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Sample records for plated nickel hardness

  1. NICKEL PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, T.B.; Zava, T.E.

    1959-05-12

    A simplified process is presented for plating nickel by the vapor decomposition of nickel carbonyl. In a preferred form of the invention a solid surface is nickel plated by subjecting the surface to contact with a mixture containing by volume approximately 20% nickel carbonyl vapor, 2% hydrogen sulfide and .l% water vapor or 1% oxygen and the remainder carbon dioxide at room temperature until the desired thickness of nickel is obtained. The advantage of this composition over others is that the normally explosive nickel carbonyl is greatly stabilized.

  2. Electroless nickel plating on stainless steels and aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Procedures for applying an adherent electroless nickel plating on 303 SE, 304, and 17-7 PH stainless steels, and 7075 aluminum alloy was developed. When heat treated, the electroless nickel plating provides a hard surface coating on a high strength, corrosion resistant substrate.

  3. Improved nickel plating of Inconel X-750

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. E.; Feeney, J. E.; Kuster, C. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electroplating technique with acid pickling provides a method of applying nickel plating on Inconel X-750 tubing to serve as a wetting agent during brazing. Low-stress nickel-plating bath contains no organic wetting agents that cause the nickel to blister at high temperatures.

  4. Evaluation of brush plated alloys as substitutes for tank plated hard chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Durham, H.B.; Hooper, A.M.

    1995-11-01

    This paper summarizes results obtained from a test program conducted in cooperation with Tinker Air Force Base (TAFB) in 1993 for the purpose of evaluating the potential of using brush plated alloys as replacements for tank plated hard chromium which is used in the overhaul of jet engines. Tank plating is energy expensive and generates waste products in several of the plating steps. Test specimens used in this study were fabricated from carbon steel, chromium-based stainless steel, and nickel-based stainless steel. Baseline specimens were tank plated with hard chromium or with a soft nickel capped with hard chromium. The specimens were tested for fatigue, thickness, microhardness, Taber wear, and Falex pin and vee block wear. All test were conducted in accordance with standard procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Test results obtained from the baseline specimens were compared with those obtained from specimens which had been coated with the three brush plated layered alloy solutions used in this evaluation. Results of this study show that brush plated alloy coatings appear promising as alternatives to tank plated hard chromium. Some data quality problems were encountered during testing, so at this time, definitive statements concerning the use of brush plating alloys as an acceptable alternative to tank plated hard chromium in critical TAFB maintenance, cannot be made. Although these tests results are not positive for TAFB`s operation, users of hard chromium tank plating with less critical applications may find brush plated coatings a suitable alternative. 1 ref.

  5. Nickel release from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Foussereau, J; Mantout, B; Baroux, B

    1994-10-01

    Nickel release from nickel-plated metals often induces allergic contact dermatitis, but, for nickel-containing stainless steels, the effect is not well-known. In this paper, AISI 304, 316L, 303 and 430 type stainless steels, nickel and nickel-plated materials were investigated. 4 tests were performed: patch tests, leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime (DMG) spot tests and electrochemical tests. Patch tests showed that 96% of the patients were intolerant to Ni-plated samples, and 14% to a high-sulfur stainless steel (303), while nickel-containing stainless steels with a low sulfur content elicited no reactions. Leaching experiments confirmed the patch tests: in acidic artificial sweat, Ni-plated samples released about 100 micrograms/cm2/week of nickel, while low-sulfur stainless steels released less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel, and AISI 303 about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week. Attention is drawn to the irrelevance of the DMG spot test, which reveals Ni present in the metal bulk but not its dissolution rate. Electrochemical experiments showed that 304 and 316 grades remain passive in the environments tested, while Ni-plated steels and AISI 303 can suffer significant cation dissolution. Thus, Ni-containing 304 and 316 steels should not induce contact dermatitis, while 303 should be avoided. A reliable nitric acid spot test is proposed to distinguish this grade from other stainless steels.

  6. Quantitative analysis of electroplated nickel coating on hard metal.

    PubMed

    Wahab, Hassan A; Noordin, M Y; Izman, S; Kurniawan, Denni

    2013-01-01

    Electroplated nickel coating on cemented carbide is a potential pretreatment technique for providing an interlayer prior to diamond deposition on the hard metal substrate. The electroplated nickel coating is expected to be of high quality, for example, indicated by having adequate thickness and uniformity. Electroplating parameters should be set accordingly for this purpose. In this study, the gap distances between the electrodes and duration of electroplating process are the investigated variables. Their effect on the coating thickness and uniformity was analyzed and quantified using design of experiment. The nickel deposition was carried out by electroplating in a standard Watt's solution keeping other plating parameters (current: 0.1 Amp, electric potential: 1.0 V, and pH: 3.5) constant. The gap distance between anode and cathode varied at 5, 10, and 15 mm, while the plating time was 10, 20, and 30 minutes. Coating thickness was found to be proportional to the plating time and inversely proportional to the electrode gap distance, while the uniformity tends to improve at a large electrode gap. Empirical models of both coating thickness and uniformity were developed within the ranges of the gap distance and plating time settings, and an optimized solution was determined using these models.

  7. Electroless Nickel Phosphorus Plating on AZ31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shartal, Kh. M.; Kipouros, G. J.

    2009-04-01

    One of the major drawbacks to using magnesium parts in automotive applications is poor corrosion resistance, which can be improved with a nickel-boron coating placed on a nickel-phosphorus coating, which, in turn, is placed on a phosphate-permanganate conversion-coating layer produced on the magnesium alloy AZ31. This work reports on the determination of the optimum kinetic parameters for producing a coherent nickel-phosphorus coating using an electroless-procedure phosphate-permanganate conversion-coating layer and for studying the effects of the experimental variables of the electroless plating process on the phosphorus content, surface morphology, and structure of the electroless nickel-phosphorus (EN-P) coatings produced. Measurements of the plating rate as a function of experimental variables such as the compositions of the plating bath constituents, temperature, and pH were implemented using the weight-gain method; the phosphorus content of the EN-P coatings was measured using energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. The surface morphology of the coating was examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM); X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to characterize the structure of each coating. An empirical rate law was determined for EN-P plating on a phosphate-permanganate conversion coating. It is found that the deposition rate of the EN-P coating increases by increasing the deposition temperature, the concentration of free nickel ions, and the concentration of hypophosphite ions in the plating bath. In addition, the deposition rate decreases by increasing both the plating bath pH and the concentration of citric acid in the plating bath.

  8. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  9. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOEpatents

    Eisenmann, Erhard T.

    1997-01-01

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorous acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution.

  10. Method for regeneration of electroless nickel plating solution

    DOEpatents

    Eisenmann, E.T.

    1997-03-11

    An electroless nickel(EN)/hypophosphite plating bath is provided employing acetic acid/acetate as a buffer and which is, as a result, capable of perpetual regeneration while avoiding the production of hazardous waste. A regeneration process is provided to process the spent EN plating bath solution. A concentrated starter and replenishment solution is provided for ease of operation of the plating bath. The regeneration process employs a chelating ion exchange system to remove nickel cations from spent EN plating solution. Phosphites are then removed from the solution by precipitation. The nickel cations are removed from the ion exchange system by elution with hypophosphorus acid and the nickel concentration of the eluate adjusted by addition of nickel salt. The treated solution and adjusted eluate are combined, stabilizer added, and the volume of resulting solution reduced by evaporation to form the bath starter and replenishing solution. 1 fig.

  11. Plated nickel wire mesh makes superior catalyst bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sill, M.

    1965-01-01

    Porous nickel mesh screen catalyst bed produces gas evolution in hydrogen peroxide thrust chambers used for attitude control of space vehicles. The nickel wire mesh disks in the catalyst bed are plated in rugose form with a silver-gold coating.

  12. Hardness and Abrasion Resistance of Nanocrystalline Nickel Alloys Near the Hall-Petch Breakdown Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    for structural applications. In this work we discuss the hardness and scratch resistance of nanocrystalline nickel and nickel-tungsten solid solution alloys...hardness and abrasion data. The role of solid solution alloying on this breakdown is also discussed.

  13. Electrochemically promoted electroless nickel-phosphorous plating on titanium substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ce; Dai, Lei; Meng, Wei; He, Zhangxing; Wang, Ling

    2017-01-01

    An electrochemically promoted electroless nickel-phosphorous plating process on titanium substrate is proposed. The influences of the temperature and current density on the phosphorous content, coating thickness and corrosion resistance are investigated. The results show that with the help of the electrochemical promotion, the uniform and amorphous nickel-phosphorous coatings with medium phosphorus content (6-8 wt%) are successfully prepared in the electroless bath at 40-60 °C. The phosphorous content of the coating increases with the temperature increasing, while decreases with current density increasing. Obvious passivation occurs for the nickel-phosphorous coatings during the anodic polarization in 3.5 wt% NaCl solution.

  14. Fabrication of electroless nickel plated aluminum freeform mirror for an infrared off-axis telescope.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Chang, Seunghyuk; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Kwang Jo; Jeong, Byeongjoon; Lee, Gil-jae; Kim, Geon Hee; Shin, Sang Kyo; Yoo, Song Min

    2015-12-01

    Freeform mirrors can be readily fabricated by a single point diamond turning (SPDT) machine. However, this machining process often leaves mid-frequency errors (MFEs) that generate undesirable diffraction effects and stray light. In this work, we propose a novel thin electroless nickel plating procedure to remove MFE on freeform surfaces. The proposed procedure has a distinct advantage over a typical thick plating method in that the machining process can be endlessly repeated until the designed mirror surface is obtained. This is of great importance because the sophisticated surface of a freeform mirror cannot be optimized by a typical SPDT machining process, which can be repeated only several times before the limited thickness of the nickel plating is consumed. We will also describe the baking process of a plated mirror to improve the hardness of the mirror surface, which is crucial for minimizing the degradation of that mirror surface that occurs during the polishing process. During the whole proposed process, the changes in surface figures and textures are monitored and cross checked by two different types of measurements, as well as by an interference pattern test. The experimental results indicate that the proposed thin electroless nickel plating procedure is very simple but powerful for removing MFEs on freeform mirror surfaces.

  15. Plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using porous nickel plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oohara, W.; Maeda, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2011-09-01

    Hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H+ and H- ions, are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a porous nickel plate. Positive ions in a hydrogen plasma generated by dc arc discharge are irradiated to the porous plate, and pair ions are produced from the back of the irradiation plane. It becomes clear that the production quantity of pair ions mainly depends on the irradiation current of positive ions and the irradiation energy affects the production efficiency of H- ions.

