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Sample records for plastidic isoprenoid synthesis

  1. Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis during Chloroplast Development 1

    PubMed Central

    Heintze, Adolf; Görlach, Jörn; Leuschner, Carola; Hoppe, Petra; Hagelstein, Petra; Schulze-Siebert, Detlef; Schultz, Gernot

    1990-01-01

    The chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis of very young leaves is supplied by the plastidic CO2 → pyruvate → acetyl-coenzyme A (C3 → C2) metabolism (D Schulze-Siebert, G Schultz [1987] Plant Physiol 84: 1233-1237) and occurs via the plastidic mevalonate pathway. The plastidic C3 → C2 metabolism and/or plastidic mevalonate pathway of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seedlings changes from maximal activity at the leaf base (containing developing chloroplasts with incomplete thylakoid stacking but a considerable rate of photosynthetic CO2-fixation) almost to ineffectivity at the leaf tip (containing mature chloroplasts with maximal photosynthetic activity). The ability to import isopentenyl diphosphate from the extraplastidic space gradually increases to substitute for the loss of endogenous intermediate supply for chloroplast isoprenoid synthesis (change from autonomic to division-of-labor stage). Fatty acid synthesis from NaH14CO3 decreases in the same manner as shown for leaf sections and chloroplasts isolated from these. Evidence has been obtained for a drastic decrease of pyruvate decarboxylase-dehydrogenase activity during chloroplast development compared with other anabolic chloroplast pathways (synthesis of aromatic amino acid and branched chain amino acids). The noncompetition of pyruvate and acetate in isotopic dilution studies indicates that both a pyruvate-derived and an acetate-derived compound are simultaneously needed to form introductory intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, presumably acetoacetyl-coenzyme A. PMID:16667567

  2. Bisphosphonate Inhibitors Reveal a Large Elasticity of Plastidic Isoprenoid Synthesis Pathway in Isoprene-Emitting Hybrid Aspen1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a feedback inhibition of the chloroplastic 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP)/2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid synthesis by end products dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) was postulated, but the extent to which DMADP and IDP can build up is not known. We used bisphosphonate inhibitors, alendronate and zoledronate, that inhibit the consumption of DMADP and IDP by prenyltransferases to gain insight into the extent of end product accumulation and possible feedback inhibition in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). A kinetic method based on dark release of isoprene emission at the expense of substrate pools accumulated in light was used to estimate the in vivo pool sizes of DMADP and upstream metabolites. Feeding with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXP reductoisomerase, alone or in combination with bisphosphonates was used to inhibit carbon input into DXP/MEP pathway or both input and output. We observed a major increase in pathway intermediates, 3- to 4-fold, upstream of DMADP in bisphosphonate-inhibited leaves, but the DMADP pool was enhanced much less, 1.3- to 1.5-fold. In combined fosmidomycin/bisphosphonate treatment, pathway intermediates accumulated, reflecting cytosolic flux of intermediates that can be important under strong metabolic pull in physiological conditions. The data suggested that metabolites accumulated upstream of DMADP consist of phosphorylated intermediates and IDP. Slow conversion of the huge pools of intermediates to DMADP was limited by reductive energy supply. These data indicate that the DXP/MEP pathway is extremely elastic, and the presence of a significant pool of phosphorylated intermediates provides an important valve for fine tuning the pathway flux. PMID:25926480

  3. Bisphosphonate inhibitors reveal a large elasticity of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen.

    PubMed

    Rasulov, Bahtijor; Talts, Eero; Kännaste, Astrid; Niinemets, Ülo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a feedback inhibition of the chloroplastic 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP)/2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid synthesis by end products dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP) and isopentenyl diphosphate (IDP) was postulated, but the extent to which DMADP and IDP can build up is not known. We used bisphosphonate inhibitors, alendronate and zoledronate, that inhibit the consumption of DMADP and IDP by prenyltransferases to gain insight into the extent of end product accumulation and possible feedback inhibition in isoprene-emitting hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × Populus tremuloides). A kinetic method based on dark release of isoprene emission at the expense of substrate pools accumulated in light was used to estimate the in vivo pool sizes of DMADP and upstream metabolites. Feeding with fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of DXP reductoisomerase, alone or in combination with bisphosphonates was used to inhibit carbon input into DXP/MEP pathway or both input and output. We observed a major increase in pathway intermediates, 3- to 4-fold, upstream of DMADP in bisphosphonate-inhibited leaves, but the DMADP pool was enhanced much less, 1.3- to 1.5-fold. In combined fosmidomycin/bisphosphonate treatment, pathway intermediates accumulated, reflecting cytosolic flux of intermediates that can be important under strong metabolic pull in physiological conditions. The data suggested that metabolites accumulated upstream of DMADP consist of phosphorylated intermediates and IDP. Slow conversion of the huge pools of intermediates to DMADP was limited by reductive energy supply. These data indicate that the DXP/MEP pathway is extremely elastic, and the presence of a significant pool of phosphorylated intermediates provides an important valve for fine tuning the pathway flux.

  4. Developmental and stress regulation of gene expression for plastid and cytosolic isoprenoid pathways in pepper fruits.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; Quennemet, J; d'Harlingue, A; Camara, B

    1996-01-01

    Plant cells synthesize a myriad of isoprenoid compounds in different subcellular compartments, which include the plastid, the mitochondria, and the endoplasmic reticulum cytosol. To start the study of the regulation of these parallel pathways, we used pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit as a model. Using different isoprenoid biosynthetic gene probes from cloned cDNAs, we showed that only genes encoding the plastid enzymes (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase, phytoene synthase, phytoene desaturase, and capasanthin-capsorubin synthase) are specifically triggered during the normal period of development, at the ripening stage. This pattern of expression can be mimicked and precociously induced by a simple wounding stress. Concerning the cytosol-located enzymes, we observed that the expression of the gene encoding farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase is constitutive, whereas that of farnesyl pyrophosphate cyclase (5-epi-aristolochene synthase) is undetectable during the normal development of the fruit. The expression of these later genes are, however, only selectively triggered after elicitor treatment. The results provide evidence for developmental control of isoprenoid biosynthesis occurring in plastids and that cytoplasmic isoprenoid biosynthesis is regulated, in part, by environmental signals. PMID:8787029

  5. The Arabidopsis IspH homolog is involved in the plastid nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Goodman, Howard M

    2005-06-01

    Plant isoprenoids are synthesized via two independent pathways, the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastid nonmevalonate pathway. The Escherichia coli IspH (LytB) protein is involved in the last step of the nonmevalonate pathway. We have isolated an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ispH null mutant that has an albino phenotype and have generated Arabidopsis transgenic lines showing various albino patterns caused by IspH transgene-induced gene silencing. The initiation of albino phenotypes rendered by IspH gene silencing can arise independently from multiple sites of the same plant. After a spontaneous initiation, the albino phenotype is systemically spread toward younger tissues along the source-to-sink flow relative to the initiation site. The development of chloroplasts is severely impaired in the IspH-deficient albino tissues. Instead of thylakoids, mutant chloroplasts are filled with vesicles. Immunoblot analysis reveals that Arabidopsis IspH is a chloroplast stromal protein. Expression of Arabidopsis IspH complements the lethal phenotype of an E. coli ispH mutant. In 2-week-old Arabidopsis seedlings, the expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), IspD, IspE, IspF, and IspG genes is induced by light, whereas the expression of the IspH gene is constitutive. The addition of 3% sucrose in the media slightly increased levels of DXS, DXR, IspD, IspE, and IspF mRNA in the dark. In a 16-h-light/8-h-dark photoperiod, the accumulation of the IspH transcript oscillates with the highest levels detected in the early light period (2-6 h) and the late dark period (4-6 h). The expression patterns of DXS and IspG are similar to that of IspH, indicating that these genes are coordinately regulated in Arabidopsis when grown in a 16-h-light/8-h-dark photoperiod.

  6. Enzymatic synthesis of isotopically labeled isoprenoid diphosphates.

    PubMed

    Christensen, D J; Poulter, C D

    1994-07-01

    Recombinant yeast isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerase and avian farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) synthase from overproducing strains of Escherichia coli were used to synthesize FPP from IPP and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). [2,4,5-13C3]IPP and [2,4,5-13C3]DMAPP were synthesized from ethyl [2-13C]bromoacetate and [1,3-13C2]acetone. Thes compounds were used as substrates for enzymatic synthesis of FPP selectivity labeled at the first or third isoprene residue or at all three.

  7. Plastidic isoprenoid biosynthesis in tomato: physiological and molecular analysis in genotypes resistant and sensitive to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Loyola, J; Verdugo, I; González, E; Casaretto, J A; Ruiz-Lara, S

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoid compounds synthesised in the plastids are involved in plant response to water deficit. The functionality of the biosynthetic pathway of these compounds under drought stress has been analysed at the physiological and molecular levels in two related species of tomato (Solanum chilense and Solanum lycopersicum) that differ in their tolerance to abiotic challenge. Expression analysis of the genes encoding enzymes of these pathways (DXS, IPI, GGPPS, PSY1, NCED and HPT1) in plants at different RWC values shows significant differences for only GGPPS and HPT1, with higher expression in the tolerant S. chilense. Chlorophyll, carotenoids, α-tocopherol and ABA content was also determined in both species under different drought conditions. In agreement with HPT1 transcriptional activity, higher α-tocopherol content was observed in S. chilense than in S. lycopersicum, which correlates with a lower degree of lipoperoxidation in the former species. These results suggest that, in addition to lower stomatal conductance, α-tocopherol biosynthesis is part of the adaptation mechanisms of S. chilense to adverse environmental conditions.

  8. Physiological function of IspE, a plastid MEP pathway gene for isoprenoid biosynthesis, in organelle biogenesis and cell morphogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants occurs by two independent pathways: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we investigated the cellular effects of depletion of IspE, a protein involved in the MEP pathway, using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The IspE gene is preferentially expressed in young tissues, and induced by light and methyl jasmonate. The GFP fusion protein of IspE was targeted to chloroplasts. Reduction of IspE expression by VIGS resulted in a severe leaf yellowing phenotype. At the cellular level, depletion of IspE severely affected chloroplast development, dramatically reducing both the number and size of chloroplasts. Interestingly, mitochondrial development was also impaired, suggesting a possibility that the plastidic MEP pathway contributes to mitochondrial isoprenoid biosynthesis in leaves. A deficiency in IspE activity decreased cellular levels of the metabolites produced by the MEP pathway, such as chlorophylls and carotenoids, and stimulated expression of some of the downstream MEP pathway genes, particularly IspF and IspG. Interestingly, the IspE VIGS lines had significantly increased numbers of cells of reduced size in all leaf layers, compared with TRV control and other VIGS lines for the MEP pathway genes. The increased cell division in the IspE VIGS lines was particularly pronounced in the abaxial epidermal layer, in which the over-proliferated cells bulged out of the plane, making the surface uneven. In addition, trichome numbers dramatically increased and the stomata size varied in the affected tissues. Our results show that IspE deficiency causes novel developmental phenotypes distinct from the phenotypes of other MEP pathway mutants, indicating that IspE may have an additional role in plant development besides its role in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  9. A photoactive isoprenoid diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonate linkage: synthesis and biochemical studies with prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Zhao, Zongbao; Strickland, Corey L.; Taban, A. Huma; Hsieh, John; Michael, Jefferies; Xie, Wenshuang; Shintani, David; McMahan, Colleen; Cornish, Katrina; Distefano, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    A number of biochemical processes rely on isoprenoids, including the post-translational modification of signaling proteins and the biosynthesis of a wide array of compounds. Photoactivatable analogues have been developed to study isoprenoid utilizing enzymes such as the isoprenoid synthases and prenyltransferases. While these initial analogues proved to be excellent structural analogues with good cross linking capability, they lack the stability needed when the goals include isolation of cross-linked species, tryptic digestion, and subsequent peptide sequencing. Here, the synthesis of a benzophenone-based farnesyl diphosphate analogue containing a stable phosphonophosphate group is described. Inhibition kinetics, photolabeling experiments, as well as x-ray crystallographic analysis with a protein prenyltransferase are described, verifying this compound as a good isoprenoid mimetic. In addition, the utility of this new analogue was explored by using it to photoaffinity label crude protein extracts obtained from Hevea brasiliensis latex. Those experiments suggest that a small protein, Rubber Elongation Factor, interacts directly with farnesyl diphosphate during rubber biosynthesis. These results indicate that this benzophenone-based isoprenoid analogue will be useful for identifying enzymes that utilize farnesyl diphosphate as a substrate. PMID:17477573

  10. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Guggisberg, Ann M.; Amthor, Rachel E.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria kills nearly 1 million people each year, and the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum has become increasingly resistant to current therapies. Isoprenoid synthesis via the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway represents an attractive target for the development of new antimalarials. The phosphonic acid antibiotic fosmidomycin is a specific inhibitor of isoprenoid synthesis and has been a helpful tool to outline the essential functions of isoprenoid biosynthesis in P. falciparum. Isoprenoids are a large, diverse class of hydrocarbons that function in a variety of essential cellular processes in eukaryotes. In P. falciparum, isoprenoids are used for tRNA isopentenylation and protein prenylation, as well as the synthesis of vitamin E, carotenoids, ubiquinone, and dolichols. Recently, isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum has been shown to be regulated by a sugar phosphatase. We outline what is known about isoprenoid function and the regulation of isoprenoid synthesis in P. falciparum, in order to identify valuable directions for future research. PMID:25217461

  11. Diazirine-containing photoactivatable isoprenoid: synthesis and application in studies with isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Funk, Amy L; Wang, Yen-Chih; Strom, Mark; Hrycyna, Christine A; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-03-07

    Photoaffinity labeling is a useful technique employed to identify protein-ligand and protein-protein noncovalent interactions. Photolabeling experiments have been particularly informative for probing membrane-bound proteins where structural information is difficult to obtain. The most widely used classes of photoactive functionalities include aryl azides, diazocarbonyls, diazirines, and benzophenones. Diazirines are intrinsically smaller than benzophenones and generate carbenes upon photolysis that react with a broader range of amino acid side chains compared with the benzophenone-derived diradical; this makes diazirines potentially more general photoaffinity-labeling agents. In this article, we describe the development and application of a new isoprenoid analogue containing a diazirine moiety that was prepared in six steps and incorporated into an a-factor-derived peptide produced via solid-phase synthesis. In addition to the diazirine moiety, fluorescein and biotin groups were also incorporated into the peptide to aid in the detection and enrichment of photo-cross-linked products. This multifuctional diazirine-containing peptide was a substrate for Ste14p, the yeast homologue of the potential anticancer target Icmt, with K(m) (6.6 μM) and V(max) (947 pmol min(-1) mg(-1)) values comparable or better than a-factor peptides functionalized with benzophenone-based isoprenoids. Photo-cross-linking experiments demonstrated that the diazirine probe photo-cross-linked to Ste14p with observably higher efficiency than benzophenone-containing a-factor peptides.

  12. Isoprenoid-phospholipid conjugates as potential therapeutic agents: Synthesis, characterization and antiproliferative studies

    PubMed Central

    Gliszczyńska, Anna; Niezgoda, Natalia; Gładkowski, Witold; Świtalska, Marta; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this research was to extend application field of isoprenoid compounds by their introduction into phospholipid structure as the transport vehicle. The series of novel isoprenoid phospholipids were synthesized in high yields (24–97%), their structures were fully characterized and its anticancer activity was investigated in vitro towards several cell lines of different origin. Most of synthesized compounds showed a significantly higher antiproliferative effect on tested cell lines than free terpene acids. The most active phosphatidylcholine analogue, containing 2,3-dihydro-3-vinylfarnesoic acids instead of fatty acids in both sn-1 and sn-2 position, inhibits the proliferation of colon cancer cells at 13.6 μM. PMID:28196124

  13. A review of tobacco BY-2 cells as an excellent system to study the synthesis and function of sterols and other isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Hemmerlin, Andréa; Gerber, Esther; Feldtrauer, Jean-François; Wentzinger, Laurent; Hartmann, Marie-Andrée; Tritsch, Denis; Hoeffler, Jean-François; Rohmer, Michel; Bach, Thomas J

    2004-08-01

    In plants, two pathways are utilized for the synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP), the universal precursor for isoprenoid biosynthesis. In this paper we review findings and observations made primarily with tobacco BY-2 cells (TBY-2), which have proven to be an excellent system in which to study the two biosynthetic pathways. A major advantage of these cells as an experimental system is their ability to readily take up specific inhibitors and stably- and/or radiolabeled precursors. This permits the functional elucidation of the role of isoprenoid end products and intermediates. Because TBY-2 cells undergo rapid cell division and can be synchronized within the cell cycle, they constitute a highly suitable test system for determination of those isoprenoids and intermediates that act as cell cycle inhibitors, thus giving an indication of which branches of the isoprenoid pathway are essential. Through chemical complementation; and use of precursors, intracellular compartmentation can be elucidated, as well as the extent to which the plastidial and cytosolic pathways contribute to the syntheses of specific groups of isoprenoids (e.g., sterols) via exchange of intermediates across membranes. These topics are discussed in the context of the pertinent literature.

  14. Isoprenoid metabolism in apicomplexan parasites

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, Leah; Odom, Audrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites include some of the most prevalent and deadly human pathogens. Novel antiparasitic drugs are urgently needed. Synthesis and metabolism of isoprenoids may present multiple targets for therapeutic intervention. The apicoplast-localized methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway for isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis is distinct from the mevalonate (MVA) pathway used by the mammalian host, and this pathway is apparently essential in most Apicomplexa. In this review, we discuss the current field of research on production and metabolic fates of isoprenoids in apicomplexan parasites, including the acquisition of host isoprenoid precursors and downstream products. We describe recent work identifying the first MEP pathway regulator in apicomplexan parasites, and introduce several promising areas for ongoing research into this well-validated antiparasitic target. PMID:25893156

  15. Chemoenzymatic synthesis of an isoprenoid phosphate tool for the analysis of complex bacterial oligosaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lujan, Donovan K; Stanziale, Jennifer A; Mostafavi, Anahita Z; Sharma, Sunita; Troutman, Jerry M

    2012-10-01

    Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase (UPPS) is a key enzyme that catalyzes the production of bactoprenols, which act as membrane anchors for the assembly of complex bacterial oligosaccharides. One of the major hurdles in understanding the assembly of oligosaccharide assembly is a lack of chemical tools to study this process, since bactoprenols and the resulting isoprenoid-linked oligosaccharides lack handles or chromophores for use in pathway analysis. Here we describe the isolation of a new UPPS from the symbiotic microorganism Bacteroides fragilis, a key species in the human microbiome. The protein was purified to homogeneity and utilized to accept a chromophore containing farnesyl diphosphate analogue as a substrate. The analogue was utilized by the enzyme and resulted in a bactoprenyl diphosphate product with an easy to monitor tag associated with it. Furthermore, the diphosphate is shown to be readily converted to monophosphate using a common molecular biology reagent. This monophosphate product allowed for the investigation of complex oligosaccharide biosynthesis, and was used to probe the activity of glycosyltransferases involved in the well characterized Campylobacter jejuni N-linked protein glycosylation. Novel reagents similar to this will provide key tools for the study of uncharacterized oligosaccharide assemblies, and open the possibility for the development of rapid screening methodology for these biosynthetic systems.

  16. Evidence for a Contribution of ALA Synthesis to Plastid-To-Nucleus Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, Olaf; Gläßer, Christine; Chen, Jin-Gui; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Grimm, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The formation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is widely controlled by environmental and metabolic feedback cues that determine the influx into the entire metabolic path. Because of its central role as the rate-limiting step, we hypothesized a potential role of ALA biosynthesis in tetrapyrrole-mediated retrograde signaling and exploited the direct impact of ALA biosynthesis on nuclear gene expression (NGE) by using two different approaches. Firstly, the Arabidopsis gun1, hy1 (gun2), hy2 (gun3), gun4 mutants showing uncoupled NGE from the physiological state of chloroplasts were thoroughly examined for regulatory modifications of ALA synthesis and transcriptional control in the nucleus. We found that reduced ALA-synthesizing capacity is common to analyzed gun mutants. Inhibition of ALA synthesis by gabaculine (GAB) that inactivates glutamate-1-semialdehyde aminotransferase and ALA feeding of wild-type and mutant seedlings corroborate the expression data of gun mutants. Transcript level of photosynthetic marker genes were enhanced in norflurazon (NF)-treated seedlings upon additional GAB treatment, while enhanced ALA amounts diminish these RNA levels in NF-treated wild-type in comparison to the solely NF-treated seedlings. Secondly, the impact of posttranslationally down-regulated ALA synthesis on NGE was investigated by global transcriptome analysis of GAB-treated Arabidopsis seedlings and the gun4-1 mutant, which is also characterized by reduced ALA formation. A common set of significantly modulated genes was identified indicating ALA synthesis as a potential signal emitter. The over-represented gene ontology categories of genes with decreased or increased transcript abundance highlight a few biological processes and cellular functions, which are remarkably affected in response to plastid-localized ALA biosynthesis. These results support the hypothesis that ALA biosynthesis correlates with retrograde signaling-mediated control of NGE.

  17. Plastidic phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase mutants impair starch synthesis in rice pollen grains and cause male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Eom, Joon-Seob; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Shin, Dongjin; An, Gynheung; Okita, Thomas W.; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the starch synthesis pathway and the role of this reserve in rice pollen, we characterized mutations in the plastidic phosphoglucomutase, OspPGM, and the plastidic large subunit of ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc) pyrophosphorylase, OsAGPL4. Both genes were up-regulated in maturing pollen, a stage when starch begins to accumulate. Progeny analysis of self-pollinated heterozygous lines carrying the OspPGM mutant alleles, osppgm-1 and osppgm-2, or the OsAGPL4 mutant allele, osagpl4-1, as well as reciprocal crosses between the wild type (WT) and heterozygotes revealed that loss of OspPGM or OsAGPL4 caused male sterility, with the former condition rescued by the introduction of the WT OspPGM gene. While iodine staining and transmission electron microscopy analyses of pollen grains from homozygous osppgm-1 lines produced by anther culture confirmed the starch null phenotype, pollen from homozygous osagpl4 mutant lines, osagpl4-2 and osagpl4-3, generated by the CRISPR/Cas system, accumulated small amounts of starch which were sufficient to produce viable seed. Such osagpl4 mutant pollen, however, was unable to compete against WT pollen successfully, validating the important role of this reserve in fertilization. Our results demonstrate that starch is mainly polymerized from ADP-Glc synthesized from plastidic hexose phosphates in rice pollen and that starch is an essential requirement for successful fertilization in rice. PMID:27588462

  18. Plastidic phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase mutants impair starch synthesis in rice pollen grains and cause male sterility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Eom, Joon-Seob; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Shin, Dongjin; An, Gynheung; Okita, Thomas W; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2016-10-01

    To elucidate the starch synthesis pathway and the role of this reserve in rice pollen, we characterized mutations in the plastidic phosphoglucomutase, OspPGM, and the plastidic large subunit of ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc) pyrophosphorylase, OsAGPL4 Both genes were up-regulated in maturing pollen, a stage when starch begins to accumulate. Progeny analysis of self-pollinated heterozygous lines carrying the OspPGM mutant alleles, osppgm-1 and osppgm-2, or the OsAGPL4 mutant allele, osagpl4-1, as well as reciprocal crosses between the wild type (WT) and heterozygotes revealed that loss of OspPGM or OsAGPL4 caused male sterility, with the former condition rescued by the introduction of the WT OspPGM gene. While iodine staining and transmission electron microscopy analyses of pollen grains from homozygous osppgm-1 lines produced by anther culture confirmed the starch null phenotype, pollen from homozygous osagpl4 mutant lines, osagpl4-2 and osagpl4-3, generated by the CRISPR/Cas system, accumulated small amounts of starch which were sufficient to produce viable seed. Such osagpl4 mutant pollen, however, was unable to compete against WT pollen successfully, validating the important role of this reserve in fertilization. Our results demonstrate that starch is mainly polymerized from ADP-Glc synthesized from plastidic hexose phosphates in rice pollen and that starch is an essential requirement for successful fertilization in rice.

  19. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  20. Synthetic biology in plastids.

    PubMed

    Scharff, Lars B; Bock, Ralph

    2014-06-01

    Plastids (chloroplasts) harbor a small gene-dense genome that is amenable to genetic manipulation by transformation. During 1 billion years of evolution from the cyanobacterial endosymbiont to present-day chloroplasts, the plastid genome has undergone a dramatic size reduction, mainly as a result of gene losses and the large-scale transfer of genes to the nuclear genome. Thus the plastid genome can be regarded as a naturally evolved miniature genome, the gradual size reduction and compaction of which has provided a blueprint for the design of minimum genomes. Furthermore, because of the largely prokaryotic genome structure and gene expression machinery, the high transgene expression levels attainable in transgenic chloroplasts and the very low production costs in plant systems, the chloroplast lends itself to synthetic biology applications that are directed towards the efficient synthesis of green chemicals, biopharmaceuticals and other metabolites of commercial interest. This review describes recent progress with the engineering of plastid genomes with large constructs of foreign or synthetic DNA, and highlights the potential of the chloroplast as a model system in bottom-up and top-down synthetic biology approaches.

  1. Isoprenoid drugs, biofuels, and chemicals--artemisinin, farnesene, and beyond.

    PubMed

    George, Kevin W; Alonso-Gutierrez, Jorge; Keasling, Jay D; Lee, Taek Soon

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids have been identified and used as natural pharmaceuticals, fragrances, solvents, and, more recently, advanced biofuels. Although isoprenoids are most commonly found in plants, researchers have successfully engineered both the eukaryotic and prokaryotic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways to produce these valuable chemicals in microorganisms at high yields. The microbial synthesis of the precursor to artemisinin--an important antimalarial drug produced from the sweet wormwood Artemisia annua--serves as perhaps the most successful example of this approach. Through advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, microbial-derived semisynthetic artemisinin may soon replace plant-derived artemisinin as the primary source of this valuable pharmaceutical. The richness and diversity of isoprenoid structures also make them ideal candidates for advanced biofuels that may act as "drop-in" replacements for gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. Indeed, the sesquiterpenes farnesene and bisabolene, monoterpenes pinene and limonene, and hemiterpenes isopentenol and isopentanol have been evaluated as fuels or fuel precursors. As in the artemisinin project, these isoprenoids have been produced microbially through synthetic biology and metabolic engineering efforts. Here, we provide a brief review of the numerous isoprenoid compounds that have found use as pharmaceuticals, flavors, commodity chemicals, and, most importantly, advanced biofuels. In each case, we highlight the metabolic engineering strategies that were used to produce these compounds successfully in microbial hosts. In addition, we present a current outlook on microbial isoprenoid production, with an eye towards the many challenges that must be addressed to achieve higher yields and industrial-scale production.

  2. A new alternative non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis in eubacteria and plants.

    PubMed

    Paseshnichenko, V A

    1998-02-01

    Data concerning the discovery of an alternative non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis leading to isopentenyl diphosphate formation are reviewed. This pathway has been discovered in experiments with several eubacteria producing triterpenoids of the hopane series. 13C-labeled acetate, glucose, and triose phosphates were used as precursors. The 13C-labeling patterns in isoprenoids were studied by 13C-NMR spectrometry. In eubacteria the universal C5 precursor--isopentenyl diphosphate--did not appear to form via the classical acetate/mevalonate pathway, but via a novel glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate/pyruvate pathway. It is postulated that the condensation of the C2 unit formed as a result of pyruvate decarboxylation with the C3 unit (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate) and the next transposition leads to the formation of the branched C5 precursor--isopentenyl diphosphate. In Scenedesmus obliquus not only all plastid isoprenoids (carotenoids and prenyl side chains of chlorophylls and plastoquinone-9) were formed via this novel pathway, but also the non-plastid cytoplasmic sterols. In higher plants the plastid isoprenoids were formed via the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate/pyruvate pathway, while the cytoplasmic sterols were formed via the acetate/mevalonate pathway.

  3. Plastids and carotenoid accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastids are ubiquitously in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids except proplastids can synth...

  4. Ubiquitin–Proteasome-Dependent Regulation of Bidirectional Communication between Plastids and the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Hirosawa, Yoshihiro; Ito-Inaba, Yasuko; Inaba, Takehito

    2017-01-01

    Plastids are DNA-containing organelles and can have unique differentiation states depending on age, tissue, and environment. Plastid biogenesis is optimized by bidirectional communication between plastids and the nucleus. Import of nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids serves as anterograde signals and vice versa, plastids themselves send retrograde signals to the nucleus, thereby controlling de novo synthesis of nuclear-encoded plastid proteins. Recently, it has become increasingly evident that the ubiquitin–proteasome system regulates both the import of anterograde plastid proteins and retrograde signaling from plastids to the nucleus. Targets of ubiquitin–proteasome regulation include unimported chloroplast precursor proteins in the cytosol, protein translocation machinery at the chloroplast surface, and transcription factors in the nucleus. This review will focus on the mechanism through which the ubiquitin–proteasome system optimizes plastid biogenesis and plant development through the regulation of nuclear–plastid interactions. PMID:28360917

  5. Cellular Localization of Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Enzymes in Marchantia polymorpha. Uncovering a New Role of Oil Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Suire, Claude; Bouvier, Florence; Backhaus, Ralph A.; Bégu, Dominique; Bonneu, Marc; Camara, Bilal

    2000-01-01

    Like seed plants, liverworts synthesize and accumulate a myriad of isoprenoid compounds. Using antibodies raised against several isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes, we investigated their intracellular compartmentation by in situ immunolocalization from Marchantia polymorpha. The enzymes examined were deoxy-xylulose phosphate synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate synthase, monoterpene synthase, geranylgeranyl diphosphate reductase, phytoene synthase, and phytoene desaturase. Our results show that liverwort oil bodies, which are organelles bound by a single unit membrane, possess isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes similar to those found in plastids and the cytosol. We postulate that oil bodies play a dynamic role in cell metabolism in addition to their role as sites of essential oil accumulation and sequestration. The occurrence of such enzymes in different cellular compartments might be due to multiple targeting of gene products to various organelles. PMID:11080275

  6. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in isolated pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Lingru; Sparace, S.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Plastids have been isolated from germinating pea (Pisum sativum L.) roots by differential centrifugation and purified on Percoll gradients. Marker enzymes (NADPH: cytochrome c reductase, fumarase and fatty acid synthesis) indicate that greater than 50% of the plastids are recovered essentially free from mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum contamination. Fatty acids synthesized from ({sup 14}C)acetate by Percoll-purified plastids are primarily 16:0, 16:1 and 18:1. ({sup 14}C)Acetate-labelled fatty acids and ({sup 14}C)glycerol-3-phosphate are both readily incorporated into glycerolipid. Approximately 12% of the total activity for glycerolipid biosynthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate is recovered in the purified plastid fraction. Glycerolipids synthesized from these precursors are primarily TAG, DAG, PE, PG, PC, PI and PA. Acyl-CoA's also accumulate when acetate is the precursor.

  7. Factors mediating plastid dependency and the origins of parasitism in apicomplexans and their close relatives

    PubMed Central

    Janouškovec, Jan; Tikhonenkov, Denis V.; Burki, Fabien; Howe, Alexis T.; Kolísko, Martin; Mylnikov, Alexander P.; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexans are a major lineage of parasites, including causative agents of malaria and toxoplasmosis. How such highly adapted parasites evolved from free-living ancestors is poorly understood, particularly because they contain nonphotosynthetic plastids with which they have a complex metabolic dependency. Here, we examine the origin of apicomplexan parasitism by resolving the evolutionary distribution of several key characteristics in their closest free-living relatives, photosynthetic chromerids and predatory colpodellids. Using environmental sequence data, we describe the diversity of these apicomplexan-related lineages and select five species that represent this diversity for transcriptome sequencing. Phylogenomic analysis recovered a monophyletic lineage of chromerids and colpodellids as the sister group to apicomplexans, and a complex distribution of retention versus loss for photosynthesis, plastid genomes, and plastid organelles. Reconstructing the evolution of all plastid and cytosolic metabolic pathways related to apicomplexan plastid function revealed an ancient dependency on plastid isoprenoid biosynthesis, predating the divergence of apicomplexan and dinoflagellates. Similarly, plastid genome retention is strongly linked to the retention of two genes in the plastid genome, sufB and clpC, altogether suggesting a relatively simple model for plastid retention and loss. Lastly, we examine the broader distribution of a suite of molecular characteristics previously linked to the origins of apicomplexan parasitism and find that virtually all are present in their free-living relatives. The emergence of parasitism may not be driven by acquisition of novel components, but rather by loss and modification of the existing, conserved traits. PMID:25717057

  8. Crystal structure of 4-(cytidine 5'-diphospho)-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol kinase, an enzyme in the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takashi; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Satoh, Shinya; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Unzai, Satoru; Tame, Jeremy R H; Park, Sam-Yong

    2003-08-08

    The crystal structure of the enzyme 4-(cytidine 5'-diphospho)-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (CDP-ME) kinase from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8 has been determined at 1.7-A resolution. This enzyme catalyzes phosphorylation of the 2-hydroxyl group of CDP-ME, the fourth step of the non-mevalonate pathway, which is essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in several pathogenic microorganisms. Since this pathway is absent in humans, it is an important target for the development of novel antimicrobial compounds. The structure of the enzyme is similar to the structures of mevalonate kinase and homoserine kinase, members of the GHMP superfamily. Lys8 and Asp125 are active site residues in mevalonate kinase that also appear to play a catalytic role in CDP-ME kinase. Both the mevalonate and the non-mevalonate pathways therefore involve closely related kinases with similar mechanisms. Assaying the enzyme showed that CDP-ME kinase will phosphorylate CDP-ME but not 4-(uridine 5'-diphospho)-2-C-methyl-D-erythritol, indicating the substrate pyrimidine moiety is involved in important interactions with the enzyme.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of cytidine derivatives that inhibit the kinase IspE of the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Crane, Christine M; Hirsch, Anna K H; Alphey, Magnus S; Sgraja, Tanja; Lauw, Susan; Illarionova, Victoria; Rohdich, Felix; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hunter, William N; Bacher, Adelbert; Diederich, François

    2008-01-01

    The enzymes of the non-mevalonate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis are attractive targets for the development of novel drugs against malaria and tuberculosis. This pathway is used exclusively by the corresponding pathogens, but not by humans. A series of water-soluble, cytidine-based inhibitors that were originally designed for the fourth enzyme in the pathway, IspD, were shown to inhibit the subsequent enzyme, the kinase IspE (from Escherichia coli). The binding mode of the inhibitors was verified by co-crystal structure analysis, using Aquifex aeolicus IspE. The crystal structures represent the first reported example of a co-crystal structure of IspE with a synthetic ligand and confirmed that ligand binding affinity originates mainly from the interactions of the nucleobase moiety in the cytidine binding pocket of the enzyme. In contrast, the appended benzimidazole moieties of the ligands adopt various orientations in the active site and establish only poor intermolecular contacts with the protein. Defined binding sites for sulfate ions and glycerol molecules, components in the crystallization buffer, near the well-conserved ATP-binding Gly-rich loop of IspE were observed. The crystal structures of A. aeolicus IspE nicely complement the one from E. coli IspE for use in structure-based design, namely by providing invaluable structural information for the design of inhibitors targeting IspE from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Plasmodium falciparum. Similar to the enzymes from these pathogens, A. aeolicus IspE directs the OH group of a tyrosine residue into a pocket in the active site. In the E. coli enzyme, on the other hand, this pocket is lined by phenylalanine and has a more pronounced hydrophobic character.

  10. Crystal Structure of 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Synthase, A Crucial Enzyme for Isoprenoids Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,S.; Usunow, G.; Busch, G.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) is a common precursor for the synthesis of all isoprenoids, which have important functions in living organisms. IPP is produced by the mevalonate pathway in archaea, fungi, and animals. In contrast, IPP is synthesized by a mevalonate-independent pathway in most bacteria, algae, and plant plastids. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) catalyzes the first and the rate-limiting step of the mevalonate-independent pathway and is an attractive target for the development of novel antibiotics, antimalarials, and herbicides. We report here the first structural information on DXS, from Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans, in complex with the coenzyme thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). The structure contains three domains (I, II, and III), each of which bears homology to the equivalent domains in transketolase and the E1 subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase. However, DXS has a novel arrangement of these domains as compared with the other enzymes, such that the active site of DXS is located at the interface of domains I and II in the same monomer, whereas that of transketolase is located at the interface of the dimer. The coenzyme TPP is mostly buried in the complex, but the C-2 atom of its thiazolium ring is exposed to a pocket that is the substrate-binding site. The structures identify residues that may have important roles in catalysis, which have been confirmed by our mutagenesis studies.

  11. Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway of Isoprenoid Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lishan; Chang, Wei-chen; Xiao, Youli; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of natural products with more than 50,000 members. All isoprenoids are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two of the most important discoveries in isoprenoid biosynthetic studies in recent years are the elucidation of a second isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway) and a modified mevalonate (MVA) pathway. In this review, mechanistic insights on the MEP pathway enzymes are summarized. Since many isoprenoids have important biological activities, the need to produce them in sufficient quantities for downstream research efforts or commercial application is apparent. Recent advances in both the MVA and MEP pathway-based synthetic biology efforts are also illustrated by reviewing the landmark work of artemisinic acid and taxadien-5α-ol production through microbial fermentations. PMID:23746261

  12. From flavors and pharmaceuticals to advanced biofuels: production of isoprenoids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tippmann, Stefan; Chen, Yun; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Isoprenoids denote the largest group of chemicals in the plant kingdom and are employed for a wide range of applications in the food and pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, isoprenoids have additionally been recognized as suitable replacements for petroleum-derived fuels and could thus promote the transition towards a more sustainable society. To realize the biofuel potential of isoprenoids, a very efficient production system is required. While complex chemical structures as well as the low abundance in nature demonstrate the shortcomings of chemical synthesis and plant extraction, isoprenoids can be produced by genetically engineered microorganisms from renewable carbon sources. In this article, we summarize the development of isoprenoid applications from flavors and pharmaceuticals to advanced biofuels and review the strategies to design microbial cell factories, focusing on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the production of these compounds. While the high complexity of biosynthetic pathways and the toxicity of certain isoprenoids still denote challenges that need to be addressed, metabolic engineering has enabled large-scale production of several terpenoids and thus, the utilization of these compounds is likely to expand in the future.

  13. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids (carotenoids, sterols, prenyl side-chains of chlorophylls and plastoquinone) via a novel pyruvate/glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate non-mevalonate pathway in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus.

    PubMed

    Schwender, J; Seemann, M; Lichtenthaler, H K; Rohmer, M

    1996-05-15

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis was investigated in the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus grown heterotrophically on 13C-labelled glucose and acetate. Several isoprenoid compounds were isolated and investigated by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. According to the 13C-labelling pattern indicated by the 13C-NMR spectra, the biosynthesis of all plastidic isoprenoids investigated (prenyl side-chains of chlorophylls and plastoquinone-9, and the carotenoids beta-carotene and lutein), as well as of the non-plastidic cytoplasmic sterols, does not proceed via the classical acetate/mevalonate pathway (which leads from acetyl-CoA via mevalonate to isopentenyl diphosphate), but via the novel glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate/pyruvate route recently detected in eubacteria. Formation of isopentenyl diphosphate involves the condensation of a C2 unit derived from pyruvate decarboxylation with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and a transposition yielding the branched C5 skeleton of isoprenic units.

  14. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  15. Plastid genetic engineering in Solanaceae.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Jelli; Park, Se Won

    2012-10-01

    Plastid genetic engineering has come of age, becoming today an attractive alternative approach for the expression of foreign genes, as it offers several advantages over nuclear transformants. Significant progress has been made in plastid genetic engineering in tobacco and other Solanaceae plants, through the use of improved regeneration procedures and transformation vectors with efficient promoters and untranslated regions. Many genes encoding for industrially important proteins and vaccines, as well as genes conferring important agronomic traits, have been stably integrated and expressed in the plastid genome. Despite these advances, it remains a challenge to achieve marked levels of plastid transgene expression in non-green tissues. In this review, we summarize the basic requirements of plastid genetic engineering and discuss the current status, limitations, and the potential of plastid transformation for expanding future studies relating to Solanaceae plants.

  16. Microbial isoprenoid production: an example of green chemistry through metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Maury, Jérôme; Asadollahi, Mohammad A; Møller, Kasper; Clark, Anthony; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    Saving energy, cost efficiency, producing less waste, improving the biodegradability of products, potential for producing novel and complex molecules with improved properties, and reducing the dependency on fossil fuels as raw materials are the main advantages of using biotechnological processes to produce chemicals. Such processes are often referred to as green chemistry or white biotechnology. Metabolic engineering, which permits the rational design of cell factories using directed genetic modifications, is an indispensable strategy for expanding green chemistry. In this chapter, the benefits of using metabolic engineering approaches for the development of green chemistry are illustrated by the recent advances in microbial production of isoprenoids, a diverse and important group of natural compounds with numerous existing and potential commercial applications. Accumulated knowledge on the metabolic pathways leading to the synthesis of the principal precursors of isoprenoids is reviewed, and recent investigations into isoprenoid production using engineered cell factories are described.

  17. Carotenoid-based phenotypic screen of the yeast deletion collection reveals new genes with roles in isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Özaydın, Bilge; Burd, Helcio; Lee, Taek Soon; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Beside their essential cellular functions, isoprenoids have value as pharmaceuticals, nutriceuticals, pesticides, and fuel alternatives. Engineering microorganisms for production of isoprenoids is relatively easy, sustainable, and cost effective in comparison to chemical synthesis or extraction from natural producers. We introduced genes encoding carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes into the haploid yeast deletion collection to identify gene deletions that improved isoprenoid production. Deletions that showed significant improvement in carotenoid production were further screened for production of bisabolene, an isoprenoid alternative to petroleum-derived diesel. Combining those deletions with other mevalonate pathway modifications increased production of bisabolene from 40mg/L to 800mg/L in shake-flask cultures. In a fermentation process, this engineered strain produced 5.2g/L of bisabolene.

  18. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  19. Plastids with or without galactoglycerolipids.

    PubMed

    Botté, Cyrille Y; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-02-01

    In structural, functional, and evolutionary terms, galactoglycerolipids are signature lipids of chloroplasts. Their presence in nongreen plastids has been demonstrated in angiosperms and diatoms. Thus, galactoglycerolipids are considered as a landmark of green and nongreen plastids, deriving from either a primary or secondary endosymbiosis. The discovery of a plastid in Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, fueled the search for galactoglycerolipids as possible targets for treatments. However, recent data have provided evidence that the Plasmodium plastid does not contain any galactoglycerolipids. In this opinion article, we discuss questions raised by the loss of galactoglycerolipids during evolution: how have galactoglycerolipids been lost? How does the Plasmodium plastid maintain four membranes without these lipids? What are the main constituents instead of galactoglycerolipids?

  20. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P; Guerra, Miguel P

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100-220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field.

  1. Plastid genomics in horticultural species: importance and applications for plant population genetics, evolution, and biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Rogalski, Marcelo; do Nascimento Vieira, Leila; Fraga, Hugo P.; Guerra, Miguel P.

    2015-01-01

    During the evolution of the eukaryotic cell, plastids, and mitochondria arose from an endosymbiotic process, which determined the presence of three genetic compartments into the incipient plant cell. After that, these three genetic materials from host and symbiont suffered several rearrangements, bringing on a complex interaction between nuclear and organellar gene products. Nowadays, plastids harbor a small genome with ∼130 genes in a 100–220 kb sequence in higher plants. Plastid genes are mostly highly conserved between plant species, being useful for phylogenetic analysis in higher taxa. However, intergenic spacers have a relatively higher mutation rate and are important markers to phylogeographical and plant population genetics analyses. The predominant uniparental inheritance of plastids is like a highly desirable feature for phylogeny studies. Moreover, the gene content and genome rearrangements are efficient tools to capture and understand evolutionary events between different plant species. Currently, genetic engineering of the plastid genome (plastome) offers a number of attractive advantages as high-level of foreign protein expression, marker gene excision, gene expression in operon and transgene containment because of maternal inheritance of plastid genome in most crops. Therefore, plastid genome can be used for adding new characteristics related to synthesis of metabolic compounds, biopharmaceutical, and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we describe the importance and applications of plastid genome as tools for genetic and evolutionary studies, and plastid transformation focusing on increasing the performance of horticultural species in the field. PMID:26284102

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Evidence for a Cryptic Plastid in the Colpodellid Voromonas pontica, a Close Relative of Chromerids and Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Gile, Gillian H.; Slamovits, Claudio H.

    2014-01-01

    Colpodellids are free-living, predatory flagellates, but their close relationship to photosynthetic chromerids and plastid-bearing apicomplexan parasites suggests they were ancestrally photosynthetic. Colpodellids may therefore retain a cryptic plastid, or they may have lost their plastids entirely, like the apicomplexan Cryptosporidium. To find out, we generated transcriptomic data from Voromonas pontica ATCC 50640 and searched for homologs of genes encoding proteins known to function in the apicoplast, the non-photosynthetic plastid of apicomplexans. We found candidate genes from multiple plastid-associated pathways including iron-sulfur cluster assembly, isoprenoid biosynthesis, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, along with a plastid-type phosphate transporter gene. Four of these sequences include the 5′ end of the coding region and are predicted to encode a signal peptide and a transit peptide-like region. This is highly suggestive of targeting to a cryptic plastid. We also performed a taxon-rich phylogenetic analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA sequences from colpodellids and their relatives, which suggests that photosynthesis was lost more than once in colpodellids, and independently in V. pontica and apicomplexans. Colpodellids therefore represent a valuable source of comparative data for understanding the process of plastid reduction in humanity's most deadly parasite. PMID:24797661

  3. Plastids and gravitropic sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, F. D.

    1997-01-01

    Data and theories about the identity of the mass that acts in gravitropic sensing are reviewed. Gravity sensing may have evolved several times in plants and algae in processes such as gravitropism of organs and tip-growing cells, gravimorphism, gravitaxis, and the regulation of cytoplasmic streaming in internodal cells of Chara. In the latter and in gravitaxis, the mass of the entire cell may function in sensing. But gravitropic sensing appears to rely upon the mass of amyloplasts that sediment since (i) the location of cells with sedimentation is highly regulated, (ii) such cells contain other morphological specializations favoring sedimentation, (iii) sedimentation always correlates with gravitropic competence in wild-type plants, (iv) magnetophoretic movement of rootcap amyloplasts mimics gravitropism, and (v) starchless and intermediate starch mutants show reduced gravitropic sensitivity. The simplest interpretation of these data is that gravitropic sensing is plastid-based.

  4. Transduction of wound and herbivory signals in plastids

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Ian T

    2010-01-01

    Plastids are the central orchestrators of the early and late responses to wounding and herbivory in plants. This organelle houses some of the most important enzymes involved in the biogenesis of intra and extracellular signals that mediate defense responses against these stresses. Among these enzymes are the ones initiating the biosynthesis of oxylipins [e.g., jasmonic acid (JA) and C6 volatiles], terpenoid volatiles and phenolic compounds, including both volatile [e.g., methylsalicylate (MeSA)] and non-volatile compounds [e.g., salicylic acid (SA)]. Plastids also play a major role in orchestrating changes in primary metabolism during herbivory and thereby in the reallocation of carbon and nitrogen to different functions in response to herbivory. How the primary stress signals generated by mechanical damage and herbivory reach the plastid to activate the rapid synthesis of these signal molecules is at present largely unknown. PMID:20798815

  5. Fatty acid biosynthesis in pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Stahl, R.J.; Sparace, S.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Fatty acid biosynthesis from (1-{sup 14}C)acetate was optimized in plastids isolated from primary root tips of 7-day-old germinating pea seeds. Fatty acid synthesis was maximum at approximately 80 nmoles/hr/mg protein in the presence of 200 {mu}M acetate, 0.5 mM each of NADH, NADPH and CoA, 6 mM each of ATP and MgCl{sub 2}, 1 mM each of the MnCl{sub 2} and glycerol-3-phosphate, 15 mM KHCO{sub 3}, and 0.1M Bis-tris-propane, pH 8.0 incubated at 35C. At the standard incubation temperature of 25C, fatty acid synthesis was linear from up to 6 hours with 80 to 100 {mu}g/mL plastid protein. ATP and CoA were absolute requirements, whereas KHCO{sub 3}, divalent cations and reduced nucleotides all improved activity by 80 to 85%. Mg{sup 2+} and NADH were the preferred cation and nucleotide, respectively. Dithiothreitol and detergents were generally inhibitory. The radioactive products of fatty acid biosynthesis were approximately 33% 16:0, 10% 18:0 and 56% 18:1 and generally did not vary with increasing concentrations of each cofactor.

  6. Differential Subplastidial Localization and Turnover of Enzymes Involved in Isoprenoid Biosynthesis in Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Perello, Catalina; Llamas, Ernesto; Burlat, Vincent; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Phillips, Michael A.; Pulido, Pablo; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Plastidial isoprenoids are a diverse group of metabolites with roles in photosynthesis, growth regulation, and interaction with the environment. The methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway produces the metabolic precursors of all types of plastidial isoprenoids. Proteomics studies in Arabidopsis thaliana have shown that all the enzymes of the MEP pathway are localized in the plastid stroma. However, immunoblot analysis of chloroplast subfractions showed that the first two enzymes of the pathway, deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) and reductoisomerase (DXR), can also be found in non-stromal fractions. Both transient and stable expression of GFP-tagged DXS and DXR proteins confirmed the presence of the fusion proteins in distinct subplastidial compartments. In particular, DXR-GFP was found to accumulate in relatively large vesicles that could eventually be released from chloroplasts, presumably to be degraded by an autophagy-independent process. Together, we propose that protein-specific mechanisms control the localization and turnover of the first two enzymes of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis chloroplasts. PMID:26919668

  7. Plastid ribosomal protein S5 plays a critical role in photosynthesis, plant development, and cold stress tolerance in arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plastid ribosomal proteins (RPs) are essential components for protein synthesis machinery and exert diverse roles in plant growth and development. Mutations in plastid RPs lead to a range of developmental phenotypes in plants. However, how they regulate these processes is not fully understood and th...

  8. Identification and characterization of plastid-type proteins from sequence-attributed features using machine learning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plastids are an important component of plant cells, being the site of manufacture and storage of chemical compounds used by the cell, and contain pigments such as those used in photosynthesis, starch synthesis/storage, cell color etc. They are essential organelles of the plant cell, also present in algae. Recent advances in genomic technology and sequencing efforts is generating a huge amount of DNA sequence data every day. The predicted proteome of these genomes needs annotation at a faster pace. In view of this, one such annotation need is to develop an automated system that can distinguish between plastid and non-plastid proteins accurately, and further classify plastid-types based on their functionality. We compared the amino acid compositions of plastid proteins with those of non-plastid ones and found significant differences, which were used as a basis to develop various feature-based prediction models using similarity-search and machine learning. Results In this study, we developed separate Support Vector Machine (SVM) trained classifiers for characterizing the plastids in two steps: first distinguishing the plastid vs. non-plastid proteins, and then classifying the identified plastids into their various types based on their function (chloroplast, chromoplast, etioplast, and amyloplast). Five diverse protein features: amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, the pseudo amino acid composition, Nterminal-Center-Cterminal composition and the protein physicochemical properties are used to develop SVM models. Overall, the dipeptide composition-based module shows the best performance with an accuracy of 86.80% and Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) of 0.74 in phase-I and 78.60% with a MCC of 0.44 in phase-II. On independent test data, this model also performs better with an overall accuracy of 76.58% and 74.97% in phase-I and phase-II, respectively. The similarity-based PSI-BLAST module shows very low performance with about 50% prediction

  9. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Haruo; Morton, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes. PMID:27196606

  10. Human Isoprenoid Synthase Enzymes as Therapeutic Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios; Berghuis, Albert; Tsantrizos, Youla

    2014-07-01

    The complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids in the human body, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently, pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies.

  11. Human isoprenoid synthase enzymes as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaeok; Matralis, Alexios N.; Berghuis, Albert M.; Tsantrizos, Youla S.

    2014-01-01

    In the human body, the complex biochemical network known as the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, which consists of a vast array of metabolites that are vital for proper cellular functions. Two key isoprenoids, farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) are responsible for the post-translational prenylation of small GTP-binding proteins, and serve as the biosynthetic precursors to numerous other biomolecules. The down-stream metabolite of FPP and GGPP is squalene, the precursor to steroids, bile acids, lipoproteins, and vitamin D. In the past, interest in prenyl synthase inhibitors focused mainly on the role of the FPP in lytic bone diseases. More recently pre-clinical and clinical studies have strongly implicated high levels of protein prenylation in a plethora of human diseases, including non-skeletal cancers, the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus mainly on the potential therapeutic value of down-regulating the biosynthesis of FPP, GGPP, and squalene. We summarize the most recent drug discovery efforts and the structural data available that support the current on-going studies. PMID:25101260

  12. The leaf-level emission factor of volatile isoprenoids: caveats, model algorithms, response shapes and scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinemets, Ü.; Monson, R. K.; Arneth, A.; Ciccioli, P.; Kesselmeier, J.; Kuhn, U.; Noe, S. M.; Peñuelas, J.; Staudt, M.

    2010-06-01

    In models of plant volatile isoprenoid emissions, the instantaneous compound emission rate typically scales with the plant's emission potential under specified environmental conditions, also called as the emission factor, ES. In the most widely employed plant isoprenoid emission models, the algorithms developed by Guenther and colleagues (1991, 1993), instantaneous variation of the steady-state emission rate is described as the product of ES and light and temperature response functions. When these models are employed in the atmospheric chemistry modeling community, species-specific ES values and parameter values defining the instantaneous response curves are often taken as initially defined. In the current review, we argue that ES as a characteristic used in the models importantly depends on our understanding of which environmental factors affect isoprenoid emissions, and consequently need standardization during experimental ES determinations. In particular, there is now increasing consensus that in addition to variations in light and temperature, alterations in atmospheric and/or within-leaf CO2 concentrations may need to be included in the emission models. Furthermore, we demonstrate that for less volatile isoprenoids, mono- and sesquiterpenes, the emissions are often jointly controlled by the compound synthesis and volatility. Because of these combined biochemical and physico-chemical drivers, specification of ES as a constant value is incapable of describing instantaneous emissions within the sole assumptions of fluctuating light and temperature as used in the standard algorithms. The definition of ES also varies depending on the degree of aggregation of ES values in different parameterization schemes (leaf- vs. canopy- or region-scale, species vs. plant functional type levels) and various aggregated ES schemes are not compatible for different integration models. The summarized information collectively emphasizes the need to update model algorithms by including

  13. Metabolic engineering for isoprenoid-based biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Phulara, S C

    2015-09-01

    Sustainable economic and industrial growth is the need of the hour and it requires renewable energy resources having better performance and compatibility with existing fuel infrastructure from biological routes. Isoprenoids (C ≥ 5) can be a potential alternative due to their diverse nature and physiochemical properties similar to that of petroleum based fuels. In the past decade, extensive research has been done to utilize metabolic engineering strategies in micro-organisms primarily, (i) to overcome the limitations associated with their natural and non-natural production and (ii) to develop commercially competent microbial strain for isoprenoid-based biofuel production. This review briefly describes the engineered isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways in well-characterized microbial systems for the production of several isoprenoid-based biofuels and fuel precursors.

  14. Visualization of plastids in pollen grains: involvement of FtsZ1 in pollen plastid division.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lay Yin; Nagata, Noriko; Matsushima, Ryo; Chen, Yuling; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Sakamoto, Wataru

    2009-04-01

    Visualizing organelles in living cells is a powerful method to analyze their intrinsic mechanisms. Easy observation of chlorophyll facilitates the study of the underlying mechanisms in chloroplasts, but not in other plastid types. Here, we constructed a transgenic plant enabling visualization of plastids in pollen grains. Combination of a plastid-targeted fluorescent protein with a pollen-specific promoter allowed us to observe the precise number, size and morphology of plastids in pollen grains of the wild type and the ftsZ1 mutant, whose responsible gene plays a central role in chloroplast division. The transgenic material presented in this work is useful for studying the division mechanism of pollen plastids.

  15. Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids

    PubMed Central

    Jarchow-Choy, Sarah K; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T

    2014-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C5-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). In order to study the enzyme transformations leading to the extensive structural diversity found within this class of compounds there must be access to the substrates. Sometimes, intermediates within a biological pathway can be isolated and used directly to study enzyme/pathway function. However, the primary route to most of the isoprenoid intermediates is through chemical catalysis. As such, this review provides the first exhaustive examination of synthetic routes to isoprenoid and isoprenoid precursors with particular emphasis on the syntheses of intermediates found as part of the 2C-methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. In addition, representative syntheses are presented for the monoterpenes (C10), sesquiterpenes (C15), diterpenes (C20), triterpenes (C30) and tetraterpenes (C40). Finally, in some instances, the synthetic routes to substrate analogs found both within the MEP pathway and downstream isoprenoids are examined. PMID:25009443

  16. Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Inhibitors Targeting Bacterial Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Desai, Janish; Wang, Yang; Wang, Ke; Malwal, Satish R; Oldfield, Eric

    2016-10-06

    We synthesized potential inhibitors of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS), undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), or undecaprenyl diphosphate phosphatase (UPPP), and tested them in bacterial cell growth and enzyme inhibition assays. The most active compounds were found to be bisphosphonates with electron-withdrawing aryl-alkyl side chains which inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria (Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at ∼1-4 μg mL(-1) levels. They were found to be potent inhibitors of FPPS; cell growth was partially "rescued" by the addition of farnesol or overexpression of FPPS, and there was synergistic activity with known isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway inhibitors. Lipophilic hydroxyalkyl phosphonic acids inhibited UPPS and UPPP at micromolar levels; they were active (∼2-6 μg mL(-1) ) against Gram-positive but not Gram-negative organisms, and again exhibited synergistic activity with cell wall biosynthesis inhibitors, but only indifferent effects with other inhibitors. The results are of interest because they describe novel inhibitors of FPPS, UPPS, and UPPP with cell growth inhibitory activities as low as ∼1-2 μg mL(-1) .

  17. Chloroplast Biogenesis: Control of Plastid Development, Protein Import, Division and Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Wataru; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Jarvis, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The chloroplast is a multi-copy cellular organelle that not only performs photosynthesis but also synthesizes amino acids, lipids and phytohormones. The plastid also responds to environmental stimuli such as gravitropism. Biogenesis of chloroplasts is initiated from proplastids in shoot meristems, and involves a series of important events. In the last decade, considerable progress has been made towards understanding various aspects of chloroplast biogenesis at the molecular level, via studies in model systems such as Arabidopsis. This review focuses on two important aspects of chloroplast biogenesis, synthesis/assembly and division/transmission. Chloroplasts originated through endosymbiosis from an ancestor of extant cyanobacteria, and thus contain their own genomes. DNA in chloroplasts is organized into complexes with proteins, and these are called nucleoids. The synthesis of chloroplast proteins is regulated at various steps. However, a majority of proteins are synthesized in the cytosol, and their proper import into chloroplast compartments is a prerequisite for chloroplast development. Fundamental aspects of plastid gene expression/regulation and chloroplast protein transport are described, together with recent proteome analyses of the organelle. Chloroplasts are not de novo synthesized, but instead are propagated from pre-existing plastids. In addition, plastids are transmitted from generation to generation with a unique mode of inheritance. Our current knowledge on the division machinery and the inheritance of plastids is described. PMID:22303235

  18. A Chemical Rescue Screen Identifies a Plasmodium falciparum Apicoplast Inhibitor Targeting MEP Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H.

    2014-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the “Malaria Box” library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  19. Involvement of de Novo Protein Synthesis, Protein Kinase, Extracellular Ca2+, and Lipoxygenase in Arachidonic Acid Induction of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase Genes and Isoprenoid Accumulation in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed Central

    Choi, D.; Bostock, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    A series of inhibitors were tested to determine the participation of de novo protein synthesis, protein kinase activity, extracellular Ca2+, and lipoxygenase activity in arachidonic acid elicitation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) gene expression and sesquiterpene phytoalexin biosynthesis in potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv Kennebec). Gene-specific probes were used to discriminate effects on the expression of two HMGR genes (hmg1 and hmg2) that respond differentially in tuber tissue following wounding or elicitor treatment. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide completely blocked arachidonate-induced hypersensitive necrosis and browning, including HMGR gene induction and phytoalexin accumulation. This suggests that proteins necessary for coupling arachidonic acid reception to HMGR mRNA accumulation are either rapidly turned over or not present constitutively and are induced following elicitor treatment. Staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinases, and ethyleneglycol-bis([beta]-aminoethyl ether)-N,N[prime]-tetraacetic acid, a Ca2+ chelator, inhibited arachidonate-induction of hmg2 gene expression and phytoalexin accumulation but did not inhibit the wound-induced expression of hmg1. However, staurosporin inhibited arachidonate's suppression of hmg1 gene expression. Eicosatetraynoic acid, a lipoxygenase inhibitor that suppresses elicitor-induced phytoalexin accumulation, also inhibited arachidonate's suppression of hmg1 and induction of hmg2. The results indicate that arachidonate's suppression of hmg1 and activation of hmg2 depend on a common intermediate or set of intermediates whose generation is sensitive to the inhibitors tested. PMID:12232162

  20. Negative Feedbacks by Isoprenoids on a Mevalonate Kinase Expressed in the Corpora Allata of Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Noriega, Fernando G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Juvenile hormones (JH) regulate development and reproductive maturation in insects. JHs are synthesized through the mevalonate pathway (MVAP), an ancient metabolic pathway present in the three domains of life. Mevalonate kinase (MVK) is a key enzyme in the MVAP. MVK catalyzes the synthesis of phosphomevalonate (PM) by transferring the γ-phosphoryl group from ATP to the C5 hydroxyl oxygen of mevalonic acid (MA). Despite the importance of MVKs, these enzymes have been poorly characterized in insects. Results We functionally characterized an Aedes aegypti MVK (AaMVK) expressed in the corpora allata (CA) of the mosquito. AaMVK displayed its activity in the presence of metal cofactors. Different nucleotides were used by AaMVK as phosphoryl donors. In the presence of Mg2+, the enzyme has higher affinity for MA than ATP. The activity of AaMVK was regulated by feedback inhibition from long-chain isoprenoids, such as geranyl diphosphate (GPP) and farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Conclusions AaMVK exhibited efficient inhibition by GPP and FPP (Ki less than 1 μM), and none by isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethyl allyl pyrophosphate (DPPM). These results suggest that GPP and FPP might act as physiological inhibitors in the synthesis of isoprenoids in the CA of mosquitoes. Changing MVK activity can alter the flux of precursors and therefore regulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis. PMID:26566274

  1. The gene for the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) small subunit relocated to the plastid genome of tobacco directs the synthesis of small subunits that assemble into Rubisco.

    PubMed

    Whitney, S M; Andrews, T J

    2001-01-01

    To assess the extent to which a nuclear gene for a chloroplast protein retained the ability to be expressed in its presumed preendosymbiotic location, we relocated the RbcS gene for the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) to the tobacco plastid genome. Plastid RbcS transgenes, both with and without the transit presequence, were equipped with 3' hepta-histidine-encoding sequences and psbA promoter and terminator elements. Both transgenes were transcribed abundantly, and their products were translated into small subunit polypeptides that folded correctly and assembled into the Rubisco hexadecamer. When present, either the transit presequence was not translated or the transit peptide was cleaved completely. After assembly into Rubisco, transplastomic small subunits were relatively stable. The hepta-histidine sequence fused to the C terminus of a single small subunit was sufficient for isolation of the whole Rubisco hexadecamer by Ni(2)+ chelation. Small subunits produced by the plastid transgenes were not abundant, never exceeding approximately 1% of the total small subunits, and they differed from cytoplasmically synthesized small subunits in their N-terminal modifications. The scarcity of transplastomic small subunits might be caused by inefficient translation or assembly.

  2. Reticulate leaves and stunted roots are independent phenotypes pointing at opposite roles of the phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate translocator defective in cue1 in the plastids of both organs

    PubMed Central

    Staehr, Pia; Löttgert, Tanja; Christmann, Alexander; Krueger, Stephan; Rosar, Christian; Rolčík, Jakub; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; Bell, Kirsten; Weber, Andreas P. M.; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) serves not only as a high energy carbon compound in glycolysis, but it acts also as precursor for plastidial anabolic sequences like the shikimate pathway, which produces aromatic amino acids (AAA) and subsequently secondary plant products. After conversion to pyruvate, PEP can also enter de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, the synthesis of branched-chain amino acids, and the non-mevalonate way of isoprenoid production. As PEP cannot be generated by glycolysis in chloroplasts and a variety of non-green plastids, it has to be imported from the cytosol by a phosphate translocator (PT) specific for PEP (PPT). A loss of function of PPT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the chlorophyll a/b binding protein underexpressed1 (cue1) mutant, which is characterized by reticulate leaves and stunted roots. Here we dissect the shoot- and root phenotypes, and also address the question whether or not long distance signaling by metabolites is involved in the perturbed mesophyll development of cue1. Reverse grafting experiments showed that the shoot- and root phenotypes develop independently from each other, ruling out long distance metabolite signaling. The leaf phenotype could be transiently modified even in mature leaves, e.g. by an inducible PPT1RNAi approach or by feeding AAA, the cytokinin trans-zeatin (tZ), or the putative signaling molecule dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol glucoside (DCG). Hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid, gibberellic acid, ethylene, methyl jasmonate, and salicylic acid did not rescue the cue1 leaf phenotype. The low cell density1 (lcd1) mutant shares the reticulate leaf-, but not the stunted root phenotype with cue1. It could neither be rescued by AAA nor by tZ. In contrast, tZ and AAA further inhibited root growth both in cue1 and wild-type plants. Based on our results, we propose a model that PPT1 acts as a net importer of PEP into chloroplast, but as an overflow valve and hence exporter in root plastids. PMID:24782872

  3. Strategies for complete plastid genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Twyford, Alex D; Ness, Rob W

    2016-10-28

    Plastid sequencing is an essential tool in the study of plant evolution. This high-copy organelle is one of the most technically accessible regions of the genome, and its sequence conservation makes it a valuable region for comparative genome evolution, phylogenetic analysis and population studies. Here, we discuss recent innovations and approaches for de novo plastid assembly that harness genomic tools. We focus on technical developments including low-cost sequence library preparation approaches for genome skimming, enrichment via hybrid baits and methylation-sensitive capture, sequence platforms with higher read outputs and longer read lengths, and automated tools for assembly. These developments allow for a much more streamlined assembly than via conventional short-range PCR. Although newer methods make complete plastid sequencing possible for any land plant or green alga, there are still challenges for producing finished plastomes particularly from herbarium material or from structurally divergent plastids such as those of parasitic plants.

  4. Spectinomycin resistance mutations in the rrn16 gene are new plastid markers in Medicago sativa.

    PubMed

    Dudas, Brigitta; Jenes, Barnabas; Kiss, Gyorgy Botond; Maliga, Pal

    2012-11-01

    We report here the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in cultured cells of Medicago sativa line RegenSY-T2. Spectinomycin induces bleaching of cultured alfalfa cells due to inhibition of protein synthesis on the prokaryotic type 70S plastid ribosomes. Spontaneous mutants resistant to spectinomycin bleaching were identified by their ability to form green shoots on plant regeneration medium containing selective spectinomycin concentrations in the range of 25-50 mg/l. Sequencing of the plastid rrn16 gene revealed that spectinomycin resistance is due to mutations in a conserved stem structure of the 16S rRNA. Resistant plants transferred to the greenhouse developed normally and produced spectinomycin-resistant seed progeny. In light of their absence in soybean, a related leguminous plant, the isolation of spectinomycin-resistant mutants in M. sativa was unexpected. The new mutations are useful for the study of plastid inheritance, as demonstrated by detection of predominantly paternal plastid inheritance in the RegenSY-T2 × Szapko57 cross, and can be used as selective markers in plastid transformation vectors to obtain cisgenic plants.

  5. A Stilbenoid-Specific Prenyltransferase Utilizes Dimethylallyl Pyrophosphate from the Plastidic Terpenoid Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Prenylated stilbenoids synthesized in some legumes exhibit plant pathogen defense properties and pharmacological activities with potential benefits to human health. Despite their importance, the biosynthetic pathways of these compounds remain to be elucidated. Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) hairy root cultures produce a diverse array of prenylated stilbenoids upon treatment with elicitors. Using metabolic inhibitors of the plastidic and cytosolic isoprenoid biosynthetic pathways, we demonstrated that the prenyl moiety on the prenylated stilbenoids derives from a plastidic pathway. We further characterized, to our knowledge for the first time, a membrane-bound stilbenoid-specific prenyltransferase activity from the microsomal fraction of peanut hairy roots. This microsomal fraction-derived resveratrol 4-dimethylallyl transferase utilizes 3,3-dimethylallyl pyrophosphate as a prenyl donor and prenylates resveratrol to form arachidin-2. It also prenylates pinosylvin to chiricanine A and piceatannol to arachidin-5, a prenylated stilbenoid identified, to our knowledge, for the first time in this study. This prenyltransferase exhibits strict substrate specificity for stilbenoids and does not prenylate flavanone, flavone, or isoflavone backbones, even though it shares several common features with flavonoid-specific prenyltransferases. PMID:27356974

  6. Rapid analysis of protein farnesyltransferase substrate specificity using peptide libraries and isoprenoid diphosphate analogues.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Dozier, Jonathan K; Beese, Lorena S; Distefano, Mark D

    2014-08-15

    Protein farnesytransferase (PFTase) catalyzes the farnesylation of proteins with a carboxy-terminal tetrapeptide sequence denoted as a Ca1a2X box. To explore the specificity of this enzyme, an important therapeutic target, solid-phase peptide synthesis in concert with a peptide inversion strategy was used to prepare two libraries, each containing 380 peptides. The libraries were screened using an alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogue followed by click chemistry with biotin azide and subsequent visualization with streptavidin-AP. Screening of the CVa2X and CCa2X libraries with Rattus norvegicus PFTase revealed reaction by many known recognition sequences as well as numerous unknown ones. Some of the latter occur in the genomes of bacteria and viruses and may be important for pathogenesis, suggesting new targets for therapeutic intervention. Screening of the CVa2X library with alkyne-functionalized isoprenoid substrates showed that those prepared from C10 or C15 precursors gave similar results, whereas the analogue synthesized from a C5 unit gave a different pattern of reactivity. Lastly, the substrate specificities of PFTases from three organisms (R. norvegicus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans) were compared using CVa2X libraries. R. norvegicus PFTase was found to share more peptide substrates with S. cerevisiae PFTase than with C. albicans PFTase. In general, this method is a highly efficient strategy for rapidly probing the specificity of this important enzyme.

  7. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    PubMed

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal.

