from LTSL within 5 min following mild heating at 42 degrees C, while <5% was released at 37 degrees C. Under similar conditions, lysolipid-free thermosensitive liposomes exhibited 70% release of cisplatin at 42 degrees C, and cholesterol-containing liposomes exhibited negligible drug release at 42 degrees C. The pharmacokinetic profiles of LTSL- and TSL-cisplatin indicated that these formulations were rapidly eliminated from circulation (terminal t(1/2) of 1.09 and 2.83 h, respectively). The therapeutic utility of LTSL-cisplatin formulation will be based on strategies where hyperthermia is applied prior to the administration of the liposomal drug-a strategy similar to that used in the clinical assessment of LTSL-doxorubicin formulation.

  11. Single-cell hydrogel encapsulation for enhanced survival of human marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karoubi, Golnaz; Ormiston, Mark L; Stewart, Duncan J; Courtman, David W

    2009-10-01

    Inadequate extracellular matrix cues and subsequent apoptotic cell death are among crucial factors currently limiting cell viability and organ retention in cell-based therapeutic strategies for vascular regeneration. Here we describe the use of a single-cell hydrogel capsule to provide enhanced cell survival of adherent cells in transient suspension culture. Human marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were singularly encapsulated in agarose capsules containing the immobilized matrix molecules, fibronectin and fibrinogen to ameliorate cell-matrix survival signals. MSCs in the enriched capsules demonstrated increased viability, greater metabolic activity and enhanced cell-cytoskeletal patterning. Increased cell viability resulted from the re-induction of cell-matrix interactions likely via integrin clustering and subsequent activation of the extracellular signal regulated MAPK (ERK)/mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Proof of principle in-vivo studies, investigating autologous MSC delivery into Fisher 344 rat hindlimb, depicted a significant increase in the number of engrafted cells using the single-cell encapsulation system. Incorporation of immobilized adhesion molecules compensates, at least in part, for the missing cell-matrix cues, thereby attenuating the initial anoikis stimuli and providing protection from subsequent apoptosis. Thus, this single-cell encapsulation strategy may markedly enhance therapeutic cell survival in targeted tissues.

  12. Molecular Signaling in Muscle Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, Henry F.

    1999-01-01

    Extended spaceflight under microgravity conditions leads to significant atrophy of weight-bearing muscles. Atrophy and hypertrophy are the extreme outcomes of the high degree of plasticity exhibited by skeletal muscle. Stimuli which control muscle plasticity include neuronal, hormonal, nutritional, and mechanical inputs. The mechanical stimulus for muscle is directly related to the work or exercise against a load performed. Little or no work is performed by weight-bearing muscles under microgravity conditions. A major hypothesis is that focal adhesion kinase (FAK) which is associated with integrin at the adherens junctions and costa meres of all skeletal muscles is an integral part of the major mechanism for molecular signaling upon mechanical stimulation in all muscle fibers. Additionally, we propose that myotonic protein kinase (DMPK) and dystrophin (DYSTR) also participate in distinct mechanically stimulated molecular signaling pathways that are most critical in type I and type II muscle fibers, respectively. To test these hypotheses, we will use the paradigms of hindlimb unloading and overloading in mice as models for microgravity conditions and a potential exercise countermeasure, respectively, in mice. We expect that FAK loss-of-function will impair hypertrophy and enhance atrophy in all skeletal muscle fibers whereas DYSTR and DMPK loss-of-function will have similar but more selective effects on Type IT and Type I fibers, respectively. Gene expression will be monitored by muscle-specific creatine kinase M promoter-reporter construct activity and specific MRNA and protein accumulation in the soleus (type I primarily) and plantaris (type 11 primarily) muscles. With these paradigms and assays, the following Specific Project Aims will be tested in genetically altered mice: 1) identify the roles of DYSTR and its pathway; 2) evaluate the roles of the DMPK and its pathway; 3) characterize the roles of FAK and its pathway and 4) genetically analyze the mechanisms

  13. Encapsulating fatty acid esters of bioactive compounds in starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay Ma, Ursula Vanesa

    Interest in the use of many bioactive compounds in foods is growing in large part because of the apparent health benefits of these molecules. However, many of these compounds can be easily degraded during processing, storage, or their passage through the gastrointestinal tract before reaching the target site. In addition, they can be bitter, acrid, or astringent, which may negatively affect the sensory properties of the product. Encapsulation of these molecules may increase their stability during processing, storage, and in the gastrointestinal tract, while providing controlled release properties. The ability of amylose to form inclusion complexes and spherulites while entrapping certain compounds has been suggested as a potential method for encapsulation of certain molecules. However, complex formation and spherulitic crystallization are greatly affected by the type of inclusion molecules, type of starch, and processing conditions. The objectives of the present investigation were to: (a) study the effect of amylose, amylopectin, and intermediate material on spherulite formation and its microstructure; (b) investigate the formation of amylose and high amylose starch inclusion complexes with ascorbyl palmitate, retinyl palmitate, and phytosterol esters; (c) evaluate the ability of spherulites to form in the presence of fatty acid esters and to entrap ascorbyl palmitate, retinyl palmitate, and phytosterol esters; and (d) evaluate the effect of processing conditions on spherulite formation and fatty acid ester entrapment. Higher ratios of linear to branched molecules resulted in the formation of more and rounder spherulites with higher heat stability. In addition to the presence of branches, it appears that spherulitic crystallization is also affected by other factors, such as degree of branching, chain length, and chain length distribution. Amylose and Hylon VII starch formed inclusion complexes with fatty acid esters of ascorbic acid, retinol, or phytosterols

  14. Development of a Plastic Melt Waste Compactor for Space Missions Experiments and Prototype Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, Gregory; Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Pisharody, Suresh; Fisher, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes development at NASA Ames Research Center of a heat melt compactor that can be used on both near term and far term missions. Experiments have been performed to characterize the behavior of composite wastes that are representative of the types of wastes produced on current and previous space missions such as International Space Station, Space Shuttle, MIR and Skylab. Experiments were conducted to characterize the volume reduction, bonding, encapsulation and biological stability of the waste composite and also to investigate other key design issues such as plastic extrusion, noxious off-gassing and removal of the of the plastic waste product from the processor. The experiments provided the data needed to design a prototype plastic melt waste processor, a description of which is included in the paper.

  15. Plastics in the Marine Environment.

    PubMed

    Law, Kara Lavender

    2017-01-03

    Plastics contamination in the marine environment was first reported nearly 50 years ago, less than two decades after the rise of commercial plastics production, when less than 50 million metric tons were produced per year. In 2014, global plastics production surpassed 300 million metric tons per year. Plastic debris has been detected worldwide in all major marine habitats, in sizes from microns to meters. In response, concerns about risks to marine wildlife upon exposure to the varied forms of plastic debris have increased, stimulating new research into the extent and consequences of plastics contamination in the marine environment. Here, I present a framework to evaluate the current understanding of the sources, distribution, fate, and impacts of marine plastics. Despite remaining knowledge gaps in mass budgeting and challenges in investigating ecological impacts, the increasing evidence of the ubiquity of plastics contamination in the marine environment, the continued rapid growth in plastics production, and the evidence-albeit limited-of demonstrated impacts to marine wildlife support immediate implementation of source-reducing measures to decrease the potential risks of plastics in the marine ecosystem.

  16. Abiotic degradation of plastic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles-López, Y. G.; Gutiérrez-Mayen, A. M.; Velasco-Pérez, M.; Beltrán-Villavicencio, M.; Vázquez-Morillas, A.; Cano-Blanco, M.

    2017-01-01

    Degradable plastics have been promoted as an option to mitigate the environmental impacts of plastic waste. However, there is no certainty about its degradability under different environmental conditions. The effect of accelerated weathering (AW), natural weathering (NW) and thermal oxidation (TO) on different plastics (high density polyethylene, HDPE; oxodegradable high density polyethylene, HDPE-oxo; compostable plastic, Ecovio ® metalized polypropylene, PP; and oxodegradable metalized polypropylene, PP-oxo) was studied. Plastics films were exposed to AW per 110 hours; to NW per 90 days; and to TO per 30 days. Plastic films exposed to AW and NW showed a general loss on mechanical properties. The highest reduction in elongation at break on AW occurred to HDPE-oxo (from 400.4% to 20.9%) and was higher than 90% for HDPE, HDPE-oxo, Ecovio ® and PP-oxo in NW. No substantial evidence of degradation was found on plastics exposed to TO. Oxo-plastics showed higher degradation rates than their conventional counterparts, and the compostable plastic was resistant to degradation in the studied abiotic conditions. This study shows that degradation of plastics in real life conditions will vary depending in both, their composition and the environment.

  17. Plastics in the Marine Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Kara Lavender

    2017-01-01

    Plastics contamination in the marine environment was first reported nearly 50 years ago, less than two decades after the rise of commercial plastics production, when less than 50 million metric tons were produced per year. In 2014, global plastics production surpassed 300 million metric tons per year. Plastic debris has been detected worldwide in all major marine habitats, in sizes from microns to meters. In response, concerns about risks to marine wildlife upon exposure to the varied forms of plastic debris have increased, stimulating new research into the extent and consequences of plastics contamination in the marine environment. Here, I present a framework to evaluate the current understanding of the sources, distribution, fate, and impacts of marine plastics. Despite remaining knowledge gaps in mass budgeting and challenges in investigating ecological impacts, the increasing evidence of the ubiquity of plastics contamination in the marine environment, the continued rapid growth in plastics production, and the evidence—albeit limited—of demonstrated impacts to marine wildlife support immediate implementation of source-reducing measures to decrease the potential risks of plastics in the marine ecosystem.

  18. Pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Conley, William R.

    2002-01-01

    A method is disclosed for pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices. The method can include encapsulating the MEMS device in a transfer molded plastic package. Next, a perforation can be made in the package to provide access to the MEMS elements. The non-ablative material removal process can include wet etching, dry etching, mechanical machining, water jet cutting, and ultrasonic machining, or any combination thereof. Finally, the MEMS elements can be released by using either a wet etching or dry plasma etching process. The MEMS elements can be protected with a parylene protective coating. After releasing the MEMS elements, an anti-stiction coating can be applied. The perforating step can be applied to both sides of the device or package. A cover lid can be attached to the face of the package after releasing any MEMS elements. The cover lid can include a window for providing optical access. The method can be applied to any plastic packaged microelectronic device that requires access to the environment, including chemical, pressure, or temperature-sensitive microsensors; CCD chips, photocells, laser diodes, VCSEL's, and UV-EPROMS. The present method places the high-risk packaging steps ahead of the release of the fragile portions of the device. It also provides protection for the die in shipment between the molding house and the house that will release the MEMS elements and subsequently treat the surfaces.

  19. Methodology for Evaluating Encapsulated Beneficial Uses of Coal Combustion Residuals

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The primary purpose of this document is to present an evaluation methodology developed by the EPA for making determinations about environmental releases from encapsulated products containing coal combustion residuals.

  20. Accelerated UV Test Methods for Encapsulants of Photovoltaic Modules: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kempe, M. D.

    2008-05-01

    This paper asserts that materials used for PV encapsulation must be evaluated for their ability to transmit light and to maintain mechanical integrity for extended periods of time under long term UV exposure.

  1. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    A cost effective encapsulant system was identified and a silicone acrylic cover material containing a durable ultraviolet screening agent was prepared. The effectiveness of the cover material in protecting photo-oxidatively sensitive polymers was demonstrated.

  2. Develop Silicone Encapsulation Systems for Terrestrial Silicon Solar Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The results for Task 3 of the Low Cost Solar Array Project are presented. Task 3 is directed toward the development of a cost effective encapsulating system for photovoltaic modules using silicon based materials. The technical approach of the contract effort is divided into four special tasks: (1) technology review; (2) generation of concepts for screening and processing silicon encapsulation systems; (3) assessment of encapsulation concepts; and (4) evaluation of encapsulation concepts. The candidate silicon materials are reviewed. The silicon and modified silicon resins were chosen on the basis of similarity to materials with known weatherability, cost, initial tangential modulus, accelerated dirt pick-up test results and the ratio of the content of organic phenyl substitution of methyl substitution on the backbone of the silicon resin.

  3. Formation and microstructure of carbon encapsulated superparamagnetic Co nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiang-Cheng; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Dong, X. L.