  16. Nickel plating of FBG strain sensors for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Marcus; Niewczas, Pawel; Johnston, Michael; Mackersie, John

    2011-05-01

    We present a method for plating FBG strain sensors with a strongly-bonded, hermetic nickel layer, without exposure of the fiber to corrosive environments. A 1μm thick, highly adhesive chrome layer is deposited onto bare fibers via evaporation. Addition of an inert and electrically conductive gold layer then allows the fiber to be electroplated with a 50-100μm nickel layer. Finite element models have confirmed that nickel plated FBG sensors can be brazed into steel structures and used to monitor local strain and temperature. Embedding gratings that are temperature and radiation resistant will be particularly applicable to the structural health monitoring of steel prestressing tendons used in the concrete containments of nuclear power plants and other safety-significant structures.

  17. NICKEL PLATING: INDUSTRY PRACTICES, CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES, AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report was prepared under the direction of EPA's ORD to assist the metal finishing community with the management of nickel plating environmental issues. This report provides the rationale for developing the document, identifies the intended user audience, and presents the fr...

  18. Replicated Nickel Optics for the Hard-X-Ray Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Replicated nickel optics has been used extensively in x-ray astronomy, most notable for the XMM/Newton mission. Thc combination of relative ease of fabrication and the inherent stability of full shell optics, make them FIJI attractive approach for medium-resolution, high-throughput applications. MSFC has been developing these optics for use in the hard-x-ray region. Efforts at improving the resolution of these, particularly the very-thin shells required to meet thc weight budget of future missions, will be described together with the prospects for significant improvements down to the 5-arcsec level.

  19. 78 FR 69371 - Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan: Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... International Trade Administration Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan...-annealed, nickel-plated flat-rolled steel products (certain nickel-plated, flat-rolled steel) from Japan..., nickel-plated flat-rolled steel products included in this investigation are flat-rolled,...

  20. Hot hardness of nickel-rich nickel-chromium-aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S. R.

    1976-01-01

    Rockwell A hardness of cast nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys was examined from ambient to 1150 K and compared to cast NiAl and IN-100. Alloy constitution was either gamma, gamma prime + gamma or gamma + beta + alpha + gamma prime. Below 1000 K beta containing NiCrAl alloys have hardnesses comparable to IN-100; above 1000 K they soften faster than IN-100. At 1150 K the hardness of beta-containing NiCrAl alloys decreases with increasing beta-content. The beta-containing NiCrAl alloys were harder than beta-NiAl. The ultimate tensile strengths of the NiCrAl alloys were estimated. The effects of NiCrAl coatings on strength and fatigue life of cooled turbine components were deduced.

  1. Brush Plating of Nickel-Tungsten Alloy for Engineering Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    12 8 Nickel-Tungsten deposit properties Property Test method Result Microstructure XRD Nanocrystalline Structure Microscopy Micro-cracked...Composition Chemical Analysis Ni 60 wt.%: W 40 wt.% Residual Stress Bent strip 12 ~ 16 kpsi tensile Hardness Microhardness (Vickers) 660 ~ 690 HV Hydrogen...embrittlement ASTM F519 1a.1 notched bar Pass without bake Ductility Bend test 1.6% Abrasive wear Taber 14 mg/1000 cycle Friction coefficient

  2. Electroless nickel plating on polymer particles.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Syuji; Hamasaki, Hiroyuki; Takeoka, Hiroaki; Tsuruoka, Takaaki; Akamatsu, Kensuke; Nakamura, Yoshinobu

    2014-09-15

    Near-monodisperse, micrometer-sized polypyrrole-palladium (PPy-Pd) nanocomposite-coated polystyrene (PS) particles have been coated with Ni overlayers by electroless plating in aqueous media. Good control of the Ni loading was achieved for 1.0 μm diameter PPy-Pd nanocomposite-coated PS particles and particles of up to 20 μm in diameter could also be efficiently coated with the Ni. Laser diffraction particle size analysis studies of dilute aqueous suspensions indicated that an additional water-soluble colloidal stabilizer, poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone), in the electroless plating reaction media was crucial to obtain colloidally stable Ni-coated composite particles. Elemental microanalysis indicated that the Ni loading could be controlled between 61 and 78 wt% for the 1.0 μm-sized particles. Scanning/transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the particle surface had a flaked morphology after Ni coating. Spherical capsules were obtained after extraction of the PS component from the Ni-coated composite particles, which indicated that the shell became rigid after Ni coating. X-ray diffraction confirmed the production of elemental Ni and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicated the existence of elemental Ni on the surface of the composite particles.

  3. Synthesis of nickel nanoparticles supported on metal oxides using electroless plating: controlling the dispersion and size of nickel nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhijie; Ge, Shaohui; Zhang, Minghui; Li, Wei; Tao, Keyi

    2009-02-15

    Nickel nanoparticles supported on metal oxides were prepared by a modified electroless nickel-plating method. The process and mechanism of electroless plating were studied by changing the active metal (Ag) loading, acidity, and surface area of metal oxides and were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and H(2) chemisorption. The results showed that the dispersion of nickel nanoparticles was dependent on the interface reaction between the metal oxide and the plating solution or the active metal and the plating solution. The Ag loading and acidity of the metal oxide mainly affected the interface reaction to change the dispersion of nickel nanoparticles. The use of ultrasonic waves and microwaves and the change of solvents from water to ethylene glycol in the electroless plating could affect the dispersion and size of nickel nanoparticles.

  4. Analysis for nickel (3 and 4) in positive plates from nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Harlan L.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA-Goddard procedure for destructive physical analysis (DPA) of nickel-cadmium cells contains a method for analysis of residual charged nickel as NiOOH in the positive plates at complete cell discharge, also known as nickel precharge. In the method, the Ni(III) is treated with an excess of an Fe(II) reducing agent and then back titrated with permanganate. The Ni(III) content is the difference between Fe(II) equivalents and permanganate equivalents. Problems have arisen in analysis at NAVSURFWARCENDIV, Crane because for many types of cells, particularly AA-size and some 'space-qualified' cells, zero or negative Ni(III) contents are recorded for which the manufacturer claims 3-5 percent precharge. Our approach to this problem was to reexamine the procedure for the source of error, and correct it or develop an alternative method.

  5. 78 FR 75371 - Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan; Scheduling of the Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... COMMISSION Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan; Scheduling of the Final... of less-than-fair-value imports from Japan of diffusion-annealed, nickel- plated flat-rolled steel...; whether or not in coils; either plated or coated with nickel or nickel-based alloys and...

  6. Arrays of holes fabricated by electron-beam lithography combined with image reversal process using nickel pulse reversal plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Yousef; Lavallée, Eric; Lau, Kien Mun; Beauvais, Jacques; Drouin, Dominique; Cloutier, Melanie; Turcotte, David; Yang, Pan; Kelkar, Prasad

    2004-05-01

    A critical issue in fabricating arrays of holes is to achieve high-aspect-ratio structures. Formation of ordered arrays of nanoholes in silicon nitride was investigated by the use of ultrathin hard etch mask formed by nickel pulse reversal plating to invert the tonality of a dry e-beam resist patterned by e-beam lithography. Ni plating was carried out using a commercial plating solution based on nickel sulfamate salt without organic additives. Reactive ion etching using SF6/CH4 was found to be very effective for pattern transfer to silicon nitride. Holes array of 100 nm diam, 270 nm period, and 400 nm depth was fabricated on a 5×5 mm2 area. .

  7. Assessment of liver function among nickel-plating workers in Egypt.

    PubMed

    El-Shafei, H M

    2011-06-01

    Currently no reports are available from Egypt regarding occupational exposure to nickel and its effects on the liver. The aim of this study was to assess the liver function of workers occupationally exposed to nickel. Standard liver function tests were applied to blood samples from 25 nickel-plating workers in Damietta, Egypt and 30 administrative workers as a reference group. Levels of urine nickel, measured by inductively coupling plasma-emission spectroscopy, were significantly higher in nickel-exposed workers compared with the reference group. The levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly higher in nickel-exposed workers. The level of serum albumin was significantly negatively correlated and the levels of serum aminotransferases, and serum gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase were significantly positively correlated with urine nickel levels. Liver function is compromised in nickel-plating workers compared with non-exposed administrative workers.

  8. 78 FR 31577 - Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ...)] Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan Determination On the basis of the... reason of imports from Japan of diffusion-annealed, nickel-plated flat-rolled steel products, provided... Commission and Commerce by Thomas Steel Strip Corporation, Warren, Ohio, alleging that an industry in...

  9. 78 FR 50378 - Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan: Postponement of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... International Trade Administration Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan... Department) initiated the antidumping duty investigation of diffusion-annealed, nickel-plated flat-rolled steel products from Japan. See Diffusion- Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From...

  10. Influence of surface treatment on the electroless nickel plating of textile fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, C. W. M.; Jiang, S. Q.; Kan, C. W.; Tung, W. S.

    2007-04-01

    The present study is performed with an objective to acquire a deeper understanding of the properties of nickel-plated polyester fabric after conducing low temperature plasma treatment. Low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen and argon gases was employed to render a hydrophilic property of woven polyester fabrics and facilitate the absorption of a palladium catalyst in order to provide a catalytic surface for electroless nickel plating. The properties of plasma-induced electroless nickel-plated polyester fabrics were evaluated by various standard testing methods in terms of both physical and chemical performances.

  11. Plating Repair Of Nickel-Alloy Pressure Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steve K.; Chagnon, Kevin M.

    1989-01-01

    Procedure for localized electrodeposition of nickel enables repair of small damaged nickel-based pressure vessels. Electrodeposition restores weakened areas of vessel wall to at least their former strength.

  12. Electrochemical performance of electroless nickel plated silicon electrodes for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetinkaya, T.; Uysal, M.; Akbulut, H.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, nickel plated silicon powders were produced using an electroless deposition process. The nickel content on the surface of silicon powders was changed by using different concentrations of NiCl2 in the plating bath. The surface morphology of the produced Ni plated composite powders was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was used to determine the elemental surface composition of the composites. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was performed to investigate the structure of the nickel plated silicon powders. Electrochemical cycling test of the nickel plated silicon electrodes were performed at a constant current of 100 mA/g in CR2016 test cells. In order to investigate electrochemical reactions of the nickel plated silicon powders with electrolyte, cyclic voltammetry test was performed at a scan rate of 0.1 mV/s. Among the used concentrations, the nickel plated silicon electrode produced using 40 g/L NiCl2 had a 246 mAh/g discharge capacity after 30 cycles.

  13. Atmospheric releases of hexavalent chromium from hard chromium plating operations

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.; Dietz, J.D.; Cooper, C.D.; Wayson, R.L.; Bauman, D.