  8. Plastids: The Green Frontiers for Vaccine Production

    PubMed Central

    Waheed, Mohammad T.; Ismail, Hammad; Gottschamel, Johanna; Mirza, Bushra; Lössl, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases pose an increasing risk to health, especially in developing countries. Vaccines are available to either cure or prevent many of these diseases. However, there are certain limitations related to these vaccines, mainly the costs, which make these vaccines mostly unaffordable for people in resource poor countries. These costs are mainly related to production and purification of the products manufactured from fermenter-based systems. Plastid biotechnology has become an attractive platform to produce biopharmaceuticals in large amounts and cost-effectively. This is mainly due to high copy number of plastids DNA in mature chloroplasts, a characteristic particularly important for vaccine production in large amounts. An additional advantage lies in the maternal inheritance of plastids in most plant species, which addresses the regulatory concerns related to transgenic plants. These and many other aspects of plastids will be discussed in the present review, especially those that particularly make these green biofactories an attractive platform for vaccine production. A summary of recent vaccine antigens against different human diseases expressed in plastids will also be presented. PMID:26635832

  9. Plastid ndh genes in plant evolution.

    PubMed

    Martín, Mercedes; Sabater, Bartolomé

    2010-08-01

    The plastid ndh genes encode components of the thylakoid Ndh complex which purportedly acts as an electron feeding valve to adjust the redox level of the cyclic photosynthetic electron transporters. During the process of evolution from endosymbiosis to modern chloroplast, most cyanobacterial genes were lost or transferred to nucleus. Eleven ndh genes are among the 150-200 genes remaining in higher plant chloroplast DNA, out of some 3000 genes in the original prokaryotic Cyanobacteria in which homologues to ndh genes encode components of the respiratory Complex I and probably other complexes. The ndh genes are absent in all sequenced plastid DNAs of algae except for the Charophyceae and some Prasinophyceae. With the possible exclusion of some Conifers and Gnetales, the plastid DNA of all photosynthetic land plants contains the ndh genes, whereas they are absent in epiphytic plants that have also lost genes for the photosynthetic machinery. Therefore, the functional role of the ndh genes seems closely related to the land adaptation of photosynthesis. Transcripts of several plastid genes require C to U editing. The ndh genes concentrate about 50% of the editing sites of angiosperm plastid transcripts. Editing sites may be remnants from an ancestor in which a number of T to C inactivating mutations took place in the ndh genes which, during evolution, are being corrected back to T. The comparison of homologous editing sites in the mRNAs of angiosperm ndh genes provides a tool to investigate selective and permissive environmental conditions of past evolutionary events.

  10. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in higher plants and in Escherichia coli: on the branching in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway and the independent biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hoeffler, Jean-François; Hemmerlin, Andréa; Grosdemange-Billiard, Catherine; Bach, Thomas J; Rohmer, Michel

    2002-01-01

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, the mevalonic-acid (MVA)-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is characterized by two branches leading separately to isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The signature of this branching is the retention of deuterium in DMAPP and the deuterium loss in IPP after incorporation of 1-[4-(2)H]deoxy-d-xylulose ([4-(2)H]DX). Feeding tobacco BY-2 cell-suspension cultures with [4-(2)H]DX resulted in deuterium retention in the isoprene units derived from DMAPP, as well as from IPP in the plastidial isoprenoids, phytoene and plastoquinone, synthesized via the MEP pathway. This labelling pattern represents direct evidence for the presence of the DMAPP branch of the MEP pathway in a higher plant, and shows that IPP can be synthesized from DMAPP in plant plastids, most probably via a plastidial IPP isomerase. PMID:12010124

  11. Regulatory Shifts in Plastid Transcription Play a Key Role in Morphological Conversions of Plastids during Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Liebers, Monique; Grübler, Björn; Chevalier, Fabien; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Merendino, Livia; Blanvillain, Robert; Pfannschmidt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Plastids display a high morphological and functional diversity. Starting from an undifferentiated small proplastid, these plant cell organelles can develop into four major forms: etioplasts in the dark, chloroplasts in green tissues, chromoplasts in colored flowers and fruits and amyloplasts in roots. The various forms are interconvertible into each other depending on tissue context and respective environmental condition. Research of the last two decades uncovered that each plastid type contains its own specific proteome that can be highly different from that of the other types. Composition of these proteomes largely defines the enzymatic functionality of the respective plastid. The vast majority of plastid proteins is encoded in the nucleus and must be imported from the cytosol. However, a subset of proteins of the photosynthetic and gene expression machineries are encoded on the plastid genome and are transcribed by a complex transcriptional apparatus consisting of phage-type nuclear-encoded RNA polymerases and a bacterial-type plastid-encoded RNA polymerase. Both types recognize specific sets of promoters and transcribe partly over-lapping as well as specific sets of genes. Here we summarize the current knowledge about the sequential activity of these plastid RNA polymerases and their relative activities in different types of plastids. Based on published plastid gene expression profiles we hypothesize that each conversion from one plastid type into another is either accompanied or even preceded by significant changes in plastid transcription suggesting that these changes represent important determinants of plastid morphology and protein composition and, hence, the plastid type. PMID:28154576

  12. Plastid transformation in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Singh, A K; Verma, S S; Bansal, K C

    2010-02-01

    We have developed a method for plastid transformation in eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), a solanaceous plant species. Plastid transformation in eggplant was achieved by bombardment of green stem segments with pPRV111A plastid expression vector carrying the aadA gene encoding aminoglycoside 3''-adenylyltransferase. Biolistic delivery of the pPRV111A plasmid yielded transplastomic plants at a frequency of two per 21 bombarded plates containing 25 stem explants each. Integration of the aadA gene in the plastome was verified by PCR analysis and also by Southern blotting using 16S rDNA (targeting sequence) and the aadA gene as a probe. Transplastomic expression of the aadA gene was verified by RT-PCR. The development of transplastomic technology in eggplant may open up exciting possibilities for novel gene introduction and expression in the engineered plastome for agronomic or pharmaceutical traits.

  13. The plastid genomes of flowering plants.

    PubMed

    Ruhlman, Tracey A; Jansen, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) has proved a valuable source of data for evaluating evolutionary relationships among angiosperms. Through basic and applied approaches, plastid transformation technology offers the potential to understand and improve plant productivity, providing food, fiber, energy and medicines to meet the needs of a burgeoning global population. The growing genomic resources available to both phylogenetic and biotechnological investigations are allowing novel insights and expanding the scope of plastome research to encompass new species. In this chapter we present an overview of some of the seminal and contemporary research that has contributed to our current understanding of plastome evolution and attempt to highlight the relationship between evolutionary mechanisms and tools of plastid genetic engineering.

  14. Gregarina niphandrodes may lack both a plastid genome and organelle.

    PubMed

    Toso, Marc A; Omoto, Charlotte K

    2007-01-01

    Gregarines are early diverging apicomplexans that appear to be closely related to Cryptosporidium. Most apicomplexans, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, and Eimeria, possess both plastids and corresponding plastid genomes. Cryptosporidium lacks both the organelle and the genome. To investigate the evolutionary history of plastids in the Apicomplexa, we tried to determine whether gregarines possess a plastid and/or its genome. We used PCR and dot-blot hybridization to determine whether the gregarine Gregarina niphandrodes possesses a plastid genome. We used an inhibitor of plastid function for any reduction in gregarine infection, and transmission electron microscopy to search for plastid ultrastructure. Despite an extensive search, an organelle of the appropriate ultrastructure in transmission electron microscopy, was not observed. Triclosan, an inhibitor of the plastid-specific enoyl-acyl carrier reductase enzyme, did not reduce host infection by G. niphandrodes. Plastid-specific primers produced amplicons with the DNA of Babesia equi, Plasmodium falciparum, and Toxoplasma gondii as templates, but not with G. niphandrodes DNA. Plastid-specific DNA probes, which hybridized to Babesia equi, failed to hybridize to G. niphandrodes DNA. This evidence indicates that G. niphandrodes is not likely to possess either a plastid organelle or its genome. This raises the possibility that the plastid was lost in the Apicomplexan following the divergence of gregarines and Cryptosporidium.

  15. Microbial Production of Isoprenoids Enabled by Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Immethun, Cheryl M.; Hoynes-O’Connor, Allison G.; Balassy, Andrea; Moon, Tae Seok

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms transform inexpensive carbon sources into highly functionalized compounds without toxic by-product generation or significant energy consumption. By redesigning the natural biosynthetic pathways in an industrially suited host, microbial cell factories can produce complex compounds for a variety of industries. Isoprenoids include many medically important compounds such as antioxidants and anticancer and antimalarial drugs, all of which have been produced microbially. While a biosynthetic pathway could be simply transferred to the production host, the titers would become economically feasible when it is rationally designed, built, and optimized through synthetic biology tools. These tools have been implemented by a number of research groups, with new tools pledging further improvements in yields and expansion to new medically relevant compounds. This review focuses on the microbial production of isoprenoids for the health industry and the advancements though synthetic biology. PMID:23577007

  16. The Plastid Outer Envelope – A Highly Dynamic Interface between Plastid and Cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Breuers, Frederique K. H.; Bräutigam, Andrea; Weber, Andreas P. M.

    2011-01-01

    Plastids are the defining organelles of all photosynthetic eukaryotes. They are the site of photosynthesis and of a large number of other essential metabolic pathways, such as fatty acid and amino acid biosyntheses, sulfur and nitrogen assimilation, and aromatic and terpenoid compound production, to mention only a few examples. The metabolism of plastids is heavily intertwined and connected with that of the surrounding cytosol, thus causing massive traffic of metabolic precursors, intermediates, and products. Two layers of biological membranes that are called the inner (IE) and the outer (OE) plastid envelope membranes bound the plastids of Archaeplastida. While the IE is generally accepted as the osmo-regulatory barrier between cytosol and stroma, the OE was considered to represent an unspecific molecular sieve, permeable for molecules of up to 10 kDa. However, after the discovery of small substrate specific pores in the OE, this view has come under scrutiny. In addition to controlling metabolic fluxes between plastid and cytosol, the OE is also crucial for protein import into the chloroplast. It contains the receptors and translocation channel of the TOC complex that is required for the canonical post-translational import of nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted proteins. Further, the OE is a metabolically active compartment of the chloroplast, being involved in, e.g., fatty acid metabolism and membrane lipid production. Also, recent findings hint on the OE as a defense platform against several biotic and abiotic stress conditions, such as cold acclimation, freezing tolerance, and phosphate deprivation. Moreover, dynamic non-covalent interactions between the OE and the endomembrane system are thought to play important roles in lipid and non-canonical protein trafficking between plastid and endoplasmic reticulum. While proteomics and bioinformatics has provided us with comprehensive but still incomplete information on proteins localized in the plastid IE, the stroma

  17. From chloroplasts to "cryptic" plastids: evolution of plastid genomes in parasitic plants.

    PubMed

    Krause, Kirsten

    2008-09-01

    To date, more than 130 plastid genomes (plastomes) have been completely sequenced. Of those, 12 are strongly reduced plastid genomes from heterotrophic plants or plant-related species that exhibit a parasitic lifestyle. Half of these species are land plants while the other half consists of unicellular species that have evolved from photosynthetic algae. Due to their specialized lifestyle, parasitic lineages experienced a loss of evolutionary pressure on the plastid genome and, in particular, on the photosynthesis-related genes. This made them tolerant for the accumulation of detrimental mutations and deletions in plastid genes. That parasitic plants are naturally occurring plastome mutants makes them a rich source of information concerning plastome evolution and the mechanisms that are involved. This review reports on the progress made in recent years with parasitic plant plastomes and attempts to summarize what we can learn from analysing the genomes of functionally reduced, or cryptic, plastids. Particularly, the loss of genes for a plastid-encoded RNA polymerase as well as an intron maturase and the retention of the gene for the large subunit of the Calvin cycle enzyme Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) in selected species will be discussed.

  18. The pattern and control of isoprenoid quinone and tocopherol metabolism in the germinating grain of wheat (Triticum vulgare)

    PubMed Central

    Hall, G. S.; Laidman, D. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. The syntheses of ubiquinone-9 and plastoquinone-9 were used as parameters respectively of mitochondrial and proplastid development in the germinating wheat grain. 2. The changes in the amounts of the tocopherols were also studied and the possible biological significance of these changes is discussed. During germination, the dimethyl tocopherols of the resting grain are probably not utilized for the synthesis of α-tocopherol. 3. It was demonstrated that ubiquinone synthesis, and hence probably mitochondrial development, in the aleurone cells during germination, is independent of control by gibberellic acid from the embryo. 4. The influence of light on the syntheses of the isoprenoid quinones in the etiolated wheat shoot was investigated. In particular, illumination did not stimulate the synthesis of either α-tocopherol or α-tocopherolquinone. PMID:5667257

  19. Plastid Proteomic Analysis in Tomato Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takanori; Dohra, Hideo; Ito, Yumihiko; Kiriiwa, Yoshikazu; Hayashi, Marina; Kamiya, Shiori; Kato, Masaya; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoichiro; Kobayashi, Megumi; Nagata, Noriko; Motohashi, Reiko

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the mechanism of plastid differentiation from chloroplast to chromoplast, we examined proteome and plastid changes over four distinct developmental stages of ‘Micro-Tom’ fruit. Additionally, to discover more about the relationship between fruit color and plastid differentiation, we also analyzed and compared ‘Micro-Tom’ results with those from two other varieties, ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’. We confirmed that proteins related to photosynthesis remain through the orange maturity stage of ‘Micro-Tom’, and also learned that thylakoids no longer exist at this stage. These results suggest that at a minimum there are changes in plastid morphology occurring before all related proteins change. We also compared ‘Micro-Tom’ fruits with ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’ using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. We found a decrease of CHRC (plastid-lipid-associated protein) and HrBP1 (harpin binding protein-1) in the ‘Black’ and ‘White Beauty’ varieties. CHRC is involved in carotenoid accumulation and stabilization. HrBP1 in Arabidopsis has a sequence similar to proteins in the PAP/fibrillin family. These proteins have characteristics and functions similar to lipocalin, an example of which is the transport of hydrophobic molecules. We detected spots of TIL (temperature-induced lipocalin) in 2D-PAGE results, however the number of spots and their isoelectric points differed between ‘Micro-Tom’ and ‘Black’/‘White Beauty’. Lipocalin has various functions including those related to environmental stress response, apoptosis induction, membrane formation and fixation, regulation of immune response, cell growth, and metabolism adjustment. Lipocalin related proteins such as TIL and HrBP1 could be related to the accumulation of carotenoids, fruit color and the differentiation of chromoplast. PMID:26371478

  20. LC-MS method for screening unknown microbial carotenoids and isoprenoid quinones.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Philipp; Geyer, Roland; Surmann, Peter; Fuhrmann, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    The structure of secondary metabolites from microorganisms provides a useful tool for microbial characterization and chemotaxonomic classification. Microbial isoprenoid quinones, for example, are well described and used to distinguish among photosynthetic microorganism groups. In addition, isoprenoid quinones can also be found, together with carotenoids, in non-photosynthetic microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to develop a LC-MS/MS method which can analyze and identify these microbial isoprenoids. Positive atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) together with collisionally induced dissociation was applied for generation of informative fragment spectra by mass spectrometry. Enhanced product ion (EPI) scan in a linear ion trap with information dependent data acquisition (IDA) enabled generation of MS fragment data even from minor isoprenoids. The developed liquid chromatography method enabled separation of isoprenoid patterns from their ester derivatives. Discovery and structural characterization of isoprenoid quinones and carotenoids were carried out by comparing characteristics of fragment spectra from unknown compounds with fragment spectra of a range of isoprenoid standard compounds and using published data. Throughout the study 17 microorganisms (e.g., Acremonium butyri, Arthrobacter spp., Brevibacterium linens, Bullera variabilis, Exophiala dermatitidis, Lecythophora hoffmannii, Panthoea agglomerans, Rhodotorula spp., Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous) were screened and probable structures of isoprenoid quinones and carotenoids were suggested. The method lays some foundations on the analysis of yet unknown isoprenoids in microorganisms by using LCMS/MS techniques.

  1. Knock-out of the plastid ribosomal protein L11 in Arabidopsis: effects on mRNA translation and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pesaresi, P; Varotto, C; Meurer, J; Jahns, P; Salamini, F; Leister, D

    2001-08-01

    The prpl11-1 mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana was identified among a collection of T-DNA tagged lines on the basis of a decrease in the effective quantum yield of photosystem II. The mutation responsible was localized to Prpl11, a single-copy nuclear gene that encodes PRPL11, a component of the large subunit of the plastid ribosome. The amino acid sequence of Arabidopsis PRPL11 is very similar to those of L11 proteins from spinach and prokaryotes. In the prpl11-1 mutant, photosensitivity and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters are significantly altered owing to changes in the levels of thylakoid protein complexes and stromal proteins. The abundance of most plastome transcripts examined, such as those of genes coding for the photosystem II core complex and RbcL, is not decreased. Plastid ribosomal RNA accumulates in wild-type amounts, and the assembly of plastid polysomes on the transcripts of the rbcL, psbA and psbE genes remains mainly unchanged in mutant plants, indicating that lack of PRPL11 affects neither the abundance of plastid ribosomes nor their assembly into polysomes. However, in vivo translation assays demonstrate that the rate of translation of the large subunit of Rubisco (RbcL) is significantly reduced in prpl11-1 plastids. Our data suggest a major role for PRPL11 in plastid ribosome activity per se, consistent with its location near the GTPase-binding centre of the chloroplast 50S ribosomal subunit. Additional effects of the mutation, including the pale green colour of the leaves and a drastic reduction in growth rate under greenhouse conditions, are compatible with reduced levels of protein synthesis in plastids.

  2. Plastid Division: Evolution, Mechanism and Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Jodi; Møller, Simon Geir

    2007-01-01

    Background The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of pre-existing chloroplasts. Chloroplasts originated as bacterial endosymbionts; however, the majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and the eukaryotic host has added several new components. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, and the Min system has retained MinE and MinD but lost MinC, acquiring at least one new component ARC3. Further, the mechanism has evolved to include two members of the dynamin protein family, ARC5 and FZL, and plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most probably added by the eukaryotic host. Scope Deciphering how the division of plastids is coordinated and controlled by nuclear-encoded factors is key to our understanding of this important biological process. Through a number of molecular-genetic and biochemical approaches, it is evident that FtsZ initiates plastid division where the coordinated action of MinD and MinE ensures correct FtsZ (Z)-ring placement. Although the classical FtsZ antagonist MinC does not exist in plants, ARC3 may fulfil this role. Together with other prokaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC6 and GC1 and key eukaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC5 and FZL, these proteins make up a sophisticated division machinery. The regulation of plastid division in a cellular context is largely unknown; however, recent microarray data shed light on this. Here the current understanding of the mechanism of chloroplast division in higher plants is reviewed with an emphasis on how recent findings are beginning to shape our understanding of the function and evolution of the components. Conclusions Extrapolation from the mechanism of bacterial cell division provides valuable clues as to how the chloroplast division process is achieved in plant cells. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the highly regulated mechanism of plastid division within the host cell has led to the evolution of features unique to the

  3. Structural analysis, plastid localization, and expression of the biotin carboxylase subunit of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase from tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Shorrosh, B S; Roesler, K R; Shintani, D; van de Loo, F J; Ohlrogge, J B

    1995-01-01

    Acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase, EC 6.4.1.2) catalyzes the synthesis of malonyl-coenzyme A, which is utilized in the plastid for de novo fatty acid synthesis and outside the plastid for a variety of reactions, including the synthesis of very long chain fatty acids and flavonoids. Recent evidence for both multifunctional and multisubunit ACCase isozymes in dicot plants has been obtained. We describe here the isolation of a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv bright yellow 2 [NT1]) cDNA clone (E3) that encodes a 58.4-kD protein that shares 80% sequence similarity and 65% identity with the Anabaena biotin carboxylase subunit of ACCase. Similar to other biotin carboxylase subunits of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the E3-encoded protein contains a putative ATP-binding motif but lacks a biotin-binding site (methionine-lysine-methionine or methionine-lysine-leucine). The deduced protein sequence contains a putative transit peptide whose function was confirmed by its ability to direct in vitro chloroplast uptake. The subcellular localization of this biotin carboxylase has also been confirmed to be plastidial by western blot analysis of pea (Pisum sativum), alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), and castor (Ricinus communis L.) plastid preparations. Northern blot analysis indicates that the plastid biotin carboxylase transcripts are expressed at severalfold higher levels in castor seeds than in leaves. PMID:7610168

  4. Biosynthesis of digalactosyldiacylglycerol in plastids from 16:3 and 18:3 plants

    SciTech Connect

    Heemskerk, J.W.M.; Heinz, E. ); Storz, T.; Schmidt, R.R. )

    1990-08-01

    Intact chloroplasts isolated from leaves of eight species of 16:3 and 18:3 plants and chromoplasts isolated from Narcissus pseudonarcissus L. flowers synthesize galactose-labeled mono-, di-, and trigalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG, DGDG, and TGDG) when incubated with UDP-(6-{sup 3}H)galactose. In all plastids, galactolipid synthesis, and especially synthesis of DGDG and TGDG, is reduced by treatment of the organelles with the nonpenetrating protease thermolysin. Envelope membranes isolated from thermolysin-treated chloroplasts of Spinacia oleracea L. (16:3 plant) and Pisum sativum L. (18:3 plant) or membranes isolated from thermolysin-treated chromoplasts are strongly reduced in galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase activity, but not with regard to UDP-Gal:diacylglycerol galactosyltransferase. For the intact plastids, this indicates that thermolysin treatment specifically blocks DGDG (and TGDG) synthesis, whereas MGDG synthesis is not affected. Neither in chloroplast nor in chromoplast membranes is DGDG synthesis stimulated by UDP-Gal. DGDG synthesis in S. oleracea chloroplasts is not stimulated by nucleoside 5{prime}-diphospho digalactosides. Therefore, galactolipid:galactolipid galactosyltransferase is so far the only detectable enzyme synthesizing DGDG.

  5. Hartmut Lichtenthaler: an authority on chloroplast structure and isoprenoid biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Govindjee

    2016-05-01

    We pay tribute to Hartmut Lichtenthaler for making important contributions to the field of photosynthesis research. He was recently recognized for ground-breaking discoveries in chloroplast structure and isoprenoid biochemistry by the Rebeiz Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR; http://vlpbp.org/ ), receiving a 2014 Lifetime Achievement Award for Photosynthesis. The ceremony, held in Champaign, Illinois, was attended by many prominent researchers in the photosynthesis field. We provide below a brief note on his education, and then describe some of the areas in which Hartmut Lichtenthaler has been a pioneer.

  6. Plastid transformation in potato: Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Valkov, Vladimir T; Gargano, Daniela; Scotti, Nunzia; Cardi, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid transformation has attractive advantages and potential applications in plant biotechnology, for long time it has been highly efficient only in tobacco. The lack of efficient selection and regeneration protocols and, for some species, the inefficient recombination using heterologous flanking regions in transformation vectors prevented the extension of the technology to major crops. However, the availability of this technology for species other than tobacco could offer new possibilities in plant breeding, such as resistance management or improvement of nutritional value, with no or limited environmental concerns. Herein we describe an efficient plastid transformation protocol for potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum). By optimizing the tissue culture system and using transformation vectors carrying homologous potato flanking sequences, we obtained up to one transplastomic shoot per bombardment. Such efficiency is comparable to that usually achieved in tobacco. The method described in this chapter can be used to regenerate potato transplastomic plants expressing recombinant proteins in chloroplasts as well as in amyloplasts.

  7. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 2: Isoprenoids. [Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    A series of isoprenoid compounds were isolated from a heat treated marine sediment (from Tanner Basin) which were not present in the original sediment. Among the compounds identified were: phytol, dihydrophytol, c-18-isoprenoid ketone, phytanic and pristanic acids, c-19 and c-20-monoolefines, and the alkanes pristane and phytane. The significance and possible routes leading to these compounds is discussed.

  8. Detection of non-sterol isoprenoids by HPLC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, Linda; van Cruchten, Arno G.; Denis, Simone W.; Amolins, Michael W.; Placzek, Andrew T.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Kulik, Willem; Waterham, Hans R.

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids constitute an important class of biomolecules that participate in many different cellular processes. Most available detection methods only allow the identification of one or two specific non-sterol isoprenoid intermediates following radioactive or fluorescent labeling. We here report a rapid, non-radioactive and sensitive procedure for the simultaneous detection and quantification of the 8 main non-sterol intermediates of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway by means of tandem mass spectrometry. Intermediates were analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring mode using a silica-based C18 HPLC column. For quantification, their stable-isotope-labeled analogues were used as internal standards. HepG2 cells were used to validate the method. Mevalonate, phosphomevalonate and the 6 subsequent isoprenoid-pyrophosphates were readily determined with detection limits ranging from 0.03 to 1.0 μmol/L. The intra- and interassay variations for HepG2 cell homogenates supplemented with isoprenoid intermediates were 3.6–10.9% and 4.4–11.9%, respectively. Under normal culturing conditions, isoprenoid intermediates in HepG2 cells were below detection limits. However, incubation of the cells with pamidronate, an inhibitor of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, resulted in increased levels of MVA, IPP/DMAPP and GPP. This method will be suitable to measure profiles of isoprenoid intermediates in cells with compromised isoprenoid biosynthesis, and to determine the specificity of potential inhibitors of the pathway. PMID:18782552

  9. The carotenogenesis pathway via the isoprenoid-beta-carotene interference approach in a new strain of Dunaliella salina isolated from Baja California Mexico.

    PubMed

    Paniagua-Michel, J; Capa-Robles, Willian; Olmos-Soto, Jorge; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique

    2009-01-01

    D. salina is one of the recognized natural sources to produce beta-carotene, and an useful model for studying the role of inhibitors and enhancers of carotenogenesis. However there is little information in D. salina regarding whether the isoprenoid substrate can be influenced by stress factors (carotenogenic) or selective inhibitors which in turn may further contribute to elucidate the early steps of carotenogenesis and biosynthesis of beta-carotene. In this study, Dunaliella salina (BC02) isolated from La Salina BC Mexico, was subjected to the method of isoprenoids-beta-carotene interference in order to promote the interruption or accumulation of the programmed biosynthesis of carotenoids. When Carotenogenic and non-carotenogenic cells of D. salina BC02 were grown under photoautotrophic growth conditions in the presence of 200 microM fosmidomycin, carotenogenesis and the synthesis of beta-carotene were interrupted after two days in cultured D. salina cells. This result is an indirect consequence of the inhibition of the synthesis of isoprenoids and activity of the recombinant DXR enzyme thereby preventing the conversion of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) to 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (MEP) and consequently interrupts the early steps of carotenogenesis in D. salina. The effect at the level of proteins and RNA was not evident. Mevinolin treated D. salina cells exhibited carotenogenesis and beta-carotene levels very similar to those of control cell cultures indicating that mevinolin not pursued any indirect action in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids and had no effect at the level of the HMG-CoA reductase, the key enzyme of the Ac/MVA pathway.

  10. The Carotenogenesis Pathway via the Isoprenoid-β-carotene Interference Approach in a New Strain of Dunaliella salina Isolated from Baja California Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua-Michel, J.; Capa-Robles, Willian; Olmos-Soto, Jorge; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique

    2009-01-01

    D. salina is one of the recognized natural sources to produce β-carotene, and an useful model for studying the role of inhibitors and enhancers of carotenogenesis. However there is little information in D. salina regarding whether the isoprenoid substrate can be influenced by stress factors (carotenogenic) or selective inhibitors which in turn may further contribute to elucidate the early steps of carotenogenesis and biosynthesis of β-carotene. In this study, Dunaliella salina (BC02) isolated from La Salina BC Mexico, was subjected to the method of isoprenoids-β-carotene interference in order to promote the interruption or accumulation of the programmed biosynthesis of carotenoids. When Carotenogenic and non-carotenogenic cells of D. salina BC02 were grown under photoautotrophic growth conditions in the presence of 200 µM fosmidomycin, carotenogenesis and the synthesis of β-carotene were interrupted after two days in cultured D. salina cells. This result is an indirect consequence of the inhibition of the synthesis of isoprenoids and activity of the recombinant DXR enzyme thereby preventing the conversion of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) to 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol (MEP) and consequently interrupts the early steps of carotenogenesis in D. salina. The effect at the level of proteins and RNA was not evident. Mevinolin treated D. salina cells exhibited carotenogenesis and β-carotene levels very similar to those of control cell cultures indicating that mevinolin not pursued any indirect action in the biosynthesis of isoprenoids and had no effect at the level of the HMG-CoA reductase, the key enzyme of the Ac/MVA pathway. PMID:19370170

  11. Targeting the isoprenoid pathway to abrogate progression of pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Alan J.; Shi, Lei; Glogauer, Michael; Neighbors, Jeffrey D.; Hohl, Raymond; Carter, A. Brent

    2015-01-01

    Fibrotic remodeling in lung injury is a major cause of morbidity. The mechanism that mediates the ongoing fibrosis is unclear, and there is no available treatment to abate the aberrant repair. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a critical role in inducing fibrosis by modulating extracellular matrix deposition. Specifically, mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis as inhibition of mitochondrial H2O2 attenuates the fibrotic response in mice. Prior studies indicate that the small GTP-binding protein, Rac1, directly mediates H2O2 generation in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Geranylgeranylation of the C-terminal cysteine residue (Cys189) is required for the for Rac1 activation and mitochondrial import. We hypothesized that impairment of geranylgeranylation would limit mitochondrial oxidative stress, and, thus, abrogate progression of pulmonary fibrosis. By targeting the isoprenoid pathway with a novel agent, digeranyl bisphosphonate (DGBP), which impairs geranylgeranylation, we demonstrate that Rac1 mitochondrial import, mitochondrial oxidative stress, and progression of the fibrotic response to lung injury are significantly attenuated. These observations reveal that targeting the isoprenoid pathway to alter Rac1 geranylgeranylation halts the progression of pulmonary fibrosis after lung injury. PMID:25958207

  12. Metabolic engineering of higher plants and algae for isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Kempinski, Chase; Jiang, Zuodong; Bell, Stephen; Chappell, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a class of compounds derived from the five carbon precursors, dimethylallyl diphosphate, and isopentenyl diphosphate. These molecules present incredible natural chemical diversity, which can be valuable for humans in many aspects such as cosmetics, agriculture, and medicine. However, many terpenoids are only produced in small quantities by their natural hosts and can be difficult to generate synthetically. Therefore, much interest and effort has been directed toward capturing the genetic blueprint for their biochemistry and engineering it into alternative hosts such as plants and algae. These autotrophic organisms are attractive when compared to traditional microbial platforms because of their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as a carbon substrate instead of supplied carbon sources like glucose. This chapter will summarize important techniques and strategies for engineering the accumulation of isoprenoid metabolites into higher plants and algae by choosing the correct host, avoiding endogenous regulatory mechanisms, and optimizing potential flux into the target compound. Future endeavors will build on these efforts by fine-tuning product accumulation levels via the vast amount of available "-omic" data and devising metabolic engineering schemes that integrate this into a whole-organism approach. With the development of high-throughput transformation protocols and synthetic biology molecular tools, we have only begun to harness the power and utility of plant and algae metabolic engineering.

  13. FAX1, a Novel Membrane Protein Mediating Plastid Fatty Acid Export

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nannan; Gügel, Irene Luise; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zeisler, Viktoria; Schreiber, Lukas; Soll, Jürgen; Philippar, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis in plants occurs in plastids, and thus, export for subsequent acyl editing and lipid assembly in the cytosol and endoplasmatic reticulum is required. Yet, the transport mechanism for plastid fatty acids still remains enigmatic. We isolated FAX1 (fatty acid export 1), a novel protein, which inserts into the chloroplast inner envelope by α-helical membrane-spanning domains. Detailed phenotypic and ultrastructural analyses of FAX1 mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana showed that FAX1 function is crucial for biomass production, male fertility and synthesis of fatty acid-derived compounds such as lipids, ketone waxes, or pollen cell wall material. Determination of lipid, fatty acid, and wax contents by mass spectrometry revealed that endoplasmatic reticulum (ER)-derived lipids decreased when FAX1 was missing, but levels of several plastid-produced species increased. FAX1 over-expressing lines showed the opposite behavior, including a pronounced increase of triacyglycerol oils in flowers and leaves. Furthermore, the cuticular layer of stems from fax1 knockout lines was specifically reduced in C29 ketone wax compounds. Differential gene expression in FAX1 mutants as determined by DNA microarray analysis confirmed phenotypes and metabolic imbalances. Since in yeast FAX1 could complement for fatty acid transport, we concluded that FAX1 mediates fatty acid export from plastids. In vertebrates, FAX1 relatives are structurally related, mitochondrial membrane proteins of so-far unknown function. Therefore, this protein family might represent a powerful tool not only to increase lipid/biofuel production in plants but also to explore novel transport systems involved in vertebrate fatty acid and lipid metabolism. PMID:25646734

  14. Dynamic composition, shaping and organization of plastid nucleoids

    PubMed Central

    Powikrowska, Marta; Oetke, Svenja; Jensen, Poul E.; Krupinska, Karin

    2014-01-01

    In this article recent progress on the elucidation of the dynamic composition and structure of plastid nucleoids is reviewed from a structural perspective. Plastid nucleoids are compact structures of multiple copies of different forms of ptDNA, RNA, enzymes for replication and gene expression as well as DNA binding proteins. Although early electron microscopy suggested that plastid DNA is almost free of proteins, it is now well established that the DNA in nucleoids similarly as in the nuclear chromatin is associated with basic proteins playing key roles in organization of the DNA architecture and in regulation of DNA associated enzymatic activities involved in transcription, replication, and recombination. This group of DNA binding proteins has been named plastid nucleoid associated proteins (ptNAPs). Plastid nucleoids are unique with respect to their variable number, genome copy content and dynamic distribution within different types of plastids. The mechanisms underlying the shaping and reorganization of plastid nucleoids during chloroplast development and in response to environmental conditions involve posttranslational modifications of ptNAPs, similarly to those changes known for histones in the eukaryotic chromatin, as well as changes in the repertoire of ptNAPs, as known for nucleoids of bacteria. Attachment of plastid nucleoids to membranes is proposed to be important not only for regulation of DNA availability for replication and transcription, but also for the coordination of photosynthesis and plastid gene expression. PMID:25237313

  15. Microtubules restrict plastid sedimentation in protonemata of the moss Ceratodon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuchow, J.; Sack, F. D.

    1994-01-01

    Apical cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are unusual among plant cells with sedimentation in that only some amyloplasts sediment and these do not fall completely to the bottom of vertical cells. To determine whether the cytoskeleton restricts plastid sedimentation, the effects of amiprophos-methyl (APM) and cytochalasin D (CD) on plastid position were quantified. APM treatments of 30-60 min increased the plastid sedimentation that is normally seen along the length of untreated or control cells. Longer APM treatments often resulted in more dramatic plastid sedimentation, and in some cases almost all plastids sedimented to the lowermost point in the cell. In contrast, the microfilament inhibitor CD did not affect longitudinal plastid sedimentation compared to untreated cells, although it did disturb or eliminate plastid zonation in the tip. These data suggest that microtubules restrict the sedimentation of plastids along the length of the cell and that microtubules are load-bearing for all the plastids in the apical cell. This demonstrates the importance of the cytoskeleton in maintaining organelle position and cell organization against the force of gravity.

  16. Gas chromatographic separation of diastereomeric isoprenoids as molecular markers of oil pollution.

    PubMed

    Berthou, F; Friovourt, M P

    1981-12-18

    By means of high-performance glass capillary gas chromatography (GC), diastereomeric isoprenoids were resolved into double peaks. The retention indices on three liquid phases and the mass spectra of the diastereoisomers were almost similar. The leading GC peaks represent the isoprenoids of fossil origin, while the rear peaks correspond to those of recent origin. Computerized gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for fingerprinting isoprenoids in different samples. The mass fragmentation patterns were characteristic of the branched alkanes. Hydrocarbon mixtures from four crude oil spills in the sea and from polluted and oil-free oyster tissues were investigated. The relative ratios of n-alkanes/pristane or phytane were shown to be strongly dependent on the chromatographic resolution of the isoprenoid peaks. It is suggested that the double GC peaks in the isoprenoid series are an unmistakable sign of oil pollution.

  17. Updating algal evolutionary relationships through plastid genome sequencing: did alveolate plastids emerge through endosymbiosis of an ochrophyte?

    PubMed

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Horák, Aleš; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Demir-Hilton, Elif; Sudek, Sebastian; Jenkins, Jerry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Přibyl, Pavel; Fousek, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Lang, B Franz; Oborník, Miroslav; Worden, Alexandra Z; Eliáš, Marek

    2015-05-28

    Algae with secondary plastids of a red algal origin, such as ochrophytes (photosynthetic stramenopiles), are diverse and ecologically important, yet their evolutionary history remains controversial. We sequenced plastid genomes of two ochrophytes, Ochromonas sp. CCMP1393 (Chrysophyceae) and Trachydiscus minutus (Eustigmatophyceae). A shared split of the clpC gene as well as phylogenomic analyses of concatenated protein sequences demonstrated that chrysophytes and eustigmatophytes form a clade, the Limnista, exhibiting an unexpectedly elevated rate of plastid gene evolution. Our analyses also indicate that the root of the ochrophyte phylogeny falls between the recently redefined Khakista and Phaeista assemblages. Taking advantage of the expanded sampling of plastid genome sequences, we revisited the phylogenetic position of the plastid of Vitrella brassicaformis, a member of Alveolata with the least derived plastid genome known for the whole group. The results varied depending on the dataset and phylogenetic method employed, but suggested that the Vitrella plastids emerged from a deep ochrophyte lineage rather than being derived vertically from a hypothetical plastid-bearing common ancestor of alveolates and stramenopiles. Thus, we hypothesize that the plastid in Vitrella, and potentially in other alveolates, may have been acquired by an endosymbiosis of an early ochrophyte.

  18. Updating algal evolutionary relationships through plastid genome sequencing: did alveolate plastids emerge through endosymbiosis of an ochrophyte?

    PubMed Central

    Ševčíková, Tereza; Horák, Aleš; Klimeš, Vladimír; Zbránková, Veronika; Demir-Hilton, Elif; Sudek, Sebastian; Jenkins, Jerry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Přibyl, Pavel; Fousek, Jan; Vlček, Čestmír; Lang, B. Franz; Oborník, Miroslav; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Eliáš, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Algae with secondary plastids of a red algal origin, such as ochrophytes (photosynthetic stramenopiles), are diverse and ecologically important, yet their evolutionary history remains controversial. We sequenced plastid genomes of two ochrophytes, Ochromonas sp. CCMP1393 (Chrysophyceae) and Trachydiscus minutus (Eustigmatophyceae). A shared split of the clpC gene as well as phylogenomic analyses of concatenated protein sequences demonstrated that chrysophytes and eustigmatophytes form a clade, the Limnista, exhibiting an unexpectedly elevated rate of plastid gene evolution. Our analyses also indicate that the root of the ochrophyte phylogeny falls between the recently redefined Khakista and Phaeista assemblages. Taking advantage of the expanded sampling of plastid genome sequences, we revisited the phylogenetic position of the plastid of Vitrella brassicaformis, a member of Alveolata with the least derived plastid genome known for the whole group. The results varied depending on the dataset and phylogenetic method employed, but suggested that the Vitrella plastids emerged from a deep ochrophyte lineage rather than being derived vertically from a hypothetical plastid-bearing common ancestor of alveolates and stramenopiles. Thus, we hypothesize that the plastid in Vitrella, and potentially in other alveolates, may have been acquired by an endosymbiosis of an early ochrophyte. PMID:26017773

  19. Identification of aryl isoprenoids in source rocks and crude oils: Biological markers for the green sulphur bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, R. E.; Powell, T. G.

    1987-03-01

    A series of C 13 to C 31 aryl isoprenoids (1-alkyl,2,3,6-trimethylbenzenes) have been identified in reef-hosted oils and their source rocks from the Middle and Upper Silurian of the Michigan Basin and Middle Devonian of the Alberta Basin, Canada. Their structure has been confirmed by unambiguous synthesis of the C 14 member of the series. Their structure and isotopic composition indicate that they are derived from isorenieratene from the Chlorobiaceae family of sulphur bacteria. These results are consistent with geological and geochemical studies that show that the source rocks were deposited under metahaline to hypersaline sulphate and sulphide rich water columns. The distribution of other biomarkers in these oils and source rocks indicates that a diverse biota contributed organic matter to the source environment. In conjunction with the aryl isoprenoids, they show that there is a remarkable similarity in composition between the two sets of oils and source rocks despite their great temporal and geographic separation. This reflects the similarity of their environments and emphasizes the importance of sedimentary facies in controlling the composition of organic matter in source rocks and their derived oils.

  20. The endosymbiotic origin, diversification and fate of plastids.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Patrick J

    2010-03-12

    Plastids and mitochondria each arose from a single endosymbiotic event and share many similarities in how they were reduced and integrated with their host. However, the subsequent evolution of the two organelles could hardly be more different: mitochondria are a stable fixture of eukaryotic cells that are neither lost nor shuffled between lineages, whereas plastid evolution has been a complex mix of movement, loss and replacement. Molecular data from the past decade have substantially untangled this complex history, and we now know that plastids are derived from a single endosymbiotic event in the ancestor of glaucophytes, red algae and green algae (including plants). The plastids of both red algae and green algae were subsequently transferred to other lineages by secondary endosymbiosis. Green algal plastids were taken up by euglenids and chlorarachniophytes, as well as one small group of dinoflagellates. Red algae appear to have been taken up only once, giving rise to a diverse group called chromalveolates. Additional layers of complexity come from plastid loss, which has happened at least once and probably many times, and replacement. Plastid loss is difficult to prove, and cryptic, non-photosynthetic plastids are being found in many non-photosynthetic lineages. In other cases, photosynthetic lineages are now understood to have evolved from ancestors with a plastid of different origin, so an ancestral plastid has been replaced with a new one. Such replacement has taken place in several dinoflagellates (by tertiary endosymbiosis with other chromalveolates or serial secondary endosymbiosis with a green alga), and apparently also in two rhizarian lineages: chlorarachniophytes and Paulinella (which appear to have evolved from chromalveolate ancestors). The many twists and turns of plastid evolution each represent major evolutionary transitions, and each offers a glimpse into how genomes evolve and how cells integrate through gene transfers and protein trafficking.

  1. Plastoglobuli: Plastid Microcompartments with Integrated Functions in Metabolism, Plastid Developmental Transitions, and Environmental Adaptation.

    PubMed

    van Wijk, Klaas J; Kessler, Felix

    2017-01-25

    Plastoglobuli (PGs) are plastid lipoprotein particles surrounded by a membrane lipid monolayer. PGs contain small specialized proteomes and metabolomes. They are present in different plastid types (e.g., chloroplasts, chromoplasts, and elaioplasts) and are dynamic in size and shape in response to abiotic stress or developmental transitions. PGs in chromoplasts are highly enriched in carotenoid esters and enzymes involved in carotenoid metabolism. PGs in chloroplasts are associated with thylakoids and contain ∼30 core proteins (including six ABC1 kinases) as well as additional proteins recruited under specific conditions. Systems analysis has suggested that chloroplast PGs function in metabolism of prenyl lipids (e.g., tocopherols, plastoquinone, and phylloquinone); redox and photosynthetic regulation; plastid biogenesis; and senescence, including recycling of phytol, remobilization of thylakoid lipids, and metabolism of jasmonate. These functionalities contribute to chloroplast PGs' role in responses to stresses such as high light and nitrogen starvation. PGs are thus lipid microcompartments with multiple functions integrated into plastid metabolism, developmental transitions, and environmental adaptation. This review provides an in-depth overview of PG experimental observations, summarizes the present understanding of PG features and functions, and provides a conceptual framework for PG research and the realization of opportunities for crop improvement. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Plant Biology Volume 68 is April 29, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  2. Isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase: A checkpoint to isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Berthelot, Karine; Estevez, Yannick; Deffieux, Alain; Peruch, Frédéric

    2012-08-01

    Even if the isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) isomerases have been discovered in the 50s, it is only in the last decade that the genetical, enzymatical, structural richness and cellular importance of this large family of crucial enzymes has been uncovered. Present in all living kingdoms, they can be classified in two subfamilies: type 1 and type 2 IPP isomerases, which show clearly distinct characteristics. They all perform the regulatory isomerization of isopentenyl diphosphate into dimethylallyl diphosphate, a key rate-limiting step of the terpenoid biosynthesis, via a protonation/deprotonation mechanism. Due to their importance in the isoprenoid metabolism and the increasing interest of industry devoted to terpenoid production, it is foreseen that the biotechnological development of such enzymes should be under intense scrutiny in the near future.

  3. Current Development in Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-chen; Song, Heng; Liu, Hung-wen; Liu, Pinghua

    2013-01-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest classes of natural products and all of them are constructed from two precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). For decades, the mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway was proposed to be the only IPP and DMAPP biosynthetic pathway. This review summarizes the newly discovered IPP and DMAPP production pathways since late 1990s, their distribution among different kingdoms, and their roles in secondary metabolite production. These new IPP and DMAPP production pathways include the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway, a modified MVA pathway, and the 5-Methylthioadenosine shunt pathway. Relative to the studies on the MVA pathway, information on the MEP pathway regulation is limited and the mechanistic details of several of its novel transformations remain to be addressed. Current status on both MEP pathway regulation and mechanistic issues are also presented. PMID:23891475

  4. Hybrid isoprenoid secondary metabolite production in terrestrial and marine actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kelley A; Fenical, William; Jensen, Paul R

    2010-12-01

    Terpenoids are among the most ubiquitous and diverse secondary metabolites observed in nature. Although actinomycete bacteria are one of the primary sources of microbially derived secondary metabolites, they rarely produce compounds in this biosynthetic class. The terpenoid secondary metabolites that have been discovered from actinomycetes are often in the form of biosynthetic hybrids called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs). HIs include significant structural diversity and biological activity and thus are important targets for natural product discovery. Recent screening of marine actinomycetes has led to the discovery of a new lineage that is enriched in the production of biologically active HI secondary metabolites. These strains represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and provide unique opportunities to study the evolutionary history and ecological functions of an unusual group of secondary metabolites.

  5. Regulation of Isoprenoid Pheromone Biosynthesis in Bumblebee Males.

    PubMed

    Prchalová, Darina; Buček, Aleš; Brabcová, Jana; Žáček, Petr; Kindl, Jiří; Valterová, Irena; Pichová, Iva

    2016-02-02

    Males of the closely related species Bombus terrestris and Bombus lucorum attract conspecific females by completely different marking pheromones. MP of B. terrestris and B. lucorum pheromones contain mainly isoprenoid (ISP) compounds and fatty acid derivatives, respectively. Here, we studied the regulation of ISP biosynthesis in both bumblebees. RNA-seq and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (AACT), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), and farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FPPS) transcripts are abundant in the B. terrestris labial gland. Maximal abundance of these transcripts correlated well with AACT enzymatic activity detected in the LG extracts. In contrast, transcript abundances of AACT, HMGR, and FPPS in B. lucorum were low, and AACT activity was not detected in LGs. These results suggest that transcriptional regulation plays a key role in the control of ISP biosynthetic gene expression and ISP pheromone biosynthesis in bumblebee males.

  6. Rampant polyuridylylation of plastid gene transcripts in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunling; Morse, David

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellate plastid genes are believed to be encoded on small generally unigenic plasmid-like minicircles. The minicircle gene complement has reached saturation with an incomplete set of plastid genes (18) compared with typical functional plastids (60–200). While some of the missing plastid genes have recently been found in the nucleus, it is still unknown if additional genes, not located on minicircles, might also contribute to the plastid genome. Sequencing of tailed RNA showed that transcripts derived from the known minicircle genes psbA and atpB contained a homogenous 3′ polyuridine tract of 25–40 residues. This unusual modification suggested that random sequencing of a poly(dA) primed cDNA library could be used to characterize the plastid transcriptome. We have recovered only 12 different polyuridylylated transcripts from our library, all of which are encoded on minicircles in several dinoflagellate species. The correspondence of all polyuridylylated transcripts with previously described minicircle genes thus supports the dinoflagellate plastid as harbouring the smallest genome of any functional chloroplast. Interestingly, northern blots indicate that the majority of transcripts are modified, suggesting that polyuridylylation is unlikely to act as a degradation signal as do the heterogeneous poly(A)-rich extensions of transcripts in cyanobacteria and other plastids. PMID:16434702

  7. Volatile isoprenoids as defense compounds during abiotic stress in tropical plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, K.

    2015-12-01

    Emissions of volatile isoprenoids from tropical forests play central roles in atmospheric processes by fueling atmospheric chemistry resulting in modified aerosol and cloud lifecycles and their associated feedbacks with the terrestrial biosphere. However, the identities of tropical isoprenoids, their biological and environmental controls, and functions within plants and ecosystems remain highly uncertain. As part of the DOE ARM program's GoAmazon 2014/15 campaign, extensive field and laboratory observations of volatile isoprenoids are being conducted in the central Amazon. Here we report the results of our completed and ongoing activities at the ZF2 forest reserve in the central Amazon. Among the results of the research are the suprisingly high abundance of light-dependent volatile isoprenoid emissions across abundant tree genera in the Amazon in both primary and secondary forests, the discovery of highly reactive monoterpene emissions from Amazon trees, and evidence for the importance of volatile isoprenoids in protecting photosynthesis during oxidative stress under elevated temperatures including energy consumption and direct antioxidant functions and a tight connection betwen volatile isoprenoid emissions, photorespiration, and CO2 recycling within leaves. The results highlight the need to model allocation of carbon to isoprenoids during elevated temperature stress in the tropics.

  8. Isoprenoid-Based Biofuels: Homologous Expression and Heterologous Expression in Prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Phulara, Suresh Chandra; Chaturvedi, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Enthusiasm for mining advanced biofuels from microbial hosts has increased remarkably in recent years. Isoprenoids are one of the highly diverse groups of secondary metabolites and are foreseen as an alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Most of the prokaryotes synthesize their isoprenoid backbone via the deoxyxylulose-5-phosphate pathway from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and pyruvate, whereas eukaryotes synthesize isoprenoids via the mevalonate pathway from acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA). Microorganisms do not accumulate isoprenoids in large quantities naturally, which restricts their application for fuel purposes. Various metabolic engineering efforts have been utilized to overcome the limitations associated with their natural and nonnatural production. The introduction of heterologous pathways/genes and overexpression of endogenous/homologous genes have shown a remarkable increase in isoprenoid yield and substrate utilization in microbial hosts. Such modifications in the hosts' genomes have enabled researchers to develop commercially competent microbial strains for isoprenoid-based biofuel production utilizing a vast array of substrates. The present minireview briefly discusses the recent advancement in metabolic engineering efforts in prokaryotic hosts for the production of isoprenoid-based biofuels, with an emphasis on endogenous, homologous, and heterologous expression strategies. PMID:27422837

  9. Arabidopsis Responds to Alternaria alternata Volatiles by Triggering Plastid Phosphoglucose Isomerase-Independent Mechanisms1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Bahaji, Abdellatif; De Diego, Nuria; Baslam, Marouane; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; García-Gómez, Pablo; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Novák, Ondřej; Spíchal, Lukáš; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds (VCs) emitted by phylogenetically diverse microorganisms (including plant pathogens and microbes that do not normally interact mutualistically with plants) promote photosynthesis, growth, and the accumulation of high levels of starch in leaves through cytokinin (CK)-regulated processes. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants not exposed to VCs, plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI) acts as an important determinant of photosynthesis and growth, likely as a consequence of its involvement in the synthesis of plastidic CKs in roots. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role in connecting the Calvin-Benson cycle with the starch biosynthetic pathway in leaves. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the responses of plants to microbial VCs and to investigate the extent of pPGI involvement, we characterized pPGI-null pgi1-2 Arabidopsis plants cultured in the presence or absence of VCs emitted by Alternaria alternata. We found that volatile emissions from this fungal phytopathogen promote growth, photosynthesis, and the accumulation of plastidic CKs in pgi1-2 leaves. Notably, the mesophyll cells of pgi1-2 leaves accumulated exceptionally high levels of starch following VC exposure. Proteomic analyses revealed that VCs promote global changes in the expression of proteins involved in photosynthesis, starch metabolism, and growth that can account for the observed responses in pgi1-2 plants. The overall data show that Arabidopsis plants can respond to VCs emitted by phytopathogenic microorganisms by triggering pPGI-independent mechanisms. PMID:27663407

  10. Origin and Evolution of Plastids and Photosynthesis in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Geoffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the origins of plastids from endosymbiotic cyanobacteria is reviewed. Establishing when during geological time the endosymbiosis occurred remains elusive, but progress has been made in defining the cyanobacterial lineage most closely related to plastids, and some mechanistic insight into the possible existence of cryptic endosymbioses perhaps involving Chlamydia-like infections of the host have also been presented. The phylogenetic affinities of the host remain obscure. The existence of a second lineage of primary plastids in euglyphid amoebae has now been confirmed, but the quasipermanent acquisition of plastids by animals has been shown to be more ephemeral than initially suspected. A new understanding of how plastids have been integrated into their hosts by transfer of photosynthate, by endosymbiotic gene transfer and repatriation of gene products back to the endosymbiont, and by regulation of endosymbiont division is presented in context. PMID:24691960

  11. Isoprenoid emission of oak species typical for the Mediterranean area: Source strength and controlling variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hauff, Karin; Rabong, Richard; Steinbrecher, Jutta

    Measurements of isoprenoid emission on five Mediterranean oak species in the field revealed that Quercus frainetto, Quercus petraea and Quercus pubescens are strong emitters of isoprene. In contrast Quercus cerris and Quercus suber emitted no significant amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes. For Q. pubenscens and Q. frainetto median emission factors of 16.68 nmol m -2 s -1 (86.06 μg g -1 dw h -1) and 30.72 nmol m -2 s -1 (133.95 μg g -1 dw h -1 were calculated, respectively. The 25 to 75 percentiles span of the emission factor data sets ranged from - 53% to + 56% of the median values. Light and temperature are the main controlling factors for isoprene emission. The influence of other environmental and plant physiological parameters on the isoprene emission is discussed. The "Guenther" emission algorithm is able to predict the daily maximum of the isoprene emission within the plant specific uncertainty range. However, the morning increase and the afternoon drop in the isoprene emission is not well parameterized. On the basis of process oriented models for the synthesis of isoprene in plants, a further reduction in the uncertainty may be achieved resulting in a more reliable prediction of short-time variation in isoprene emission.

  12. New Insight into Isoprenoids Biosynthesis Process and Future Prospects for Drug Designing in Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    Saggu, Gagandeep S.; Pala, Zarna R.; Garg, Shilpi; Saxena, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    The MEP (Methyl Erythritol Phosphate) isoprenoids biosynthesis pathway is an attractive drug target to combat malaria, due to its uniqueness and indispensability for the parasite. It is functional in the apicoplast of Plasmodium and its products get transported to the cytoplasm, where they participate in glycoprotein synthesis, electron transport chain, tRNA modification and several other biological processes. Several compounds have been tested against the enzymes involved in this pathway and amongst them Fosmidomycin, targeted against IspC (DXP reductoisomerase) enzyme and MMV008138 targeted against IspD enzyme have shown good anti-malarial activity in parasite cultures. Fosmidomycin is now-a-days prescribed clinically, however, less absorption, shorter half-life, and toxicity at higher doses, limits its use as an anti-malarial. The potential of other enzymes of the pathway as candidate drug targets has also been determined. This review details the various drug molecules tested against these targets with special emphasis to Plasmodium. We corroborate that MEP pathway functional within the apicoplast of Plasmodium is a major drug target, especially during erythrocytic stages. However, the major bottlenecks, bioavailability and toxicity of the new molecules needs to be addressed, before considering any new molecule as a potent antimalarial. PMID:27679614

  13. Photoactive analogs of farnesyl diphosphate and related isoprenoids: design and applications in studies of medicinally important isoprenoid-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vervacke, Jeffrey S; Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is an important metabolic intermediate in the biosynthesis of a variety of molecules including sesquiterpenes and the side chains of a number of cofactors. FPP is also the source of isoprenoid side chains found attached to proteins. Enzymes that employ FPP as a substrate are of interest because they are involved in the semisynthesis of drugs as well as targets for drug design. Photoactive analogs of FPP have been useful for identifying enzymes that use this molecule as a substrate. A variety of photocrosslinking groups have been employed to prepare FPP analogs for use in such experiments including aryl azides, diazotrifluoropropionates and benzophenones. In this review, the design of these probes is described along with an examination of how they have been used in crosslinking experiments.

  14. The plastid terminal oxidase: its elusive function points to multiple contributions to plastid physiology.

    PubMed

    Nawrocki, Wojciech J; Tourasse, Nicolas J; Taly, Antoine; Rappaport, Fabrice; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    Plastids have retained from their cyanobacterial ancestor a fragment of the respiratory electron chain comprising an NADPH dehydrogenase and a diiron oxidase, which sustain the so-called chlororespiration pathway. Despite its very low turnover rates compared with photosynthetic electron flow, knocking out the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) in plants or microalgae leads to severe phenotypes that encompass developmental and growth defects together with increased photosensitivity. On the basis of a phylogenetic and structural analysis of the enzyme, we discuss its physiological contribution to chloroplast metabolism, with an emphasis on its critical function in setting the redox poise of the chloroplast stroma in darkness. The emerging picture of PTOX is that of an enzyme at the crossroads of a variety of metabolic processes, such as, among others, the regulation of cyclic electron transfer and carotenoid biosynthesis, which have in common their dependence on the redox state of the plastoquinone pool, set largely by the activity of PTOX in darkness.

  15. The foundation of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

    PubMed

    Hagemann, Rudolf

    2010-03-01

    In 1909 two papers by Correns and by Baur published in volume 1 of Zeitschrift für induktive Abstammungs- und Vererbungslehre (now Molecular Genetics and Genomics) reported on the non-Mendelian inheritance of chlorophyll deficiencies. These papers, reporting the very first cases of extranuclear inheritance, laid the foundation for a new field: non-Mendelian or extranuclear genetics. Correns observed a purely maternal inheritance (in Mirabilis), whereas Baur found a biparental inheritance (in Pelargonium). Correns suspected the non-Mendelian factors in the cytoplasm, while Baur believed that the plastids carry these extranuclear factors. In the following years, Baur's hypothesis was proved to be correct. Baur subsequently developed the theory of plastid inheritance. In many genera the plastids are transmitted only uniparentally by the mother, while in a few genera there is a biparental plastid inheritance. Commonly there is random sorting of plastids during ontogenetic development. Renner and Schwemmle as well as geneticists in other countries added additional details to this theory. Pioneering studies on mitochondrial inheritance in yeast started in 1949 in the group of Ephrussi and Slonimski; respiration-deficient cells (petites in yeast, poky in Neurospora) were demonstrated to be due to mitochondrial mutations. Electron microscopical and biochemical studies (1962-1964) showed that plastids and mitochondria contain organelle-specific DNA molecules. These findings laid the molecular basis for the two branches of extranuclear inheritance: plastid and mitochondrial genetics.

  16. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Guoliang; Chi, Shan; Liu, Cui; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we fully sequenced the circular plastid genome of a brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida. The genome is 130,383 base pairs (bp) in size; it contains a large single-copy (LSC, 76,598 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 42,977 bp), separated by two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb: 5,404 bp). The genome contains 139 protein-coding, 28 tRNA, and 6 rRNA genes; none of these genes contains introns. Organization and gene contents of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome were similar to those of Saccharina japonica. There is a co-linear relationship between the plastid genome of U. pinnatifida and that of three previously sequenced large brown algal species. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 taxa based on 23 plastid protein-coding genes grouped all plastids into a red or green lineage. In the large brown algae branch, U. pinnatifida and S. japonica formed a sister clade with much closer relationship to Ectocarpus siliculosus than to Fucus vesiculosus. For the first time, the start codon ATT was identified in the plastid genome of large brown algae, in the atpA gene of U. pinnatifida. In addition, we found a gene-length change induced by a 3-bp repetitive DNA in ycf35 and ilvB genes of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome.

  17. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Guoliang; Chi, Shan; Liu, Cui; Wang, Haiyang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we fully sequenced the circular plastid genome of a brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida. The genome is 130,383 base pairs (bp) in size; it contains a large single-copy (LSC, 76,598 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 42,977 bp), separated by two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb: 5,404 bp). The genome contains 139 protein-coding, 28 tRNA, and 6 rRNA genes; none of these genes contains introns. Organization and gene contents of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome were similar to those of Saccharina japonica. There is a co-linear relationship between the plastid genome of U. pinnatifida and that of three previously sequenced large brown algal species. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 taxa based on 23 plastid protein-coding genes grouped all plastids into a red or green lineage. In the large brown algae branch, U. pinnatifida and S. japonica formed a sister clade with much closer relationship to Ectocarpus siliculosus than to Fucus vesiculosus. For the first time, the start codon ATT was identified in the plastid genome of large brown algae, in the atpA gene of U. pinnatifida. In addition, we found a gene-length change induced by a 3-bp repetitive DNA in ycf35 and ilvB genes of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome. PMID:26426800

  18. Apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in human and murine tumor cells are initiated by isoprenoids.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Elson, C E

    1999-04-01

    Diverse classes of phytochemicals initiate biological responses that effectively lower cancer risk. One class of phytochemicals, broadly defined as pure and mixed isoprenoids, encompasses an estimated 22,000 individual components. A representative mixed isoprenoid, gamma-tocotrienol, suppresses the growth of murine B16(F10) melanoma cells, and with greater potency, the growth of human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and human leukemic (HL-60) cells. beta-Ionone, a pure isoprenoid, suppresses the growth of B16 cells and with greater potency, the growth of MCF-7, HL-60 and human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells. Results obtained with diverse cell lines differing in ras and p53 status showed that the isoprenoid-mediated suppression of growth is independent of mutated ras and p53 functions. beta-Ionone suppressed the growth of human colon fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) but only when present at three-fold the concentration required to suppress the growth of Caco-2 cells. The isoprenoids initiated apoptosis and, concomitantly arrested cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Both suppress 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase activity. beta-Ionone and lovastatin interfered with the posttranslational processing of lamin B, an activity essential to assembly of daughter nuclei. This interference, we postulate, renders neosynthesized DNA available to the endonuclease activities leading to apoptotic cell death. Lovastatin-imposed mevalonate starvation suppressed the glycosylation and translocation of growth factor receptors to the cell surface. As a consequence, cells were arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. This rationale may apply to the isoprenoid-mediated G1-phase arrest of tumor cells. The additive and potentially synergistic actions of these isoprenoids in the suppression of tumor cell proliferation and initiation of apoptosis coupled with the mass action of the diverse isoprenoid constituents of plant products may explain, in part, the impact of fruit, vegetable

  19. Low frequency paternal transmission of plastid genes in Brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Anja; Stelljes, Christian; Adams, Caroline; Kirchner, Stefan; Burkhard, Gabi; Jarzombski, Sabine; Broer, Inge; Horn, Patricia; Elsayed, Ashraf; Hagl, Peter; Leister, Dario; Koop, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Plastid-encoded genes are maternally inherited in most plant species. Transgenes located on the plastid genome are thus within a natural confinement system, preventing their distribution via pollen. However, a low-frequency leakage of plastids via pollen seems to be universal in plants. Here we report that a very low-level paternal inheritance in Arabidopsis thaliana occurs under field conditions. As pollen donor an Arabidopsis accession (Ler-Ely) was used, which carried a plastid-localized atrazine resistance due to a point mutation in the psbA gene. The frequency of pollen transmission into F1 plants, based on their ability to express the atrazine resistance was 1.9 × 10(-5). We extended our analysis to another cruciferous species, the world-wide cultivated crop Brassica napus. First, we isolated a fertile and stable plastid transformant (T36) in a commercial cultivar of B. napus (cv Drakkar). In T36 the aadA and the bar genes were integrated in the inverted repeat region of the B. napus plastid DNA following particle bombardment of hypocotyl segments. Southern blot analysis confirmed transgene integration and homoplasmy of plastid DNA. Line T36 expressed Basta resistance from the inserted bar gene and this trait was used to estimate the frequency of pollen transmission into F1 plants. A frequency of <2.6 × 10(-5) was determined in the greenhouse. Taken together, our data show a very low rate of paternal plastid transmission in Brassicacea. Moreover, the establishment of plastid transformation in B. napus facilitates a safe use of this important crop plant for plant biotechnology.

  20. Plastid Molecular Pharming I. Production of Oral Vaccines via Plastid Transformation.

    PubMed

    Berecz, Bernadett Berecz; Zelenyánszki, Helga; Pólya, Sára; Tamás-Nyitrai, Cecília; Oszvald, Mária

    2016-10-04

    Vaccines produced in plants have opened up new opportunities in vaccination. Among the various categories of vaccines, the recombinant vaccine is generally regarded as the most economical and safest type because it cannot cause disease and does not require large-scale cultivation of pathogens. Due to the low cost of their cultivation, plants may represent viable alternative platforms for producing subunit vaccines. Genetic engineering of plastids is the innovation of the last three decades and has numerous benefits when compared to nuclear transformation. Due to the high level of expression, oral vaccines produced in transplastomic plants do not have to be purified as they can be consumed raw, which, therefore, reduces the cost of preparation, transportation and handling of the vaccines. Oral vaccination also excludes the risk of other infections or contaminations, while compartmentation of the plant cell provides an excellent encapsulation to the antigen within the plastid. Herein we review the main biotechnological and immunological aspects of the progress achieved in the field of plastid derived edible vaccines during the last decade. As there is a public debate against genetically modified crops, the advantages and limitations of oral vaccines are also discussed.

  1. Plastid transformation in sugar beet: Beta vulgaris.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast biotechnology has assumed great importance in the past 20 years and, thanks to the numerous advantages as compared to conventional transgenic technologies, has been applied in an increasing number of plant species but still very much limited. Hence, it is of utmost importance to extend the range of species in which plastid transformation can be applied. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an important industrial crop of the temperate zone in which chloroplast DNA is not transmitted trough pollen. Transformation of the sugar beet genome is performed in several research laboratories; conversely sugar beet plastome genetic transformation is far away from being considered a routine technique. We describe here a method to obtain transplastomic sugar beet plants trough biolistic transformation. The availability of sugar beet transplastomic plants should avoid the risk of gene flow between these cultivated genetic modified sugar beet plants and the wild-type plants or relative wild species.

  2. The complete plastid genome sequence of Bomarea edulis (Alstroemeriaceae: Liliales).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Chang Young; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Bomarea, a member of the family Alstroemeriaceae, is distributed from Chile to Mexico and includes approximately 120 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have clarified the monophyly of the family within the order Liliales and the sister relationship with the family Colchicaceae. At this time, five plastid genomes of Liliales have been analyzed at the familial level. To examine plastid genome variation at the generic level, we sequenced the plastid genome of Bomarea edulis, which is the most widely distributed species in the genus, and compared it with Alstroemeria aurea. The plastid genome sequence of B. edulis was 154,925 bp in length with a similar structure as A. aurea, excluding the IR-LSC junction. Ycf68 and infA were pseudogenes caused by frameshift mutations, and the ycf15 gene was deleted, similar to A. aurea.

  3. [Plastid genome engineering: novel optimization strategies and applications].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fei; Lu, Shizhan; Gao, Liang; Zhang, Juanjuan; Lin, Yongjun

    2015-08-01

    The plastid genome engineering system allows site-specific modifications via two homologous recombination events. It is much safer, more precise and efficient compared with the nuclear transformation system. This technology can be applied to the basic research to expand plastid genome function analysis, and it also provides an excellent platform for not only high-level production of recombinant proteins but also plant breeding. In this review, we summarize the state of the art and progresses in this field. We focus on novel breeding strategies in transformation system improvement and new tools to enhance plastid transgene expression levels. In addition, we highlight selected applications in resistance engineering and quality improvement via metabolic engineering. We believe that by overcoming current technological limitations in the plastid transformation system can another green revolution for crop breeding beckon.

  4. Entire plastid phylogeny of the carrot genus (Daucus, Apiaceae):Concordance with nuclear data and mitochondrial and nuclear DNA insertions to the plastid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We explored the phylogenetic utility of entire plastid DNA sequences in Daucus and compared the results to prior phylogenetic results using plastid, nuclear, and mitochondrial DNA sequences. We obtained, using Illumina sequencing, full plastid sequences of 37 accessions of 20 Daucus taxa and outgrou...

  5. Antiglioma effects of N6-isopentenyladenosine, an endogenous isoprenoid end product, through the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ciaglia, Elena; Abate, Mario; Laezza, Chiara; Pisanti, Simona; Vitale, Mario; Seneca, Vincenzo; Torelli, Giovanni; Franceschelli, Silvia; Catapano, Giuseppe; Gazzerro, Patrizia; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2017-02-15

    Malignant gliomas are highly dependent on the isoprenoid pathway for the synthesis of lipid moieties critical for cell proliferation. The isoprenoid derivative N6-isopentenyladenosine (iPA) displays pleiotropic biological effects, including a direct anti-tumor activity in several tumor models. The antiglioma effects of iPA was then explored in U87MG cells both in vitro and grafted in mice and the related molecular mechanism confirmed in primary derived patients' glioma cells. iPA powerfully inhibited tumor cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis through a mechanism involving a marked accumulation of the pro-apoptotic BIM protein and inhibition of EGFR. Indeed, activating AMPK following conversion into its iPAMP active form, iPA stimulated EGFR phosphorylation and ubiquitination along a proteasome-mediated pathway which was responsible for receptor degradation and its downstream signaling pathways inhibition, including the STAT3, ERK and AKT cascade. The inhibition of AMPK by compound C prevented iPA-mediated phosphorylation of EGFR, known to precede receptor loss. As expected the block of EGFR degradation, by exposure to the proteasome inhibitor MG132, significantly reduced iPA-induced cell death. Given the importance of receptor degradation in iPA-mediated cytotoxicity, we also documented that the EGFR expression levels in a panel of primary glioma cells confers them a high sensitivity to iPA treatment. In conclusion our study provides the first evidence of iPA antiglioma effect. Indeed, as glioma is driven by aberrant signaling of growth factor receptors, particularly the EGFR, iPA, alone or in association with EGFR targeted therapies, might be a promising therapeutic tool to achieve a potent anti-tumoral effect.

  6. Disruption of insect isoprenoid biosynthesis with pyridinium bisphosphonates.

    PubMed

    Sen, Stephanie E; Wood, Lyndsay; Jacob, Reshma; Xhambazi, Alisa; Pease, Britanny; Jones, Alexis; Horsfield, Taylor; Lin, Alice; Cusson, Michel

    2015-08-01

    produce homologous isoprenoid structure and to be selectively inhibited by larger PyrBPs.

  7. Highly isotopically depleted isoprenoids: Molecular markers for ancient methane venting

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, V.; Peckmann, J.; Seifert, R.; Wehrung, P.; Reitner, J.; Michaelis, W.

    1999-12-01

    The authors propose that organic compounds found in a Miocene limestone from Marmorito (Northern Italy) are source markers for organic matter present in ancient methane vent systems (cold seeps). The limestone contains high concentrations of the tail-to-tail linked, acyclic C{sub 20} isoprenoid 2,6,11,15-tetramethylhexadecane (crocetane), a C{sub 25} homolog 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethylicosane (PME), and a distinctive glycerol ether lipid containing 3,7,11,15-tetramethylhexadecyl (phytanyl-) moieties. The chemical structures of these biomarkers indicate a common origin from archaea. Their extremely {sup 13}C-depleted isotope compositions ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}108 to {minus}115.6% PDB) suggest that the respective archaea have directly or indirectly introduced isotopically depleted, methane-derived carbon into their biomass. The authors postulate that a second major cluster of biomarkers showing heavier isotope values ({delta}{sup 13}C {approximately} {minus}88%) is derived from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). The observed biomarkers sustain the idea that methanogenic bacteria, in a syntrophic community with SRB, are responsible for the anaerobic oxidation of methane in marine sediments. Marmorito may thus represent a conceivable ancient scenario for methane consumption performed by a defined, two-membered bacterial consortium: (1) archaea that perform reversed methanogenesis by oxidizing methane and producing CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}; and (2) SRB that consume the resulting H{sub 2}. Furthermore, the respective organic molecules are, unlike other compounds, tightly bound to the crystalline carbonate phase. The Marmorito carbonates can thus be regarded as cold seep microbialites rather than mere antigenic carbonates.