    Carbon encapsulated magnetic cobalt nanoparticles have been synthesized by the modified arc-discharge method. Both high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles reveal the presence of 8-15nm diameter crystallites coated with 1-3 carbon layers. In particular, HREM images indicate that the intimate and contiguous carbon fringe around those Co nanoparticles is good evidence for complete encapsulation by carbon shell layers. The encapsulated phases are identified as hcp α-Co, fcc β-Co and cobalt carbide (Co 3 C) nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nano-area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). However, some fcc β-Co particles with a significant fraction of stacking faults are observed by HREM and confirmed by means of numerical fast Fourier transform (FFT) of HREM lattice images. The carbon encapsulation formation and growth mechanism are also reviewed.

  4. Design, analysis and test verification of advanced encapsulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III

    1983-01-01

    A preliminary reduced variable master was constructed for pressure loading. A study of cell thickness versus cell stress was completed. Work is continuing on encapsulation of qualification modules. A 4 ft x 4 ft 'credit card' construction laminate was made.

  5. Method of making foam-encapsulated laser targets

    DOEpatents

    Rinde, James A.; Fulton, Fred J.

    1977-01-01

    Foam-encapsulated laser fusion targets are fabricated by suspending fusion fuel filled shells in a solution of cellulose acetate, extruding the suspension through a small orifice into a bath of ice water, soaking the thus formed shell containing cellulose acetate gel in the water to extract impurities, freezing the gel, and thereafter freeze-drying wherein water and solvents sublime and the gel structure solidifies into a low-density microcellular foam containing one or more encapsulated fuel-filled shells. The thus formed material is thereafter cut and mounted on a support to provide laser fusion targets containing a fuel-filled shell surrounded by foam having a thickness of 10 to 60 .mu.m, a cell size of less than 2 .mu.m, and density of 0.08 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3. Various configured foam-encapsulated targets capable of being made by the encapsulation method are illustrated.

  6. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles by simian virus 40 capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tingjuan; Zhang, Zhiping; Gao, Ding; Li, Feng; Wei, Hongping; Liang, Xiaosheng; Cui, Zongqiang; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-10-01

    Viral capsid-nanoparticle hybrid structures constitute a new type of nanoarchitecture that can be used for various applications. We previously constructed a hybrid structure comprising quantum dots encapsulated by simian virus 40 (SV40) capsids for imaging viral infection pathways. Here, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are encapsulated into SV40 capsids and the effect of particle size and surface ligands (i.e. mPEG and DNA) on AuNP encapsulation is studied. Particle size and surface decoration play complex roles in AuNP encapsulation by SV40 capsids. AuNPs >=15 nm (when coated with mPEG750 rather than mPEG2000), or >=10 nm (when coated with 10T or 50T DNA) can be encapsulated. Encapsulation efficiency increased as the size of the AuNPs increased from 10 to 30 nm. In addition, the electrostatic interactions derived from negatively charged DNA ligands on the AuNP surfaces promote encapsulation when the AuNPs have a small diameter (i.e. 10 nm and 15 nm). Moreover, the SV40 capsid is able to carry mPEG750-modified 15-nm AuNPs into living Vero cells, whereas the mPEG750-modified 15-nm AuNPs alone cannot enter cells. These results will improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying nanoparticle encapsulation in SV40 capsids and enable the construction of new functional hybrid nanostructures for cargo delivery.Viral capsid-nanoparticle hybrid structures constitute a new type of nanoarchitecture that can be used for various applications. We previously constructed a hybrid structure comprising quantum dots encapsulated by simian virus 40 (SV40) capsids for imaging viral infection pathways. Here, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are encapsulated into SV40 capsids and the effect of particle size and surface ligands (i.e. mPEG and DNA) on AuNP encapsulation is studied. Particle size and surface decoration play complex roles in AuNP encapsulation by SV40 capsids. AuNPs >=15 nm (when coated with mPEG750 rather than mPEG2000), or >=10 nm (when coated with 10T or 50T DNA) can be

  7. Study on preparation of β-cyclodextrin encapsulation tea extract.

    PubMed

    Haidong, Liang; Fang, Yu; Zhihong, Tong; Changle, Ren

    2011-11-01

    Microencapsulation of ethanol extract of tea was performed in this study. In order to microencapsulate, β-cyclodextrin was used as wall material. Ethanol extract of tea was used as the core material. Microcapsules in the solid form were obtained by drying the emulsions. RSM showed that optimal processing parameters were as followings: core material/wall material 1/4, β-cyclodextrin content 16%, stirring time 30 min and stirring temperature 200°C. Pharmacological activities of β-cyclodextrin encapsulation tea extract were determined. It was found that β-cyclodextrin encapsulation tea extract could enhance BMD, BMC and bone Ca, Zn and Cu contents. In addition, β-cyclodextrin encapsulation tea extract could still reduce blood Ca contents. These results indicated that β-cyclodextrin encapsulation tea extract was useful for improving bone quality in aged animals.

  8. A simple encapsulation method for organic optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qian-Qian; An, Qiao-Shi; Zhang, Fu-Jun

    2014-08-01

    The performances of organic optoelectronic devices, such as organic light emitting diodes and polymer solar cells, have rapidly improved in the past decade. The stability of an organic optoelectronic device has become a key problem for further development. In this paper, we report one simple encapsulation method for organic optoelectronic devices with a parafilm, based on ternary polymer solar cells (PSCs). The power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of PSCs with and without encapsulation decrease from 2.93% to 2.17% and from 2.87% to 1.16% after 168-hours of degradation under an ambient environment, respectively. The stability of PSCs could be enhanced by encapsulation with a parafilm. The encapsulation method is a competitive choice for organic optoelectronic devices, owing to its low cost and compatibility with flexible devices.

  9. Antitumor Activity of Peptide Amphiphile Nanofiber-Encapsulated Camptothecin

    SciTech Connect

    Soukasene, Stephen; Toft, Daniel J.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Lu, Hsuming; Lee, Hyung-Kun; Standley, Stephany M.; Cryns, Vincent L.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-04-02

    Self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofibers were used to encapsulate camptothecin (CPT), a naturally occurring hydrophobic chemotherapy agent, using a solvent evaporation technique. Encapsulation by PA nanofibers was found to improve the aqueous solubility of the CPT molecule by more than 50-fold. PAs self-assembled into nanofibers in the presence of CPT as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy. Small-angle X-ray scattering results suggest a slight increase in diameter of the nanofiber to accommodate the hydrophobic cargo. In vitro studies using human breast cancer cells show an enhancement in antitumor activity of the CPT when encapsulated by the PA nanofibers. In addition, using a mouse orthotopic model of human breast cancer, treatment with PA nanofiber-encapsulated CPT inhibited tumor growth. These results highlight the potential of this model PA system to be adapted for delivery of hydrophobic therapies to treat a variety of diseases including cancer.

  10. Solar-Cell Encapsulation by One-Step Lamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarbolouki, M. N.

    1983-01-01

    Simple method of potting solar cells reduces encapsulating to one-step lamination process. Simplified process saves time and expense. Potting material is added to two inside faces of solar-cell assembly before they are sandwiched and cured.

  11. A quantitative method for photovoltaic encapsulation system optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, A., III; Minning, C. P.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    It is pointed out that the design of encapsulation systems for flat plate photovoltaic modules requires the fulfillment of conflicting design requirements. An investigation was conducted with the objective to find an approach which will make it possible to determine a system with optimum characteristics. The results of the thermal, optical, structural, and electrical isolation analyses performed in the investigation indicate the major factors in the design of terrestrial photovoltaic modules. For defect-free materials, minimum encapsulation thicknesses are determined primarily by structural considerations. Cell temperature is not strongly affected by encapsulant thickness or thermal conductivity. The emissivity of module surfaces exerts a significant influence on cell temperature. Encapsulants should be elastomeric, and ribs are required on substrate modules. Aluminum is unsuitable as a substrate material. Antireflection coating is required on cell surfaces.

  12. Application of encapsulation technology in stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Maryam; Kalalinia, Fatemeh

    2015-12-15

    Stem cells are characterized by their capacity for self-renewal and their ability to differentiate into specific cell types under the influence of their microenvironment. These cells are potent therapeutic tools to treat various regenerative diseases based on their ability to produce a therapeutic protein or restore natural tissue function with minimal side effects. However, a major problem that must be overcome is to find a suitable stem cell delivery system. Cell encapsulation is a novel concept in which cells are immobilized inside a biocompatible and semi-permeable natural or synthetic matrix. The purpose of encapsulation is to protect the cell from the host's immune system, improve cell expansion and maintain cell viability, self-renewal potency and direct cell differentiation toward a desired lineage. This review will provide an overview of the application of encapsulation technology for phenotypic and functional improvement of stem cells and using these encapsulated cells to treat various diseases.

  13. Comparative properties of optically clear epoxy encapsulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Maury; Zhou, Yan

    2001-12-01

    Three epoxy systems were evaluated for physical dn optical properties. The three systems chosen for the study were selected on the basis of their optical clarity, color and chemistry. Three distinctly different chemistries were chosen, aromatic epoxy-amine cured. Aromatic epoxy- anhydride cured and cycloaliphatic epoxy-anhydride cured. All three systems remained optically clear and water-white after full cure. The three selected systems were tested for physical properties, adhesion and light transmission properties. Light transmission was measured after thermal and humidity exposure. Adhesion was measured after humidity exposure only. Both of the epoxy-anhydride systems performed well in optical properties but poorer in adhesion as compared to the epoxy-amine system. The aromatic epoxy- amine system discolored badly during thermal exposure at 100 C. Data generated from this work will be used in selecting clear encapsulating materials for photonics applications. No single system offers optimal performance in all areas. The best compromise material is the aromatic epoxy-anhydride system.

  14. Identification Schemes from Key Encapsulation Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anada, Hiroaki; Arita, Seiko

    We propose a generic conversion from a key encapsulation mechanism (KEM) to an identification (ID) scheme. The conversion derives the security for ID schemes against concurrent man-in-the-middle (cMiM) attacks from the security for KEMs against adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks on one-wayness (one-way-CCA2). Then, regarding the derivation as a design principle of ID schemes, we develop a series of concrete one-way-CCA2 secure KEMs. We start with El Gamal KEM and prove it secure against non-adaptive chosen ciphertext attacks on one-wayness (one-way-CCA1) in the standard model. Then, we apply a tag framework with the algebraic trick of Boneh and Boyen to make it one-way-CCA2 secure based on the Gap-CDH assumption. Next, we apply the CHK transformation or a target collision resistant hash function to exit the tag framework. And finally, as it is better to rely on the CDH assumption rather than the Gap-CDH assumption, we apply the Twin DH technique of Cash, Kiltz and Shoup. The application is not “black box” and we do it by making the Twin DH technique compatible with the algebraic trick. The ID schemes obtained from our KEMs show the highest performance in both computational amount and message length compared with previously known ID schemes secure against concurrent man-in-the-middle attacks.

  15. Use of recycled plastics in wood plastic composites - a review.

    PubMed

    Kazemi Najafi, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    The use of recycled and waste thermoplastics has been recently considered for producing wood plastic composites (WPCs). They have great potential for WPCs manufacturing according to results of some limited researches. This paper presents a detailed review about some essential properties of waste and recycled plastics, important for WPCs production, and of research published on the effect of recycled plastics on the physical and mechanical properties of WPCs.

  16. Method for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations, medium for encapsulating and isolating hazardous cations

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, S.R.; Anderson, K.B.; Song, K.; Yuchs, S.E.; Marshall, C.L.

    1996-12-31

    The problems associated with the disposal of toxic metals in an environmentally acceptable manner continues to plague industry. Such metals as nickel, vanadium, molybdenum, cobalt, iron, and antimony present physiological and ecological challenges that are best addressed through minimization of exposure and dispersion. A method for encapsulating hazardous cations is provided comprising supplying a pretreated substrate containing the cations; contacting the substrate with an organo-silane compound to form a coating on the substrate; and allowing the coating to cure. A medium for containing hazardous cations is also provided, comprising a substrate having ion-exchange capacity and a silane-containing coating on the substrate.

  17. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.

    2000-09-05

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of ionomer. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first ionomer layer, and a second layer of ionomer is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  18. Encapsulant Material For Solar Cell Module And Laminated Glass Applications

    DOEpatents

    Hanoka, Jack I.; Klemchuk, Peter P.

    2001-02-13

    An encapsulant material includes a layer of metallocene polyethylene disposed between two layers of an acid copolymer of polyethylene. More specifically, the layer of metallocene polyethylene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the first layer of the acid copolymer of polyethylene, and a second layer of the acid copolymer of polyethlene is disposed adjacent a rear surface of the layer of metallocene polyethylene. The encapsulant material can be used in solar cell module and laminated glass applications.