    1992-01-01

    The study represents an assessment of airborne fugitive hexavalent chromium concentrations at these facilities. In an effort to develop a model for stack emissions of Cr(VI), EPA data were reviewed and a correlation for chromium emissions was reported versus ampere-hours and plating bath volume. A modification of a stack sampling train was constructed to accommodate fugitive sampling efforts made at two hard chrome plating facilities. The levels found at both sites, for the most part, were below detection limits of 4 micrograms cu m and 6 micrograms cu m for the 1st and 2nd plant, respectively. The annual emission rates from Plants 1 and 2 are < 0.5 and < 1 lb Cr(VI) per year, respectively.

  14. Effectiveness of nickel plating in inhibiting atmospheric corrosion of copper alloy contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, T.; Sorensen, R.; Guilinger, T.

    1997-12-31

    A series of tests was run to determine the effect of Ni plating thickness on connector contact resistance. Copper coupons were plated with an electrolytic nickel strike followed by electroless nickel to produce Ni layers of 10, 20, 55 and 100 {micro}in. The coupons were then exposed to a simulated industrial environment. Pore corrosion was observed after the exposure, which correlated with Ni thickness. In a second series of tests, beryllium-copper four-tine contacts with 50 {micro}in of gold plate over electrolytic nickel strike/electroless-nickel plates of varying thickness were exposed the same corrosive environment. Contact resistance of mated pairs was monitored over a two-month period. The degradation in contact resistance correlated with the Ni thickness used in the connectors.

  15. HVOF thermal spraying: An alternative to hard chrome plating

    SciTech Connect

    Bolles, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    In recent years pressure to find alternatives to chromium electroplating has accelerated dramatically. While it is not likely that the process will be banned completely, the trend points to severe limitations. Industries must now look closely at their applications, and actively consider alternatives to hard chrome plaint. One of the most viable alternatives in thermal spraying. Recent advances in high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) technology offer an environmentally safer, cleaner and less-expensive alternative to chromium plating. It has been shown here that HVOF coatings can be used as chromium plating alternatives for many different applications. The HVOF process offers several advantages over chromium plaint including thicker coating capability, no part size restrictions and no hazardous waste products. A number of HVOF coatings have had excellent results in laboratory and field testing, and can be considered as effective replacements for hard chrome. The choice for a suitable replacement can only be made after careful assessment of the conditions associated with the application in question.

  16. Pulse electrodeposited nickel using sulphamate electrolyte for hardness and corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Sivasakthi, P.; Sekar, R.; Bapu, G.N.K.Ramesh

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Nickel deposits from sulphamate solutions using pulse method are prepared. • Effect of duty cycle and frequency are studied. • XRD, SEM and AFM of the nickel deposits are characterized. • Corrosion characteristics of the nickel deposit are reported. - Abstract: Nickel deposits have been obtained on mild steel substrate by pulse current (PC) electrodeposition method using nickel sulphamate electrolyte. Micro hardness values increased with decreasing duty cycle and pulse frequency. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that (2 0 0) plane was predominant and the nickel deposit obtained at low duty cycle and low frequency has the smallest grain size. The surface morphology of the coatings was explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy. These studies showed that the microstructure of the nickel coatings changed from pyramidal structure to homogeneous structure with increasing duty cycle and pulse frequencies. The corrosion resistance of coatings was evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance studies in 3.5 wt% sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions. An enhancement of the corrosion resistance, charge-transfer resistance and wear resistance has been obtained at low duty cycle and low frequencies.

  17. Electrodeposited Zinc-Nickel as an Alternative to Cadmium Plating for Aerospace Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, V. C.

    1991-01-01

    Corrosion evaluation studies were conducted on 4130 alloy steel samples coated with electrodeposited zinc-nickel and samples coated with electrodeposited cadmium. The zinc nickel was deposited by the selection electrochemical metallizing process. These coated samples were exposed to a 5-percent salt fog environment at 35 plus or minus 2 C for a period ranging from 96 to 240 hours. An evaluation of the effect of dichromate coatings on the performance of each plating was conducted. The protection afforded by platings with a dichromate seal was compared to platings without the seal. During the later stages of testing, deposit adhesion and the potential for hydrogen entrapment were also evaluated.

  18. Nickel Electroless Plating: Adhesion Analysis for Mono-Type Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Gu; Rehman, Atteq ur; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Soo Hong

    2015-10-01

    The adhesion of the front electrodes to silicon substrate is the most important parameters to be optimized. Nickel silicide which is formed by sintering process using a silicon substrate improves the mechanical and electrical properties as well as act as diffusion barrier for copper. In this experiment p-type mono-crystalline czochralski (CZ) silicon wafers having resistivity of 1.5 Ω·cm were used to study one step and two step nickel electroless plating process. POCl3 diffusion process was performed to form the emitter with the sheet resistance of 70 ohm/sq. The Six, layer was set down as an antireflection coating (ARC) layer at emitter surface by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. Laser ablation process was used to open SiNx passivation layer locally for the formation of the front electrodes. Nickel was deposited by electroless plating process by one step and two step nickel electroless deposition process. The two step nickel plating was performed by applying a second nickel deposition step subsequent to the first sintering process. Furthermore, the adhesion analysis for both one step and two steps process was conducted using peel force tester (universal testing machine, H5KT) after depositing Cu contact by light induced plating (LIP).

  19. Site-selective electroless nickel plating on patterned thin films of macromolecular metal complexes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mutsumi; Yamagiwa, Hiroki; Asakawa, Daisuke; Noguchi, Makoto; Kurashina, Tadashi; Fukawa, Tadashi; Shirai, Hirofusa

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate a simple route to depositing nickel layer patterns using photocross-linked polymer thin films containing palladium catalysts, which can be used as adhesive interlayers for fabrication of nickel patterns on glass and plastic substrates. Electroless nickel patterns can be obtained in three steps: (i) the pattern formation of partially quaterized poly(vinyl pyridine) by UV irradiation, (ii) the formation of macromolecular metal complex with palladium, and (iii) the nickel metallization using electroless plating bath. Metallization is site-selective and allows for a high resolution. And the resulting nickel layered structure shows good adhesion with glass and plastic substrates. The direct patterning of metallic layers onto insulating substrates indicates a great potential for fabricating micro/nano devices.

  20. Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Stewart, T.L.

    1982-01-01

    Two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation have been evaluated. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, and an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. These mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

  1. 78 FR 19734 - Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Steel Flat-Rolled Products From Japan; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Steel Flat-Rolled Products From Japan; Institution of... retarded, by reason of imports from Japan of diffusion-annealed, nickel-plated steel flat-rolled...

  2. Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, S.A.

    1981-07-29

    The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

  3. Method for determining the hardness of strain hardening articles of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wallace, Steven A.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a rapid nondestructive method for determining the extent of strain hardening in an article of tungsten-nickel-iron alloy. The method comprises saturating the article with a magnetic field from a permanent magnet, measuring the magnetic flux emanating from the article, comparing the measurements of the magnetic flux emanating from the article with measured magnetic fluxes from similarly shaped standards of the alloy with known amounts of strain hardening to determine the hardness.

  4. Screen test for cadmium and nickel plates as developed and used within the Aerospace Corporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phan, A. H.; Zimmerman, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure described here was recently developed to quantify loading uniformity of nickel and cadmium plates and to screen finished electrodes prior to cell assembly. The technique utilizes the initial solubility rates of the active material in a standard chemical deloading solution at fixed conditions. The method can provide a reproducible indication of plate loading uniformity in situations where high surface loading limits the free flow of deloading solution into the internal porosity of the sinter plate. A preliminary study indicates that 'good' cell performance is associated with higher deloading rates.

  5. Electrolytic Regeneration of Contaminated Electroless Nickel Plating Baths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    SERVICE 138 TSGT Jorge L. Soto 7 CES/CEV, Dyess AFB, TX LESSONS LEARNED IMPLEMENTING THE HAZMART 140 Msgt. James P. Day 2 MXS/LGMS, Barksdale AFB...INITIATIVES LOX OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENTS 230 Brian Ballew SA-ALC/TIESM, Kelly AFB, TX LESSONS- LEARNED FROM THE EVALUATION OF 236 BRUSH PLATING...A LOW RISK 273 HIGH REWARD POLLUTION PREVENTION TOOL Kendal R. Smith Enviro Filtration, Gary, IN METHODOLOGY FOR MAKING SUBSTITUTES 277 Jared E

  6. Analysis of continuous solvent extraction of nickel from spent electroless nickel plating baths by a mixer-settler.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Tanaka, Mikiya

    2009-05-30

    It is urgent to develop an effective technique to treat the large amount of spent electroless nickel plating bath and recycle the high concentration nickel. In our previous study, high recycling efficiency of nickel from the model spent bath was obtained by continuous solvent extraction with 2-hydroxy-5-nonylacetophenone oxime (LIX84I) as the extractant and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester (PC88A) as the accelerator using a mixer-settler extractor. It was observed that the extraction efficiency was affected by the operation parameters such as the flow rates of the aqueous and organic phases and the total stage number. In the present study, the effects of the operation parameters on the extraction efficiency were quantitatively studied on the basis of the pseudo-first-order interfacial extraction rate equation together with the hydrodynamic properties in the mixer. The organic phase holdup, measured under varying conditions of the flow rates of both phases, was analyzed by the Takahashi-Takeuchi holdup model in order to estimate the specific interfacial area. The overall extraction rate coefficients defined by the product of the interfacial extraction rate constant and the specific interfacial area were evaluated using the experimental data and ranged from 3.5 x 10(-3) to 6.7 x 10(-3)s(-1), which was close to the value of 3.4 x 10(-3)s(-1) obtained by batch extraction. Finally, an engineering simulation method was established for assessing the extraction efficiency of nickel during a multistage operation.

  7. Friction and hardness of gold films deposited by ion plating and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films on various substrates in contact with a 0.025-mm-radius spherical silicon carbide rider in mineral oil. Hardness measurements were also made to examine the hardness depth profile of the coated gold on the substrate. The results indicate that the hardness is influenced by the depth of the gold coating from the surface. The hardness increases with an increase in the depth. The hardness is also related to the composition gradient in the graded interface between the gold coating and the substrate. The graded interface exhibited the highest hardness resulting from an alloy hardening effect. The coefficient of friction is inversely related to the hardness, namely, the load carrying capacity of the surface. The greater the hardness that the metal surface possesses, the lower is the coefficient of friction. The graded interface exhibited the lowest coefficient of friction.

  8. Zone Plates for Hard X-Ray FEL Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, D.; Holmberg, A.; Vogt, U.; Sinn, H.