  8. The plastid genome of Eutreptiella provides a window into the process of secondary endosymbiosis of plastid in euglenids.

    PubMed

    Hrdá, Štěpánka; Fousek, Jan; Szabová, Jana; Hampl, Vladimír; Hampl, Vladimír; Vlček, Čestmír

    2012-01-01

    Euglenids are a group of protists that comprises species with diverse feeding modes. One distinct and diversified clade of euglenids is photoautotrophic, and its members bear green secondary plastids. In this paper we present the plastid genome of the euglenid Eutreptiella, which we assembled from 454 sequencing of Eutreptiella gDNA. Comparison of this genome and the only other available plastid genomes of photosynthetic euglenid, Euglena gracilis, revealed that they contain a virtually identical set of 57 protein coding genes, 24 genes fewer than the genome of Pyramimonas parkeae, the closest extant algal relative of the euglenid plastid. Searching within the transcriptomes of Euglena and Eutreptiella showed that 6 of the missing genes were transferred to the nucleus of the euglenid host while 18 have been probably lost completely. Euglena and Eutreptiella represent the deepest bifurcation in the photosynthetic clade, and therefore all these gene transfers and losses must have happened before the last common ancestor of all known photosynthetic euglenids. After the split of Euglena and Eutreptiella only one additional gene loss took place. The conservation of gene content in the two lineages of euglenids is in contrast to the variability of gene order and intron counts, which diversified dramatically. Our results show that the early secondary plastid of euglenids was much more susceptible to gene losses and endosymbiotic gene transfers than the established plastid, which is surprisingly resistant to changes in gene content.

  9. Pigment content and leaf plastid ultrastructure in the tomato mutant lutescent-2.

    PubMed

    Fornasiero, R B; Bonatti, P M

    1985-03-01

    The non-lethal tomato mutant «lutescent-2» shows an early yellowing of normal developed leaves. Its ripe fruits display a yellow colouring, red pigment synthesis being delayed by up to two weeks. Typical pigment synthesis, related to leaf maturation, does not occur in mutant leaves. Both the concentration of chl a and chl b start to decrease very quickly at the end of leaf expansion. Early yellowing of «1-2» leaves appears to be related to the reduced car(470) content, which leads to chlorophyll photooxidation. Structural evidence of a deficiency in car(470) content in young «1- 2» plastids is given by a reduction of stroma thylakoids as well as by a limited grana stacking. The altered balance between the two pigment classes determined an active, even if incomplete, conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplast-like organelles.

  10. Block of the Mevalonate Pathway Triggers Oxidative and Inflammatory Molecular Mechanisms Modulated by Exogenous Isoprenoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines’ release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD. PMID:24758928

  11. Block of the mevalonate pathway triggers oxidative and inflammatory molecular mechanisms modulated by exogenous isoprenoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Tricarico, Paola Maura; Kleiner, Giulio; Valencic, Erica; Campisciano, Giuseppina; Girardelli, Martina; Crovella, Sergio; Knowles, Alessandra; Marcuzzi, Annalisa

    2014-04-22

    Deregulation of the mevalonate pathway is known to be involved in a number of diseases that exhibit a systemic inflammatory phenotype and often neurological involvements, as seen in patients suffering from a rare disease called mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD). One of the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology could depend on the shortage of isoprenoid compounds and the subsequent mitochondrial damage, leading to oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines' release. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that cellular death results from the balance between apoptosis and pyroptosis, both driven by mitochondrial damage and the molecular platform inflammasome. In order to rescue the deregulated pathway and decrease inflammatory markers, exogenous isoprenoid compounds were administered to a biochemical model of MKD obtained treating a murine monocytic cell line with a compound able to block the mevalonate pathway, plus an inflammatory stimulus. Our results show that isoprenoids acted in different ways, mainly increasing the expression of the evaluated markers [apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, nucleotide-binding oligomerization-domain protein-like receptors 3 (NALP3), cytokines and nitric oxide (NO)]. Our findings confirm the hypothesis that inflammation is triggered, at least partially, by the shortage of isoprenoids. Moreover, although further studies are necessary, the achieved results suggest a possible role for exogenous isoprenoids in the treatment of MKD.

  12. A small portion of plastid transcripts is polyadenylated in the flagellate Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Záhonová, Kristína; Hadariová, Lucia; Vacula, Rostislav; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Eliáš, Marek; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej

    2014-03-03

    Euglena gracilis possesses secondary plastids of green algal origin. In this study, E. gracilis expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from polyA-selected mRNA were searched and several ESTs corresponding to plastid genes were found. PCR experiments failed to detect SL sequence at the 5'-end of any of these transcripts, suggesting plastid origin of these polyadenylated molecules. Quantitative PCR experiments confirmed that polyadenylation of transcripts occurs in the Euglena plastids. Such transcripts have been previously observed in primary plastids of plants and algae as low-abundance intermediates of transcript degradation. Our results suggest that a similar mechanism exists in secondary plastids.

  13. Function of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols during oxidative stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jerzy; Szymańska, Renata; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Dłużewska, Jolanta

    2016-09-25

    Isoprenoid quinones and chromanols in plants fulfill both signaling and antioxidant functions under oxidative stress. The redox state of the plastoquinol pool (PQ-pool), which is modulated by interaction with reactive oxygen species (ROS) during oxidative stress, has a major regulatory function in both short- and long-term acclimatory responses. By contrast, the scavenging of ROS by prenyllipids affects signaling pathways where ROS play a role as signaling molecules. As the primary antioxidants, isoprenoid quinones and chromanols are synthesized under high-light stress in response to any increased production of ROS. During photo-oxidative stress, these prenyllipids are continuously synthesized and oxidized to other compounds. In turn, their oxidation products (hydroxy-plastochromanol, plastoquinol-C, plastoquinone-B) can still have an antioxidant function. The oxidation products of isoprenoid quinones and chromanols formed specifically in the face of singlet oxygen, can be indicators of singlet oxygen stress.

  14. Impact of summer drought on isoprenoid emissions and carbon sink of three Scots pine provenances

    PubMed Central

    Lüpke, M.; Leuchner, M.; Steinbrecher, R.; Menzel, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) provenances cover broad ecological amplitudes. In a greenhouse study, we investigated the impact of drought stress and rewetting on gas exchange for three provenances (Italy: Emilia Romagna; Spain: Alto Ebro; Germany: East-German lowlands) of 2-year old Scots pine seedlings. CO2, water vapour and isoprenoid exchange of stressed and control trees were quantified with a four-chamber dynamic-enclosure system in the controlled environment of a climate chamber. The three provenances showed distinct isoprenoid emission patterns and were classified into a non-Δ3-carene, with either high α-/β-pinene or β-myrcene fraction, and a Δ3-carene dominated type. Isoprenoid emission rates, net-photosynthesis and transpiration were reduced during summer drought stress and significantly recovered after rewetting. A seasonal increase of isoprenoid emission rates towards autumn was observed for all control groups. Compared with the German provenance, the Spanish and Italian provenances revealed higher isoprenoid emission rates and more plastic responses to drought stress and seasonal development, which points to a local adaptation to climate. As a result of drought, net carbon uptake and transpiration of trees was reduced, but recovered after rewetting. We conclude from our study that Scots pine isoprenoid emission is more variable than expected and sensitive to drought periods, likely impacting regional air chemistry. Thus, a provenance-specific emission assessment accounting for reduced emission during prolonged (summer) drought is recommend for setting up biogenic volatile organic compound emission inventories used in air quality models. PMID:27591438

  15. A Genetic and Pharmacological Analysis of Isoprenoid Pathway by LC-MS/MS in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Takami, Tomonori; Fang, Yue; Zhou, Xin; Jaiseng, Wurentuya; Ma, Yan; Kuno, Takayoshi

    2012-01-01

    Currently, statins are the only drugs acting on the mammalian isoprenoid pathway. The mammalian genes in this pathway are not easily amenable to genetic manipulation. Thus, it is difficult to study the effects of the inhibition of various enzymes on the intermediate and final products in the isoprenoid pathway. In fission yeast, antifungal compounds such as azoles and terbinafine are available as inhibitors of the pathway in addition to statins, and various isoprenoid pathway mutants are also available. Here in these mutants, treated with statins or antifungals, we quantified the final and intermediate products of the fission yeast isoprenoid pathway using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. In hmg1-1, a mutant of the gene encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), ergosterol (a final sterol product), and squalene (an intermediate pathway product), were decreased to approximately 80% and 10%, respectively, compared with that of wild-type cells. Consistently in wild-type cells, pravastatin, an HMGR inhibitor decreased ergosterol and squalene, and the effect was more pronounced on squalene. In hmg1-1 mutant and in wild-type cells treated with pravastatin, the decrease in the levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate respectively was larger than that of ergosterol but was smaller than that of squalene. In Δerg6 or Δsts1 cells, mutants of the genes involved in the last step of the pathway, ergosterol was not detected, and the changes of intermediate product levels were distinct from that of hmg1-1 mutant. Notably, in wild-type cells miconazole and terbinafine only slightly decreased ergosterol level. Altogether, these studies suggest that the pleiotropic phenotypes caused by the hmg1-1 mutation and pravastatin might be due to decreased levels of isoprenoid pyrophosphates or other isoprenoid pathway intermediate products rather than due to a decreased ergosterol level. PMID:23145048

  16. Plastid gene expression during fruit ripening in tomato.

    PubMed

    Piechulla, B; Imlay, K R; Gruissem, W

    1985-11-01

    A tomato chloroplast genome map has been constructed with the restriction enzymes Hpa I, Pvu II, and Sal I. Twelve plastid genes have been located on the tomato plastid genome (159 kb).The expression of plastid genes during tomato fruit ripening has been studied. The levels of transcripts of various genes coding for proteins of the photosystem I (psaA), photosystem II (psbA, psbB, psbC, psbD) and the stroma (rbcL) decrease when plastids differentiate from chloroplasts to chromoplasts. The amount of plastid ribosomal RNA also decreases. Transcripts of the genes for the P700 reaction center protein (psaA), for the photosystem II-associated proteins (psbC, psbD) and for the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (rbcL) cannot be detected in chromoplasts. In contrast, a relatively high level of mRNA is present for the 32 kD protein ('herbicide-binding protein', psbA) in red fruit.

  17. Plastid ultrastructure and photosynthesis in greening petaloid hypsophylls.

    PubMed

    Weidner, M; Franz, A; Napp-Zinn, K

    1985-02-01

    The ultrastructural and biochemicalphysiological aspects of postfloral greening have been studied in hypsophylls of Heliconia aurantiaca Ghiesbr., Guzmania cf. x magnifica Richter and Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel. In all three species the greening of the hypsophylls is due to plastid transformation, chloroplast formation proceeding from the initially different types of plastids. The degradation process of the original plastid structures and the mode of thylakoid formation are distinct in each case. In none of the species do the transformed plastids look identical to the chloroplasts of the corresponding foliage leaves. On a chlorophyll basis, the rate of photosynthesis of the greened hypsophylls surpasses the rate of the leaves considerably in Spathiphyllum, but is much lower in Heliconia (no data for Guzmania). In all species, anatomy, plastid structure, pigments, 77° K-fluorescence emission, ribulose-1,5-bis-phosphate carboxylase activities and short-term photosynthesis (14)CO2-assimilation patterns prove the greened hypsophylls to be capable of providing additional carbon to the developing fruits, thus supplementing the import of organic matter from the foliage leaves.

  18. Overexpression of Plastid Transketolase in Tobacco Results in a Thiamine Auxotrophic Phenotype[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Khozaei, Mahdi; Fisk, Stuart; Lawson, Tracy; Gibon, Yves; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Lefebvre, Stephane C.; Raines, Christine A.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased plastid transketolase on photosynthetic capacity and growth, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with increased levels of transketolase protein were produced. This was achieved using a cassette composed of a full-length Arabidopsis thaliana transketolase cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The results revealed a major and unexpected effect of plastid transketolase overexpression as the transgenic tobacco plants exhibited a slow-growth phenotype and chlorotic phenotype. These phenotypes were complemented by germinating the seeds of transketolase-overexpressing lines in media containing either thiamine pyrophosphate or thiamine. Thiamine levels in the seeds and cotyledons were lower in transketolase-overexpressing lines than in wild-type plants. When transketolase-overexpressing plants were supplemented with thiamine or thiamine pyrophosphate throughout the life cycle, they grew normally and the seed produced from these plants generated plants that did not have a growth or chlorotic phenotype. Our results reveal the crucial importance of the level of transketolase activity to provide the precursor for synthesis of intermediates and to enable plants to produce thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate for growth and development. The mechanism determining transketolase protein levels remains to be elucidated, but the data presented provide evidence that this may contribute to the complex regulatory mechanisms maintaining thiamine homeostasis in plants. PMID:25670766

  19. Overexpression of plastid transketolase in tobacco results in a thiamine auxotrophic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Khozaei, Mahdi; Fisk, Stuart; Lawson, Tracy; Gibon, Yves; Sulpice, Ronan; Stitt, Mark; Lefebvre, Stephane C; Raines, Christine A

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the effect of increased plastid transketolase on photosynthetic capacity and growth, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with increased levels of transketolase protein were produced. This was achieved using a cassette composed of a full-length Arabidopsis thaliana transketolase cDNA under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The results revealed a major and unexpected effect of plastid transketolase overexpression as the transgenic tobacco plants exhibited a slow-growth phenotype and chlorotic phenotype. These phenotypes were complemented by germinating the seeds of transketolase-overexpressing lines in media containing either thiamine pyrophosphate or thiamine. Thiamine levels in the seeds and cotyledons were lower in transketolase-overexpressing lines than in wild-type plants. When transketolase-overexpressing plants were supplemented with thiamine or thiamine pyrophosphate throughout the life cycle, they grew normally and the seed produced from these plants generated plants that did not have a growth or chlorotic phenotype. Our results reveal the crucial importance of the level of transketolase activity to provide the precursor for synthesis of intermediates and to enable plants to produce thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate for growth and development. The mechanism determining transketolase protein levels remains to be elucidated, but the data presented provide evidence that this may contribute to the complex regulatory mechanisms maintaining thiamine homeostasis in plants.

  20. The Recovery of Plastid Function Is Required for Optimal Response to Low Temperatures in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kindgren, Peter; Dubreuil, Carole; Strand, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Cold acclimation is an essential response in higher plants to survive freezing temperatures. Here, we report that two independent mutant alleles of the H-subunit of Mg-chelatase, CHLH, gun5-1 and cch in Arabidopsis are sensitive to low temperatures. Plants were grown in photoperiodic conditions and exposed to low temperatures for short- and long-term periods. Tetrapyrrole biosynthesis was initially significantly inhibited in response to low temperature but recovered in wild type (Col-0), although the tetrapyrrole levels were lower in cold compared to control conditions. The gun5-1 and cch alleles showed an inability to recover chlorophyll biosynthesis in addition to a significant decrease in freezing tolerance. We found that the impaired plastid function in the CHLH mutant plants resulted in compromised de novo protein synthesis at low temperatures. The expression of the transcription factors CBF1-3 was super-induced in gun5-1 and cch mutant alleles but expression levels of their target genes, COR15a, COR47 and COR78 were similar or even lower compared to Col-0. In addition, the protein levels of COR15a were lower in gun5-1 and cch and a general defect in protein synthesis could be seen in the gun5-1 mutant following a 35S labelling experiment performed at low temperature. Taken together, our results demonstrate the importance of a functional chloroplast for the cold acclimation process and further suggest that impaired plastid function could result in inhibition of protein synthesis at low temperature. PMID:26366569

  1. A HYPOTHESIS FOR PLASTID EVOLUTION IN CHROMALVEOLATES(1).

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Puerta, M Virginia; Delwiche, Charles F

    2008-10-01

    Four eukaryotic lineages, namely, haptophytes, alveolates, cryptophytes, and heterokonts, contain in most cases photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic members-the photosynthetic ones with secondary plastids with chl c as the main photosynthetic pigment. These four photosynthetic lineages were grouped together on the basis of their pigmentation and called chromalveolates, which is usually understood to imply loss of plastids in the nonphotosynthetic members. Despite the ecological and economic importance of this group of organisms, the phylogenetic relationships among these algae are only partially understood, and the so-called chromalveolate hypothesis is very controversial. This review evaluates the evidence for and against this grouping and summarizes the present understanding of chromalveolate evolution. We also describe a testable hypothesis that is intended to accommodate current knowledge based on plastid and nuclear genomic data, discuss the implications of this model, and comment on areas that require further examination.

  2. Evidence for the retention of two evolutionary distinct plastids in dinoflagellates with diatom endosymbionts.

    PubMed

    Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Imanian, Behzad; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-09-01

    Dinoflagellates harboring diatom endosymbionts (termed "dinotoms") have undergone a process often referred to as "tertiary endosymbiosis"--the uptake of algae containing secondary plastids and integration of those plastids into the new host. In contrast to other tertiary plastids, and most secondary plastids, the endosymbiont of dinotoms is distinctly less reduced, retaining a number of cellular features, such as their nucleus and mitochondria and others, in addition to their plastid. This has resulted in redundancy between host and endosymbiont, at least between some mitochondrial and cytosolic metabolism, where this has been investigated. The question of plastidial redundancy is particularly interesting as the fate of the host dinoflagellate plastid is unclear. The host cytosol possesses an eyespot that has been postulated to be a remnant of the ancestral peridinin plastid, but this has not been tested, nor has its possible retention of plastid functions. To investigate this possibility, we searched for plastid-associated pathways and functions in transcriptomic data sets from three dinotom species. We show that the dinoflagellate host has indeed retained genes for plastid-associated pathways and that these genes encode targeting peptides similar to those of other dinoflagellate plastid-targeted proteins. Moreover, we also identified one gene encoding an essential component of the dinoflagellate plastid protein import machinery, altogether suggesting the presence of a functioning plastid import system in the host, and by extension a relict plastid. The presence of the same plastid-associated pathways in the endosymbiont also extends the known functional redundancy in dinotoms, further confirming the unusual state of plastid integration in this group of dinoflagellates.

  3. Evidence for the Retention of Two Evolutionary Distinct Plastids in Dinoflagellates with Diatom Endosymbionts

    PubMed Central

    Hehenberger, Elisabeth; Imanian, Behzad; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harboring diatom endosymbionts (termed “dinotoms”) have undergone a process often referred to as “tertiary endosymbiosis”—the uptake of algae containing secondary plastids and integration of those plastids into the new host. In contrast to other tertiary plastids, and most secondary plastids, the endosymbiont of dinotoms is distinctly less reduced, retaining a number of cellular features, such as their nucleus and mitochondria and others, in addition to their plastid. This has resulted in redundancy between host and endosymbiont, at least between some mitochondrial and cytosolic metabolism, where this has been investigated. The question of plastidial redundancy is particularly interesting as the fate of the host dinoflagellate plastid is unclear. The host cytosol possesses an eyespot that has been postulated to be a remnant of the ancestral peridinin plastid, but this has not been tested, nor has its possible retention of plastid functions. To investigate this possibility, we searched for plastid-associated pathways and functions in transcriptomic data sets from three dinotom species. We show that the dinoflagellate host has indeed retained genes for plastid-associated pathways and that these genes encode targeting peptides similar to those of other dinoflagellate plastid-targeted proteins. Moreover, we also identified one gene encoding an essential component of the dinoflagellate plastid protein import machinery, altogether suggesting the presence of a functioning plastid import system in the host, and by extension a relict plastid. The presence of the same plastid-associated pathways in the endosymbiont also extends the known functional redundancy in dinotoms, further confirming the unusual state of plastid integration in this group of dinoflagellates. PMID:25172904

  4. Comprehensive Assessment of Transcriptional Regulation Facilitates Metabolic Engineering of Isoprenoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Iris; Poirier, Brenton C; Herron, Blake K; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-11-01

    In plants, two spatially separated pathways provide the precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines with modulated levels of expression of each individual gene involved in the cytosolic/peroxisomal mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways. By assessing the correlation of transgene expression levels with isoprenoid marker metabolites (gene-to-metabolite correlation), we determined the relative importance of transcriptional control at each individual step of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The accumulation patterns of metabolic intermediates (metabolite-to-gene correlation) were then used to infer flux bottlenecks in the sterol pathway. The extent of metabolic cross talk, the exchange of isoprenoid intermediates between compartmentalized pathways, was assessed by a combination of gene-to-metabolite and metabolite-to-metabolite correlation analyses. This strategy allowed the selection of genes to be modulated by metabolic engineering, and we demonstrate that the overexpression of predictable combinations of genes can be used to significantly enhance flux toward specific end products of the sterol pathway. Transgenic plants accumulating increased amounts of sterols are characterized by significantly elevated biomass, which can be a desirable trait in crop and biofuel plants.

  5. Comprehensive Assessment of Transcriptional Regulation Facilitates Metabolic Engineering of Isoprenoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Iris; Poirier, Brenton C.; Herron, Blake K.; Lange, Bernd Markus

    2015-01-01

    In plants, two spatially separated pathways provide the precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis. We generated transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lines with modulated levels of expression of each individual gene involved in the cytosolic/peroxisomal mevalonate and plastidial methylerythritol phosphate pathways. By assessing the correlation of transgene expression levels with isoprenoid marker metabolites (gene-to-metabolite correlation), we determined the relative importance of transcriptional control at each individual step of isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis. The accumulation patterns of metabolic intermediates (metabolite-to-gene correlation) were then used to infer flux bottlenecks in the sterol pathway. The extent of metabolic cross talk, the exchange of isoprenoid intermediates between compartmentalized pathways, was assessed by a combination of gene-to-metabolite and metabolite-to-metabolite correlation analyses. This strategy allowed the selection of genes to be modulated by metabolic engineering, and we demonstrate that the overexpression of predictable combinations of genes can be used to significantly enhance flux toward specific end products of the sterol pathway. Transgenic plants accumulating increased amounts of sterols are characterized by significantly elevated biomass, which can be a desirable trait in crop and biofuel plants. PMID:26282236

  6. Chapter 3: Omics Advances of Biosynthetic Pathways of Isoprenoid Production in Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Paniagua-Michel, J.; Subramanian, Venkataramanan

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the current status of microalgal isoprenoids and the role of omics technologies, or otherwise specified, in bioproducts optimization and applications are reviewed. Emphasis is focused in the metabolic pathways of microalgae involved in the production of commercially important products, namely, hydrocarbons and biofuels, nutraceuticals, and pharmaceuticals.

  7. PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 and PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED1 Mediate Photorelocation Movements of Both Chloroplasts and Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Organelle movement and positioning play important roles in fundamental cellular activities and adaptive responses to environmental stress in plants. To optimize photosynthetic light utilization, chloroplasts move toward weak blue light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong blue light (the avoidance response). Nuclei also move in response to strong blue light by utilizing the light-induced movement of attached plastids in leaf cells. Blue light receptor phototropins and several factors for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been identified through molecular genetic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 (PMI1) is a plant-specific C2-domain protein that is required for efficient chloroplast photorelocation movement. There are two PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED (PMIR) genes, PMIR1 and PMIR2, in the Arabidopsis genome. However, the mechanism in which PMI1 regulates chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements and the involvement of PMIR1 and PMIR2 in these organelle movements remained unknown. Here, we analyzed chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mutant lines of PMI1, PMIR1, and PMIR2. In mesophyll cells, the pmi1 single mutant showed severe defects in both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements resulting from the impaired regulation of chloroplast-actin filaments. In pavement cells, pmi1 mutant plants were partially defective in both plastid and nuclear photorelocation movements, but pmi1pmir1 and pmi1pmir1pmir2 mutant lines lacked the blue light-induced movement responses of plastids and nuclei completely. These results indicated that PMI1 is essential for chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mesophyll cells and that both PMI1 and PMIR1 are indispensable for photorelocation movements of plastids and thus, nuclei in pavement cells.

  8. Exclusion of plastid nucleoids and ribosomes from stromules in tobacco and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Newell, Christine A; Natesan, Senthil K A; Sullivan, James A; Jouhet, Juliette; Kavanagh, Tony A; Gray, John C

    2012-02-01

    Stromules are stroma-filled tubules that extend from the surface of plastids and allow the transfer of proteins as large as 550 kDa between interconnected plastids. The aim of the present study was to determine if plastid DNA or plastid ribosomes are able to enter stromules, potentially permitting the transfer of genetic information between plastids. Plastid DNA and ribosomes were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to LacI, the lac repressor, which binds to lacO-related sequences in plastid DNA, and to plastid ribosomal proteins Rpl1 and Rps2, respectively. Fluorescence from GFP-LacI co-localised with plastid DNA in nucleoids in all tissues of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) examined and there was no indication of its presence in stromules, not even in hypocotyl epidermal cells, which contain abundant stromules. Fluorescence from Rpl1-GFP and Rps2-GFP was also observed in a punctate pattern in chloroplasts of tobacco and Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh.], and fluorescent stromules were not detected. Rpl1-GFP was shown to assemble into ribosomes and was co-localised with plastid DNA. In contrast, in hypocotyl epidermal cells of dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings, fluorescence from Rpl1-GFP was more evenly distributed in plastids and was observed in stromules on a total of only four plastids (<0.02% of the plastids observed). These observations indicate that plastid DNA and plastid ribosomes do not routinely move into stromules in tobacco and Arabidopsis, and suggest that transfer of genetic information by this route is likely to be a very rare event, if it occurs at all.

  9. Contribution of understorey vegetation and soil processes to boreal forest isoprenoid exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäki, Mari; Heinonsalo, Jussi; Hellén, Heidi; Bäck, Jaana

    2017-03-01

    Boreal forest floor emits biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) from the understorey vegetation and the heterogeneous soil matrix, where the interactions of soil organisms and soil chemistry are complex. Earlier studies have focused on determining the net exchange of VOCs from the forest floor. This study goes one step further, with the aim of separately determining whether the photosynthesized carbon allocation to soil affects the isoprenoid production by different soil organisms, i.e., decomposers, mycorrhizal fungi, and roots. In each treatment, photosynthesized carbon allocation through roots for decomposers and mycorrhizal fungi was controlled by either preventing root ingrowth (50 µm mesh size) or the ingrowth of roots and fungi (1 µm mesh) into the soil volume, which is called the trenching approach. Isoprenoid fluxes were measured using dynamic (steady-state flow-through) chambers from the different treatments. This study aimed to analyze how important the understorey vegetation is as a VOC sink. Finally, a statistical model was constructed based on prevailing temperature, seasonality, trenching treatments, understory vegetation cover, above canopy photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil water content, and soil temperature to estimate isoprenoid fluxes. The final model included parameters with a statistically significant effect on the isoprenoid fluxes. The results show that the boreal forest floor emits monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and isoprene. Monoterpenes were the most common group of emitted isoprenoids, and the average flux from the non-trenched forest floor was 23 µg m-2 h-1. The results also show that different biological factors, including litterfall, carbon availability, biological activity in the soil, and physico-chemical processes, such as volatilization and absorption to the surfaces, are important at various times of the year. This study also discovered that understorey vegetation is a strong sink of monoterpenes. The

  10. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-03-13

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, L-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, L-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant.

  11. Production Of Cellulase In Plastids Of Transgenic Plants

    DOEpatents

    Lamppa, Gayle

    2002-08-06

    A genetic construct encoding a fusion protein including endogluconase E1 and a transit peptide is used to transform plants. The plants produce cellulase by expressing the genetic construct. The cellulase is targeted to plastids and can be collected and purified.

  12. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the “recycling” of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  13. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-29

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the "recycling" of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance.

  14. Proteome Dynamics during Plastid Differentiation in Rice1[W

    PubMed Central

    Kleffmann, Torsten; von Zychlinski, Anne; Russenberger, Doris; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Gehrig, Peter; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baginsky, Sacha

    2007-01-01

    We have analyzed proteome dynamics during light-induced development of rice (Oryza sativa) chloroplasts from etioplasts using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tandem mass spectrometry protein identification. In the dark, the etioplast allocates the main proportion of total protein mass to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and a surprisingly high number of proteins to the regulation and expression of plastid genes. Chaperones, proteins for photosynthetic energy metabolism, and enzymes of the tetrapyrrole pathway were identified among the most abundant etioplast proteins. The detection of 13 N-terminal acetylated peptides allowed us to map the exact localization of the transit peptide cleavage site, demonstrating good agreement with the prediction for most proteins. Based on the quantitative etioplast proteome map, we examined early light-induced changes during chloroplast development. The transition from heterotrophic metabolism to photosynthesis-supported autotrophic metabolism was already detectable 2 h after illumination and affected most essential metabolic modules. Enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, and gene expression were up-regulated, whereas enzymes in amino acid and fatty acid metabolism were significantly decreased in relative abundance. Enzymes involved in nucleotide metabolism, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, and redox regulation remained unchanged. Phosphoprotein-specific staining at different time points during chloroplast development revealed light-induced phosphorylation of a nuclear-encoded plastid RNA-binding protein, consistent with changes in plastid RNA metabolism. Quantitative information about all identified proteins and their regulation by light is available in plprot, the plastid proteome database (http://www.plprot.ethz.ch). PMID:17189339

  15. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  16. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  17. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Makoto T; Kojo, Kei H; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids.

  18. Protein synthesis during the initial phase of the temperature-induced bleaching response in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, W. )

    1990-05-01

    Growing cultures of photoheterotrophic Euglena gracilis experience an increase in chlorophyll accumulation during the initial phase of the temperature-induced bleaching response suggesting an increase in the synthesis of plastid components at the bleaching temperature of 33{degree}C. A primary goal of this work was to establish whether an increase in the synthesis of plastid proteins accompanies the observed increase in chlorophyll accumulation. In vivo pulse-labeling experiments with ({sup 35}S)sodium sulfate were carried out with cells grown at room temperature or at 33{degree}C. The synthesis of a number of plastid polypeptides of nucleocytoplasmic origin, including some presumably novel polypeptides, increased in cultures treated for 15 hours at 33{degree}C. In contrast, while synthesis of thylakoid proteins by the plastid protein synthesis machinery decreased modestly, synthesis of the large subunit of the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase was strongly affected at the elevated temperature. Synthesis of novel plastid-encoded polypeptides was not induced at the bleaching temperature. It is concluded that protein synthesis in plastids declines during the initial phase of the temperature response in Euglena despite an overall increase in cellular protein synthesis and an increase in chlorophyll accumulation per cell.

  19. A mutation in Arabidopsis seedling plastid development1 affects plastid differentiation in embryo-derived tissues during seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Ruppel, Nicholas J; Logsdon, Charles A; Whippo, Craig W; Inoue, Kentaro; Hangarter, Roger P

    2011-01-01

    Oilseed plants like Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) develop green photosynthetically active embryos. Upon seed maturation, the embryonic chloroplasts degenerate into a highly reduced plastid type called the eoplast. Upon germination, eoplasts redifferentiate into chloroplasts and other plastid types. Here, we describe seedling plastid development1 (spd1), an Arabidopsis seedling albino mutant capable of producing normal green vegetative tissues. Mutant seedlings also display defects in etioplast and amyloplast development. Precocious germination of spd1 embryos showed that the albino seedling phenotype of spd1 was dependent on the passage of developing embryos through the degreening and dehydration stages of seed maturation, suggesting that SPD1 is critical during eoplast development or early stages of eoplast redifferentiation. The SPD1 gene was found to encode a protein containing a putative chloroplast-targeting sequence in its amino terminus and also domains common to P-loop ATPases. Chloroplast localization of the SPD1 protein was confirmed by targeting assays in vivo and in vitro. Although the exact function of SPD1 remains to be defined, our findings reveal aspects of plastid development unique to embryo-derived cells.

  20. Hybridization study of developmental plastid gene expression in mustard (Sinapsis alba L.) with cloned probes for most plastid DNA regions.

    PubMed

    Link, G

    1984-07-01

    An approach to assess the extent of developmental gene expression of various regions of plastid (pt)DNA in mustard (Sinapis alba L.) is described. It involves cloning of most ptDNA regions. The cloned regions then serve as hybridization probes to detect and assess the abundance of complementary RNA sequences represented in total plastid RNA. By comparison of the hybridization pattern observed with plastid RNA from either dark-grown or light-grown plants it was found that many ptDNA regions are constitutively expressed, while several 'inducible' regions account for much higher transcript levels in the chloroplast than in the etioplast stage. The reverse situation, i.e. 'repressed' regions which would account for higher transcript levels in the etioplast, was not observed. The hybridization results obtained with RNA from 'intermediatetype' plastids suggest that transient gene expression is a common feature during light-induced chloroplast development. The time-course of gene expression differs for various ptDNA regions.

  1. Isolation of precise plastid deletion mutants by homology-based excision: a resource for site-directed mutagenesis, multi-gene changes and high-throughput plastid transformation.

    PubMed

    Kode, Vasumathi; Mudd, Elisabeth A; Iamtham, Siriluck; Day, Anil

    2006-06-01

    We describe a simple and efficient homology-based excision method to delete plastid genes. The procedure allows one or more adjacent plastid genes to be deleted without the retention of a marker gene. We used aadA-based transformation to duplicate a 649 bp region of plastid DNA corresponding to the atpB promoter region. Efficient recombination between atpB repeats deletes the intervening foreign genes and 1,984 bp of plastid DNA (co-ordinates 57,424-59,317) containing the rbcL gene. Only five foreign bases are present in DeltarbcL plants illustrating the precision of homology-based excision. Sequence analysis of non-functional rbcL-related sequences in DeltarbcL plants indicated an extra-plastidic origin. Mutant DeltarbcL plants were heterotrophic, pale-green and contained round plastids with reduced amounts of thylakoids. Restoration of autotrophy and leaf pigmentation following aadA-based transformation with the wild-type rbcL gene ruled out mutations in other genes. Excision and re-use of aadA shows that, despite the multiplicity of plastid genomes, homology-based excision ensures complete removal of functional aadA genes. Rescue of the DeltarbcL mutation and autotrophic growth stabilizes transgenic plastids in heteroplasmic transformants following antibiotic withdrawal, enhancing the overall efficiency of plastid transformation. Unlike the available set of homoplasmic knockout mutants in 25 plastid genes, the rbcL deletion mutant isolated here is readily transformed with the efficient aadA marker gene. This improvement in deletion design facilitates advanced studies that require the isolation of double mutants in distant plastid genes and the replacement of the deleted locus with site-directed mutant alleles and is not easily achieved using other methods.

  2. Phylogenomic investigation of phospholipid synthesis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Lombard, Jonathan; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2012-01-01

    Archaea have idiosyncratic cell membranes usually based on phospholipids containing glycerol-1-phosphate linked by ether bonds to isoprenoid lateral chains. Since these phospholipids strongly differ from those of bacteria and eukaryotes, the origin of the archaeal membranes (and by extension, of all cellular membranes) was enigmatic and called for accurate evolutionary studies. In this paper we review some recent phylogenomic studies that have revealed a modified mevalonate pathway for the synthesis of isoprenoid precursors in archaea and suggested that this domain uses an atypical pathway of synthesis of fatty acids devoid of any acyl carrier protein, which is essential for this activity in bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, we show new or updated phylogenetic analyses of enzymes likely responsible for the isoprenoid chain synthesis from their precursors and the phospholipid synthesis from glycerol phosphate, isoprenoids, and polar head groups. These results support that most of these enzymes can be traced back to the last archaeal common ancestor and, in many cases, even to the last common ancestor of all living organisms.

  3. Synthetic isoprenoid analogues for the study of prenylated proteins: Fluorescent imaging and proteomic applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yen-Chih; Distefano, Mark D

    2016-02-01

    Protein prenylation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by prenyltransferases involving the attachment of farnesyl or geranylgeranyl groups to residues near the C-termini of proteins. This irreversible covalent modification is important for membrane localization and proper signal transduction. Here, the use of isoprenoid analogues for studying prenylated proteins is reviewed. First, experiments with analogues containing small fluorophores that are alternative substrates for prenyltransferases are described. Those analogues have been useful for quantifying binding affinity and for the production of fluorescently labeled proteins. Next, the use of analogues that incorporate biotin, bioorthogonal groups or antigenic moieties is described. Such probes have been particularly useful for identifying proteins that are naturally prenylated within mammalian cells. Overall, the use of isoprenoid analogues has contributed significantly to the understanding of protein prenlation.

  4. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: Geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e, highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C{sub 40} isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an {open_quotes}isoprenoid{close_quotes} algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350{degrees}C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C{sub 1} to C{sub 40} pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution to linear chains and their relationships with the C{sub 40} isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  5. Closed pyrolyses of the isoprenoid algaenan of Botryococcus braunii, L race: geochemical implications for derived kerogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, F.; Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.

    1995-07-01

    Algaenans, i.e., highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable, insoluble macromolecular constituents, have been identified in a number of microalga cell walls and their selective preservation shown to play a major role in the formation of numerous kerogens. All the algaenans so far examined comprise a network of long polymethylenic chains, except for the L race of Botryococcus braunii. The resistant macromolecular material isolated from the latter, termed PRB L, is based on C 40 isoprenoid chains with a lycopane-type skeleton. Recent comparative studies of PRB L and of Botryococcus-derived sediments provided the first example of kerogen formation via the selective preservation of an "isoprenoid" algaenan. The present study is concerned with PRB L pyrolyses in sealed gold tubes under various temperature/time conditions (260-350°C, 0.5-69 h). For the conversion rates thus obtained, ranging from 30 to 100%, a complete mass balance of the different families of pyrolysis products was established; most of the C 1 to C 40 pyrolysate constituents were identified and the abundances of the above compounds and their variations with conversion progress were determined. This study thus allowed us (1) to derive further information about PRB L chemical structure (location of the ether bridges, contribution of linear chains and their relationships with the C 40 isoprenoid ones), (2) to determine the behaviour of this isoprenoid algaenan to thermal stress (timing of the formation of the different groups of products then released, nature of the primary cleavages, origin and mode of formation of the secondary products, and further degradations), and (3) to show, in connection with previous studies, that PRB L-derived kerogens should exhibit pronounced differences relative to standard type I kerogens, the latter being based on polymethylenic chains, regarding not only the structure of the generated products but also the timing of oil generation (upward shift of the catagenesis zone).

  6. Structure elucidation and phytotoxicity of C13 nor-isoprenoids from Cestrum parqui.

    PubMed

    D'Abrosca, Brigida; DellaGreca, Marina; Fiorentino, Antonio; Monaco, Pietro; Oriano, Palma; Temussi, Fabio

    2004-02-01

    Twelve C(13) nor-isoprenoids have been isolated from the leaves of Cestrum parqui (Solanaceae). The structure (2R,6R,9R)-2,9-dihydroxy-4-megastigmen-3-one has been assigned to the new compound. All the structures have been determined by spectroscopic means and chemical correlations. The compounds showed phytotoxic effect on the germination and growth of Lactuca sativa L.

  7. Exploring the interactions between isoprenoid chain and labdenediol diphosphate synthase based on molecular docking and quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wujun; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yixin; Zhao, Zongbao Kent

    2014-12-01

    Many natural products and biosynthetic intermediates contain isoprenoid chains. Isoprenoid chains are believed to interact with some proteins in the biological systems, but such interactions remain poorly understood. Here labdenediol diphosphate synthase (LPPS) was used as a model to explore the molecular interactions involving isoprenoid chains. Both homology modeling and docking simulation results indicated that binding form between isoprenoid chain and LPPS is dominated by hydrophobic forces in one binding site. The interactions were also examined via quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technology using synthetic isoprenoid chain-contained probes. The binding constant (1.51 μM(-1)), binding site number (n = 1) and key amino acid residues (Y196, F262, W266, F301, F308, W398, W439, and Y445) were obtained. Both computational and QCM results suggested that LPPS interacts strongly with farnesyl and geranylgeranyl groups. These interactions are primarily caused by hydrophobic and π-π interaction nature. Together, this study provided insightful information to understand molecular interactions between isoprenoid chains and proteins.

  8. Double bond stereochemistry influences the susceptibility of short-chain isoprenoids and polyprenols to decomposition by thermo-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Molińska, Ewa; Klimczak, Urszula; Komaszyło, Joanna; Derewiaka, Dorota; Obiedziński, Mieczysław; Kania, Magdalena; Danikiewicz, Witold; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2015-04-01

    Isoprenoid alcohols are common constituents of living cells. They are usually assigned a role in the adaptation of the cell to environmental stimuli, and this process might give rise to their oxidation by reactive oxygen species. Moreover, cellular isoprenoids may also undergo various chemical modifications resulting from the physico-chemical treatment of the tissues, e.g., heating during food processing. Susceptibility of isoprenoid alcohols to heat treatment has not been studied in detail so far. In this study, isoprenoid alcohols differing in the number of isoprene units and geometry of the double bonds, β-citronellol, geraniol, nerol, farnesol, solanesol and Pren-9, were subjected to thermo-oxidation at 80 °C. Thermo-oxidation resulted in the decomposition of the tested short-chain isoprenoids as well as medium-chain polyprenols with simultaneous formation of oxidized derivatives, such as hydroperoxides, monoepoxides, diepoxides and aldehydes, and possible formation of oligomeric derivatives. Oxidation products were monitored by GC-FID, GC-MS, ESI-MS and spectrophotometric methods. Interestingly, nerol, a short-chain isoprenoid with a double bond in the cis (Z) configuration, was more oxidatively stable than its trans (E) isomer, geraniol. However, the opposite effect was observed for medium-chain polyprenols, since Pren-9 (di-trans-poly-cis-prenol) was more susceptible to thermo-oxidation than its all-trans isomer, solanesol. Taken together, these results experimentally confirm that both short- and long-chain polyisoprenoid alcohols are prone to thermo-oxidation.

  9. The evolution of glycogen and starch metabolism in eukaryotes gives molecular clues to understand the establishment of plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Steven; Colleoni, Christophe; Cenci, Ugo; Raj, Jenifer Nirmal; Tirtiaux, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    Solid semi-crystalline starch and hydrosoluble glycogen define two distinct physical states of the same type of storage polysaccharide. Appearance of semi-crystalline storage polysaccharides appears linked to the requirement of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria to fuel nitrogenase and protect it from oxygen through respiration of vast amounts of stored carbon. Starch metabolism itself resulted from the merging of the bacterial and eukaryote pathways of storage polysaccharide metabolism after endosymbiosis of the plastid. This generated the three Archaeplastida lineages: the green algae and land plants (Chloroplastida), the red algae (Rhodophyceae), and the glaucophytes (Glaucophyta). Reconstruction of starch metabolism in the common ancestor of Archaeplastida suggests that polysaccharide synthesis was ancestrally cytosolic. In addition, the synthesis of cytosolic starch from the ADP-glucose exported from the cyanobacterial symbiont possibly defined the original metabolic flux by which the cyanobiont provided photosynthate to its host. Additional evidence supporting this scenario include the monophyletic origin of the major carbon translocators of the inner membrane of eukaryote plastids which are sisters to nucleotide-sugar transporters of the eukaryote endomembrane system. It also includes the extent of enzyme subfunctionalization that came as a consequence of the rewiring of this pathway to the chloroplasts in the green algae. Recent evidence suggests that, at the time of endosymbiosis, obligate intracellular energy parasites related to extant Chlamydia have donated important genes to the ancestral starch metabolism network.

  10. Proteolysis in Plastids of Arabidopsis Thaliana: Functional Analysis of ClpS1,2,T and their Physical and Genetic Interactions with the ClpPR Protease Core Complex and Clp Chaperones

    SciTech Connect

    van Wijk, Klaas

    2009-01-12

    Chloroplasts are essential organelles required for plant growth and biomass production. They synthesize many essential secondary metabolites (e.g. hormones, isoprenoids, amino acids, etc.) and house the photosynthetic apparatus needed for conversion of light energy and CO2 into chemical energy [in the form of reduced carbohydrates, ATP and NADPH]. Thus chloroplasts are essential for life on earth and essential for production of bioenergy. Formation and maintenance of a functional chloroplast requires an extensive investment in the biogenesis and homeostasis apparatus. Protease and proteolysis play a critical role in these processes, with the Clp gene family being particularly central. Proteolysis of proteins and protein complexes in plastids is poorly understood, and is not only critical for biogenesis, adaptation and maintenance but is also important for plant development. Several years ago, the vanWijk lab identified a large and relatively abundant ClpP/R/S complex, along with ClpC1,C2 and ClpD chaperones and a putative Clp affinity modulator in plastids. So far, no substrate recognition mechanism has been determined for any Clp complex in plants. The purpose of this grant was to initiate functional analysis of three members of the Clp family.

  11. Squalenes, phytanes and other isoprenoids as major neutral lipids of methanogenic and thermoacidophilic 'archaebacteria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, T. G.; Langworthy, T. A.; Holzer, G.; Oro, J.

    1979-01-01

    The neutral lipids from nine species of methanogenic bacteria (five methanobacilli, two methanococci, a methanospirillum and a methanosarcina) and two thermoacidophilic bacteria (Thermo-plasma and Sulfolobus) have been analyzed. The neutral lipids were found to comprise a wide range (C14 to C30) of polyisoprenyl hydrocarbons with varying degrees of saturation. The principal components represented the three major isoprenoid series (C20 phytanyl, C25 pentaisoprenyl, and C30 squalenyl), in contrast with the neutral lipids of extreme halophiles, which consist predominantly of C2O (phytanyl, geranylgeraniol), C30 (squalenes), C40 (carotenes) and C50 (bacterioruberins compounds), as reported by Kates (1978). These results, which indicate strong general similarities between genetically diverse organisms, support the classification of these organisms in a separate phylogenetic group. The occurrence of similar isoprenoid compounds in petroleum and ancient sediments and the fact that the methanogens, halophiles and thermoacidophiles live in conditions presumed to have prevailed in archaen times suggest that the isoprenoid compounds in petroleum compounds and sediment may have been directly synthesized by organisms of this type

  12. Isoprenoid Alcohols are Susceptible to Oxidation with Singlet Oxygen and Hydroxyl Radicals.

    PubMed

    Komaszylo Née Siedlecka, Joanna; Kania, Magdalena; Masnyk, Marek; Cmoch, Piotr; Lozinska, Iwona; Czarnocki, Zbigniew; Skorupinska-Tudek, Karolina; Danikiewicz, Witold; Swiezewska, Ewa

    2016-02-01

    Isoprenoids, as common constituents of all living cells, are exposed to oxidative agents--reactive oxygen species, for example, singlet oxygen or hydroxyl radicals. Despite this fact, products of oxidation of polyisoprenoids have never been characterized. In this study, chemical oxidation of isoprenoid alcohols (Prenol-2 and -10) was performed using singlet oxygen (generated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide/molybdate or upon photochemical reaction in the presence of porphyrin), oxygen (formed upon hydrogen peroxide dismutation) or hydroxyl radical (generated by the hydrogen peroxide/sonication, UV/titanium dioxide or UV/hydrogen peroxide) systems. The structure of the obtained products, hydroxy-, peroxy- and heterocyclic derivatives, was studied with the aid of mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods. Furthermore, mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization appeared to be a useful analytical tool to detect the products of oxidation of isoprenoids (ESI-MS analysis), as well as to establish their structure on the basis of the fragmentation spectra of selected ions (ESI-MS/MS analysis). Taken together, susceptibility of polyisoprenoid alcohols to various oxidizing agents was shown for the first time.

  13. Constructing tailored isoprenoid products by structure-guided modification of geranylgeranyl reductase.

    PubMed

    Kung, Yan; McAndrew, Ryan P; Xie, Xinkai; Liu, Charlie C; Pereira, Jose H; Adams, Paul D; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-07-08

    The archaeal enzyme geranylgeranyl reductase (GGR) catalyzes hydrogenation of carbon-carbon double bonds to produce the saturated alkyl chains of the organism's unusual isoprenoid-derived cell membrane. Enzymatic reduction of isoprenoid double bonds is of considerable interest both to natural products researchers and to synthetic biologists interested in the microbial production of isoprenoid drug or biofuel molecules. Here we present crystal structures of GGR from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, including the structure of GGR bound to geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP). The structures are presented alongside activity data that depict the sequential reduction of GGPP to H6GGPP via the intermediates H2GGPP and H4GGPP. We then modified the enzyme to generate sequence variants that display increased rates of H6GGPP production or are able to halt the extent of reduction at H2GGPP and H4GGPP. Crystal structures of these variants not only reveal the structural bases for their altered activities; they also shed light onto the catalytic mechanism employed.

  14. Restricted utility of aryl isoprenoids as indicators for photic zone anoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koopmans, Martin P.; Schouten, Stefan; Kohnen, Math E. L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    1996-12-01

    In a North Sea oil, the carotenoid derivatives β-carotene, β-isorenieratane, and isorenieratane were identified, together with a series of aryl isoprenoids with a 2,3,6-trimethyl substitution pattern for the aromatic ring. The δ13C values of β-carotene and β-isorenieratane are similar, whereas isorenieratane is ca. 15% heavier. This suggests that β-isorenieratane is not derived from β-isorenieratane biosynthesised by Chlorobiaceae, but from aromatisation of β-carotene. This was confirmed by laboratory aromatisation of partially hydrogenated β-carotene, which yielded β-isorenieratane as the main product. The aryl isoprenoids, which can be formed by Csbnd C bond cleavage of both isorenieratane and β-isorenieratane, have a mixed isotopic signature in the oil. These results indicate that mere identification of aryl isoprenoids, without determination of their δ13C values, cannot be used to assess the presence of Chlorobiaceae, and, thus, photic zone anoxia in the depositional environment.

  15. Metabolite profiling identified methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate efflux as a limiting step in microbial isoprenoid production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kang; Zou, Ruiyang; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Too, Heng-Phon

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are natural products that are all derived from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). These precursors are synthesized either by the mevalonate (MVA) pathway or the 1-Deoxy-D-Xylulose 5-Phosphate (DXP) pathway. Metabolic engineering of microbes has enabled overproduction of various isoprenoid products from the DXP pathway including lycopene, artemisinic acid, taxadiene and levopimaradiene. To date, there is no method to accurately measure all the DXP metabolic intermediates simultaneously so as to enable the identification of potential flux limiting steps. In this study, a solid phase extraction coupled with ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (SPE UPLC-MS) method was developed. This method was used to measure the DXP intermediates in genetically engineered E. coli. Unexpectedly, methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate (MEC) was found to efflux when certain enzymes of the pathway were over-expressed, demonstrating the existence of a novel competing pathway branch in the DXP metabolism. Guided by these findings, ispG was overexpressed and was found to effectively reduce the efflux of MEC inside the cells, resulting in a significant increase in downstream isoprenoid production. This study demonstrated the necessity to quantify metabolites enabling the identification of a hitherto unrecognized pathway and provided useful insights into rational design in metabolic engineering.

  16. Genomic perspectives on the birth and spread of plastids

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The endosymbiotic origin of plastids from cyanobacteria was a landmark event in the history of eukaryotic life. Subsequent to the evolution of primary plastids, photosynthesis spread from red and green algae to unrelated eukaryotes by secondary and tertiary endosymbiosis. Although the movement of cyanobacterial genes from endosymbiont to host is well studied, less is known about the migration of eukaryotic genes from one nucleus to the other in the context of serial endosymbiosis. Here I explore the magnitude and potential impact of nucleus-to-nucleus endosymbiotic gene transfer in the evolution of complex algae, and the extent to which such transfers compromise our ability to infer the deep structure of the eukaryotic tree of life. In addition to endosymbiotic gene transfer, horizontal gene transfer events occurring before, during, and after endosymbioses further confound our efforts to reconstruct the ancient mergers that forged multiple lines of photosynthetic microbial eukaryotes. PMID:25902528

  17. CyanoClust: comparative genome resources of cyanobacteria and plastids.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Naobumi V; Sato, Naoki

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, which perform oxygen-evolving photosynthesis as do chloroplasts of plants and algae, are one of the best-studied prokaryotic phyla and one from which many representative genomes have been sequenced. Lack of a suitable comparative genomic database has been a problem in cyanobacterial genomics because many proteins involved in physiological functions such as photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation are not catalogued in commonly used databases, such as Clusters of Orthologous Proteins (COG). CyanoClust is a database of homolog groups in cyanobacteria and plastids that are produced by the program Gclust. We have developed a web-server system for the protein homology database featuring cyanobacteria and plastids. Database URL: http://cyanoclust.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/.

  18. Plastid-nucleus communication involves calcium-modulated MAPK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hailong; Feng, Peiqiang; Chi, Wei; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Li, Yuan; Ren, Dongtao; Lu, Congming; David Rochaix, Jean; Leister, Dario; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast retrograde signals play important roles in coordinating the plastid and nuclear gene expression and are critical for proper chloroplast biogenesis and for maintaining optimal chloroplast functions in response to environmental changes in plants. Until now, the signals and the mechanisms for retrograde signalling remain poorly understood. Here we identify factors that allow the nucleus to perceive stress conditions in the chloroplast and to respond accordingly by inducing or repressing specific nuclear genes encoding plastid proteins. We show that ABI4, which is known to repress the LHCB genes during retrograde signalling, is activated through phosphorylation by the MAP kinases MPK3/MPK6 and the activity of these kinases is regulated through 14-3-3ω-mediated Ca2+-dependent scaffolding depending on the chloroplast calcium sensor protein CAS. These findings uncover an additional mechanism in which chloroplast-modulated Ca2+ signalling controls the MAPK pathway for the activation of critical components of the retrograde signalling chain. PMID:27399341

  19. Plastid-localized amino acid biosynthetic pathways of Plantae are predominantly composed of non-cyanobacterial enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Prieto, Adrian; Moustafa, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Studies of photosynthetic eukaryotes have revealed that the evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria involved the recruitment of non-cyanobacterial proteins. Our phylogenetic survey of >100 Arabidopsis nuclear-encoded plastid enzymes involved in amino acid biosynthesis identified only 21 unambiguous cyanobacterial-derived proteins. Some of the several non-cyanobacterial plastid enzymes have a shared phylogenetic origin in the three Plantae lineages. We hypothesize that during the evolution of plastids some enzymes encoded in the host nuclear genome were mistargeted into the plastid. Then, the activity of those foreign enzymes was sustained by both the plastid metabolites and interactions with the native cyanobacterial enzymes. Some of the novel enzymatic activities were favored by selective compartmentation of additional complementary enzymes. The mosaic phylogenetic composition of the plastid amino acid biosynthetic pathways and the reduced number of plastid-encoded proteins of non-cyanobacterial origin suggest that enzyme recruitment underlies the recompartmentation of metabolic routes during the evolution of plastids. PMID:23233874

  20. Production of high levels of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate in plastids of Camelina sativa seeds.

    PubMed

    Malik, Meghna R; Yang, Wenyu; Patterson, Nii; Tang, Jihong; Wellinghoff, Rachel L; Preuss, Mary L; Burkitt, Claire; Sharma, Nirmala; Ji, Yuanyuan; Jez, Joseph M; Peoples, Oliver P; Jaworski, Jan G; Cahoon, Edgar B; Snell, Kristi D

    2015-06-01

    Poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production in plastids of Camelina sativa seeds was investigated by comparing levels of polymer produced upon transformation of plants with five different binary vectors containing combinations of five seed-specific promoters for expression of transgenes. Genes encoding PHB biosynthetic enzymes were modified at the N-terminus to encode a plastid targeting signal. PHB levels of up to 15% of the mature seed weight were measured in single sacrificed T1 seeds with a genetic construct containing the oleosin and glycinin promoters. A more detailed analysis of the PHB production potential of two of the best performing binary vectors in a Camelina line bred for larger seed size yielded lines containing up to 15% polymer in mature T2 seeds. Transmission electron microscopy showed the presence of distinct granules of PHB in the seeds. PHB production had varying effects on germination, emergence and survival of seedlings. Once true leaves formed, plants grew normally and were able to set seeds. PHB synthesis lowered the total oil but not the protein content of engineered seeds. A change in the oil fatty acid profile was also observed. High molecular weight polymer was produced with weight-averaged molecular weights varying between 600 000 and 1 500 000, depending on the line. Select lines were advanced to later generations yielding a line with 13.7% PHB in T4 seeds. The levels of polymer produced in this study are the highest reported to date in a seed and are an important step forward for commercializing an oilseed-based platform for PHB production.

  1. Design and synthesis of non-hydrolyzable homoisoprenoid α-monofluorophosphonate inhibitors of PPAPDC family integral membrane lipid phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Thangaiah; Ren, Hongmei; Subramanian, Karunai Leela; Sunkara, Manjula; Onono, Fredrick O; Morris, Andrew J; Spielmann, H Peter

    2014-09-15

    An efficient, diversity oriented synthesis of homoisoprenoid α-monofluorophosphonates utilizing electrophilic fluorination is presented along with their activity as inhibitors of PPAPDC2 family integral membrane lipid phosphatases. These novel phosphatase-resistant analogues of isoprenoid monophosphates are a platform for further structure-activity relationship studies and provide access to other isoprenoid family members where the phosphate ester oxygen is replaced by a α-monofluoromethylene moiety.

  2. Seasonality of isoprenoid emissions from a primary rainforest in central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Eliane G.; Jardine, Kolby; Tota, Julio; Jardine, Angela; Yãnez-Serrano, Ana Maria; Karl, Thomas; Tavares, Julia; Nelson, Bruce; Gu, Dasa; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Martin, Scot; Artaxo, Paulo; Manzi, Antonio; Guenther, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Tropical rainforests are an important source of isoprenoid and other volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions to the atmosphere. The seasonal variation of these compounds is however still poorly understood. In this study, vertical profiles of mixing ratios of isoprene, total monoterpenes and total sesquiterpenes, were measured within and above the canopy, in a primary rainforest in central Amazonia, using a proton transfer reaction - mass spectrometer (PTR-MS). Fluxes of these compounds from the canopy into the atmosphere were estimated from PTR-MS measurements by using an inverse Lagrangian transport model. Measurements were carried out continuously from September 2010 to January 2011, encompassing the dry and wet seasons. Mixing ratios were higher during the dry (isoprene - 2.68 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.67 ± 0.3 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.09 ± 0.07 ppbv) than the wet season (isoprene - 1.66 ± 0.9 ppbv, total monoterpenes - 0.47 ± 0.2 ppbv; total sesquiterpenes - 0.03 ± 0.02 ppbv) for all compounds. Ambient air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) behaved similarly. Daytime isoprene and total monoterpene mixing ratios were highest within the canopy, rather than near the ground or above the canopy. By comparison, daytime total sesquiterpene mixing ratios were highest near the ground. Daytime fluxes varied significantly between seasons for all compounds. The maximums for isoprene (2.53 ± 0.5 µmol m-2 h-1) and total monoterpenes (1.77 ± 0.05 µmol m-2 h-1) were observed in the late dry season, whereas the maximum for total sesquiterpenes was found during the dry-to-wet transition season (0.77 ± 0.1 µmol m-2 h-1). These flux estimates suggest that the canopy is the main source of isoprenoids emitted into the atmosphere for all seasons. However, uncertainties in turbulence parameterization near the ground could affect estimates of fluxes that come from the ground. Leaf phenology seemed to be an important driver of seasonal

  3. The origin of primary plastids: a pas de deux or a ménage à trois?

    PubMed

    Baum, David

    2013-01-01

    The idea of an endosymbiotic origin of plastids has become incontrovertible, but many important aspects of plastid origins remain obscured in the mists of more than a billion years of evolutionary history. This commentary provides a critical summary of a recent proposal that primary plastid endosymbiosis was facilitated by the secretion into the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens that allowed the host to utilize carbohydrates exported from the incipient plastid. Although not without flaws, the model provides an explanation for why primary plastids have evolved so rarely and why Archaeplastida, among all phagotrophic eukaryotes, succeeded in establishing primary plastids.

  4. Changes in plastid proteome and structure in arbuscular mycorrhizal roots display a nutrient starvation signature.

    PubMed

    Daher, Zeina; Recorbet, Ghislaine; Solymosi, Katalin; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Mounier, Arnaud; Morandi, Dominique; Lherminier, Jeannine; Wipf, Daniel; Dumas-Gaudot, Eliane; Schoefs, Benoît

    2017-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, arbuscule-containing root cortex cells display a proliferation of plastids, a feature usually ascribed to an increased plant anabolism despite the lack of studies focusing on purified root plastids. In this study, we investigated mycorrhiza-induced changes in plastidic pathways by performing a label-free comparative subcellular quantitative proteomic analysis targeted on plastid-enriched fractions isolated from Medicago truncatula roots, coupled to a cytological analysis of plastid structure. We identified 490 root plastid protein candidates, among which 79 changed in abundance upon mycorrhization, as inferred from spectral counting. According to cross-species sequence homology searches, the mycorrhiza-responsive proteome was enriched in proteins experimentally localized in thylakoids, whereas it was depleted of proteins ascribed predominantly to amyloplasts. Consistently, the analysis of plastid morphology using transmission electron microscopy indicated that starch depletion associated with the proliferation of membrane-free and tubular membrane-containing plastids was a feature specific to arbusculated cells. The loss of enzymes involved in carbon/nitrogen assimilation and provision of reducing power, coupled to macromolecule degradation events in the plastid-enriched fraction of mycorrhizal roots that paralleled lack of starch accumulation in arbusculated cells, lead us to propose that arbuscule functioning elicits a nutrient starvation and an oxidative stress signature that may prime arbuscule breakdown.

  5. High-Frequency Transformation of Undeveloped Plastids in Tobacco Suspension Cells

    PubMed Central

    Langbecker, Camri L.; Ye, Guang-Ning; Broyles, Debra L.; Duggan, Lisa L.; Xu, Charles W.; Hajdukiewicz, Peter T.J.; Armstrong, Charles L.; Staub, Jeffrey M.

    2004-01-01

    Although leaf chloroplast transformation technology was developed more than a decade ago, no reports exist of stable transformation of undeveloped plastids or other specialized plastid types, such as proplastids, etioplasts, or amyloplasts. In this work we report development of a dark-grown tobacco suspension cell model system to investigate the transformation potential of undeveloped plastids. Electron microscope analysis confirmed that the suspension cells carry plastids that are significantly smaller (approximately 50-fold less in volume) and have a very different subcellular localization and developmental state than leaf cell chloroplasts. Using antibiotic selection in the light, we demonstrated that both plastid and nuclear transformation of these cell suspensions is efficient and reproducible, with plastid transformation frequency at least equal to that of leaf chloroplast transformation. Homoplasmic plastid transformants are readily obtained in cell colonies, or in regenerated plants, providing a more consistent and versatile model than the leaf transformation system. Because of the uniformity of the cell suspension model, we could further show that growth rate, selection scheme, particle size, and DNA amount influence the frequency of transformation. Our results indicate that the rate-limiting steps for nuclear and plastid transformation are different, and each must be optimized separately. The suspension cell system will be useful as a model for understanding transformation in those plant species that utilize dark-grown embryogenic cultures and for characterizing the steps that lead to homoplasmic plastid transformation. PMID:15141065

  6. Plastid–Nuclear Interaction and Accelerated Coevolution in Plastid Ribosomal Genes in Geraniaceae

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Plastids and mitochondria have many protein complexes that include subunits encoded by organelle and nuclear genomes. In animal cells, compensatory evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits was identified and the high mitochondrial mutation rates were hypothesized to drive compensatory evolution in nuclear genomes. In plant cells, compensatory evolution between plastid and nucleus has rarely been investigated in a phylogenetic framework. To investigate plastid–nuclear coevolution, we focused on plastid ribosomal protein genes that are encoded by plastid and nuclear genomes from 27 Geraniales species. Substitution rates were compared for five sets of genes representing plastid- and nuclear-encoded ribosomal subunit proteins targeted to the cytosol or the plastid as well as nonribosomal protein controls. We found that nonsynonymous substitution rates (dN) and the ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (ω) were accelerated in both plastid- (CpRP) and nuclear-encoded subunits (NuCpRP) of the plastid ribosome relative to control sequences. Our analyses revealed strong signals of cytonuclear coevolution between plastid- and nuclear-encoded subunits, in which nonsynonymous substitutions in CpRP and NuCpRP tend to occur along the same branches in the Geraniaceae phylogeny. This coevolution pattern cannot be explained by physical interaction between amino acid residues. The forces driving accelerated coevolution varied with cellular compartment of the sequence. Increased ω in CpRP was mainly due to intensified positive selection whereas increased ω in NuCpRP was caused by relaxed purifying selection. In addition, the many indels identified in plastid rRNA genes in Geraniaceae may have contributed to changes in plastid subunits. PMID:27190001

  7. Photosynthetic limitations and volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids in the poikilochlorophyllous resurrection plant Xerophyta humilis during dehydration and rehydration.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Megan; Loreto, Francesco; Velikova, Violeta; Brunetti, Cecilia; Di Ferdinando, Martina; Tattini, Massimiliano; Calfapietra, Carlo; Farrant, Jill M

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the photosynthetic limitations occurring during dehydration and rehydration of Xerophyta humilis, a poikilochlorophyllous resurrection plant, and whether volatile and non-volatile isoprenoids might be involved in desiccation tolerance. Photosynthesis declined rapidly after dehydration below 85% relative water content (RWC). Raising intercellular CO(2) concentrations during desiccation suggest that the main photosynthetic limitation was photochemical, affecting energy-dependent RuBP regeneration. Imaging fluorescence confirmed that both the number of photosystem II (PSII) functional reaction centres and their efficiency were impaired under progressive dehydration, and revealed the occurrence of heterogeneous photosynthesis during desiccation, being the basal leaf area more resistant to the stress. Full recovery in photosynthetic parameters occurred on rehydration, confirming that photosynthetic limitations were fully reversible and that no permanent damage occurred. During desiccation, zeaxanthin and lutein increased only when photosynthesis had ceased, implying that these isoprenoids do not directly scavenge reactive oxygen species, but rather protect photosynthetic membranes from damage and consequent denaturation. X. humilis was found to emit isoprene, a volatile isoprenoid that acts as a membrane strengthener in plants. Isoprene emission was stimulated by drought and peaked at 80% RWC. We surmise that isoprene and non-volatile isoprenoids cooperate in reducing membrane damage in X. humilis, isoprene being effective when desiccation is moderate while non-volatile isoprenoids operate when water deficit is more extreme.

  8. A RubisCO like protein links SAM metabolism with isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Evans, Bradley S.; Cho, Kyuil; Warlick, Benjamin P.; Sriram, Jaya; Wood, B. McKay; Imker, Heidi J.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Tabita, F. Robert; Gerlt, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Functional assignment of uncharacterized proteins is a challenge in the era of large-scale genome sequencing. Here, we combine in extracto-NMR, proteomics, and transcriptomics with a newly developed (knock-out) metabolomics platform to determine a potential physiological role for a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RubisCO)-like protein (RLP) from Rhodospirillum rubrum. Our studies unravelled an unexpected link in bacterial central carbon metabolism between S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent polyamine metabolism and isoprenoid biosynthesis and also provide an alternative approach to assign enzyme function at the organismic level. PMID:23042035

  9. Differential Activities of Thalidomide and Isoprenoid Biosynthetic Pathway Inhibitors in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Holstein, Sarah A.; Tong, Huaxiang; Hohl, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Thalidomide has emerged as an effective agent for treating multiple myeloma, however the precise mechanism of action remains unknown. Agents known to target the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) can have cytotoxic effects in myeloma cells. The interactions between thalidomide and IBP inhibitors in human multiple myeloma cells were evaluated. Enhanced cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis was observed in RPMI-8226 cells. Examination of intracellular levels of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) revealed a wide variance in basal levels and response to IBP inhibitors. These findings provide a mechanism for the differential sensitivity of myeloma cells to pharmacologic manipulation of the IBP. PMID:19646757

  10. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced by thermal alteration of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philp, R. P.; Brown, S.; Calvin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The potential of algae and photosynthetic bacteria to serve as precursors of kerogen was studied to determine what factors affect the relative rates of formation of precursor hydrocarbons. Cells of Nostoc muscorum and Rhodopseudomonas spheroides were subjected to thermal alteration (by heating samples in glass tubes sealed under nitrogen) for two, four, and twelve weeks. Both unextracted and extracted cells in the absence and presence of montmorillonite were investigated, and the isoprenoid hydrocarbons produced in these experiments were determined. Phytane and five isomeric phytenes were the main hydrocarbons observed; their relative rates of formation in the different experimental conditions are described. No phytadienes, pristane, or pristenes were detected.

  11. Remote sensing of plant emissions of volatile isoprenoids with PRI. Prospects for upscaling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penuelas, J.

    2013-12-01

    Josep Peñuelas*1,2, Giovanni Marino1,2,3,4, Joan LLusia1,2, Catherine Morfopoulos1,2,5, Gerard Farre-Armengol1,2, Shawn Kefauver, Alex Guenther6 , Francesca Rapparini7 , Roger Seco1,2,6, Marc Estiarte1,2, Mónica Mejia-Chang1,2, Romà Ogaya1,2, Jordi Sardans1,2 , Andrew Turnipseed6, Peter Harley6, Osvaldo Facini7, Rita Baraldi7, Jim Greenberg6 , Iolanda Filella1,2 1 CSIC, Global Ecology Unit CREAF-CEAB-UAB, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 2 CREAF, Cerdanyola del Vallés 08193, Catalonia, Spain 3 Dipartimento di Bioscienze e Territorio, Università degli Studi del Molise, Contrada Fonte Lappone, 86090 Pesche (IS), Italy 4 Institute for Plant Protection, National Research Council, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy 5 Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Silwood Park, Ascot, SL5 7PY, UK 6 Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000, USA 7 Biometeorology Institute, IBIMET-CNR, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna, Italy Abstract Terrestrial plants re-emit around 1-2% of the carbon they fix as isoprene and monoterpenes. These emissions play major roles in the ecological relationships among living organisms and in atmospheric chemistry and climate, and yet their actual quantification at the ecosystem level in different regions is far from being resolved. Phenomenological models are used to estimate the emission rates, but the limited understanding of the function and regulation of these emissions leads to large uncertainties in such estimations. Many measurements have been made at the foliar but few at the ecosystem level, and those that do exist are limited in space and time. We here provide evidence that a simple remote sensing index, the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which is indicative of light use efficiency (LUE), is a good indirect estimator of foliar isoprenoid emissions and therefore can be used to sense them remotely. These results open

  12. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Makoto T.; Kojo, Kei H.; Kazama, Yusuke; Sasaki, Shun; Abe, Tomoko; Itoh, Ryuuichi D.