  19. Development of Encapsulated Dye for Surface Impact Damage Indicator System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    GROUP SUB-GROUP Composites Ultrasonics Dye Impact Microcapsules 11 04 NDE polyurethane 11 1 0Encapsulation Paint 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if...encapsulation, microencapsule incorporation into the USAF polyurethane paint, dnd initial correlation study of impact damage to impact coating indication. It is...project were to: 1. Refine the microcapsule formulation to be compatible with MIL-C-83286 paint. 2. Fabricate composite panels from isotropic graphite

  20. Crystal Growth in Liquid-Encapsulated Float Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J.; Frazier, Donald O.; Lehoczky, Sandor; Vlasse, Marcus; Facemire, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Suitably chosen liquid encapsulant placed around melt zone in float-zone crystal-growth system performs four important functions enhancing purity and reducing strains and dislocations in final crystal. In new technique, grow dislocation-free crystals with precisely controlled composition even from materials not amenable to conventional float-zone crystal-growth method. Support provided by encapsulant make it practical to process materials of low surface tension.

  1. Microsphere-based scaffolds encapsulating chondroitin sulfate or decellularized cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vineet; Tenny, Kevin M; Barragan, Marilyn; Berkland, Cory J; Detamore, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix materials such as decellularized cartilage (DCC) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) may be attractive chondrogenic materials for cartilage regeneration. The goal of the current study was to investigate the effects of encapsulation of DCC and CS in homogeneous microsphere-based scaffolds, and to test the hypothesis that encapsulation of these extracellular matrix materials would induce chondrogenesis of rat bone marrow stromal cells. Four different types of homogeneous scaffolds were fabricated from microspheres of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid): Blank (poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) only; negative control), transforming growth factor-β3 encapsulated (positive control), DCC encapsulated, and CS encapsulated. These scaffolds were then seeded with rat bone marrow stromal cells and cultured for 6 weeks. The DCC and CS encapsulation altered the morphological features of the microspheres, resulting in higher porosities in these groups. Moreover, the mechanical properties of the scaffolds were impacted due to differences in the degree of sintering, with the CS group exhibiting the highest compressive modulus. Biochemical evidence suggested a mitogenic effect of DCC and CS encapsulation on rat bone marrow stromal cells with the matrix synthesis boosted primarily by the inherently present extracellular matrix components. An important finding was that the cell seeded CS and DCC groups at week 6 had up to an order of magnitude higher glycosaminoglycan contents than their acellular counterparts. Gene expression results indicated a suppressive effect of DCC and CS encapsulation on rat bone marrow stromal cell chondrogenesis with differences in gene expression patterns existing between the DCC and CS groups. Overall, DCC and CS were easily included in microsphere-based scaffolds; however, there is a requirement to further refine their concentrations to achieve the differentiation profiles we seek in vitro. PMID:27358376

  2. Lead macro-encapsulation conceptual and experimental studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Orebaugh, E.G.

    1993-01-31

    Macro-encapsulation, the regulatory treatment for radioactively contaminated lead (mixed) waste has been conceptually and experimentally evaluated for practical application. Epoxy encapsulants molded around lead billets have proven to be exceptionally rugged, easily applied, have high radiation and chemical stability, and minimize required process equipment and production of secondary wastes. This technology can now be considered developed, and can be applied as discussed in this report.

  3. Lead macro-encapsulation conceptual and experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Orebaugh, E.G.

    1993-01-31

    Macro-encapsulation, the regulatory treatment for radioactively contaminated lead (mixed) waste has been conceptually and experimentally evaluated for practical application. Epoxy encapsulants molded around lead billets have proven to be exceptionally rugged, easily applied, have high radiation and chemical stability, and minimize required process equipment and production of secondary wastes. This technology can now be considered developed, and can be applied as discussed in this report.

  4. One plasticity model for problems of plastic metal working

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greshnov, V. M.

    2008-11-01

    Scalar and tensor models of plastic flow of metals extending plasticity theory are considered over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. Equations are derived using the physico-phenomenological approach based on modern concepts and methods of the physics and mechanics of plastic deformation. For hardening and viscoplastic solids, a new mathematical formulation of the boundary-value plasticity problem taking into account loading history is obtained. Results of testing of the model are given. A numerical finite-element algorithm for the solution of applied problems is described.

  5. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vikram; Coffey, M Justin

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients.

  6. Plastic Surgery and Suicide: A Clinical Guide for Plastic Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, M. Justin

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Several studies have identified an increased risk of suicide among patient populations which a plastic surgeon may have a high risk of encountering: women undergoing breast augmentation, cosmetic surgery patients, and breast cancer patients. No formal guidelines exist to assist a plastic surgeon when faced with such a patient, and not every plastic surgery team has mental health clinicians that are readily accessible for consultation or referral. The goal of this clinical guide is to offer plastic surgeons a set of practical approaches to manage potentially suicidal patients. In addition, the authors review a screening tool, which can assist surgeons when encountering high-risk patients. PMID:27622096

  7. Direct liquefaction of plastics and coprocessing of coal with plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, G.P.; Feng, Z.; Mahajan, V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this work were to optimize reaction conditions for the direct liquefaction of waste plastics and the coprocessing of coal with waste plastics. In previous work, the direct liquefaction of medium and high density polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PPE), poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), and a mixed plastic waste, and the coliquefaction of these plastics with coals of three different ranks was studied. The results established that a solid acid catalyst (HZSM-5 zeolite) was highly active for the liquefaction of the plastics alone, typically giving oil yields of 80-95% and total conversions of 90-100% at temperatures of 430-450 {degrees}C. In the coliquefaction experiments, 50:50 mixtures of plastic and coal were used with a tetralin solvent (tetralin:solid = 3:2). Using approximately 1% of the HZSM-5 catalyst and a nanoscale iron catalyst, oil yields of 50-70% and total conversion of 80-90% were typical. In the current year, further investigations were conducted of the liquefaction of PE, PPE, and a commingled waste plastic obtained from the American Plastics Council (APC), and the coprocessing of PE, PPE and the APC plastic with Black Thunder subbituminous coal. Several different catalysts were used in these studies.

  8. 16 CFR 1611.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations... procedures set forth in section 4(a) of the act. Note: If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated... under part 1611—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to...

  9. 16 CFR 1611.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations... procedures set forth in section 4(a) of the act. Note: If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated... under part 1611—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to...

  10. 16 CFR 1611.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations... procedures set forth in section 4(a) of the act. Note: If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated... under part 1611—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to...

  11. 16 CFR 1611.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations... procedures set forth in section 4(a) of the act. Note: If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated... under part 1611—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to...

  12. 16 CFR 1611.34 - Only uncovered or exposed parts of wearing apparel to be tested.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FLAMMABLE FABRICS ACT REGULATIONS STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF VINYL PLASTIC FILM Rules and Regulations... procedures set forth in section 4(a) of the act. Note: If the outer layer of plastic film or plastic-coated... under part 1611—Standard for the Flammability of Vinyl Plastic Film. If the outer layer adheres to...

  13. An experimental/analytical comparison of strains in encapsulated assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Burchett, S.N.

    1991-11-01

    A combined experimental and analytical study of strains developed in encapsulated assemblies during casting, curing and thermal excursions is described. The experimental setup, designed to measure in situ strains, consisted of thin, closed-end, Kovar tubes that were instrumented with strain gages and thermocouples before being over-cast with a polymeric encapsulant. Four bisphenol A (three diethanolamine cured and one anhydride cured) epoxy-based materials and one urethane elastomeric material were studied. After cure of the encapsulant, tube strains were measured over the temperature range of {minus}55{degrees}C to 90{degrees}C. The thermal excursion experiments were then numerically modeled using finite element analyses and the computed strains were compared to the experimental strains. The predicted strains were over estimated (conservative) when a linear, elastic, temperature-dependent material model was assumed for the encapsulant and the stress free temperature T{sub i} was assumed to correspond to the cure temperature {Tc} of the encapsulant. Very good agreement was obtained with linear elastic calculations provided that the stress free temperature corresponded to the onset of the glassy-to-rubbery transition range of the encapsulant. Finally, excellent agreement was obtained in one of the materials (828/DEA) when a viscoelastic material model was utilized and a stress free temperature corresponding to the cure temperature was assumed. 13 refs., 20 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushant; Singh, Abhay Narayan; Verma, Anil; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) nanosphere encapsulating superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were successfully synthesized using double emulsion (w/o/w) solvent evaporation technique. Characterization of the nanosphere using dynamic light scattering, field emission scanning electron microscope, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed a spherical-shaped nanosphere in a size range of 812 ± 64 nm with moderate protein encapsulation efficiency of 55.42 ± 3.7 % and high in vitro protein release. Human skin HaCat cells were used for analyzing antioxidative properties of SOD- and CAT-encapsulated PCL nanospheres. Oxidative stress condition in HaCat cells was optimized with exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 1 mM) as external stress factor and verified through reactive oxygen species (ROS) analysis using H2DCFDA dye. PCL nanosphere encapsulating SOD and CAT together indicated better antioxidative defense against H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human skin HaCat cells in comparison to PCL encapsulating either SOD or CAT alone as well as against direct supplement of SOD and CAT protein solution. Increase in HaCat cells SOD and CAT activities after treatment hints toward uptake of PCL nanosphere into the human skin HaCat cells. The result signifies the role of PCL-encapsulating SOD and CAT nanosphere in alleviating oxidative stress.

  15. Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Ductwork installed in unconditioned attics can significantly increase the overall heating and cooling costs of residential buildings. In fact, estimated duct thermal losses for single-family residential buildings with ductwork installed in unconditioned attics range from 10% to 45%. In a study of three single-story houses in Florida, the Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) investigated the strategy of using buried and/or encapsulated ducts (BED) to reduce duct thermal losses in existing homes. The BED strategy consists of burying ducts in loose-fill insulation and/or encapsulating them in closed cell polyurethane spray foam (ccSPF) insulation. There are three possible combinations of BED strategies: (1) buried ducts; (2) encapsulated ducts (with ccSPF); and (3) buried and encapsulated ducts. The best solution for each situation depends on the climate, age of the house, and the configuration of the HVAC system and attic. For new construction projects, the team recommends that ducts be both encapsulated and buried as the minimal planning and costs required for this will yield optimal energy savings. The encapsulated/buried duct strategy, which utilizes ccSPF to address condensation concerns, is an approach that was developed specifically for humid climates.

  16. Encapsulation of liquids using a counter rotating twin screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Tackenberg, Markus W; Krauss, Ralph; Marmann, Andreas; Thommes, Markus; Schuchmann, Heike P; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Until now extrusion is not applied for pharmaceutical encapsulation processes, whereas extrusion is widely used for encapsulation of flavours within food applications. Based on previous mixing studies, a hot melt counter-rotating extrusion process for encapsulation of liquid active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) was investigated. The mixing ratio of maltodextrin to sucrose as matrix material was adapted in first extrusion trials. Then the number of die holes was investigated to decrease expansion and agglutination of extrudates to a minimum. At a screw speed of 180 min(-1) the product temperature was decreased below 142 °C, resulting in extrudates of cylindrical shape with a crystalline content of 9-16%. Volatile orange terpenes and the nonvolatile α-tocopherol were chosen as model APIs. Design of experiments were performed to investigate the influences of barrel temperature, powder feed rate, and API content on the API retentions. A maximum of 9.2% α-tocopherol was encapsulated, while the orange terpene encapsulation rate decreased to 6.0% due to evaporation after leaving the die. During 12 weeks of storage re-crystallization of sucrose occurred; however, the encapsulated orange terpene amount remained unchanged.

  17. Enzyme-encapsulated silica nanoparticle for cancer chemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Yi-Rong; Ho, Wei-Jen; Chao, Jiun-Shuan; Yuan, Chiun-Jye

    2012-03-01

    A novel horseradish peroxidase-encapsulated silica nanoparticle (SNP) was generated in this study under relatively mild conditions. The generated enzyme-encapsulated SNP were relatively uniform in size (average 70 ± 14.3 nm), monodispersed, and spherical, as characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The horseradish peroxidase encapsulated in silica nanoparticle exhibits biological properties, such as a pH-dependent activity profile and k m value, similar to that of free enzymes. Furthermore, enzyme-encapsulated SNP exhibited good operational stability for the repetitive usage with a relative standard deviation of 5.1 % ( n = 10) and a high stability for long term storage (>60 days) at 4 °C. The feasibility of using enzyme-encapsulated SNP in prodrug cancer therapy was also demonstrated by its capability to convert the prodrug indole-3-acetic acid into cytotoxic peroxyl radicals and trigger the death of tumor cells. These results indicate that the developed enzyme-encapsulated SNP has potential in the applications of prodrug cancer therapy.