    2011-09-09

    We investigated theoretically the use of zone plates for the focusing of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL). In a finite-element simulation the heat load on zone plates placed in the high intensity x-ray beam was simulated for four different zone plate materials: gold, iridium, tungsten, and CVD diamond. The main result of the calculations is that all zone plates remain below the melting temperature throughout a full XFEL pulse train of 3000 pulses. However, if the zone plate is placed in the direct beam it will experience large and rapid temperature fluctuations on the order of 300 K. The situation is relaxed if the optic is placed behind a monochromator and the fluctuations are reduced to around 20 K. Besides heat load, the maximization of the total efficiency of the complete optical system is an important issue. We calculated the efficiency of different zone plates and monochromator systems and found that the final beam size of the XFEL in combination with its monochromaticity will be important parameters.

  9. Performance of hard X-ray zone plates at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Maser, J.; Lai, B.; Cai, Z.; Rodrigues, W.; Legnini, D.; Ilinski, P.; Yun, W.; Chen, Z.; Krasnoperova, A.A.; Vladimirsky, Y.; Cerrina, F.; Di, E.; Fabrizio, E.; Gentili, M.

    1999-12-20

    Fresnel zone plates have been highly successful as focusing and imaging optics for soft x-ray microscopes and microprobe. More recently, with the advent of third-generation high-energy storage rings, zone plates for the hard x-ray regime have been put to use as well. The performance of zone plates manufactured using a combination of electron-beam lithography and x-ray lithography is described.

  10. Absorption of metals in mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) after ingesting nickel-plated carbon-steel hooks.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Shane P; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J; Butcher, Paul A; Cairns, Stuart C

    2014-08-01

    Previous research has alluded to the potential of metals being absorbed by fish after ingesting fishing hooks, which may have adverse effects on fish health and the organisms that consume them. Subsequently, this study aimed to quantify the potential of mulloway (Argyrosomus japonicus) to absorb metals during the decay of ingested nickel-plated carbon-steel hooks. Twenty-five treatment fish were allowed to ingest nickel-plated carbon-steel hooks during angling and then monitored with 25 controls (untreated fish) for up to 42 days for hook ejection and mortality. Blood, liver and muscle samples were collected from treatment, control and 14 wild-caught individuals to determine the concentrations of chromium, cobalt, copper, iron, manganese and nickel. The results showed that increased oxidation influenced hook ejection, and that hook-ingested fish had significantly elevated concentrations of nickel in their liver and blood, but not muscle. This research has shown that there is an avenue for metal absorption from ingested hooks.

  11. Electroless nickel and ion-plated protective coatings for silvered glass mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, M.A.; Chaudiere, D.A.; Dake, L.S.; Stewart, T.L.

    1982-04-01

    A preliminary examination of two methods of protecting second surface silvered glass mirrors from environmental degradation is presented. One method employed silver mirrors overcoated with Al, Ni, 304 stainless steel, Cr, or an Al/Cu alloy prepared by ion-plating. The other method used conventional wet process silver mirrors protected with a thin electroless nickel coating. No attempt was made to optimize the coatings for either method. These experimental mirrors were compared with conventional paint backed silver/copper mirrors after exposure to elevated temperatures and water vapor in order to estimate their relative environmental stability. The electroless nickel mirrors showed consistently more resistance to these stresses than either the conventional or ion-plated mirrors, suggesting that they may provide more durable field service.

  12. Removal of nickel(II) from aqueous solution and nickel plating industry wastewater using an agricultural waste: Peanut hulls

    SciTech Connect

    Periasamy, K.; Namasivayam, C.

    1995-07-01

    Activated carbon prepared from peanut hulls (PHC), an agricultural waste by-product, has been used for the adsorption of Ni(II) from aqueous solution. The process of uptake obeys both Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. The applicability of Lagergren kinetic model has also been investigated. Quantitative removal of Ni(II) from 100 mL aqueous solution containing 20 mg/L Ni(II) by 85 mg PHC was observed over a pH range of 4.0 to 10.0. The suitability of PHC for treating nickel plating industry wastewater was also tested. A comparative study with a commercial granular activated carbon (GAC) showed that PHC is 36 times more efficient compared to GAC based on Langmuir adsorption capacity (Q{sub O}).

  13. Stability of hard plates on soft substrates and application to the design of bioinspired segmented armor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, R.; Barthelat, F.

    2016-07-01

    Flexible natural armors from fish, alligators or armadillo are attracting an increasing amount of attention from their unique and attractive combinations of hardness, flexibility and light weight. In particular, the extreme contrast of stiffness between hard plates and surrounding soft tissues give rise to unusual and attractive mechanisms, which now serve as model for the design of bio-inspired armors. Despite a growing interest in bio-inspired flexible protection, there is little guidelines as to the choice of materials, optimum thickness, size, shape and arrangement for the protective plates. In this work, we focus on a failure mode we recently observed on natural and bio-inspired scaled armors: the unstable tilting of individual scales subjected to off-centered point forces. We first present a series of experiments on this system, followed by a model based on contact mechanics and friction. We condense the result into a single stability diagram which capture the key parameters that govern the onset of plate tilting from a localized force. We found that the stability of individual plates is governed by the location of the point force on the plate, by the friction at the surface of the plate, by the size of the plate and by the stiffness of the substrate. We finally discuss how some of these parameters can be optimized at the design stage to produce bio-inspired protective systems with desired combination of surface hardness, stability and flexural compliance.

  14. A study of degradation of plates for nickel-cadmium spacecraft cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    The relative merits of coining and not coining of sintered nickel oxide and cadmium plates was investigated. Sample plate materials from most commercial cell suppliers were obtained and characterized for properties that may correlate with the tendency toward physical disintegration during handling and over long periods of time in the cell. Special test methods were developed to obtain comparative data in a short time. A wide range of physical properties and coining thickness was observed, resulting in a range of responses. The stronger materials resisted loss of sinter better than weaker materials whether or not coined. Coining improved handling and resistance to electrochemical cycling of weaker materials. The mechanism of break-down of positive plate edges under cycling appears to be the same as that of thickening and blistering. Brittle, nonadherent sinter, resulting from certain impregnation processes, is the most vulnerable to degradation. It is concluded that the latter type of materials should be coined, but coining of strong materials is optional.

  15. High density tungsten-nickel-iron-cobalt alloys having improved hardness and method for making same

    SciTech Connect

    Penrice, T.W.; Bost, J.

    1988-08-09

    This patent describes the process of making high density alloy containing about 85 to 98 weight percent tungsten and the balance of the alloy being essentially a binder of nickel, iron and cobalt, and wherein the cobalt is present in an amount within the range of about 5 to 47.5 weight percent of the binder, comprising: blending powders of the tungsten, nickel, iron and cobalt into a homogeneous composition, compacting the homogeneous composition into a shaped article, heating the shaped article to a temperature and for a time sufficient to sinter the article, subjecting the sintered article to a temperature sufficient to enable the intermetallic phase formed at the matrix to tungsten interface to diffuse into the gamma austenitic phase whereby the alpha tungsten/gamma austenite boundaries are essentially free of such intermetallic phase, quenching the article, and swaging the article to a reduction in area of about 5 to 40 percent, the article having improved mechanical properties, including improved tensile strength and hardness while maintaining suitable ductility for subsequent working thereof.

  16. Ultrasonic preparation of nano-nickel/activated carbon composite using spent electroless nickel plating bath and application in degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Su, Jingyu; Jin, Guanping; Li, Changyong; Zhu, Xiaohui; Dou, Yan; Li, Yong; Wang, Xin; Wang, Kunwei; Gu, Qianqian

    2014-11-01

    Ni was effectively recovered from spent electroless nickel (EN) plating baths by forming a nano-nickel coated activated carbon composite. With the aid of ultrasonication, melamine-formaldehyde-tetraoxalyl-ethylenediamine chelating resins were grafted on activated carbon (MFT/AC). PdCl2 sol was adsorbed on MFT/AC, which was then immersed in spent electroless nickel plating bath; then nano-nickel could be reduced by ascorbic acid to form a nano-nickel coating on the activated carbon composite (Ni/AC) in situ. The materials present were carefully examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemistry techniques. The resins were well distributed on the inside and outside surfaces of activated carbon with a size of 120 ± 30 nm in MFT/AC, and a great deal of nano-nickel particles were evenly deposited with a size of 3.8 ± 1.1 nm in Ni/MFT. Moreover, Ni/AC was successfully used as a catalyst for ultrasonic degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol.

  17. Rolling contact fatigue in high vacuum using ion plated nickel-copper-silver solid lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2011-01-15

    Ion plated, nickel-copper-silver coated steel ball bearings that were tested in rolling contact fatigue (RCF) experiments in high vacuum are presented in this article. ANSI T5 ball bearings were coated with approximately 10 nm of nickel-copper followed by 100 nm of silver using a dc ion plating process. The balls were then tested for RCF in vacuum in the 10{sup -7} Torr range at 130 Hz rotational speed and at 4.1 GPa Hertzian contact stress. The significance of this work is in the extension of RCF testing to an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) application using silver as a lubricant instead of oil. The effects of pressure and voltage on the ion plating process were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy and RCF life testing in UHV. Test results with a ball size of 5/16 in. in UHV show that deposition at voltages greater than 2.5 kV shortens the RCF life and introduces a unique failure mode. Voltage and pressure fluctuations during the deposition process result in significant thickness monitor measurement errors as well. A regulator control scheme that minimizes the process pressure overshoot is also simulated.

  18. Soft metal plating enables hard metal seal to operate successfully in low temperature, high pressure environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamvermeyer, D. J.

    1967-01-01

    Soft metal plating of hard metal lip seal enables successful operation of seal in a cryogenic fluid line under high pressure. The seal is coated with a thin film of 24 carat gold on the lip area to provide antigall and seal properties.

  19. A study of degradation of plates for nickel-cadmium spacecraft cells. [feasibility of coining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The relative merits of coining and not coining of sintered nickel-oxide and cadmium plates was investigated. A survey of the industry including cell manufactures and users was made and results summarized. Sample plate materials from most commercial cell suppliers were obtained and characterized for properties that may correlate with the tendency toward physical disintegration during handling and over long periods of time in the cell. Special test methods were developed to obtain comparative data in a short time. A wide range of physical properties and coining thicknesses was observed, resulting in a range of responses. The stronger, less brittle materials resisted loss of sinter better than weaker materials whether or not coined. Coining improved handling and resistance to electrochemical cycling in all materials tested. An apparent exception was found to be due to improper coining of a tapered edge.