    2015-01-01

    Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids. PMID:26500667

  13. Characterization of the plastid-specific germination and seedling establishment transcriptional programme.

    PubMed

    Demarsy, E; Buhr, F; Lambert, E; Lerbs-Mache, S

    2012-01-01

    Upon imbibition, dry seeds rapidly gain metabolic activity and the switching on of a germination-specific transcriptional programme in the nucleus goes ahead, with the induction of many nucleus-encoded transcripts coding for plastid-localized proteins. Dedifferentiated plastids present in dry seeds differentiate into chloroplasts in cotyledons and into amyloplasts in the root and in the hypocotyl, raising the question of whether the beginning of a new plant's life cycle is also characterized by specific changes in the plastid transcriptional programme. Here the plastid transcriptome is characterized during imbibition/stratification, germination, and early seedling outgrowth. It is shown that each of these three developmental steps is characterized by specific changes in the transcriptome profile, due to differential activities of the three plastid RNA polymerases and showing the integration of plastids into a germination-specific transcriptional programme. All three RNA polymerases are active during imbibition; that is, at 4 °C in darkness. However, activity of plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) is restricted to the rrn operon. After cold release, PEP changes specificity by also transcribing photosynthesis-related genes. The period of germination and radicle outgrowth is further characterized by remarkable antisense RNA production that diminishes during greening when photosynthesis-related mRNAs accumulate to their highest but to very different steady-state levels. During stratification and germination mRNA accumulation is not paralleled by protein accumulation, indicating that plastid transcription is more important for efficient germination than translation.

  14. Fluorescent Protein Aided Insights on Plastids and their Extensions: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Kathleen; Wozny, Michael R.; Jaipargas, Erica-Ashley; Barton, Kiah A.; Anderson, Cole; Mathur, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Multi-colored fluorescent proteins targeted to plastids have provided new insights on the dynamic behavior of these organelles and their interactions with other cytoplasmic components and compartments. Sub-plastidic components such as thylakoids, stroma, the inner and outer membranes of the plastid envelope, nucleoids, plastoglobuli, and starch grains have been efficiently highlighted in living plant cells. In addition, stroma filled membrane extensions called stromules have drawn attention to the dynamic nature of the plastid and its interactions with the rest of the cell. Use of dual and triple fluorescent protein combinations has begun to reveal plastid interactions with mitochondria, the nucleus, the endoplasmic reticulum and F-actin and suggests integral roles of plastids in retrograde signaling, cell to cell communication as well as plant-pathogen interactions. While the rapid advances and insights achieved through fluorescent protein based research on plastids are commendable it is necessary to endorse meaningful observations but subject others to closer scrutiny. Here, in order to develop a better and more comprehensive understanding of plastids and their extensions we provide a critical appraisal of recent information that has been acquired using targeted fluorescent protein probes. PMID:26834765

  15. Endosymbiosis undone by stepwise elimination of the plastid in a parasitic dinoflagellate

    PubMed Central

    Gornik, Sebastian G.; Febrimarsa; Cassin, Andrew M.; MacRae, James I.; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Rchiad, Zineb; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bacic, Antony; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Pain, Arnab; Waller, Ross F.

    2015-01-01

    Organelle gain through endosymbiosis has been integral to the origin and diversification of eukaryotes, and, once gained, plastids and mitochondria seem seldom lost. Indeed, discovery of nonphotosynthetic plastids in many eukaryotes—notably, the apicoplast in apicomplexan parasites such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium—highlights the essential metabolic functions performed by plastids beyond photosynthesis. Once a cell becomes reliant on these ancillary functions, organelle dependence is apparently difficult to overcome. Previous examples of endosymbiotic organelle loss (either mitochondria or plastids), which have been invoked to explain the origin of eukaryotic diversity, have subsequently been recognized as organelle reduction to cryptic forms, such as mitosomes and apicoplasts. Integration of these ancient symbionts with their hosts has been too well developed to reverse. Here, we provide evidence that the dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp., a marine parasite of crustaceans, represents a rare case of endosymbiotic organelle loss by the elimination of the plastid. Extensive RNA and genomic sequencing data provide no evidence for a plastid organelle, but, rather, reveal a metabolic decoupling from known plastid functions that typically impede organelle loss. This independence has been achieved through retention of ancestral anabolic pathways, enzyme relocation from the plastid to the cytosol, and metabolic scavenging from the parasite’s host. Hematodinium sp. thus represents a further dimension of endosymbiosis—life after the organelle. PMID:25902514

  16. Precise excision of plastid DNA by the large serine recombinase Bxb1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To elucidate the precise excision of transgene, tobacco plastid genome was transformed with a vector (pTCH-BxbPB) that contains a stuffer DNA fragment flanked by directly oriented attB and attP recognition sites for the Bxb1 recombinase. The transformed plastid genomes containing the recognition si...

  17. Combined heat shock protein 90 and ribosomal RNA sequence phylogeny supports multiple replacements of dinoflagellate plastids.

    PubMed

    Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Minge, Marianne A; Cavalier-Smith, Tom; Nedreklepp, Joachim M; Klaveness, Dag; Jakobsen, Kjetill S

    2006-01-01

    Dinoflagellates harbour diverse plastids obtained from several algal groups, including haptophytes, diatoms, cryptophytes, and prasinophytes. Their major plastid type with the accessory pigment peridinin is found in the vast majority of photosynthetic species. Some species of dinoflagellates have other aberrantly pigmented plastids. We sequenced the nuclear small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene of the "green" dinoflagellate Gymnodinium chlorophorum and show that it is sister to Lepidodinium viride, indicating that their common ancestor obtained the prasinophyte (or other green alga) plastid in one event. As the placement of dinoflagellate species that acquired green algal or haptophyte plastids is unclear from small and large subunit (LSU) rRNA trees, we tested the usefulness of the heat shock protein (Hsp) 90 gene for dinoflagellate phylogeny by sequencing it from four species with aberrant plastids (G. chlorophorum, Karlodinium micrum, Karenia brevis, and Karenia mikimotoi) plus Alexandrium tamarense, and constructing phylogenetic trees for Hsp90 and rRNAs, separately and together. Analyses of the Hsp90 and concatenated data suggest an ancestral origin of the peridinin-containing plastid, and two independent replacements of the peridinin plastid soon after the early radiation of the dinoflagellates. Thus, the Hsp90 gene seems to be a promising phylogenetic marker for dinoflagellate phylogeny.

  18. Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-06-23

    In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future.

  19. Plastid-expressed 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase genes provide high level glyphosate tolerance in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ye, G N; Hajdukiewicz, P T; Broyles, D; Rodriguez, D; Xu, C W; Nehra, N; Staub, J M

    2001-02-01

    Plastid transformation (transplastomic) technology has several potential advantages for biotechnological applications including the use of unmodified prokaryotic genes for engineering, potential high-level gene expression and gene containment due to maternal inheritance in most crop plants. However, the efficacy of a plastid-encoded trait may change depending on plastid number and tissue type. We report a feasibility study in tobacco plastids to achieve high-level herbicide resistance in both vegetative tissues and reproductive organs. We chose to test glyphosate resistance via over-expression in plastids of tolerant forms of 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS). Immunological, enzymatic and whole-plant assays were used to prove the efficacy of three different prokaryotic (Achromobacter, Agrobacterium and Bacillus) EPSPS genes. Using the Agrobacterium strain CP4 EPSPS as a model we identified translational control sequences that direct a 10,000-fold range of protein accumulation (to >10% total soluble protein in leaves). Plastid-expressed EPSPS could provide very high levels of glyphosate resistance, although levels of resistance in vegetative and reproductive tissues differed depending on EPSPS accumulation levels, and correlated to the plastid abundance in these tissues. Paradoxically, higher levels of plastid-expressed EPSPS protein accumulation were apparently required for efficacy than from a similar nuclear-encoded gene. Nevertheless, the demonstration of high-level glyphosate tolerance in vegetative and reproductive organs using transplastomic technology provides a necessary step for transfer of this technology to other crop species.

  20. Complete Plastid Genome Sequencing of Four Tilia Species (Malvaceae): A Comparative Analysis and Phylogenetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jie; Ma, Peng-Fei; Li, Hong-Tao; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Tilia is an ecologically and economically important genus in the family Malvaceae. However, there is no complete plastid genome of Tilia sequenced to date, and the taxonomy of Tilia is difficult owing to frequent hybridization and polyploidization. A well-supported interspecific relationships of this genus is not available due to limited informative sites from the commonly used molecular markers. We report here the complete plastid genome sequences of four Tilia species determined by the Illumina technology. The Tilia plastid genome is 162,653 bp to 162,796 bp in length, encoding 113 unique genes and a total number of 130 genes. The gene order and organization of the Tilia plastid genome exhibits the general structure of angiosperms and is very similar to other published plastid genomes of Malvaceae. As other long-lived tree genera, the sequence divergence among the four Tilia plastid genomes is very low. And we analyzed the nucleotide substitution patterns and the evolution of insertions and deletions in the Tilia plastid genomes. Finally, we build a phylogeny of the four sampled Tilia species with high supports using plastid phylogenomics, suggesting that it is an efficient way to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of this genus. PMID:26566230

  1. Evidence for horizontal transfer of mitochondrial DNA to the plastid genome in a bamboo genus

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Xiao; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    In flowering plants, three genomes (nuclear, mitochondrial, and plastid) coexist and intracellular horizontal transfer of DNA is prevalent, especially from the plastid to the mitochondrion genome. However, the plastid genomes are generally conserved in evolution and have long been considered immune to foreign DNA. Recently, the opposite direction of DNA transfer from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome has been reported in two eudicot lineages. Here we sequenced 6 plastid genomes of bamboos, three of which are neotropical woody species and three are herbaceous ones. Several unusual features were found, including the duplication of trnT-GGU and loss of one copy of rps19 due to contraction of inverted repeats (IRs). The most intriguing was the ~2.7 kb insertion in the plastid IR regions in the three herbaceous bamboos. Furthermore, the insertion was documented to be horizontally transferred from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome. Our study provided evidence of the mitochondrial-to-plastid DNA transfer in the monocots, demonstrating again that this rare event does occur in other angiosperm lineages. However, the mechanism underlying the transfer remains obscure, and more studies in other plants may elucidate it in the future. PMID:26100509

  2. Plastid sedimentation kinetics in roots of wild-type and starch-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacCleery, S. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Sedimentation and movement of plastids in columella cells of the root cap were measured in seedlings of wild-type, a reduced starch mutant, and a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis. To assay for sedimentation, we used both linear measurements and the change of angle from the cell center as indices in vertical and reoriented plants with the aid of computer-assisted image analysis. Seedlings were fixed at short periods after reorientation, and plastid sedimentation correlated with starch content in the three strains of Arabidopsis. Amyloplasts of wild-type seedlings showed the greatest sedimentation, whereas plastids of the starchless mutant showed no significant sedimentation in the vertically grown and reoriented seedlings. Because previous research has shown that a full complement of starch is needed for full gravitropic sensitivity, this study correlates increased sensitivity with plastid sedimentation. However, although plastid sedimentation contributed to gravisensitivity, it was not required, because the gravitropic starchless mutant had plastids that did not sediment. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to measure plastid sedimentation in Arabidopsis roots after reorientation of seedlings. Taken together, the results of this study are consistent with the classic plastid-based and protoplast-based models of graviperception and suggest that multiple systems of perception exist in plant cells.

  3. Endosymbiosis undone by stepwise elimination of the plastid in a parasitic dinoflagellate.

    PubMed

    Gornik, Sebastian G; Febrimarsa; Cassin, Andrew M; MacRae, James I; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Rchiad, Zineb; McConville, Malcolm J; Bacic, Antony; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Pain, Arnab; Waller, Ross F

    2015-05-05

    Organelle gain through endosymbiosis has been integral to the origin and diversification of eukaryotes, and, once gained, plastids and mitochondria seem seldom lost. Indeed, discovery of nonphotosynthetic plastids in many eukaryotes--notably, the apicoplast in apicomplexan parasites such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium--highlights the essential metabolic functions performed by plastids beyond photosynthesis. Once a cell becomes reliant on these ancillary functions, organelle dependence is apparently difficult to overcome. Previous examples of endosymbiotic organelle loss (either mitochondria or plastids), which have been invoked to explain the origin of eukaryotic diversity, have subsequently been recognized as organelle reduction to cryptic forms, such as mitosomes and apicoplasts. Integration of these ancient symbionts with their hosts has been too well developed to reverse. Here, we provide evidence that the dinoflagellate Hematodinium sp., a marine parasite of crustaceans, represents a rare case of endosymbiotic organelle loss by the elimination of the plastid. Extensive RNA and genomic sequencing data provide no evidence for a plastid organelle, but, rather, reveal a metabolic decoupling from known plastid functions that typically impede organelle loss. This independence has been achieved through retention of ancestral anabolic pathways, enzyme relocation from the plastid to the cytosol, and metabolic scavenging from the parasite's host. Hematodinium sp. thus represents a further dimension of endosymbiosis--life after the organelle.

  4. Complete Plastid Genome Sequencing of Four Tilia Species (Malvaceae): A Comparative Analysis and Phylogenetic Implications.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Ma, Peng-Fei; Li, Hong-Tao; Li, De-Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Tilia is an ecologically and economically important genus in the family Malvaceae. However, there is no complete plastid genome of Tilia sequenced to date, and the taxonomy of Tilia is difficult owing to frequent hybridization and polyploidization. A well-supported interspecific relationships of this genus is not available due to limited informative sites from the commonly used molecular markers. We report here the complete plastid genome sequences of four Tilia species determined by the Illumina technology. The Tilia plastid genome is 162,653 bp to 162,796 bp in length, encoding 113 unique genes and a total number of 130 genes. The gene order and organization of the Tilia plastid genome exhibits the general structure of angiosperms and is very similar to other published plastid genomes of Malvaceae. As other long-lived tree genera, the sequence divergence among the four Tilia plastid genomes is very low. And we analyzed the nucleotide substitution patterns and the evolution of insertions and deletions in the Tilia plastid genomes. Finally, we build a phylogeny of the four sampled Tilia species with high supports using plastid phylogenomics, suggesting that it is an efficient way to resolve the phylogenetic relationships of this genus.

  5. Whole mitochondrial and plastid genome SNP analysis of nine date palm cultivars reveals plastid heteroplasmy and close phylogenetic relationships among cultivars.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Jamal S M; Arasappan, Dhivya; Bahieldin, Ahmed; Abo-Aba, Salah; Bafeel, Sameera; Zari, Talal A; Edris, Sherif; Shokry, Ahmed M; Gadalla, Nour O; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Al-Kordy, Magdy A; El-Domyati, Fotoh M; Jansen, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Date palm is a very important crop in western Asia and northern Africa, and it is the oldest domesticated fruit tree with archaeological records dating back 5000 years. The huge economic value of this crop has generated considerable interest in breeding programs to enhance production of dates. One of the major limitations of these efforts is the uncertainty regarding the number of date palm cultivars, which are currently based on fruit shape, size, color, and taste. Whole mitochondrial and plastid genome sequences were utilized to examine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of date palms to evaluate the efficacy of this approach for molecular characterization of cultivars. Mitochondrial and plastid genomes of nine Saudi Arabian cultivars were sequenced. For each species about 60 million 100 bp paired-end reads were generated from total genomic DNA using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. For each cultivar, sequences were aligned separately to the published date palm plastid and mitochondrial reference genomes, and SNPs were identified. The results identified cultivar-specific SNPs for eight of the nine cultivars. Two previous SNP analyses of mitochondrial and plastid genomes identified substantial intra-cultivar ( = intra-varietal) polymorphisms in organellar genomes but these studies did not properly take into account the fact that nearly half of the plastid genome has been integrated into the mitochondrial genome. Filtering all sequencing reads that mapped to both organellar genomes nearly eliminated mitochondrial heteroplasmy but all plastid SNPs remained heteroplasmic. This investigation provides valuable insights into how to deal with interorganellar DNA transfer in performing SNP analyses from total genomic DNA. The results confirm recent suggestions that plastid heteroplasmy is much more common than previously thought. Finally, low levels of sequence variation in plastid and mitochondrial genomes argue for using nuclear SNPs for molecular

  6. Proteomic analysis of the Cyanophora paradoxa muroplast provides clues on early events in plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Facchinelli, Fabio; Pribil, Mathias; Oster, Ulrike; Ebert, Nina J; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Leister, Dario; Weber, Andreas P M

    2013-02-01

    Glaucophytes represent the first lineage of photosynthetic eukaryotes of primary endosymbiotic origin that diverged after plastid establishment. The muroplast of Cyanophora paradoxa represents a primitive plastid that resembles its cyanobacterial ancestor in pigment composition and the presence of a peptidoglycan wall. To attain insights into the evolutionary history of cyanobiont integration and plastid development, it would thus be highly desirable to obtain knowledge on the composition of the glaucophyte plastid proteome. Here, we provide the first proteomic analysis of the muroplast of C. paradoxa. Mass spectrometric analysis of the muroplast proteome identified 510 proteins with high confidence. The protein repertoire of the muroplast revealed novel paths for reduced carbon flow and export to the cytosol through a sugar phosphate transporter of chlamydial origin. We propose that C. paradoxa possesses a primordial plastid mirroring the situation in the early protoalga.

  7. Large-scale phylogenomic analyses indicate a deep origin of primary plastids within cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Criscuolo, Alexis; Gribaldo, Simonetta

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of photosynthetic eukaryotes has played a crucial role in evolution and has strongly modified earth's ecology. Several phylogenetic analyses have established that primary plastids arose from a cyanobacterium through endosymbiosis. However, the question of which present-day cyanobacterial lineage is most closely related to primary plastids has been unclear. Here, we have performed an extensive phylogenomic investigation on the origin of primary plastids based on the analysis of up to 191 protein markers and over 30,000 aligned amino acid sites from 22 primary photosynthetic eukaryotes and 61 cyanobacteria representing a wide taxonomic sampling of this phylum. By using a number of solutions to circumvent a large range of systematic errors, we have reconstructed a robust global phylogeny of cyanobacteria and studied the placement of primary plastids within it. Our results strongly support an early emergence of primary plastids within cyanobacteria, prior to the diversification of most present-day cyanobacterial lineages for which genomic data are available.

  8. Plastid transformation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) by polyethylene glycol treatment of protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Lelivelt, Cilia L C; van Dun, Kees M P; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; McCabe, Matthew S; Hogg, Bridget V; Nugent, Jacqueline M

    2014-01-01

    A detailed protocol for PEG-mediated plastid transformation of Lactuca sativa cv. Flora, using leaf protoplasts, is described. Successful plastid transformation using protoplasts requires a large number of viable cells, high plating densities, and an efficient regeneration system. Transformation was achieved using a vector that targets genes to the trnI/trnA intergenic region of the lettuce plastid genome. The aadA gene, encoding an adenylyltransferase enzyme that confers spectinomycin resistance, was used as a selectable marker. With the current method, the expected transformation frequency is 1-2 spectinomycin-resistant cell lines per 10(6) viable protoplasts. Fertile, diploid, homoplasmic, plastid-transformed lines were obtained. Transmission of the plastid-encoded transgene to the T1 generation was demonstrated.

  9. RNase P RNA from the recently evolved plastid of Paulinella and from algae.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Bayard, Pilar; Puerto-Galán, Leonor; Vioque, Agustín

    2014-11-13

    The RNase P RNA catalytic subunit (RPR) encoded in some plastids has been found to be functionally defective. The amoeba Paulinella chromatophora contains an organelle (chromatophore) that is derived from the recent endosymbiotic acquisition of a cyanobacterium, and therefore represents a model of the early steps in the acquisition of plastids. In contrast with plastid RPRs the chromatophore RPR retains functionality similar to the cyanobacterial enzyme. The chromatophore RPR sequence deviates from consensus at some positions but those changes allow optimal activity compared with mutated chromatophore RPR with the consensus sequence. We have analyzed additional RPR sequences identifiable in plastids and have found that it is present in all red algae and in several prasinophyte green algae. We have assayed in vitro a subset of the plastid RPRs not previously analyzed and confirm that these organelle RPRs lack RNase P activity in vitro.

  10. Progressive and Biased Divergent Evolution Underpins the Origin and Diversification of Peridinin Dinoflagellate Plastids.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Richard G; Klinger, Christen M; Newby, Robert J; Butterfield, Erin R; Richardson, Elisabeth; Dacks, Joel B; Howe, Christopher J; Nisbet, Ellen R; Bowler, Chris

    2016-11-04

    Dinoflagellates are algae of tremendous importance to ecosystems and to public health. The cell biology and genome organization of dinoflagellate species is highly unusual. For example, the plastid genomes of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates encode only a minimal number of genes arranged on small elements termed "minicircles". Previous studies of peridinin plastid genes have found evidence for divergent sequence evolution, including extensive substitutions, novel insertions and deletions, and use of alternative translation initiation codons. Understanding the extent of this divergent evolution has been hampered by the lack of characterized peridinin plastid sequences. We have identified over 300 previously unannotated peridinin plastid mRNAs from published transcriptome projects, vastly increasing the number of sequences available. Using these data, we have produced a well-resolved phylogeny of peridinin plastid lineages, which uncovers several novel relationships within the dinoflagellates. This enables us to define changes to plastid sequences that occurred early in dinoflagellate evolution, and that have contributed to the subsequent diversification of individual dinoflagellate clades. We find that the origin of the peridinin dinoflagellates was specifically accompanied by elevations both in the overall number of substitutions that occurred on plastid sequences, and in the Ka/Ks ratio associated with plastid sequences, consistent with changes in selective pressure. These substitutions, alongside other changes, have accumulated progressively in individual peridinin plastid lineages. Throughout our entire dataset, we identify a persistent bias toward non-synonymous substitutions occurring on sequences encoding photosystem I subunits and stromal regions of peridinin plastid proteins, which may have underpinned the evolution of this unusual organelle.

  11. Plastid biotechnology for crop production: present status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    The world population is expected to reach an estimated 9.2 billion by 2050. Therefore, food production globally has to increase by 70% in order to feed the world, while total arable land, which has reached its maximal utilization, may even decrease. Moreover, climate change adds yet another challenge to global food security. In order to feed the world in 2050, biotechnological advances in modern agriculture are essential. Plant genetic engineering, which has created a new wave of global crop production after the first green revolution, will continue to play an important role in modern agriculture to meet these challenges. Plastid genetic engineering, with several unique advantages including transgene containment, has made significant progress in the last two decades in various biotechnology applications including development of crops with high levels of resistance to insects, bacterial, fungal and viral diseases, different types of herbicides, drought, salt and cold tolerance, cytoplasmic male sterility, metabolic engineering, phytoremediation of toxic metals and production of many vaccine antigens, biopharmaceuticals and biofuels. However, useful traits should be engineered via chloroplast genomes of several major crops. This review provides insight into the current state of the art of plastid engineering in relation to agricultural production, especially for engineering agronomic traits. Understanding the bottleneck of this technology and challenges for improvement of major crops in a changing climate are discussed. PMID:21437683

  12. Maternal inheritance of plastids and mitochondria in Cycas L. (Cycadaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhong, Zhi-Rong; Li, Nan; Qian, Dan; Jin, Jian-Hua; Chen, Tao

    2011-12-01

    Cycas is often considered a living fossil, thereby providing a unique model for revealing the evolution of spermatophytes. To date, the genetic inheritance of these archaic plants is not fully understood. The present study seeks to document the process of organelle inheritance in an interspecific cross of Cycas species. Extranuclear organelle DNA from chloroplasts and mitochondria was analyzed using both polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and microscopy. Here, we show that the chloroplasts and mitochondria in the progeny of interspecific crosses between Cycas taitungensis and Cycas ferruginea were exclusively inherited from the female parent. Epifluorescence microscopic analyses of the pollen cells from Cycas elongata indicated that there was a significant degradation of organelle DNA in male reproductive cells following maturation; the DNA fluorescent signals were only seen after pollen mitosis two, but not detectable at mature stage. Lack of organelle DNA fluorescent signal in prothallial cells was confirmed by the absence of plastids and mitochondria in electronic microscopic images. In conclusion, these data suggest that the maternal plastid and mitochondrial inheritance in Cycas, native to the old world, are the same as seen in seed plants.

  13. Protein synthesis in chloroplasts. Characteristics and products of protein synthesis in vitro in etioplasts and developing chloroplasts from pea leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Siddell, S G; Ellis, R J

    1975-01-01

    The function of plastid ribosomes in pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated by characterizing the products of protein synthesis in vitro in plastids isolated at different stages during the transition from etioplast to chloroplast. Etioplasts and plastids isolated after 24, 48 and 96h of greening in continuous white light, use added ATP to incorporate labelled amino acids into protein. Plastids isolated from greening leaves can also use light as the source of energy for protein synthesis. The labelled polypeptides synthesized in isolated plastids were analysed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate-ureapolyacrylamide gels. Six polypeptides are synthesized in etioplasts with ATP as energy source. Only one of these polypeptides is present in a 150 000g supernatant fraction. This polypeptide has been identified as the large subunit of Fraction I protein (3-phospho-D-glycerate carboxylyase EC 4.1.1.39) by comparing the tryptic 'map' of its L-(35S)methionine-labelled peptides with the tryptic 'map' of large subunit peptides from Fraction I labelled with L-(35S)methionine in vivo. The same gel pattern of six polypeptides is seen when plastids isolated from greening leaves are incubated with either added ATP or light as the energy source. However, the rates of synthesis of particular polypeptides are different in plastids isolated at different stages of the etioplast to chloroplast transition. The results support the idea that plastid ribosomes synthesize only a small number of proteins, and that the number and molecular weight of these proteins does not alter during the formation of chloroplasts from etioplasts. Images PLATE 1 PMID:1147911

  14. Rat p67 GBP is induced by interferon-gamma and isoprenoid-modified in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Vestal, D J; Buss, J E; Kelner, G S; Maciejewski, D; Asundi, V K; Maki, R A

    1996-07-16

    The guanylate binding proteins, GBPs, are a family of interferon-induced GTP-binding proteins that include the rat p67. We report here that rat p67, for which interferon regulation had not previously been demonstrated, is induced by IFN-gamma and also by LPS in both cultured bone marrow-derived macrophages and microglia. The basal level of rat p67 in macrophages is low but increases dramatically between 2 and 4 hours after treating cells with either IFN-gamma or LPS. It then remains elevated over the next 24 hours. Rat p67 is isoprenoid modified. The isoprenoid modification was detected in p67 isolated both from primary IFN-gamma-activated macrophages and when the gene for p67 was transfected into COS cells. This is the first demonstration of in vivo prenylation of a GBP. The interferon regulation and prenylation of rat p67 point toward this protein being significant in the functions of both activated macrophages and microglia.

  15. An investigation into the role of malonyl-coenzyme A in isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, M. J. P.; Kekwick, R. G. O.

    1973-01-01

    1. [14C]Malonyl-CoA was incorporated into isoprenoids by cell-free yeast preparations, by preparations from pigeon and rat liver, and by Hevea brasiliensis latex. 2. In agreement with previous reports the incorporation of acetyl-CoA into isoprenoids was not inhibited by avidin and was not stimulated by HCO3−. In a cell-free yeast preparation addition of HCO3− stimulated the formation of fatty acids from acetyl-CoA and decreased the incorporation into unsaponifiable lipids. 3. The labelling patterns of β-hydroxy-β-methylglutaryl-CoA formed from [2-14C]- and [1,3-14C]-malonyl-CoA in rat and pigeon liver preparations were those that would be expected if malonyl-CoA underwent decarboxylation to acetyl-CoA before incorporation. 4. The labelling pattern of ergosterol formed by cell-free yeast preparations from [2-14C]malonyl-CoA was also consistent with decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA before incorporation. 5. The incorporation of [2-14C]malonyl-CoA into mevalonate by rat liver preparations was related to the malonyl-CoA decarboxylase activity present in the preparation. PMID:4579226

  16. Isoprenoid emissions of trees in a tropical rainforest in Xishuangbanna, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilske, B.; Cao, K.-F.; Schebeske, G.; Chen, J.-W.; Wang, A.; Kesselmeier, J.

    Isoprenoid emissions of eight tropical tree species of SE Asia were investigated using dynamic Teflon bag branch enclosures. Emission potentials of four species were considerably deviating from a previous report. Two species, Garcinia cowa and Celtis philippensis, emitted isoprene with standard emission factors, given as carbon on dry weight basis of 20.7 and 0.2μgg-1h-1, respectively, before the peak of the rainy season. After the peak of the rainy reason the standard emission changed to 17.5 and 0.7μgg-1h-1, respectively. The other six species emitted monoterpenes with low standard emission factors between <0.1 and 0.5μgg-1h-1. Four out of five species investigated at two different times of the year showed seasonal differences in emission rates and composition. Total isoprenoid emissions were generally higher with new leaf flush than with aged leaves. Overall, the results suggest that better understanding of volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission from tropical species of SE Asia requires investigations that cover different seasons.

  17. Potato steroidal glycoalkaloid levels and the expression of key isoprenoid metabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Krits, Pinchas; Fogelman, Edna; Ginzberg, Idit

    2007-12-01

    The potato steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) are toxic secondary metabolites, and their total content in tubers should not exceed 20 mg/100 g fresh weight. The two major SGA in cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum) are alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. SGA biosynthetic genes and the genetic factors that control their expression have not yet been determined. In the present study, potato genotypes exhibiting different levels of SGA content showed an association between high SGA levels in their leaves and tubers and high expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase 1 (hmg1) and squalene synthase 1 (pss1), genes of the mevalonic/isoprenoid pathway. Transcripts of other key enzymes of branches of the isoprenoid pathway, vetispiradiene/sesquiterpene synthase (pvs1) and sterol C24-methyltransferase type1 (smt1), were undetectable or exhibited stable expression regardless of SGA content, respectively, suggesting facilitated precursor flow to the SGA biosynthetic branch. The transcript ratio of solanidine glucosyltransferase (sgt2) to solanidine galactosyltransferase (sgt1) was correlated to the documented chaconine-to-solanine ratio in the tested genotypes. Significantly higher expression of hmg1, pss1, smt1, sgt1 and sgt2 was monitored in the tuber phelloderm than in the parenchyma of the tuber's flesh, targeting the former as the main SGA-producing tissue in the tuber, in agreement with the known high SGA content in the layers directly under the tuber skin.

  18. Mechanisms for autophagy modulation by isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Dykstra, Kaitlyn M; Allen, Cheryl; Born, Ella J; Tong, Huaxiang; Holstein, Sarah A

    2015-12-08

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the production of monoclonal protein (MP). We have shown previously that disruption of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (IBP) causes a block in MP secretion through a disruption of Rab GTPase activity, leading to an enhanced unfolded protein response and subsequent apoptosis in MM cells. Autophagy is induced by cellular stressors including nutrient deprivation and ER stress. IBP inhibitors have been shown to have disparate effects on autophagy. Here we define the mechanisms underlying the differential effects of IBP inhibitors on autophagic flux in MM cells utilizing specific pharmacological inhibitors. We demonstrate that IBP inhibition induces a net increase in autophagy as a consequence of disruption of isoprenoid biosynthesis which is not recapitulated by direct geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. IBP inhibitor-induced autophagy is a cellular defense mechanism as treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 enhances the cytotoxic effects of GGPP depletion, but not geranylgeranyl transferase inhibition. Immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that IBP inhibitors disrupt ER to Golgi trafficking of monoclonal light chain protein and that this protein is not a substrate for alternative degradative pathways such as aggresomes and autophagosomes. These studies support further development of specific GGTase II inhibitors as anti-myeloma agents.

  19. Stereochemical studies of acyclic isoprenoids-XII. Lipids of methanogenic bacteria and possible contributions to sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risatti, J.B.; Rowland, S.J.; Yon, D.A.; Maxwell, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Abundant volatile lipids of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum and Methanosarcina barkeri include isoprenoid hydrocarbons (??? C30), and C15, C20 and C25 isoprenoid alcohols. M. barkeri contains 2,6,10,15,19-pentamethyleicosane, whose relative stereochemistry is the same as found in marine sediments, indicating that it is a marker of methanogenic activity. The C20, C30 and C25 alkenes in M. thermoautotrophicum also have a preferred sterochemistry; the latter have the 2,6,10,14,18-pentamethyleicosanyl skeleton, suggesting that the alkane in marine sediments may derive from methanogens. The stereochemistry of squalane in a marine sediment is also compatible with an origin in methanogens; in contrast, the stereochemistry of pristane in M. thermoautotrophicum indicates a fossil fuel contaminant origin, suggesting that this and certain other alkanes reported in archaebacteria might also be of contaminant origin. There is, therefore, little evidence at present that the pristane in immature marine sediments originates in methanogens. The C15 and C20 saturated alcohols in M. thermoautotrophicum have mainly the all-R configuration. If this is generally true for methanogens, the C20 alcohol in the Messel shale may originate mainly from methanogens, whereas that in the Green River shale may originate mainly from photosynthetic organisms. ?? 1984.

  20. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation.

    PubMed

    DeGraw, Amanda J; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D; Dozier, Jonathan K; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D

    2010-12-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here, we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogs for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and density functional theory calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of protein farnesyl transferase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogs is employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogs for chemical proteomic applications.

  1. Evaluation of alkyne-modified isoprenoids as chemical reporters of protein prenylation

    PubMed Central

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Palsuledesai, Charuta; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Dozier, Jonathan K.; Lenevich, Stepan; Rashidian, Mohammad; Distefano, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Protein prenyltransferases catalyze the attachment of C15 (farnesyl) and C20 (geranylgeranyl) groups to proteins at specific sequences localized at or near the C-termini of specific proteins. Determination of the specific protein prenyltransferase substrates affected by the inhibition of these enzymes is critical for enhancing knowledge of the mechanism of such potential drugs. Here we investigate the utility of alkyne-containing isoprenoid analogues for chemical proteomics experiments by showing that these compounds readily penetrate mammalian cells in culture and become incorporated into proteins that are normally prenylated. Derivatization via Cu(I) catalyzed Click reaction with a fluorescent azide reagent allows the proteins to be visualized and their relative levels to be analyzed. Simultaneous treatment of cells with these probes and inhibitors of prenylation reveals decreases in the levels of some but not all of the labeled proteins. Two-dimensional electrophoretic separation of these labeled proteins followed by mass spectrometric analysis allowed several labeled proteins to be unambiguously identified. Docking experiments and DFT calculations suggest that the substrate specificity of PFTase may vary depending on whether azide- or alkyne-based isoprenoid analogues are employed. These results demonstrate the utility of alkyne-containing analogues for chemical proteomic applications. PMID:21040496

  2. Conversion of Isoprenoid Oil by Catalytic Cracking and Hydrocracking over Nanoporous Hybrid Catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Toshiyuki; Liu, Chen; Li, Xiaohong; Maekawa, Takaaki; Asaoka, Sachio

    2012-01-01

    In order to produce petroleum alternatives from biomass, a significant amount of research has been focused on oils from microalgae due to their origin, which would not affect food availability. Nanoporous hybrid catalysts composed of ns Al2O3 and zeolites have been proven to be very useful compared to traditional catalysts in hydrotreating (HT), hydrocracking (HC), and catalytic cracking (CC) of large molecules. To evaluate the reaction scheme and products from model isoprenoid compounds of microalgae oil, nanoporous hybrid catalyst technologies (CC: ns Al2O3/H-USY and ns Al2O3/H-GaAlMFI; HC: [Ni-Mo/γ-Al2O3]/ns Al2O3/H-beta) were studied. The major product from CC on ns Al2O3/H-USY was highly aromatic gasoline, while the product from HC was half-isoparaffinic/olefinic kerosene. Although more than 50 wt% of the products from HT/CC on the USY catalyst was liquefied petroleum gas due to overcracking, the product from HT/CC on the MFI catalyst was high-octane-number gasoline. Delightfully, the product from HT/HC was kerosene and its average number was 11, with more than 80 wt% being isoparaffinic. As a result, it was demonstrated that hydrotreating may convert isoprenoid oil from microalgae over nanoporous hybrid catalysts into a variety of products. PMID:22791962

  3. Both the transglycosylase and transpeptidase functions in plastid penicillin-binding protein are essential for plastid division in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Yoshiko; TAKECHI, Katsuaki; TAKIO, Susumu; TAKANO, Hiroyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Class A penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are active in the final step of bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthesis. They possess a transglycosylase (TG) domain to polymerize the glycan chains and a transpeptidase (TP) domain to catalyze peptide cross-linking. We reported that knockout of the Pbp gene in the moss Physcomitrella patens (ΔPpPbp) results in a macrochloroplast phenotype by affecting plastid division. Here, expression of PpPBP-GFP in ΔPpPbp restored the wild-type phenotype and GFP fluorescence was observed mainly in the periphery of each chloroplast. Stable transformants expressing Anabaena PBP with the plastid-targeting sequence, or PpPBP replacing the Anabaena TP domain exhibited partial recovery, while chloroplast number was recovered to that of wild-type plants in the transformant expressing PpPBP replacing the Anabaena TG domain. Transient expression experiments with site-directed mutagenized PpPBP showed that mutations in the conserved amino acids in both domains interfered with phenotype recovery. These results suggest that both TG and TP functions are essential for function of PpPBP in moss chloroplast division. PMID:27941308

  4. Evolution of alternative biosynthetic pathways for vitamin C following plastid acquisition in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Glen; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Pornsaksit, Varissa; Smirnoff, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) is an enzyme co-factor in eukaryotes that also plays a critical role in protecting photosynthetic eukaryotes against damaging reactive oxygen species derived from the chloroplast. Many animal lineages, including primates, have become ascorbate auxotrophs due to the loss of the terminal enzyme in their biosynthetic pathway, l-gulonolactone oxidase (GULO). The alternative pathways found in land plants and Euglena use a different terminal enzyme, l-galactonolactone dehydrogenase (GLDH). The evolutionary processes leading to these differing pathways and their contribution to the cellular roles of ascorbate remain unclear. Here we present molecular and biochemical evidence demonstrating that GULO was functionally replaced with GLDH in photosynthetic eukaryote lineages following plastid acquisition. GULO has therefore been lost repeatedly throughout eukaryote evolution. The formation of the alternative biosynthetic pathways in photosynthetic eukaryotes uncoupled ascorbate synthesis from hydrogen peroxide production and likely contributed to the rise of ascorbate as a major photoprotective antioxidant. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06369.001 PMID:25768426

  5. Rice Debranching Enzyme Isoamylase3 Facilitates Starch Metabolism and Affects Plastid Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Min-Soo; Umemoto, Takayuki; Kawagoe, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Debranching enzymes, which hydrolyze α-1 and 6-glucosidic linkages in α-polyglucans, play a dual role in the synthesis and degradation of starch in plants. A transposon-inserted rice mutant of isoamylase3 (isa3) contained an increased amount of starch in the leaf blade at the end of the night, indicating that ISA3 plays a role in the degradation of transitory starch during the night. An epitope-tagged ISA3 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited hydrolytic activity on β-limit dextrin and amylopectin. We investigated whether ISA3 plays a role in amyloplast development and starch metabolism in the developing endosperm. ISA3–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein expressed under the control of the rice ISA3 promoter was targeted to the amyloplast stroma in the endosperm. Overexpression of ISA3 in the sugary1 mutant, which is deficient in ISA1 activity, did not convert water-soluble phytoglycogen to starch granules, indicating that ISA1 and ISA3 are not functionally redundant. Both overexpression and loss of function of ISA3 in the endosperm generated pleomorphic amyloplasts and starch granules. Furthermore, chloroplasts in the leaf blade of isa3 seedlings were large and pleomorphic. These results suggest that ISA3 facilitates starch metabolism and affects morphological characteristics of plastids in rice. PMID:21551159

  6. Direct Estimate of the Spontaneous Mutation Rate Uncovers the Effects of Drift and Recombination in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Plastid Genome.

    PubMed

    Ness, Rob W; Kraemer, Susanne A; Colegrave, Nick; Keightley, Peter D

    2016-03-01

    Plastids perform crucial cellular functions, including photosynthesis, across a wide variety of eukaryotes. Since endosymbiosis, plastids have maintained independent genomes that now display a wide diversity of gene content, genome structure, gene regulation mechanisms, and transmission modes. The evolution of plastid genomes depends on an input of de novo mutation, but our knowledge of mutation in the plastid is limited to indirect inference from patterns of DNA divergence between species. Here, we use a mutation accumulation experiment, where selection acting on mutations is rendered ineffective, combined with whole-plastid genome sequencing to directly characterize de novo mutation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show that the mutation rates of the plastid and nuclear genomes are similar, but that the base spectra of mutations differ significantly. We integrate our measure of the mutation rate with a population genomic data set of 20 individuals, and show that the plastid genome is subject to substantially stronger genetic drift than the nuclear genome. We also show that high levels of linkage disequilibrium in the plastid genome are not due to restricted recombination, but are instead a consequence of increased genetic drift. One likely explanation for increased drift in the plastid genome is that there are stronger effects of genetic hitchhiking. The presence of recombination in the plastid is consistent with laboratory studies in C. reinhardtii and demonstrates that although the plastid genome is thought to be uniparentally inherited, it recombines in nature at a rate similar to the nuclear genome.

  7. Engineering plastid genomes: methods, tools, and applications in basic research and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bock, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The small bacterial-type genome of the plastid (chloroplast) can be engineered by genetic transformation, generating cells and plants with transgenic plastid genomes, also referred to as transplastomic plants. The transformation process relies on homologous recombination, thereby facilitating the site-specific alteration of endogenous plastid genes as well as the precisely targeted insertion of foreign genes into the plastid DNA. The technology has been used extensively to analyze chloroplast gene functions and study plastid gene expression at all levels in vivo. Over the years, a large toolbox has been assembled that is now nearly comparable to the techniques available for plant nuclear transformation and that has enabled new applications of transplastomic technology in basic and applied research. This review describes the state of the art in engineering the plastid genomes of algae and land plants (Embryophyta). It provides an overview of the existing tools for plastid genome engineering, discusses current technological limitations, and highlights selected applications that demonstrate the immense potential of chloroplast transformation in several key areas of plant biotechnology.

  8. Dinoflagellate nuclear SSU rRNA phylogeny suggests multiple plastid losses and replacements.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, J F; Taylor, F J; Keeling, P J; Cavalier-Smith, T

    2001-09-01

    Dinoflagellates are a trophically diverse group of protists with photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic members that appears to incorporate and lose endosymbionts relatively easily. To trace the gain and loss of plastids in dinoflagellates, we have sequenced the nuclear small subunit rRNA gene of 28 photosynthetic and four non-photosynthetic species, and produced phylogenetic trees with a total of 81 dinoflagellate sequences. Patterns of plastid gain, loss, and replacement were plotted onto this phylogeny. With the exception of the apparently early-diverging Syndiniales and Noctilucales, all non-photosynthetic dinoflagellates are very likely to have had photosynthetic ancestors with peridinin-containing plastids. The same is true for all dinoflagellates with plastids other than the peridinin-containing plastid: their ancestors have replaced one type of plastid for another, in some cases most likely through a non-photosynthetic intermediate. Eight independent instances of plastid loss and three of replacement can be inferred from existing data, but as more non-photosynthetic lineages are characterized these numbers will surely grow.

  9. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems.

  10. Evolutionary constraints on the plastid tRNA set decoding methionine and isoleucine

    PubMed Central

    Alkatib, Sibah; Fleischmann, Tobias T.; Scharff, Lars B.; Bock, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The plastid (chloroplast) genomes of seed plants typically encode 30 tRNAs. Employing wobble and superwobble mechanisms, most codon boxes are read by only one or two tRNA species. The reduced set of plastid tRNAs follows the evolutionary trend of organellar genomes to shrink in size and coding capacity. A notable exception is the AUN codon box specifying methionine and isoleucine, which is decoded by four tRNA species in nearly all seed plants. However, three of these four tRNA genes were lost from the genomes of some parasitic plastid-containing lineages, possibly suggesting that less than four tRNA species could be sufficient to decode the triplets in the AUN box. To test this hypothesis, we have performed knockout experiments for the four AUN-decoding tRNAs in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastids. We find that all four tRNA genes are essential under both autotrophic and heterotrophic growth conditions, possibly suggesting tRNA import into plastids of parasitic plastid-bearing species. Phylogenetic analysis of the four plastid tRNA genes reveals striking conservation of all those bacterial features that are involved in discrimination between the different tRNA species containing CAU anticodons. PMID:22553362

  11. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear–plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. PMID:26893456

  12. Is ftsH the key to plastid longevity in sacoglossan slugs?

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; Habicht, Jörn; Woehle, Christian; Huang, Changjie; Christa, Gregor; Wägele, Heike; Nickelsen, Jörg; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sequestered by sacoglossan sea slugs have long been a puzzle. Some sacoglossans feed on siphonaceous algae and can retain the plastids in the cytosol of their digestive gland cells. There, the stolen plastids (kleptoplasts) can remain photosynthetically active in some cases for months. Kleptoplast longevity itself challenges current paradigms concerning photosystem turnover, because kleptoplast photosystems remain active in the absence of nuclear algal genes. In higher plants, nuclear genes are essential for plastid maintenance, in particular, for the constant repair of the D1 protein of photosystem II. Lateral gene transfer was long suspected to underpin slug kleptoplast longevity, but recent transcriptomic and genomic analyses show that no algal nuclear genes are expressed from the slug nucleus. Kleptoplast genomes themselves, however, appear expressed in the sequestered state. Here we present sequence data for the chloroplast genome of Acetabularia acetabulum, the food source of the sacoglossan Elysia timida, which can maintain Acetabularia kleptoplasts in an active state for months. The data reveal what might be the key to sacoglossan kleptoplast longevity: plastids that remain photosynthetically active within slugs for periods of months share the property of encoding ftsH, a D1 quality control protease that is essential for photosystem II repair. In land plants, ftsH is always nuclear encoded, it was transferred to the nucleus from the plastid genome when Charophyta and Embryophyta split. A replenishable supply of ftsH could, in principle, rescue kleptoplasts from D1 photodamage, thereby influencing plastid longevity in sacoglossan slugs.

  13. PLASTID DYNAMICS DURING SURVIVAL OF DINOPHYSIS CAUDATA WITHOUT ITS CILIATE PREY(1).

    PubMed

    Park, Myung Gil; Park, Jong Soo; Kim, Miran; Yih, Wonho

    2008-10-01

    To survive, the marine dinoflagellate Dinophysis caudata Saville-Kent must feed on the plastidic ciliate Myrionecta rubra (=Mesodinium rubrum), itself a consumer of cryptophytes. Whether D. caudata has its own permanent chloroplasts or retains plastids from its ciliate prey, however, remains unresolved. Further, how long D. caudata plastids (or kleptoplastids) persist and remain photosynthetically active in the absence of prey remains unknown. We addressed those issues here, using the first established culture of D. caudata. Phylogenetic analyses of the plastid 16S rRNA and psbA gene sequences directly from the three organisms (D. caudata, M. rubra, and a cryptophyte) revealed that the sequences of both genes from the three organisms are almost identical to each other, supporting that the plastids of D. caudata are kleptoplastids. A 3-month starvation experiment revealed that D. caudata can remain photosynthetically active for ∼2 months when not supplied with prey. D. caudata cells starved for more than 2 months continued to keep the plastid 16S rRNA gene but lost the photosynthesis-related genes (i.e., psaA and psbA genes). When the prey was available again, however, D. caudata cells starved for more than 2 months were able to reacquire plastids and slowly resumed photosynthetic activity. Taken all together, the results indicate that the nature of the relationship between D. caudata and its plastids is not that of permanent cellular acquisitions. D. caudata is an intriguing protist that would represent an interesting evolutionary adaptation with regard to photosynthesis as well as help us to better understand plastid evolution in eukaryotes.

  14. Electrochemical measurement of lateral diffusion coefficients of ubiquinones and plastoquinones of various isoprenoid chain lengths incorporated in model bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    Marchal, D; Boireau, W; Laval, J M; Moiroux, J; Bourdillon, C

    1998-01-01

    The long-range diffusion coefficients of isoprenoid quinones in a model of lipid bilayer were determined by a method avoiding fluorescent probe labeling of the molecules. The quinone electron carriers were incorporated in supported dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine layers at physiological molar fractions (<3 mol%). The elaborate bilayer template contained a built-in gold electrode at which the redox molecules solubilized in the bilayer were reduced or oxidized. The lateral diffusion coefficient of a natural quinone like UQ10 or PQ9 was 2.0 +/- 0.4 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) at 30 degrees C, two to three times smaller than the diffusion coefficient of a lipid analog in the same artificial bilayer. The lateral mobilities of the oxidized or reduced forms could be determined separately and were found to be identical in the 4-13 pH range. For a series of isoprenoid quinones, UQ2 or PQ2 to UQ10, the diffusion coefficient exhibited a marked dependence on the length of the isoprenoid chain. The data fit very well the quantitative behavior predicted by a continuum fluid model in which the isoprenoid chains are taken as rigid particles moving in the less viscous part of the bilayer and rubbing against the more viscous layers of lipid heads. The present study supports the concept of a homogeneous pool of quinone located in the less viscous region of the bilayer. PMID:9545054

  15. Metabolic effectors secreted by bacterial pathogens: essential facilitators of plastid endosymbiosis?

    PubMed

    Ball, Steven G; Subtil, Agathe; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Moustafa, Ahmed; Weber, Andreas P M; Gehre, Lena; Colleoni, Christophe; Arias, Maria-Cecilia; Cenci, Ugo; Dauvillée, David

    2013-01-01

    Under the endosymbiont hypothesis, over a billion years ago a heterotrophic eukaryote entered into a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium (the cyanobiont). This partnership culminated in the plastid that has spread to forms as diverse as plants and diatoms. However, why primary plastid acquisition has not been repeated multiple times remains unclear. Here, we report a possible answer to this question by showing that primary plastid endosymbiosis was likely to have been primed by the secretion in the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens. We provide evidence suggesting that the cyanobiont might have rescued its afflicted host by feeding photosynthetic carbon into a chlamydia-controlled assimilation pathway.

  16. Plastids and pathogens: mechanosensitive channels and survival in a hypoosmotic world.

    PubMed

    Veley, Kira M; Haswell, Elizabeth S

    2012-06-01

    In bacteria, MscS-type mechanosensitive channels serve to protect cells from lysis as they swell during extreme osmotic stress. We recently showed that two MscS homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana serve a similar purpose in the epidermal plastids of the leaf, indicating that the plant cell cytoplasm can present a dynamic osmotic challenge to the plastid. MscS homologs are predicted to be targeted to both plastids and mitochondrial envelopes and have been found in the genomes of intracellular pathogens. Here we discuss the implications of these observations, and propose that MS channels provide an essential mechanism for osmotic adaptation to both intracellular and the extracellular environments.

  17. Genomic footprints of a cryptic plastid endosymbiosis in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed; Beszteri, Bánk; Maier, Uwe G; Bowler, Chris; Valentin, Klaus; Bhattacharya, Debashish

    2009-06-26

    Diatoms and other chromalveolates are among the dominant phytoplankters in the world's oceans. Endosymbiosis was essential to the success of chromalveolates, and it appears that the ancestral plastid in this group had a red algal origin via an ancient secondary endosymbiosis. However, recent analyses have turned up a handful of nuclear genes in chromalveolates that are of green algal derivation. Using a genome-wide approach to estimate the "green" contribution to diatoms, we identified >1700 green gene transfers, constituting 16% of the diatom nuclear coding potential. These genes were probably introduced into diatoms and other chromalveolates from a cryptic endosymbiont related to prasinophyte-like green algae. Chromalveolates appear to have recruited genes from the two major existing algal groups to forge a highly successful, species-rich protist lineage.

  18. The complete plastid genome sequence of Picea jezoensis (Pinaceae: Piceoideae).

    PubMed

    Yang, Jong Cheol; Joo, Minjung; So, Soonku; Yi, Dong-Keun; Shin, Chang Ho; Lee, You-Mi; Choi, Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the complete chloroplast genome of P. jezoensis was completed. The total genome size was 124 146 bp, containing a pair of very short inverted repeats (IRa and IRb) of 422 bp, which were separated by large single copy (LSC) and small single copy (SSC) with 66 956 bp and 56 346 bp, respectively. The overall GC contents of the plastid genome were determined as 38.8%. One hundred fifteen genes including 68 peptide-encoding genes, 35 tRNA genes, four rRNA genes, six open-reading frames, and two pseudogenes were annotated. In these genes, 15 genes contained only one or two introns. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum likelihood (ML) methods were performed from fully sequenced Gymnosperms and other species of dataset composed of 69 protein-coding genes.

  19. Identification of long-chain isoprenoid alkylbenzenes in sediments and crude oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Kock-van Dalen, A. C.; de Leeuw, Jan W.

    1988-11-01

    A series of novel methylated phytanylbenzenes (phytanylbenzene, 1-methyl-3-phytanylbenzene, 1,4-dimethyl-2-phytanylbenzene, 1,2-dimethyl-4-phytanylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethyl-5-phytanylbenzene) have been identified in sediment extracts and oils ranging in age from Miocene to Permian. Identifications were based on comparison of mass spectra and Chromatographie data of synthetic methylated phytanylbenzenes with those of geologically occurring methylated phytanylbenzenes and by coinjections with the standards. Although methylated phytanylbenzenes are structurally related to the methylated 2-methyl-2-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)chromans, components also present in the samples studied, the former do not appear to be the diagenetic derivatives of the latter. The methylated phytanylbenzenes are thought to be derived diagenetically from isoprenoid quinones or may represent a direct biosynthetic origin from specific archaebacteria.

  20. Fluorescent probes for investigation of isoprenoid configuration and size discrimination by bactoprenol-utilizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Anahita Z; Lujan, Donovan K; Erickson, Katelyn M; Martinez, Christina D; Troutman, Jerry M

    2013-09-01

    Undecaprenyl Pyrophosphate Synthase (UPPS) is an enzyme critical to the production of complex polysaccharides in bacteria, as it produces the crucial bactoprenol scaffold on which these materials are assembled. Methods to characterize the systems associated with polysaccharide production are non-trivial, in part due to the lack of chemical tools to investigate their assembly. In this report, we develop a new fluorescent tool using UPPS to incorporate a powerful fluorescent anthranilamide moiety into bactoprenol. The activity of this analogue in polysaccharide biosynthesis is then tested with the initiating hexose-1-phosphate transferases involved in Capsular Polysaccharide A biosynthesis in the symbiont Bacteroides fragilis and the asparagine-linked glycosylation system of the pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni. In addition, it is shown that the UPPS used to make this probe is not specific for E-configured isoprenoid substrates and that elongation by UPPS is required for activity with the downstream enzymes.

  1. Enhancing isoprenoid production through systematically assembling and modulating efflux pumps in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian-Feng; Xiong, Zhi-Qiang; Li, Shi-Yuan; Wang, Yong

    2013-09-01

    Enhancement of the cellular exportation of heterologous compounds is an important aspect to improve the product yield in microbial cell factory. Efflux pumps can expel various intra- or extra-cellular substances out of microbial hosts and increase the cellular tolerance. Thus in this study, by using the hydrophobic sesquiterpene (amorphadiene) and diterpene (kaurene) as two model compounds, we attempted to improve isoprenoid production through systematically engineering the efflux pumps in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). The pleiotropic resistant pumps, AcrAB-TolC, MdtEF-TolC from E. coli and heterologous MexAB-OprM pump from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were overexpressed, assembled, and finely modulated. We found that overexpression of AcrB and TolC components can effectively enhance the specific yield of amorphadiene and kaurene, e.g., 31 and 37 % improvement for amorphadiene compared with control, respectively. The heterologous MexB component can enhance kaurene production with 70 % improvement which is more effective than TolC and AcrB. The results suggest that the three components of tripartite efflux pumps play varied effect to enhance isoprenoid production. Considering the highly organized structure of efflux pumps and importance of components interaction, various component combinations were constructed and the copy number of key components AcrB and TolC was finely modulated as well. The results exhibit that the combination TolC and TolC and AcrB improved the specific yield of amorphadiene with 118 %, and AcrA and TolC and AcrB improved that of kaurene with 104 %. This study indicates that assembling and finely modulating efflux pumps is an effective strategy to improve the production of heterologous compounds in E. coli.

  2. Indirect Stimulation of Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells Through Alterations in Isoprenoid Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Puan, Kia-Joo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Feng, Ju; Giner, José-Luis; Cao, Rong; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Oldfield, Eric; Morita, Craig T.

    2011-01-01

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), an intermediate in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by microbes, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Aminobisphosphonates and alkylamines indirectly stimulate Vγ2Vδ2 cells by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS) in the mevalonate pathway, thereby increasing IPP/ApppI that directly stimulate. In this study, we further characterize stimulation by these compounds, and define pathways used by new classes of compounds. Consistent with FDPS inhibition, stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 cells by aminobisphosphonates and alkylamines was much more sensitive to statin inhibition than stimulation by prenyl pyrophosphates. However, the continuous presence of aminobisphosphonates was toxic for T cells, and blocked their proliferation. Aminobisphosphonate stimulation was rapid and prolonged, independent of known antigen presenting molecules, and resistant to fixation. New classes of stimulatory compounds–mevalonate, the alcohol of HMBPP, and alkenyl phosphonates–likely stimulate differently. Mevalonate, a rate-limiting metabolite, appears to enter cells to increase IPP levels whereas the alcohol of HMBPP and alkenyl phosphonates are directly recognized. The critical chemical feature of bisphosphonates is the amino moiety, because its loss switched aminobisphosphonates to direct antigens. Transfection of APC with siRNA downregulating FDPS rendered them stimulatory for Vγ2Vδ2 cells, and increased cellular IPP. siRNAs for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase functioned similarly. Our results show that a variety of manipulations affecting isoprenoid metabolism lead to stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells and that pulsing aminobisphosphonates would be more effective for the ex vivo expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22013129

  3. The plastid genomes of nonphotosynthetic algae are not so small after all

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa-Martinez, Francisco; Nedelcu, Aurora M.; Reyes-Prieto, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The thing about plastid genomes in nonphotosynthetic plants and algae is that they are usually very small and highly compact. This is not surprising: a heterotrophic existence means that genes for photosynthesis can be easily discarded. But the loss of photosynthesis cannot explain why the plastomes of heterotrophs are so often depauperate in noncoding DNA. If plastid genomes from photosynthetic taxa can span the gamut of compactness, why can't those of nonphotosynthetic species? Well, recently we showed that they can. The free-living, heterotrophic green alga Polytoma uvella has a plastid genome boasting more than 165 kilobases of noncoding DNA, making it the most bloated plastome yet found in a heterotroph. In this addendum to the primary study, we elaborate on why the P. uvella plastome is so inflated, discussing the potential impact of a free-living vs. parasitic lifestyle on plastid genome expansion in nonphotosynthetic lineages. PMID:28377793

  4. Nuclear and plastid genetic engineering of plants: comparison of opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Benjamin; Zaltsman, Adi; Lacroix, Benoît; Kozlovsky, Stanislav V; Krichevsky, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plant genetic engineering is one of the key technologies for crop improvement as well as an emerging approach for producing recombinant proteins in plants. Both plant nuclear and plastid genomes can be genetically modified, yet fundamental functional differences between the eukaryotic genome of the plant cell nucleus and the prokaryotic-like genome of the plastid will have an impact on key characteristics of the resulting transgenic organism. So, which genome, nuclear or plastid, to transform for the desired transgenic phenotype? In this review we compare the advantages and drawbacks of engineering plant nuclear and plastid genomes to generate transgenic plants with the traits of interest, and evaluate the pros and cons of their use for different biotechnology and basic research applications, ranging from generation of commercial crops with valuable new phenotypes to 'bioreactor' plants for large-scale production of recombinant proteins to research model plants expressing various reporter proteins.

  5. The Complete Plastid Genomes of the Two ‘Dinotoms’ Durinskia baltica and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum

    PubMed Central

    Keeling, Patrick J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In one small group of dinoflagellates, photosynthesis is carried out by a tertiary endosymbiont derived from a diatom, giving rise to a complex cell that we collectively refer to as a ‘dinotom’. The endosymbiont is separated from its host by a single membrane and retains plastids, mitochondria, a large nucleus, and many other eukaryotic organelles and structures, a level of complexity suggesting an early stage of integration. Although the evolution of these endosymbionts has attracted considerable interest, the plastid genome has not been examined in detail, and indeed no tertiary plastid genome has yet been sequenced. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe the complete plastid genomes of two closely related dinotoms, Durinskia baltica and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum. The D. baltica (116470 bp) and K. foliaceum (140426 bp) plastid genomes map as circular molecules featuring two large inverted repeats that separate distinct single copy regions. The organization and gene content of the D. baltica plastid closely resemble those of the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The K. foliaceum plastid genome is much larger, has undergone more reorganization, and encodes a putative tyrosine recombinase (tyrC) also found in the plastid genome of the heterokont Heterosigma akashiwo, and two putative serine recombinases (serC1 and serC2) homologous to recombinases encoded by plasmids pCf1 and pCf2 in another pennate diatom, Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The K. foliaceum plastid genome also contains an additional copy of serC1, two degenerate copies of another plasmid-encoded ORF, and two non-coding regions whose sequences closely resemble portions of the pCf1 and pCf2 plasmids. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that while the plastid genomes of two dinotoms share very similar gene content and genome organization with that of the free-living pennate diatom P. tricornutum, the K. folicaeum plastid genome has absorbed two exogenous plasmids

  6. Plastid Phylogenomic Analyses Resolve Tofieldiaceae as the Root of the Early Diverging Monocot Order Alismatales

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Ma, Peng-Fei; Li, Hong-Tao; Yang, Jun-Bo; Wang, Hong; Li, De-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    The predominantly aquatic order Alismatales, which includes approximately 4,500 species within Araceae, Tofieldiaceae, and the core alismatid families, is a key group in investigating the origin and early diversification of monocots. Despite their importance, phylogenetic ambiguity regarding the root of the Alismatales tree precludes answering questions about the early evolution of the order. Here, we sequenced the first complete plastid genomes from three key families in this order: Potamogeton perfoliatus (Potamogetonaceae), Sagittaria lichuanensis (Alismataceae), and Tofieldia thibetica (Tofieldiaceae). Each family possesses the typical quadripartite structure, with plastid genome sizes of 156,226, 179,007, and 155,512 bp, respectively. Among them, the plastid genome of S. lichuanensis is the largest in monocots and the second largest in angiosperms. Like other sequenced Alismatales plastid genomes, all three families generally encode the same 113 genes with similar structure and arrangement. However, we detected 2.4 and 6 kb inversions in the plastid genomes of Sagittaria and Potamogeton, respectively. Further, we assembled a 79 plastid protein-coding gene sequence data matrix of 22 taxa that included the three newly generated plastid genomes plus 19 previously reported ones, which together represent all primary lineages of monocots and outgroups. In plastid phylogenomic analyses using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference, we show both strong support for Acorales as sister to the remaining monocots and monophyly of Alismatales. More importantly, Tofieldiaceae was resolved as the most basal lineage within Alismatales. These results provide new insights into the evolution of Alismatales as well as the early-diverging monocots as a whole. PMID:26957030

  7. Proteome analysis of plastids from developing seeds of Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Camila B; Shah, Mohibullah; Soares, Emanoella L; Nogueira, Fábio C S; Carvalho, Paulo C; Junqueira, Magno; Araújo, Gabriel D T; Soares, Arlete A; Domont, Gilberto B; Campos, Francisco A P

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we performed a proteomic analysis of plastids isolated from the endosperm of developing Jatropha curcas seeds that were in the initial stage of deposition of protein and lipid reserves. Proteins extracted from the plastids were digested with trypsin, and the peptides were applied to an EASY-nano LC system coupled inline to an ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer, and this led to the identification of 1103 proteins representing 804 protein groups, of which 923 proteins were considered as true identifications, and this considerably expands the repertoire of J. curcas proteins identified so far. Of the identified proteins, only five are encoded in the plastid genome, and none of them are involved in photosynthesis, evidentiating the nonphotosynthetic nature of the isolated plastids. Homologues for 824 out of 923 identified proteins were present in PPDB, SUBA, or PlProt databases while homologues for 13 proteins were not found in any of the three plastid proteins databases but were marked as plastidial by at least one of the three prediction programs used. Functional classification showed that proteins belonging to amino acids metabolism comprise the main functional class, followed by carbohydrate, energy, and lipid metabolisms. The small and large subunits of Rubisco were identified, and their presence in the plastids is considered to be an adaptive feature counterbalancing for the loss of one-third of the carbon as CO2 as a result of the conversion of carbohydrate to oil through glycolysis. While several enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of several precursors of diterpenoids were identified, we were unable to identify any terpene synthase/cyclase, which suggests that the plastids isolated from the endosperm of developing seeds do not synthesize phorbol esters. In conclusion, our study provides insights into the major biosynthetic pathways and certain unique features of the plastids from the endosperm of developing seeds at the whole proteome

  8. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, Christopher R.; Nawrath, Christiane; Poirier, Yves

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid.

  9. Processes for producing polyhydroxybutyrate and related polyhydroxyalkanoates in the plastids of higher plants

    DOEpatents

    Somerville, C.R.; Nawrath, C.; Poirier, Y.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention relates to a process for producing poly-D-(-)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) and related polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the plastids of plants. The production of PHB is accomplished by genetically transforming plants with modified genes from microorganisms. The genes encode the enzymes required to synthesize PHB from acetyl-CoA or related metabolites and are fused with additional plant sequences for targeting the enzymes to the plastid. 37 figs.

  10. Dual targeting of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases to the mitochondrion and complex plastid in chlorarachniophytes.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Yoshihisa; Burki, Fabien; Keeling, Patrick J

    2012-12-15

    In plants, many nucleus-encoded proteins are targeted to both mitochondria and plastids, and this process is generally mediated by ambiguous N-terminal targeting sequences that are recognized by receptors on both organelles. In many algae, however, plastids were acquired by secondarily engulfing green or red algae, which were retained within the endomembrane system. Protein targeting to these secondary plastids is more complex, and because they do not reside directly in the cytoplasm, dual targeting cannot function as it does in plant cells. Here we investigate dual targeting of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) in chlorarachniophytes, which are complex algae that possess secondary plastids and a relict nucleus derived from a green algal endosymbiont. Chlorarachniophytes have four genome-containing compartments, but almost all the aaRSs are nucleus-encoded and present in fewer than four copies (some as few as two), suggesting multiple targeting. We characterized the subcellular localization of two classes, HisRS (three copies) and GlyRS (two copies), using GFP fusion proteins. In both cases, one copy was dually targeted to mitochondria and plastids, but unlike plants this was mediated by translation initiation variants. We also found that the periplastidal compartment (the relict green algal cytoplasm) lacks both GlyRS and a cognate tRNA, suggesting that pre-charged host tRNAs are imported into this compartment. Leader analysis of other aaRSs suggests that alternative translation is a common strategy for dual targeting in these complex cells. Overall, dual targeting to mitochondria and plastids is a shared feature of plastid-bearing organisms, but the increased complexity of trafficking into secondary plastids requires a different strategy.

  11. An Early-Branching Freshwater Cyanobacterium at the Origin of Plastids.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Toledo, Rafael I; Deschamps, Philippe; López-García, Purificación; Zivanovic, Yvan; Benzerara, Karim; Moreira, David

    2017-02-06

    Photosynthesis evolved in eukaryotes by the endosymbiosis of a cyanobacterium, the future plastid, within a heterotrophic host. This primary endosymbiosis occurred in the ancestor of Archaeplastida, a eukaryotic supergroup that includes glaucophytes, red algae, green algae, and land plants [1-4]. However, although the endosymbiotic origin of plastids from a single cyanobacterial ancestor is firmly established, the nature of that ancestor remains controversial: plastids have been proposed to derive from either early- or late-branching cyanobacterial lineages [5-11]. To solve this issue, we carried out phylogenomic and supernetwork analyses of the most comprehensive dataset analyzed so far including plastid-encoded proteins and nucleus-encoded proteins of plastid origin resulting from endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT) of primary photosynthetic eukaryotes, as well as wide-ranging genome data from cyanobacteria, including novel lineages. Our analyses strongly support that plastids evolved from deep-branching cyanobacteria and that the present-day closest cultured relative of primary plastids is Gloeomargarita lithophora. This species belongs to a recently discovered cyanobacterial lineage widespread in freshwater microbialites and microbial mats [12, 13]. The ecological distribution of this lineage sheds new light on the environmental conditions where the emergence of photosynthetic eukaryotes occurred, most likely in a terrestrial-freshwater setting. The fact that glaucophytes, the first archaeplastid lineage to diverge, are exclusively found in freshwater ecosystems reinforces this hypothesis. Therefore, not only did plastids emerge early within cyanobacteria, but the first photosynthetic eukaryotes most likely evolved in terrestrial-freshwater settings, not in oceans as commonly thought.

  12. Formation and excretion of autophagic plastids (plastolysomes) in Brassica napus embryogenic microspores

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Vega, Verónica; Corral-Martínez, Patricia; Rivas-Sendra, Alba; Seguí-Simarro, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    The change in developmental fate of microspores reprogrammed toward embryogenesis is a complex but fascinating experimental system where microspores undergo dramatic changes derived from the developmental switch. After 40 years of study of the ultrastructural changes undergone by the induced microspores, many questions are still open. In this work, we analyzed the architecture of DNA-containing organelles such as plastids and mitochondria in samples of B. napus isolated microspore cultures covering the different stages before, during, and after the developmental switch. Mitochondria presented a conventional oval or sausage-like morphology for all cell types studied, similar to that found in vivo in other cell types from vegetative parts. Similarly, plastids of microspores before induction and of non-induced cells showed conventional architectures. However, approximately 40% of the plastids of embryogenic microspores presented atypical features such as curved profiles, protrusions, and internal compartments filled with cytoplasm. Three-dimensional reconstructions confirmed that these plastids actually engulf cytoplasm regions, isolating them from the rest of the cell. Acid phosphatase activity was found in them, confirming the lytic activity of these organelles. In addition, digested plastid-like structures were found excreted to the apoplast. All these phenomena seemed transient, since microspore-derived embryos (MDEs) showed conventional plastids. Together, these results strongly suggested that under special circumstances, such as those of the androgenic switch, plastids of embryogenic microspores behave as autophagic plastids (plastolysomes), engulfing cytoplasm for digestion, and then are excreted out of the cytoplasm as part of a cleaning program necessary for microspores to become embryos. PMID:25745429

  13. PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 and PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED1 Mediate Photorelocation Movements of Both Chloroplasts and Nuclei1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Organelle movement and positioning play important roles in fundamental cellular activities and adaptive responses to environmental stress in plants. To optimize photosynthetic light utilization, chloroplasts move toward weak blue light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong blue light (the avoidance response). Nuclei also move in response to strong blue light by utilizing the light-induced movement of attached plastids in leaf cells. Blue light receptor phototropins and several factors for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been identified through molecular genetic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 (PMI1) is a plant-specific C2-domain protein that is required for efficient chloroplast photorelocation movement. There are two PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED (PMIR) genes, PMIR1 and PMIR2, in the Arabidopsis genome. However, the mechanism in which PMI1 regulates chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements and the involvement of PMIR1 and PMIR2 in these organelle movements remained unknown. Here, we analyzed chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mutant lines of PMI1, PMIR1, and PMIR2. In mesophyll cells, the pmi1 single mutant showed severe defects in both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements resulting from the impaired regulation of chloroplast-actin filaments. In pavement cells, pmi1 mutant plants were partially defective in both plastid and nuclear photorelocation movements, but pmi1pmir1 and pmi1pmir1pmir2 mutant lines lacked the blue light-induced movement responses of plastids and nuclei completely. These results indicated that PMI1 is essential for chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mesophyll cells and that both PMI1 and PMIR1 are indispensable for photorelocation movements of plastids and thus, nuclei in pavement cells. PMID:26324877

  14. Regulation of Expression and Evolution of Genes in Plastids of Rhodophytic Branch

    PubMed Central

    Zverkov, Oleg Anatolyevich; Seliverstov, Alexandr Vladislavovich; Lyubetsky, Vassily Alexandrovich

    2016-01-01

    A novel algorithm and original software were used to cluster all proteins encoded in plastids of 72 species of the rhodophytic branch. The results are publicly available at http://lab6.iitp.ru/ppc/redline72/ in a database that allows fast identification of clusters (protein families) both by a fragment of an amino acid sequence and by a phylogenetic profile of a protein. No such integral clustering with the corresponding functions can be found in the public domain. The putative regulons of the transcription factors Ycf28 and Ycf29 encoded in the plastids were identified using the clustering and the database. A regulation of translation initiation was proposed for the ycf24 gene in plastids of certain red algae and apicomplexans as well as a regulation of a putative gene in apicoplasts of Babesia spp. and Theileria parva. The conserved regulation of the ycf24 gene expression and specificity alternation of the transcription factor Ycf28 were shown in the plastids. A phylogenetic tree of plastids was generated for the rhodophytic branch. The hypothesis of the origin of apicoplasts from the common ancestor of all apicomplexans from plastids of red algae was confirmed. PMID:26840333

  15. Gain and loss of photosynthetic membranes during plastid differentiation in the shoot apex of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Charuvi, Dana; Kiss, Vladimir; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Adam, Zach; Reich, Ziv

    2012-03-01

    Chloroplasts of higher plants develop from proplastids, which are undifferentiated plastids that lack photosynthetic (thylakoid) membranes. In flowering plants, the proplastid-chloroplast transition takes place at the shoot apex, which consists of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the flanking leaf primordia. It has been believed that the SAM contains only proplastids and that these become chloroplasts only in the primordial leaves. Here, we show that plastids of the SAM are neither homogeneous nor necessarily null. Rather, their developmental state varies with the specific region and/or layer of the SAM in which they are found. Plastids throughout the L1 and L3 layers of the SAM possess fairly developed thylakoid networks. However, many of these plastids eventually lose their thylakoids during leaf maturation. By contrast, plastids at the central, stem cell-harboring region of the L2 layer of the SAM lack thylakoid membranes; these appear only at the periphery, near the leaf primordia. Thus, plastids in the SAM undergo distinct differentiation processes that, depending on their lineage and position, lead to either development or loss of thylakoid membranes. These processes continue along the course of leaf maturation.