  18. Stability analysis of an encapsulated microbubble against gas diffusion.

    PubMed

    Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik

    2010-03-01

    Linear stability analysis is performed for a mathematical model of diffusion of gases from an encapsulated microbubble. It is an Epstein-Plesset model modified to account for encapsulation elasticity and finite gas permeability. Although bubbles, containing gases other than air, are considered, the final stable bubble, if any, contains only air, and stability is achieved only when the surrounding medium is saturated or oversaturated with air. In absence of encapsulation elasticity, only a neutral stability is achieved for zero surface tension, the other solution being unstable. For an elastic encapsulation, different equilibrium solutions are obtained depending on the saturation level and whether the surface tension is smaller or higher than the elasticity. For an elastic encapsulation, elasticity can stabilize the bubble. However, imposing a non-negativity condition on the effective surface tension (consisting of reference surface tension and the elastic stress) leads to an equilibrium radius which is only neutrally stable. If the encapsulation can support a net compressive stress, it achieves actual stability. The linear stability results are consistent with our recent numerical findings. Physical mechanisms for the stability or instability of various equilibriums are provided.

  19. Critical factors affecting cell encapsulation in superporous hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Desai, Esha S; Tang, Mary Y; Ross, Amy E; Gemeinhart, Richard A

    2012-04-01

    We recently showed that superporous hydrogel (SPH) scaffolds promote long-term stem cell viability and cell driven mineralization when cells were seeded within the pores of pre-fabricated SPH scaffolds. The possibility of cell encapsulation within the SPH matrix during its fabrication was further explored in this study. The impact of each chemical component used in SPH fabrication and each step of the fabrication process on cell viability was systematically examined. Ammonium persulfate, an initiator, and sodium bicarbonate, the gas-generating compound, were the two components having significant toxicity toward encapsulated cells at the concentrations necessary for SPH fabrication. Cell survival rates were 55.7% ± 19.3% and 88.8% ± 9.4% after 10 min exposure to ammonium persulfate and sodium bicarbonate solutions, respectively. In addition, solution pH change via the addition of sodium bicarbonate had significant toxicity toward encapsulated cells with cell survival of only 50.3% ± 2.5%. Despite toxicity of chemical components and the SPH fabrication method, cells still exhibited significant overall survival rates within SPHs of 81.2% ± 6.8% and 67.0% ± 0.9%, respectively, 48 and 72 h after encapsulation. This method of cell encapsulation holds promise for use in vitro and in vivo as a scaffold material for both hydrogel matrix encapsulation and cell seeding within the pores.

  20. Processing plastics in Packerland

    SciTech Connect

    Ridgley, H.

    1998-04-01

    Located in Green Bay, Wisconsin, Catenation, Inc. is a privately held recycling company dedicated to the recovery of post-consumer plastic containers. What makes the company stand out is its ability to separate and sort material from a commingled bale. Catenation uses custom-made, high-speed, computer-driven vision equipment to scan and sort every bottle by category. The computer even can be programmed to distinguish soiled jugs from clean containers. This is a selling point for buyers of resin who are insistent on receiving high-grade material.

  1. Fabrication of plastic biochips

    SciTech Connect

    Saaem, Ishtiaq; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Alam, S. Munir; Tian Jingdong

    2010-07-15

    A versatile surface functionalization procedure based on rf magnetron sputtering of silica was performed on poly(methylmethacrylate), polycarbonate, polypropylene, and cyclic olefin copolymers (Topas 6015). The hybrid thermoplastic surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis and contact angle measurements. The authors then used these hybrid materials to perform a sandwich assay targeting an HIV-1 antibody using fluorescent detection and biotinylated peptides immobilized using the bioaffinity of biotin-neutravidin. They found a limit of detection similar to arrays on glass surfaces and believed that this plastic biochip platform may be used for the development of disposable immunosensing and diagnostic applications.

  2. Presynaptic long-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Calakos, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a major cellular substrate for learning, memory, and behavioral adaptation. Although early examples of long-term synaptic plasticity described a mechanism by which postsynaptic signal transduction was potentiated, it is now apparent that there is a vast array of mechanisms for long-term synaptic plasticity that involve modifications to either or both the presynaptic terminal and postsynaptic site. In this article, we discuss current and evolving approaches to identify presynaptic mechanisms as well as discuss their limitations. We next provide examples of the diverse circuits in which presynaptic forms of long-term synaptic plasticity have been described and discuss the potential contribution this form of plasticity might add to circuit function. Finally, we examine the present evidence for the molecular pathways and cellular events underlying presynaptic long-term synaptic plasticity. PMID:24146648

  3. Key Questions on the Role of Phenotypic Plasticity in Eco-Evolutionary Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hendry, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Ecology and evolution have long been recognized as reciprocally influencing each other, with recent research emphasizing how such interactions can occur even on very short (contemporary) time scales. Given that these interactions are mediated by organismal phenotypes, they can be variously shaped by genetic variation, phenotypic plasticity, or both. I here address 8 key questions relevant to the role of plasticity in eco-evolutionary dynamics. Focusing on empirical evidence, especially from natural populations, I offer the following conclusions. 1) Plasticity is--not surprisingly--sometimes adaptive, sometimes maladaptive, and sometimes neutral. 2) Plasticity has costs and limits but these constraints are highly variable, often weak, and hard to detect. 3) Variable environments favor the evolution of increased trait plasticity, which can then buffer fitness/performance (i.e., tolerance). 4) Plasticity sometimes aids colonization of new environments (Baldwin Effect) and responses to in situ environmental change. However, plastic responses are not always necessary or sufficient in these contexts. 5) Plasticity will sometimes promote and sometimes constrain genetic evolution. 6) Plasticity will sometimes help and sometimes hinder ecological speciation but, at present, empirical tests are limited. 7) Plasticity can show considerable evolutionary change in contemporary time, although the rates of this reaction norm evolution are highly variable among taxa and traits. 8) Plasticity appears to have considerable influences on ecological dynamics at the community and ecosystem levels, although many more studies are needed. In summary, plasticity needs to be an integral part of any conceptual framework and empirical investigation of eco-evolutionary dynamics.

  4. A Conservative Formulation for Plasticity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    diverse. For instance, the microphysical pictures of metal plasticity and of the flow of granular materials are quite different. Furthermore, passage from...of inhomogeneous materials can be adapted to model plasticity by allowing- the local reference frames of Noll to be dynramic [6]. In this approach...gradient and the entropy. Choosing a plasticity model amounts to specifying thle evolu- tion and constitutive e-vations. 472 PLOHIR AND SHARP A general

  5. The commercialization of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Eric

    2013-09-01

    The last decade has brought a major challenge to the traditional practice of plastic surgery from corporations that treat plastic surgery as a commercial product and market directly to the public. This corporate medicine model may include promotion of a trademarked procedure or device, national advertising that promises stunning results, sales consultants, and claims of innovation, superiority, and improved safety. This article explores the ethics of this business practice and whether corporate medicine is a desirable model for patients and plastic surgeons.

  6. Americium behaviour in plastic vessels.

    PubMed

    Legarda, F; Herranz, M; Idoeta, R; Abelairas, A

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of (241)Am dissolved in water in different plastic storage vessels was determined. Three different plastics were investigated with natural and distilled waters and the retention of (241)Am by these plastics was studied. The same was done by varying vessel agitation time, vessel agitation speed, surface/volume ratio of water in the vessels and water pH. Adsorptions were measured to be between 0% and 70%. The adsorption of (241)Am is minimized with no water agitation, with PET or PVC plastics, and by water acidification.

  7. White matter plasticity in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Young, K M

    2014-09-12

    CNS white matter is subject to a novel form of neural plasticity which has been termed "myelin plasticity". It is well established that oligodendrocyte generation and the addition of new myelin internodes continue throughout normal adulthood. These new myelin internodes maybe required for the de novo myelination of previously unmyelinated axons, myelin sheath replacement, or even myelin remodeling. Each process could alter axonal conduction velocity, but to what end? We review the changes that occur within the white matter over the lifetime, the known regulators and mediators of white matter plasticity in the mature CNS, and the physiological role this plasticity may play in CNS function.

  8. THERMAL STABILITY OF GLASS PLASTICS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPOSITE MATERIALS, THERMAL STABILITY), (* GLASS TEXTILES, THERMAL STABILITY), (*LAMINATED PLASTICS , THERMAL STABILITY), HEATING, COOLING, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, FATIGUE(MECHANICS), FLEXURAL STRENGTH, THERMAL STRESSES, USSR

  9. Modeling plasticity of materials with nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudinova, N. R.

    2017-02-01

    A new approach to modeling of the plasticity of materials with the particle size in the range from 3 to 20 nm (nanostructure) has been proposed. It is based on classical thermodynamic approach employing the surface tension of nanoparticles. Its main advantage is the minimum number of physical parameters in use. In the context of the proposed model, we calculated the dependence of the melting temperature on the nanoparticle size which is consistent with experimental data. The volume density of the surface energy of nanoparticles was also determined. This energy is assumed to be a significant part of the internal energy during deformation Yield point was interpreted as the result of changes of grains surface energy during the deformation. The obtained yield point dependence on the grain size was related to the Hall–Petch law, and this resulted in confirmation of the hypothesis on the crucial role of surface tension forces in the initial stage of plastic deformation of nanomaterials.

  10. [Erythropoietin in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Günter, C I; Rezaeian, F; Harder, Y; Lohmeyer, J A; Egert, S; Bader, A; Schilling, A F; Machens, H-G

    2013-04-01

    EPO is an autologous hormone, which is known to regulate erythropoiesis. For 30 years it has been used for the therapy of diverse forms of anaemia, such as renal anaemia, tumour-related anaemias, etc. Meanwhile, a multitude of scientific publications were able to demonstrate its pro-regenerative effects after trauma. These include short-term effects such as the inhibition of the "primary injury response" or apoptosis, and mid- and long-term effects for example the stimulation of stem cell recruitment, growth factor production, angiogenesis and re-epithelialisation. Known adverse reactions are increases of thromboembolic events and blood pressure, as well as a higher mortality in patients with tumour anaemias treated with EPO. Scientific investigations of EPO in the field of plastic surgery included: free and local flaps, nerve regeneration, wound healing enhancement after dermal thermal injuries and in chronic wounds.Acute evidence for the clinical use of EPO in the field of plastic surgery is still not satisfactory, due to the insufficient number of Good Clinical Practice (GCP)-conform clinical trials. Thus, the initiation of more scientifically sound trials is indicated.

  11. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-07-27

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3-4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  12. Plastics recycling: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, Jefferson; Dvorak, Robert; Kosior, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Plastics are inexpensive, lightweight and durable materials, which can readily be moulded into a variety of products that find use in a wide range of applications. As a consequence, the production of plastics has increased markedly over the last 60 years. However, current levels of their usage and disposal generate several environmental problems. Around 4 per cent of world oil and gas production, a non-renewable resource, is used as feedstock for plastics and a further 3–4% is expended to provide energy for their manufacture. A major portion of plastic produced each year is used to make disposable items of packaging or other short-lived products that are discarded within a year of manufacture. These two observations alone indicate that our current use of plastics is not sustainable. In addition, because of the durability of the polymers involved, substantial quantities of discarded end-of-life plastics are accumulating as debris in landfills and in natural habitats worldwide. Recycling is one of the most important actions currently available to reduce these impacts and represents one of the most dynamic areas in the plastics industry today. Recycling provides opportunities to reduce oil usage, carbon dioxide emissions and the quantities of waste requiring disposal. Here, we briefly set recycling into context against other waste-reduction strategies, namely reduction in material use through downgauging or product reuse, the use of alternative biodegradable materials and energy recovery as fuel. While plastics have been recycled since the 1970s, the quantities that are recycled vary geographically, according to plastic type and application. Recycling of packaging materials has seen rapid expansion over the last decades in a number of countries. Advances in technologies and systems for the collection, sorting and reprocessing of recyclable plastics are creating new opportunities for recycling, and with the combined actions of the public, industry and governments it

  13. [Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M

    2009-09-01

    Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific

  14. Doxycycline-encapsulated nanotube-modified dentin adhesives.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, S A; Palasuk, J; Kamocki, K; Geraldeli, S; Gregory, R L; Platt, J A; Windsor, L J; Bottino, M C

    2014-12-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti-matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)-encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)-modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives-but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels-we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of encapsulated MMP

  15. Fabrication of hemispherical liquid encapsulated structures based on droplet molding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Hiroki; Miki, Norihisa

    2015-12-01

    We have developed and demonstrated a method for forming spherical structures of a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane encapsulating a liquid. Liquid encapsulation can enhance the performance of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices by providing deformability and improved dielectric properties. Parylene deposition and wafer bonding are applied to encapsulate liquid into a MEMS device. In parylene deposition, a parylene membrane is directly formed onto a liquid droplet. However, since the parylene membrane is stiff, the membrane is fragile. Although wafer bonding can encapsulate liquid between two substrates, the surface of the fabricated structure is normally flat. We propose a new liquid encapsulation method by dispensing liquid droplets. At first, a 20 μl PDMS droplet is dispensed on ethylene glycol. A 70 μl glycerin droplet is dispensed into a PDMS casting solution layer. The droplet forms a layer on heated ethylene glycol. Glycerin and ethylene glycol are chosen for their high boiling points. Additionally, a glycerin droplet is dispensed on the layer and surrounded by a thin PDMS casting solution film. The film is baked for 1 h at 75 °C. As the result, a structure encapsulating a liquid in a flexible PDMS membrane is obtained. We investigate the effects of the volume, surface tension, and guide thickness on the shape of the formed structures. We also evaluated the effect of the structure diameter on miniaturization. The structure can be adapted for various functions by changing the encapsulated liquid. We fabricated a stiffness-tunable structure by dispensing a magnetorheoligical fluid droplet with a stiffness that can be changed by an external magnetic field. We also confirmed that the proposed structure can produce stiffness differences that are distinguishable by humans.