  20. Development of a Prototype Nickel Optic for the Constellation-X Hard-X-Ray Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, S.; Bruni, R. J.; Citerio, O.; Engelhaupt, D.; Ghigo, M.; Gorenstien, P.; Mazzoleni, F.; ODell, S. L.; Pareschi, G.; Ramsey, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Constellation-X mission, planned for launch in 2011, will feature an array of hard-x ray telescopes with a total collecting area goal of 1500 square centimeters at 40 keV. Various technologies are currently being investigated for the optics of these telescopes including multilayer-coated Eletroformed-Nickel-Replicated (ENR) shells. The attraction of the ENR process is that the resulting full-shell optics are inherently stable and offer the promise of good angular resolution and enhanced instrument sensitivity. The challenge for this process is to meet a relatively tight weight budget with a relatively dense material (rho nickel = 9 grams per cubic centimeters.) To demonstrate the viability of the ENR process we are fabricating a prototype HXT mirror module to be tested against a competing segmented-glass-shell optic. The ENR prototype will consist of 5 shells of diameters from 150 mm to 280 mm and of 426 mm total length. To meet the stringent weight budget for Con-X, the shells will be only 150 micron thick. The innermost of these will be coated with Iridium, while the remainder will be coated with graded-density multilayers. Mandrels for these shells are currently under fabrication (Jan 03), with the first shells scheduled for production in February 03. A tentative date of late Summer has been set for prototype testing. Issues currently being addressed are the control of stresses in the multiplayer coating and ways of mitigating their effects on the figure of the necessarily thin shells. Also, the fabrication, handling and mounting of these shells without inducing permanent figure distortions. A full status report on the prototype optic will be presented along with test results as available.

  1. The Effect of Adding Corrosion Inhibitors into an Electroless Nickel Plating Bath for Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Rong; Su, Yongyao; Liu, Hongdong; Cheng, Jiang; Yang, Xin; Shao, Zhongcai

    2016-10-01

    In this work, corrosion inhibitors were added into an electroless nickel plating bath to realize nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) coating deposition on magnesium alloy directly. The performance of five corrosion inhibitors was evaluated by inhibition efficiency. The results showed that only ammonium hydrogen fluoride (NH4HF2) and ammonium molybdate ((NH4)2MoO4) could be used as corrosion inhibitors for magnesium alloy in the bath. Moreover, compounding NH4HF2 and (NH4)2MoO4, the optimal concentrations were both at 1.5 ~ 2%. The deposition process of Ni-P coating was observed by using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It showed corrosion inhibitors inhibited undesired dissolution of magnesium substrate during the electroless plating process. In addition, SEM observation indicated that the corrosion inhibition reaction and the Ni2+ replacement reaction were competitive at the initial deposition time. Both electrochemical analysis and thermal shock test revealed that the Ni-P coating exhibited excellent corrosion resistance and adhesion properties in protecting the magnesium alloy.

  2. Electroless nickel plating on APTHS modified wood veneer for EMI shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haibing; Li, Jian; Wang, Lijuan

    2010-12-01

    A new activation process was developed for electroless plating to prepare wood-based EMI shielding material. Pd(II) was adsorbed on a wood surface modified with γ-aminopropyltrihydroxysilane (APTHS) formed by the hydrolysis of γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). After reduction of Pd(II), electroless plating was successfully initiated and an Ni-P coating was deposited on the wood veneer. The activation process and resulting coating were characterized by XPS, SEM-EDS and XRD. The metal deposition, surface resistivity and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness were measured. XPS analysis proved that Pd(II) was bonded to the amino group of APTHS and was reduced to Pd(0). The Ni-P coating was uniform, compact and continuous, and consisted of 3.39 wt.% phosphorus and 96.61 wt.% nickel. XRD analysis indicated that the coating was crystalline, which is thought to be related to the low phosphorus content. The plated birch veneers exhibited electromagnetic shielding effectiveness greater than 60 dB in the frequency range 10 MHz-1.5 GHz.

  3. Field Emission Lamps Prepared with Dip-Coated and Nickel Electroless Plated Carbon Nanotube Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Pu, N W; Youh, M J; Chung, K J; Liu, Y M; Ger, M D

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication and efficiency enhancement of tubal field emission lamps (FELs) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as the cathode field emitters were studied. The cathode filaments were prepared by eletrolessly plating a nickel (Ni) film on the cathode made of a 304 stainless steel wire dip-coated with MWNTs. The 304 wire was dip-coated with MWNTs and nano-sized Pd catalyst in a solution, and then eletrolessly plated with Ni to form an MWNT-embedded composite film. The MWNTs embedded in Ni not only had better adhesion but also exhibited a higher FE threshold voltage, which is beneficial to our FEL system and can increase the luminous efficiency of the anode phosphor. Our results show that the FE cathode prepared by dipping three times in a solution containing 400 ppm Pd nano-catalysts and 0.2 wt.% MWNTs and then eletrolessly plating a Ni film at a deposition temperature of 60 °C, pH value of 5, and deposition time of 7 min has the best FE uniformity and efficiency. Its emission current can stay as low as 2.5 mA at a high applied voltage of 7 kV, which conforms to the high-voltage-and-low-current requirement of the P22 phosphor and can therefore maximize the luminous efficiency of our FEL. We found that the MWNT cathodes prepared by this approach are suitable for making high-efficiency FELs.

  4. 78 FR 23905 - Diffusion-Annealed, Nickel-Plated Flat-Rolled Steel Products From Japan: Initiation of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... at less than normal value (``NV''). In addition, Petitioner alleges that subject imports exceed the...'') subheadings 7210.90.6000 and 7212.50.0000, corresponding to bills of lading, as obtained through Zepol... of certain nickel-plated, flat-rolled steel from Japan captured in bills of lading. Petitioner...

  5. Diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy by electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, M.S.; Chang, C.B.; Chuang, T.H.

    2000-02-01

    Although intimate contact can be obtained for diffusion bonding of a superplastic Inconel 718SPF superalloy under a low pressure of 7 MPa, the precipitates formed at the interface retarded achievement of a sound joint. The shear strength was only 41.5 MPa for an overlap length of 12 T (T = 1.3 mm, sheet thickness). The diffusion bondability of t his Inconel 718SPF superalloy was enhanced by electroless nickel plating. In this situation, the bonding shear strength increased to 70.4 MPa for the same overlap length of 12 T under the same bonding condition, regardless of the roughness of the surface to be bonded. Upon decreasing the overlap length from 12 to 6T, the bonding strength remained constant.

  6. Scratch Adhesion Evaluation of Electroless Nickel Plating on mg and mg Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhenmin; Gao, Wei

    Magnesium (Mg) and its alloys are being used as structural components in industry because of their high strength-to-weight ratio and relatively high stiffness. A shortcoming of Mg based alloys is their poor corrosion and wear resistance. Therefore, coatings or surface treatment are needed for protection purpose. This paper reports our work on electroless plating of Ni-P on Mg alloys. Pure Mg, AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys were used as the substrates to investigate friction and adhesion properties of the electroless Ni-P coatings. The maximum friction coefficient (~0.3) was found on the electroless nickel coating of pure Mg substrate. The adhesion strengths of the coatings on AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys are higher than that on pure Mg. The critical load (a measure of adhesion strength) of AZ31 reached 13.1 N.

  7. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui–Yuan; Yu, Zhao–Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun–Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi–Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30–60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1–5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200–500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application. PMID:26603776

  8. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui–Yuan; Yu, Zhao–Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun–Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi–Chuan

    2015-11-01

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30-60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1-5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200-500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application.

  9. Achieving high strength and high ductility in magnesium alloy using hard-plate rolling (HPR) process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Yuan; Yu, Zhao-Peng; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Zha, Min; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Qi-Chuan

    2015-11-25

    Magnesium alloys are highly desirable for a wide range of lightweight structural components. However, rolling Mg alloys can be difficult due to their poor plasticity, and the strong texture yielded from rolling often results in poor plate forming ability, which limits their further engineering applications. Here we report a new hard-plate rolling (HPR) route which achieves a large reduction during a single rolling pass. The Mg-9Al-1Zn (AZ91) plates processed by HPR consist of coarse grains of 30-60 μm, exhibiting a typical basal texture, fine grains of 1-5 μm and ultrafine (sub) grains of 200-500 nm, both of the latter two having a weakened texture. More importantly, the HPR was efficient in gaining a simultaneous high strength and uniform ductility, i.e., ~371 MPa and ~23%, respectively. The superior properties should be mainly attributed to the cooperation effect of the multimodal grain structure and weakened texture, where the former facilitates a strong work hardening while the latter promotes the basal slip. The HPR methodology is facile and effective, and can avoid plate cracking that is prone to occur during conventional rolling processes. This strategy is applicable to hard-to-deform materials like Mg alloys, and thus has a promising prospect for industrial application.

  10. Sonocatalytic injury of cancer cells attached on the surface of a nickel-titanium dioxide alloy plate.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Maruyama, Hirotaka; Ogino, Chiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2016-01-01

    The present study demonstrates ultrasound-induced cell injury using a nickel-titanium dioxide (Ni-TiO2) alloy plate as a sonocatalyst and a cell culture surface. Ultrasound irradiation of cell-free Ni-TiO2 alloy plates with 1 MHz ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm(2) for 30s led to an increased generation of hydroxyl (OH) radicals compared to nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) control alloy plates with and without ultrasound irradiation. When human breast cancer cells (MCF-7 cells) cultured on the Ni-TiO2 alloy plates were irradiated with 1 MHz ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm(2) for 30s and then incubated for 48 h, cell density on the alloy plate was reduced to approximately 50% of the controls on the Ni-Ti alloy plates with and without ultrasound irradiation. These results indicate the injury of MCF-7 cells following sonocatalytic OH radical generation by Ni-TiO2. Further experiments demonstrated cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation after ultrasound irradiation of MCF-7 cells attached on the Ni-TiO2 alloy plates, indicating induction of apoptosis.

  11. Development of a nickel plated aluminum krypton-81m target system.

    PubMed

    Alrumayan, F; Okarvi, S M; Nagatsu, K; Yanbawi, S; Aljammaz, I

    2017-03-01

    A fully automated system was developed to produce rubidium-81 ((81)Rb), based on the (nat)Kr (p, n) (81)Rb reaction. The energy incident on the target was 26MeV. Only 6MeV was stopped inside the gas and the remainder was stopped by a specially designed flange. The target body was characterized by its conical shape and its inner walls were chemically plated with 100±10µm of nickel (Ni). Ni is advantageous as a fairly good conductor of heat whose surface can resist solutions. Additionally, the Ni plated target allowed potassium chloride to dissolve (81)Rb, with no further effect on the target body. The system produced (81)Rb with a production yield of approximately 4.5mCi/µAh, which is close to the calculated expected yield of 5.3mCi/µAh. The system is able to deliver reliable and reproducible radioactivity for patients and can be operated up to 1500µAh before preventive maintenance is due. Key steps in designing the (81)Rb target for selected energy ranges are reported here.