  16. The case of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to the peculiar dinoflagellate plastid genome

    PubMed Central

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Bodył, Andrzej; Moszczyński, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Organelle genomes lose their genes by transfer to host nuclear genomes, but only occasionally are enriched by foreign genes from other sources. In contrast to mitochondria, plastid genomes are especially resistant to such horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and thus every gene acquired in this way is notable. An exceptional case of HGT was recently recognized in the peculiar peridinin plastid genome of dinoflagellates, which is organized in plasmid-like minicircles. Genomic and phylogenetic analyses of Ceratium horridum and Pyrocystis lunula minicircles revealed four genes and one unannotated open reading frame that probably were gained from bacteria belonging to the Bacteroidetes. Such bacteria seem to be a good source of genes because close endosymbiotic associations between them and dinoflagellates have been observed. The HGT-acquired genes are involved in plastid functions characteristic of other photosynthetic eukaryotes, and their arrangement resembles bacterial operons. These studies indicate that the peridinin plastid genome, usually regarded as having resulted from reduction and fragmentation of a typical plastid genome derived from red algae, may have a chimeric origin that includes bacterial contributions. Potential contamination of the Ceratium and Pyrocystis plastid genomes by bacterial sequences and the controversial localization of their minicircles in the nucleus are also discussed. PMID:24195014

  17. Plant-like proteins in protozoa, metazoa and fungi imply universal plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shu; Guo, Jian-Hua; Du, Jun-Bo; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, plant-like proteins in protozoa, metazoa and fungi have been identified. Analysis of them suggests that for millions of years universal plastid endosymbiosis and gene transfer occurred in ancestors of metazoa/fungi, and some transferred fragments have been reserved till now even in modern mammals. Most eukaryotes once contained plastids in the ancient era, and some of them lost plastids later. Functions of homologues in cyanobacterial genomes and eukaryotic genomes are in consensus, and are most involved in organic compound metabolism. With emergence of organelles and subcellular structures in the eukaryotic cell, the locations of these proteins diversified. Furthermore, some novel functions were adopted, especially in vertebrates. Analysis also implies that plastids acquired through a mechanism of secondary endosymbiosis may be preserved even until the multicellular era in simple animals. Phylogenetic trees of some proteins suggest that in ancient times the common ancestor of photosynthetic protist Euglena and parasite Trypanosoma once engulfed a green alga, and then it lost the plastid, but recently some euglenids engulfed algae again. Plastid endosymbiosis is a more general process than we originally thought, and may happen more than one time in one species.

  18. Development of novel types of plastid transformation vectors and evaluation of factors controlling expression.

    PubMed

    Herz, Stefan; Füssl, Monika; Steiger, Sandra; Koop, Hans-Ulrich

    2005-12-01

    Two new vector types for plastid transformation were developed and uidA reporter gene expression was compared to standard transformation vectors. The first vector type does not contain any plastid promoter, instead it relies on extension of existing plastid operons and was therefore named "operon-extension" vector. When a strongly expressed plastid operon like psbA was extended by the reporter gene with this vector type, the expression level was superior to that of a standard vector under control of the 16S rRNA promoter. Different insertion sites, promoters and 5'-UTRs were analysed for their effect on reporter gene expression with standard and operon-extension vectors. The 5'-UTR of phage 7 gene 10 in combination with a modified N-terminus was found to yield the highest expression levels. Expression levels were also strongly dependent on external factors like plant or leaf age or light intensity. In the second vector type, named "split" plastid transformation vector, modules of the expression cassette were distributed on two separate vectors. Upon co-transformation of plastids with these vectors, the complete expression cassette became inserted into the plastome. This result can be explained by successive co-integration of the split vectors and final loop-out recombination of the duplicated sequences. The split vector concept was validated with different vector pairs.

  19. ycf1, the most promising plastid DNA barcode of land plants

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenpan; Xu, Chao; Li, Changhao; Sun, Jiahui; Zuo, Yunjuan; Shi, Shuo; Cheng, Tao; Guo, Junjie; Zhou, Shiliang

    2015-01-01

    A DNA barcode is a DNA fragment used to identify species. For land plants, DNA fragments of plastid genome could be the primary consideration. Unfortunately, most of the plastid candidate barcodes lack species-level resolution. The identification of DNA barcodes of high resolution at species level is critical to the success of DNA barcoding in plants. We searched the available plastid genomes for the most variable regions and tested the best candidates using both a large number of tree species and seven well-sampled plant groups. Two regions of the plastid gene ycf1, ycf1a and ycf1b, were the most variable loci that were better than existing plastid candidate barcodes and can serve as a barcode of land plants. Primers were designed for the amplification of these regions, and the PCR success of these primers ranged from 82.80% to 98.17%. Of 420 tree species, 357 species could be distinguished using ycf1b, which was slightly better than the combination of matK and rbcL. For the well-sampled representative plant groups, ycf1b generally performed better than any of the matK, rbcL and trnH-psbA. We concluded that ycf1a or ycf1b is the most variable plastid genome region and can serve as a core barcode of land plants. PMID:25672218

  20. Plastids Are Major Regulators of Light Signaling in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ruckle, Michael E.; Burgoon, Lyle D.; Lawrence, Lauren A.; Sinkler, Christopher A.; Larkin, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    We previously provided evidence that plastid signaling regulates the downstream components of a light signaling network and that this signal integration coordinates chloroplast biogenesis with both the light environment and development by regulating gene expression. We tested these ideas by analyzing light- and plastid-regulated transcriptomes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that the enrichment of Gene Ontology terms in these transcriptomes is consistent with the integration of light and plastid signaling (1) down-regulating photosynthesis and inducing both repair and stress tolerance in dysfunctional chloroplasts and (2) helping coordinate processes such as growth, the circadian rhythm, and stress responses with the degree of chloroplast function. We then tested whether factors that contribute to this signal integration are also regulated by light and plastid signals by characterizing T-DNA insertion alleles of genes that are regulated by light and plastid signaling and that encode proteins that are annotated as contributing to signaling, transcription, or no known function. We found that a high proportion of these mutant alleles induce chloroplast biogenesis during deetiolation. We quantified the expression of four photosynthesis-related genes in seven of these enhanced deetiolation (end) mutants and found that photosynthesis-related gene expression is attenuated. This attenuation is particularly striking for Photosystem II subunit S expression. We conclude that the integration of light and plastid signaling regulates a number of END genes that help optimize chloroplast function and that at least some END genes affect photosynthesis-related gene expression. PMID:22383539

  1. Effects of inversion on plastid position and gravitropism in Ceratodon protonemata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuchow, J.; Sack, F. D.

    1993-01-01

    When dark-grown tip cells of protonemata of the moss Ceratodon purpureus are turned to the horizontal, plastids first sediment towards gravity in a specific zone and then the tip curves upward. To determine whether gravitropism and plastid sedimentation occur in other orientations, protonemata were reoriented to angles other than 90 degrees. Qualitative and quantitative light microscopic observations show that plastid sedimentation along the cell axis occurs in both upright and inverted cells. However, only some plastids fall and sedimentation is incomplete; plastids remain distributed throughout the length of the cell, and those plastids that sediment do not fall all the way to the bottom of the cell. Tip cells are gravitropic regardless of stimulation angle, and as in higher plants, the maximal rate of initial curvature is in response to a 120 degrees reorientation. Infrared videomicroscopy, time-lapse studies of living, inverted protonemata indicate that amyloplast sedimentation precedes upward curvature. Together, these data further support (i) the hypothesis that amyloplast sedimentation functions in gravitropic sensing in these cells, and (ii) the idea that gravity affected the evolution of cell organization.

  2. An Arabidopsis Homolog of the Bacterial Cell Division Inhibitor SulA Is Involved in Plastid DivisionW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Raynaud, Cécile; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Perennes, Claudette; Bergounioux, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    Plastids have evolved from an endosymbiosis between a cyanobacterial symbiont and a eukaryotic host cell. Their division is mediated both by proteins of the host cell and conserved bacterial division proteins. Here, we identified a new component of the plastid division machinery, Arabidopsis thaliana SulA. Disruption of its cyanobacterial homolog (SSulA) in Synechocystis and overexpression of an AtSulA-green fluorescent protein fusion in Arabidopsis demonstrate that these genes are involved in cell and plastid division, respectively. Overexpression of AtSulA inhibits plastid division in planta but rescues plastid division defects caused by overexpression of AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1, demonstrating that its role in plastid division may involve an interaction with AtFtsZ1-1 and AtFtsZ2-1. PMID:15208387

  3. Plastid Transformation in the Monocotyledonous Cereal Crop, Rice (Oryza sativa) and Transmission of Transgenes to Their Progeny

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sa Mi; Kang, Kyungsu; Chung, Hyunsup; Yoo, Soon Hee; Xu, Xiang Ming; Lee, Seung-Bum; Cheong, Jong-Joo; Daniell, Henry; Kim, Minkyun

    2012-01-01

    The plastid transformation approach offers a number of unique advantages, including high-level transgene expression, multi-gene engineering, transgene containment, and a lack of gene silencing and position effects. The extension of plastid transformation technology to monocotyledonous cereal crops, including rice, bears great promise for the improvement of agronomic traits, and the efficient production of pharmaceutical or nutritional enhancement. Here, we report a promising step towards stable plastid transformation in rice. We produced fertile transplastomic rice plants and demonstrated transmission of the plastid-expressed green fluorescent protein (GFP) and aminoglycoside 3′-adenylyltransferase genes to the progeny of these plants. Transgenic chloroplasts were determined to have stably expressed the GFP, which was confirmed by both confocal microscopy and Western blot analyses. Although the produced rice plastid transformants were found to be heteroplastomic, and the transformation efficiency requires further improvement, this study has established a variety of parameters for the use of plastid transformation technology in cereal crops. PMID:16819304

  4. Increased Ratio of Electron Transport to Net Assimilation Rate Supports Elevated Isoprenoid Emission Rate in Eucalypts under Drought1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Dani, Kaidala Ganesha Srikanta; Jamie, Ian McLeod; Prentice, Iain Colin; Atwell, Brian James

    2014-01-01

    Plants undergoing heat and low-CO2 stresses emit large amounts of volatile isoprenoids compared with those in stress-free conditions. One hypothesis posits that the balance between reducing power availability and its use in carbon assimilation determines constitutive isoprenoid emission rates in plants and potentially even their maximum emission capacity under brief periods of stress. To test this, we used abiotic stresses to manipulate the availability of reducing power. Specifically, we examined the effects of mild to severe drought on photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) and net carbon assimilation rate (NAR) and the relationship between estimated energy pools and constitutive volatile isoprenoid emission rates in two species of eucalypts: Eucalyptus occidentalis (drought tolerant) and Eucalyptus camaldulensis (drought sensitive). Isoprenoid emission rates were insensitive to mild drought, and the rates increased when the decline in NAR reached a certain species-specific threshold. ETR was sustained under drought and the ETR-NAR ratio increased, driving constitutive isoprenoid emission until severe drought caused carbon limitation of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway. The estimated residual reducing power unused for carbon assimilation, based on the energetic status model, significantly correlated with constitutive isoprenoid emission rates across gradients of drought (r2 > 0.8) and photorespiratory stress (r2 > 0.9). Carbon availability could critically limit emission rates under severe drought and photorespiratory stresses. Under most instances of moderate abiotic stress levels, increased isoprenoid emission rates compete with photorespiration for the residual reducing power not invested in carbon assimilation. A similar mechanism also explains the individual positive effects of low-CO2, heat, and drought stresses on isoprenoid emission. PMID:25139160

  5. Functional characterization of a plastidal cation-dependent O-methyltransferase from the liverwort Plagiochasma appendiculatum.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui-Xue; Zhao, Yu; Gao, Shuai; Zhang, Yu-Ying; Li, Dan-Dan; Lou, Hong-Xiang; Cheng, Ai-Xia

    2015-10-01

    Caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferases (CCoAOMTs), known to be involved in phenylpropanoid metabolism and lignin synthesis, have been characterized from several higher plant species, which also harbor CCoAOMT-like enzymes responsible for methylation of a variety of flavonoids, anthocyanins, coumarins and phenylpropanoids. Here, a gene encoding a CCoAOMT (PaOMT1) was isolated from a sequenced cDNA library of the liverwort species Plagiochasma appendiculatum, a species belonging to the Family Aytoniaceae. The full-length cDNA sequence of PaOMT1 contains 909 bp, and is predicted to encode a protein with 302 amino acids. The gene products were 40-50% identical to CCoAOMT sequences of other plants. Experiments based on recombinant PaOMT1 showed that the enzyme was able to methylate phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and coumarins, with a preference for the flavonoid quercetin (19). Although the substrate selectivity and biochemical feature of PaOMT1 is similar to CCoAOMT-like enzymes, the sequence alignment results indicated PaOMT1 is closer to true CCoAOMT enzymes. A phylogenetic analysis indicated that PaOMT1 is intermediate between true CCoAOMTs and CCoAOMT-like enzymes. The transient expression of a PaOMT1-GFP fusion in tobacco demonstrated that PaOMT1 is directed to the plastids. PaOMT1 may represent an ancestral form of higher plant true CCoAOMT and CCoAOMT-like enzymes. This is the first time an O-methyltransferase was characterized in liverworts.

  6. Diurnal regulation of plastid genes in Populus deltoides.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M S; Naithani, S; Tuli, R; Sane, P V

    2000-12-01

    Light regulates leaf and chloroplast development, together with overall chloroplast gene expression at various levels. Plants respond to diurnal and seasonal changes in light by changing expression of photosynthesis genes and metabolism. In Populus deltoides, a deciduous tree species, leaf development begins in the month of March and leaf maturation is attained by summer, which is subsequently followed by autumnal senescence and fall. In the present study, diurnal changes in the steady state transcript levels of plastid genes were examined in the fully developed leaves during summer season. Our results show that steady state level of the psaA/B, psbA, psbEFLJ and petA transcripts showed differential accumulation during diurnal cycle in summer. However, there was no significant change in the pigment composition during the day/night cycle. Our studies suggest that the diurnal regulation of steady state mRNA accumulation may play a crucial role during daily adjustments in plants life with rapidly changing light irradiance and temperature.

  7. Plastid primers for angiosperm phylogenetics and phylogeography1

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    Premise of the study: PCR primers are available for virtually every region of the plastid genome. Selection of which primer pairs to use is second only to selection of the genic region. This is particularly true for research at the species/population interface. Methods: Primer pairs for 130 regions of the chloroplast genome were evaluated in 12 species distributed across the angiosperms. Likelihood of amplification success was inferred based upon number and location of mismatches to target sequence. Intraspecific sequence variability was evaluated under three different criteria in four species. Results: Many published primer pairs should work across all taxa sampled, with the exception of failure due to genomic reorganization events. Universal barcoding primers were the least likely to work (65% success). The list of most variable regions for use within species has little in common with the lists identified in prior studies. Discussion: Published primer sequences should amplify a diversity of flowering plant DNAs, even those designed for specific taxonomic groups. “Universal” primers may have extremely limited utility. There was little consistency in likelihood of amplification success for any given publication across lineages or within lineage across publications. PMID:26082876

  8. DNA maintenance in plastids and mitochondria of plants

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Delene J.; Bendich, Arnold J.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA molecules in plastids and mitochondria of plants have been studied for over 40 years. Here, we review the data on the circular or linear form, replication, repair, and persistence of the organellar DNA (orgDNA) in plants. The bacterial origin of orgDNA appears to have profoundly influenced ideas about the properties of chromosomal DNA molecules in these organelles to the point of dismissing data inconsistent with ideas from the 1970s. When found at all, circular genome-sized molecules comprise a few percent of orgDNA. In cells active in orgDNA replication, most orgDNA is found as linear and branched-linear forms larger than the size of the genome, likely a consequence of a virus-like DNA replication mechanism. In contrast to the stable chromosomal DNA molecules in bacteria and the plant nucleus, the molecular integrity of orgDNA declines during leaf development at a rate that varies among plant species. This decline is attributed to degradation of damaged-but-not-repaired molecules, with a proposed repair cost-saving benefit most evident in grasses. All orgDNA maintenance activities are proposed to occur on the nucleoid tethered to organellar membranes by developmentally-regulated proteins. PMID:26579143

  9. Plastids of Marine Phytoplankton Produce Bioactive Pigments and Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Heydarizadeh, Parisa; Poirier, Isabelle; Loizeau, Damien; Ulmann, Lionel; Mimouni, Virginie; Schoefs, Benoît; Bertrand, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplankton is acknowledged to be a very diverse source of bioactive molecules. These compounds play physiological roles that allow cells to deal with changes of the environmental constrains. For example, the diversity of light harvesting pigments allows efficient photosynthesis at different depths in the seawater column. Identically, lipid composition of cell membranes can vary according to environmental factors. This, together with the heterogenous evolutionary origin of taxa, makes the chemical diversity of phytoplankton compounds much larger than in terrestrial plants. This contribution is dedicated to pigments and lipids synthesized within or from plastids/photosynthetic membranes. It starts with a short review of cyanobacteria and microalgae phylogeny. Then the bioactivity of pigments and lipids (anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenic, anti-cancer, anti-obesity, anti-allergic activities, and cardio- neuro-, hepato- and photoprotective effects), alone or in combination, is detailed. To increase the cellular production of bioactive compounds, specific culture conditions may be applied (e.g., high light intensity, nitrogen starvation). Regardless of the progress made in blue biotechnologies, the production of bioactive compounds is still limited. However, some examples of large scale production are given, and perspectives are suggested in the final section. PMID:24022731

  10. Blurred pictures from the crime scene: the growing case for a function of Chlamydiales in plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Steven G; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent papers have brought suggestive evidence for an active role of Chlamydiales in the establishment of the plastid. Chlamydiales define a very ancient group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that multiply in vesicles within eukaryotic phagotrophic host cells such as animals, amoebae or other protists, possibly including the hypothetical phagotroph that internalized the cyanobacterial ancestor of the plastid over a billion years ago. We briefly survey the case for an active role of these ancient pathogens in plastid endosymbiosis. We argue that a good understanding of the Chlamydiales infection cycle and diversity may help to shed light on the process of metabolic integration of the evolving plastid.

  11. Targeted insertion of foreign genes into the tobacco plastid genome without physical linkage to the selectable marker gene

    SciTech Connect

    Carrer, H.; Maliga, P.

    1995-08-01

    To determine whether targeted DNA insertion into the tobacco plastid genome can be obtained without physical linkage to a selectable marker gene, we carried out biolistic transformation of chloroplasts in tobacco leaf segments with a 1:1 mix of two independently targeted antibiotic resistance genes. Plastid transformants were selected by spectinomycin resistance due to expression of an integrated aadA gene. Integration of the unselected kanamycin resistance (kan) gene into the same plastid genome was established by Southern probing in {approx}20% of the spectinomycin-selected clones. Efficient cotransformation will facilitate targeted plastid genome modification without physical linkage to a marker gene. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Light promotion of hypocotyl gravitropism of a starch-deficient tobacco mutant correlates with plastid enlargement and sedimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitha, S.; Yang, M.; Kiss, J. Z.; Sack, F. D.

    1998-01-01

    Dark-grown hypocotyls of a starch-deficient mutant (NS458) of tobacco (Nicotiana sylvestris) lack amyloplasts and plastid sedimentation, and have severely reduced gravitropism. However, gravitropism improved dramatically when NS458 seedlings were grown in the light. To determine the extent of this improvement and whether mutant hypocotyls contain sedimented amyloplasts, gravitropic sensitivity (induction time and intermittent stimulation) and plastid size and position in the endodermis were measured in seedlings grown for 8 d in the light. Light-grown NS458 hypocotyls were gravitropic but were less sensitive than the wild type (WT). Starch occupied 10% of the volume of NS458 plastids grown in both the light and the dark, whereas WT plastids were essentially filled with starch in both treatments. Light increased plastid size twice as much in the mutant as in the WT. Plastids in light-grown NS458 were sedimented, presumably because of their larger size and greater total starch content. The induction by light of plastid sedimentation in NS458 provides new evidence for the role of plastid mass and sedimentation in stem gravitropic sensing. Because the mutant is not as sensitive as the WT, NS458 plastids may not have sufficient mass to provide full gravitropic sensitivity.

  13. Exceptional inheritance of plastids via pollen in Nicotiana sylvestris with no detectable paternal mitochondrial DNA in the progeny.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory; Svab, Zora; Maliga, Pal

    2012-10-01

    Plastids and mitochondria, the DNA-containing cytoplasmic organelles, are maternally inherited in the majority of angiosperm species. Even in plants with strict maternal inheritance, exceptional paternal transmission of plastids has been observed. Our objective was to detect rare leakage of plastids via pollen in Nicotiana sylvestris and to determine if pollen transmission of plastids results in co-transmission of paternal mitochondria. As father plants, we used N. sylvestris plants with transgenic, selectable plastids and wild-type mitochondria. As mother plants, we used N. sylvestris plants with Nicotiana undulata cytoplasm, including the CMS-92 mitochondria that cause cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) by homeotic transformation of the stamens. We report here exceptional paternal plastid DNA in approximately 0.002% of N. sylvestris seedlings. However, we did not detect paternal mitochondrial DNA in any of the six plastid-transmission lines, suggesting independent transmission of the cytoplasmic organelles via pollen. When we used fertile N. sylvestris as mothers, we obtained eight fertile plastid transmission lines, which did not transmit their plastids via pollen at higher frequencies than their fathers. We discuss the implications for transgene containment and plant evolutionary histories inferred from cytoplasmic phylogenies.

  14. Translation and Co-translational Membrane Engagement of Plastid-encoded Chlorophyll-binding Proteins Are Not Influenced by Chlorophyll Availability in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Zoschke, Reimo; Chotewutmontri, Prakitchai; Barkan, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Chlorophyll is an indispensable constituent of the photosynthetic machinery in green organisms. Bound by apoproteins of photosystems I and II, chlorophyll performs light-harvesting and charge separation. Due to the phototoxic nature of free chlorophyll and its precursors, chlorophyll synthesis is regulated to comply with the availability of nascent chlorophyll-binding apoproteins. Conversely, the synthesis and co-translational insertion of such proteins into the thylakoid membrane have been suggested to be influenced by chlorophyll availability. In this study, we addressed these hypotheses by using ribosome profiling to examine the synthesis and membrane targeting of chlorophyll-binding apoproteins in chlorophyll-deficient chlH maize mutants (Zm-chlH). ChlH encodes the H subunit of the magnesium chelatase (also known as GUN5), which catalyzes the first committed step in chlorophyll synthesis. Our results show that the number and distribution of ribosomes on plastid mRNAs encoding chlorophyll-binding apoproteins are not substantially altered in Zm-chlH mutants, suggesting that chlorophyll has no impact on ribosome dynamics. Additionally, a Zm-chlH mutation does not change the amino acid position at which nascent chlorophyll-binding apoproteins engage the thylakoid membrane, nor the efficiency with which membrane-engagement occurs. Together, these results provide evidence that chlorophyll availability does not selectively activate the translation of plastid mRNAs encoding chlorophyll apoproteins. Our results imply that co- or post-translational proteolysis of apoproteins is the primary mechanism that adjusts apoprotein abundance to chlorophyll availability in plants.

  15. A highly spatially resolved GIS-based model to assess the isoprenoid emissions from key Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Claudia Kemper; Fares, Silvano; Ciccioli, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    The amount of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (BVOC) emitted from terrestrial vegetation is of great importance in atmospheric reactivity, particularly for ozone-forming reactions and as condensation nuclei in aerosol formation and growth. This work presents a detailed inventory of isoprenoid emissions from vegetation in Italy using an original approach which combines state of the art models to estimate the species-specific isoprenoid emissions and a Geographic Information System (GIS) where emissions are spatially represented. Isoprenoid species and basal emission factors were obtained by combining results from laboratory experiments with those published in literature. For the first time, our investigation was not only restricted to isoprene and total monoterpenes, but our goal was to provide maps of isoprene and individual monoterpenes at a high-spatial (˜1 km2) and temporal resolution (daily runs, monthly trends in emissions are discussed in the text). Another novelty in our research was the inclusion of the effects of phenology on plant emissions. Our results show that: a) isoprene, a-pinene, sabinene and b-pinene are the most important compounds emitted from vegetation in Italy; b) annual biogenic isoprene and monoterpene fluxes for the year 2006 were ˜31.30 Gg and ˜37.70 Gg, respectively; and c) Quercus pubescens + Quercus petrea + Quercus robur, Quercus ilex, Quercus suber and Fagus sylvatica are the principal isoprenoid emitting species in the country. The high spatial and temporal resolution, combined with the species-specific emission output, makes the model particularly suitable for assessing local budgets, and for modeling photochemical pollution in Italy.

  16. Precise precursor rebalancing for isoprenoids production by fine control of gapA expression in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jung, Juyoung; Lim, Jae Hyung; Kim, Se Yeon; Im, Dae-Kyun; Seok, Joo Yeon; Lee, Seung-Jae V; Oh, Min-Kyu; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of isoprenoids via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) pathway requires equimolar glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate to divert carbon flux toward the products of interest. Here, we demonstrate that precursor balancing is one of the critical steps for the production of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli. First, the implementation of the synthetic lycopene production pathway as a model system and the amplification of the native DXP pathway were accomplished using synthetic constitutive promoters and redesigned 5'-untranslated regions (5'-UTRs). Next, fine-controlled precursor balancing was investigated by tuning phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA) or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The results showed that tuning-down of gapA improved the specific lycopene content by 45% compared to the overexpression of ppsA. The specific lycopene content in the strains with down-regulated gapA increased by 97% compared to that in the parental strain. Our results indicate that gapA is the best target for precursor balancing to increase biosynthesis of isoprenoids.

  17. Natural isoprenoids inhibit LPS-induced-production of cytokines and nitric oxide in aminobisphosphonate-treated monocytes.

    PubMed

    Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Tommasini, Alberto; Crovella, Sergio; Pontillo, Alessandra

    2010-06-01

    The inhibition of mevalonate pathway through genetic defects (mevalonate kinase deficiency, MKD) or pharmacologic drugs (aminobisphosphonates) causes a shortage of intermediate compounds and, in particular, of geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP) associated to the activation of caspase-1 and IL-1beta release. Geraniol (GOH), farnesol (FOH), geranylgeraniol (GGOH) and menthol (MOH), due to their isoprenoid structure, are supposed to enter the mevalonate pathway and to by-pass the biochemical block, reconstituting the pathway. Considering the already known side effects of aminobisphosphonates, and the lack of a specific treatment for MKD, we evaluated the impact of these natural isoprenoids compounds in a RAW cell lines chemically treated with the aminobisphosphonate alendronate, and in monocytes isolated from 2 patients affected by MKD. GOH, FOH, GGOH and MOH were all capable to diminish inflammatory marker levels induced by LPS. These natural isoprenoids could be proposed as novel therapeutic approach for the still orphan drug MKD, but also considered for the evaluation of possible inflammatory side effects of aminobisphosphonates.

  18. Molecular characterization of the Calvin cycle enzyme phosphoribulokinase in the stramenopile alga Vaucheria litorea and the plastid hosting mollusc Elysia chlorotica.

    PubMed

    Rumpho, Mary E; Pochareddy, Sirisha; Worful, Jared M; Summer, Elizabeth J; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Pelletreau, Karen N; Tyler, Mary S; Lee, Jungho; Manhart, James R; Soule, Kara M

    2009-11-01

    Phosphoribulokinase (PRK), a nuclear-encoded plastid-localized enzyme unique to the photosynthetic carbon reduction (Calvin) cycle, was cloned and characterized from the stramenopile alga Vaucheria litorea. This alga is the source of plastids for the mollusc (sea slug) Elysia chlorotica which enable the animal to survive for months solely by photoautotrophic CO2 fixation. The 1633-bp V. litorea prk gene was cloned and the coding region, found to be interrupted by four introns, encodes a 405-amino acid protein. This protein contains the typical bipartite target sequence expected of nuclear-encoded proteins that are directed to complex (i.e. four membrane-bound) algal plastids. De novo synthesis of PRK and enzyme activity were detected in E. chlorotica in spite of having been starved of V. litorea for several months. Unlike the algal enzyme, PRK in the sea slug did not exhibit redox regulation. Two copies of partial PRK-encoding genes were isolated from both sea slug and aposymbiotic sea slug egg DNA using PCR. Each copy contains the nucleotide region spanning exon 1 and part of exon 2 of V. litorea prk, including the bipartite targeting peptide. However, the larger prk fragment also includes intron 1. The exon and intron sequences of prk in E. chlorotica and V. litorea are nearly identical. These data suggest that PRK is differentially regulated in V. litorea and E. chlorotica and at least a portion of the V. litorea nuclear PRK gene is present in sea slugs that have been starved for several months.

  19. The plastidic DEAD-box RNA helicase 22, HS3, is essential for plastid functions both in seed development and in seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Masatake; Hayashi, Makoto; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio

    2013-09-01

    Plants accumulate large amounts of storage products in seeds to provide an energy reserve and to supply nutrients for germination and post-germinative growth. Arabidopsis thaliana belongs to the Brassica family, and oil is the main storage product in Arabidopsis seeds. To elucidate the regulatory mechanisms of oil biosynthesis in seeds, we screened for high density seeds (heavy seed) that have a low oil content. HS3 (heavy seed 3) encodes the DEAD-box RNA helicase 22 that is localized to plastids. The triacylglycerol (TAG) content of hs3-1 seeds was 10% lower than that of wild-type (WT) seeds, while the protein content was unchanged. The hs3-1 plants displayed a pale-green phenotype in developing seeds and seedlings, but not in adult leaves. The HS3 expression level was high in developing seeds and seedlings, but was low in stems, rosette leaves and flowers. The plastid gene expression profile of WT developing seeds and seedlings differed from that of hs3-1 developing seeds and seedlings. The expression of several genes was reduced in developing hs3-1 seeds, including accD, a gene that encodes the β subunit of carboxyltransferase, which is one component of acetyl-CoA carboxylase in plastids. In contrast, no differences were observed between the expression profiles of WT and hs3-1 rosette leaves. These results show that HS3 is essential for proper mRNA accumulation of plastid genes during seed development and seedling growth, and suggest that HS3 ensures seed oil biosynthesis by maintaining plastid mRNA levels.

  20. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria: a novel pathway for the early steps leading to isopentenyl diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, M; Knani, M; Simonin, P; Sutter, B; Sahm, H

    1993-10-15

    Incorporation of 13C-labelled glucose, acetate, pyruvate or erythrose allowed the determination of the origin of the carbon atoms of triterpenoids of the hopane series and/or of the ubiquinones from several bacteria (Zymomonas mobilis, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Escherichia coli and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris) confirmed our earlier results obtained by incorporation of 13C-labelled acetate into the hopanoids of other bacteria and led to the identification of a novel biosynthetic route for the early steps of isoprenoid biosynthesis. The C5 framework of isoprenic units results most probably (i) from the condensation of a C2 unit derived from pyruvate decarboxylation (e.g. thiamine-activated acetaldehyde) on the C-2 carbonyl group of a triose phosphate derivative issued probably from dihydroxyacetone phosphate and not from pyruvate and (ii) from a transposition step. Although this hypothetical biosynthetic pathway resembles that of L-valine biosynthesis, this amino acid or its C5 precursors could be excluded as intermediates in the formation of isoprenic units.

  1. δ-Deuterium Isotope Effects as Probes for Transition-State Structures of Isoprenoid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathways to isoprenoid compounds involve transfer of the prenyl moiety in allylic diphosphates to electron-rich (nucleophilic) acceptors. The acceptors can be many types of nucleophiles, while the allylic diphosphates only differ in the number of isoprene units and stereochemistry of the double bonds in the hydrocarbon moieties. Because of the wide range of nucleophilicities of naturally occurring acceptors, the mechanism for prenyltransfer reactions may be dissociative or associative with early to late transition states. We have measured δ-secondary kinetic isotope effects operating through four bonds for substitution reactions with dimethylallyl derivatives bearing deuterated methyl groups at the distal (C3) carbon atom in the double bond under dissociative and associative conditions. Computational studies with density functional theory indicate that the magnitudes of the isotope effects correlate with the extent of bond formation between the allylic moiety and the electron-rich acceptor in the transition state for alkylation and provide insights into the structures of the transition states for associative and dissociative alkylation reactions. PMID:24665882

  2. Constraints in the application of the Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether index as a terrestrial input proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fietz, Susanne; MartíNez-Garcia, Alfredo; Huguet, Carme; Rueda, Gemma; Rosell-Melé, Antoni

    2011-10-01

    Determination of the relative inputs of aquatic autochthonous and terrestrial allochthonous organic matter into marine and lacustrine environments is essential to understanding the global carbon budget. A variety of proxies are used for this purpose, including the Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether (BIT) index. This is calculated from the concentrations of branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs), derived from unidentified terrestrial bacteria, and crenarchaeol, a marker for aquatic mesophile Thaumarchaeota (Crenarchaeota group I). As the index is a ratio, its value depends on both the crenarchaeol aquatic in situ production and the soil-derived branched GDGT input. Therefore, the BIT index reflects not only changes in the input of terrestrial or soil organic matter but also relative variations in aquatic Thaumarchaeota abundance in the water column. In fact, we show that in oceanic and lacustrine settings, the BIT index can be dominated by the aquatic end-member of the ratio. Consequently, the BIT index by itself can be an unreliable proxy to compare the input of terrestrial matter between sites and over time, and we propose that the quantification of branched GDGT fluxes or concentrations may instead be a better indicator of soil terrestrial inputs.

  3. Isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis offers potential targets for drug discovery against diseases caused by apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Hunter, William N

    2011-01-01

    Two, simple, C5 compounds, dimethylally diphosphate and isopentenyl diphosphate, are the universal precursors of isoprenoids, a large family of natural products involved in numerous important biological processes. Two distinct biosynthetic pathways have evolved to supply these precursors. Humans use the mevalonate route whilst many species of bacteria including important pathogens, plant chloroplasts and apicomplexan parasites exploit the non-mevalonate pathway. The absence from humans, combined with genetic and chemical validation suggests that the non-mevalonate pathway holds the potential to support new drug discovery programmes targeting Gram-negative bacteria and the apicomplexan parasites responsible for causing serious human diseases, and also infections of veterinary importance. The non-mevalonate pathway relies on eight enzyme-catalyzed stages exploiting a range of cofactors and metal ions. A wealth of structural and mechanistic data, mainly derived from studies of bacterial enzymes, now exists for most components of the pathway and these will be described. Particular attention will be paid to how these data inform on the apicomplexan orthologues concentrating on the enzymes from Plasmodium spp. these cause malaria, one the most important parasitic diseases in the world today.

  4. Applicability of highly branched isoprenoids as a sea ice proxy in the Ross Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jae Il; Belt, Simon T.; Gal, Jong-Ku; Smik, Lukas; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice is an integral component of the polar climate system, constraining the effect of changing surface albedo, ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges, the formation of deep and intermediate waters that participate in driving the meridional overturning circulation and thus global climate. In recent years, a mono-unsaturated highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkene which is biosynthesised by certain sea ice diatoms during the spring bloom and, upon ice melt, deposited into underlying sediments, has been uniquely observed in Arctic sea ice and in Arctic sediments. Hence, the term IP25 (ice proxy with 25 carbon atoms) was proposed to distinguish this compound from other HBI isomers and has become an established proxy for the reconstruction of Arctic sea ice. In contrast, a monounsaturated HBI alkene, i.e. IP25, has not been observed in sea ice or sediments from the Antarctic. Hence, the application of diene and triene HBI concentrations and the resulting diene/triene (D/T) ratio was alternatively introduced as sea ice/open water indicators in the Southern Ocean. However, there is still lack of data covering the wide areas around the Antarctic, especially from the Ross Sea. Hence, we investigated surface sediment samples from the Ross Sea (n=14) collected during the R/V ARAON cruise in 2015 as well as from the Antarctic Peninsula (n=17) collected during several R/V ARAON cruises between 2001 and 2013. We will present our preliminary results and will discuss the applicability of the HBI in the Ross Sea.

  5. Cloning and characterization of farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase from the highly branched isoprenoid producing diatom Rhizosolenia setigera

    PubMed Central

    Ferriols, Victor Marco Emmanuel N.; Yaginuma, Ryoko; Adachi, Masao; Takada, Kentaro; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Okada, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    The diatom Rhizosolenia setigera Brightwell produces highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) hydrocarbons that are ubiquitously present in marine environments. The hydrocarbon composition of R. setigera varies between C25 and C30 HBIs depending on the life cycle stage with regard to auxosporulation. To better understand how these hydrocarbons are biosynthesized, we characterized the farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) synthase (FPPS) enzyme of R. setigera. An isolated 1465-bp cDNA clone contained an open reading frame spanning 1299-bp encoding a protein with 432 amino acid residues. Expression of the RsFPPS cDNA coding region in Escherichia coli produced a protein that exhibited FPPS activity in vitro. A reduction in HBI content from diatoms treated with an FPPS inhibitor, risedronate, suggested that RsFPPS supplies precursors for HBI biosynthesis. Product analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry also revealed that RsFPPS produced small amounts of the cis-isomers of geranyl pyrophosphate and FPP, candidate precursors for the cis-isomers of HBIs previously characterized. Furthermore, RsFPPS gene expression at various life stages of R. setigera in relation to auxosporulation were also analyzed. Herein, we present data on the possible role of RsFPPS in HBI biosynthesis, and it is to our knowledge the first instance that an FPPS was cloned and characterized from a diatom. PMID:25996801

  6. Evolution of galactoglycerolipid biosynthetic pathways--from cyanobacteria to primary plastids and from primary to secondary plastids.

    PubMed

    Petroutsos, Dimitris; Amiar, Souad; Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Bastien, Olivier; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Jouhet, Juliette; Falconet, Denis; Block, Maryse A; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Bowler, Chris; Botté, Cyrille; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Photosynthetic membranes have a unique lipid composition that has been remarkably well conserved from cyanobacteria to chloroplasts. These membranes are characterized by a very high content in galactoglycerolipids, i.e., mono- and digalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG and DGDG, respectively). Galactoglycerolipids make up the bulk of the lipid matrix in which photosynthetic complexes are embedded. They are also known to fulfill specific functions, such as stabilizing photosystems, being a source of polyunsaturated fatty acids for various purposes and, in some eukaryotes, being exported to other subcellular compartments. The conservation of MGDG and DGDG suggests that selection pressures might have conserved the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis, but this does not appear to be the case. Important evolutionary transitions comprise primary endosymbiosis (from a symbiotic cyanobacterium to a primary chloroplast) and secondary endosymbiosis (from a symbiotic unicellular algal eukaryote to a secondary plastid). In this review, we compare biosynthetic pathways based on available molecular and biochemical data, highlighting enzymatic reactions that have been conserved and others that have diverged or been lost, as well as the emergence of parallel and alternative biosynthetic systems originating from other metabolic pathways. Questions for future research are highlighted.

  7. Comparative analysis of plastid genomes of non-photosynthetic Ericaceae and their photosynthetic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Logacheva, Maria D.; Schelkunov, Mikhail I.; Shtratnikova, Victoria Y.; Matveeva, Maria V.; Penin, Aleksey A.

    2016-01-01

    Although plastid genomes of flowering plants are typically highly conserved regarding their size, gene content and order, there are some exceptions. Ericaceae, a large and diverse family of flowering plants, warrants special attention within the context of plastid genome evolution because it includes both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic species with rearranged plastomes and putative losses of “essential” genes. We characterized plastid genomes of three species of Ericaceae, non-photosynthetic Monotropa uniflora and Hypopitys monotropa and photosynthetic Pyrola rotundifolia, using high-throughput sequencing. As expected for non-photosynthetic plants, M. uniflora and H. monotropa have small plastid genomes (46 kb and 35 kb, respectively) lacking genes related to photosynthesis, whereas P. rotundifolia has a larger genome (169 kb) with a gene set similar to other photosynthetic plants. The examined genomes contain an unusually high number of repeats and translocations. Comparative analysis of the expanded set of Ericaceae plastomes suggests that the genes clpP and accD that are present in the plastid genomes of almost all plants have not been lost in this family (as was previously thought) but rather persist in these genomes in unusual forms. Also we found a new gene in P. rotundifolia that emerged as a result of duplication of rps4 gene. PMID:27452401

  8. Efficient and stable transformation of Lactuca sativa L. cv. Cisco (lettuce) plastids.

    PubMed

    Kanamoto, Hirosuke; Yamashita, Atsushi; Asao, Hiroshi; Okumura, Satoru; Takase, Hisabumi; Hattori, Masahira; Yokota, Akiho; Tomizawa, Ken-Ichi

    2006-04-01

    Transgenic plastids offer unique advantages in plant biotechnology, including high-level foreign protein expression. However, broad application of plastid genome engineering in biotechnology has been largely hampered by the lack of plastid transformation systems for major crops. Here we describe the development of a plastid transformation system for lettuce, Lactuca sativa L. cv. Cisco. The transforming DNA carries a spectinomycin-resistance gene (aadA) under the control of lettuce chloroplast regulatory expression elements, flanked by two adjacent lettuce plastid genome sequences allowing its targeted insertion between the rbcL and accD genes. On average, we obtained 1 transplastomic lettuce plant per bombardment. We show that lettuce leaf chloroplasts can express transgene-encoded GFP to approximately 36% of the total soluble protein. All transplastomic T0 plants were fertile and the T1 progeny uniformly showed stability of the transgene in the chloroplast genome. This system will open up new possibilities for the efficient production of edible vaccines, pharmaceuticals, and antibodies in plants.

  9. Foreign Plastid Sequences in Plant Mitochondria are Frequently Acquired Via Mitochondrion-to-Mitochondrion Horizontal Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gandini, C. L.; Sanchez-Puerta, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) exhibit variable quantities of alien sequences. Many of these sequences are acquired by intracellular gene transfer (IGT) from the plastid. In addition, frequent events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between mitochondria of different species also contribute to their expanded genomes. In contrast, alien sequences are rarely found in plastid genomes. Most of the plant-to-plant HGT events involve mitochondrion-to-mitochondrion transfers. Occasionally, foreign sequences in mtDNAs are plastid-derived (MTPT), raising questions about their origin, frequency, and mechanism of transfer. The rising number of complete mtDNAs allowed us to address these questions. We identified 15 new foreign MTPTs, increasing significantly the number of those previously reported. One out of five of the angiosperm species analyzed contained at least one foreign MTPT, suggesting a remarkable frequency of HGT among plants. By analyzing the flanking regions of the foreign MTPTs, we found strong evidence for mt-to-mt transfers in 65% of the cases. We hypothesize that plastid sequences were initially acquired by the native mtDNA via IGT and then transferred to a distantly-related plant via mitochondrial HGT, rather than directly from a foreign plastid to the mitochondrial genome. Finally, we describe three novel putative cases of mitochondrial-derived sequences among angiosperm plastomes. PMID:28262720

  10. Selective pressure against horizontally acquired prokaryotic genes as a driving force of plastid evolution

    PubMed Central

    Llorente, Briardo; de Souza, Flavio S. J.; Soto, Gabriela; Meyer, Cristian; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Ayub, Nicolás D.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The plastid organelle comprises a high proportion of nucleus-encoded proteins that were acquired from different prokaryotic donors via independent horizontal gene transfers following its primary endosymbiotic origin. What forces drove the targeting of these alien proteins to the plastid remains an unresolved evolutionary question. To better understand this process we screened for suitable candidate proteins to recapitulate their prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Here we identify the ancient horizontal transfer of a bacterial polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene to the nuclear genome of an early land plant ancestor and infer the possible mechanism behind the plastidial localization of the encoded enzyme. Arabidopsis plants expressing PPO versions either lacking or harbouring a plastid-targeting signal allowed examining fitness consequences associated with its subcellular localization. Markedly, a deleterious effect on plant growth was highly correlated with PPO activity only when producing the non-targeted enzyme, suggesting that selection favoured the fixation of plastid-targeted protein versions. Our results reveal a possible evolutionary mechanism of how selection against heterologous genes encoding cytosolic proteins contributed in incrementing plastid proteome complexity from non-endosymbiotic gene sources, a process that may also impact mitochondrial evolution. PMID:26750147

  11. Selective pressure against horizontally acquired prokaryotic genes as a driving force of plastid evolution.

    PubMed

    Llorente, Briardo; de Souza, Flavio S J; Soto, Gabriela; Meyer, Cristian; Alonso, Guillermo D; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Ayub, Nicolás D; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-11

    The plastid organelle comprises a high proportion of nucleus-encoded proteins that were acquired from different prokaryotic donors via independent horizontal gene transfers following its primary endosymbiotic origin. What forces drove the targeting of these alien proteins to the plastid remains an unresolved evolutionary question. To better understand this process we screened for suitable candidate proteins to recapitulate their prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Here we identify the ancient horizontal transfer of a bacterial polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene to the nuclear genome of an early land plant ancestor and infer the possible mechanism behind the plastidial localization of the encoded enzyme. Arabidopsis plants expressing PPO versions either lacking or harbouring a plastid-targeting signal allowed examining fitness consequences associated with its subcellular localization. Markedly, a deleterious effect on plant growth was highly correlated with PPO activity only when producing the non-targeted enzyme, suggesting that selection favoured the fixation of plastid-targeted protein versions. Our results reveal a possible evolutionary mechanism of how selection against heterologous genes encoding cytosolic proteins contributed in incrementing plastid proteome complexity from non-endosymbiotic gene sources, a process that may also impact mitochondrial evolution.

  12. Manipulation of starch granule size distribution in potato tubers by modulation of plastid division.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Sylvia; Caspers, Martien; Kottenhagen, Marijke; Meima, Henk; ter Stege, Renaldo; de Vetten, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Starch granule size is an important parameter for starch applications in industry. Starch granules are formed in amyloplasts, which are, like chloroplasts, derived from proplastids. Division processes and associated machinery are likely to be similar for all plastids. Essential roles for FtsZ proteins in plastid division in land plants have been revealed. FtsZ forms the so-called Z ring which, together with inner and outer plastid division rings, brings about constriction of the plastid. It has been shown that modulation of the expression level of FtsZ may result in altered chloroplast size and number. To test whether FtsZ is also involved in amyloplast division and whether this, in turn, may affect the starch granule size in crop plants, FtsZ protein levels were either reduced or increased in potato. As shown previously in other plant species, decreased StFtsZ1 protein levels in leaves resulted in a decrease in the number of chloroplasts in guard cells. More interestingly, plants with increased StFtsZ1 protein levels in tubers resulted in less, but larger, starch granules. This suggests that the stoichiometry between StFtsZ1 and other components of the plastid division machinery is important for its function. Starch from these tubers also had altered pasting properties and phosphate content. The importance of our results for the starch industry is discussed.

  13. Foreign Plastid Sequences in Plant Mitochondria are Frequently Acquired Via Mitochondrion-to-Mitochondrion Horizontal Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gandini, C L; Sanchez-Puerta, M V

    2017-03-06

    Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA) exhibit variable quantities of alien sequences. Many of these sequences are acquired by intracellular gene transfer (IGT) from the plastid. In addition, frequent events of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) between mitochondria of different species also contribute to their expanded genomes. In contrast, alien sequences are rarely found in plastid genomes. Most of the plant-to-plant HGT events involve mitochondrion-to-mitochondrion transfers. Occasionally, foreign sequences in mtDNAs are plastid-derived (MTPT), raising questions about their origin, frequency, and mechanism of transfer. The rising number of complete mtDNAs allowed us to address these questions. We identified 15 new foreign MTPTs, increasing significantly the number of those previously reported. One out of five of the angiosperm species analyzed contained at least one foreign MTPT, suggesting a remarkable frequency of HGT among plants. By analyzing the flanking regions of the foreign MTPTs, we found strong evidence for mt-to-mt transfers in 65% of the cases. We hypothesize that plastid sequences were initially acquired by the native mtDNA via IGT and then transferred to a distantly-related plant via mitochondrial HGT, rather than directly from a foreign plastid to the mitochondrial genome. Finally, we describe three novel putative cases of mitochondrial-derived sequences among angiosperm plastomes.

  14. Selective pressure against horizontally acquired prokaryotic genes as a driving force of plastid evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llorente, Briardo; de Souza, Flavio S. J.; Soto, Gabriela; Meyer, Cristian; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Bravo-Almonacid, Fernando; Ayub, Nicolás D.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The plastid organelle comprises a high proportion of nucleus-encoded proteins that were acquired from different prokaryotic donors via independent horizontal gene transfers following its primary endosymbiotic origin. What forces drove the targeting of these alien proteins to the plastid remains an unresolved evolutionary question. To better understand this process we screened for suitable candidate proteins to recapitulate their prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition. Here we identify the ancient horizontal transfer of a bacterial polyphenol oxidase (PPO) gene to the nuclear genome of an early land plant ancestor and infer the possible mechanism behind the plastidial localization of the encoded enzyme. Arabidopsis plants expressing PPO versions either lacking or harbouring a plastid-targeting signal allowed examining fitness consequences associated with its subcellular localization. Markedly, a deleterious effect on plant growth was highly correlated with PPO activity only when producing the non-targeted enzyme, suggesting that selection favoured the fixation of plastid-targeted protein versions. Our results reveal a possible evolutionary mechanism of how selection against heterologous genes encoding cytosolic proteins contributed in incrementing plastid proteome complexity from non-endosymbiotic gene sources, a process that may also impact mitochondrial evolution.

  15. A targeted enrichment strategy for massively parallel sequencing of angiosperm plastid genomes1

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Gregory W.; Moore, Michael J.; Mandala, Venkata S.; Douglas, Norman A.; Kates, Heather-Rose; Qi, Xinshuai; Brockington, Samuel F.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.; Gitzendanner, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: We explored a targeted enrichment strategy to facilitate rapid and low-cost next-generation sequencing (NGS) of numerous complete plastid genomes from across the phylogenetic breadth of angiosperms. • Methods and Results: A custom RNA probe set including the complete sequences of 22 previously sequenced eudicot plastomes was designed to facilitate hybridization-based targeted enrichment of eudicot plastid genomes. Using this probe set and an Agilent SureSelect targeted enrichment kit, we conducted an enrichment experiment including 24 angiosperms (22 eudicots, two monocots), which were subsequently sequenced on a single lane of the Illumina GAIIx with single-end, 100-bp reads. This approach yielded nearly complete to complete plastid genomes with exceptionally high coverage (mean coverage: 717×), even for the two monocots. • Conclusions: Our enrichment experiment was highly successful even though many aspects of the capture process employed were suboptimal. Hence, significant improvements to this methodology are feasible. With this general approach and probe set, it should be possible to sequence more than 300 essentially complete plastid genomes in a single Illumina GAIIx lane (achieving ∼50× mean coverage). However, given the complications of pooling numerous samples for multiplex sequencing and the limited number of barcodes (e.g., 96) available in commercial kits, we recommend 96 samples as a current practical maximum for multiplex plastome sequencing. This high-throughput approach should facilitate large-scale plastid genome sequencing at any level of phylogenetic diversity in angiosperms. PMID:25202518

  16. Generation of marker-free plastid transformants using a transiently cointegrated selection gene.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Sebastian M J; Huang, Fong-Chin; Golds, Timothy J; Koop, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-02-01

    Genetic engineering of higher plant plastids typically involves stable introduction of antibiotic resistance genes as selection markers. Even though chloroplast genes are maternally inherited in most crops, the possibility of marker transfer to wild relatives or microorganisms cannot be completely excluded. Furthermore, marker expression can be a substantial metabolic drain. Therefore, efficient methods for complete marker removal from plastid transformants are necessary. One method to remove the selection gene from higher plant plastids is based on loop-out recombination, a process difficult to control because selection of homoplastomic transformants is unpredictable. Another method uses the CRE/lox system, but requires additional retransformation and sexual crossing for introduction and subsequent removal of the CRE recombinase. Here we describe the generation of marker-free chloroplast transformants in tobacco using the reconstitution of wild-type pigmentation in combination with plastid transformation vectors, which prevent stable integration of the kanamycin selection marker. One benefit of a procedure using mutants is that marker-free plastid transformants can be produced directly in the first generation (T0) without retransformation or crossing.

  17. Prokaryotic orthologues of mitochondrial alternative oxidase and plastid terminal oxidase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Allison E; Amirsadeghi, Sasan; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2003-12-01

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX) and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX) are two similar members of the membrane-bound diiron carboxylate group of proteins. AOX is a ubiquinol oxidase present in all higher plants, as well as some algae, fungi, and protists. It may serve to dampen reactive oxygen species generation by the respiratory electron transport chain. PTOX is a plastoquinol oxidase in plants and some algae. It is required in carotenoid biosynthesis and may represent the elusive oxidase in chlororespiration. Recently, prokaryotic orthologues of both AOX and PTOX proteins have appeared in sequence databases. These include PTOX orthologues present in four different cyanobacteria as well as an AOX orthologue in an alpha-proteobacterium. We used PCR, RT-PCR and northern analyses to confirm the presence and expression of the PTOX gene in Anabaena variabilis PCC 7120. An extensive phylogeny of newly found prokaryotic and eukaryotic AOX and PTOX proteins supports the idea that AOX and PTOX represent two distinct groups of proteins that diverged prior to the endosymbiotic events that gave rise to the eukaryotic organelles. Using multiple sequence alignment, we identified residues conserved in all AOX and PTOX proteins. We also provide a scheme to readily distinguish PTOX from AOX proteins based upon differences in amino acid sequence in motifs around the conserved iron-binding residues. Given the presence of PTOX in cyanobacteria, we suggest that this acronym now stand for plastoquinol terminal oxidase. Our results have implications for the photosynthetic and respiratory metabolism of these prokaryotes, as well as for the origin and evolution of eukaryotic AOX and PTOX proteins.

  18. In vivo import of plastocyanin and a fusion protein into developmentally different plastids of transgenic plants

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Douwe de; Cremers, Fons; Teertstra, Renske; Smits, Lianne; Hille, Jacques; Smeekens, Sjef; Weisbeek, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Transgenic tomato plants that constitutively express a foreign plastocyanin gene were used to study protein transport in different tissues. Normally expression of endogenous plastocyanin genes in plants is restricted to photosynthetic tissues only, whereas this foreign plastocyanin protein is found to be present in all tissues examined. The protein is transported into the local plastids in these tissues and it is processed to the mature size. We conclude that plastids of developmentally different tissues are capable of importing precursor proteins that are normally not found in these tissues. Most likely such plastids, though functionally and morphologically differentiated, have similar or identical protein import mechanisms when compared to the chloroplasts in green tissue. Images PMID:15977334

  19. Pathways of intracellular communication: tetrapyrroles and plastid-to-nucleus signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodermel, Steve; Park, Sungsoon

    2003-07-01

    Retrograde plastid-to-nucleus signaling plays a central role in coordinating nuclear and plastid gene expression. The gun (genomes uncoupled) mutants of Arabidopsis have been used to demonstrate that Mg-protoporphyrin (Mg-Proto) acts as a plastid signal to repress the transcription of nuclear photosynthesis genes (1). It is unclear how Mg-Proto triggers repression, but several components of this pathway have been recently identified. These include the products of GUN4 and GUN5. GUN5 is the ChlH subunit of Mg-chelatase, which produces Mg-Proto, and GUN4 is a regulator of ChlH activity (2). GUN4 might also play a role in photoprotection and in the trafficking of Mg-Proto.

  20. Plastidic aspartate aminotransferases and the biosynthesis of essential amino acids in plants.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; Cañas, Rafael A; Pascual, M Belén; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2014-10-01

    In the chloroplasts and in non-green plastids of plants, aspartate is the precursor for the biosynthesis of different amino acids and derived metabolites that play distinct and important roles in plant growth, reproduction, development or defence. Aspartate biosynthesis is mediated by the enzyme aspartate aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.1), which catalyses the reversible transamination between glutamate and oxaloacetate to generate aspartate and 2-oxoglutarate. Plastids contain two aspartate aminotransferases: a eukaryotic-type and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying aspartate and prephenate aminotransferase activities. A general overview of the biochemistry, regulation, functional significance, and phylogenetic origin of both enzymes is presented. The roles of these plastidic aminotransferases in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids are discussed.

  1. A complete plastid phylogeny of Daucus – concordance to nuclear results, and markers necessary for phylogenetic resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Premise of study: Our purposes were to (1) obtain a well-resolved plastid counterpart to the 94 gene nuclear ortholog gene phylogeny of Arbizu et al. (2014, Amer. J. Bot. 101:1666-1685; and Syst. Bot., in press), and (2) to investigate various classes and numbers of plastid markers necessary for a c...

  2. Babesia bovis: a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of plastid-encoded genes supports green algal origin of apicoplasts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Apicomplexan parasites commonly contain a unique, non-photosynthetic plastid-like organelle termed the apicoplast. Previous analyses of other plastid-containing organisms suggest that apicoplasts were derived from a red algal ancestor. In this report, we present an extensive phylogenetic study of ap...

  3. CHLH/GUN5 Function in Tetrapyrrole Metabolism Is Correlated with Plastid Signaling but not ABA Responses in Guard Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ibata, Harue; Nagatani, Akira; Mochizuki, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Expression of Photosynthesis-Associated Nuclear Genes (PhANGs) is controlled by environmental stimuli and plastid-derived signals (“plastid signals”) transmitting the developmental and functional status of plastids to the nucleus. Arabidopsis genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants exhibit defects in plastid signaling, leading to ectopic expression of PhANGs in the absence of chloroplast development. GUN5 encodes the plastid-localized Mg-chelatase enzyme subunit (CHLH), and recent studies suggest that CHLH is a multifunctional protein involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, plastid signaling and ABA responses in guard cells. To understand the basis of CHLH multifunctionality, we investigated 15 gun5 missense mutant alleles and transgenic lines expressing a series of truncated CHLH proteins in a severe gun5 allele (cch) background (tCHLHs, 10 different versions). Here, we show that Mg-chelatase function and plastid signaling are generally correlated; in contrast, based on the analysis of the gun5 missense mutant alleles, ABA-regulated stomatal control is distinct from these two other functions. We found that none of the tCHLHs could restore plastid-signaling or Mg-chelatase functions. Additionally, we found that both the C-terminal half and N-terminal half of CHLH function in ABA-induced stomatal movement. PMID:27872634

  4. RECG Maintains Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Stability by Suppressing Extensive Recombination between Short Dispersed Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Odahara, Masaki; Masuda, Yuichi; Sato, Mayuko; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Harada, Chizuru; Toyooka, Kiminori; Sekine, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of plastid and mitochondrial genome stability is crucial for photosynthesis and respiration, respectively. Recently, we have reported that RECA1 maintains mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing gross rearrangements induced by aberrant recombination between short dispersed repeats in the moss Physcomitrella patens. In this study, we studied a newly identified P. patens homolog of bacterial RecG helicase, RECG, some of which is localized in both plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids. RECG partially complements recG deficiency in Escherichia coli cells. A knockout (KO) mutation of RECG caused characteristic phenotypes including growth delay and developmental and mitochondrial defects, which are similar to those of the RECA1 KO mutant. The RECG KO cells showed heterogeneity in these phenotypes. Analyses of RECG KO plants showed that mitochondrial genome was destabilized due to a recombination between 8–79 bp repeats and the pattern of the recombination partly differed from that observed in the RECA1 KO mutants. The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) instability was greater in severe phenotypic RECG KO cells than that in mild phenotypic ones. This result suggests that mitochondrial genomic instability is responsible for the defective phenotypes of RECG KO plants. Some of the induced recombination caused efficient genomic rearrangements in RECG KO mitochondria. Such loci were sometimes associated with a decrease in the levels of normal mtDNA and significant decrease in the number of transcripts derived from the loci. In addition, the RECG KO mutation caused remarkable plastid abnormalities and induced recombination between short repeats (12–63 bp) in the plastid DNA. These results suggest that RECG plays a role in the maintenance of both plastid and mitochondrial genome stability by suppressing aberrant recombination between dispersed short repeats; this role is crucial for plastid and mitochondrial functions. PMID:25769081

  5. Differential regulation of Arabidopsis plastid gene expression and RNA editing in non-photosynthetic tissues.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ching-Chih; Lee, Chih-Jen; Chung, Yi-Ting; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun

    2013-07-01

    RNA editing is one of the post-transcriptional processes that commonly occur in plant plastids and mitochondria. In Arabidopsis, 34 C-to-U RNA editing events, affecting transcripts of 18 plastid genes, have been identified. Here, we examined the editing and expression of these transcripts in different organs, and in green and non-green seedlings (etiolated, cia5-2, ispF and ispG albino mutants, lincomycin-, and norflurazon-treated). The editing efficiency of Arabidopsis plastid transcripts varies from site to site, and may be specifically regulated in different tissues. Steady state levels of plastid transcripts are low or undetectable in etiolated seedlings, but most editing sites are edited with efficiencies similar to those observed in green seedlings. By contrast, the editing of some sites is completely lost or significantly reduced in other non-green tissues; for instance, the editing of ndhB-149, ndhB-1255, and ndhD-2 is completely lost in roots and in lincomycin-treated seedlings. The editing of ndhD-2 is also completely lost in albino mutants and norflurazon-treated seedlings. However, matK-640 is completely edited, and accD-794, atpF-92, psbE-214, psbF-77, psbZ-50, and rps14-50 are completely or highly edited in both green and non-green tissues. In addition, the expression of nucleus-encoded RNA polymerase dependent transcripts is specifically induced by lincomycin, and the splicing of ndhB transcripts is significantly reduced in the albino mutants and inhibitor-treated seedlings. Our results indicate that plastid gene expression, and the splicing and editing of plastid transcripts are specifically and differentially regulated in various types of non-green tissues.

  6. Complete Plastid Genome of the Brown Alga Costaria costata (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xumin; Liu, Tao; Wang, Haiyang; Wang, Guoliang; Chi, Shan; Liu, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Costaria costata is a commercially and industrially important brown alga. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to determine the complete plastid genome of C. costata. The genome consists of a 129,947 bp circular DNA molecule with an A+T content of 69.13% encoding a standard set of six ribosomal RNA genes, 27 transfer RNA genes, and 137 protein-coding genes with two conserved open reading frames (ORFs). The overall genome structure of C. costata is nearly the same as those of Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida. The plastid genomes of these three algal species retain a strong conservation of the GTG start codon while infrequently using TGA as a stop codon. In this regard, they differ substantially from the plastid genomes of Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus. Analysis of the nucleic acid substitution rates of the Laminariales plastid genes revealed that the petF gene has the highest substitution rate and the petN gene contains no substitution over its complete length. The variation in plastid genes between C. costata and S. japonica is lower than that between C. costata and U. pinnatifida as well as that between U. pinnatifida and S. japonica. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that C. costata and U. pinnatifida have a closer genetic relationship. We also identified two gene length mutations caused by the insertion or deletion of repeated sequences, which suggest a mechanism of gene length mutation that may be one of the key explanations for the genetic variation in plastid genomes.

  7. Complete Plastid Genome of the Brown Alga Costaria costata (Laminariales, Phaeophyceae)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Haiyang; Wang, Guoliang; Chi, Shan; Liu, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Costaria costata is a commercially and industrially important brown alga. In this study, we used next-generation sequencing to determine the complete plastid genome of C. costata. The genome consists of a 129,947 bp circular DNA molecule with an A+T content of 69.13% encoding a standard set of six ribosomal RNA genes, 27 transfer RNA genes, and 137 protein-coding genes with two conserved open reading frames (ORFs). The overall genome structure of C. costata is nearly the same as those of Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida. The plastid genomes of these three algal species retain a strong conservation of the GTG start codon while infrequently using TGA as a stop codon. In this regard, they differ substantially from the plastid genomes of Ectocarpus siliculosus and Fucus vesiculosus. Analysis of the nucleic acid substitution rates of the Laminariales plastid genes revealed that the petF gene has the highest substitution rate and the petN gene contains no substitution over its complete length. The variation in plastid genes between C. costata and S. japonica is lower than that between C. costata and U. pinnatifida as well as that between U. pinnatifida and S. japonica. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that C. costata and U. pinnatifida have a closer genetic relationship. We also identified two gene length mutations caused by the insertion or deletion of repeated sequences, which suggest a mechanism of gene length mutation that may be one of the key explanations for the genetic variation in plastid genomes. PMID:26444909

  8. A model to assess the emission of individual isoprenoids emitted from Italian ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper Pacheco, C. J.; Fares, S.; Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a GIS-based model to estimate the emissions from the Italian forest ecosystems. The model was aimed at generating a species-specific emission inventory for isoprene and individual monoterpenes that could have been validated with experimental data collected in selected sites of the CARBOITALY network. The model was develop for the year 2006. At a resolution of 1 km2 with a daily time resolution. By using the emission rates of individual components obtained through several laboratory and field experiments carried out on different vegetation species of the Mediterranean basin, maps of individual isoprenoids were generated for the Italian ecosystems. The spatial distribution and fractional contents of vegetation species present in the Italian forest ecosystems was obtained by combining the CORINE IV land cover map with National Forest Inventory based on ground observations performed at local levels by individual Italian regions (22) in which the country is divided. In general, basal emission rates for individual isoprenoids was reported by Steinbrecher et al. 1997 and Karl et al. 2009 were used. In this case, classes were further subdivided into T and L+T emitters as functions of the active pool. In many instances, however they were revised based on the results obtained in our Institute through determinations performed at leaf, branch (cuvette method) or ecosystem level (REA and the gradient method). In the latter case, studies performed in Italy and/or Mediterranean countries were used. An empirical light extinction function as a function of the canopy type and structure was introduced. The algorithms proposed by (Guenther et al. 1993) were used, but, they were often adapted to fit with the experimental observations made in the Mediterranean Areas. They were corrected for a seasonality factor (Steinbrecher et al. 2009) taking into account a time lag in leaf sprouting due to the plant elevation. A simple parameterization with LAI was

  9. Genetic Profiling of the Isoprenoid and Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway Genes of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Cosentino, Raúl O.; Agüero, Fernán

    2014-01-01

    In Trypanosoma cruzi the isoprenoid and sterol biosynthesis pathways are validated targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. In this work we present a study of the genetic diversity observed in genes from these pathways. Using a number of bioinformatic strategies, we first identified genes that were missing and/or were truncated in the T. cruzi genome. Based on this analysis we obtained the complete sequence of the ortholog of the yeast ERG26 gene and identified a non-orthologous homolog of the yeast ERG25 gene (sterol methyl oxidase, SMO), and we propose that the orthologs of ERG25 have been lost in trypanosomes (but not in Leishmanias). Next, starting from a set of 16 T. cruzi strains representative of all extant evolutionary lineages, we amplified and sequenced ∼24 Kbp from 22 genes, identifying a total of 975 SNPs or fixed differences, of which 28% represent non-synonymous changes. We observed genes with a density of substitutions ranging from those close to the average (∼2.5/100 bp) to some showing a high number of changes (11.4/100 bp, for the putative lathosterol oxidase gene). All the genes of the pathway are under apparent purifying selection, but genes coding for the sterol C14-demethylase, the HMG-CoA synthase, and the HMG-CoA reductase have the lowest density of missense SNPs in the panel. Other genes (TcPMK, TcSMO-like) have a relatively high density of non-synonymous SNPs (2.5 and 1.9 every 100 bp, respectively). However, none of the non-synonymous changes identified affect a catalytic or ligand binding site residue. A comparative analysis of the corresponding genes from African trypanosomes and Leishmania shows similar levels of apparent selection for each gene. This information will be essential for future drug development studies focused on this pathway. PMID:24828104

  10. Diatom-Specific Highly Branched Isoprenoids as Biomarkers in Antarctic Consumers

    PubMed Central

    Goutte, Aurélie; Cherel, Yves; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Klein, Vincent; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Raccurt, Mireille; Robineau, Camille; Massé, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The structure, functioning and dynamics of polar marine ecosystems are strongly influenced by the extent of sea ice. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton represent the primary sources of nutrition for higher trophic-level organisms in seasonally ice-covered areas, but their relative contributions to polar marine consumers remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the potential of diatom-specific lipid markers and highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs) for estimating the importance of these two carbon pools in an Antarctic pelagic ecosystem. Using GC-MS analysis, we studied HBI biomarkers in key marine species over three years in Adélie Land, Antarctica: euphausiids (ice krill Euphausia crystallorophias and Antarctic krill E. superba), fish (bald notothens Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and seabirds (Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae, snow petrels Pagodroma nivea and cape petrels Daption capense). This study provides the first evidence of the incorporation of HBI lipids in Antarctic pelagic consumers. Specifically, a di-unsaturated HBI (diene) of sea ice origin was more abundant in ice-associated species than in pelagic species, whereas a tri-unsaturated HBI (triene) of phytoplanktonic origin was more abundant in pelagic species than in ice-associated species. Moreover, the relative abundances of diene and triene in seabird tissues and eggs were higher during a year of good sea ice conditions than in a year of poor ice conditions. In turn, the higher contribution of ice algal derived organic matter to the diet of seabirds was related to earlier breeding and higher breeding success. HBI biomarkers are a promising tool for estimating the contribution of organic matter derived from ice algae in pelagic consumers from Antarctica. PMID:23418580

  11. Diatom-specific highly branched isoprenoids as biomarkers in Antarctic consumers.

    PubMed

    Goutte, Aurélie; Cherel, Yves; Houssais, Marie-Noëlle; Klein, Vincent; Ozouf-Costaz, Catherine; Raccurt, Mireille; Robineau, Camille; Massé, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    The structure, functioning and dynamics of polar marine ecosystems are strongly influenced by the extent of sea ice. Ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton represent the primary sources of nutrition for higher trophic-level organisms in seasonally ice-covered areas, but their relative contributions to polar marine consumers remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the potential of diatom-specific lipid markers and highly branched isoprenoids (HBIs) for estimating the importance of these two carbon pools in an Antarctic pelagic ecosystem. Using GC-MS analysis, we studied HBI biomarkers in key marine species over three years in Adélie Land, Antarctica: euphausiids (ice krill Euphausia crystallorophias and Antarctic krill E. superba), fish (bald notothens Pagothenia borchgrevinki and Antarctic silverfish Pleuragramma antarcticum) and seabirds (Adélie penguins Pygoscelis adeliae, snow petrels Pagodroma nivea and cape petrels Daption capense). This study provides the first evidence of the incorporation of HBI lipids in Antarctic pelagic consumers. Specifically, a di-unsaturated HBI (diene) of sea ice origin was more abundant in ice-associated species than in pelagic species, whereas a tri-unsaturated HBI (triene) of phytoplanktonic origin was more abundant in pelagic species than in ice-associated species. Moreover, the relative abundances of diene and triene in seabird tissues and eggs were higher during a year of good sea ice conditions than in a year of poor ice conditions. In turn, the higher contribution of ice algal derived organic matter to the diet of seabirds was related to earlier breeding and higher breeding success. HBI biomarkers are a promising tool for estimating the contribution of organic matter derived from ice algae in pelagic consumers from Antarctica.