  16. Encapsulation of ionic electroactive polymers: reducing the interaction with environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaakson, P.; Aabloo, A.; Tamm, T.

    2016-04-01

    Ionic electro-active polymer (iEAP) actuators are composite materials that change their mechanical properties in response to external electrical stimulus. The interest in these devices is mainly driven by their capability to generate biomimetic movements, and their potential use in soft robotics. The driving voltage of an iEAP-actuator (0.5… 3 V) is at least an order of magnitude lower than that needed for other types of electroactive polymers. To apply iEAP-actuators in potential real-world applications, the capability of operating in different environments (open air, different solvents) must be available. In their natural form, the iEAP-actuators are capable of interacting with the surrounding environment (evaporation of solvent from the electrolyte solution, ion or solvent exchange, humidity effects), therefore, for prevention of unpredictable behavior of the actuator and the contamination of the environment, encapsulation of the actuator is needed. The environmental contamination aspect of the encapsulation material is substantial when selecting an applicable encapsulant. The suitable encapsulant should form thin films, be light in weight, elastic, fit tightly, low cost, and easily reproducible. The main goal of the present study is to identify and evaluate the best potential encapsulation techniques for iEAPactuators. Various techniques like thin film on liquid coating, dip coating, hot pressing, hot rolling; and several materials like polydimethylsiloxane, polyurethane, nitrocellulose, paraffin-composite-films were investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of the combinations of the above mentioned techniques and materials are discussed. Successfully encapsulated iEAP-actuators gained durability and were stably operable for long periods of time under ambient conditions. The encapsulation process also increased the stability of the iEAP-actuator by minimizing the environment effects. This makes controlling iEAP-actuators more straight-forward and

  17. Doxycycline-Encapsulated Nanotube-Modified Dentin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, S.A.; Palasuk, J.; Kamocki, K.; Geraldeli, S.; Gregory, R.L.; Platt, J.A.; Windsor, L.J.; Bottino, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents details of fabrication, biological activity (i.e., anti–matrix metalloproteinase [anti-MMP] inhibition), cytocompatibility, and bonding characteristics to dentin of a unique doxycycline (DOX)–encapsulated halloysite nanotube (HNT)–modified adhesive. We tested the hypothesis that the release of DOX from the DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive can effectively inhibit MMP activity. We incorporated nanotubes, encapsulated or not with DOX, into the adhesive resin of a commercially available bonding system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose [SBMP]). The following groups were tested: unmodified SBMP (control), SBMP with nanotubes (HNT), and DOX-encapsulated nanotube-modified adhesive (HNT+DOX). Changes in degree of conversion (DC) and microtensile bond strength were evaluated. Cytotoxicity was examined on human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs). To prove the successful encapsulation of DOX within the adhesives—but, more important, to support the hypothesis that the HNT+DOX adhesive would release DOX at subantimicrobial levels—we tested the antimicrobial activity of synthesized adhesives and the DOX-containing eluates against Streptococcus mutans through agar diffusion assays. Anti-MMP properties were assessed via β-casein cleavage assays. Increasing curing times (10, 20, 40 sec) led to increased DC values. There were no statistically significant differences (p > .05) in DC within each increasing curing time between the modified adhesives compared to SBMP. No statistically significant differences in microtensile bond strength were noted. None of the adhesives eluates were cytotoxic to the human dental pulp stem cells. A significant growth inhibition of S. mutans by direct contact illustrates successful encapsulation of DOX into the experimental adhesive. More important, DOX-containing eluates promoted inhibition of MMP-1 activity when compared to the control. Collectively, our findings provide a solid background for further testing of

  18. Development of highly durable deep-ultraviolet AlGaN-based LED multichip array with hemispherical encapsulated structures using a selected resin through a detailed feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, Shoko; Yamada, Kiho; Hirano, Akira; Ippommatsu, Masamichi; Ito, Masahiro; Morishima, Naoki; Aosaki, Ko; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-08-01

    To replace mercury lamps with AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet (DUV) LEDs, a simple and low-cost package with increased light extraction efficiency (LEE) is indispensable. Therefore, resin encapsulation is considered to be a key technology. However, the photochemical reactions induced by DUV light cause serious problems, and conventional resins cannot be used. In the former part of this study, a comparison of a silicone resin and fluorine polymers was carried out in terms of their suitability for encapsulation, and we concluded that only one of the fluorine polymers can be used for encapsulation. In the latter part, the endurance of encapsulation using the selected fluorine polymer was investigated, and we confirmed that the selected fluorine polymer can guarantee a lifetime of over 6,000 h at a wavelength of 265 nm. Furthermore, a 3 × 4 array module of encapsulated dies on a simple AlN submount was fabricated, demonstrating the possibility of W/cm2-class lighting.

  19. Physical and Mechanical Properties of Glass--Reinforced Plastics,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    REINFORCED PLASTICS , REVIEWS), GLASS TEXTILES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES, SILICONE PLASTICS , POLYESTER PLASTICS , PHENOLIC... PLASTICS , EPOXY RESINS, TEST METHODS, NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING, FIRE RESISTANT MATERIALS, POLYVINYL CHLORIDE, USSR

  20. Plastics to fuel: A review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reviews recent developments in catalytic and non-catalytic degradation of waste plastics into fuels. Thermal degradation decomposes plastic into three fractions: gas, crude oil, and solid residue. Crude oil from non-catalytic pyrolysis is usually composed of higher boiling point hydrocarb...

  1. Working memory plasticity and aging.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Rebecca E; Katz, Benjamin

    2017-02-01

    The present research explores how the trajectory of learning on a working memory task changes throughout the life span, and whether gains in working memory performance are exclusively a question of initial working memory capacity (WMC) or whether age exerts an independent effect. In a large, cross-sectional study of younger, middle-aged, and older adults, we examined learning on a widely used working memory task-the dual n-back task-over 20 sessions of practice. We found that, while all age groups improved on the task, older adults demonstrated less improvement on the task, and also reached a lower asymptotic maximum performance than younger adults. After controlling for initial WMC, we found that age exerted independent effects on training gains and asymptotic performance; older adults tended to improve less and reached lower levels of performance than younger adults. The difference between younger and older adults' rates of learning depended in part on initial WMC. These results suggest that age-related effects on working memory include not only effects on capacity, but also plasticity and the ability to improve on a task. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Splicing plastic optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Susan D.; Salazar, Roberto A.

    1991-12-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) plastic optical fiber (500 micrometers diameter, fluoropolymer cladding) has been spliced using a fused silica sleeve and a variety of solvent/PMMA solutions as adhesives. Mechanical splicing using index matching fluid has also been investigated. To ensure good bonding and minimize scattering, fiber ends are polished prior to application of adhesive. Using an LED ((lambda) max approximately 640 nm), losses are routinely less than 1.0 dB/splice, and some adhesive formulations have exhibited losses as low as 0.2 dB/splice. Five-meter fibers with as many as ten splices/fiber have been monitored over a period of several months. No fiber has exhibited an increase in optical loss with time.

  3. Surface deposition and encapsulation of metallic clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hund, Jared Franklin

    In this work metallic clusters are produced by both encapsulation in an aerogel matrix and deposition on a surface. Entrapment of metal clusters inside aerogels is accomplished though synthesis of a hydrogel precursor, washing it with an aqueous metal salt solution, and controlled reduction of the metal. Although the aerogel matrix stabilizes and prevents subsequent loss or aggregation of the clusters once they are produced, controlling the rate of reduction is key to the size and morphology of the clusters. In order to do this, both radiolytic and chemical reduction methods are used. The radiolytic technique for the formation of metal cluster aerogel composites utilizes gamma radiation to reduce the solution of Ag+ or [AuCl 4]- ions inside of the hydrogel precursor. After exposure to gamma rays, the previously colorless gels have the coloration typical of colloids of Au (pink) and Ag (yellow/brown) clusters. Typical gamma doses are between 2 to 3.5 kGy for hydrogels containing 10-4 to 10-3 mol·L-1 metal solutions. Subsequent characterization confirmed the presence of metal clusters with a fcc structure. The cluster diameters varied between 10 and 200nm, depending on the synthesis parameters. More conventional chemical reduction is also employed in this work to produce noble metal clusters in an aerogel matrix. Hydrogels were washed in a basic solution of Ag+ or [AuCl4]- ions, and formaldehyde was added to the solution. The reduction proceeded relatively slowly, allowing the formaldehyde to diffuse into the hydrogel before complete reduction took place. This procedure was also used to produce alloys of gold and silver clusters embedded in silica aerogels. Also included in this dissertation is the surface deposition of metallic clusters on a silicon surface. The apparatus built produces a cold beam of gas droplets that pick up evaporated metal clusters and deposit them on a surface. The gas clusters are produced by supersonic expansion of a gas (Ar, He, or N2

  4. Injection molding of engineering plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyon, Dilhan M.

    1991-03-01

    This final report summarizes the findings of a study in injection molding of engineering plastics. Two engineering plastic resins, i.e., unmodified grades of a polyetherimide and a poly (2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene ether) were thoroughly characterized. The characterization included rheology, thermal properties and P-V-T behavior. The data were employed to predict various microstructural distributions including density, residual stress and birefringence distributions in compression and injection molded specimens of these two engineering plastics. The detailed microstructural distributions were also studied experimentally upon processing the two engineering plastics, employing instrumented machines and industrial practices. The experimental findings were elucidated under the light of the numerical simulation results. Overall, this study should furnish a first order understanding of the microstructure development in articles injection molded from amorphous engineering plastic resins.