  12. Hard x-ray nanofocusing using total-reflection zone plates

    SciTech Connect

    Takano, Hidekazu Matsumura, Atsuyuki; Sakka, Kenji; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Tsuji, Takuya

    2016-01-28

    A total-reflection zone plate (TRZP), which is a reflective grating that generates a line focus of hard X-rays, was developed. Newly designed TRZPs, introducing a laminar grating concept, were fabricated with various zone parameters. The focusing performances with regard to the beam size and the diffraction efficiency were evaluated using synchrotron radiation X-rays of 10 keV energy. Although the beam sizes measured are insufficient in comparison with the ideal value, the maximum diffraction efficiency, measured at 20%, exceeds the limitations of conventional TRZPs based on a binary grating.

  13. Hard-x-ray microscopy with Fresnel zone plates reaches 40 nm Rayleigh resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y. S.; Yi, J. M.; De Carlo, F.; Shen, Q.; Lee, Wah-Keat; Wu, H. J.; Wang, C. L.; Wang, J. Y.; Liu, C. J.; Wang, C. H.; Wu, S. R.; Chien, C. C.; Hwu, Y.; Tkachuk, A.; Yun, W.; Feser, M.; Liang, K. S.; Yang, C. S.; Je, J. H.; Margaritondo, G.

    2008-03-10

    Substantial improvements in the nanofabrication and characteristics of gold Fresnel zone plates yielded unprecedented resolution levels in hard-x-ray microscopy. Tests performed on a variety of specimens with 8-10 keV photons demonstrated a first-order lateral resolution below 40 nm based on the Rayleigh criterion. Combined with the use of a phase contrast technique, this makes it possible to view features in the 30 nm range; good-quality images can be obtained at video rate, down to 50 ms/frame. The important repercussions on materials science, nanotechnology, and the life sciences are discussed.

  14. Nickel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The agricultural significance of nickel (Ni) is becoming increasingly apparent; yet, relative few farmers, growers, specialists or researchers know much about its function in crops, nor symptoms of deficiency or toxicity. The body of knowledge is reviewed regarding Ni’s background, uptake, transloc...

  15. Qualification Testing of General Electric 50 Ah Nickel-Cadmium Cells with New Separator and New Positive Plate Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1986-01-01

    Forty-two 50 Ah aerospace nickel-cadmium cells were delivered to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by General Electric (GE) in February, 1985, for the purpose of evaluating and qualifying a new nylon separator material Pellon 2536, and the new GE Positive Plate Nickel Attack Control Passivation process. Testing began in May, 1985, at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC) in Crane, Indiana with standard initial evaluation tests. Life cycling in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) began in July, 1985, with approximately 1200 LEO cycles complete at this writting. Early test results show that cells with positive plate passivation exhibit higher than normal charge voltage characteristics. Other aspects of performance were nominal.

  16. Phase equilibria and plate-fluid interfacial tensions for associating hard sphere fluids confined in slit pores.

    PubMed

    Fu, Dong; Li, Xiao-Sen

    2006-08-28

    The excess Helmholtz free energy functional for associating hard sphere fluid is formulated by using a modified fundamental measure theory [Y. X. Yu and J. Z. Wu, J. Chem. Phys. 117, 10156 (2002)]. Within the framework of density functional theory, the thermodynamic properties including phase equilibria for both molecules and monomers, equilibrium plate-fluid interfacial tensions and isotherms of excess adsorption, average molecule density, average monomer density, and plate-fluid interfacial tension for four-site associating hard sphere fluids confined in slit pores are investigated. The phase equilibria inside the hard slit pores and attractive slit pores are determined according to the requirement that temperature, chemical potential, and grand potential in coexistence phases should be equal and the plate-fluid interfacial tensions at equilibrium states are predicted consequently. The influences of association energy, fluid-solid interaction, and pore width on phase equilibria and equilibrium plate-fluid interfacial tensions are discussed.

  17. Effect of dry cryogenic treatment on Vickers hardness and wear resistance of new martensitic shape memory nickel-titanium alloy

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Prabhakaran, Gopalakrishnan; Rajadurai, Arunachalam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the role of dry cryogenic treatment (CT) temperature and time on the Vickers hardness and wear resistance of new martensitic shape memory (SM) nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy. The null hypothesis tested was that there is no difference in Vickers hardness and wear resistance between SM NiTi alloys following CT under two soaking temperatures and times. Materials and Methods: The composition and the phase transformation behavior of the alloy were examined by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, respectively. Fifteen cylindrical specimens and 50 sheet specimens were subjected to different CT conditions: Deep cryogenic treatment (DCT) 24 group: −185°C, 24 h; DCT six group: −185°C, 6 h; shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) 24 group: −80°C, 24 h; SCT six group: −80°C, 6 h; and control group. Wear resistance was assessed from weight loss before and after reciprocatory wet sliding wear. Results: The as-received SM NiTi alloy contained 50.8 wt% nickel and possessed austenite finish temperature (Af) of 45.76°C. Reduction in Vickers hardness of specimens in DCT 24 group was highly significant (P < 0.01; Tukey's honest significant difference [HSD]). The weight loss was significantly higher in DCT 24 group (P < 0.05; Tukey's HSD). Conclusion: Deep dry CT with 24 h soaking period significantly reduces the hardness and wear resistance of SM NiTi alloy. PMID:26929689

  18. Structure zone diagram and particle incorporation of nickel brush plated composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isern, L.; Impey, S.; Almond, H.; Clouser, S. J.; Endrino, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    This work studies the deposition of aluminium-incorporated nickel coatings by brush electroplating, focusing on the electroplating setup and processing parameters. The setup was optimised in order to increase the volume of particle incorporation. The optimised design focused on increasing the plating solution flow to avoid sedimentation, and as a result the particle transport experienced a three-fold increase when compared with the traditional setup. The influence of bath load, current density and the brush material used was investigated. Both current density and brush material have a significant impact on the morphology and composition of the coatings. Higher current densities and non-abrasive brushes produce rough, particle-rich samples. Different combinations of these two parameters influence the surface characteristics differently, as illustrated in a Structure Zone Diagram. Finally, surfaces featuring crevices and peaks incorporate between 3.5 and 20 times more particles than smoother coatings. The presence of such features has been quantified using average surface roughness Ra and Abbott-Firestone curves. The combination of optimised setup and rough surface increased the particle content of the composite to 28 at.%.

  19. Structure zone diagram and particle incorporation of nickel brush plated composite coatings

    PubMed Central

    Isern, L.; Impey, S.; Almond, H.; Clouser, S. J.; Endrino, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    This work studies the deposition of aluminium-incorporated nickel coatings by brush electroplating, focusing on the electroplating setup and processing parameters. The setup was optimised in order to increase the volume of particle incorporation. The optimised design focused on increasing the plating solution flow to avoid sedimentation, and as a result the particle transport experienced a three-fold increase when compared with the traditional setup. The influence of bath load, current density and the brush material used was investigated. Both current density and brush material have a significant impact on the morphology and composition of the coatings. Higher current densities and non-abrasive brushes produce rough, particle-rich samples. Different combinations of these two parameters influence the surface characteristics differently, as illustrated in a Structure Zone Diagram. Finally, surfaces featuring crevices and peaks incorporate between 3.5 and 20 times more particles than smoother coatings. The presence of such features has been quantified using average surface roughness Ra and Abbott-Firestone curves. The combination of optimised setup and rough surface increased the particle content of the composite to 28 at.%. PMID:28300159

  20. Direct-write X-ray lithography using a hard X-ray Fresnel zone plate.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Yong; Noh, Do Young; Lee, Hae Cheol; Yu, Chung-Jong; Hwu, Yeukuang; Kang, Hyon Chol

    2015-05-01

    Results are reported of direct-write X-ray lithography using a hard X-ray beam focused by a Fresnel zone plate with an outermost zone width of 40 nm. An X-ray beam at 7.5 keV focused to a nano-spot was employed to write arbitrary patterns on a photoresist thin film with a resolution better than 25 nm. The resulting pattern dimension depended significantly on the kind of underlying substrate, which was attributed to the lateral spread of electrons generated during X-ray irradiation. The proximity effect originated from the diffuse scattering near the focus and electron blur was also observed, which led to an increase in pattern dimension. Since focusing hard X-rays to below a 10 nm spot is currently available, the direct-write hard X-ray lithography developed in this work has the potential to be a promising future lithographic method.

  1. Upgrading multilayer zone plate technology for hard x-ray focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirotomo, Toshiki; Takano, Hidekazu; Sumida, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takahisa; Konishi, Shigeki; Ichimaru, Satoshi; Ohchi, Tadayuki; Takenaka, Hisataka; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Multilayer zone plate (MZP) technology for hard X-ray focusing was upgraded and its focusing performance was evaluated using 20-keV X-rays at the synchrotron beamline (BL24XU) of SPring-8. The MZP consists of MoSi2 and Si layers alternately deposited on a glass fiber by magnetron sputtering so that all zone boundaries satisfy the Fresnel zone configuration. The focused beam was evaluated using knife-edge scanning in which the measured intensity distribution is identical to the line spread function (LSF) in the focal plane. The focused beamsize of about 30 nm was estimated by oscillation peaks observed in the measured LSF according to Rayleigh's criterion.

  2. Upgrading multilayer zone plate technology for hard x-ray focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Hirotomo, Toshiki; Konishi, Shigeki; Takano, Hidekazu Sumida, Kazuhiro; Tsusaka, Yoshiyuki; Kagoshima, Yasushi; Koyama, Takahisa; Ichimaru, Satoshi; Ohchi, Tadayuki; Takenaka, Hisataka

    2016-01-28

    Multilayer zone plate (MZP) technology for hard X-ray focusing was upgraded and its focusing performance was evaluated using 20-keV X-rays at the synchrotron beamline (BL24XU) of SPring-8. The MZP consists of MoSi{sub 2} and Si layers alternately deposited on a glass fiber by magnetron sputtering so that all zone boundaries satisfy the Fresnel zone configuration. The focused beam was evaluated using knife-edge scanning in which the measured intensity distribution is identical to the line spread function (LSF) in the focal plane. The focused beamsize of about 30 nm was estimated by oscillation peaks observed in the measured LSF according to Rayleigh’s criterion.