  12. Biosynthesis of isoprenoids: a bifunctional IspDF enzyme from Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Rohdich, Felix; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Gräwert, Tobias; Hecht, Stefan; Bacher, Adelbert; Hunter, William N

    2004-07-01

    In the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, the conversion of 2C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate into its cyclic diphosphate proceeds via nucleotidyl intermediates and is catalyzed by the products of the ispD, ispE and ispF genes. An open reading frame of Campylobacter jejuni with similarity to the ispD and ispF genes of Escherichia coli was cloned into an expression vector directing the formation of a 42 kDa protein in a recombinant E. coli strain. The purified protein was shown to catalyze the transformation of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate into 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol and the conversion of 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2-phosphate into 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate at catalytic rates of 19 micro mol x mg(-1) x min(-1) and 7 micro mol x mg(-1) x min(-1), respectively. Both enzyme-catalyzed reactions require divalent metal ions. The C. jejuni enzyme does not catalyze the formation of 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 3,4-cyclophosphate from 4-diphosphocytidyl-2C-methyl-D-erythritol, a side reaction catalyzed in vitro by the IspF proteins of E. coli and Plasmodium falciparum. Comparative genomic analysis show that all sequenced alpha- and epsilon-proteobacteria have fused ispDF genes. These bifunctional proteins are potential drug targets in several human pathogens (e.g. Helicobacter pylori, C. jejuni and Treponema pallidum).

  13. Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate kinase: isolation and characterization of an enzyme of the isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Voynova, Natalya E; Rios, Sandra E; Miziorko, Henry M

    2004-01-01

    It has been proposed that isoprenoid biosynthesis in several gram-positive cocci depends on the mevalonate pathway for conversion of acetyl coenzyme A to isopentenyl diphosphate. Mevalonate kinase catalyzes a key reaction in this pathway. In this study the enzyme from Staphylococcus aureus was expressed in Escherichia coli, isolated in a highly purified form, and characterized. The overall amino acid sequence of this enzyme was very heterologous compared with the sequences of eukaryotic mevalonate kinases. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and analytical gel filtration chromatography suggested that the native enzyme is a monomer with a molecular mass of approximately 33 kDa. The specific activity was 12 U/mg, and the pH optimum was 7.0 to 8.5. The apparent K(m) values for R,S-mevalonate and ATP were 41 and 339 micro M, respectively. There was substantial substrate inhibition at millimolar levels of mevalonate. The sensitivity to feedback inhibition by farnesyl diphosphate and its sulfur-containing analog, farnesyl thiodiphosphate, was characterized. These compounds were competitive inhibitors with respect to ATP; the K(i) values were 46 and 45 micro M for farnesyl diphosphate and its thio analog, respectively. Parallel measurements with heterologous eukaryotic mevalonate kinases indicated that S. aureus mevalonate kinase is much less sensitive to feedback inhibition (K(i) difference, 3 orders of magnitude) than the human enzyme. In contrast, both enzymes tightly bound trinitrophenyl-ATP, a fluorescent substrate analog, suggesting that there are similarities in structural features that are important for catalytic function.

  14. Prerequisite for highly efficient isoprenoid production by cyanobacteria discovered through the over-expression of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase and carbon allocation analysis.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, Kai; Kawano, Yusuke; Hotta, Shingo; Sekine, Midori; Watanabe, Takafumi; Ihara, Masaki

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria have recently been receiving considerable attention owing to their potential as photosynthetic producers of biofuels and biomaterials. Here, we focused on the production of isoprenoids by cyanobacteria, and aimed to provide insight into metabolic engineering design. To this end, we examined the over-expression of a key enzyme in 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. In the DXS-over-expression strain (Dxs_ox), the mRNA and protein levels of DXS were 4-times and 1.5-times the levels in the wild-type (WT) strain, respectively. The carotenoid content of the Dxs_ox strain (8.4 mg/g dry cell weight [DCW]) was also up to 1.5-times higher than that in the WT strain (5.6 mg/g DCW), whereas the glycogen content dramatically decreased to an undetectable level. These observations suggested that the carotenoid content in the Dxs_ox strain was increased by consuming glycogen, which is a C-storage compound in cyanobacteria. We also quantified the total sugar (145 and 104 mg/g DCW), total fatty acids (31 and 24 mg/g DCW) and total protein (200 and 240 mg/g DCW) content in the WT and Dxs_ox strains, respectively, which were much higher than the carotenoid content. In particular, approximately 54% of the proteins were phycobiliproteins. This study demonstrated the major destinations of carbon flux in cyanobacteria, and provided important insights into metabolic engineering. Target yield can be improved through optimization of gene expression, the DXS protein stabilization, cell propagation depression and restriction of storage compound synthesis.

  15. NtPolI-like1 and NtPolI-like2, bacterial DNA polymerase I homologs isolated from BY-2 cultured tobacco cells, encode DNA polymerases engaged in DNA replication in both plastids and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuriko; Sakai, Atsushi; Takechi, Katsuaki; Takio, Susumu; Takusagawa, Mari; Takano, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Two cDNAs encoding homologs of bacterial DNA polymerase I were isolated from cultured tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 cells, and the corresponding genes were named NtPolI-like1 and NtPolI-like2. High sequence similarity suggested that they are orthologous genes each derived from respective parental species of N. tabacum, an allotetraploid plant. Each of the NtPolI-like1/2 gene products had a putative transit peptide for plastid localization at the N-terminus, followed by a 3'-5' exonuclease domain in the internal region, and a DNA polymerase domain in the C-terminal region. Among family A DNA polymerases, NtPolI-like proteins formed, together with other plant DNA polymerase I homologs, a phylogenetic group distinct from mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma in animals and fungi, as well as eukaryotic cell nuclear-localized repair enzymes. In contrast to computer predictions, experiments with green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein and Western blotting analysis suggested dual targeting of the gene products to both plastids and mitochondria. The recombinant NtPolI-like2 protein exhibited DNA polymerase activity in vitro. Their biochemical character roughly coincided with those of the 116 kDa DNA polymerases found in the plastid and mitochondrial nuclei (nucleoids) isolated from BY-2 cells. Pre-treatment of the organelle nuclear extracts with anti-NtPolI-like antibody removed most of the DNA polymerase activity. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses demonstrated transient activation of NtPolI-like gene expression in the initial phase of cell proliferation, exactly when the 116 kDa DNA polymerases in the isolated organelle nuclei were activated and preferential synthesis of organelle DNAs occurred. Taken together, our results suggest that NtPolI-like1/2 genes encode DNA polymerases engaged in DNA replication in both plastids and mitochondria.

  16. Nonsterol Isoprenoids Activate Human Constitutive Androstane Receptor in an Isoform-Selective Manner in Primary Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rondini, Elizabeth A.; Duniec-Dmuchowski, Zofia

    2016-01-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that accumulation of nonsterol isoprenoids following treatment with the squalene synthase inhibitor, squalestatin 1 (SQ1) markedly induced cytochrome P450 (CYP)2B1 mRNA and reporter activity in primary cultured rat hepatocytes, which was dependent on activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). The objective of the current study was to evaluate whether isoprenoids likewise activate murine CAR (mCAR) or one or more isoforms of human CAR (hCAR) produced by alternative splicing (SPTV, hCAR2; APYLT, hCAR3). We found that SQ1 significantly induced Cyp2b10 mRNA (∼3.5-fold) in primary hepatocytes isolated from both CAR–wild-type and humanized CAR transgenic mice, whereas the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor pravastatin had no effect. In the absence of CAR, basal Cyp2b10 mRNA levels were reduced by 28-fold and the effect of SQ1 on Cyp2b10 induction was attenuated. Cotransfection with an expression plasmid for hCAR1, but not hCAR2 or hCAR3, mediated SQ1-induced CYP2B1 and CYP2B6 reporter activation in hepatocytes isolated from CAR-knockout mice. This effect was also observed following treatment with the isoprenoid trans,trans-farnesol. The direct agonist CITCO increased interaction of hCAR1, hCAR2, and hCAR3 with steroid receptor coactivator-1. However, no significant effect on coactivator recruitment was observed with SQ1, suggesting an indirect activation mechanism. Further results from an in vitro ligand binding assay demonstrated that neither farnesol nor other isoprenoids are direct ligands for hCAR1. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SQ1 activates CYP2B transcriptional responses through farnesol metabolism in an hCAR1-dependent manner. Further, this effect probably occurs through an indirect mechanism. PMID:26798158

  17. Evolutionary diversification and characterization of the eubacterial gene family encoding DXR type II, an alternative isoprenoid biosynthetic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoprenoids constitute a vast family of natural compounds performing diverse and essential functions in all domains of life. In most eubacteria, isoprenoids are synthesized through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. The production of MEP is usually catalyzed by deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR-I) but a few organisms use an alternative DXR-like enzyme (DXR-II). Results Searches through 1498 bacterial complete proteomes detected 130 sequences with similarity to DXR-II. Phylogenetic analysis identified three well-resolved clades: the DXR-II family (clustering 53 sequences including eleven experimentally verified as functional enzymes able to produce MEP), and two previously uncharacterized NAD(P)-dependent oxidoreductase families (designated DLO1 and DLO2 for DXR-II-like oxidoreductases 1 and 2). Our analyses identified amino acid changes critical for the acquisition of DXR-II biochemical function through type-I functional divergence, two of them mapping onto key residues for DXR-II activity. DXR-II showed a markedly discontinuous distribution, which was verified at several levels: taxonomic (being predominantly found in Alphaproteobacteria and Firmicutes), metabolic (being mostly found in bacteria with complete functional MEP pathways with or without DXR-I), and phenotypic (as no biological/phenotypic property was found to be preferentially distributed among DXR-II-containing strains, apart from pathogenicity in animals). By performing a thorough comparative sequence analysis of GC content, 3:1 dinucleotide frequencies, codon usage and codon adaptation indexes (CAI) between DXR-II sequences and their corresponding genomes, we examined the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), as opposed to an scenario of massive gene loss, in the evolutionary origin and diversification of the DXR-II subfamily in bacteria. Conclusions Our analyses support a single origin of the DXR-II family through functional divergence, in which constitutes

  18. Against the traffic: The first evidence for mitochondrial DNA transfer into the plastid genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transfer of DNA between different compartments of the plant cell, i.e. plastid, mitochondrion and nucleus, is a well-known phenomenon in plant evolution. Six directions of inter-compartmental DNA migration are possible in theory, however only four of them have been previously reported. These include...

  19. Ultrastructural study on dynamics of lipid bodies and plastids during ripening of chili pepper fruits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lin

    2013-03-01

    Dynamics of lipid bodies and plastids in chili pepper fruits during ripening were investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy. Mesocarp of chili pepper fruits consists of collenchyma, normal parenchyma, and huge celled parenchyma. In mature green fruits, plastids contain numerous thylakoids that are well organized into grana in collenchyma, a strikingly huge amount of starch and irregularly organized thylakoids in normal parenchyma, and simple tubes rather than thylakoids in huge celled parenchyma. These morphological features suggest that plastids are chloroplasts in collenchyma, chloroamyloplasts in normal parenchyma, proplastids in huge celled parenchyma. As fruits ripen to red, plastids in all cell types convert to chromoplasts and, concomitantly, lipid bodies accumulate in both cytoplasm and chromoplasts. Cytosolic lipid bodies are lined up in a regular layer adjacent to plasma membrane. The cytosolic lipid body consists of a core surrounded by a membrane. The core is comprised of a more electron-dense central part enclosed by a slightly less electron-dense peripheral layer. Plastidial lipid bodies in collenchyma, normal parenchyma, and endodermis initiate as plastoglobuli, which in turn convert to rod-like structures. Therefore, plastidial lipid bodies are more dynamic than cytosolic lipid bodies. Both cytosolic and plastidial lipid bodies contain rich unsaturated lipids.

  20. The Complete Plastid Genome of Lagerstroemia fauriei and Loss of rpl2 Intron from Lagerstroemia (Lythraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Cuihua; Tembrock, Luke R.; Johnson, Nels G.; Simmons, Mark P.; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Lagerstroemia (crape myrtle) is an important plant genus used in ornamental horticulture in temperate regions worldwide. As such, numerous hybrids have been developed. However, DNA sequence resources and genome information for Lagerstroemia are limited, hindering evolutionary inferences regarding interspecific relationships. We report the complete plastid genome of Lagerstroemia fauriei. To our knowledge, this is the first reported whole plastid genome within Lythraceae. This genome is 152,440 bp in length with 38% GC content and consists of two single-copy regions separated by a pair of 25,793 bp inverted repeats. The large single copy and the small single copy regions span 83,921 bp and 16,933 bp, respectively. The genome contains 129 genes, including 17 located in each inverted repeat. Phylogenetic analysis of genera sampled from Geraniaceae, Myrtaceae, and Onagraceae corroborated the sister relationship between Lythraceae and Onagraceae. The plastid genomes of L. fauriei and several other Lythraceae species lack the rpl2 intron, which indicating an early loss of this intron within the Lythraceae lineage. The plastid genome of L. fauriei provides a much needed genetic resource for further phylogenetic research in Lagerstroemia and Lythraceae. Highly variable markers were identified for application in phylogenetic, barcoding and conservation genetic applications. PMID:26950701

  1. Stable Plastid Transformation for High-Level Recombinant Protein Expression: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meili; Li, Yongfei; Xue, Xiaochang; Wang, Xianfeng; Long, Jiangang

    2012-01-01

    Plants are a promising expression system for the production of recombinant proteins. However, low protein productivity remains a major obstacle that limits extensive commercialization of whole plant and plant cell bioproduction platform. Plastid genetic engineering offers several advantages, including high levels of transgenic expression, transgenic containment via maternal inheritance, and multigene expression in a single transformation event. In recent years, the development of optimized expression strategies has given a huge boost to the exploitation of plastids in molecular farming. The driving forces behind the high expression level of plastid bioreactors include codon optimization, promoters and UTRs, genotypic modifications, endogenous enhancer and regulatory elements, posttranslational modification, and proteolysis. Exciting progress of the high expression level has been made with the plastid-based production of two particularly important classes of pharmaceuticals: vaccine antigens, therapeutic proteins, and antibiotics and enzymes. Approaches to overcome and solve the associated challenges of this culture system that include low transformation frequencies, the formation of inclusion bodies, and purification of recombinant proteins will also be discussed. PMID:23093835

  2. Complete plastid genome of Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl and comparative analysis in Rosaceae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Liqun; Guan, Qijie; Amin, Awais; Zhu, Wei; Li, Mengzhu; Li, Ximin; Zhang, Lin; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-01-01

    Eriobotrya japonica (Thunb.) Lindl (loquat) is an evergreen Rosaceae fruit tree widely distributed in subtropical regions. Its leaves are considered as traditional Chinese medicine and are of high medical value especially for cough and emesis. Thus, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of E. japonica to better utilize this important species. The complete plastid genome of E. japonica is 159,137 bp in length, which contains a typical quadripartite structure with a pair of inverted repeats (IR, 26,326 bp) separated by large (LSC, 89,202 bp) and small (SSC, 19,283 bp) single-copy regions. The E. japonica plastid genome encodes 112 unique genes which consist of 78 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Gene structure and content of E. japonica plastid genome are quite conserved and show similarity among Rosaceous species. Five large indels are unique to E. japonica in comparison with Pyrus pyrifolia and Prunus persica, which could be utilized as molecular markers. A total of 72 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were detected and most of them are mononucleotide repeats composed of A or T, indicating a strong A or T bias for base composition. The Ka and Ks ratios of most genes are lower than 1, which suggests that most genes are under purifying selection. The phylogenetic analysis described the evolutionary relationship within Rosaceae and fully supported a close relationship between E. japonica and P. pyrifolia.

  3. Occurrence of plastid RNA editing in all major lineages of land plants

    PubMed Central

    Freyer, Regina; Kiefer-Meyer, Marie-Christine; Kössel, Hans

    1997-01-01

    RNA editing changes posttranscriptionally single nucleotides in chloroplast-encoded transcripts. Although much work has been done on mechanistic and functional aspects of plastid editing, little is known about evolutionary aspects of this RNA processing step. To gain a better understanding of the evolution of RNA editing in plastids, we have investigated the editing patterns in ndhB and rbcL transcripts from various species comprising all major groups of land plants. Our results indicate that RNA editing occurs in plastids of bryophytes, fern allies, true ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Both editing frequencies and editing patterns show a remarkable degree of interspecies variation. Furthermore, we have found that neither plastid editing frequencies nor the editing pattern of a specific transcript correlate with the phylogenetic tree of the plant kingdom. The poor evolutionary conservation of editing sites among closely related species as well as the occurrence of single species-specific editing sites suggest that the differences in the editing patterns and editing frequencies are probably due both to independent loss and to gain of editing sites. In addition, our results indicate that RNA editing is a relatively ancient process that probably predates the evolution of land plants. This supposition is in good agreement with the phylogenetic data obtained for plant mitochondrial RNA editing, thus providing additional evidence for common evolutionary roots of the two plant organellar editing systems. PMID:9177209

  4. Did an ancient chlamydial endosymbiosis facilitate the establishment of primary plastids?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinling; Gogarten, Johann Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Ancient endosymbioses are responsible for the origins of mitochondria and plastids, and they contribute to the divergence of several major eukaryotic groups. Although chlamydiae, a group of obligate intracellular bacteria, are not found in plants, an unexpected number of chlamydial genes are most similar to plant homologs, which, interestingly, often contain a plastid-targeting signal. This observation has prompted several hypotheses, including gene transfer between chlamydiae and plant-related groups and an ancestral relationship between chlamydiae and cyanobacteria. Results We conducted phylogenomic analyses of the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae to identify genes specifically related to chlamydial homologs. We show that at least 21 genes were transferred between chlamydiae and primary photosynthetic eukaryotes, with the donor most similar to the environmental Protochlamydia. Such an unusually high number of transferred genes suggests an ancient chlamydial endosymbiosis with the ancestral primary photosynthetic eukaryote. We hypothesize that three organisms were involved in establishing the primary photosynthetic lineage: the eukaryotic host cell, the cyanobacterial endosymbiont that provided photosynthetic capability, and a chlamydial endosymbiont or parasite that facilitated the establishment of the cyanobacterial endosymbiont. Conclusion Our findings provide a glimpse into the complex interactions that were necessary to establish the primary endosymbiotic relationship between plastid and host cytoplasms, and thereby explain the rarity with which long-term successful endosymbiotic relationships between heterotrophs and photoautotrophs were established. Our data also provide strong and independent support for a common origin of all primary photosynthetic eukaryotes and of the plastids they harbor. PMID:17547748

  5. ARC3 is a stromal Z-ring accessory protein essential for plastid division

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Jodi; Vojta, Lea; Soll, Jurgen; Møller, Simon G

    2007-01-01

    In plants, chloroplast division is an integral part of development, and these vital organelles arise by binary fission from pre-existing cytosolic plastids. Chloroplasts arose by endosymbiosis and although they have retained elements of the bacterial cell division machinery to execute plastid division, they have evolved to require two functionally distinct forms of the FtsZ protein and have lost elements of the Min machinery required for Z-ring placement. Here, we analyse the plastid division component accumulation and replication of chloroplasts 3 (ARC3) and show that ARC3 forms part of the stromal plastid division machinery. ARC3 interacts specifically with AtFtsZ1, acting as a Z-ring accessory protein and defining a unique function for this family of FtsZ proteins. ARC3 is involved in division site placement, suggesting that it might functionally replace MinC, representing an important advance in our understanding of the mechanism of chloroplast division and the evolution of the chloroplast division machinery. PMID:17304239

  6. Draft Plastid and Mitochondrial Genome Sequences from Antarctic Alga Prasiola crispa

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Evelise Leis; Wallau, Gabriel da Luz; Rangel, Darlene Lopes; Machado, Laís Ceschini; da Silva, Alexandre Freitas; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Duarte; Macedo, Pablo Echeverria; Pereira, Antonio Batista; Victoria, Filipe de Carvalho; Boldo, Juliano Tomazzoni; Dal Belo, Cháriston André

    2015-01-01

    The organelle genomes of the Antarctic alga Prasiola crispa (Lightfoot) Kützing have been sequenced. The plastid and mitochondrial genomes have a total length of 196,502 bp and 89,819 bp, respectively. These genomes have 19 putative photosynthesis-related genes and 17 oxidative metabolism-related genes, respectively. PMID:26450727

  7. Phytoene desaturase is present in a large protein complex in the plastid membrane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phytoene desaturase (PDS, EC 1.14.99.-) represents one of the key enzymes in the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway and is present in nearly all types of plastids in plants. To further characterize PDS, we isolated the PDS cDNA from cauliflower (BoPDS) and confirmed its function by heterologous express...

  8. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Blazier, J Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K; Sabir, Jamal S M; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-04-18

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA.

  9. More Membranes, more Proteins: Complex Protein Import Mechanisms into Secondary Plastids

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Swati; Striepen, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Plastids are found across the tree of life in a tremendous diversity of life forms. Surprisingly they are not limited to photosynthetic organisms but also found in numerous predators and parasites. An important reason for the pervasiveness of plastids has been their ability to move laterally and to jump from one branch of the tree of life to the next through secondary endosymbiosis. Eukaryotic algae have entered endosymbiotic relationships with other eukaryotes on multiple independent occasions. The descendants of these endosymbiotic events now carry complex plastids, organelles that are bound by three or even four membranes. As in all endosymbiotic organelles most of the symbiont’s genes have been transferred to the host and their protein products have to be imported into the organelle. As four membranes might suggest, this is a complex process. The emerging mechanisms display a series of translocons that mirror the divergent ancestry of the membranes they cross. This review is written from a parasite biologist viewpoint and seeks to provide a brief overview of plastid evolution in particular for readers not already familiar with plant and algal biology and then focuses on recent molecular discoveries using genetically tractable Apicomplexa and diatoms. PMID:21036664

  10. Transcriptional regulation and DNA methylation in plastids during transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, H; Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Akazawa, T

    1990-01-01

    During transitional conversion of chloroplasts to chromoplasts in ripening tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruits, transcripts for several plastid genes for photosynthesis decreased to undetectable levels. Run-on transcription of plastids indicated that transcriptional regulation operated as a predominant factor. We found that most of the genes in chloroplasts were actively transcribed in vitro by Escherichia coli and soluble plastid RNA polymerases, but some genes in chromoplasts seemed to be silent when assayed by the in vitro systems. The regulatory step, therefore, was ascribed to DNA templates. The analysis of modified base composition revealed the presence of methylated bases in chromoplast DNA, in which 5-methylcytosine was most abundant. The presence of 5-methylcytosine detected by isoschizomeric endonucleases and Southern hybridization was correlated with the undetectable transcription activity of each gene in the run-on assay and in vitro transcription experiments. It is thus concluded that the suppression of transcription mediated by DNA methylation is one of the mechanisms governing gene expression in plastids converting from chloroplasts to chromoplasts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2303026

  11. Varietal Tracing of Virgin Olive Oils Based on Plastid DNA Variation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Jiménez, Marga; Besnard, Guillaume; Dorado, Gabriel; Hernandez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Olive oil traceability remains a challenge nowadays. DNA analysis is the preferred approach to an effective varietal identification, without any environmental influence. Specifically, olive organelle genomics is the most promising approach for setting up a suitable set of markers as they would not interfere with the pollinator variety DNA traces. Unfortunately, plastid DNA (cpDNA) variation of the cultivated olive has been reported to be low. This feature could be a limitation for the use of cpDNA polymorphisms in forensic analyses or oil traceability, but rare cpDNA haplotypes may be useful as they can help to efficiently discriminate some varieties. Recently, the sequencing of olive plastid genomes has allowed the generation of novel markers. In this study, the performance of cpDNA markers on olive oil matrices, and their applicability on commercial Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) oils were assessed. By using a combination of nine plastid loci (including multi-state microsatellites and short indels), it is possible to fingerprint six haplotypes (in 17 Spanish olive varieties), which can discriminate high-value commercialized cultivars with PDO. In particular, a rare haplotype was detected in genotypes used to produce a regional high-value commercial oil. We conclude that plastid haplotypes can help oil traceability in commercial PDO oils and set up an experimental methodology suitable for organelle polymorphism detection in the complex olive oil matrices. PMID:23950947

  12. Energetic coupling between plastids and mitochondria drives CO2 assimilation in diatoms.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Benjamin; Berne, Nicolas; Murik, Omer; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Prihoda, Judit; Tanaka, Atsuko; Villanova, Valeria; Bligny, Richard; Flori, Serena; Falconet, Denis; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Santabarbara, Stefano; Rappaport, Fabrice; Joliot, Pierre; Tirichine, Leila; Falkowski, Paul G; Cardol, Pierre; Bowler, Chris; Finazzi, Giovanni

    2015-08-20

    Diatoms are one of the most ecologically successful classes of photosynthetic marine eukaryotes in the contemporary oceans. Over the past 30 million years, they have helped to moderate Earth's climate by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, sequestering it via the biological carbon pump and ultimately burying organic carbon in the lithosphere. The proportion of planetary primary production by diatoms in the modern oceans is roughly equivalent to that of terrestrial rainforests. In photosynthesis, the efficient conversion of carbon dioxide into organic matter requires a tight control of the ATP/NADPH ratio which, in other photosynthetic organisms, relies principally on a range of plastid-localized ATP generating processes. Here we show that diatoms regulate ATP/NADPH through extensive energetic exchanges between plastids and mitochondria. This interaction comprises the re-routing of reducing power generated in the plastid towards mitochondria and the import of mitochondrial ATP into the plastid, and is mandatory for optimized carbon fixation and growth. We propose that the process may have contributed to the ecological success of diatoms in the ocean.

  13. Divergence of RNA polymerase α subunits in angiosperm plastid genomes is mediated by genomic rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    Blazier, J. Chris; Ruhlman, Tracey A.; Weng, Mao-Lun; Rehman, Sumaiyah K.; Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Jansen, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Genes for the plastid-encoded RNA polymerase (PEP) persist in the plastid genomes of all photosynthetic angiosperms. However, three unrelated lineages (Annonaceae, Passifloraceae and Geraniaceae) have been identified with unusually divergent open reading frames (ORFs) in the conserved region of rpoA, the gene encoding the PEP α subunit. We used sequence-based approaches to evaluate whether these genes retain function. Both gene sequences and complete plastid genome sequences were assembled and analyzed from each of the three angiosperm families. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that the rpoA sequences are likely functional despite retaining as low as 30% nucleotide sequence identity with rpoA genes from outgroups in the same angiosperm order. The ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions indicated that these genes are under purifying selection, and bioinformatic prediction of conserved domains indicated that functional domains are preserved. One of the lineages (Pelargonium, Geraniaceae) contains species with multiple rpoA-like ORFs that show evidence of ongoing inter-paralog gene conversion. The plastid genomes containing these divergent rpoA genes have experienced extensive structural rearrangement, including large expansions of the inverted repeat. We propose that illegitimate recombination, not positive selection, has driven the divergence of rpoA. PMID:27087667

  14. Plastid distribution in columella cells of a starchless Arabidopsis mutant grown in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Paulsen, A. Q.; Brown, C. S.; Guikema, J. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Wild-type and starchless Arabidopsis thaliana mutant seedlings (TC7) were grown and fixed in the microgravity environment of a U.S. Space Shuttle spaceflight. Computer image analysis of longitudinal sections from columella cells suggest a different plastid positioning mechanism for mutant and wild-type in the absence of gravity.

  15. Chromoplast formation during tomato fruit ripening. No evidence for plastid DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Marano, M R; Carrillo, N

    1991-01-01

    Ripening of tomato fruits involves differentiation of chloroplasts into non-photosynthetic chromoplasts. Plastid DNAs isolated either from green leaf chloroplasts or mature red fruit chromoplasts were compared by restriction endonuclease and DNA/DNA hybridization analyses. The same restriction and gene maps were obtained for both types of DNAs, illustrating the lack of major recombinational events during chromoplast formation. Several enzymes were used that discriminate the presence of methylated bases in their target sequences (Pst I, Pvu II, Sal I, Mbo I/Sau 3AI, Msp I/Hpa II, Bst NI/Eco RII). Plastid DNA fragments generated by these enzymes were hybridized against DNA probes encompassing about 85% of the tobacco chloroplast genome. These probes represented genes that follow very different expression behaviors in response to plastid development. Extensive restriction and hybridization analyses failed to reveal any difference between the chloroplast and chromoplast genomes, indicating that no developmentally related DNA methylation was detected by these methods. The results presented here do not support the hypothesis that selective DNA methylation of the chromoplast genome might play a major role in the transcriptional control of gene expression in these non-photosynthetic plastids.

  16. Complete plastid genome sequence of Daucus carota: Implications for biotechnology and phylogeny of angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Ruhlman, Tracey; Lee, Seung-Bum; Jansen, Robert K; Hostetler, Jessica B; Tallon, Luke J; Town, Christopher D; Daniell, Henry

    2006-01-01

    Background Carrot (Daucus carota) is a major food crop in the US and worldwide. Its capacity for storage and its lifecycle as a biennial make it an attractive species for the introduction of foreign genes, especially for oral delivery of vaccines and other therapeutic proteins. Until recently efforts to express recombinant proteins in carrot have had limited success in terms of protein accumulation in the edible tap roots. Plastid genetic engineering offers the potential to overcome this limitation, as demonstrated by the accumulation of BADH in chromoplasts of carrot taproots to confer exceedingly high levels of salt resistance. The complete plastid genome of carrot provides essential information required for genetic engineering. Additionally, the sequence data add to the rapidly growing database of plastid genomes for assessing phylogenetic relationships among angiosperms. Results The complete carrot plastid genome is 155,911 bp in length, with 115 unique genes and 21 duplicated genes within the IR. There are four ribosomal RNAs, 30 distinct tRNA genes and 18 intron-containing genes. Repeat analysis reveals 12 direct and 2 inverted repeats ≥ 30 bp with a sequence identity ≥ 90%. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences for 61 protein-coding genes using both maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) were performed for 29 angiosperms. Phylogenies from both methods provide strong support for the monophyly of several major angiosperm clades, including monocots, eudicots, rosids, asterids, eurosids II, euasterids I, and euasterids II. Conclusion The carrot plastid genome contains a number of dispersed direct and inverted repeats scattered throughout coding and non-coding regions. This is the first sequenced plastid genome of the family Apiaceae and only the second published genome sequence of the species-rich euasterid II clade. Both MP and ML trees provide very strong support (100% bootstrap) for the sister relationship of Daucus with Panax in the

  17. Exploring the limits for reduction of plastid genomes: a case study of the mycoheterotrophic orchids Epipogium aphyllum and Epipogium roseum.

    PubMed

    Schelkunov, Mikhail I; Shtratnikova, Viktoria Yu; Nuraliev, Maxim S; Selosse, Marc-Andre; Penin, Aleksey A; Logacheva, Maria D

    2015-01-28

    The question on the patterns and limits of reduction of plastid genomes in nonphotosynthetic plants and the reasons of their conservation is one of the intriguing topics in plant genome evolution. Here, we report sequencing and analysis of plastid genome in nonphotosynthetic orchids Epipogium aphyllum and Epipogium roseum, which, with sizes of 31 and 19 kbp, respectively, represent the smallest plastid genomes characterized by now. Besides drastic reduction, which is expected, we found several unusual features of these "minimal" plastomes: Multiple rearrangements, highly biased nucleotide composition, and unprecedentedly high substitution rate. Only 27 and 29 genes remained intact in the plastomes of E. aphyllum and E. roseum-those encoding ribosomal components, transfer RNAs, and three additional housekeeping genes (infA, clpP, and accD). We found no signs of relaxed selection acting on these genes. We hypothesize that the main reason for retention of plastid genomes in Epipogium is the necessity to translate messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of accD and/or clpP proteins which are essential for cell metabolism. However, these genes are absent in plastomes of several plant species; their absence is compensated by the presence of a functional copy arisen by gene transfer from plastid to the nuclear genome. This suggests that there is no single set of plastid-encoded essential genes, but rather different sets for different species and that the retention of a gene in the plastome depends on the interaction between the nucleus and plastids.

  18. Chloroplast Biogenesis-Associated Nuclear Genes: Control by Plastid Signals Evolved Prior to Their Regulation as Part of Photomorphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Alison C.; Khan, Safina; López-Juez, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The assembly of photosynthetically competent chloroplasts occurs in angiosperm seedlings when first exposed to light, and is due to the control by light of photosynthesis-associated nuclear genes (PhANGs), also dependent upon plastid-to-nucleus “biogenic” communication signals. The relationship between light- and plastid signal-regulation of PhANGs is close but poorly understood. In contrast, many conifers green in the dark and the promoter of a pine PhANG, Lhcb, is active in the dark in tobacco. Here, we show that the activity of this promoter in tobacco is sensitive to plastid photobleaching, or to the inhibition of plastid translation in the light or the dark, and the same interventions reduce expression of the native gene in pine seedlings, demonstrating classic plastid biogenic signaling in gymnosperms. Furthermore, Arabidopsis mutations causing defective plastid biogenesis suppress the effect in darkness of mutations in COP1 and DET1, repressors of photomorphogenesis, for the expression of several PhANGs but not a photosynthesis-unrelated, light-regulated gene. GLK transcriptional regulators mediate the response of LHCB but not of other tested PhANGs. We propose the ability to suppress PhANG response to positive plastid biogenic signals in the dark may have contributed to the evolution of light-controlled chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:26697036

  19. Exploring the Limits for Reduction of Plastid Genomes: A Case Study of the Mycoheterotrophic Orchids Epipogium aphyllum and Epipogium roseum

    PubMed Central

    Schelkunov, Mikhail I.; Shtratnikova, Viktoria Yu; Nuraliev, Maxim S.; Selosse, Marc-Andre; Penin, Aleksey A.; Logacheva, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    The question on the patterns and limits of reduction of plastid genomes in nonphotosynthetic plants and the reasons of their conservation is one of the intriguing topics in plant genome evolution. Here, we report sequencing and analysis of plastid genome in nonphotosynthetic orchids Epipogium aphyllum and Epipogium roseum, which, with sizes of 31 and 19 kbp, respectively, represent the smallest plastid genomes characterized by now. Besides drastic reduction, which is expected, we found several unusual features of these “minimal” plastomes: Multiple rearrangements, highly biased nucleotide composition, and unprecedentedly high substitution rate. Only 27 and 29 genes remained intact in the plastomes of E. aphyllum and E. roseum—those encoding ribosomal components, transfer RNAs, and three additional housekeeping genes (infA, clpP, and accD). We found no signs of relaxed selection acting on these genes. We hypothesize that the main reason for retention of plastid genomes in Epipogium is the necessity to translate messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of accD and/or clpP proteins which are essential for cell metabolism. However, these genes are absent in plastomes of several plant species; their absence is compensated by the presence of a functional copy arisen by gene transfer from plastid to the nuclear genome. This suggests that there is no single set of plastid-encoded essential genes, but rather different sets for different species and that the retention of a gene in the plastome depends on the interaction between the nucleus and plastids. PMID:25635040

  20. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  1. Deciphering the role of aspartate and prephenate aminotransferase activities in plastid nitrogen metabolism.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Fernando; El-Azaz, Jorge; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts and plastids of nonphotosynthetic plant cells contain two aspartate (Asp) aminotransferases: a eukaryotic type (Asp5) and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying Asp and prephenate aminotransferase activities (PAT). We have identified the entire Asp aminotransferase gene family in Nicotiana benthamiana and isolated and cloned the genes encoding the isoenzymes with plastidic localization: NbAsp5 and NbPAT. Using a virus-induced gene silencing approach, we obtained N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbAsp5 and/or NbPAT. Phenotypic and metabolic analyses were conducted in silenced plants to investigate the specific roles of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids within the plastid. The NbAsp5 silenced plants had no changes in phenotype, exhibiting similar levels of free Asp and glutamate as control plants, but contained diminished levels of asparagine and much higher levels of lysine. In contrast, the suppression of NbPAT led to a severe reduction in growth and strong chlorosis symptoms. NbPAT silenced plants exhibited extremely reduced levels of asparagine and were greatly affected in their phenylalanine metabolism and lignin deposition. Furthermore, NbPAT suppression triggered a transcriptional reprogramming in plastid nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, our results indicate that NbPAT has an overlapping role with NbAsp5 in the biosynthesis of Asp and a key role in the production of phenylalanine for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The analysis of NbAsp5/NbPAT cosilenced plants highlights the central role of both plastidic aminotransferases in nitrogen metabolism; however, only NbPAT is essential for plant growth and development.

  2. Genus-Wide Screening Reveals Four Distinct Types of Structural Plastid Genome Organization in Pelargonium (Geraniaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Röschenbleck, Joachim; Weinl, Stefan; Kudla, Jörg; Müller, Kai F.

    2017-01-01

    Geraniaceae are known for their unusual plastid genomes (plastomes), with the genus Pelargonium being most conspicuous with regard to plastome size and gene organization as judged by the sequenced plastomes of P. x hortorum and P. alternans. However, the hybrid origin of P. x hortorum and the uncertain phylogenetic position of P. alternans obscure the events that led to these extraordinary plastomes. Here, we examine all plastid reconfiguration hotspots for 60 Pelargonium species across all subgenera using a PCR and sequencing approach. Our reconstruction of the rearrangement history revealed four distinct plastome types. The ancestral plastome configuration in the two subgenera Magnipetala and Pelargonium is consistent with that of the P. alternans plastome, whereas that of the subgenus Parvulipetala deviates from this organization by one synapomorphic inversion in the trnNGUU–ndhF region. The plastome of P. x hortorum resembles those of one group of the subgenus Paucisignata, but differs from a second group by another inversion in the psaI–psaJ region. The number of microstructural changes and amount of repetitive DNA are generally elevated in all inverted regions. Nucleotide substitution rates correlate positively with the number of indels in all regions across the different subgenera. We also observed lineage- and species-specific changes in the gene content, including gene duplications and fragmentations. For example, the plastid rbcL–psaI region of Pelargonium contains a highly variable accD-like region. Our results suggest alternative evolutionary paths under possibly changing modes of plastid transmission and indicate the non-functionalization of the plastid accD gene in Pelargonium. PMID:28172771

  3. Distribution and Phylogenetic Significance of the 71-kb Inversion in the Plastid Genome in Funariidae (Bryophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Goffinet, Bernard; Wickett, Norman J.; Werner, Olaf; Ros, Rosa Maria; Shaw, A. Jonathan; Cox, Cymon J.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims The recent assembly of the complete sequence of the plastid genome of the model taxon Physcomitrella patens (Funariaceae, Bryophyta) revealed that a 71-kb fragment, encompassing much of the large single copy region, is inverted. This inversion of 57% of the genome is the largest rearrangement detected in the plastid genomes of plants to date. Although initially considered diagnostic of Physcomitrella patens, the inversion was recently shown to characterize the plastid genome of two species from related genera within Funariaceae, but was lacking in another member of Funariidae. The phylogenetic significance of the inversion has remained ambiguous. Methods Exemplars of all families included in Funariidae were surveyed. DNA sequences spanning the inversion break ends were amplified, using primers that anneal to genes on either side of the putative end points of the inversion. Primer combinations were designed to yield a product for either the inverted or the non-inverted architecture. Key Results The survey reveals that exemplars of eight genera of Funariaceae, the sole species of Disceliaceae and three generic representatives of Encalyptales all share the 71-kb inversion in the large single copy of the plastid genome. By contrast, the plastid genome of Gigaspermaceae (Funariales) is characterized by a gene order congruent with that described for other mosses, liverworts and hornworts, and hence it does not possess this inversion. Conclusions The phylogenetic distribution of the inversion in the gene order supports a hypothesis only weakly supported by inferences from sequence data whereby Funariales are paraphyletic, with Funariaceae and Disceliaceae sharing a common ancestor with Encalyptales, and Gigaspermaceae sister to this combined clade. To reflect these relationships, Gigaspermaceae are excluded from Funariales and accommodated in their own order, Gigaspermales order nov., within Funariideae. PMID:17337480

  4. Plastid Osmotic Stress Activates Cellular Stress Responses in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Margaret E.; Basu, Meera R.; Bhaskara, Govinal Badiger; Verslues, Paul E.; Haswell, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about cytoplasmic osmoregulatory mechanisms in plants, and even less is understood about how the osmotic properties of the cytoplasm and organelles are coordinately regulated. We have previously shown that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants lacking functional versions of the plastid-localized mechanosensitive ion channels Mechanosensitive Channel of Small Conductance-Like2 (MSL2) and MSL3 contain leaf epidermal plastids under hypoosmotic stress, even during normal growth and development. Here, we use the msl2 msl3 mutant as a model to investigate the cellular response to constitutive plastid osmotic stress. Under unstressed conditions, msl2 msl3 seedlings exhibited several hallmarks of drought or environmental osmotic stress, including solute accumulation, elevated levels of the compatible osmolyte proline (Pro), and accumulation of the stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, msl2 msl3 mutants expressed Pro and ABA metabolism genes in a pattern normally seen under drought or osmotic stress. Pro accumulation in the msl2 msl3 mutant was suppressed by conditions that reduce plastid osmotic stress or inhibition of ABA biosynthesis. Finally, treatment of unstressed msl2 msl3 plants with exogenous ABA elicited a much greater Pro accumulation response than in the wild type, similar to that observed in plants under drought or osmotic stress. These results suggest that osmotic imbalance across the plastid envelope can elicit a response similar to that elicited by osmotic imbalance across the plasma membrane and provide evidence for the integration of the osmotic state of an organelle into that of the cell in which it resides. PMID:24676856

  5. Resveratrol Intervenes in the Cholesterol- and Isoprenoid-Mediated Amyloidogenic Processing of AβPP in Familial Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sathya, Mohan; Moorthi, Ponnusamy; Premkumar, Palanisamy; Kandasamy, Mahesh; Jayachandran, Kesavan Swaminathan; Anusuyadevi, Muthuswamy

    2017-12-03

    Deterioration of cholesterol metabolism has recently been a frontier subject of investigation in the field of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Though amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) primes the pathological cascade, changes in cholesterol levels and its intermediates, geranyl geranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate, is expected to have a different consequence on AβPP processing and amyloid-β (Aβ) generation. However, the use of statins (HMG-COA reductase inhibitor) has been widely implicated in slowing down the pathogenic progression of AD, while the epidemiological reports on its biological effect remains controversial. Considering this fact, the choice of drug that could maintain cholesterol homeostasis without altering its biosynthesis may yield a better therapeutic efficacy on AD. Thus, the present study focused on determining the influence of cholesterol and isoprenoids on amyloidogenic-cleavage of AβPP, in addition to resveratrol as a potent therapeutic drug in CHO-APPswe cell lines. High levels of cholesterol were found to enhance the maturation of AβPP and altered the expression and subcellular localization of ADAM10, BACE1, and PS1 thereby promoting Aβ generation, whereas high isoprenoids increased both maturation as well as amyloidogenic-cleavage of AβPP, which was evident through β-CTF production. Interestingly, the therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol maintained cholesterol homeostasis and reduced the amyloidogenic burden through its ability to enhance SIRT1 expression and thereby regulating differential expression of AD determinants.

  6. Metabolic Labeling with an Alkyne-modified Isoprenoid Analog Facilitates Imaging and Quantification of the Prenylome in Cells.

    PubMed

    Palsuledesai, Charuta C; Ochocki, Joshua D; Kuhns, Michelle M; Wang, Yen-Chih; Warmka, Janel K; Chernick, Dustin S; Wattenberg, Elizabeth V; Li, Ling; Arriaga, Edgar A; Distefano, Mark D

    2016-10-21

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification that is responsible for membrane association and protein-protein interactions. The oncogenic protein Ras, which is prenylated, has been the subject of intense study in the past 20 years as a therapeutic target. Several studies have shown a correlation between neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease and protein prenylation. Here, a method for imaging and quantification of the prenylome using microscopy and flow cytometry is described. We show that metabolically incorporating an alkyne isoprenoid into mammalian cells, followed by a Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne azide cycloaddition reaction to a fluorophore, allows for detection of prenylated proteins in several cell lines and that different cell types vary significantly in their levels of prenylated proteins. The addition of a prenyltransferase inhibitor or the precursors to the native isoprenoid substrates lowers the levels of labeled prenylated proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that there is a significantly higher (22%) level of prenylated proteins in a cellular model of compromised autophagy as compared to normal cells, supporting the hypothesis of a potential involvement of protein prenylation in abrogated autophagy. These results highlight the utility of total prenylome labeling for studies on the role of protein prenylation in various diseases including aging-related disorders.

  7. Protein synthesis in tomato-fruit locule tissue

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J. W.; Cocking, E. C.

    1967-01-01

    1. Osmotically disrupted protoplasts and isolated plastids from tomato-fruit locule tissue were found capable of incorporating 14C-labelled amino acids under aseptic conditions into an exhaustively washed trichloroacetic acid-insoluble protein fraction. 2. The disrupted protoplast system incorporated 20–45μμmoles of amino acid/mg. of protein in 10min. The isolated plastid system incorporated 10–20μμmoles of amino acid/mg. of protein; 40–150μμg. of carbon/mg. of protein was incorporated in 10min. from 14C-labelled amino acid mixture. 3. Incorporation is stimulated by added ATP in the dark, but no added ATP is required when the system is illuminated. The cell-free plastid system is to some extent self-sufficient and does not normally require an added supernatant fraction or unlabelled amino acids. 4. Amino acid incorporation by plastids is inhibited by chloramphenicol, puromycin, actinomycin D, ribonuclease and deoxyribonuclease. It is suggested that the mechanism of protein synthesis in the cell-free plastids, and in the tissue generally, is basically the same as established for bacteria. Ribosomes and highspeed supernatant from this tissue were to some extent interchangeable with Escherichia coli ribosomes and supernatant in cell-free incubations. 5. Incorporation of amino acids by isolated plastids was stimulated by indol-3-ylacetic acid and kinetin, and, whereas incorporation normally proceeds for only 10–20min., the time-course was extended in the presence of these growth substances. It is suggested that hormones may be involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in plants. PMID:5340735

  8. Identification of genes for sulfolipid synthesis in primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Kobayashi, Satomi; Aoki, Motohide; Umemura, Tomonari; Kobayashi, Isao; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2016-01-29

    Sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol is one of the lipids that construct thylakoid membranes, and is distributed from cyanobacteria to plastids in plants including a red lineage. One of the most primitive red algae, Cyanidioschyzon melorae, similar to cyanobacteria and green plants, possesses homologs of the SQD1 and SQD2 genes that code for UDP-sulfoquinovose and sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol synthases, respectively, for the synthesis of sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. We here revealed the structural properties of SQD1 and SQD2 homologs in C. melorae intrinsic to those of the authentic proteins, and verified their enzymatic functions through heterologous expression in cyanobacterial disruptants as to the corresponding genes. The results demonstrated that the system of sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol synthesis could have been conserved through evolution of cyanobacteria to plastids in a red lineage, which is compatible with the monophyletic origin of plastids.

  9. Tuning the production of variable length, fluorescent polyisoprenoids using surfactant-controlled enzymatic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Troutman, Jerry M; Erickson, Katelyn M; Scott, Phillip M; Hazel, Joseph M; Martinez, Christina D; Dodbele, Samantha

    2015-05-12

    Bactoprenyl diphosphate (BPP), a two-E eight-Z configuration C55 isoprenoid, serves as a critical anchor for the biosynthesis of complex glycans central to bacterial survival and pathogenesis. BPP is formed by the polymerase undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UppS), which catalyzes the elongation of a single farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with eight Z-configuration isoprene units from eight isopentenyl diphosphates. In vitro analysis of UppS and other polyprenyl diphosphate synthases requires the addition of a surfactant such as Triton X-100 to stimulate the release of the hydrophobic product from the enzyme for effective and efficient turnover. Here using a fluorescent 2-nitrileanilinogeranyl diphosphate analogue of FPP, we have found that a wide range of surfactants can stimulate release of product from UppS and that the structure of the surfactant has a major impact on the lengths of products produced by the protein. Of particular importance, shorter chain surfactants promote the release of isoprenoids with four to six Z-configuration isoprene additions, while larger chain surfactants promote the formation of natural isoprenoid lengths (8Z) and larger. We have found that the product chain lengths can be readily controlled and coarsely tuned by adjusting surfactant identity, concentration, and reaction time. We have also found that binary mixtures of just two surfactants can be used to fine-tune isoprenoid lengths. The surfactant effects discovered do not appear to be significantly altered with an alternative isoprenoid substrate. However, the surfactant effects do appear to be dependent on differences in UppS between bacterial species. This work provides new insights into surfactant effects in enzymology and highlights how these effects can be leveraged for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of otherwise difficult to obtain glycan biosynthesis probes. This work also provides key reagents for the systematic analysis of structure-activity relationships between glycan

  10. Expression of the plastid-located glutamine synthetase of Medicago truncatula. Accumulation of the precursor in root nodules reveals an in vivo control at the level of protein import into plastids.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula M; Lima, Lígia M; Santos, Isabel M; Carvalho, Helena G; Cullimore, Julie V

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the plastid-located glutamine synthetase (GS) of Medicago truncatula Gaertn (MtGS2). A cDNA was isolated encoding a GS2 precursor polypeptide of 428 amino acids composing an N-terminal transit peptide of 49 amino acids. Expression analysis, by Westerns and by northern hybridization, revealed that MtGS2 is expressed in both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic organs. Both transcripts and proteins of MtGS2 were detected in substantial amounts in root nodules, suggesting that the enzyme might be performing some important role in this organ. Surprisingly, about 40% of the plastid GS in nodules occurred in the non-processed precursor form (preGS2). This precursor was not detected in any other organ studied and moreover was not observed in non-fixing nodules. Cellular fractionation of nodule extracts revealed that preGS2 is associated with the plastids and that it is catalytically inactive. Immunogold electron microscopy revealed a frequent coincidence of GS with the plastid envelope. Taken together, these results suggest a nodule-specific accumulation of the GS2 precursor at the surface of the plastids in nitrogen-fixing nodules. These results may reflect a regulation of GS2 activity in relation to nitrogen fixation at the level of protein import into nodule plastids.

  11. Variation in short-term and long-term responses of photosynthesis and isoprenoid-mediated photoprotection to soil water availability in four Douglas-fir provenances.

    PubMed

    Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Jansen, Kirstin; Wildhagen, Henning; Hess, Moritz; Kayler, Zachary; Kammerer, Bernd; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo

    2017-01-10

    For long-lived forest tree species, the understanding of intraspecific variation among populations and their response to water availability can reveal their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change. Dissipation of excess excitation energy, mediated by photoprotective isoprenoids, is an important defense mechanism against drought and high light when photosynthesis is hampered. We used 50-year-old Douglas-fir trees of four provenances at two common garden experiments to characterize provenance-specific variation in photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms mediated by essential and non-essential isoprenoids in response to soil water availability and solar radiation. All provenances revealed uniform photoprotective responses to high solar radiation, including increased de-epoxidation of photoprotective xanthophyll cycle pigments and enhanced emission of volatile monoterpenes. In contrast, we observed differences between provenances in response to drought, where provenances sustaining higher CO2 assimilation rates also revealed increased water-use efficiency, carotenoid-chlorophyll ratios, pools of xanthophyll cycle pigments, β-carotene and stored monoterpenes. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation to contrasting habitats affected chlorophyll-carotenoid ratios, pool sizes of photoprotective xanthophylls, β-carotene, and stored volatile isoprenoids. We conclude that intraspecific variation in isoprenoid-mediated photoprotective mechanisms contributes to the adaptive potential of Douglas-fir provenances to climate change.

  12. Photosynthesis and assimilate partitioning between carbohydrates and isoprenoid products in vegetatively active and dormant guayule: physiological and environmental constraints on rubber accumulation in a semiarid shrub

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stems and roots of the desert shrub guayule, Parthenium argentatum, contain a significant amount of latex that can be used as a source of natural rubber. Photosynthesis and the levels of carbohydrates and volatile isoprenoid products were measured in guayule plants grown under simulated summer-...

  13. Effect of temperature and CO2-enrichment on photosynthesis and the levels of carbohydrates and isoprenoid pathway products in guayule, a latex producing shrub

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The stems and roots of the desert shrub guayule, Parthenium argentatum, contain a significant amount of latex, a potential source of natural rubber. To determine the factors regulating carbon partitioning, net photosynthesis (Pn) and the levels of carbohydrates and isoprenoid compounds were measured...

  14. Variation in short-term and long-term responses of photosynthesis and isoprenoid-mediated photoprotection to soil water availability in four Douglas-fir provenances

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Laura Verena; Kleiber, Anita; Jansen, Kirstin; Wildhagen, Henning; Hess, Moritz; Kayler, Zachary; Kammerer, Bernd; Schnitzler, Jörg-Peter; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen; Gessler, Arthur; Ensminger, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    For long-lived forest tree species, the understanding of intraspecific variation among populations and their response to water availability can reveal their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change. Dissipation of excess excitation energy, mediated by photoprotective isoprenoids, is an important defense mechanism against drought and high light when photosynthesis is hampered. We used 50-year-old Douglas-fir trees of four provenances at two common garden experiments to characterize provenance-specific variation in photosynthesis and photoprotective mechanisms mediated by essential and non-essential isoprenoids in response to soil water availability and solar radiation. All provenances revealed uniform photoprotective responses to high solar radiation, including increased de-epoxidation of photoprotective xanthophyll cycle pigments and enhanced emission of volatile monoterpenes. In contrast, we observed differences between provenances in response to drought, where provenances sustaining higher CO2 assimilation rates also revealed increased water-use efficiency, carotenoid-chlorophyll ratios, pools of xanthophyll cycle pigments, β-carotene and stored monoterpenes. Our results demonstrate that local adaptation to contrasting habitats affected chlorophyll-carotenoid ratios, pool sizes of photoprotective xanthophylls, β-carotene, and stored volatile isoprenoids. We conclude that intraspecific variation in isoprenoid-mediated photoprotective mechanisms contributes to the adaptive potential of Douglas-fir provenances to climate change. PMID:28071755

  15. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-01-01

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture. PMID:27306416

  16. Hedysarum L. (Fabaceae: Hedysareae) Is Not Monophyletic – Evidence from Phylogenetic Analyses Based on Five Nuclear and Five Plastid Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pei-Liang; Wen, Jun; Duan, Lei; Arslan, Emine; Ertuğrul, Kuddisi; Chang, Zhao-Yang

    2017-01-01

    The legume family (Fabaceae) exhibits a high level of species diversity and evolutionary success worldwide. Previous phylogenetic studies of the genus Hedysarum L. (Fabaceae: Hedysareae) showed that the nuclear and the plastid topologies might be incongruent, and the systematic position of the Hedysarum sect. Stracheya clade was uncertain. In this study, phylogenetic relationships of Hedysarum were investigated based on the nuclear ITS, ETS, PGDH, SQD1, TRPT and the plastid psbA-trnH, trnC-petN, trnL-trnF, trnS-trnG, petN-psbM sequences. Both nuclear and plastid data support two major lineages in Hedysarum: the Hedysarum s.s. clade and the Sartoria clade. In the nuclear tree, Hedysarum is biphyletic with the Hedysarum s.s. clade sister to the Corethrodendron + Eversmannia + Greuteria + Onobrychis clade (the CEGO clade), whereas the Sartoria clade is sister to the genus Taverniera DC. In the plastid tree, Hedysarum is monophyletic and sister to Taverniera. The incongruent position of the Hedysarum s.s. clade between the nuclear and plastid trees may be best explained by a chloroplast capture hypothesis via introgression. The Hedysarum sect. Stracheya clade is resolved as sister to the H. sect. Hedysarum clade in both nuclear and plastid trees, and our analyses support merging Stracheya into Hedysarum. Based on our new evidence from multiple sequences, Hedysarum is not monophyletic, and its generic delimitation needs to be reconsidered. PMID:28122062

  17. Gain and Loss of Photosynthetic Membranes during Plastid Differentiation in the Shoot Apex of Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Charuvi, Dana; Kiss, Vladimir; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Adam, Zach; Reich, Ziv

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplasts of higher plants develop from proplastids, which are undifferentiated plastids that lack photosynthetic (thylakoid) membranes. In flowering plants, the proplastid-chloroplast transition takes place at the shoot apex, which consists of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) and the flanking leaf primordia. It has been believed that the SAM contains only proplastids and that these become chloroplasts only in the primordial leaves. Here, we show that plastids of the SAM are neither homogeneous nor necessarily null. Rather, their developmental state varies with the specific region and/or layer of the SAM in which they are found. Plastids throughout the L1 and L3 layers of the SAM possess fairly developed thylakoid networks. However, many of these plastids eventually lose their thylakoids during leaf maturation. By contrast, plastids at the central, stem cell–harboring region of the L2 layer of the SAM lack thylakoid membranes; these appear only at the periphery, near the leaf primordia. Thus, plastids in the SAM undergo distinct differentiation processes that, depending on their lineage and position, lead to either development or loss of thylakoid membranes. These processes continue along the course of leaf maturation. PMID:22438022

  18. Quantitative analysis of the mitochondrial and plastid proteomes of the moss Physcomitrella patens reveals protein macrocompartmentation and microcompartmentation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Stefanie J; Lang, Daniel; Hoernstein, Sebastian N W; Lang, Erika G E; Schuessele, Christian; Schmidt, Anton; Fluck, Melanie; Leisibach, Desirée; Niegl, Christina; Zimmer, Andreas D; Schlosser, Andreas; Reski, Ralf

    2014-04-01

    Extant eukaryotes are highly compartmentalized and have integrated endosymbionts as organelles, namely mitochondria and plastids in plants. During evolution, organellar proteomes are modified by gene gain and loss, by gene subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization, and by changes in protein targeting. To date, proteomics data for plastids and mitochondria are available for only a few plant model species, and evolutionary analyses of high-throughput data are scarce. We combined quantitative proteomics, cross-species comparative analysis of metabolic pathways, and localizations by fluorescent proteins in the model plant Physcomitrella patens in order to assess evolutionary changes in mitochondrial and plastid proteomes. This study implements data-mining methodology to classify and reliably reconstruct subcellular proteomes, to map metabolic pathways, and to study the effects of postendosymbiotic evolution on organellar pathway partitioning. Our results indicate that, although plant morphologies changed substantially during plant evolution, metabolic integration of organelles is largely conserved, with exceptions in amino acid and carbon metabolism. Retargeting or regulatory subfunctionalization are common in the studied nucleus-encoded gene families of organelle-targeted proteins. Moreover, complementing the proteomic analysis, fluorescent protein fusions revealed novel proteins at organelle interfaces such as plastid stromules (stroma-filled tubules) and highlight microcompartments as well as intercellular and intracellular heterogeneity of mitochondria and plastids. Thus, we establish a comprehensive data set for mitochondrial and plastid proteomes in moss, present a novel multilevel approach to organelle biology in plants, and place our findings into an evolutionary context.

  19. Genetic structure of Populus hybrid zone along the Irtysh River provides insight into plastid-nuclear incompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yan-Fei; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Duan, Ai-Guo; Abuduhamiti, Bawerjan

    2016-06-16

    In plants, the maintenance of species integrity despite hybridization has often been explained by the co-adaption of nuclear gene complexes. However, the interaction between plastid and nuclear sub-genomes has been underestimated. Here, we analyzed the genetic structure of a Populus alba and P. tremula hybrid zone along the Irtysh River system in the Altai region, northwest China, using both nuclear microsatellites and plastid DNA sequences. We found high interspecific differentiation, although the hybrid P. × canescens was prevalent. Bayesian inference classified most hybrids into F1, followed by a few back-crosses to P. alba, and fewer F2 hybrids and back-crosses to P. tremula, indicating a few introgressions but preference toward P. alba. When plastid haplotypes in parental species were distinct, P. × canescens carried the haplotypes of both parents, but showed significant linkage between intraspecific haplotype and nuclear genotypes at several microsatellite loci. Selection, rather than migration and assortative mating, might have contributed to such plastid-nuclear disequilibria. By removing later-generated hybrids carrying interspecific combinations of haplotype and nuclear genotypes, plastid-nuclear incompatibility has greatly limited the gene exchange between P. alba and P. tremula via backcrossing with hybrids, demonstrating a significant association between plastid haplotype and the proportion of nuclear admixture.

  20. Genomes of Stigonematalean cyanobacteria (subsection V) and the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis from prokaryotes to plastids.

    PubMed

    Dagan, Tal; Roettger, Mayo; Stucken, Karina; Landan, Giddy; Koch, Robin; Major, Peter; Gould, Sven B; Goremykin, Vadim V; Rippka, Rosmarie; Tandeau de Marsac, Nicole; Gugger, Muriel; Lockhart, Peter J; Allen, John F; Brune, Iris; Maus, Irena; Pühler, Alfred; Martin, William F

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria forged two major evolutionary transitions with the invention of oxygenic photosynthesis and the bestowal of photosynthetic lifestyle upon eukaryotes through endosymbiosis. Information germane to understanding those transitions is imprinted in cyanobacterial genomes, but deciphering it is complicated by lateral gene transfer (LGT). Here, we report genome sequences for the morphologically most complex true-branching cyanobacteria, and for Scytonema hofmanni PCC 7110, which with 12,356 proteins is the most gene-rich prokaryote currently known. We investigated components of cyanobacterial evolution that have been vertically inherited, horizontally transferred, and donated to eukaryotes at plastid origin. The vertical component indicates a freshwater origin for water-splitting photosynthesis. Networks of the horizontal component reveal that 60% of cyanobacterial gene families have been affected by LGT. Plant nuclear genes acquired from cyanobacteria define a lower bound frequency of 611 multigene families that, in turn, specify diazotrophic cyanobacterial lineages as having a gene collection most similar to that possessed by the plastid ancestor.

  1. The dynamic history of plastid genomes in the Campanulaceae sensu lato is unique among angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Eric B.

    2014-01-01

    Why have some plants lost the organizational stability in plastid genomes (plastomes) that evolved in their algal ancestors? During the endosymbiotic transformation of a cyanobacterium into the eukaryotic plastid, most cyanobacterial genes were transferred to the nucleus or otherwise lost from the plastome, and the resulting plastome architecture in land plants confers organizational stability, as evidenced by the conserved gene order among bryophytes and lycophytes, whereas ferns, gymnosperms, and angiosperms share a single, 30-kb inversion. Although some additional gene losses have occurred, gene additions to angiosperm plastomes were previously unknown. Plastomes in the Campanulaceae sensu lato have incorporated dozens of large ORFs (putative protein-coding genes). These insertions apparently caused many of the 125+ large inversions now known in this small eudicot clade. This phylogenetically restricted phenomenon is not biogeographically localized, which indicates that these ORFs came from the nucleus or (less likely) a cryptic endosymbiont. PMID:25024223

  2. Massive gene transfer and extensive RNA editing of a symbiotic dinoflagellate plastid genome.

    PubMed

    Mungpakdee, Sutada; Shinzato, Chuya; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Kawashima, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Ryo; Hisata, Kanako; Tanaka, Makiko; Goto, Hiroki; Fujie, Manabu; Lin, Senjie; Satoh, Nori; Shoguchi, Eiichi

    2014-05-31

    Genome sequencing of Symbiodinium minutum revealed that 95 of 109 plastid-associated genes have been transferred to the nuclear genome and subsequently expanded by gene duplication. Only 14 genes remain in plastids and occur as DNA minicircles. Each minicircle (1.8-3.3 kb) contains one gene and a conserved noncoding region containing putative promoters and RNA-binding sites. Nine types of RNA editing, including a novel G/U type, were discovered in minicircle transcripts but not in genes transferred to the nucleus. In contrast to DNA editing sites in dinoflagellate mitochondria, which tend to be highly conserved across all taxa, editing sites employed in DNA minicircles are highly variable from species to species. Editing is crucial for core photosystem protein function. It restores evolutionarily conserved amino acids and increases peptidyl hydropathy. It also increases protein plasticity necessary to initiate photosystem complex assembly.

  3. Birth of Four Chimeric Plastid Gene Clusters in Japanese Umbrella Pine

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chih-Yao; Wu, Chung-Shien; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2016-01-01

    Many genes in the plastid genomes (plastomes) of plants are organized as gene clusters, in which genes are co-transcribed, resembling bacterial operons. These plastid operons are highly conserved, even among conifers, whose plastomes are highly rearranged relative to other seed plants. We have determined the complete plastome sequence of Sciadopitys verticillata (Japanese umbrella pine), the sole member of Sciadopityaceae. The Sciadopitys plastome is characterized by extensive inversions, pseudogenization of four tRNA genes after tandem duplications, and a unique pair of 370-bp inverted repeats involved in the formation of isomeric plastomes. We showed that plastomic inversions in Sciadopitys have led to shuffling of the remote conserved operons, resulting in the birth of four chimeric gene clusters. Our data also demonstrated that the relocated genes can be co-transcribed in these chimeric gene clusters. The plastome of Sciadopitys advances our current understanding of how the conifer plastomes have evolved toward increased diversity and complexity. PMID:27269365

  4. Plastid transformation in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) by the biolistic process.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Menq-Jiau; Yang, Ming-Te; Chu, Wan-Ru; Liu, Cheng-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata L.) is one of the most important vegetable crops grown worldwide. Scientists are using biotechnology in addition to traditional breeding methods to develop new cabbage varieties with desirable traits. Recent biotechnological advances in chloroplast transformation technology have opened new avenues for crop improvement. In 2007, we developed a stable plastid transformation system for cabbage and reported the successful transformation of the cry1Ab gene into the cabbage chloroplast genome. This chapter describes the methods for cabbage transformation using biolistic procedures. The following sections are included in this protocol: preparation of donor materials, coating gold particles with DNA, biolistic bombardment, as well as the regeneration and selection of transplastomic cabbage plants. The establishment of a plastid transformation system for cabbage offers new possibilities for introducing new agronomic and horticultural traits into Brassica crops.

  5. Efficient plastid transformation in tobacco using the aphA-6 gene and kanamycin selection.

    PubMed

    Huang, F-C; Klaus, S M J; Herz, S; Zou, Z; Koop, H-U; Golds, T J

    2002-09-01

    Here we report on the development of a new dominant selection marker for plastid transformation in higher plants using the aminoglycoside phosphotransferase gene aphA-6 from Acinetobacter baumannii. Vectors containing chimeric aphA-6 gene constructs were introduced into the tobacco chloroplast using particle bombardment of alginate-embedded protoplast-derived micro colonies or polyethylene glycol (PEG)-mediated DNA uptake. Targeted insertion into the plastome was achieved via homologous recombination, and plastid transformants were recovered on the basis of their resistance to kanamycin. Variations in kanamycin resistance in transplastomic lines were observed depending on the 5' and 3' regulatory elements associated with the aphA-6 coding region. Transplastomic plants were fertile and showed maternal inheritance of the transplastome in the progeny.

  6. DNA Methylation Occurred around Lowly Expressed Genes of Plastid DNA during Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Ngernprasirtsiri, J; Kobayashi, H; Akazawa, T

    1988-09-01

    We have analyzed DNA methylation of plastid DNA from fully ripened red fruits, green mature fruits, and green leaves of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum var. Firstmore). Essentially identical restriction profiles were obtained between chromoplast and chloroplast DNAs by EcoRI digestion. BstNI/EcoRII and HpaII/MspI are pairs of isoschizomers that can discriminate between methylated and unmethylated DNAs. These endonucleases produced different restriction patterns of plastid DNAs from tomato fruits compared to tomato leaves. Moreover, we have found from Southern blots that methylation was not detected in DNA fragments containing certain genes that are actively expressed in chromoplasts, whereas DNA fragments bearing genes that are barely transcribed in chromoplasts are methylated.

  7. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter--IV. Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Huizinga, B J; Tannenbaum, E; Kaplan, I R

    1987-01-01

    A series of pyrolysis experiments, utilizing two different immature oil-prone kerogens ("type I": Green River Formation kerogen; "Type II": Monterey Formation kerogen) mixed with common sedimentary minerals (calcite, illite, or Na-montmorillonite), was conducted to study the effects of minerals on the generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes during laboratory-simulated catagenesis of kerogen. The influence of clay minerals on the aliphatic hydrocarbons is critically dependent on the water concentration during laboratory thermal maturation. Under extremely low contents of water (i.e., dry pyrolysis, where only pyrolysate water is present), C12(+) -range n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids are mostly destroyed by montmorillonite but undergo only minor alteration with illite. Both clay minerals significantly reduce alkene formation during dry pyrolysis. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water = 2:1), the effects of the clay minerals are substantially reduced. In addition, the dry pyrolysis experiments show that illite and montmorillonite preferentially retain large amounts of the polar constituents of bitumen, but not n-alkanes or acyclic isoprenoids. Therefore, bitumen fractionation according to polarity differences occurs in the presence of these clay minerals. By this process, n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids are concentrated in the bitumen fraction that is not strongly adsorbed on the clay matrices. The extent of these concentrations effects is greatly diminished during hydrous pyrolysis. In contrast, calcite has no significant influence on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons. In addition, calcite is incapable of retaining bitumen. Therefore, the fractionation of n-alkanes or acyclic isoprenoids relative to the polar constituents of bitumen is insignificant in the presence of calcite.