  5. Functional improvement of porcine neonatal pancreatic cell clusters via conformal encapsulation using an air-driven encapsulator

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sol Ji; Shin, Soojeong; Koo, Ok Jae; Moon, Joon Ho; Jang, Goo; Ahn, Curie

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of islet cells into diabetic patients is a promising therapy, provided that the islet cells are able to evade host immune rejection. With improved islet viability, this strategy may effectively reverse diabetes. We applied 2% calcium alginate to generate small and large capsules to encapsulate porcine neonatal pancreatic cell clusters (NPCCs) using an air-driven encapsulator. After encapsulation, the viability was assessed at 1, 4, 7, 14 and 28 days and secretion of functional insulin in response to glucose stimulation were tested at days 14 and 28. Selective permeability of the small alginate capsules was confirmed using various sizes of isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (FITC-dextran). Encapsulation of NPCCs was performed without islet protrusion in the small and large capsules. The viability of NPCCs in all experimental groups was greater than 90% at day 1 and then gradually decreased after day 7. The NPCCs encapsulated in large capsules showed significantly lower viability (79.50 ± 2.88%) than that of naïve NPCCs and NPCCs in small capsule (86.83 ± 2.32%, 87.67 ± 2.07%, respectively) at day 7. The viability of naïve NPCCs decreased rapidly at day 14 (75.67 ± 1.75%), whereas the NPCCs encapsulated in small capsules maintained (82.0 ± 2.19%). After 14 and 28 days NPCCs' function in small capsules (2.67 ± 0.09 and 2.13 ± 0.09) was conserved better compared to that of naïve NPCCs (2.04 ± 0.25 and 1.53 ± 0.32, respectively) and NPCCs in large capsules (2.04 ± 0.34 and 1.13 ± 0.10, respectively), as assessed by a stimulation index. The small capsules also demonstrated selective permeability. With this encapsulation technique, small capsules improved the viability and insulin secretion of NPCCs without islet protrusion. PMID:22020445

  6. Recent trends and applications of encapsulating materials for probiotic stability.

    PubMed

    Riaz, Qurat Ul Ain; Masud, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    The importance of probiotics and their live delivery in the gastrointestinal tract has gained much importance in the recent past. Many reports have indicated that there is poor viability of probiotic bacteria in dairy based products, both fermented and non-fermented, and also in the human gastro-intestinal system is questionable. In this case, microencapsulation is the most significant emerging and efficient technology that is being used for the preservation of probiotics against adverse environmental conditions. Apart from different techniques of microencapsulation, various types of encapsulating materials are also used for the process, namely, alginate, chitosan, carrageenan, gums (locust bean, gellan gum, xanthan gum, etc.), gelatin, whey protein, starch, and compression coating. Each one of the encapsulating materials has its own unique characteristics of capsule formation and provision of shape, appearance, and strength to microbeads. The type of encapsulating material also influences the viability of probiotics during storage, processing, and in the gastrointestinal tract. The effectiveness of any material depends not upon its capsule forming capability, strength, and enhancing viability but also on its cheapness, availability, and biocompatibility. So, added convenience and reduced packaging costs may also be used to offset the cost of encapsulating one or more ingredients. Encapsulated forms of ingredients provide a longer shelf life for the product.

  7. Durability of Polymeric Encapsulation Materials for Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, D. C.; Muller, M.; Kempe, M. D.; Araki, K.; Kennedy, C. E.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-03-01

    Many concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems use a polymeric encapsulant to couple and optical component and/or coverglass to the cell. In that location, the encapsulation improves the transmission of concentrated optical flux through interface(s), while protecting the cell from the environment. The durability of encapsulation materials, however, is not well established relative to the desired service life of 30 years. Therefore, we have initiated a screen test to identify the field-induced failure modes for a variety of popular PV encapsulation materials. An existing CPV module (with no PV cells present) was modified to accommodate encapsulation specimens. The module (where nominal concentration of solar flux is 500x for the domed-Fresnel design) has been mounted on a tracker in Golden, CO (elevation 1.79 km). Initial results are reported here for 18 months cumulative exposure, including the hottest and coldest months of the past year. Characteristics observed at intervals during that time include: visual appearance, direct and hemispherical transmittance, and mass. Degradation may be assessed from subsequent analysis (including yellowness index and cut-on frequency) relative to the ambient conditions present during field exposure. The fluorescence signature observed of all the silicone specimens is examined here, including possible factors of causation -- the platinum catalyst used in the addition cured materials as well as the primer used to promote adhesion to the quartz substrate and superstrate.

  8. Opsonization of encapsulated Cryptococcus neoformans by specific anticapsular antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Kozel, T R; Follette, J L

    1981-01-01

    Antisera prepared in rabbits against either whole encapsulated cells of Cryptococcus neoformans or purified cryptococcal polysaccharide were opsonic for the encapsulated yeast. The opsonic activity was removed by absorption with whole cryptococci and was inhibited by free polysaccharide. As little as 0.13 microgram of cryptococcal polysaccharide produced a 50% inhibition of opsonization. Various degrees of neutralization by polysaccharides from the four cryptococcal serotypes suggested that the opsonins were type specific. Fractionation of antiserum on Bio-Gel A-5m (Bio-Rad Laboratories) and diethylaminoethyl cellulose showed that the opsonins were antibodies of the immunoglobulin G class. These opsonizing antibodies did not require heat-labile serum components for optimal phagocytosis of the yeast. Inhibition studies using 2-deoxy-D-glucose demonstrated that ingestion of encapsulated cryptococci opsonized with anticapsular antibody was a 2-deoxy-D-glucose-inhibitable process. This result differed from similar studies with non-encapsulated cryptococci which showed that ingestion of non-encapsulated cryptococci opsonized with normal serum was not inhibited by 2-deoxy-D-glucose. PMID:7014468

  9. Enhanced encapsulation of metoprolol tartrate with carbon nanotubes as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-12-01

    A highly water-soluble antihypertensive drug, metoprolol tartrate (MT), was selected as a model drug for preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-impregnated ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres. The present investigation was aimed to increase encapsulation efficiency of MT with excellent adsorbent properties of MWCNTs. The unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience of MWCNTs have drawn much anticipation as carrier for highly water-soluble drugs. Carbon nanotubes drug adsorbate (MWCNTs:MT)-loaded EC microspheres were further optimized by the central composite design of the experiment. The effects of independent variables (MWCNTs:MT and EC:adsorbate) were evaluated on responses like entrapment efficiency (EE) and t 50 (time required for 50% drug release). The optimized batch was compared with drug alone EC microspheres. The results revealed high degree of improvement in encapsulation efficiency for MWCNTs:MT-loaded EC microspheres. In vitro drug release study exhibited complete release form drug alone microspheres within 15 h, while by the same time only 50-60% drug was released for MWCNTs-impregnated EC microspheres. The optimized batch was further characterized by various instrumental analyses such as scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results endorse encapsulation of MWCNTs:MT adsorbate inside the matrix of EC microspheres, which might have resulted in enhanced encapsulation and sustained effect of MT. Hence, MWCNTs can be utilized as novel carriers for extended drug release and enhanced encapsulation of highly water-soluble drug, MT.

  10. Drug encapsulated aerosolized microspheres as a biodegradable, intelligent glioma therapy.

    PubMed

    Floyd, J Alaina; Galperin, Anna; Ratner, Buddy D

    2016-02-01

    The grim prognosis for patients diagnosed with malignant gliomas necessitates the development of new therapeutic strategies for localized and sustained drug delivery to combat tumor drug resistance and regrowth. Here we introduce drug encapsulated aerosolized microspheres as a biodegradable, intelligent glioma therapy (DREAM BIG therapy). DREAM BIG therapy is envisioned to deliver three chemotherapeutics, temporally staged over one year, via a bioadhesive, biodegradable spray directly to the brain surgical site after tumor excision. In this proof-of-principle article exploring key components of the DREAM BIG therapy prototype, rhodamine B (RB) encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) encapsulated poly(lactic acid) microspheres were formulated and characterized. The encapsulation efficiency of RB and IgG and the release kinetics of the model drugs from the microspheres were elucidated in addition to the release kinetics of RB from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres formulated in a degradable poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) solution. The successful aerosolized application onto brain tissue ex-vivo demonstrated the conformal adhesion of the RB encapsulated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres to the convoluted brain surface mediated by the thermoresponsive carrier, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide). These preliminary results suggest the potential of the DREAM BIG therapy for future use with multiple chemotherapeutics and microsphere types to combat gliomas at a localized site.

  11. Polymer encapsulation of amoxicillin microparticles by SAS process.

    PubMed

    Montes, A; Baldauf, E; Gordillo, M D; Pereyra, C M; Martínez de la Ossa, E J

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of amoxicillin (AMC) with ethyl cellulose (EC) by a supercritical antisolvent process (SAS) was investigated. AMC microparticles obtained previously by an SAS process were used as host particles and EC, a biodegradable polymer used for the controlled release of drugs, was chosen as the coating material. In this work, a suspension of AMC microparticles in a solution of ethyl cellulose in dichloromethane (DCM) was sprayed through a nozzle into supercritical CO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and HPLC analyses were carried out. The effects of AMC:EC ratio, the initial polymer concentration of the solution, temperature and pressure on the encapsulation process were investigated. Although all the experiments led to powder precipitation, the AMC encapsulation was achieved in only half of the cases, particularly when the lower drug:polymer ratios were assayed. In general, it was observed that the percentages of AMC present in the precipitates were higher on increasing the AMC:EC ratio. In these cases composites rather than encapsulates were obtained. The in vitro release profiles of the resulting materials were evaluated in order to ascertain whether composites can be used as encapsulated systems for drug delivery systems.

  12. Production of Methanol from Methane by Encapsulated Methylosinus sporium.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Mehariya, Sanjeet; Otari, Sachin V; Madan, Bharat; Haw, Jung Rim; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhang, Liaoyuan; Kim, In-Won

    2016-12-28

    Massive reserves of methane (CH₄) remain unexplored as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals, mainly because of the lack of economically suitable and sustainable strategies for selective oxidation of CH₄ to methanol. The present study demonstrates the bioconversion of CH₄ to methanol mediated by Type I methanotrophs, such as Methylomicrobium album and Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum. Furthermore, immobilization of a Type II methanotroph, Methylosinus sporium, was carried out using different encapsulation methods, employing sodium-alginate (Na-alginate) and silica gel. The encapsulated cells demonstrated higher stability for methanol production. The optimal pH, temperature, and agitation rate were determined to be pH 7.0, 30°C, and 175 rpm, respectively, using inoculum (1.5 mg of dry cell mass/ml) and 20% of CH₄ as a feed. Under these conditions, maximum methanol production (3.43 and 3.73 mM) by the encapsulated cells was recorded. Even after six cycles of reuse, the Na-alginate and silica gel encapsulated cells retained 61.8% and 51.6% of their initial efficiency for methanol production, respectively, in comparison with the efficiency of 11.5% observed in the case of free cells. These results suggest that encapsulation of methanotrophs is a promising approach to improve the stability of methanol production.

  13. Double emulsion solvent evaporation techniques used for drug encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Zafar, Nadiah; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2015-12-30

    Double emulsions are complex systems, also called "emulsions of emulsions", in which the droplets of the dispersed phase contain one or more types of smaller dispersed droplets themselves. Double emulsions have the potential for encapsulation of both hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic drugs, cosmetics, foods and other high value products. Techniques based on double emulsions are commonly used for the encapsulation of hydrophilic molecules, which suffer from low encapsulation efficiency because of rapid drug partitioning into the external aqueous phase when using single emulsions. The main issue when using double emulsions is their production in a well-controlled manner, with homogeneous droplet size by optimizing different process variables. In this review special attention has been paid to the application of double emulsion techniques for the encapsulation of various hydrophilic and hydrophobic anticancer drugs, anti-inflammatory drugs, antibiotic drugs, proteins and amino acids and their applications in theranostics. Moreover, the optimized ratio of the different phases and other process parameters of double emulsions are discussed. Finally, the results published regarding various types of solvents, stabilizers and polymers used for the encapsulation of several active substances via double emulsion processes are reported.

  14. The interaction of encapsulated pharmaceutical drugs with a silica matrix.

    PubMed

    Morais, Everton C; Correa, Gabriel G; Brambilla, Rodrigo; Radtke, Claudio; Baibich, Ione Maluf; dos Santos, João Henrique Z

    2013-03-01

    A series of seven drugs, namely, fluoxetine, gentamicin, lidocaine, morphine, nifedipine, paracetamol and tetracycline, were encapsulated. The encapsulated systems were characterized using a series of complementary techniques: Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffusive reflectance spectroscopy in the UV-vis region (DRS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). According to the DRS spectra, most of the encapsulated systems showed a band shift of the maximum absorption when compared with the corresponding bare pharmaceutical. Additionally, after encapsulation, the drugs exhibited infrared band shifts toward higher wavenumbers, which in turn provided insight into potential sites for interaction with the silica framework. The amine group showed a band shift in the spectra of almost all the drugs (except nifedipine and tetracycline). This finding indicates the possibility of a hydrogen bonding interaction between the drug and the silica via electron donation from the amine group to the silica framework. XPS confirmed this interaction between the pharmaceuticals and the silica through the amine group. A correlation was observed between the textural characteristics of the solids and the spectroscopic data, suggesting that the amine groups from the pharmaceuticals were more perturbed upon encapsulation.

  15. Spin transport in fully hexagonal boron nitride encapsulated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurram, M.; Omar, S.; Zihlmann, S.; Makk, P.; Schönenberger, C.; van Wees, B. J.