  3. Nanofocusing of hard X-ray free electron laser pulses using diamond based Fresnel zone plates.

    PubMed

    David, C; Gorelick, S; Rutishauser, S; Krzywinski, J; Vila-Comamala, J; Guzenko, V A; Bunk, O; Färm, E; Ritala, M; Cammarata, M; Fritz, D M; Barrett, R; Samoylova, L; Grünert, J; Sinn, H

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of X-ray sources based on the free-electron laser (XFEL) principle are presently under construction or have recently started operation. The intense, ultrashort pulses of these sources will enable new insights in many different fields of science. A key problem is to provide x-ray optical elements capable of collecting the largest possible fraction of the radiation and to focus into the smallest possible focus. As a key step towards this goal, we demonstrate here the first nanofocusing of hard XFEL pulses. We developed diamond based Fresnel zone plates capable of withstanding the full beam of the world's most powerful x-ray laser. Using an imprint technique, we measured the focal spot size, which was limited to 320 nm FWHM by the spectral band width of the source. A peak power density in the focal spot of 4×10(17)W/cm(2) was obtained at 70 fs pulse length.

  4. Waste minimisation in a hard chromiun plating Small Medium Enterprise (SME).

    PubMed

    Viguri, J R; Andrés, A; Irabien, A

    2002-01-01

    The high potential of waste stream minimisation in the metal finishing sector justifies specific studies of Small and Medium Enterprises (SME). In this work, the minimisation options of the wastes generated in a hard chromium plating activity have been analysed. The study has been performed in a small job shop company, which works in batch mode with big pieces. A process flowsheet after connecting the unit operations and determining the process inputs (raw and secondary materials) and outputs (waste streams) has been carried out. The main properties, quantity and current management of the waste streams have been shown. The obvious lack of information has been identified and finally the waste minimisation options that could be adopted by the company have been recorded.

  5. CURRENT AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES FOR EXTENDING THE LIFETIME OF ELECTROLESS NICKEL PLATING BATHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The waste treatment and rejuvenation of spent electroless nickel baths has attracted a considerable amount of interest from electroplating shops, electroless nickel suppliers, universities and regulatory agencies due to the finite life of the baths and the associated waste that t...

  6. Hard x-ray holographic microscopy using refractive prism and Fresnel zone plate objective

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Yoshio; Takeuchi, Akihisa

    2005-09-15

    An optics for hard x-ray holographic microscopy has been developed and preliminary experiments have been done at SPring-8 undulator beamline 20XU. The optical system consists of an x-ray objective lens (Fresnel zone plate) and a wave front-division-type interferometer with prism optics. The illuminating x-ray beam is coherent with parallel radiation, and the spatially coherent area is much larger than the aperture of the objective lens. The refractive prism is placed behind the back focal plane of the objective lens in order to configure the wavefront-dividing interferometer. Half of the illuminating radiation is used for illuminating an object, and the other half is used for forming a reference wave. The magnified image of the object is generated at an image plane, and the reference wave is superimposed on the magnified image of the object. The recorded interferogram includes both amplitude and phase information of the object. The spatial resolution is determined by the numerical aperture of the objective lens. Therefore, in principle, this method enables holographic imaging at nanometer scale to be carried out in the hard x-ray region.

  7. Qualification testing of General Electric 50 Ah nickel-cadmium cells with Pellon 2536 separator and passivated positive plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, George W.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two 50 Ah nickel-cadmium cells were delivered to the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by General Electric (GE) in February, 1985 for the purpose of evaluating and qualifying a nonwoven nylon separator material, Pellon 2536, and the GE positive plate nickel attack control gas passivation process. Testing began May, 1985 at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC) in Crane, Indiana with GSFC standard initial evaluation tests. Life cycling in both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geosynchronous Orbit (GEO) began in July, 1985 with approximately 6500 LEO cycles and three GEO eclipse seasons completed. After early problems in maintaining test pack temperature control, all packs are performing well but are exhibiting higher than normal charge voltage characteristics.

  8. Grazing Incidence Nickel Replicated Optics for Hard X-ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peturzzo, J. J., III; Elsner, R. F.; Joy, M. K.; ODell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The requirements for future hard x-ray (up to 50 keV) telescopes are lightweight, high angular resolution optics with large collecting areas. Grazing incidence replicated optics are an excellent candidate for this, type of mission, providing better angular resolution, comparable area/unit mass, and simpler fabrication than multilayer-coated foils. Most importantly, the technology to fabricate the required optics currently exists. A comparison of several hard x-ray telescope designs will be presented.

  9. High energy muon induced radioactive nuclides in nickel plate and its use for 2-D muon-beam image profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurebayashi, Y.; Sakurai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Doshita, N.; Kikuchi, S.; Tokanai, F.; Horiuchi, K.; Tajima, Y.; Oe, T.; Sato, T.; Gunji, S.; Inui, E.; Kondo, K.; Iwata, N.; Sasaki, N.; Matsuzaki, H.; Kunieda, S.

    2015-11-01

    Target materials were exposed to a muon beam with an energy of 160 GeV/c at the COMPASS experiment line in CERN-SPS to measure the production cross-sections for muon-induced radionuclides. A muon imager containing four nickel plates, each measuring 100 mm×100 mm, exposed to the IP plate successfully detected the muon beam image during an irradiation period of 33 days. The contrasting density rate of the nickel plate was (5.2±0.7)×10-9 PSL/muon per one-day exposure to IP. The image measured 122 mm and 174 mm in horizontal and vertical lengths, respectively, in relation to the surface of the base, indicating that 50±6% of the muon beam flux is confined to an area of 18% of the whole muon beam. The number of muons estimated from the PSL value in the total beam image area (0.81±0.1)×1013 was comparable to the total muon counts of the ion-chamber at the M2 beam line in the CERN-SPS. The production cross-sections of Cr-51, Mn-54, Co-56, Co-57, and Co-58 in nickel were 0.19±0.08, 0.34±0.06, 0.5±0.05, 3.44±0.07, 0.4±0.03 in the unit of mb, respectively, reducing muon associated particles effects. They are approximately 10 times smaller than that a proceeding study by Heisinger et al.

  10. Microstructure and hardness development in a copper-nickel diffusion gradient model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchstein, L. D. L.; Zhang, X.; Hansen, N.

    2015-08-01

    Cu has been electrolytically coated with Ni and subsequently deformed by rotary swaging up to a strain of e=2 to create a chemical gradient at the interface of the two elements. The extend of this chemical intermixing has been investigated through Energy Dispersive X- ray (EDX) spectroscopy in the Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscope (SEM and TEM). The depth, in which intermixing takes place, is about 1pm from the interface. Because of the uniform deformation, the structure does not get elongated but rather uniformly reduced in size. Microindentation hardness measurement shows a hardness increase from 120 to 135kp/mm2 in the Cu phase with increasing strain. After annealing at 200°C for up to 4h the hardness first decreases, but raises above the value for the highly strained sample. The experimental findings are discussed with emphasis on surface mechanical alloying as a process of both scientific and technological interest.

  11. Current distribution and current efficiency in pulsed current plating of nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, S.I.; Jeong, K.M.; Kim, S.K.; Sohn, H.J.

    1996-09-01

    A mathematical model is presented to obtain the current distribution and current efficiency on a rotating disk electrode under controlled current condition. The calculated results compare well with experiments performed using a nickel/nickel sulfate system in the presence of boric acid. The current density is highly nonuniform due to the ohmic drop in the electrolyte. The current efficiency was decreased with the increase of hydrogen concentration as well as applied pulse current density.

  12. Removal of copper, nickel and chromium mixtures from metal plating wastewater by adsorption with modified carbon foam.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Gu; Lee, Soonjae; Park, Jeong-Ann; Park, Chanhyuk; Lee, Sang Jeong; Kim, Song-Bae; An, Byungryul; Yun, Seong-Taek; Lee, Sang-Hyup; Choi, Jae-Woo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the characterizations and adsorption efficiencies for chromium, copper and nickel were evaluated using manufacture-grade Fe2O3-carbon foam. SEM, XRD, XRF and BET analyses were performed to determine the characteristics of the material. Various pore sizes (12-420 μm) and iron contents (3.62%) were found on the surface of the Fe2O3-carbon foam. Fe2O3-carbon foam was found to have excellent adsorption efficiency compared to carbon foam for mixed solutions of cationic and anionic heavy metals. The adsorption capacities for chromium, copper and nickel were 6.7, 3.8 and 6.4 mg/g, respectively, which were obtained using a dual exponential adsorption model. In experiments with varying dosages of the Fe2O3 powder, no notable differences were observed in the removal efficiency. In a fixed-bed column test, Fe2O3-carbon foam achieved adsorption capacities for chromium, copper and nickel of 33.0, 12.0 and 9.5 mg/g, respectively, after 104 h. Based on these results, Fe2O3-carbon foam was observed to be a promising material for treatment of plating wastewater.

  13. Study of high performance alloy electroforming. [nickel manganese and nickel cobalt manganese alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-manganese alloy electrodeposits from an electrolyte containing more manganese ion than previously used is being evaluated at two bath operating temperatures with a great variety of pulse plating conditions. Saccharine was added as a stress reducing agent for the electroforming of several of the samples with highest manganese content. All specimens for mechanical property testing have been produced but are not through the various heat treatments as yet. One of the heat treatment will be at 343 C (650 F), the temperature at which the MCC outer electroformed nickel shell is stress relieved. A number of retainer specimens from prior work have been tested for hardness before and after heat treatment. There appears to be a fairly good correlation between hardness and mechanical properties. Comparison of representative mechanical properties with hardnesses are made for nickel-manganese electrodeposits and nickel-cobalt-manganese deposits.

  14. Influence of process parameters on rolling-contact-fatigue life of ion plated nickel-copper-silver lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2012-05-15

    In this paper, we present a connection between argon ion flux, element-mixing, and rolling contact fatigue (RCF) life of a thin film nickel-copper-silver lubricant on ball bearings. The film is deposited on the balls using an ion plating process and tested for RCF in high vacuum. The ion flux is measured using a Langmuir probe and the plane stress within the film during deposition is calculated using a thin film model. Experiments reveal that there is an inverse relationship between ion flux and RCF life for most deposition voltage and pressure combinations tested, specifically, 15.5-18.5 mTorr and 1.5-3.5 kV. For voltages up to 2.5 kV, RCF life decreases as ion flux increases due to increased compressive stress within the film, reaching as high as 2.6 GPa. For voltages between 2.5 and 3.5 kV, interlayer mixing of nickel and copper with the silver layer reduces RCF life due to contamination, even as ion flux and corresponding film compressive stress are reduced. A Monte Carlo-based simulation tool, SRIM is used to track collision cascades of the argon ions and metal atoms within the coating layers. At process voltages above 2.5 kV we observe elemental mixing of copper and nickel with the silver layer using Auger electron spectroscopy of coated steel and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls. The authors conclude that an ion flux greater than 5.0 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} leads to reduced RCF life due to high film stress. In addition, process voltages greater than 2.5 kV also reduce RCF life due to contamination and interlayer mixing of nickel and copper within the silver layer.