  8. Detecting and Characterizing the Highly Divergent Plastid Genome of the Nonphotosynthetic Parasitic Plant Hydnora visseri (Hydnoraceae)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Julia; Der, Joshua P.; Wafula, Eric K.; Jones, Samuel S.; Wagner, Sarah T.; Honaas, Loren A.; Ralph, Paula E.; Bolin, Jay F.; Maass, Erika; Neinhuis, Christoph; Wanke, Stefan; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2016-01-01

    Plastid genomes of photosynthetic flowering plants are usually highly conserved in both structure and gene content. However, the plastomes of parasitic and mycoheterotrophic plants may be released from selective constraint due to the reduction or loss of photosynthetic ability. Here we present the greatly reduced and highly divergent, yet functional, plastome of the nonphotosynthetic holoparasite Hydnora visseri (Hydnoraceae, Piperales). The plastome is 27 kb in length, with 24 genes encoding ribosomal proteins, ribosomal RNAs, tRNAs, and a few nonbioenergetic genes, but no genes related to photosynthesis. The inverted repeat and the small single copy region are only approximately 1.5 kb, and intergenic regions have been drastically reduced. Despite extreme reduction, gene order and orientation are highly similar to the plastome of Piper cenocladum, a related photosynthetic plant in Piperales. Gene sequences in Hydnora are highly divergent and several complementary approaches using the highest possible sensitivity were required for identification and annotation of this plastome. Active transcription is detected for all of the protein-coding genes in the plastid genome, and one of two introns is appropriately spliced out of rps12 transcripts. The whole-genome shotgun read depth is 1,400× coverage for the plastome, whereas the mitochondrial genome is covered at 40× and the nuclear genome at 2×. Despite the extreme reduction of the genome and high sequence divergence, the presence of syntenic, long transcriptionally active open-reading frames with distant similarity to other plastid genomes and a high plastome stoichiometry relative to the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes suggests that the plastome remains functional in H. visseri. A four-stage model of gene reduction, including the potential for complete plastome loss, is proposed to account for the range of plastid genomes in nonphotosynthetic plants. PMID:26739167

  9. Comparative Analysis of Begonia Plastid Genomes and Their Utility for Species-Level Phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J; Kidner, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    Recent, rapid radiations make species-level phylogenetics difficult to resolve. We used a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing approach to identify informative genomic regions to resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels in Begonia from a survey of sixteen species. A long-range PCR method was used to generate draft plastid genomes to provide a strong phylogenetic backbone, identify fast evolving regions and provide informative molecular markers for species-level phylogenetic studies in Begonia.

  10. Comparative Analysis of Begonia Plastid Genomes and Their Utility for Species-Level Phylogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Nicola; Harrison, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent, rapid radiations make species-level phylogenetics difficult to resolve. We used a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing approach to identify informative genomic regions to resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels in Begonia from a survey of sixteen species. A long-range PCR method was used to generate draft plastid genomes to provide a strong phylogenetic backbone, identify fast evolving regions and provide informative molecular markers for species-level phylogenetic studies in Begonia. PMID:27058864

  11. Toward an understanding of the function of Chlamydiales in plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ball, Steven G; Colleoni, Christophe; Kadouche, Derifa; Ducatez, Mathieu; Arias, Maria-Cecilia; Tirtiaux, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Plastid endosymbiosis defines a process through which a fully evolved cyanobacterial ancestor has transmitted to a eukaryotic phagotroph the hundreds of genes required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis, together with the membrane structures, and cellular compartment associated with this process. In this review, we will summarize the evidence pointing to an active role of Chlamydiales in metabolic integration of free living cyanobacteria, within the cytosol of the last common plant ancestor.

  12. Plastid transformation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) by biolistic DNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Ruhlman, Tracey A

    2014-01-01

    The interest in producing pharmaceutical proteins in a nontoxic plant host has led to the development of an approach to express such proteins in transplastomic lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). A number of therapeutic proteins and vaccine antigen candidates have been stably integrated into the lettuce plastid genome using biolistic DNA delivery. High levels of accumulation and retention of biological activity suggest that lettuce may provide an ideal platform for the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  13. Stable transformation of the cotton plastid genome and maternal inheritance of transgenes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashi; Dhingra, Amit; Daniell, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Chloroplast genetic engineering overcomes concerns of gene containment, low levels of transgene expression, gene silencing, positional and pleiotropic effects or presence of vector sequences in transformed genomes. Several therapeutic proteins and agronomic traits have been highly expressed via the tobacco chloroplast genome but extending this concept to important crops has been a major challenge; lack of 100% homologous species-specific chloroplast transformation vectors containing suitable selectable markers, ability to regulate transgene expression in developing plastids and inadequate tissue culture systems via somatic embryogenesis are major challenges. We employed a ‘Double Gene/Single Selection (DGSS)’ plastid transformation vector that harbors two selectable marker genes (aphA-6 and nptII) to detoxify the same antibiotic by two enzymes, irrespective of the type of tissues or plastids; by combining this with an efficient regeneration system via somatic embryogenesis, cotton plastid transformation was achieved for the first time. The DGSS transformation vector is at least 8-fold (1 event/2.4 bombarded plates) more efficient than ‘Single Gene/Single Selection (SGSS)’ vector (aphA-6; 1 event per 20 bombarded plates). Chloroplast transgenic lines were fertile, flowered and set seeds similar to untransformed plants. Transgenes stably integrated into the cotton chloroplast genome were maternally inherited and were not transmitted via pollen when out-crossed with untransformed female plants. Cotton is one of the most important genetically modified crops ($ 120 billion US annual economy). Successful transformation of the chloroplast genome should address concerns about transgene escape, insects developing resistance, inadequate insect control and promote public acceptance of genetically modified cotton. PMID:15604738

  14. Confirmation of soybean plastid rRNAs by formaldehyde denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Q; Zheng, Y; Chen, H B; Huang, L Q

    2014-10-27

    Owing to their prokaryotic origin, plastid rRNAs are mainly 23s/16s/5s rRNAs. We present a novel plant RNA isolation method in this paper. Also, not only the eukaryotic 28s (26s, 25s)/18s rRNAs but the prokaryotic 26s/23s rRNAs as well were demonstrated in a single sample for the first time by formaldehyde denaturing agarose gel electrophoresis.

  15. Identification and geochemical significance of cyclic di-and trisulphides with linear and acyclic isoprenoid carbon skeletons in immature sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnen, Math E. L.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; ten Haven, H. L.; Van Dalen, A. C. Kock; Schouten, Stefan; De Leeuw, Jan W.

    1991-12-01

    Homologous series (C 15-C 24) of novel 3- n-alkyl-1,2-dithianes and 3- n-alkyl-6-methyl-1,2-di-thianes have been identified in immature sediments. The identification of these compounds was based on comparison of mass spectra and Chromatographie data with those of synthesized 3-methyl-6-tridecyll, 2-dithiane. In addition, 4-methyl-3-(3,7,11-trimethyldodecyl)-1,2-dithiane, 4-(4,8,12-trimethyltridecyl)-1,2-dithiane, 5-methyl-4-(3,7,11-trimethyldodecyl)-1,2,3-trithiepane, and a 1,2-dithiane possessing a pentakishomohopane carbon skeleton were tentatively assigned on the basis of mass spectral characteristics, selective chemolysis, and desulphurisation. The occurrence of these cyclic di-and trisulphides with linear, acyclic isoprenoid and hopanoid carbon skeletons in thermally immature sediments indicates that inorganic polysulphides are incorporated into functionalised lipids during the early stages of diagenesis.

  16. Role of the C-terminal extension peptide of plastid located glutamine synthetase from Medicago truncatula: Crucial for enzyme activity and needless for protein import into the plastids.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Maria João; Vale, Diogo; Cunha, Luis; Melo, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS), a key enzyme in plant nitrogen metabolism, is encoded by a small family of highly homologous nuclear genes that produce cytosolic (GS1) and plastidic (GS2) isoforms. Compared to GS1, GS2 proteins have two extension peptides, one at the N- and the other at the C-terminus, which show a high degree of conservation among plant species. It has long been known that the N-terminal peptide acts as a transit peptide, targeting the protein to the plastids however, the function of the C-terminal extension is still unknown. To investigate whether the C-terminal extension influences the activity of the enzyme, we produced a C-terminal truncated version of Medicago truncatula GS2a in Escherechia coli and studied its catalytic properties. The activity of the truncated protein was found to be lower than that of MtGS2a and with less affinity for glutamate. The importance of the C-terminal extension for the protein import into the chloroplast was also assessed by transient expression of fluorescently-tagged MtGS2a truncated at the C-terminus, which was correctly detected in the chloroplast. The results obtained in this work demonstrate that the C-terminal extension of M. truncatula GS2a is important for the activity of the enzyme and does not contain crucial information for the import process.

  17. A plastid envelope location of Arabidopsis ent-kaurene oxidase links the plastid and endoplasmic reticulum steps of the gibberellin biosynthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Helliwell, C A; Sullivan, J A; Mould, R M; Gray, J C; Peacock, W J; Dennis, E S

    2001-10-01

    We have used fusions of gibberellin biosynthesis enzymes to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to determine the subcellular localization of the early steps of the pathway. Gibberellin biosynthesis from geranylgeranyl diphosphate is catalysed by enzymes of the terpene cyclase, cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase classes. We show that the N-terminal pre-sequences of the Arabidopsis thaliana terpene cyclases copalyl diphosphate synthase (AtCPS1) and ent-kaurene synthase (AtKS1) direct GFP to chloroplasts in transient assays following microprojectile bombardment of tobacco leaves. The AtKS1-GFP fusion is also imported by isolated pea chloroplasts. The N-terminal portion of the cytochrome P450 protein ent-kaurene oxidase (AtKO1) directs GFP to chloroplasts in tobacco leaf transient assays. Chloroplast import assays with 35S-labelled AtKO1 protein show that it is targeted to the outer face of the chloroplast envelope. The leader sequences of the two ent-kaurenoic acid oxidases (AtKAO1 and AtKAO2) from Arabidopsis direct GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest that the AtKO1 protein links the plastid- and endoplasmic reticulum-located steps of the gibberellin biosynthesis pathway by association with the outer envelope of the plastid.

  18. Chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted by a metabolite in the methylerythritol phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, Nicole A; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Mead, David J; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2004-05-11

    The chlamydial developmental cycle is characterized by an intracellular replicative form, termed the reticulate body, and an extracellular form called the elementary body. Elementary bodies are characterized by a condensed chromatin, which is maintained by a histone H1-like protein, Hc1. Differentiation of elementary bodies to reticulate bodies is accompanied by dispersal of the chromatin as chlamydiae become transcriptionally active, although the mechanisms of Hc1 release from DNA have remained unknown. Dissociation of the nucleoid requires chlamydial transcription and translation with negligible loss of Hc1. A genetic screen was therefore designed to identify chlamydial genes rescuing Escherichia coli from the lethal effects of Hc1 overexpression. CT804, a gene homologous to ispE, which encodes an intermediate enzyme of the non-mevalonate methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis, was selected. E. coli coexpressing CT804 and Hc1 grew normally, although they expressed Hc1 to a level equivalent to that which condensed the chromatin of parent Hc1-expressing controls. Inhibition of the MEP pathway with fosmidomycin abolished IspE rescue of Hc1-expressing E. coli. Deproteinated extract from IspE-expressing bacteria caused dispersal of purified chlamydial nucleoids, suggesting that chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted by a small metabolite within the MEP pathway rather than by direct action of IspE. By partial reconstruction of the MEP pathway, we determined that 2-C-methylerythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate dissociated Hc1 from chlamydial chromatin. These results suggest that chlamydial histone-DNA interactions are disrupted upon germination by a small metabolite in the MEP pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  19. Comparison of sister species identifies factors underpinning plastid compatibility in green sea slugs

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Jan; Woehle, Christian; Christa, Gregor; Wägele, Heike; Tielens, Aloysius G. M.; Jahns, Peter; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    The only animal cells known that can maintain functional plastids (kleptoplasts) in their cytosol occur in the digestive gland epithelia of sacoglossan slugs. Only a few species of the many hundred known can profit from kleptoplasty during starvation long-term, but why is not understood. The two sister taxa Elysia cornigera and Elysia timida sequester plastids from the same algal species, but with a very different outcome: while E. cornigera usually dies within the first two weeks when deprived of food, E. timida can survive for many months to come. Here we compare the responses of the two slugs to starvation, blocked photosynthesis and light stress. The two species respond differently, but in both starvation is the main denominator that alters global gene expression profiles. The kleptoplasts' ability to fix CO2 decreases at a similar rate in both slugs during starvation, but only E. cornigera individuals die in the presence of functional kleptoplasts, concomitant with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the digestive tract. We show that profiting from the acquisition of robust plastids, and key to E. timida's longer survival, is determined by an increased starvation tolerance that keeps ROS levels at bay. PMID:25652835

  20. Versatile roles of Arabidopsis plastid ribosomal proteins in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Romani, Isidora; Tadini, Luca; Rossi, Fabio; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Jahns, Peter; Kater, Martin; Leister, Dario; Pesaresi, Paolo

    2012-12-01

    A lack of individual plastid ribosomal proteins (PRPs) can have diverse phenotypic effects in Arabidopsis thaliana, ranging from embryo lethality to compromised vitality, with the latter being associated with photosynthetic lesions and decreases in the expression of plastid proteins. In this study, reverse genetics was employed to study the function of eight PRPs, five of which (PRPS1, -S20, -L27, -L28 and -L35) have not been functionally characterised before. In the case of PRPS17, only leaky alleles or RNA interference lines had been analysed previously. PRPL1 and PRPL4 have been described as essential for embryo development, but their mutant phenotypes are analysed in detail here. We found that PRPS20, -L1, -L4, -L27 and -L35 are required for basal ribosome activity, which becomes crucial at the globular stage and during the transition from the globular to the heart stage of embryogenesis. Thus, lack of any of these PRPs leads to alterations in cell division patterns, and embryo development ceases prior to the heart stage. PRPL28 is essential at the latest stages of embryo-seedling development, during the greening process. PRPS1, -S17 and -L24 appear not to be required for basal ribosome activity and the organism can complete its entire life cycle in their absence. Interestingly, despite the prokaryotic origin of plastids, the significance of individual PRPs for plant development cannot be predicted from the relative phenotypic severity of the corresponding mutants in prokaryotic systems.

  1. Protein import into the photosynthetic organelles of Paulinella chromatophora and its implications for primary plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz, Paweł; Bodył, Andrzej; Gagat, Przemysław

    2012-12-01

    The rhizarian amoeba Paulinella chromatophora harbors two photosynthetically active organelles of cyanobacterial origin that have been acquired independently of classic primary plastids. Because their acquisition did take place relatively recently, they are expected to provide new insight into the ancient cyanobacterial primary endosymbiosis. During the process of Paulinella endosymbiont-to-organelle transformation, more than 30 genes have been transferred from the organelle to the host nuclear genome via endosymbiotic gene transfer (EGT). The article discusses step-by-step protein import of EGT-derived proteins into Paulinella photosynthetic organelles with the emphasis on the nature of their targeting signals and the final passage of proteins through the inner organelle membrane. The latter most probably involves a simplified Tic translocon composed of Tic21- and Tic32-like proteins as well as a Hsp70-based motor responsible for pulling of imported proteins into the organelle matrix. Our results indicate that although protein translocation across the inner membrane of Paulinella photosynthetic organelles seems to resemble the one in classic primary plastids, the transport through the outer membrane does not. The differences could result from distinct integration pathways of Paulinella photosynthetic organelles and primary plastids with their respective host cells.

  2. Revisiting the Plastid Phylogenomics of Pinaceae with Two Complete Plastomes of Pseudolarix and Tsuga.

    PubMed

    Sudianto, Edi; Wu, Chung-Shien; Lin, Ching-Ping; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2016-06-27

    Phylogeny of the ten Pinaceous genera has long been contentious. Plastid genomes (plastomes) provide an opportunity to resolve this problem because they contain rich evolutionary information. To comprehend the plastid phylogenomics of all ten Pinaceous genera, we sequenced the plastomes of two previously unavailable genera, Pseudolarix amabilis (122,234 bp) and Tsuga chinensis (120,859 bp). Both plastomes share similar gene repertoire and order. Here for the first time we report a unique insertion of tandem repeats in accD of T. chinensis From the 65 plastid protein-coding genes common to all Pinaceous genera, we re-examined the phylogenetic relationship among all Pinaceous genera. Our two phylogenetic trees are congruent in an identical tree topology, with the five genera of the Abietoideae subfamily constituting a monophyletic clade separate from the other three subfamilies: Pinoideae, Piceoideae, and Laricoideae. The five genera of Abietoideae were grouped into two sister clades consisting of (1) Cedrus alone and (2) two sister subclades of Pseudolarix-Tsuga and Abies-Keteleeria, with the former uniquely losing the gene psaM and the latter specifically excluding the 3 psbA from the residual inverted repeat.

  3. Mitochondrial and plastid genome architecture: Reoccurring themes, but significant differences at the extremes

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David Roy; Keeling, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial and plastid genomes show a wide array of architectures, varying immensely in size, structure, and content. Some organelle DNAs have even developed elaborate eccentricities, such as scrambled coding regions, nonstandard genetic codes, and convoluted modes of posttranscriptional modification and editing. Here, we compare and contrast the breadth of genomic complexity between mitochondrial and plastid chromosomes. Both organelle genomes have independently evolved many of the same features and taken on similar genomic embellishments, often within the same species or lineage. This trend is most likely because the nuclear-encoded proteins mediating these processes eventually leak from one organelle into the other, leading to a high likelihood of processes appearing in both compartments in parallel. However, the complexity and intensity of genomic embellishments are consistently more pronounced for mitochondria than for plastids, even when they are found in both compartments. We explore the evolutionary forces responsible for these patterns and argue that organelle DNA repair processes, mutation rates, and population genetic landscapes are all important factors leading to the observed convergence and divergence in organelle genome architecture. PMID:25814499

  4. The tomato plastidic fructokinase SlFRK3 plays a role in xylem development.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ofer; Damari-Weissler, Hila; Secchi, Francesca; Rachamilevitch, Shimon; German, Marcelo A; Yeselson, Yelena; Amir, Rachel; Schaffer, Arthur; Holbrook, N Michele; Aloni, Roni; Zwieniecki, Maciej A; Granot, David

    2016-03-01

    Plants have two kinds of fructokinases (FRKs) that catalyze the key step of fructose phosphorylation, cytosolic and plastidic. The major cytosolic tomato FRK, SlFRK2, is essential for the development of xylem vessels. In order to study the role of SlFRK3, which encodes the only plastidic FRK, we generated transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) plants with RNAi suppression of SlFRK3 as well as plants expressing beta-glucoronidase (GUS) under the SlFRK3 promoter. GUS staining indicated SlFRK3 expression in vascular tissues of the leaves and stems, including cambium, differentiating xylem, young xylem fibers and phloem companion cells. Suppression of SlFRK3 reduced the stem xylem area, stem and root water conductance, and whole-plant transpiration, with minor effects on plant development. However, suppression of SlFRK3 accompanied by partial suppression of SlFRK2 induced significant growth-inhibition effects, including the wilting of mature leaves. Grafting experiments revealed that these growth effects are imposed primarily by the leaves, whose petioles had unlignified, thin-walled xylem fibers with collapsed parenchyma cells around the vessels. A cross between the SlFRK2-antisense and SlFRK3-RNAi lines exhibited similar wilting and anatomical effects, confirming that these effects are the result of the combined suppression of SlFRK3 and SlFRK2. These results demonstrate a role of the plastidic SlFRK3 in xylem development and hydraulic conductance.

  5. A plastid gene phylogeny of the non-photosynthetic parasitic Orobanche (Orobanchaceae) and related genera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, J.-M.; Manen, J.-F.; Colwell, A.E.; Schneeweiss, G.M.

    2008-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the non-photosynthetic Orobanche sensu lato (Orobanchaceae), which includes some of the economically most important parasitic weeds, remain insufficiently understood and controversial. This concerns both the phylogenetic relationships within the genus, in particular its monophyly or lack thereof, and the relationships to other holoparasitic genera such as Cistanche or Conopholis. Here we present the first comprehensive phylogenetic study of this group based on a region from the plastid genome (rps2 gene). Although substitution rates appear to be elevated compared to the photosynthetic members of Orobanchaceae, relationships among the major lineages Cistanche, Conopholis plus Epifagus, Boschniakia rossica (Cham. & Schltdl.) B. Fedtsch., B. himalaica Hook. f. & Thomson, B. hookeri Walp. plus B. strobilacea A. Gray, and Orobanche s. l. remain unresolved. Resolution within Orobanche, however, is much better. In agreement with morphological, cytological and other molecular phylogenetic evidence, five lineages, corresponding to the four traditionally recognised sections (Gymnocaulis, Myzorrhiza, Orobanche, Trionychon) and O. latisquama Reut. ex Boiss. (of sect. Orobanche), can be distinguished. A combined analysis of plastid rps2 and nuclear ITS sequences of the holoparasitic genera results in more resolved and better supported trees, although the relationships among Orobanche s. l., Cistanche, and the clade including the remaining genera is unresolved. Therefore, rps2 is a marker from the plastid genome that is well-suited to be used in combination with other already established nuclear markers for resolving generic relationships of Orobanche and related genera. ?? 2008 The Botanical Society of Japan and Springer.

  6. Expansion of inverted repeat does not decrease substitution rates in Pelargonium plastid genomes.

    PubMed

    Weng, Mao-Lun; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Jansen, Robert K

    2017-04-01

    For species with minor inverted repeat (IR) boundary changes in the plastid genome (plastome), nucleotide substitution rates were previously shown to be lower in the IR than the single copy regions (SC). However, the impact of large-scale IR expansion/contraction on plastid nucleotide substitution rates among closely related species remains unclear. We included plastomes from 22 Pelargonium species, including eight newly sequenced genomes, and used both pairwise and model-based comparisons to investigate the impact of the IR on sequence evolution in plastids. Ten types of plastome organization with different inversions or IR boundary changes were identified in Pelargonium. Inclusion in the IR was not sufficient to explain the variation of nucleotide substitution rates. Instead, the rate heterogeneity in Pelargonium plastomes was a mixture of locus-specific, lineage-specific and IR-dependent effects. Our study of Pelargonium plastomes that vary in IR length and gene content demonstrates that the evolutionary consequences of retaining these repeats are more complicated than previously suggested.

  7. Revisiting the Plastid Phylogenomics of Pinaceae with Two Complete Plastomes of Pseudolarix and Tsuga

    PubMed Central

    Sudianto, Edi; Wu, Chung-Shien; Lin, Ching-Ping; Chaw, Shu-Miaw

    2016-01-01

    Phylogeny of the ten Pinaceous genera has long been contentious. Plastid genomes (plastomes) provide an opportunity to resolve this problem because they contain rich evolutionary information. To comprehend the plastid phylogenomics of all ten Pinaceous genera, we sequenced the plastomes of two previously unavailable genera, Pseudolarix amabilis (122,234 bp) and Tsuga chinensis (120,859 bp). Both plastomes share similar gene repertoire and order. Here for the first time we report a unique insertion of tandem repeats in accD of T. chinensis. From the 65 plastid protein-coding genes common to all Pinaceous genera, we re-examined the phylogenetic relationship among all Pinaceous genera. Our two phylogenetic trees are congruent in an identical tree topology, with the five genera of the Abietoideae subfamily constituting a monophyletic clade separate from the other three subfamilies: Pinoideae, Piceoideae, and Laricoideae. The five genera of Abietoideae were grouped into two sister clades consisting of (1) Cedrus alone and (2) two sister subclades of Pseudolarix—Tsuga and Abies—Keteleeria, with the former uniquely losing the gene psaM and the latter specifically excluding the 3 psbA from the residual inverted repeat. PMID:27352945

  8. Comparison of sister species identifies factors underpinning plastid compatibility in green sea slugs.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jan; Woehle, Christian; Christa, Gregor; Wägele, Heike; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Jahns, Peter; Gould, Sven B

    2015-03-07

    The only animal cells known that can maintain functional plastids (kleptoplasts) in their cytosol occur in the digestive gland epithelia of sacoglossan slugs. Only a few species of the many hundred known can profit from kleptoplasty during starvation long-term, but why is not understood. The two sister taxa Elysia cornigera and Elysia timida sequester plastids from the same algal species, but with a very different outcome: while E. cornigera usually dies within the first two weeks when deprived of food, E. timida can survive for many months to come. Here we compare the responses of the two slugs to starvation, blocked photosynthesis and light stress. The two species respond differently, but in both starvation is the main denominator that alters global gene expression profiles. The kleptoplasts' ability to fix CO2 decreases at a similar rate in both slugs during starvation, but only E. cornigera individuals die in the presence of functional kleptoplasts, concomitant with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the digestive tract. We show that profiting from the acquisition of robust plastids, and key to E. timida's longer survival, is determined by an increased starvation tolerance that keeps ROS levels at bay.

  9. Mechanisms for independent cytoplasmic inheritance of mitochondria and plastids in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriko

    2010-03-01

    The inheritance of mitochondria and plastids in angiosperms has been categorized into three modes:maternal, biparental and paternal. Many mechanisms have been proposed for maternal inheritance, including: (1) physical exclusion of the organelle itself during pollenmitosis I (PMI); (2) elimination of the organelle by formation of enucleated cytoplasmic bodies (ECB); (3) autophagic degradation of organelles during male gametophyte development; (4) digestion of the organelle after fertilization; and (5)--the most likely possibility--digestion of organellar DNA in generative cells just after PMI. In detailed cytological observations, the presence or absence of mitochondrial and plastid DNA in generative cells corresponds to biparental/paternal inheritance or maternal inheritance of the respective organelle examined genetically. These improved cytological observations demonstrate that the replication or digestion of organellar DNA in young generative cells just after PMI is a critical point determining the mode of cytoplasmic inheritance. This review describes the independent control mechanisms in mitochondria and plastids that lead to differences in cytoplasmic inheritance in angiosperms.

  10. Kanamycin-resistant alfalfa has a point mutation in the 16S plastid rRNA.

    PubMed

    Rosellini, D; LaFayette, P R; Barone, P; Veronesi, F; Parrott, W A

    2004-05-01

    Genes conferring resistance to kanamycin are frequently used to obtain transgenic plants as spontaneous resistance to kanamycin is not known to exist in higher plants. Nevertheless, mutations conferring kanamycin resistance have been identified in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, raising the question as to why kanamycin-resistant mutants have not been found in higher plants. While attempting plastid transformation of alfalfa, we obtained non-transgenic but kanamycin-resistant somatic embryos following 2 months of culture in the presence of 50 mg l(-1) kanamycin. Sequencing of the plastid DNA region corresponding to the decoding site of the 16S rRNA in ten independent resistant events revealed an A to C transversion at position 1357 of the 16S plastid rDNA, the same site at which an A to G conversion confers kanamycin resistance to C. reinhardtii by reducing the ability of the antibiotic to bind to its target site. All plants derived from the resistant embryos through additional cycles of somatic embryogenesis in the absence of kanamycin retained the mutant phenotype, suggesting that the mutation was homoplastomic. Resistant plants produced 85% less biomass than controls; their leaves were chlorotic during early development and over time slowly turned green. The absence of kanamycin- resistant mutants in higher plants might be explained by the requirement for a regeneration system capable of resulting in homoplastomic individuals, or it may be the result of the detrimental effect of the mutation on the phenotype.

  11. The antibiotic micrococcin is a potent inhibitor of growth and protein synthesis in the malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Rogers, M J; Cundliffe, E; McCutchan, T F

    1998-03-01

    The antibiotic micrococcin is a potent growth inhibitor of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 35 nM. This is comparable to or less than the corresponding levels of commonly used antimalarial drugs. Micrococcin, like thiostrepton, putatively targets protein synthesis in the plastid-like organelle of the parasite.

  12. Escherichia coli engineered to synthesize isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate from mevalonate: a novel system for the genetic analysis of the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Campos, N; Rodríguez-Concepción, M; Sauret-Güeto, S; Gallego, F; Lois, L M; Boronat, A

    2001-01-01

    Isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP) constitute the basic building block of isoprenoids, a family of compounds that is extraordinarily diverse in structure and function. IPP and DMAPP can be synthesized by two independent pathways: the mevalonate pathway and the recently discovered 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Although the MEP pathway is essential in most eubacteria, algae and plants and has enormous biotechnological interest, only some of its steps have been determined. We devised a system suitable for the genetic analysis of the MEP pathway in Escherichia coli. A synthetic operon coding for yeast 5-diphosphomevalonate decarboxylase, human 5-phosphomevalonate kinase, yeast mevalonate kinase and E. coli isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase was incorporated in the chromosome of this bacterium. The expression of this operon allowed the synthesis of IPP and DMAPP from mevalonate added exogenously and complementation of lethal mutants of the MEP pathway. We used this system to show that the ygbP, ychB and ygbB genes are essential in E. coli and that the steps catalysed by the products of these genes belong to the trunk line of the MEP pathway. PMID:11115399

  13. Chromera velia, Endosymbioses and the Rhodoplex Hypothesis—Plastid Evolution in Cryptophytes, Alveolates, Stramenopiles, and Haptophytes (CASH Lineages)

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Jörn; Ludewig, Ann-Kathrin; Michael, Victoria; Bunk, Boyke; Jarek, Michael; Baurain, Denis; Brinkmann, Henner

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of Chromera velia, a free-living photosynthetic relative of apicomplexan pathogens, has provided an unexpected opportunity to study the algal ancestry of malaria parasites. In this work, we compared the molecular footprints of a eukaryote-to-eukaryote endosymbiosis in C. velia to their equivalents in peridinin-containing dinoflagellates (PCD) to reevaluate recent claims in favor of a common ancestry of their plastids. To this end, we established the draft genome and a set of full-length cDNA sequences from C. velia via next-generation sequencing. We documented the presence of a single coxI gene in the mitochondrial genome, which thus represents the genetically most reduced aerobic organelle identified so far, but focused our analyses on five “lucky genes” of the Calvin cycle. These were selected because of their known support for a common origin of complex plastids from cryptophytes, alveolates (represented by PCDs), stramenopiles, and haptophytes (CASH) via a single secondary endosymbiosis with a red alga. As expected, our broadly sampled phylogenies of the nuclear-encoded Calvin cycle markers support a rhodophycean origin for the complex plastid of Chromera. However, they also suggest an independent origin of apicomplexan and dinophycean (PCD) plastids via two eukaryote-to-eukaryote endosymbioses. Although at odds with the current view of a common photosynthetic ancestry for alveolates, this conclusion is nonetheless in line with the deviant plastome architecture in dinoflagellates and the morphological paradox of four versus three plastid membranes in the respective lineages. Further support for independent endosymbioses is provided by analysis of five additional markers, four of them involved in the plastid protein import machinery. Finally, we introduce the “rhodoplex hypothesis” as a convenient way to designate evolutionary scenarios where CASH plastids are ultimately the product of a single secondary endosymbiosis with a red alga but

  14. Evolutionary dynamics of introns in plastid-derived genes in plants: saturation nearly reached but slow intron gain continues.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Rogozin, Igor B; Deusch, Oliver; Dagan, Tal; Martin, William; Koonin, Eugene V

    2008-01-01

    Some of the principal transitions in the evolution of eukaryotes are characterized by engulfment of prokaryotes by primitive eukaryotic cells. In particular, approximately 1.6 billion years ago, engulfment of a cyanobacterium that became the ancestor of chloroplasts and other plastids gave rise to Plantae, the major branch of eukaryotes comprised of glaucophytes, red algae, green algae, and green plants. After endosymbiosis, there was large-scale migration of genes from the endosymbiont to the nuclear genome of the host such that approximately 18% of the nuclear genes in Arabidopsis appear to be of chloroplast origin. To gain insights into the process of evolution of gene structure in these, originally, intronless genes, we compared the properties and the evolutionary dynamics of introns in genes of plastid origin and ancestral eukaryotic genes in Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice genomes. We found that intron densities in plastid-derived genes were slightly but significantly lower than those in ancestral eukaryotic genes. Although most of the introns in both categories of genes were conserved between monocots (rice) and dicots (Arabidopsis and poplar), lineage-specific intron gain was more pronounced in plastid-derived genes than in ancestral genes, whereas there was no significant difference in the intron loss rates between the 2 classes of genes. Thus, after the transfer to the nuclear genome, the plastid-derived genes have undergone a massive intron invasion that, by the time of the divergence of dicots and monocots (150-200 MYA), yielded intron densities only slightly lower than those in ancestral genes. Nevertheless, the accumulation of introns in plastid-derived genes appears not to have reached saturation and continues to this time, albeit at a low rate. The overall pattern of intron gain and loss in the plastid-derived genes is shaped by this continuing gain and the more general tendency for loss that is characteristic of the recent evolution of plant genes.

  15. Transformation of plastids in soil-shaded lowermost hypocotyl segments of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) during a 60-day cultivation period.

    PubMed

    Kakuszi, Andrea; Solymosi, Katalin; Böddi, Béla

    2017-04-01

    The maintenance but substantial transformation of plastids was found in lowermost hypocotyl segments of soil-grown bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Magnum) during a 60-day cultivation period. Although the plants were grown under natural light-dark cycles, this hypocotyl segment was under full coverage of the soil in 5-7 cm depth, thus it was never exposed to light. The 4-day-old plants were fully etiolated: amyloplasts, occasionally prolamellar bodies, protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) and protochlorophyll (Pchl) were found in the hypocotyls of these young seedlings. The 633 and 654 nm bands in the 77 K fluorescence emission spectra indicated the presence of Pchlide and Pchl pigments. During aging, both the Pchlide and Pchl contents increased, however, the Pchl to Pchlide ratio gradually increased. In parallel, the contribution of the 654 nm form decreased and in the spectra of the 60-day-old samples, the main band shifted to 631 nm, and a new form appeared with an emission maximum at 641 nm. The photoactivity had been lost; bleaching took place at continuous illumination. The inner membranes of the plastids disappeared, the amount of starch storing amyloplasts decreased. These data may indicate the general importance of plastids for plant cell metabolism, which can be the reason for their maintenance. Also the general heterogeneity of plastid forms can be concluded: in tissues not exposed to light, Pchl accumulating plastids develop and are maintained even for a long period.

  16. Variable Frequency of Plastid RNA Editing among Ferns and Repeated Loss of Uridine-to-Cytidine Editing from Vascular Plants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution. PMID:25568947

  17. Three old and one new: protein import into red algal-derived plastids surrounded by four membranes.

    PubMed

    Stork, Simone; Lau, Julia; Moog, Daniel; Maier, Uwe-G

    2013-10-01

    Engulfment of a red or green alga by another eukaryote and subsequent reduction of the symbiont to an organelle, termed a complex plastid, is a process known as secondary endosymbiosis and is shown in a diverse group of eukaryotic organisms. Important members are heterokontophytes, haptophytes, cryptophytes, and apicomplexan parasites, all of them with complex plastids of red algal origin surrounded by four membranes. Although the evolutionary relationship between these organisms is still debated, they share common mechanisms for plastid protein import. In this review, we describe recent findings and current models on preprotein import into complex plastids with a special focus on the second outermost plastid membrane. Derived from the plasma membrane of the former endosymbiont, the evolution of protein transport across this so-called periplastidal membrane most likely represented the challenge in the transition from an endosymbiont to a host-dependent organelle. Here, remodeling and relocation of the symbiont endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery gave rise to a translocon complex termed symbiont-specific ERAD-like machinery and provides a fascinating insight into complex cellular evolution.

  18. Reconstruction of molecular phylogeny of closely related Amorphophallus species of India using plastid DNA marker and fingerprinting approaches.

    PubMed

    Gholave, Avinash R; Pawar, Kiran D; Yadav, Shrirang R; Bapat, Vishwas A; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2017-01-01

    Plastid DNA markers sequencing and DNA fingerprinting approaches were used and compared for resolving molecular phylogeny of closely related, previously unexplored Amorphophallus species of India. The utility of individual plastid markers namely rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA, trnLC-trnLD, their combined dataset and two fingerprinting techniques viz. RAPD and ISSR were tested for their efficacy to resolves Amorphophallus species into three sections specific clades namely Rhaphiophallus, Conophallus and Amorphophallus. In the present study, sequences of these four plastid DNA regions as well as RAPD and ISSR profiles of 16 Amorphophallus species together with six varieties of two species were generated and analyzed. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian Inference based construction of phylogenetic trees indicated that among the four plastid DNA regions tested individually and their combined dataset, rbcL was found best suited for resolving closely related Amorphophallus species into section specific clades. When analyzed individually, rbcL exhibited better discrimination ability than matK, trnH-psbA, trnLC-trnLD and combination of all four tested plastid markers. Among two fingerprinting techniques used, the resolution of Amorphophallus species using RAPD was better than ISSR and combination of RAPD +ISSR and in congruence with resolution based on rbcL.

  19. Horizontal transfer of DNA from the mitochondrial to the plastid genome and its subsequent evolution in milkweeds (apocynaceae).

    PubMed

    Straub, Shannon C K; Cronn, Richard C; Edwards, Christopher; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of DNA from the plastid to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of higher plants is a common phenomenon; however, plastid genomes (plastomes) are highly conserved and have generally been regarded as impervious to HGT. We sequenced the 158 kb plastome and the 690 kb mitochondrial genome of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca [Apocynaceae]) and found evidence of intracellular HGT for a 2.4-kb segment of mitochondrial DNA to the rps2-rpoC2 intergenic spacer of the plastome. The transferred region contains an rpl2 pseudogene and is flanked by plastid sequence in the mitochondrial genome, including an rpoC2 pseudogene, which likely provided the mechanism for HGT back to the plastome through double-strand break repair involving homologous recombination. The plastome insertion is restricted to tribe Asclepiadeae of subfamily Asclepiadoideae, whereas the mitochondrial rpoC2 pseudogene is present throughout the subfamily, which confirms that the plastid to mitochondrial HGT event preceded the HGT to the plastome. Although the plastome insertion has been maintained in all lineages of Asclepiadoideae, it shows minimal evidence of transcription in A. syriaca and is likely nonfunctional. Furthermore, we found recent gene conversion of the mitochondrial rpoC2 pseudogene in Asclepias by the plastid gene, which reflects continued interaction of these genomes.

  20. Cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast ribosome reveals the location of plastid-specific ribosomal proteins and extensions.

    PubMed

    Graf, Michael; Arenz, Stefan; Huter, Paul; Dönhöfer, Alexandra; Nováček, Jiří; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-12-15

    Ribosomes are the protein synthesizing machines of the cell. Recent advances in cryo-EM have led to the determination of structures from a variety of species, including bacterial 70S and eukaryotic 80S ribosomes as well as mitoribosomes from eukaryotic mitochondria, however, to date high resolution structures of plastid 70S ribosomes have been lacking. Here we present a cryo-EM structure of the spinach chloroplast 70S ribosome, with an average resolution of 5.4 Å for the small 30S subunit and 3.6 Å for the large 50S ribosomal subunit. The structure reveals the location of the plastid-specific ribosomal proteins (RPs) PSRP1, PSRP4, PSRP5 and PSRP6 as well as the numerous plastid-specific extensions of the RPs. We discover many features by which the plastid-specific extensions stabilize the ribosome via establishing additional interactions with surrounding ribosomal RNA and RPs. Moreover, we identify a large conglomerate of plastid-specific protein mass adjacent to the tunnel exit site that could facilitate interaction of the chloroplast ribosome with the thylakoid membrane and the protein-targeting machinery. Comparing the Escherichia coli 70S ribosome with that of the spinach chloroplast ribosome provides detailed insight into the co-evolution of RP and rRNA.

  1. Variable frequency of plastid RNA editing among ferns and repeated loss of uridine-to-cytidine editing from vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wenhu; Grewe, Felix; Mower, Jeffrey P

    2015-01-01

    The distinct distribution and abundance of C-to-U and U-to-C RNA editing among land plants suggest that these two processes originated and evolve independently, but the paucity of information from several key lineages limits our understanding of their evolution. To examine the evolutionary diversity of RNA editing among ferns, we sequenced the plastid transcriptomes from two early diverging species, Ophioglossum californicum and Psilotum nudum. Using a relaxed automated approach to minimize false negatives combined with manual inspection to eliminate false positives, we identified 297 C-to-U and three U-to-C edit sites in the O. californicum plastid transcriptome but only 27 C-to-U and no U-to-C edit sites in the P. nudum plastid transcriptome. A broader comparison of editing content with the leptosporangiate fern Adiantum capillus-veneris and the hornwort Anthoceros formosae uncovered large variance in the abundance of plastid editing, indicating that the frequency and type of RNA editing is highly labile in ferns. Edit sites that increase protein conservation among species are more abundant and more efficiently edited than silent and non-conservative sites, suggesting that selection maintains functionally important editing. The absence of U-to-C editing from P. nudum plastid transcripts and other vascular plants demonstrates that U-to-C editing loss is a recurrent phenomenon in vascular plant evolution.

  2. Auxenochlorella protothecoides and Prototheca wickerhamii plastid genome sequences give insight into the origins of non-photosynthetic algae.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dong; Wang, Yun; Murakami, Tatsuya; Shen, Yue; Gong, Jianhui; Jiang, Huifeng; Smith, David R; Pombert, Jean-Francois; Dai, Junbiao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-09-25

    The forfeiting of photosynthetic capabilities has occurred independently many times throughout eukaryotic evolution. But almost all non-photosynthetic plants and algae still retain a colorless plastid and an associated genome, which performs fundamental processes apart from photosynthesis. Unfortunately, little is known about the forces leading to photosynthetic loss; this is largely because there is a lack of data from transitional species. Here, we compare the plastid genomes of two "transitional" green algae: the photosynthetic, mixotrophic Auxenochlorella protothecoides and the non-photosynthetic, obligate heterotroph Prototheca wickerhamii. Remarkably, the plastid genome of A. protothecoides is only slightly larger than that of P. wickerhamii, making it among the smallest plastid genomes yet observed from photosynthetic green algae. Even more surprising, both algae have almost identical plastid genomic architectures and gene compositions (with the exception of genes involved in photosynthesis), implying that they are closely related. This close relationship was further supported by phylogenetic and substitution rate analyses, which suggest that the lineages giving rise to A. protothecoides and P. wickerhamii diverged from one another around six million years ago.

  3. Horizontal Transfer of DNA from the Mitochondrial to the Plastid Genome and Its Subsequent Evolution in Milkweeds (Apocynaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Shannon C.K.; Cronn, Richard C.; Edwards, Christopher; Fishbein, Mark; Liston, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of DNA from the plastid to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes of higher plants is a common phenomenon; however, plastid genomes (plastomes) are highly conserved and have generally been regarded as impervious to HGT. We sequenced the 158 kb plastome and the 690 kb mitochondrial genome of common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca [Apocynaceae]) and found evidence of intracellular HGT for a 2.4-kb segment of mitochondrial DNA to the rps2–rpoC2 intergenic spacer of the plastome. The transferred region contains an rpl2 pseudogene and is flanked by plastid sequence in the mitochondrial genome, including an rpoC2 pseudogene, which likely provided the mechanism for HGT back to the plastome through double-strand break repair involving homologous recombination. The plastome insertion is restricted to tribe Asclepiadeae of subfamily Asclepiadoideae, whereas the mitochondrial rpoC2 pseudogene is present throughout the subfamily, which confirms that the plastid to mitochondrial HGT event preceded the HGT to the plastome. Although the plastome insertion has been maintained in all lineages of Asclepiadoideae, it shows minimal evidence of transcription in A. syriaca and is likely nonfunctional. Furthermore, we found recent gene conversion of the mitochondrial rpoC2 pseudogene in Asclepias by the plastid gene, which reflects continued interaction of these genomes. PMID:24029811

  4. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis1

    PubMed Central

    Pesaresi, Paolo; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes. PMID:26823545

  5. GUN1 Controls Accumulation of the Plastid Ribosomal Protein S1 at the Protein Level and Interacts with Proteins Involved in Plastid Protein Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tadini, Luca; Pesaresi, Paolo; Kleine, Tatjana; Rossi, Fabio; Guljamow, Arthur; Sommer, Frederik; Mühlhaus, Timo; Schroda, Michael; Masiero, Simona; Pribil, Mathias; Rothbart, Maxi; Hedtke, Boris; Grimm, Bernhard; Leister, Dario

    2016-03-01

    Developmental or metabolic changes in chloroplasts can have profound effects on the rest of the plant cell. Such intracellular responses are associated with signals that originate in chloroplasts and convey information on their physiological status to the nucleus, which leads to large-scale changes in gene expression (retrograde signaling). A screen designed to identify components of retrograde signaling resulted in the discovery of the so-called genomes uncoupled (gun) mutants. Genetic evidence suggests that the chloroplast protein GUN1 integrates signals derived from perturbations in plastid redox state, plastid gene expression, and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TPB) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings, exerting biogenic control of chloroplast functions. However, the molecular mechanism by which GUN1 integrates retrograde signaling in the chloroplast is unclear. Here we show that GUN1 also operates in adult plants, contributing to operational control of chloroplasts. The gun1 mutation genetically interacts with mutations of genes for the chloroplast ribosomal proteins S1 (PRPS1) and L11. Analysis of gun1 prps1 lines indicates that GUN1 controls PRPS1 accumulation at the protein level. The GUN1 protein physically interacts with proteins involved in chloroplast protein homeostasis based on coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments suggest that GUN1 might transiently interact with several TPB enzymes, including Mg-chelatase subunit D (CHLD) and two other TPB enzymes known to activate retrograde signaling. Moreover, the association of PRPS1 and CHLD with protein complexes is modulated by GUN1. These findings allow us to speculate that retrograde signaling might involve GUN1-dependent formation of protein complexes.

  6. Biosynthesis of Sesterterpenes, Head-to-Tail Triterpenes, and Sesquarterpenes in Bacillus clausii: Identification of Multifunctional Enzymes and Analysis of Isoprenoid Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Daijiro; Yamaga, Hiroaki; Murakami, Mizuki; Totsuka, Yusuke; Shinada, Tetsuro; Sato, Tsutomu

    2015-06-15

    We performed functional analysis of recombinant enzymes and analysis of isoprenoid metabolites in Bacillus clausii to gain insights into the biosynthesis of rare terpenoid groups of sesterterpenes, head-to-tail triterpenes, and sesquarterpenes. We have identified an (all-E)-isoprenyl diphosphate synthase (E-IDS) homologue as a trifunctional geranylfarnesyl diphosphate (GFPP)/hexaprenyl diphosphate (HexPP)/heptaprenyl diphosphate (HepPP) synthase. In addition, we have redefined the function of a tetraprenyl-β-curcumene synthase homologue as that of a trifunctional sesterterpene/triterpene/sesquarterpene synthase. This study has revealed that GFPP, HexPP, and HepPP, intermediates of two isoprenoid pathways (acyclic terpenes and menaquinones), are biosynthesized by one trifunctional E-IDS. In addition, GFPP/HexPP and HepPP are the primary substrates for the biosynthesis of acyclic terpenes and menaquinone-7, respectively.

  7. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  8. [Screening of potential antibiotics, inhibitors of the nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis--2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate derivatives].

    PubMed

    Ershov, Iu V; Mazikin, K V; Ostrovskiĭ, D N

    2010-01-01

    The recently discovered nonmevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis is a prospective target in screening of new antibiotics. Because of the absence of the pathway in the animal cells, the specific inhibitors of the pathway will be a new class of antibiotics against many pathogens (which cause, e.g., malaria, tuberculosis, etc), combining high efficiency and low toxicity. Several derivatives of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MEC) were synthesized. 4-Phospho-methyl-D-erythritol-1,2-cyclophosphate, benzyl ether and benzyliden derivative of MEC inhibited the 14C-MEC incorporation into isoprenoids of chromoplasts from red pepper with IC50 of 1.7-5 MM. Some inhibition (about 10%) was also observed with the use of dimethyl ether and isopropyliden derivative of MEC.

  9. The role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV - Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizinga, Bradley J.; Tannenbaum, Eli; Kaplan, Isaac R.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of common sedimentary minerals (illite, Na-montmorillonite, or calcite) under different water concentrations on the generation and release of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and select alkenes from oil-prone kerogens was investigated. Matrices containing Green River Formation kerogen or Monterey Formation kerogen, alone or in the presence of minerals, were heated at 200 or 300 C for periods of up to 1000 hours, and the pyrolysis products were analyzed. The influence of the first two clay minerals was found to be critically dependent on the water content. Under the dry pyrolysis conditions, both minerals significantly reduced alkene formation; the C12+ n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids were mostly destroyed by montmorillonite, but underwent only minor alteration with illite. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water of 2/1), the effects of both minerals were substantially reduced. Calcite had no significant effect on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons.

  10. Novel filaments 5 nm in diameter constitute the cytosolic ring of the plastid division apparatus.

    PubMed

    Miyagishima, S; Takahara, M; Kuroiwa, T

    2001-03-01

    The plastid division apparatus (called the plastid-dividing ring) has been detected in several plant and algal species at the constricted region of plastids by transmission electron microscopy. The apparatus is composed of two or three rings: an outer ring in the cytosol, an inner ring in the stroma, and a middle ring in the intermembrane space. The components of these rings are not clear. FtsZ, which forms the bacterial cytokinetic ring, has been proposed as a component of both the inner and outer rings. Here, we present the ultrastructure of the outer ring at high resolution. To visualize the outer ring by negative staining, we isolated dividing chloroplasts from a synchronized culture of a red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, and lysed them with nonionic detergent Nonidet P-40. Nonidet P-40 extracted primarily stroma, thylakoids, and the inner and middle rings, leaving the envelope and outer ring largely intact. Negative staining revealed that the outer ring consists of a bundle of 5-nm filaments in which globular proteins are spaced 4.8 nm apart. Immunoblotting using an FtsZ-specific antibody failed to show immunoreactivity in the fraction containing the filament. Moreover, the filament structure and properties are unlike those of known cytoskeletal filaments. The bundle of filaments forms a very rigid structure and does not disassemble in 2 M urea. We also identified a dividing phase-specific 56-kD protein of chloroplasts as a candidate component of the ring. Our results suggest that the main architecture of the outer ring did not descend from cyanobacteria during the course of endosymbiosis but was added by the host cell early in plant evolution.

  11. Massively Convergent Evolution for Ribosomal Protein Gene Content in Plastid and Mitochondrial Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Uwe-G; Zauner, Stefan; Woehle, Christian; Bolte, Kathrin; Hempel, Franziska; Allen, John F.; Martin, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Plastid and mitochondrial genomes have undergone parallel evolution to encode the same functional set of genes. These encode conserved protein components of the electron transport chain in their respective bioenergetic membranes and genes for the ribosomes that express them. This highly convergent aspect of organelle genome evolution is partly explained by the redox regulation hypothesis, which predicts a separate plastid or mitochondrial location for genes encoding bioenergetic membrane proteins of either photosynthesis or respiration. Here we show that convergence in organelle genome evolution is far stronger than previously recognized, because the same set of genes for ribosomal proteins is independently retained by both plastid and mitochondrial genomes. A hitherto unrecognized selective pressure retains genes for the same ribosomal proteins in both organelles. On the Escherichia coli ribosome assembly map, the retained proteins are implicated in 30S and 50S ribosomal subunit assembly and initial rRNA binding. We suggest that ribosomal assembly imposes functional constraints that govern the retention of ribosomal protein coding genes in organelles. These constraints are subordinate to redox regulation for electron transport chain components, which anchor the ribosome to the organelle genome in the first place. As organelle genomes undergo reduction, the rRNAs also become smaller. Below size thresholds of approximately 1,300 nucleotides (16S rRNA) and 2,100 nucleotides (26S rRNA), all ribosomal protein coding genes are lost from organelles, while electron transport chain components remain organelle encoded as long as the organelles use redox chemistry to generate a proton motive force. PMID:24259312

  12. The first complete plastid genomes of Melastomataceae are highly structurally conserved

    PubMed Central

    Neubig, Kurt M.; Majure, Lucas C.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the past three decades, several studies have predominantly relied on a small sample of the plastome to infer deep phylogenetic relationships in the species-rich Melastomataceae. Here, we report the first full plastid sequences of this family, compare general features of the sampled plastomes to other sequenced Myrtales, and survey the plastomes for highly informative regions for phylogenetics. Methods Genome skimming was performed for 16 species spread across the Melastomataceae. Plastomes were assembled, annotated and compared to eight sequenced plastids in the Myrtales. Phylogenetic inference was performed using Maximum Likelihood on six different data sets, where putative biases were taken into account. Summary statistics were generated for all introns and intergenic spacers with suitable size for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and used to rank the markers by phylogenetic information. Results The majority of the plastomes sampled are conserved in gene content and order, as well as in sequence length and GC content within plastid regions and sequence classes. Departures include the putative presence of rps16 and rpl2 pseudogenes in some plastomes. Phylogenetic analyses of the majority of the schemes analyzed resulted in the same topology with high values of bootstrap support. Although there is still uncertainty in some relationships, in the highest supported topologies only two nodes received bootstrap values lower than 95%. Discussion Melastomataceae plastomes are no exception for the general patterns observed in the genomic structure of land plant chloroplasts, being highly conserved and structurally similar to most other Myrtales. Despite the fact that the full plastome phylogeny shares most of the clades with the previously widely used and reduced data set, some changes are still observed and bootstrap support is higher. The plastome data set presented here is a step towards phylogenomic analyses in the Melastomataceae and will be

  13. Resolving ancient radiations: can complete plastid gene sets elucidate deep relationships among the tropical gingers (Zingiberales)?

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Craig F.; Specht, Chelsea D.; Leebens-Mack, Jim; Stevenson, Dennis Wm.; Zomlefer, Wendy B.; Davis, Jerrold I.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Zingiberales comprise a clade of eight tropical monocot families including approx. 2500 species and are hypothesized to have undergone an ancient, rapid radiation during the Cretaceous. Zingiberales display substantial variation in floral morphology, and several members are ecologically and economically important. Deep phylogenetic relationships among primary lineages of Zingiberales have proved difficult to resolve in previous studies, representing a key region of uncertainty in the monocot tree of life. Methods Next-generation sequencing was used to construct complete plastid gene sets for nine taxa of Zingiberales, which were added to five previously sequenced sets in an attempt to resolve deep relationships among families in the order. Variation in taxon sampling, process partition inclusion and partition model parameters were examined to assess their effects on topology and support. Key Results Codon-based likelihood analysis identified a strongly supported clade of ((Cannaceae, Marantaceae), (Costaceae, Zingiberaceae)), sister to (Musaceae, (Lowiaceae, Strelitziaceae)), collectively sister to Heliconiaceae. However, the deepest divergences in this phylogenetic analysis comprised short branches with weak support. Additionally, manipulation of matrices resulted in differing deep topologies in an unpredictable fashion. Alternative topology testing allowed statistical rejection of some of the topologies. Saturation fails to explain observed topological uncertainty and low support at the base of Zingiberales. Evidence for conflict among the plastid data was based on a support metric that accounts for conflicting resampled topologies. Conclusions Many relationships were resolved with robust support, but the paucity of character information supporting the deepest nodes and the existence of conflict suggest that plastid coding regions are insufficient to resolve and support the earliest divergences among families of Zingiberales. Whole plastomes

  14. Redox regulation of a novel plastid-targeted beta-amylase of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sparla, Francesca; Costa, Alex; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Pupillo, Paolo; Trost, Paolo

    2006-07-01

    Nine genes of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) encode for beta-amylase isozymes. Six members of the family are predicted to be extrachloroplastic isozymes and three contain predicted plastid transit peptides. Among the latter, chloroplast-targeted beta-amylase (At4g17090) and thioredoxin-regulated beta-amylase (TR-BAMY; At3g23920; this work) are experimentally demonstrated to be targeted to plastids. Recombinant TR-BAMY was catalytically active only when expressed as a mature protein, i.e. with no transit peptide. Mature TR-BAMY was a monomer of 60 kD, hydrolyzing soluble starch with optimal activity between pH 6.0 and 8.0. The activity of recombinant TR-BAMY was strictly dependent on redox potential with an Em,7.0 of -302 +/- 14 mV. Thioredoxins f1, m1, and y1 of Arabidopsis were all able to mediate the reductive activation of oxidized TR-BAMY. Site-specific mutants showed that TR-BAMY oxidative inhibition depended on the formation of a disulfide bridge between Cys-32 and Cys-470. Consistent with TR-BAMY redox dependency, total beta-amylase activity in Arabidopsis chloroplasts was partially redox regulated and required reducing conditions for full activation. In Arabidopsis, TR-BAMY transcripts were detected in leaves, roots, flowers, pollen, and seeds. TR-BAMY may be the only beta-amylase of nonphotosynthetic plastids suggesting a redox regulation of starch metabolism in these organelles. In leaves, where chloroplast-targeted beta-amylase is involved in physiological degradation of starch in the dark, TR-BAMY is proposed to participate to a redox-regulated pathway of starch degradation under specific stress conditions.

  15. Prokaryotic origins for the mitochondrial alternative oxidase and plastid terminal oxidase nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Patrick M; Umbach, Ann L; Wilce, Jackie A

    2003-12-18

    The mitochondrial alternative oxidase is a diiron carboxylate quinol oxidase (Dox) found in plants and some fungi and protists, but not animals. The plastid terminal oxidase is distantly related to alternative oxidase and is most likely also a Dox protein. Database searches revealed that the alpha-proteobacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans and the cyanobacteria Nostoc sp. PCC7120, Synechococcus sp. WH8102 and Prochlorococcus marinus subsp. pastoris CCMP1378 each possess a Dox homolog. Each prokaryotic protein conforms to the current structural models of the Dox active site and phylogenetic analyses suggest that the eukaryotic Dox genes arose from an ancestral prokaryotic gene.

  16. Plastid Localization of the Key Carotenoid Enzyme Phytoene Synthase Is Altered by Isozyme, Allelic Variation, and Activity[W

    PubMed Central

    Shumskaya, Maria; Bradbury, Louis M.T.; Monaco, Regina R.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2012-01-01

    Plant carotenoids have unique physiological roles related to specific plastid suborganellar locations. Carotenoid metabolic engineering could enhance plant adaptation to climate change and improve food security and nutritional value. However, lack of fundamental knowledge on carotenoid pathway localization limits targeted engineering. Phytoene synthase (PSY), a major rate-controlling carotenoid enzyme, is represented by multiple isozymes residing at unknown plastid sites. In maize (Zea mays), the three isozymes were transiently expressed and found either in plastoglobuli or in stroma and thylakoid membranes. PSY1, with one to two residue modifications of naturally occurring functional variants, exhibited altered localization, associated with distorted plastid shape and formation of a fibril phenotype. Mutating the active site of the enzyme reversed this phenotype. Discovery of differential PSY locations, linked with activity and isozyme type, advances the engineering potential for modifying carotenoid biosynthesis. PMID:23023170

  17. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is localized to both the cytoplasm and plastids in developing pericarp of tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Wang, Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    The intracellular location of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) in developing pericarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) has been investigated by immunolocalization. With the use of a highly specific anti-tomato fruit AGP antibody, the enzyme was localized in cytoplasm as well as plastids at both the light and electron microscope levels. The immunogold particles in plastids were localized in the stroma and at the surface of the starch granule, whereas those in the cytoplasm occurred in cluster-like patterns. Contrary to the fruit, the labeling in tomato leaf cells occurred exclusively in the chloroplasts. These data demonstrate that AGP is localized to both the cytoplasm and plastids in developing pericarp cells of tomato.

  18. Sequencing of whole plastid genomes and nuclear ribosomal DNA of Diospyros species (Ebenaceae) endemic to New Caledonia: many species, little divergence

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Barbara; Paun, Ovidiu; Munzinger, Jérôme; Chase, Mark W.; Samuel, Rosabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Some plant groups, especially on islands, have been shaped by strong ancestral bottlenecks and rapid, recent radiation of phenotypic characters. Single molecular markers are often not informative enough for phylogenetic reconstruction in such plant groups. Whole plastid genomes and nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) are viewed by many researchers as sources of information for phylogenetic reconstruction of groups in which expected levels of divergence in standard markers are low. Here we evaluate the usefulness of these data types to resolve phylogenetic relationships among closely related Diospyros species. Methods Twenty-two closely related Diospyros species from New Caledonia were investigated using whole plastid genomes and nrDNA data from low-coverage next-generation sequencing (NGS). Phylogenetic trees were inferred using maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference on separate plastid and nrDNA and combined matrices. Key Results The plastid and nrDNA sequences were, singly and together, unable to provide well supported phylogenetic relationships among the closely related New Caledonian Diospyros species. In the nrDNA, a 6-fold greater percentage of parsimony-informative characters compared with plastid DNA was found, but the total number of informative sites was greater for the much larger plastid DNA genomes. Combining the plastid and nuclear data improved resolution. Plastid results showed a trend towards geographical clustering of accessions rather than following taxonomic species. Conclusions In plant groups in which multiple plastid markers are not sufficiently informative, an investigation at the level of the entire plastid genome may also not be sufficient for detailed phylogenetic reconstruction. Sequencing of complete plastid genomes and nrDNA repeats seems to clarify some relationships among the New Caledonian Diospyros species, but the higher percentage of parsimony-informative characters in nrDNA compared with

  19. Simultaneous production and partitioning of heterologous polyketide and isoprenoid natural products in an Escherichia coli two-phase bioprocess.

    PubMed

    Boghigian, Brett A; Myint, Melissa; Wu, Jiequn; Pfeifer, Blaine A

    2011-11-01

    Natural products have long served as rich sources of drugs possessing a wide range of pharmacological activities. The discovery and development of natural product drug candidates is often hampered by the inability to efficiently scale and produce a molecule of interest, due to inherent qualities of the native producer. Heterologous biosynthesis in an engineering and process-friendly host emerged as an option to produce complex natural products. Escherichia coli has previously been utilized to produce complex precursors to two popular natural product drugs, erythromycin and paclitaxel. These two molecules represent two of the largest classes of natural products, polyketides and isoprenoids, respectively. In this study, we have developed a platform E. coli strain capable of simultaneous production of both product precursors at titers greater than 15 mg l(-1). The utilization of a two-phase batch bioreactor allowed for very strong in situ separation (having a partitioning coefficient of greater than 5,000), which would facilitate downstream purification processes. The system developed here could also be used in metagenomic studies to screen environmental DNA for natural product discovery and preliminary production experiments.

  20. Mono-, di- and trimethylated homologues of isoprenoid tetraether lipid cores in archaea and environmental samples: mass spectrometric identification and significance.

    PubMed

    Knappy, Chris; Barillà, Daniela; Chong, James; Hodgson, Dominic; Morgan, Hugh; Suleman, Muhammad; Tan, Christine; Yao, Peng; Keely, Brendan

    2015-12-01

    Higher homologues of widely reported C(86) isoprenoid diglycerol tetraether lipid cores, containing 0-6 cyclopentyl rings, have been identified in (hyper)thermophilic archaea, representing up to 21% of total tetraether lipids in the cells. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry confirms that the additional carbon atoms in the C(87-88) homologues are located in the etherified chains. Structures identified include dialkyl and monoalkyl ('H-shaped') tetraethers containing C(40-42) or C(81-82) hydrocarbons, respectively, many representing novel compounds. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis of hydrocarbons released from the lipid cores by ether cleavage suggests that the C(40) chains are biphytanes and the C(41) chains 13-methylbiphytanes. Multiple isomers, having different chain combinations, were recognised among the dialkyl lipids. Methylated tetraethers are produced by Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus in varying proportions depending on growth conditions, suggesting that methylation may be an adaptive mechanism to regulate cellular function. The detection of methylated lipids in Pyrobaculum sp. AQ1.S2 and Sulfolobus acidocaldarius represents the first reported occurrences in Crenarchaeota. Soils and aquatic sediments from geographically distinct mesotemperate environments that were screened for homologues contained monomethylated tetraethers, with di- and trimethylated structures being detected occasionally. The structural diversity and range of occurrences of the C(87-89) tetraethers highlight their potential as complementary biomarkers for archaea in natural environments.

  1. Impact of deep-water derived isoprenoid tetraether lipids on the TEX86 paleothermometry along the portuguese continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jung-Hyun; Villanueva, Laura; Zell, Claudia; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-04-01

    The TEX86 proxy was developed based on isoprenoid glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (isoGDGTs) biosynthesized by Thaumarchaeota and afterwards slightly modified to TEX86-H, a logarithmic function for TEX86. However, it remains uncertain how well this proxy reconstructs annual mean SST, especially due to the water depth influence. We investigated the potential effect of deep-water dwelling Thaumarchaeota in the warm and saline Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) on the distribution of isoGDGTs by analysing suspended particulate matter (SPM) and surface sediments collected along five land-ocean transects along the southern Portuguese continental margin. To this end, we directly compared for the first time the composition of intact polar lipid (IPL)-derived isoGDGTs of SPM with the diversity, abundance, and activity of Thaumarchaeota based on the genetic analysis of the genes coding for the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) and the geranylgeranylglyceryl phosphate (GGGP) synthase involved in the isoGDGT biosynthetic pathway. Our results show that the sedimentary distribution of CL isoGDGTs used in TEX86-H along the Portuguese margin is primarily influenced by water depth due to the increasing contribution of the deep-water population of Thaumarchaeota residing in the MOW.

  2. Effect of Chlamydomonas plastid terminal oxidase 1 expressed in tobacco on photosynthetic electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Feilke, Kathleen; Streb, Peter; Cornic, Gabriel; Perreau, François; Kruk, Jerzy; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The plastid terminal oxidase PTOX is a plastohydroquinone:oxygen oxidoreductase that is important for carotenoid biosynthesis and plastid development. Its role in photosynthesis is controversially discussed. Under a number of abiotic stress conditions, the protein level of PTOX increases. PTOX is thought to act as a safety valve under high light protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against photodamage. However, transformants with high PTOX level were reported to suffer from photoinhibition. To analyze the effect of PTOX on the photosynthetic electron transport, tobacco expressing PTOX-1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr-PTOX1) was studied by chlorophyll fluorescence, thermoluminescence, P700 absorption kinetics and CO2 assimilation. Cr-PTOX1 was shown to compete very efficiently with the photosynthetic electron transport for PQH2 . High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis confirmed that the PQ pool was highly oxidized in the transformant. Immunoblots showed that, in the wild-type, PTOX was associated with the thylakoid membrane only at a relatively alkaline pH value while it was detached from the membrane at neutral pH. We present a model proposing that PTOX associates with the membrane and oxidizes PQH2 only when the oxidation of PQH2 by the cytochrome b6 f complex is limiting forward electron transport due to a high proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane.

  3. Diversification of Rosaceae since the Late Cretaceous based on plastid phylogenomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shu-Dong; Jin, Jian-Jun; Chen, Si-Yun; Chase, Mark W; Soltis, Douglas E; Li, Hong-Tao; Yang, Jun-Bo; Li, De-Zhu; Yi, Ting-Shuang

    2017-02-10

    Phylogenetic relationships in Rosaceae have long been problematic because of frequent hybridisation, apomixis and presumed rapid radiation, and their historical diversification has not been clarified. With 87 genera representing all subfamilies and tribes of Rosaceae and six of the other eight families of Rosales (outgroups), we analysed 130 newly sequenced plastomes together with 12 from GenBank in an attempt to reconstruct deep relationships and reveal temporal diversification of this family. Our results highlight the importance of improving sequence alignment and the use of appropriate substitution models in plastid phylogenomics. Three subfamilies and 16 tribes (as previously delimited) were strongly supported as monophyletic, and their relationships were fully resolved and strongly supported at most nodes. Rosaceae were estimated to have originated during the Late Cretaceous with evidence for rapid diversification events during several geological periods. The major lineages rapidly diversified in warm and wet habits during the Late Cretaceous, and the rapid diversification of genera from the early Oligocene onwards occurred in colder and drier environments. Plastid phylogenomics offers new and important insights into deep phylogenetic relationships and the diversification history of Rosaceae. The robust phylogenetic backbone and time estimates we provide establish a framework for future comparative studies on rosaceous evolution.

  4. Structural changes in plastids of developing Splachnum ampullaceum sporophytes and relationship to odour production

    PubMed Central

    McCuaig, B.; Dufour, S. C.; Raguso, R. A.; Bhatt, A. P.; Marino, P.

    2014-01-01

    Many mosses of the family Splachnaceae are entomophilous and rely on flies for spore dispersal. Splachnum ampullaceum produces a yellow- or pink-coloured hypophysis that releases volatile compounds, attracting flies to the mature moss. The biosynthetic sources of the visual and aromatic cues within the hypophysis have not been identified, and may be either symbiotic cyanobacteria or chromoplasts that break down lipids into volatile compounds. Here, we used transmission electron microscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to investigate the sources of these attractants, focusing on different tissues and stages of maturation. Microscopy revealed an abundance of plastids within the hypophysis, while no symbiotic bacteria were observed. During plant maturation, plastids differentiated from amyloplasts with large starch granules to photosynthetic chloroplasts and finally to chromoplasts with lipid accumulations. We used GC-MS to identify over 50 volatile organic compounds from mature sporophytes including short-chain oxygenated compounds, unsaturated irregular terpenoids, fatty acid-derived 6- and 8-carbon alcohols and ketones, and the aromatic compounds acetophenone and p-cresol. The hypophysis showed localised production of pungent volatiles, mainly short-chain fermentation compounds and p-cresol. Some of these volatiles have been shown to be produced from lipid oxidase degradation of linolenic acid within chromoplasts. However, other compounds (such as cyclohexanecarboxylic acid esters) may have a microbial origin. Further investigation is necessary to identify the origin of fly attractants in these mosses. PMID:25213550

  5. Phylogenetic relationships in subfamily Tillandsioideae (Bromeliaceae) based on DNA sequence data from seven plastid regions.

    PubMed

    Barfuss, Michael H J; Samuel, Rosabelle; Till, Walter; Stuessy, Tod F

    2005-02-01

    Molecular phylogenetic studies of seven plastid DNA regions were used to resolve circumscriptions at generic and infrageneric levels in subfamily Tillandsioideae of Bromeliaceae. One hundred and ten tillandsioid samples were analyzed, encompassing 10 genera, 104 species, and two cultivars. Two species of Bromelioideae, eight species of the polymorphic Pitcairnioideae, and two species of Rapateaceae were selected as outgroups. Parsimony analysis was based on sequence variation of five noncoding (partial 5' and 3' trnK intron, rps16 intron, trnL intron, trnL-trnF intergenic spacer, atpB-rbcL intergenic spacer) and two coding plastid regions (rbcL and matK). Phylogenetic analyses of individual regions produced congruent, but mostly weakly supported or unresolved clades. Results of the combined data set, however, clearly show that subfamily Tillandsioideae is monophyletic. The earliest divergence separates a lineage comprised of Glomeropitcairnia and Catopsis from the "core" tillandsioids. In their present circumscriptions, genera Vriesea and Tillandsia, and their subgenera or sections, as well as Guzmania and Mezobromelia, are poly- and/or paraphyletic. Genera Alcantarea, Werauhia, Racinaea, and Viridantha appear monophyletic, but separation of these from Vriesea and Tillandsia makes the remainder paraphyletic. Nevertheless, Tillandsioideae separates into four main clades, which are proposed as tribes, viz., Catopsideae, Glomeropitcairnieae, Vrieseeae, and Tillandsieae.