    2016-03-01

    We study fully hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) encapsulated graphene spin valve devices at room temperature. The device consists of a graphene channel encapsulated between two crystalline hBN flakes: thick-hBN flake as a bottom gate dielectric substrate which masks the charge impurities from SiO2/Si substrate and single-layer thin-hBN flake as a tunnel barrier. Full encapsulation prevents the graphene from coming in contact with any polymer/chemical during the lithography and thus gives homogeneous charge and spin transport properties across different regions of the encapsulated graphene. Further, even with the multiple electrodes in-between the injection and the detection electrodes which are in conductivity mismatch regime, we observe spin transport over 12.5 -μ m -long distance under the thin-hBN encapsulated graphene channel, demonstrating the clean interface and the pinhole-free nature of the thin hBN as an efficient tunnel barrier.

  16. Islet and stem cell encapsulation for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster, Clarence E; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues.

  17. Islet and Stem Cell Encapsulation for Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster 3rd, Clarence E.; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  18. Terrestrial applications of FEP-encapsulated solar cell modules. [power systems using Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene encapsulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forestieri, A. F.; Ratajczak, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    The NASA-Lewis Research Center program of transferring the FEP-encapsulated solar cell technology developed for the space program to terrestrial applications is presented. The electrical power system design and the array mechanical design are described, and power systems being tested are discussed. The latter are located at NOAA-RAMOS weather stations at Sterling, Va., and Mammoth Mountain, Calif.; on the roof of the Lewis Research Center; on a NOAA-Coast Guard buoy in the Gulf of Mexico; in a U.S. Forest Service mountaintop voice repeater station in the Inyo National Forest, Calif., and in a backpack charger for portable transmitter/receivers being used in the same place. Preliminary results of testing are still incomplete, but show that rime ice can cause cracks in modular cells without damaging the FEP though, which keeps the grid lines intact, and that electrically active elements of the module must be completely sealed from salt water to prevent FEP delamination.

  19. Modulation of synaptic plasticity by stress hormone associates with plastic alteration of synaptic NMDA receptor in the adult hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Tse, Yiu Chung; Bagot, Rosemary C; Hutter, Juliana A; Wong, Alice S; Wong, Tak Pan

    2011-01-01

    Stress exerts a profound impact on learning and memory, in part, through the actions of adrenal corticosterone (CORT) on synaptic plasticity, a cellular model of learning and memory. Increasing findings suggest that CORT exerts its impact on synaptic plasticity by altering the functional properties of glutamate receptors, which include changes in the motility and function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid subtype of glutamate receptor (AMPAR) that are responsible for the expression of synaptic plasticity. Here we provide evidence that CORT could also regulate synaptic plasticity by modulating the function of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), which mediate the induction of synaptic plasticity. We found that stress level CORT applied to adult rat hippocampal slices potentiated evoked NMDAR-mediated synaptic responses within 30 min. Surprisingly, following this fast-onset change, we observed a slow-onset (>1 hour after termination of CORT exposure) increase in synaptic expression of GluN2A-containing NMDARs. To investigate the consequences of the distinct fast- and slow-onset modulation of NMDARs for synaptic plasticity, we examined the formation of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) within relevant time windows. Paralleling the increased NMDAR function, both LTP and LTD were facilitated during CORT treatment. However, 1-2 hours after CORT treatment when synaptic expression of GluN2A-containing NMDARs is increased, bidirectional plasticity was no longer facilitated. Our findings reveal the remarkable plasticity of NMDARs in the adult hippocampus in response to CORT. CORT-mediated slow-onset increase in GluN2A in hippocampal synapses could be a homeostatic mechanism to normalize synaptic plasticity following fast-onset stress-induced facilitation.

  20. Ibuprofen-in-cyclodextrin-in-W/O/W emulsion - Improving the initial and long-term encapsulation efficiency of a model active ingredient.

    PubMed

    Hattrem, Magnus N; Kristiansen, Kåre A; Aachmann, Finn L; Dille, Morten J; Draget, Kurt I

    2015-06-20

    A challenge in formulating water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) emulsions is the uncontrolled release of the encapsulated compound prior to application. Pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals usually have amphipathic nature, which may contribute to leakage of the active ingredient. In the present study, cyclodextrins (CyDs) were used to impart a change in the relative polarity and size of a model compound (ibuprofen) by the formation of inclusion complexes. Various inclusion complexes (2-hydroxypropyl (HP)-β-CyD-, α-CyD- and γ-CyD-ibuprofen) were prepared and presented within W/O/W emulsions, and the initial and long-term encapsulation efficiency was investigated. HP-β-CyD-ibuprofen provided the highest encapsulation of ibuprofen in comparison to a W/O/W emulsion with unassociated ibuprofen confined within the inner water phase, with a four-fold increase in the encapsulation efficiency. An improved, although lower, encapsulation efficiency was obtained for the inclusion complex γ-CyD-ibuprofen in comparison to HP-β-CyD-ibuprofen, whereas α-CyD-ibuprofen had a similar encapsulation efficiency to that of unassociated ibuprofen. The lower encapsulation efficiency of ibuprofen in combination with α-CyD and γ-CyD was attributed to a lower association constant for the γ-CyD-ibuprofen inclusion complex and the ability of α-CyD to form inclusion complexes with fatty acids. For the W/O/W emulsion prepared with HP-β-CyD-ibuprofen, the highest encapsulation of ibuprofen was obtained at hyper- and iso-osmotic conditions and by using an excess molar ratio of CyD to ibuprofen. In the last part of the study, it was suggested that the chemical modification of the HP-β-CyD molecule did not influence the encapsulation of ibuprofen, as a similar encapsulation efficiency was obtained for an inclusion complex prepared with mono-1-glucose-β-CyD.

  1. Cortical plasticity and brain computer interface.

    PubMed

    Rossini, P M; Noris Ferilli, M A; Ferreri, F

    2012-06-01

    There is increasing evidence to support the concept that adult brain has the remarkable ability to plastically reorganize itself. Brain plasticity involves distinct functional and structural components and plays a crucial role in reorganizing central nervous system's networks after any lesion in order to partly or totally restore lost and/or compromised functions. The idea that a computer can decode brain electromagnetic signals to infer the intentions of a human and then enact those intentions directly through a machine is becoming a reasonable technical possibility. In neurological patients unable to move and to communicate with the external environment, technologies implementing brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) can be of valuable aid and support. The emerging possibility, through neuro-imaging advanced techniques, to clarify some crucial issues underlying brain plasticity will give the possibility to modulate these mechanisms in a BCI-oriented way. This approach may have a tremendous impact in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders and the clinical advent of this technology will usher in a new era of restorative medicine.

  2. The developmental stages of synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Christian; Kessels, Helmut W

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The brain is programmed to drive behaviour by precisely wiring the appropriate neuronal circuits. Wiring and rewiring of neuronal circuits largely depends on the orchestrated changes in the strengths of synaptic contacts. Here, we review how the rules of synaptic plasticity change during development of the brain, from birth to independence. We focus on the changes that occur at the postsynaptic side of excitatory glutamatergic synapses in the rodent hippocampus and neocortex. First we summarize the current data on the structure of synapses and the developmental expression patterns of the key molecular players of synaptic plasticity, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors, as well as pivotal kinases (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, protein kinase C) and phosphatases (PP1, PP2A, PP2B). In the second part we relate these findings to important characteristics of the emerging network. We argue that the concerted and gradual shifts in the usage of plasticity molecules comply with the changing need for (re)wiring neuronal circuits. PMID:24144877

  3. Plasticising and injecting lowest quantities of plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmann, Ch.; Neuß, A.; Weber, M.; Fischer, T.

    2014-05-01

    For an economic production of thermoplastic micro parts a reproducible quality is one of the key aspects. Therefore, injection moulding is one of the most common production technologies. The material and process oriented plasticising of the required amount of plastic material are still challenging. Due to the concept of standard injection moulding machines the plasticising screw with a non-return valve is used as the injection plunger. This principle can only realise injection volumes which arise directly from the screw diameter D and the injection stroke. Miniaturisation of this design is limited, since the screw core must absorb the required torque while a feeding of the granules is to ensure by a sufficient flight depth. Even the smallest standard diameters of 14 mm and minimum injection strokes result in shot volumes, which account for multiples of the component volume of common micro parts. At present a new plasticising concept is developed by the Institute of Plastics Processing (IKV), Aachen, Germany. The concept is characterised by the position of the screw flights, which are attached to the inside of the plasticising cylinder. The injection piston is mounted coaxially within the cylinder. The so-called 'inverted plastication' is based on the kinematic reversal of the screw flights' arrangement. As the injection piston does not have to feature neither a special feed section nor screw flights, it is exposed to lower mechanical stresses. It therefore features a smaller diameter than common plasticising screws. Thus, the entire plasticising unit can be adapted to the volume of micro parts. Currently, an experimental setup is built which allows a systematical analysis of the different influencing parameters.

  4. Encapsulation of black carrot juice using spray and freeze drying.

    PubMed

    Murali, S; Kar, Abhijit; Mohapatra, Debabandya; Kalia, Pritam

    2015-12-01

    Black carrot juice extracted using pectinase enzyme was encapsulated in three different carrier materials (maltodextrin 20DE, gum arabic and tapioca starch) using spray drying at four inlet temperatures (150, 175, 200 and 225 ℃) and freeze drying at a constant temperature of - 53 ℃ and vacuum of 0.22-0.11 mbar with the constant feed mixture. The products were analyzed for total anthocyanin content, antioxidant activity, water solubility index, encapsulation efficiency and total colour change. For both the drying methods followed in this study, maltodextrin 20DE as the carrier material has proven to be better in retaining maximum anthocyanin and antioxidant activity compared to gum arabic and tapioca starch. The best spray dried product, was obtained at 150 ℃. The most acceptable was the freeze dried product with maximum anthocyanin content, antioxidant activity, water solubility index, encapsulation efficiency and colour change.

  5. In vitro release properties of encapsulated blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) extracts.

    PubMed

    Flores, Floirendo P; Singh, Rakesh K; Kerr, William L; Phillips, Dennis R; Kong, Fanbin

    2015-02-01

    We aimed to determine the effect of encapsulation on the release properties of blueberry extracts during simulated gastrointestinal digestion. An ethanolic pomace extract was microencapsulated with whey protein isolate via spray drying. The in vitro release of monomeric anthocyanins, phenolics and ferric reducing antioxidant activity of the microcapsules (W) were evaluated for the microcapsules and two non-encapsulated systems: ethanolic pomace extract (P) and freeze-dried juice (F). Concentrations of anthocyanin and phenolics were normalised prior to digestion. Results showed that antioxidant activity was in the order of: F>W>P. Regardless of encapsulation, more phenolics were released from W and P than F. Anthocyanin concentration decreased after intestinal digestion for W, but remained constant for P and F. MALDI-MS showed similar spectra for P and F but not for W. The spray-dried product has comparable release characteristics to freeze-dried juice, and may be investigated for food applications.

  6. Properties of probiotics and encapsulated probiotics in food.

    PubMed

    Ozyurt, V Hazal; Ötles, Semih

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are microorganisms which confer health benefits upon application in sufficiently-high viable cell amounts. Probiotics are typically members of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species commonly associated with human gastrointestinal tracts. In the recent past, there has been a rising interest in producing functional foods containing encapsulated probiotic bacteria. Recent studies have been reported using dairy products like cheese, yogurt and ice cream as food carrier, and non-dairy products like meat, fruits, cereals, chocolate, etc. However, the industrial sector contains only few encapsulated probiotic products. Probiotics have been developed by several companies in a capsule or a tablet form. The review compiles probiotics, encapsulation technology and cell life in the food matrices.

  7. Encapsulation method for atom probe tomography analysis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Larson, D J; Giddings, A D; Wu, Y; Verheijen, M A; Prosa, T J; Roozeboom, F; Rice, K P; Kessels, W M M; Geiser, B P; Kelly, T F

    2015-12-01

    Open-space nanomaterials are a widespread class of technologically important materials that are generally incompatible with analysis by atom probe tomography (APT) due to issues with specimen preparation, field evaporation and data reconstruction. The feasibility of encapsulating such non-compact matter in a matrix to enable APT measurements is investigated using nanoparticles as an example. Simulations of field evaporation of a void, and the resulting artifacts in ion trajectory, underpin the requirement that no voids remain after encapsulation. The approach is demonstrated by encapsulating Pt nanoparticles in an ZnO:Al matrix created by atomic layer deposition, a growth technique which offers very high surface coverage and conformality. APT measurements of the Pt nanoparticles are correlated with transmission electron microscopy images and numerical simulations in order to evaluate the accuracy of the APT reconstruction.