  6. Intra-plastid protein trafficking: how plant cells adapted prokaryotic mechanisms to the eukaryotic condition.

    PubMed

    Celedon, Jose M; Cline, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Protein trafficking and localization in plastids involve a complex interplay between ancient (prokaryotic) and novel (eukaryotic) translocases and targeting machineries. During evolution, ancient systems acquired new functions and novel translocation machineries were developed to facilitate the correct localization of nuclear encoded proteins targeted to the chloroplast. Because of its post-translational nature, targeting and integration of membrane proteins posed the biggest challenge to the organelle to avoid aggregation in the aqueous compartments. Soluble proteins faced a different kind of problem since some had to be transported across three membranes to reach their destination. Early studies suggested that chloroplasts addressed these issues by adapting ancient-prokaryotic machineries and integrating them with novel-eukaryotic systems, a process called 'conservative sorting'. In the last decade, detailed biochemical, genetic, and structural studies have unraveled the mechanisms of protein targeting and localization in chloroplasts, suggesting a highly integrated scheme where ancient and novel systems collaborate at different stages of the process. In this review we focus on the differences and similarities between chloroplast ancestral translocases and their prokaryotic relatives to highlight known modifications that adapted them to the eukaryotic situation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids.

  7. Phylogenetic Relationships and Species Delimitation in Pinus Section Trifoliae Inferrred from Plastid DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-León, Sergio; Gernandt, David S.; Pérez de la Rosa, Jorge A.; Jardón-Barbolla, Lev

    2013-01-01

    Recent diversification followed by secondary contact and hybridization may explain complex patterns of intra- and interspecific morphological and genetic variation in the North American hard pines (Pinus section Trifoliae), a group of approximately 49 tree species distributed in North and Central America and the Caribbean islands. We concatenated five plastid DNA markers for an average of 3.9 individuals per putative species and assessed the suitability of the five regions as DNA bar codes for species identification, species delimitation, and phylogenetic reconstruction. The ycf1 gene accounted for the greatest proportion of the alignment (46.9%), the greatest proportion of variable sites (74.9%), and the most unique sequences (75 haplotypes). Phylogenetic analysis recovered clades corresponding to subsections Australes, Contortae, and Ponderosae. Sequences for 23 of the 49 species were monophyletic and sequences for another 9 species were paraphyletic. Morphologically similar species within subsections usually grouped together, but there were exceptions consistent with incomplete lineage sorting or introgression. Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses indicated that all three subsections diversified relatively recently during the Miocene. The general mixed Yule-coalescent method gave a mixed model estimate of only 22 or 23 evolutionary entities for the plastid sequences, which corresponds to less than half the 49 species recognized based on morphological species assignments. Including more unique haplotypes per species may result in higher estimates, but low mutation rates, recent diversification, and large effective population sizes may limit the effectiveness of this method to detect evolutionary entities. PMID:23936218

  8. History of plastid DNA insertions reveals weak deletion and at mutation biases in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Daniel B; Wu, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-21

    Angiosperm mitochondrial genomes exhibit many unusual properties, including heterogeneous nucleotide composition and exceptionally large and variable genome sizes. Determining the role of nonadaptive mechanisms such as mutation bias in shaping the molecular evolution of these unique genomes has proven challenging because their dynamic structures generally prevent identification of homologous intergenic sequences for comparative analyses. Here, we report an analysis of angiosperm mitochondrial DNA sequences that are derived from inserted plastid DNA (mtpts). The availability of numerous completely sequenced plastid genomes allows us to infer the evolutionary history of these insertions, including the specific nucleotide substitutions and indels that have occurred because their incorporation into the mitochondrial genome. Our analysis confirmed that many mtpts have a complex history, including frequent gene conversion and multiple examples of horizontal transfer between divergent angiosperm lineages. Nevertheless, it is clear that the majority of extant mtpt sequence in angiosperms is the product of recent transfer (or gene conversion) and is subject to rapid loss/deterioration, suggesting that most mtpts are evolving relatively free from functional constraint. The evolution of mtpt sequences reveals a pattern of biased mutational input in angiosperm mitochondrial genomes, including an excess of small deletions over insertions and a skew toward nucleotide substitutions that increase AT content. However, these mutation biases are far weaker than have been observed in many other cellular genomes, providing insight into some of the notable features of angiosperm mitochondrial architecture, including the retention of large intergenic regions and the relatively neutral GC content found in these regions.

  9. Phylogenetic relationships and species delimitation in pinus section trifoliae inferrred from plastid DNA.

    PubMed

    Hernández-León, Sergio; Gernandt, David S; Pérez de la Rosa, Jorge A; Jardón-Barbolla, Lev

    2013-01-01

    Recent diversification followed by secondary contact and hybridization may explain complex patterns of intra- and interspecific morphological and genetic variation in the North American hard pines (Pinus section Trifoliae), a group of approximately 49 tree species distributed in North and Central America and the Caribbean islands. We concatenated five plastid DNA markers for an average of 3.9 individuals per putative species and assessed the suitability of the five regions as DNA bar codes for species identification, species delimitation, and phylogenetic reconstruction. The ycf1 gene accounted for the greatest proportion of the alignment (46.9%), the greatest proportion of variable sites (74.9%), and the most unique sequences (75 haplotypes). Phylogenetic analysis recovered clades corresponding to subsections Australes, Contortae, and Ponderosae. Sequences for 23 of the 49 species were monophyletic and sequences for another 9 species were paraphyletic. Morphologically similar species within subsections usually grouped together, but there were exceptions consistent with incomplete lineage sorting or introgression. Bayesian relaxed molecular clock analyses indicated that all three subsections diversified relatively recently during the Miocene. The general mixed Yule-coalescent method gave a mixed model estimate of only 22 or 23 evolutionary entities for the plastid sequences, which corresponds to less than half the 49 species recognized based on morphological species assignments. Including more unique haplotypes per species may result in higher estimates, but low mutation rates, recent diversification, and large effective population sizes may limit the effectiveness of this method to detect evolutionary entities.

  10. Using plastid genome-scale data to resolve enigmatic relationships among basal angiosperms

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Michael J.; Bell, Charles D.; Soltis, Pamela S.; Soltis, Douglas E.

    2007-01-01

    Although great progress has been made in clarifying deep-level angiosperm relationships, several early nodes in the angiosperm branch of the Tree of Life have proved difficult to resolve. Perhaps the last great question remaining in basal angiosperm phylogeny involves the branching order among the five major clades of mesangiosperms (Ceratophyllum, Chloranthaceae, eudicots, magnoliids, and monocots). Previous analyses have found no consistent support for relationships among these clades. In an effort to resolve these relationships, we performed phylogenetic analyses of 61 plastid genes (≈42,000 bp) for 45 taxa, including members of all major basal angiosperm lineages. We also report the complete plastid genome sequence of Ceratophyllum demersum. Parsimony analyses of combined and partitioned data sets varied in the placement of several taxa, particularly Ceratophyllum, whereas maximum-likelihood (ML) trees were more topologically stable. Total evidence ML analyses recovered a clade of Chloranthaceae + magnoliids as sister to a well supported clade of monocots + (Ceratophyllum + eudicots). ML bootstrap and Bayesian support values for these relationships were generally high, although approximately unbiased topology tests could not reject several alternative topologies. The extremely short branches separating these five lineages imply a rapid diversification estimated to have occurred between 143.8 ± 4.8 and 140.3 ± 4.8 Mya. PMID:18048334

  11. Analysis of curated and predicted plastid subproteomes of Arabidopsis. Subcellular compartmentalization leads to distinctive proteome properties.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi; Emanuelsson, Olof; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2004-06-01

    Carefully curated proteomes of the inner envelope membrane, the thylakoid membrane, and the thylakoid lumen of chloroplasts from Arabidopsis were assembled based on published, well-documented localizations. These curated proteomes were evaluated for distribution of physical-chemical parameters, with the goal of extracting parameters for improved subcellular prediction and subsequent identification of additional (low abundant) components of each membrane system. The assembly of rigorously curated subcellular proteomes is in itself also important as a parts list for plant and systems biology. Transmembrane and subcellular prediction strategies were evaluated using the curated data sets. The three curated proteomes differ strongly in average isoelectric point and protein size, as well as transmembrane distribution. Removal of the cleavable, N-terminal transit peptide sequences greatly affected isoelectric point and size distribution. Unexpectedly, the Cys content was much lower for the thylakoid proteomes than for the inner envelope. This likely relates to the role of the thylakoid membrane in light-driven electron transport and helps to avoid unwanted oxidation-reduction reactions. A rule of thumb for discriminating between the predicted integral inner envelope membrane and integral thylakoid membrane proteins is suggested. Using a combination of predictors and experimentally derived parameters, four plastid subproteomes were predicted from the fully annotated Arabidopsis genome. These predicted subproteomes were analyzed for their properties and compared to the curated proteomes. The sensitivity and accuracy of the prediction strategies are discussed. Data can be extracted from the new plastid proteome database (http://ppdb.tc.cornell.edu).

  12. Plastid sequence evolution: a new pattern of nucleotide substitutions in the Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Decker-Walters, Deena S; Chung, Sang-Min; Staub, Jack E

    2004-05-01

    Nucleotide substitutions (i.e., point mutations) are the primary driving force in generating DNA variation upon which selection can act. Substitutions called transitions, which entail exchanges between purines (A = adenine, G = guanine) or pyrimidines (C = cytosine, T = thymine), typically outnumber transversions (e.g., exchanges between a purine and a pyrimidine) in a DNA strand. With an increasing number of plant studies revealing a transversion rather than transition bias, we chose to perform a detailed substitution analysis for the plant family Cucurbitaceae using data from several short plastid DNA sequences. We generated a phylogenetic tree for 19 taxa of the tribe Benincaseae and related genera and then scored conservative substitution changes (e.g., those not exhibiting homoplasy or reversals) from the unambiguous branches of the tree. Neither the transition nor (A+T)/(G+C) biases found in previous studies were supported by our overall data. More importantly, we found a novel and symmetrical substitution bias in which Gs had been preferentially replaced by A, As by C, Cs by T, and Ts by G, resulting in the G-->A-->C-->T-->G substitution series. Understanding this pattern will lead to new hypotheses concerning plastid evolution, which in turn will affect the choices of substitution models and other tree-building algorithms for phylogenetic analyses based on nucleotide data.

  13. The First Complete Plastid Genome from Joinvilleaceae (J. ascendens; Poales) Shows Unique and Unpredicted Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sean V.; Swingley, Wesley D.; Duvall, Melvin R.

    2016-01-01

    Joinvilleaceae is a family of tropical grass-like monocots that comprises only the genus Joinvillea. Previous studies have placed Joinvilleaceae in close phylogenetic proximity to the well-studied grass family. A full plastome sequence was determined and characterized for J. ascendens. The plastome was sequenced with next generation methods, fully assembled de novo and annotated. The assembly revealed two novel inversions specific to the Joinvilleaceae lineage and at least one novel plastid inversion in the Joinvilleaceae-Poaceae lineage. Two previously documented inversions in the Joinvilleaceae-Poaceae lineage and one previously documented inversion in the Poaceae lineage were also verified. Inversion events were identified visually and verified computationally by simulation mutations. Additionally, the loss and subsequent degradation of the accD gene in order Poales was explored extensively in Poaceae and J. ascendens. The two novel inversions along with changes in gene composition between families better delimited lineages in the Poales. The presence of large inversions and subsequent reversals in this small family suggested a high potential for large-scale rearrangements to occur in plastid genomes. PMID:27658044

  14. Expression of bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) synthesis genes in hairy roots of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Menzel, G; Harloff, H-J; Jung, C

    2003-01-01

    Three genes from Ralstonia eutropha necessary for poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) synthesis were introduced into the hairy roots of sugar beet. Transformation of a vector construct harbouring the PHB genes, each fused to the coding region of the pea ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase plastid targeting sequence, resulted in 20 transgenic hairy-root clones, producing up to 55 mg high molecular PHB/g dry weight, as identified by gas chromatography, gel permeation chromatography and HPLC. Accumulation of PHB polymer in sugar beet root leucoplasts was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Thus, for the first time, plastidic PHB production was demonstrated for roots of a carbohydrate-storing crop plant.

  15. Comparison of phosphate uptake rates by the smallest plastidic and aplastidic protists in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Manuela; Grob, Carolina; Scanlan, David J; Martin, Adrian P; Burkill, Peter H; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2011-11-01

    The smallest phototrophic protists (<3 μm) are important primary producers in oligotrophic subtropical gyres - the Earth's largest ecosystems. In order to elucidate how these protists meet their inorganic nutrient requirements, we compared the phosphate uptake rates of plastidic and aplastidic protists in the phosphate-depleted subtropical and tropical North Atlantic (4-29°N) using a combination of radiotracers and flow cytometric sorting on two Atlantic Meridional Transect cruises. Plastidic protists were divided into two groups according to their size (<2 and 2-3 μm). Both groups of plastidic protists showed higher phosphate uptake rates per cell than the aplastidic protists. Although the phosphate uptake rates of protist cells were on average seven times (P<0.001) higher than those of bacterioplankton, the biomass-specific phosphate uptake rates of protists were one fourth to one twentieth of an average bacterioplankton cell. The unsustainably low biomass-specific phosphate uptake by both plastidic and aplastidic protists suggests the existence of a common alternative means of phosphorus acquisition - predation on phosphorus-rich bacterioplankton cells.

  16. Synonymous Codon Usage Bias in the Plastid Genome is Unrelated to Gene Structure and Shows Evolutionary Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yueying; Xu, Wenjing; Xing, Tian; Zhao, Mingming; Li, Nana; Yan, Li; Xia, Guangmin; Wang, Mengcheng

    2015-01-01

    Synonymous codon usage bias (SCUB) is the nonuniform usage of codons, occurring often in nearly all organisms. Our previous study found that SCUB is correlated with intron number, is unequal among exons in the plant nuclear genome, and mirrors evolutionary specialization. However, whether this rule exists in the plastid genome has not been addressed. Here, we present an analysis of SCUB in the plastid genomes of 25 species from lower to higher plants (algae, bryophytes, pteridophytes, gymnosperms, and spermatophytes). We found NNA and NNT (A- and T-ending codons) are preferential in the plastid genomes of all plants. Interestingly, this preference is heterogeneous among taxonomies of plants, with the strongest preference in bryophytes and the weakest in pteridophytes, suggesting an association between SCUB and plant evolution. In addition, SCUB frequencies are consistent among genes with varied introns and among exons, indicating that the bias of NNA and NNT is unrelated to either intron number or exon position. Further, SCUB is associated with DNA methylation–induced conversion of cytosine to thymine in the vascular plants but not in algae or bryophytes. These data demonstrate that these SCUB profiles in the plastid genome are distinctly different compared with the nuclear genome. PMID:25922569

  17. Ubiquitin-Proteasome Dependent Regulation of the GOLDEN2-LIKE 1 Transcription Factor in Response to Plastid Signals1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Tokumaru, Mitsuaki; Adachi, Fumi; Toda, Makoto; Yazu, Fumiko; Hirosawa, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GOLDEN2-LIKE (GLK) transcription factors promote chloroplast biogenesis by regulating the expression of photosynthesis-related genes. Arabidopsis GLK1 is also known to participate in retrograde signaling from chloroplasts to the nucleus. To elucidate the mechanism by which GLK1 is regulated in response to plastid signals, we biochemically characterized Arabidopsis GLK1 protein. Expression analysis of GLK1 protein indicated that GLK1 accumulates in aerial tissues. Both tissue-specific and Suc-dependent accumulation of GLK1 were regulated primarily at the transcriptional level. In contrast, norflurazon- or lincomycin-treated gun1-101 mutant expressing normal levels of GLK1 mRNA failed to accumulate GLK1 protein, suggesting that plastid signals directly regulate the accumulation of GLK1 protein in a GUN1-independent manner. Treatment of the glk1glk2 mutant expressing functional GFP-GLK1 with a proteasome inhibitor, MG-132, induced the accumulation of polyubiquitinated GFP-GLK1. Furthermore, the level of endogenous GLK1 in plants with damaged plastids was partially restored when those plants were treated with MG-132. Collectively, these data indicate that the ubiquitin-proteasome system participates in the degradation of Arabidopsis GLK1 in response to plastid signals. PMID:27821720

  18. Role of chloroplasts and other plastids in ageing and death of plants and animals: a tale of Vishnu and Shiva.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Wouter G; Yoshimoto, Kohki

    2010-04-01

    Chloroplasts (chlorophyll-containing plastids) and other plastids are found in all plants and many animals. They are crucial to the survival of plants and most of the animals that harbour them. An example of a non-photosynthesizing plastid in animals is the apicoplast in the malaria-causing Plasmodium species, which is required for survival of the parasite. Many animals (such as sea slugs, sponges, reef corals, and clams) consume prey containing chloroplasts, or feed on algae. Some of these incorporate the chloroplasts from their food, or whole algal cells, into their own cells. Other species from these groups place algal cells between their own cells. Reef-building corals often lose their intracellular algae as a result of environmental changes, resulting in coral bleaching and death. The sensitivity of the chloroplast internal membranes to temperature stress is one of the reasons for coral death. Chloroplasts can also be a causal factor in the processes leading to whole-plant death, as the knockout of a gene encoding a chloroplast protein delayed the yellowing that proceeds death in tobacco plants. It is concluded that chloroplasts and other plastids are essential to individual survival in many species, including animals, and that they also play a role in triggering death in some plant and animal species.

  19. Changes in Plastid and Mitochondria Protein Expression in Arabidopsis Thaliana Callus on Board Chinese Spacecraft SZ-8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Zheng, Hui Qiong

    2015-11-01

    Microgravity represents an adverse abiotic environment, which causes rearrangements in cellular organelles and changes in the energy metabolism of cells. Plastids and mitochondria are two subcellular energy organelles that are responsible for major metabolic processes, including photosynthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, ß-oxidation, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. In our previous study performed on board the Chinese spacecraft SZ-8, we evaluated the global changes exerted by microgravity on the proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana cell cultures by comparing the microgravity-exposed samples with the controls either under 1 g centrifugation in space or 1 g ground conditions. Here, we report additional data from this space experiment that highlights the plastid and mitochondria proteins that responded to space flight conditions. We observed that 43 plastidial proteins and 50 mitochondrial proteins changed their abundances under microgravity in space. The major changes in both plastids and mitochondria involved proteins that functions in a suite of redox antioxidant and metabolic pathways. These results suggested that these antioxidant and metabolic changes in plastids and mitochondria could be important components of the adaptive strategy in plants subjected to microgravity in space.

  20. Soybean plastidal omega-3 fatty acid desaturase genes GmFAD7 and GmFAD8: structure and expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomic structure and deduced protein sequence of soybean FAD7 and FAD8 have features similar to higher plant plastidal '-3 desaturases: 8 exons and 7 introns, predicted proteins of 453 amino acid residues containing three conserved histidine motifs, amino terminal chloroplast transit peptides, ...

  1. Evaluation of drug effects on Toxoplasma gondii nuclear and plastid DNA replication using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Zhang, Ming; Hong, Lingxian; Zhou, Kefu; Lin, Yuguang

    2010-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii Nicolle and Manceaux, 1908 is a unicellular protozoan that can infect a broad spectrum of organisms including humans. In addition to a nuclear genome, it also carries a circular DNA within a plastid-like organelle (apicoplast) and a linear genome within its mitochondria. The plastid organelle has been shown to be the target of various anti-parasitic drugs or antibiotics. To evaluate the effects of agents on the DNA replication of T. gondii, we tested six drugs (ciprofloxacin, acetylspiramycin, clindamycin, azithromycin, artemether, and sulfadiazine) on the parasite cultured in Hela cells. After drug treatment for 48 h, the parasite growth and DNA replication were evaluated and quantitated using TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR with oligonucleotide primers synthesized based on a gene from the apicoplast genome (ycf24, Genbank accession no. U87145) and a gene from the nuclear genome (uprt, Genbank accession no. U10246). Our results showed that ciprofloxacin was the most effective in inhibiting the replication of the plastid DNA after 48 h drug treatment, with a reduction of 22% in the copy number of the plastid DNA. Artemether was the most effective drug in suppressing the proliferation of tachyzoites. This study also demonstrates that real-time quantitative PCR is a simple and useful technique for monitoring parasite growth and DNA replication.

  2. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; Baidoo, Edward; Wang, George; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Soon Lee, Taek

    2015-06-01

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulation by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Finally, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.

  3. Metabolic engineering for the high-yield production of isoprenoid-based C5 alcohols in E. coli

    DOE PAGES

    George, Kevin W.; Thompson, Mitchell G.; Kang, Aram; ...

    2015-06-08

    Branched five carbon (C5) alcohols are attractive targets for microbial production due to their desirable fuel properties and importance as platform chemicals. In this study, we engineered a heterologous isoprenoid pathway in E. coli for the high-yield production of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 3-methyl-1-butanol, three C5 alcohols that serve as potential biofuels. We first constructed a pathway for 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol, where metabolite profiling identified NudB, a promiscuous phosphatase, as a likely pathway bottleneck. We achieved a 60% increase in the yield of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol by engineering the Shine-Dalgarno sequence of nudB, which increased protein levels by 9-fold and reduced isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) accumulationmore » by 4-fold. To further optimize the pathway, we adjusted mevalonate kinase (MK) expression and investigated MK enzymes from alternative microbes such as Methanosarcina mazei. Next, we expressed a fusion protein of IPP isomerase and the phosphatase (Idi1~NudB) along with a reductase (NemA) to diversify production to 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol and 3-methyl-1-butanol. Lastly, we used an oleyl alcohol overlay to improve alcohol recovery, achieving final titers of 2.23 g/L of 3-methyl-3-buten-1-ol (~70% of pathway-dependent theoretical yield), 150 mg/L of 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol, and 300 mg/L of 3-methyl-1-butanol.« less

  4. Probing phosphorylation by non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthetic enzymes using (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Ananya; Shah, Meha H; Bitok, J Kipchirchir; Hassis-LeBeau, Maria E; Freel Meyers, Caren L

    2009-09-01

    The biogenesis of isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate (DMAPP) is accomplished by the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants, bacteria and parasites, making it a potential target for the development of anti-infective agents and herbicides. The biosynthetic enzymes comprising this pathway catalyze intriguing chemical transformations on diphosphate scaffolds, offering an opportunity to generate novel analogs in this synthetically challenging compound class. Such a biosynthetic approach to generating new diphosphate analogs may involve transformation through discrete diphosphate species, presenting unique challenges in structure determination and characterization of unnatural enzyme-generated diphosphate products produced in tandem. We have developed (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation NMR spectroscopy techniques for the direct characterization of crude MEP pathway enzyme products at low concentrations (200 microM to 5 mM) on a room temperature (non-cryogenic) NMR probe. Coupling the 100% natural abundance of the (31)P nucleus with the high intrinsic sensitivity of proton NMR, (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy is particularly useful for characterization of unnatural diphosphate enzyme products in the MEP pathway. As proof of principle, we demonstrate the rapid characterization of natural enzyme products of the enzymes IspD, E and F in tandem enzyme incubations. In addition, we have characterized several unnatural enzyme products using this technique, including new products of cytidyltransferase IspD bearing erythritol, glycerol and ribose components. The results of this study indicate that IspD may be a useful biocatalyst and highlight (1)H-(31)P-(31)P correlation spectroscopy as a valuable tool for the characterization of other unnatural products in non-mammalian isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  5. Fast detection of leaf pigments and isoprenoids for ecophysiological studies, plant phenotyping and validating remote-sensing of vegetation.

    PubMed

    Junker, Laura V; Ensminger, Ingo

    2016-12-01

    Rapid developments in remote-sensing of vegetation and high-throughput precision plant phenotyping promise a range of real-life applications using leaf optical properties for non-destructive assessment of plant performance. Use of leaf optical properties for assessing plant performance requires the ability to use photosynthetic pigments as proxies for physiological properties and the ability to detect these pigments fast, reliably and at low cost. We describe a simple and cost-effective protocol for the rapid analysis of chlorophylls, carotenoids and tocopherols using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Many existing methods are based on the expensive solvent acetonitrile, take a long time or do not include lutein epoxide and α-carotene. We aimed to develop an HPLC method which separates all major chlorophylls and carotenoids as well as lutein epoxide, α-carotene and α-tocopherol. Using a C30 -column and a mobile phase with a gradient of methanol, methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) and water, our method separates the above pigments and isoprenoids within 28 min. The broad applicability of our method is demonstrated using samples from various plant species and tissue types, e.g. leaves of Arabidopsis and avocado plants, several deciduous and conifer tree species, various crops, stems of parasitic dodder, fruit of tomato, roots of carrots and Chlorella algae. In comparison to previous methods, our method is very affordable, fast and versatile and can be used to analyze all major photosynthetic pigments that contribute to changes in leaf optical properties and which are of interest in most ecophysiological studies.

  6. Divergent Isoprenoid Biosynthesis Pathways in Staphylococcus Species Constitute a Drug Target for Treating Infections in Companion Animals

    PubMed Central

    Cain, Christine L.; Morris, Daniel O.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus species are a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections in humans and animals, and the antibiotics used to treat these infections are often the same. Methicillin- and multidrug-resistant staphylococcal infections are becoming more common in human and veterinary medicine. From a “One Health” perspective, this overlap in antibiotic use and resistance raises concerns over the potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative genomics analysis revealed that Staphylococcus species use divergent pathways to synthesize isoprenoids. Species frequently associated with skin and soft tissue infections in companion animals, including S. schleiferi and S. pseudintermedius, use the nonmevalonate pathway. In contrast, S. aureus, S. epidermidis, and S. lugdunensis use the mevalonate pathway. The antibiotic fosmidomycin, an inhibitor of the nonmevalonate pathway, was effective in killing canine clinical staphylococcal isolates but had no effect on the growth or survival of S. aureus and S. epidermidis. These data identify an essential metabolic pathway in Staphylococcus that differs among members of this genus and suggest that drugs such as fosmidomycin, which targets enzymes in the nonmevalonate pathway, may be an effective treatment for certain staphylococcal infections. IMPORTANCE Drug-resistant Staphylococcus species are a major concern in human and veterinary medicine. There is a need for new antibiotics that exhibit a selective effect in treating infections in companion and livestock animals and that would not be used to treat human bacterial infections. We have identified fosmidomycin as an antibiotic that selectively targets certain Staphylococcus species that are often encountered in skin infections in cats and dogs. These findings expand our understanding of Staphylococcus evolution and may have direct implications for treating staphylococcal infections in veterinary medicine. PMID:27704053

  7. A novel type of light-harvesting antenna protein of red algal origin in algae with secondary plastids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Light, the driving force of photosynthesis, can be harmful when present in excess; therefore, any light harvesting system requires photoprotection. Members of the extended light-harvesting complex (LHC) protein superfamily are involved in light harvesting as well as in photoprotection and are found in the red and green plant lineages, with a complex distribution pattern of subfamilies in the different algal lineages. Results Here, we demonstrate that the recently discovered “red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like proteins” (RedCAPs) form a monophyletic family within this protein superfamily. The occurrence of RedCAPs was found to be restricted to the red algal lineage, including red algae (with primary plastids) as well as cryptophytes, haptophytes and heterokontophytes (with secondary plastids of red algal origin). Expression of a full-length RedCAP:GFP fusion construct in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum confirmed the predicted plastid localisation of RedCAPs. Furthermore, we observed that similarly to the fucoxanthin chlorophyll a/c-binding light-harvesting antenna proteins also RedCAP transcripts in diatoms were regulated in a diurnal way at standard light conditions and strongly repressed at high light intensities. Conclusions The absence of RedCAPs from the green lineage implies that RedCAPs evolved in the red lineage after separation from the the green lineage. During the evolution of secondary plastids, RedCAP genes therefore must have been transferred from the nucleus of the endocytobiotic alga to the nucleus of the host cell, a process that involved complementation with pre-sequences allowing import of the gene product into the secondary plastid bound by four membranes. Based on light-dependent transcription and on localisation data, we propose that RedCAPs might participate in the light (intensity and quality)-dependent structural or functional reorganisation of the light-harvesting antennae of the photosystems upon dark to light

  8. Subcellular immunocytochemical analysis detects the highest concentrations of glutathione in mitochondria and not in plastids.

    PubMed

    Zechmann, B; Mauch, F; Sticher, L; Müller, M

    2008-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant and redox buffer with multiple roles in plant metabolism. Glutathione biosynthesis is restricted to the cytosol and the plastids and the product is distributed to the various organelles by unknown mechanisms. In the present study immunogold cytochemistry based on anti-glutathione antisera and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the relative concentration of glutathione in different organelles of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root cells. Glutathione-specific labelling was detected in all cellular compartments except the apoplast and the vacuole. The highest glutathione content was surprisingly not found in plastids, which have been described before as a major site of glutathione accumulation, but in mitochondria which lack the capacity for glutathione biosynthesis. Mitochondria of both leaf and root cells contained 7-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher glutathione levels than plastids while the density of glutathione labelling in the cytosol, nuclei, and peroxisomes was intermediate. The accuracy of the glutathione labelling is supported by two observations. First, pre-adsorption of the anti-glutathione antisera with glutathione reduced the density of the gold particles in all organelles to background levels. Second, the overall glutathione-labelling density was reduced by about 90% in leaves of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis mutant pad2-1 and increased in transgenic plants with enhanced glutathione accumulation. Hence, there was a strong correlation between immunocytochemical and biochemical data of glutathione accumulation. Interestingly, the glutathione labelling of mitochondria in pad2-1 remained very similar to wild-type plants thus suggesting that the high mitochondrial glutathione content is maintained in a situation of permanent glutathione-deficiency at the expense of other glutathione pools. High and constant levels of glutathione in mitochondria appear to be particularly

  9. Subcellular immunocytochemical analysis detects the highest concentrations of glutathione in mitochondria and not in plastids

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, B.; Mauch, F.; Sticher, L.; Müller, M.

    2008-01-01

    The tripeptide glutathione is a major antioxidant and redox buffer with multiple roles in plant metabolism. Glutathione biosynthesis is restricted to the cytosol and the plastids and the product is distributed to the various organelles by unknown mechanisms. In the present study immunogold cytochemistry based on anti-glutathione antisera and transmission electron microscopy was used to determine the relative concentration of glutathione in different organelles of Arabidopsis thaliana leaf and root cells. Glutathione-specific labelling was detected in all cellular compartments except the apoplast and the vacuole. The highest glutathione content was surprisingly not found in plastids, which have been described before as a major site of glutathione accumulation, but in mitochondria which lack the capacity for glutathione biosynthesis. Mitochondria of both leaf and root cells contained 7-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher glutathione levels than plastids while the density of glutathione labelling in the cytosol, nuclei, and peroxisomes was intermediate. The accuracy of the glutathione labelling is supported by two observations. First, pre-adsorption of the anti-glutathione antisera with glutathione reduced the density of the gold particles in all organelles to background levels. Second, the overall glutathione-labelling density was reduced by about 90% in leaves of the glutathione-deficient Arabidopsis mutant pad2-1 and increased in transgenic plants with enhanced glutathione accumulation. Hence, there was a strong correlation between immunocytochemical and biochemical data of glutathione accumulation. Interestingly, the glutathione labelling of mitochondria in pad2-1 remained very similar to wild-type plants thus suggesting that the high mitochondrial glutathione content is maintained in a situation of permanent glutathione-deficiency at the expense of other glutathione pools. High and constant levels of glutathione in mitochondria appear to be particularly

  10. Complete Plastid Genome of the Recent Holoparasite Lathraea squamaria Reveals Earliest Stages of Plastome Reduction in Orobanchaceae

    PubMed Central

    Samigullin, Tahir H.; Logacheva, Maria D.; Penin, Aleksey A.; Vallejo-Roman, Carmen M.

    2016-01-01

    Plants from the family Orobanchaceae are widely used as a model to study different aspects of parasitic lifestyle including host–parasite interactions and physiological and genomic adaptations. Among the latter, the most prominent are those that occurred due to the loss of photosynthesis; they include the reduction of the photosynthesis-related gene set in both nuclear and plastid genomes. In Orobanchaceae, the transition to non-photosynthetic lifestyle occurred several times independently, but only one lineage has been in the focus of evolutionary studies. These studies included analysis of plastid genomes and transcriptomes and allowed the inference of patterns and mechanisms of genome reduction that are thought to be general for parasitic plants. Here we report the plastid genome of Lathraea squamaria, a holoparasitic plant from Orobanchaceae, clade Rhinantheae. We found that in this plant the degree of plastome reduction is the least among non-photosynthetic plants. Like other parasites, Lathraea possess a plastome with elevated absolute rate of nucleotide substitution. The only gene lost is petL, all other genes typical for the plastid genome are present, but some of them–those encoding photosystem components (22 genes), cytochrome b6/f complex proteins (4 genes), plastid-encoded RNA polymerase subunits (2 genes), ribosomal proteins (2 genes), ccsA and cemA–are pseudogenized. Genes for cytochrome b6/f complex and photosystems I and II that do not carry nonsense or frameshift mutations have an increased ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, indicating the relaxation of purifying selection. Our divergence time estimates showed that transition to holoparasitism in Lathraea lineage occurred relatively recently, whereas the holoparasitic lineage Orobancheae is about two times older. PMID:26934745

  11. Complete Plastid Genome of the Recent Holoparasite Lathraea squamaria Reveals Earliest Stages of Plastome Reduction in Orobanchaceae.

    PubMed

    Samigullin, Tahir H; Logacheva, Maria D; Penin, Aleksey A; Vallejo-Roman, Carmen M

    2016-01-01

    Plants from the family Orobanchaceae are widely used as a model to study different aspects of parasitic lifestyle including host-parasite interactions and physiological and genomic adaptations. Among the latter, the most prominent are those that occurred due to the loss of photosynthesis; they include the reduction of the photosynthesis-related gene set in both nuclear and plastid genomes. In Orobanchaceae, the transition to non-photosynthetic lifestyle occurred several times independently, but only one lineage has been in the focus of evolutionary studies. These studies included analysis of plastid genomes and transcriptomes and allowed the inference of patterns and mechanisms of genome reduction that are thought to be general for parasitic plants. Here we report the plastid genome of Lathraea squamaria, a holoparasitic plant from Orobanchaceae, clade Rhinantheae. We found that in this plant the degree of plastome reduction is the least among non-photosynthetic plants. Like other parasites, Lathraea possess a plastome with elevated absolute rate of nucleotide substitution. The only gene lost is petL, all other genes typical for the plastid genome are present, but some of them-those encoding photosystem components (22 genes), cytochrome b6/f complex proteins (4 genes), plastid-encoded RNA polymerase subunits (2 genes), ribosomal proteins (2 genes), ccsA and cemA-are pseudogenized. Genes for cytochrome b6/f complex and photosystems I and II that do not carry nonsense or frameshift mutations have an increased ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates, indicating the relaxation of purifying selection. Our divergence time estimates showed that transition to holoparasitism in Lathraea lineage occurred relatively recently, whereas the holoparasitic lineage Orobancheae is about two times older.

  12. The SUFBC2 D complex is required for the biogenesis of all major classes of plastid Fe-S proteins.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xueyun; Kato, Yukako; Sumida, Akihiro; Tanaka, Ayumi; Tanaka, Ryouichi

    2017-04-01

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) proteins play crucial roles in plastids, participating in photosynthesis and other metabolic pathways. Fe-S clusters are thought to be assembled on a scaffold complex composed of SUFB, SUFC and SUFD proteins. However, several additional proteins provide putative scaffold functions in plastids, and, therefore, the contribution of SUFB, C and D proteins to overall Fe-S assembly still remains unclear. In order to gain insights regarding Fe-S cluster biosynthesis in plastids, we analyzed the complex composed of SUFB, C and D in Arabidopsis by blue native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Using this approach, a major complex of 170 kDa containing all subunits was detected, indicating that these proteins constitute a SUFBC2 D complex similar to their well characterized bacterial counterparts. The functional effects of SUFB, SUFC or SUFD depletion were analyzed using an inducible RNAi silencing system to specifically target the aforementioned components; resulting in a decrease of various plastidic Fe-S proteins including the PsaA/B and PsaC subunits of photosystem I, ferredoxin and glutamine oxoglutarate aminotransferase. In contrast, the knockout of potential Fe-S scaffold proteins, NFU2 and HCF101, resulted in a specific decrease in the PsaA/B and PsaC levels. These results indicate that the functions of SUFB, SUFC and SUFD for Fe-S cluster biosynthesis cannot be replaced by other scaffold proteins and that SUFBC2 D, NFU2 and HCF101 are involved in the same pathway for the biogenesis of PSI. Taken together, our results provide in vivo evidence supporting the hypothesis that SUFBC2 D is the major, and possibly sole scaffold in plastids.

  13. Deciphering the Role of Aspartate and Prephenate Aminotransferase Activities in Plastid Nitrogen Metabolism1[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Fernando; El-Azaz, Jorge; Ávila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M.

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts and plastids of nonphotosynthetic plant cells contain two aspartate (Asp) aminotransferases: a eukaryotic type (Asp5) and a prokaryotic-type bifunctional enzyme displaying Asp and prephenate aminotransferase activities (PAT). We have identified the entire Asp aminotransferase gene family in Nicotiana benthamiana and isolated and cloned the genes encoding the isoenzymes with plastidic localization: NbAsp5 and NbPAT. Using a virus-induced gene silencing approach, we obtained N. benthamiana plants silenced for NbAsp5 and/or NbPAT. Phenotypic and metabolic analyses were conducted in silenced plants to investigate the specific roles of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of essential amino acids within the plastid. The NbAsp5 silenced plants had no changes in phenotype, exhibiting similar levels of free Asp and glutamate as control plants, but contained diminished levels of asparagine and much higher levels of lysine. In contrast, the suppression of NbPAT led to a severe reduction in growth and strong chlorosis symptoms. NbPAT silenced plants exhibited extremely reduced levels of asparagine and were greatly affected in their phenylalanine metabolism and lignin deposition. Furthermore, NbPAT suppression triggered a transcriptional reprogramming in plastid nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, our results indicate that NbPAT has an overlapping role with NbAsp5 in the biosynthesis of Asp and a key role in the production of phenylalanine for the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The analysis of NbAsp5/NbPAT cosilenced plants highlights the central role of both plastidic aminotransferases in nitrogen metabolism; however, only NbPAT is essential for plant growth and development. PMID:24296073

  14. Essential role of conserved DUF177A protein in plastid 23S rRNA accumulation and plant embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiani; Suzuki, Masaharu; McCarty, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    DUF177 proteins are nearly universally conserved in bacteria and plants except the Chlorophyceae algae. Thus far, duf177 mutants in bacteria have not established a function. In contrast, duf177a mutants have embryo lethal phenotypes in maize and Arabidopsis. In maize inbred W22, duf177a mutant embryos arrest at an early transition stage, whereas the block is suppressed in the B73 inbred background, conditioning an albino seedling phenotype. Background-dependent embryo lethal phenotypes are characteristic of maize plastid gene expression mutants. Consistent with the plastid gene expression hypothesis, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a significant reduction of 23S rRNA in an Escherichia coli duf177 knockout. Plastid 23S rRNA contents of duf177a mutant tissues were also markedly reduced compared with the wild-type, whereas plastid 16S, 5S, and 4.5S rRNA contents were less affected, indicating that DUF177 is specifically required for accumulation of prokaryote-type 23S rRNA. An AtDUF177A–green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene controlled by the native AtDUF177A promoter fully complemented the Arabidopsis atduf177a mutant. Transient expression of AtDUF177A–GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that the protein was localized in chloroplasts. The essential role of DUF177A in chloroplast–ribosome formation is reminiscent of IOJAP, another highly conserved ribosome-associated protein, suggesting that key mechanisms controlling ribosome formation in plastids evolved from non-essential pathways for regulation of the prokaryotic ribosome. PMID:27574185

  15. A Guide to Choosing Vectors for Transformation of the Plastid Genome of Higher Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Kerry Ann; Azhagiri, Arun Kumar; Tungsuchat-Huang, Tarinee; Maliga, Pal

    2007-01-01

    Plastid transformation, originally developed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), has recently been extended to a number of crop species enabling in vivo probing of plastid function and biotechnological applications. In this article we report new plastid vectors that enable insertion of transgenes in the inverted repeat region of the plastome between the trnV and 3′rps12 or trnI and trnA genes. Efficient recovery of transplastomic clones is ensured by selection for spectinomycin (aadA) or kanamycin (neo) resistance genes. Expression of marker genes can be verified using commercial antibodies that detect the accumulation of neomycin phosphotranseferase II, the neo gene product, or the C-terminal c-myc tag of aminoglycoside-3″-adenylytransferase, encoded by the aadA gene. Aminoglycoside-3″-adenylytransferase, the spectinomycin inactivating enzyme, is translationally fused with green fluorescent protein in two vectors so that transplastomic clones can be selected by spectinomycin resistance and visually identified by fluorescence in ultraviolet light. The marker genes in the new vectors are flanked by target sites for Cre or Int, the P1 and phiC31 phage site-specific recombinases. When uniform transformation of all plastid genomes is obtained, the marker genes can be excised by Cre or Int expressed from a nuclear gene. Choice of expression signals for the gene of interest, complications caused by the presence of plastid DNA sequences recognized by Cre, and loss of transgenes by homologous recombination via duplicated sequences are also discussed to facilitate a rational choice from among the existing vectors and to aid with new target-specific vector designs. PMID:17965179

  16. Alternative translational initiation of ATP sulfurylase underlying dual localization of sulfate assimilation pathways in plastids and cytosol in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, Anne-Sophie; Yoshimoto, Naoko; Sekiguchi, Ai; Rykulski, Nicholas; Saito, Kazuki; Takahashi, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Plants assimilate inorganic sulfate into sulfur-containing vital metabolites. ATP sulfurylase (ATPS) is the enzyme catalyzing the key entry step of the sulfate assimilation pathway in both plastids and cytosol in plants. Arabidopsis thaliana has four ATPS genes (ATPS1, -2, -3, and -4) encoding ATPS pre-proteins containing N-terminal transit peptide sequences for plastid targeting, however, the genetic identity of the cytosolic ATPS has remained unverified. Here we show that Arabidopsis ATPS2 dually encodes plastidic and cytosolic ATPS isoforms, differentiating their subcellular localizations by initiating translation at AUG(Met1) to produce plastid-targeted ATPS2 pre-proteins or at AUG(Met52) or AUG(Met58) within the transit peptide to have ATPS2 stay in cytosol. Translational initiation of ATPS2 at AUG(Met52) or AUG(Met58) was verified by expressing a tandem-fused synthetic gene, ATPS2 (5'UTR-His12) :Renilla luciferase:ATPS2 (Ile13-Val77) :firefly luciferase, under a single constitutively active CaMV 35S promoter in Arabidopsis protoplasts and examining the activities of two different luciferases translated in-frame with split N-terminal portions of ATPS2. Introducing missense mutations at AUG(Met52) and AUG(Met58) significantly reduced the firefly luciferase activity, while AUG(Met52) was a relatively preferred site for the alternative translational initiation. The activity of luciferase fusion protein starting at AUG(Met52) or AUG(Met58) was not modulated by changes in sulfate conditions. The dual localizations of ATPS2 in plastids and cytosol were further evidenced by expression of ATPS2-GFP fusion proteins in Arabidopsis protoplasts and transgenic lines, while they were also under control of tissue-specific ATPS2 promoter activity found predominantly in leaf epidermal cells, guard cells, vascular tissues and roots.

  17. Molecular phylogenetics of subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA regions, including a new taxonomic arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Azorín, Mario; Crespo, Manuel B.; Juan, Ana; Fay, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxonomic arrangement within subfamily Ornithogaloideae (Hyacinthaceae) has been a matter of controversy in recent decades: several new taxonomic treatments have been proposed, based exclusively on plastid DNA sequences, and these have resulted in classifications which are to a great extent contradictory. Some authors have recognized only a single genus Ornithogalum for the whole subfamily, including 250–300 species of variable morphology, whereas others have recognized many genera. In the latter case, the genera are inevitably much smaller and they are better defined morphologically. However, some are not monophyletic as circumscribed. Methods Phylogenetic analyses of Ornithogaloideae were based on nucleotide sequences of four plastid regions (trnL intron, trnL-F spacer, rbcL and matK) and a nuclear region (ITS). Eighty species covering all relevant taxonomic groups previously recognized in the subfamily were sampled. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses were performed. The molecular data were compared with a matrix of 34 morphological characters. Key Results Combinations of plastid and nuclear data yielded phylogenetic trees which are better resolved than those obtained with any plastid region alone or plastid regions in combination. Three main clades are found, corresponding to the previously recognized tribes Albuceae, Dipcadieae and Ornithogaleae. In these, up to 19 clades are described which are definable by morphology and biogeography. These mostly correspond to previously described taxa, though some need recircumscription. Morphological characters are assessed for their diagnostic value for taxonomy in the subfamily. Conclusions On the basis of the phylogenetic analyses, 19 monophyletic genera are accepted within Ornithogaloideae: Albuca, Avonsera, Battandiera, Cathissa, Coilonox, Dipcadi, Eliokarmos, Elsiea, Ethesia, Galtonia, Honorius, Loncomelos, Melomphis, Neopatersonia, Nicipe, Ornithogalum, Pseudogaltonia, Stellarioides and

  18. ACR11 is an Activator of Plastid-Type Glutamine Synthetase GS2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Osanai, Takashi; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Otsuki, Hitomi; Saito, Kazuki; Yokota Hirai, Masami

    2017-03-06

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is an important enzyme for nitrogen assimilation, and GS2, encoded by GLN2, is the only plastid-type GS in Arabidopsis thaliana. A co-expression analysis suggested that the expression level of the gene encoding a uridylyltransferase-like protein, ACR11, is strongly correlated with GLN2 expression levels. Here we showed that the recombinant ACR11 protein increased GS2 activity in vitro by reducing the Km values of its substrate glutamine. A T-DNA insertion mutant of ACR11 exhibited a reduced GS activity under low nitrate conditions and reduced glutamine levels. Biochemical analyses revealed that ACR11 and GS2 interacted both in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that ACR11 is an activator of GS2, giving it a mechanistic role in the nitrogen assimilation of A. thaliana.

  19. Tree ferns: monophyletic groups and their relationships as revealed by four protein-coding plastid loci.

    PubMed

    Korall, Petra; Pryer, Kathleen M; Metzgar, Jordan S; Schneider, Harald; Conant, David S

    2006-06-01

    Tree ferns are a well-established clade within leptosporangiate ferns. Most of the 600 species (in seven families and 13 genera) are arborescent, but considerable morphological variability exists, spanning the giant scaly tree ferns (Cyatheaceae), the low, erect plants (Plagiogyriaceae), and the diminutive endemics of the Guayana Highlands (Hymenophyllopsidaceae). In this study, we investigate phylogenetic relationships within tree ferns based on analyses of four protein-coding, plastid loci (atpA, atpB, rbcL, and rps4). Our results reveal four well-supported clades, with genera of Dicksoniaceae (sensu ) interspersed among them: (A) (Loxomataceae, (Culcita, Plagiogyriaceae)), (B) (Calochlaena, (Dicksonia, Lophosoriaceae)), (C) Cibotium, and (D) Cyatheaceae, with Hymenophyllopsidaceae nested within. How these four groups are related to one other, to Thyrsopteris, or to Metaxyaceae is weakly supported. Our results show that Dicksoniaceae and Cyatheaceae, as currently recognised, are not monophyletic and new circumscriptions for these families are needed.

  20. The complete plastid genome of Piper kadsura (Piperaceae), an East Asian woody vine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Hyun; Choi, In-Su; Choi, Byoung-Hee; Yang, Sungyu; Choi, Goya

    2016-09-01

    We sequenced the complete plastid genome (plastome) for Piper kadsura, a woody vine endemic to East Asia. This species is part of the largest genus within Piperaceae and its genome is almost identical to its congener P. cenocladum. The plastome for P. kadsura comprises 131 genes, including four unique rRNAs, 30 tRNAs, and 79 protein-coding genes. It retains ycf1 as an intact open reading frame. Our phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the monophyly of the Piper genus. The additional plastome sequence found in this evolutionarily and economically important genus will be a valuable, fundamental tool for future studies of phylogenetic relationships among basal angiosperms, and will provide a useful resource for molecular breeding programs.

  1. Plastid DNA sequencing and nuclear SNP genotyping help resolve the puzzle of central American Platanus

    PubMed Central

    De Castro, Olga; Di Maio, Antonietta; Lozada García, José Armando; Piacenti, Danilo; Vázquez-Torres, Mario; De Luca, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Recent research on the history of Platanus reveals that hybridization phenomena occurred in the central American species. This study has two goals: to help resolve the evolutive puzzle of central American Platanus, and to test the potential of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detecting ancient hybridization. Methods Sequencing of a uniparental plastid DNA marker [psbA-trnH(GUG) intergenic spacer] and qualitative and quantitative single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of biparental nuclear ribosomal DNA (nrDNA) markers [LEAFY intron 2 (LFY-i2) and internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)] were used. Key Results Based on the SNP genotyping results, several Platanus accessions show the presence of hybridization/introgression, including some accessions of P. rzedowskii and of P. mexicana var. interior and one of P. mexicana var. mexicana from Oaxaca (= P. oaxacana). Based on haplotype analyses of the psbA-trnH spacer, five haplotypes were detected. The most common of these is present in taxa belonging to P. orientalis, P. racemosa sensu lato, some accessions of P. occidentalis sensu stricto (s.s.) from Texas, P. occidentalis var. palmeri, P. mexicana s.s. and P. rzedowskii. This is highly relevant to genetic relationships with the haplotypes present in P. occidentalis s.s. and P. mexicana var. interior. Conclusions Hybridization and introgression events between lineages ancestral to modern central and eastern North American Platanus species occurred. Plastid haplotypes and qualitative and quantitative SNP genotyping provide information critical for understanding the complex history of Mexican Platanus. Compared with the usual molecular techniques of sub-cloning, sequencing and genotyping, real-time PCR assay is a quick and sensitive technique for analysing complex evolutionary patterns. PMID:23798602

  2. Dark-induced senescence of barley leaves involves activation of plastid transglutaminases.

    PubMed

    Sobieszczuk-Nowicka, E; Zmienko, A; Samelak-Czajka, A; Łuczak, M; Pietrowska-Borek, M; Iorio, R; Del Duca, S; Figlerowicz, M; Legocka, J

    2015-04-01

    Transglutaminases (E.C. 2.3.2.13) catalyze the post-translational modification of proteins by establishing ε-(γ-glutamyl) lysine isopeptide bonds and by the covalent conjugation of polyamines to endo-glutamyl residues of proteins. In light of the confirmed role of transglutaminases in animal cell apoptosis and only limited information on the role of these enzymes in plant senescence, we decided to investigate the activity of chloroplast transglutaminases (ChlTGases) and the fate of chloroplast-associated polyamines in Hordeum vulgare L. 'Nagrad' leaves, where the senescence process was induced by darkness (day 0) and continued until chloroplast degradation (day 12). Using an anti-TGase antibody, we detected on a subcellular level, the ChlTGases that were associated with destacked/degraded thylakoid membranes, and beginning on day 5, were also found in the stroma. Colorimetric and radiometric assays revealed during senescence an increase in ChlTGases enzymatic activity. The MS/MS identification of plastid proteins conjugated with exogenous polyamines had shown that the ChlTGases are engaged in the post-translational modification of proteins involved in photosystem organization, stress response, and oxidation processes. We also computationally identified the cDNA of Hv-Png1-like, a barley homologue of the Arabidopsis AtPng1 gene. Its mRNA level was raised from days 3 to 10, indicating that transcriptional regulation controls the activity of barley ChlTGases. Together, the presented results deepen our knowledge of the mechanisms of the events happened in dark-induced senescence of barley leaves that might be activation of plastid transglutaminases.

  3. High biological variability of plastids, photosynthetic pigments and pigment forms of leaf primordia in buds.

    PubMed

    Solymosi, Katalin; Morandi, Dominique; Bóka, Károly; Böddi, Béla; Schoefs, Benoît

    2012-05-01

    To study the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus in nature, the carotenoid and chlorophyllous pigment compositions of differently developed leaf primordia in closed and opening buds of common ash (Fraxinus excelsior L.) and horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) as well as in closed buds of tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima P. Mill.) were analyzed with HPLC. The native organization of the chlorophyllous pigments was studied using 77 K fluorescence spectroscopy, and plastid ultrastructure was investigated with electron microscopy. Complete etiolation, i.e., accumulation of protochlorophyllide, and absence of chlorophylls occurred in the innermost leaf primordia of common ash buds. The other leaf primordia were partially etiolated in the buds and contained protochlorophyllide (0.5-1 μg g(-1) fresh mass), chlorophyllides (0.2-27 μg g(-1) fresh mass) and chlorophylls (0.9-643 μg g(-1) fresh mass). Etio-chloroplasts with prolamellar bodies and either regular or only low grana were found in leaves having high or low amounts of chlorophyll a and b, respectively. After bud break, etioplast-chloroplast conversion proceeded and the pigment contents increased in the leaves, similarly to the greening processes observed in illuminated etiolated seedlings under laboratory conditions. The pigment contents and the ratio of the different spectral forms had a high biological variability that could be attributed to (i) various light conditions due to light filtering in the buds resulting in differently etiolated leaf primordia, (ii) to differences in the light-exposed and inner regions of the same primordia in opening buds due to various leaf folding, and (iii) to tissue-specific slight variations of plastid ultrastructure.

  4. Reassimilation of Photorespiratory Ammonium in Lotus japonicus Plants Deficient in Plastidic Glutamine Synthetase.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carmen M; García-Calderón, Margarita; Márquez, Antonio J; Betti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the plastidic isoform of glutamine synthetase (GS2) is the enzyme in charge of photorespiratory ammonium reassimilation in plants. The metabolic events associated to photorespiratory NH4(+) accumulation were analyzed in a Lotus japonicus photorespiratory mutant lacking GS2. The mutant plants accumulated high levels of NH4(+) when photorespiration was active, followed by a sudden drop in the levels of this compound. In this paper it was examined the possible existence of enzymatic pathways alternative to GS2 that could account for this decline in the photorespiratory ammonium. Induction of genes encoding for cytosolic glutamine synthetase (GS1), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and asparagine synthetase (ASN) was observed in the mutant in correspondence with the diminishment of NH4(+). Measurements of gene expression, polypeptide levels, enzyme activity and metabolite levels were carried out in leaf samples from WT and mutant plants after different periods of time under active photorespiratory conditions. In the case of asparagine synthetase it was not possible to determine enzyme activity and polypeptide content; however, an increased asparagine content in parallel with the induction of ASN gene expression was detected in the mutant plants. This increase in asparagine levels took place concomitantly with an increase in glutamine due to the induction of cytosolic GS1 in the mutant, thus revealing a major role of cytosolic GS1 in the reassimilation and detoxification of photorespiratory NH4(+) when the plastidic GS2 isoform is lacking. Moreover, a diminishment in glutamate levels was observed, that may be explained by the induction of NAD(H)-dependent GDH activity.

  5. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    PubMed

    Savage, Linda J; Imre, Kathleen M; Hall, David A; Last, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/) identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/). Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles were identified.

  6. A new phylogeny for the genus Picea from plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear sequences.

    PubMed

    Lockwood, Jared D; Aleksić, Jelena M; Zou, Jiabin; Wang, Jing; Liu, Jianquan; Renner, Susanne S

    2013-12-01

    Studies over the past ten years have shown that the crown groups of most conifer genera are only about 15-25 Ma old. The genus Picea (spruces, Pinaceae), with around 35 species, appears to be no exception. In addition, molecular studies of co-existing spruce species have demonstrated frequent introgression. Perhaps not surprisingly therefore previous phylogenetic studies of species relationships in Picea, based mostly on plastid sequences, suffered from poor statistical support. We therefore generated mitochondrial, nuclear, and further plastid DNA sequences from carefully sourced material, striking a balance between alignability with outgroups and phylogenetic signal content. Motif duplications in mitochondrial introns were treated as characters in a stochastic Dollo model; molecular clock models were calibrated with fossils; and ancestral ranges were inferred under maximum likelihood. In agreement with previous findings, Picea diverged from its sister clade 180 million years ago (Ma), and the most recent common ancestor of today's spruces dates to 28 Ma. Different from previous analyses though, we find a large Asian clade, an American clade, and a Eurasian clade. Two expansions occurred from Asia to North America and several between Asia and Europe. Chinese P. brachytyla, American P. engelmannii, and Norway spruce, P. abies, are not monophyletic, and North America has ten, not eight species. Divergence times imply that Pleistocene refugia are unlikely to be the full explanation for the relationships between the European species and their East Asian relatives. Thus, northern Norway spruce may be part of an Asian species complex that diverged from the southern Norway spruce lineage in the Upper Miocene, some 6 Ma, which can explain the deep genetic gap noted in phylogeographic studies of Norway spruce. The large effective population sizes of spruces, and incomplete lineage sorting during speciation, mean that the interspecific relationships within each of the

  7. Systematics of Amaryllidaceae based on cladistic analysis of plastid sequence data.

    PubMed

    Meerow, A W; Fay, M F; Guy, C L; Li, Q B; Zaman, F Q; Chase, M W

    1999-09-01

    Cladistic analyses of plastid DNA sequences rbcL and trnL-F are presented separately and combined for 48 genera of Amaryllidaceae and 29 genera of related asparagalean families. The combined analysis is the most highly resolved of the three and provides good support for the monophyly of Amaryllidaceae and indicates Agapanthaceae as its sister family. Alliaceae are in turn sister to the Amaryllidaceae/Agapanthaceae clade. The origins of the family appear to be western Gondwanaland (Africa), and infrafamilial relationships are resolved along biogeographic lines. Tribe Amaryllideae, primarily South African, is sister to the rest of Amaryllidaceae; this tribe is supported by numerous morphological synapomorphies as well. The remaining two African tribes of the family, Haemantheae and Cyrtantheae, are well supported, but their position relative to the Australasian Calostemmateae and a large clade comprising the Eurasian and American genera, is not yet clear. The Eurasian and American elements of the family are each monophyletic sister clades. Internal resolution of the Eurasian clade only partially supports currently accepted tribal concepts, and few conclusions can be drawn on the relationships of the genera based on these data. A monophyletic Lycorideae (Central and East Asian) is weakly supported. Galanthus and Leucojum (Galantheae pro parte) are supported as sister genera by the bootstrap. The American clade shows a higher degree of internal resolution. Hippeastreae (minus Griffinia and Worsleya) are well supported, and Zephyranthinae are resolved as a distinct subtribe. An Andean clade marked by a chromosome number of 2n = 46 (and derivatives thereof) is resolved with weak support. The plastid DNA phylogenies are discussed in the context of biogeography and character evolution in the family.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of Cranichidinae and Prescottiinae (Orchidaceae, Cranichideae) inferred from plastid and nuclear DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Gerardo A.; Cabrera, Lidia I.; Madriñán, Santiago; Chase, Mark W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Phylogenetic relationships of subtribes Cranichidinae and Prescottiinae, two diverse groups of neotropical terrestrial orchids, are not satisfactorily understood. A previous molecular phylogenetic study supported monophyly for Cranichidinae, but Prescottiinae consisted of two clades not sister to one another. However, that analysis included only 11 species and eight genera of these subtribes. Here, plastid and nuclear DNA sequences are analysed for an enlarged sample of genera and species of Cranichidinae and Prescottiinae with the aim of clarifying their relationships, evaluating the phylogenetic position of the monospecific genera Exalaria, Ocampoa and Pseudocranichis and examining the value of various structural traits as taxonomic markers. Methods Approx. 6000 bp of nucleotide sequences from nuclear ribosomal (ITS) and plastid DNA (rbcL, matK-trnK and trnL-trnF) were analysed with cladistic parsimony and Bayesian inference for 45 species/14 genera of Cranichidinae and Prescottiinae (plus suitable outgroups). The utility of flower orientation, thickenings of velamen cell walls, hamular viscidium and pseudolabellum to mark clades recovered by the molecular analysis was assessed by tracing these characters on the molecular trees. Key Results Spiranthinae, Cranichidinae, paraphyletic Prescottia (with Pseudocranichis embedded), and a group of mainly Andean ‘prescottioid’ genera (the ‘Stenoptera clade’) were strongly supported. Relationships among these clades were unresolved by parsimony but the Bayesian tree provided moderately strong support for the resolution (Spiranthinae–(Stenoptera clade-(Prescottia/Pseudocranichis–Cranichidinae))). Three of the four structural characters mark clades on the molecular trees, but the possession of a pseudolabellum is variable in the polyphyletic Ponthieva. Conclusions No evidence was found for monophyly of Prescottiinae and the reinstatement of Cranichidinae s.l. (including the genera of

  9. Genomic profiling of plastid DNA variation in the Mediterranean olive tree

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Characterisation of plastid genome (or cpDNA) polymorphisms is commonly used for phylogeographic, population genetic and forensic analyses in plants, but detecting cpDNA variation is sometimes challenging, limiting the applications of such an approach. In the present study, we screened cpDNA polymorphism in the olive tree (Olea europaea L.) by sequencing the complete plastid genome of trees with a distinct cpDNA lineage. Our objective was to develop new markers for a rapid genomic profiling (by Multiplex PCRs) of cpDNA haplotypes in the Mediterranean olive tree. Results Eight complete cpDNA genomes of Olea were sequenced de novo. The nucleotide divergence between olive cpDNA lineages was low and not exceeding 0.07%. Based on these sequences, markers were developed for studying two single nucleotide substitutions and length polymorphism of 62 regions (with variable microsatellite motifs or other indels). They were then used to genotype the cpDNA variation in cultivated and wild Mediterranean olive trees (315 individuals). Forty polymorphic loci were detected on this sample, allowing the distinction of 22 haplotypes belonging to the three Mediterranean cpDNA lineages known as E1, E2 and E3. The discriminating power of cpDNA variation was particularly low for the cultivated olive tree with one predominating haplotype, but more diversity was detected in wild populations. Conclusions We propose a method for a rapid characterisation of the Mediterranean olive germplasm. The low variation in the cultivated olive tree indicated that the utility of cpDNA variation for forensic analyses is limited to rare haplotypes. In contrast, the high cpDNA variation in wild populations demonstrated that our markers may be useful for phylogeographic and populations genetic studies in O. europaea. PMID:21569271

  10. Isolation and structure determination of a benzofuran and a bis-nor-isoprenoid from Aspergillus niger grown on the water soluble fraction of Morinda citrifolia Linn. leaves.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Bina S; Ismail, Fouzia A Sattar; Gulzar, Tahsin; Begum, Sabira

    2003-10-01

    The leaves of Morinda citrifolia, Linn. afforded a new benzofuran and a bis-nor-isoprenoid, blumenol C, hitherto unreported from this source. The structures of these have been elucidated as 5-benzofuran carboxylic acid-6-formyl methyl ester (1) and 4-(3'(R)-hydroxybutyl)-3,5,5, trimethyl-cyclohex-2-en-1-one (2) respectively through spectroscopic studies. The NMR data (including 1D, 2D techniques) and stereochemistry at C-3' of Compound 2 is also being reported for the first time.

  11. Low polarity pyrolysis products of Permian to Recent Botryococcus-rich sediments: First evidence for the contribution of an isoprenoid algaenan to kerogen formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, S.; Largeau, C.; Behar, F.

    1994-09-01

    Hydrocarbon identification led to the recognition of three distinct chemical races in the green microalga Botryococcus braunii. These three races (A, B, and L) also show pronounced differences in the chemical structure of the algaenans, i.e., the insoluble, highly aliphatic, nonhydrolysable macromolecular constituents (termed PRB) of their outer walls. PRB A and PRBB are based upon polymethylenic chains, while PRB L is based on C40 isoprenoid moieties. Previous studies demonstrated that the selective preservation of PRB A and/or PRB B played a major role in the genesis of various Botryococcus-derived kerogens; in sharp contrast, the above kerogens did not show any indices of a PRB L contribution. The main purpose of this study was therefore to examine, via the screening of a number of Botryococcus-derived kerogens, if some contribution of PRB L, i.e., of an "isoprenoid algaenan", could be observed. To this end, the pyrolysis products of the three PRB and of seven Botryococcus-rich kerogens were examined. Parallel study of the algaenans of the three races of B. braunii indicated that a clear-cut distinction can be made, by analysis of low polarity pyrolysis products, between PRB A and PRB B, on the one hand, and PRB L, on the other hand. Thereafter, identification of the low polarity pyrolysis products of Botryococcus-rich kerogens revealed some contribution of the L race, along with the A or B race, in three samples out of seven: a Pliocene Torbanite and two Recent sediments. These observations thus provided the first example of the formation of kerogen fractions by the selective preservation of an algaenan based on isoprenoid chains. But they also revealed that important transformations of such chains can take place during kerogen early diagenesis. In sharp contrast, examination of the four Palaeozoic Torbanites revealed a complete lack of isoprenoid moieties, and hence no evidence of PRB L contribution. Comparison of n-alkane/n-alk-1-ene doublet distribution in

  12. Over-expression of a pepper plastid lipid-associated protein in tobacco leads to changes in plastid ultrastructure and plant development upon stress.

    PubMed

    Rey, P; Gillet, B; Römer, S; Eymery, F; Massimino, J; Peltier, G; Kuntz, M

    2000-03-01

    Proteins homologous to fibrillin, a pepper plastid lipid-associated protein involved in carotenoid storage in fruit chromoplasts, have been recently identified in leaf chloroplasts from several species and shown to be induced upon environmental stress. To further investigate the role of the protein, transgenic Nicotiana tabacum plants over-expressing fibrillin using a constitutive promoter were generated. Transgenics grown under standard light intensities (300 micromol photons m-2 sec-1) were found to contain substantial amounts of fibrillin in flowers and leaves. In leaves, the protein was immunolocalized within chloroplasts in both stromal and thylakoid subfractions. No change was noticed in thylakoid structures from transgenics, but chloroplasts contained an increased number of plastoglobules organized in clusters. In petals, leucoplasts were also found to contain more agglutinated plastoglobules. The effects of environmental factors on fibrillin gene expression and protein localization were studied in tobacco leaves. Less fibrillin was present in plants grown under low light intensities, which can be explained by the involvement of a light-dependent splicing step in the control of fibrillin gene expression in leaves. Analysis of protein subfractions from plants subjected to drought or high light showed that both stresses resulted in fibrillin association with thylakoids. Whereas no growth difference between wild-type (WT) and transgenic plants was noticed under low light conditions, transgenics exhibit a longer main stem, enhanced development of lateral stems and accelerated floral development under higher light intensities. These data suggest that fibrillin-related proteins fulfil an important function in plant development in relation to environmental constraints.

  13. The Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don: Plastid Genome Evolution, Molecular Marker Identification, and Phylogenetic Implications in Asterids.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chuan; Chung, Wan-Chia; Chen, Ling-Ling; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2013-01-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthusroseus in the family Apocynaceae) is an important medicinal plant and is the source of several widely marketed chemotherapeutic drugs. It is also commonly grown for its ornamental values and, due to ease of infection and distinctiveness of symptoms, is often used as the host for studies on phytoplasmas, an important group of uncultivated plant pathogens. To gain insights into the characteristics of apocynaceous plastid genomes (plastomes), we used a reference-assisted approach to assemble the complete plastome of C. roseus, which could be applied to other C. roseus-related studies. The C. roseus plastome is the second completely sequenced plastome in the asterid order Gentianales. We performed comparative analyses with two other representative sequences in the same order, including the complete plastome of Coffeaarabica (from the basal Gentianales family Rubiaceae) and the nearly complete plastome of Asclepiassyriaca (Apocynaceae). The results demonstrated considerable variations in gene content and plastome organization within Apocynaceae, including the presence/absence of three essential genes (i.e., accD, clpP, and ycf1) and large size changes in non-coding regions (e.g., rps2-rpoC2 and IRb-ndhF). To find plastome markers of potential utility for Catharanthus breeding and phylogenetic analyses, we identified 41 C. roseus-specific simple sequence repeats. Furthermore, five intergenic regions with high divergence between C. roseus and three other euasterids I taxa were identified as candidate markers. To resolve the euasterids I interordinal relationships, 82 plastome genes were used for phylogenetic inference. With the addition of representatives from Apocynaceae and sampling of most other asterid orders, a sister relationship between Gentianales and Solanales is supported.

  14. Subunits of the Plastid ClpPR Protease Complex Have Differential Contributions to Embryogenesis, Plastid Biogenesis, and Plant Development in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Ramirez Rodriguez, Verenice; Zybailov, Boris; Olinares, Paul Dominic B.; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The plastid ClpPR protease complex in Arabidopsis thaliana consists of five catalytic ClpP and four noncatalytic ClpR subunits. An extensive analysis of the CLPR family and CLPP5 is presented to address this complexity. Null alleles for CLPR2 and CLPR4 showed delayed embryogenesis and albino embryos, with seedling development blocked in the cotyledon stage; this developmental block was overcome under heterotrophic conditions, and seedlings developed into small albino to virescent seedlings. By contrast, null alleles for CLPP5 were embryo lethal. Thus, the ClpPR proteins make different functional contributions. To further test for redundancies and functional differences between the ClpR proteins, we overexpressed full-length cDNAs for ClpR1, R2, R3, R4 in clpr1, clpr2 and clpr4 mutants. This showed that overexpression of ClpR3 can complement for the loss of ClpR1, but not for the loss of ClpR2 or ClpR4, indicating that ClpR3 can functionally substitute ClpR1. By contrast, ClpR1, R2 and R4 could not substitute each other. Double mutants of weak CLPR1 and 2 alleles were seedling lethal, showing that a minimum concentration of different ClpR proteins is essential for Clp function. Microscopy and large-scale comparative leaf proteome analyses of a CLPR4 null allele demonstrate a central role of Clp protease in chloroplast biogenesis and protein homeostasis; substrates are discussed. Lack of transcriptional and translational feedback regulation within the CLPPR gene family indicates that regulation of Clp activity occurs through Clp complex assembly and substrate delivery. PMID:19525416

  15. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    DOE PAGES

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemicalmore » scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, we confirm that the mevalonate pathway is not always present in genomes that contain HI gene clusters and thus is not a reliable query for identifying strains with the potential to produce HI secondary metabolites

  16. Genomic insights into the evolution of hybrid isoprenoid biosynthetic gene clusters in the MAR4 marine streptomycete clade

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Kelley A.; Jensen, Paul R.

    2015-11-17

    Background: Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular genetics of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Coupled with increased access to genome sequence data, new insight can be gained into the diversity and distributions of secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters and the evolutionary processes that generate them. Here we examine the distribution of gene clusters predicted to encode the biosynthesis of a structurally diverse class of molecules called hybrid isoprenoids (HIs) in the genus Streptomyces. These compounds are derived from a mixed biosynthetic origin that is characterized by the incorporation of a terpene moiety onto a variety of chemical scaffolds and include many potent antibiotic and cytotoxic agents. Results: One hundred and twenty Streptomyces genomes were searched for HI biosynthetic gene clusters using ABBA prenyltransferases (PTases) as queries. These enzymes are responsible for a key step in HI biosynthesis. The strains included 12 that belong to the ‘MAR4’ clade, a largely marine-derived lineage linked to the production of diverse HI secondary metabolites. We found ABBA PTase homologs in all of the MAR4 genomes, which averaged five copies per strain, compared with 21 % of the non-MAR4 genomes, which averaged one copy per strain. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that MAR4 PTase diversity has arisen by a combination of horizontal gene transfer and gene duplication. Furthermore, there is evidence that HI gene cluster diversity is generated by the horizontal exchange of orthologous PTases among clusters. Many putative HI gene clusters have not been linked to their secondary metabolic products, suggesting that MAR4 strains will yield additional new compounds in this structure class. Finally, w