  8. Encapsulation as a Strategy for the Design of Biological Compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Giessen, Tobias W; Silver, Pamela A

    2016-02-27

    Compartmentalization is one of the defining features of life. Through intracellular spatial control, cells are able to organize and regulate their metabolism. One of the most broadly used organizational principles in nature is encapsulation. Cellular processes can be encapsulated within either membrane-bound organelles or proteinaceous compartments that create distinct microenvironments optimized for a given task. Further challenges addressed through intracellular compartmentalization are toxic or volatile pathway intermediates, slow turnover rates and competing side reactions. This review highlights a selection of naturally occurring membrane- and protein-based encapsulation systems in microbes and their recent applications and emerging opportunities in synthetic biology. We focus on examples that use engineered cellular organization to control metabolic pathway flux for the production of useful compounds and materials.

  9. Conformally encapsulated multi-electrode arrays with seamless insulation

    DOEpatents

    Tabada, Phillipe J.; Shah, Kedar G.; Tolosa, Vanessa; Pannu, Satinderall S.; Tooker, Angela; Delima, Terri; Sheth, Heeral; Felix, Sarah

    2016-11-22

    Thin-film multi-electrode arrays (MEA) having one or more electrically conductive beams conformally encapsulated in a seamless block of electrically insulating material, and methods of fabricating such MEAs using reproducible, microfabrication processes. One or more electrically conductive traces are formed on scaffold material that is subsequently removed to suspend the traces over a substrate by support portions of the trace beam in contact with the substrate. By encapsulating the suspended traces, either individually or together, with a single continuous layer of an electrically insulating material, a seamless block of electrically insulating material is formed that conforms to the shape of the trace beam structure, including any trace backings which provide suspension support. Electrical contacts, electrodes, or leads of the traces are exposed from the encapsulated trace beam structure by removing the substrate.

  10. Chitosan-alginate nanocapsules for encapsulation of turmeric oil.

    PubMed

    Lertsutthiwong, P; Rojsitthisak, P

    2011-12-01

    Turmeric oil is widely used in pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications because of its antibacterial, antifungal, antioxidant, and insect-repellent properties. However, turmeric oil is volatile, insoluble in water and unstable in certain environments, which causes difficulties with formulation development and stability of new products. One approach to overcome these problems is to encapsulate turmeric oil in carriers formed from naturally occurring polysaccharides. Among such polysaccharides, chitosan and alginate have been widely used as particulate carriers for encapsulation and controlled release of bioactive compounds. The potential for size reduction of the carriers to the nanometer scale is of particular interest for delivery systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the versatile properties of turmeric oil and discuss the use of alginate and chitosan for capsule formation and encapsulation of turmeric oil in chitosan-alginate nanocapsules. We also discuss the in vitro skin permeation of turmeric oil from nanocapsules.

  11. Modeling powder encapsulation in dosator-based machines: I. Theory.

    PubMed

    Khawam, Ammar

    2011-12-15

    Automatic encapsulation machines have two dosing principles: dosing disc and dosator. Dosator-based machines compress the powder to plugs that are transferred into capsules. The encapsulation process in dosator-based capsule machines was modeled in this work. A model was proposed to predict the weight and length of produced plugs. According to the model, the plug weight is a function of piston dimensions, powder-bed height, bulk powder density and precompression densification inside dosator while plug length is a function of piston height, set piston displacement, spring stiffness and powder compressibility. Powder densification within the dosator can be achieved by precompression, compression or both. Precompression densification depends on the powder to piston height ratio while compression densification depends on piston displacement against powder. This article provides the theoretical basis of the encapsulation model, including applications and limitations. The model will be applied to experimental data separately.

  12. Evaluation of Encapsulated Inhibitor for Autonomous Corrosion Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnsey, M. N.; Li, W.; Buhrow, J. W.; Calle, L. M.; Pearman, B. P.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    This work concerns the development of smart coating technologies based on microencapsulation for the autonomous control of corrosion. Microencapsulation allows the incorporation of corrosion inhibitors into coating which provides protection through corrosion-controlled release of these inhibitors.One critical aspect of a corrosion protective smart coating is the selection of corrosion inhibitor for encapsulation and comparison of the inhibitor function before and after encapsulation. For this purpose, a systematic approach is being used to evaluate free and encapsulated corrosion inhibitors by salt immersion. Visual, optical microscope, and Scanning Electron Microscope (with low-angle backscatter electron detector) are used to evaluate these inhibitors. It has been found that the combination of different characterization tools provide an effective method for evaluation of early stage localized corrosion and the effectiveness of corrosion inhibitors.

  13. Laser Glass Frit Sealing for Encapsulation of Vacuum Insulation Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kind, H.; Gehlen, E.; Aden, M.; Olowinsky, A.; Gillner, A.

    Laser glass frit sealing is a joining method predestined in electronics for the sealing of engineered materials housings in dimensions of some 1 mm2 to several 10 mm2. The application field ranges from encapsulation of display panels to sensor housings. Laser glass frit sealing enables a hermetical closure excluding humidity and gas penetration. But the seam quality is also interesting for other applications requiring a hermetical sealing. One application is the encapsulation of vacuum insulation glass. The gap between two panes must be evacuated for reducing the thermal conductivity. Only an efficient encapsulating technique ensures durable tight joints of two panes for years. Laser glass frit sealing is an alternative joining method even though the material properties of soda lime glass like sensitivity to thermal stresses are much higher as known from engineered materials. An adapted thermal management of the process is necessary to prevent the thermal stresses within the pane to achieve crack free and tight glass frit seams.

  14. Encapsulation system for the immunoisolation of living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Taylor G. (Inventor); Lacik, Igor (Inventor); Brissova, Marcela (Inventor); Anikumar, Amrutur V. (Inventor); Prokop, Ales (Inventor); Powers, Alvin C. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is drawn to a composition of matter comprising high viscosity sodium alginate, cellulose sulfate and a multi-component polycation. Additionally, the present invention provides methods for making capsules, measuring capsule permeability to immunologically-relevant proteins and treating disease in an animal using encapsulated cells. Over one thousand combinations of polyanions and polycations were examined as polymer candidates suitable for encapsulation of living cells and thirty-three pairs were effective. The combination of sodium alginate, cellulose sulfate, poly(methylene-co-guanidine) hydrochloride, calcium chloride, and sodium chloride produced the most desirable results. Pancreatic islets encapsulated in this multicomponent capsule demonstrated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and reversed diabetes without stimulating immune reaction in mice. The capsule formulation and system of the present invention allows independent adjustments of capsule size, wall thickness, mechanical strength and permeability, and offers distinct advantages for immunoisolating cells.

  15. Polymer encapsulation of inorganic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ladj, Rachid; Bitar, Ahmad; Eissa, Mohamed M; Fessi, Hatem; Mugnier, Yannick; Le Dantec, Ronan; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2013-12-15

    Hybrid inorganic colloidal particles have attracted a great attention in the last years, and they have been largely used in various applications and more particularly in biomedical nanotechnology. Recently, they are used as carriers for biomolecules, and exploited for use in microsystems, microfluidics and in lab-on-a chip based bionanotechnology. Various kinds of hybrid particles can be listed starting from classical inorganic nanoparticles such as silica, gold, silver, iron oxide and those exhibiting intrinsic properties such as semiconducting nanoparticles (e.g. quantum dots). As a general tendency, to be conveniently used in biomedical applications, the encapsulation of the inorganic nanoparticles in a polymer matrix is incontestably needed. Consequently, various chemistry-based encapsulation processes have been developed and showed promising results as compared to the encapsulation using preformed polymers.

  16. Encapsulation of shiitake (Lenthinus edodes) flavors by spray drying.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hirokazu; Yoshii, Hidefumi; Ohe, Hisashi; Yasuda, Masahumi; Furuta, Takeshi; Kuwahara, Hiroshige; Ohkawara, Masaaki; Linko, Pekka

    2004-01-01

    Powdery encapsulation of shiitake flavors, extracted from dried shiitake, was investigated by spray drying. Flavor retention increased with an increase in drying air temperature and solid content, and decreased with an increase in dextrose equivalents of maltodextrin. A heat-treatment of the extract liquid made the lenthionine concentration increase, but did not influence the concentrations of the other flavors. The formation of lenthionine with heat-treatment could be described by the consecutive unimolecular-type first order reaction. Lenthionine content in a spray-dried powder prepared with the heated extracted liquid significantly increased. alpha-Cyclodextrin was the most suitable encapsulant of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-cyclodextrins to prepare the spray-dried powder, including lenthionine. The flavor retentions were markedly increased by using of alpha-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin in combination as an encapsulant.

  17. Degradation of Silicone Encapsulants in CPV Optics: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Tappan, Ian A.; Cai, Can; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2016-07-01

    High efficiency multijunction solar cells in terrestrial concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) modules are becoming an increasingly cost effective and viable option in utility scale power generation. As with other utility scale photovoltaics, CPV modules need to guarantee operational lifetimes of at least 25 years. The reliability of optical elements in CPV modules poses a unique materials challenge due to the increased UV irradiance and enhanced temperature cycling associated with concentrated solar flux. The polymeric and thin film materials used in the optical elements are especially susceptible to UV damage, diurnal temperature cycling and active chemical species from the environment. We used fracture mechanics approaches to study the degradation modes including: the adhesion between the encapsulant and the cell or secondary optical element; and the cohesion of the encapsulant itself. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of materials degradation under elevated stress conditions is critical for commercialization of CPV technology and can offer unique insights into degradation modes in similar encapsulants used in other photovoltaic modules.

  18. Enhanced structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures by graphene encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matković, Aleksandar; Vasić, Borislav; Pešić, Jelena; Prinz, Julia; Bald, Ilko; Milosavljević, Aleksandar R.; Gajić, Radoš

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate that a single-layer graphene replicates the shape of DNA origami nanostructures very well. It can be employed as a protective layer for the enhancement of structural stability of DNA origami nanostructures. Using the AFM based manipulation, we show that the normal force required to damage graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures is over an order of magnitude greater than for the unprotected ones. In addition, we show that graphene encapsulation offers protection to the DNA origami nanostructures against prolonged exposure to deionized water, and multiple immersions. Through these results we demonstrate that graphene encapsulated DNA origami nanostructures are strong enough to sustain various solution phase processing, lithography and transfer steps, thus extending the limits of DNA-mediated bottom-up fabrication.

  19. Adhesion and debonding kinetics of photovoltaic encapsulation in moist environments: Adhesion and debonding kinetics of photovoltaic encapsulation

    SciTech Connect

    Novoa, Fernando D.; Miller, David C.; Dauskardt, Reinhold H.

    2015-07-27

    Debonding of photovoltaic (PV) encapsulation in moist environments is frequently reported but presently not well understood or quantified. Temperature cycling, moisture, and mechanical loads often cause loss of encapsulation adhesion and interfacial debonding, initially facilitating back-reflectance and reduced electrical current, but ultimately leading to internal corrosion and loss of module functionality. To investigate the effects of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on the kinetics of encapsulation debonding, we developed a mechanics-based technique to measure encapsulation debond energy and debond growth rates in a chamber of controlled environment. The debond energy decreased from 2.15 to 1.75 kJ m-2 in poly(ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) (EVA) and from 0.67 to 0.52 kJ m-2 in polyvinyl butyral when T increased from 25 to 50 degrees C and 20 to 40 degrees C, respectively. The debond growth rates of EVA increased up to 1000-fold with small increases of T (10 degrees C) and RH (15%). To elucidate the mechanisms of environmental debonding, we developed a fracture-kinetics model, where the viscoelastic relaxation processes at the debonding-tip are used to predict debond growth. The model and techniques constitute the fundamental basis for developing accelerated aging tests and long-term reliability predictions for PV encapsulation.

  20. International policies to reduce plastic marine pollution from single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads): A review.

    PubMed

    Xanthos, Dirk; Walker, Tony R

    2017-02-18

    Marine plastic pollution has been a growing concern for decades. Single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads) are a significant source of this pollution. Although research outlining environmental, social, and economic impacts of marine plastic pollution is growing, few studies have examined policy and legislative tools to reduce plastic pollution, particularly single-use plastics (plastic bags and microbeads). This paper reviews current international market-based strategies and policies to reduce plastic bags and microbeads. While policies to reduce microbeads began in 2014, interventions for plastic bags began much earlier in 1991. However, few studies have documented or measured the effectiveness of these reduction strategies. Recommendations to further reduce single-use plastic marine pollution include: (i) research to evaluate effectiveness of bans and levies to ensure policies are having positive impacts on marine environments; and (ii) education and outreach to reduce consumption of plastic bags and microbeads at source.