  15. Large-Scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rools In A Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethlehem Steel's (now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    SciTech Connect

    John Mengel; Anthony Martocci; Larry Fabina; RObert Petrusha; Ronald Chango

    2003-09-01

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system.

  16. Modification of a force plate system for equine gait analysis on hard road surfaces: a technical note.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A M; Pardoe, C H

    2001-04-01

    Studies on horseshoe materials have been limited to the analysis of kinematic data to determine slip times and distances, since equine force plate analysis is traditionally undertaken on a rubber-surfaced force plate. The purpose of this study was to modify a force plate for measuring ground reaction forces on a road surface and report preliminary data from the system. A steel-reinforced concrete top plate of 18 mm thickness and mass 23 kg, and a 12 mm thick top plate of 6 mm bituminous macadam wear coat (road surface) contained in a tray constructed of 2 mm thick steel, mass 21 kg, were constructed. The top plates were bolted to a forceplate and resonance frequency of the force plate top plate combinations were 278 Hz (concrete) and 218 Hz (roadway), respectively. Simultaneous kinetic and kinematic data were collected while a horse, shod in steel horseshoes, was trotted over the concrete-topped force plate until 8 foot placements were recorded. The foot slipped for mean +/- s.d. 35 +/- 7 mm in 29 +/- 8 ms after impact and both Fy and Fz increased during foot slip. The ratio of Fy/Fz during slip was relatively constant at 0.56 +/- 0.05. The top plates have proved resilient in use and have withstood a variety of horseshoe designs and tungsten-capped stud nails with minimal damage. They enable measurement of ground reaction forces on hard surfaces and the calculation of the energy dissipated via foot slippage by integration of the craniocaudal force-foot position data after impact.

  17. Study on micro-hardness of electroless composite plating of Ni-P with SiC Nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Zhaoguo; Li, Jiamin; Xu, Donghui

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, a Ni-P electroless composite coating containing nano SiC particles was produced. The wearability of the composite coating was studied. Temperature, PH of the plating liquid and the concentration of SiC nanoparticles in the plating liquid were taken as parameters and the experiment with three factors and five levels was designed through the method of quadratic orthogonal rotation combination. SiC nanoparticles were dispersed by ultrasonic. The influence of the testing parameters on the hardness of the coating was studied intensively. The optimal parameters were obtained when the temperature is 86+/-1°C, PH is 6+/-0.5 and the concentration of SiC nanoparticles is 6g/L. The maximal hardness of the coating is over 1700HV after heat treatment.

  18. AS04-AS02-133 Electroformed-Nickel Hard-X-Ray Optic Development at NASA/MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian; Eisner, Ron; Engelhaupt, Darell; Gubarev, Mikhail; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; ODell, Stephen; Speegle, Chet; Weisskopf, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We are developing the nickel electroforming process to fabricate high-quality mirrors for the region. Two applications for these optics are a balloon-borne payload, termed HERO, and a hard-X-ray telescope module for consideration for the Constellation-X mission. In the formation on shells, of 15 arcsec angular resolution, will provide over 200 sq cm of effective collecting area unprecedented sensitivity in the 20-75 keV region. A first flight of a partial payload, feature approximately 1/4 of the total collecting area, is scheduled for the Spring of 2004. In the Co-application, two mirror shells, of diameters 150 and 230 mm, are being fabricated. This is particularly challenging as high angular resolution must be maintained with shells of only 1 mm thickness (driven by the tight weight budget for the mission). Further, the shells must be low (less than 5 A on sub-micron spatial scales) to permit efficient use of planned multilayer coatings which must release cleanly from their forming mandrels without any surface degradation.

  19. Efficacy of reducing agent and surfactant contacting pattern on the performance characteristics of nickel electroless plating baths coupled with and without ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amrita; Pujari, Murali; Uppaluri, Ramgopal; Verma, Anil

    2014-07-01

    This article addresses furthering the role of sonication for the optimal fabrication of nickel ceramic composite membranes using electroless plating. Deliberating upon process modifications for surfactant induced electroless plating (SIEP) and combined surfactant and sonication induced electroless plating (SSOEP), this article highlights a novel method of contacting of the reducing agent and surfactant to the conventional electroless nickel plating baths. Rigorous experimental investigations indicated that the combination of ultrasound (in degas mode), surfactant and reducing agent pattern had a profound influence in altering the combinatorial plating characteristics. For comparison purpose, purely surfactant induced nickel ELP baths have also been investigated. These novel insights consolidate newer research horizons for the role of ultrasound to achieve dense metal ceramic composite membranes in a shorter span of total plating time. Surface and physical characterizations were carried out using BET, FTIR, XRD, FESEM and nitrogen permeation experiments. It has been analyzed that the SSOEP baths provided maximum ratio of percent pore densification per unit metal film thickness (PPDδ) and hold the key for further fine tuning of the associated degrees of freedom. On the other hand SIEP baths provided lower (PPDδ) ratio but higher PPD. For SSOEP baths with dropwise reducing agent and bulk surfactant, the PPD and metal film thickness values were 73.4% and 8.4 μm which varied to 66.9% and 13.3 μm for dropwise reducing agent and drop surfactant case.

  20. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-02-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  1. Microstructure Evolution During Stainless Steel-Copper Vacuum Brazing with a Ag/Cu/Pd Filler Alloy: Effect of Nickel Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, R. K.; Laik, A.; Mishra, P.

    2017-03-01

    Vacuum brazing of stainless steel and copper plates was done using a silver-based filler alloy. In one set of experiments, around 30-µm-thick nickel coatings were electrochemically applied on stainless steel plates before carrying out the brazing runs and its effect in making changes in the braze-zone microstructure was studied. For brazing temperature of 830 °C, scanning electron microscopy examination of the braze-zone revealed that relatively sound joints were obtained when brazing was done with nickel-coated stainless steel than with uncoated one. However, when brazing of nickel-coated stainless steel and copper plates was done at 860 °C, a wide crack appeared in the braze-zone adjacent to copper side. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and electron microprobe analysis confirmed that at higher temperature, the diffusion of Cu atoms from copper plate towards the braze-zone was faster than that of Ni atoms from nickel coating. Helium leak rate of the order 10-11 Pa m3/s was obtained for the crack-free joint, whereas this value was higher than 10-4 Pa m3/s for the joint having crack. The shear strength of the joint was found to decrease considerably due to the presence of crack.

  2. Waste Reduction for Electroless Nickel Plating Solutions at U.S. Army Depots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-10

    2-4 2.2.3 Complexing Agents .................................. 2-6 2.2.4 Stabilizers/ Inhibitors .................................. 2-9...11P04 H ypophosphor-ous acid3 H~lIOPhosphorous acid (orthophosphorous acid) 1IIOOC)C0bCO I Succinic acid Ii I List of Chemicals and Abbreviations...source of nickel ions * A reducing agent • Complexing agents • Stabilizers/ inhibitors * Energy If all of the above components are not in the correct

  3. Interlaminar and ductile characteristics of carbon fibers-reinforced plastics produced by nanoscaled electroless nickel plating on carbon fiber surfaces.

    PubMed

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Rhee, Kyong-Yop

    2002-01-15

    In this work, a new method based on nanoscaled Ni-P alloy coating on carbon fiber surfaces is proposed for the improvement of interfacial properties between fibers and epoxy matrix in a composite system. Fiber surfaces and the mechanical interfacial properties of composites were characterized by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS), and impact strength. Experimental results showed that the O(1s)/C(1s) ratio or Ni and P amounts had been increased as the electroless nickel plating proceeded; the ILSS had also been slightly improved. The impact properties were significantly improved in the presence of Ni-P alloy on carbon fiber surfaces, increasing the ductility of the composites. This was probably due to the effect of substituted Ni-P alloy, leading to an increase of the resistance to the deformation and the crack initiation of the epoxy system.

  4. Fresnel zone plate stacking in the intermediate field for high efficiency focusing in the hard X-ray regime.

    PubMed

    Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Wojcik, Michael; Liu, Jie; Roehrig, Chris; Cummings, Marvin; Vila-Comamala, Joan; Li, Kenan; Lai, Barry; Shu, Deming; Vogt, Stefan

    2014-11-17

    Focusing efficiency of Fresnel zone plates (FZPs) for X-rays depends on zone height, while the achievable spatial resolution depends on the width of the finest zones. FZPs with optimal efficiency and sub-100-nm spatial resolution require high aspect ratio structures which are difficult to fabricate with current technology especially for the hard X-ray regime. A possible solution is to stack several zone plates. To increase the number of FZPs within one stack, we first demonstrate intermediate-field stacking and apply this method by stacks of up to five FZPs with adjusted diameters. Approaching the respective optimum zone height, we maximized efficiencies for high resolution focusing at three different energies, 10, 11.8, and 25 keV.

  5. Finite thickness effect of a zone plate on focusing hard x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Wenbing; Chrzas, John J.; Viccaro, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Spatial resolution and focusing efficiency are two important properties of a zone plate in x-ray focusing applications. A general expression of the zone plate equation describing its zone registration is derived from the interference of spherical waves emited from two mutually coherent point sources. An analytical expression of the focusing efficiency in terms of the zone plate thickness and x-ray refractive indices of the zones is also derived. Validity condition for using this expression is considered. Thickness required for obtaining adequate focusing efficiency is calculated as a function of x-ray energy for several representative materials. The spatial resolution of a finite thickness zone plate is worse than that of an infinetly thin zone plate which is approximately equal to the smallest zone width of the zone plate. The effect of the finite thickness on the spatial resolution is considered. This manuscript has been authored under contract number W-31-109-ENG-38 with the U. S. Department of Energy. Accordingly the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution or allow others todo so for U. S. Government purposes. 146 / SPIE Vol 1345 Advanced X-Ray/EUV Radiation Sources andApplications(1990)

  6. Comparison under a simulated sun of two black-nickel-coated flat-plate solar collectors with a nonselective black-paint-coated collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, F. F.

    1975-01-01

    A performance evaluation was made of two, black nickel coated, flat plate solar collectors. Collector performance was determined under a simulated sun for a wide range of inlet temperatures, including the temperature required for solar powered absorption air conditioning. For a basis of comparison a performance test was made on a traditional, two glass, nonselective, black paint coated, flat plate collector. Performance curves and performance parameters are presented to point out the importance of the design variables which determine an efficient collector. A black nickel coated collector was found to be a good performer at the conditions expected for solar powered absorption air conditioning. This collector attained a thermal efficiency of 50 percent at an inlet temperature of 366 K (200 F) and an incident flux of 946 watts/sq m (300 Btu/hr-sq ft).

  7. Electrospark Deposition for Depot- and Field-Level Component Repair and Replacement of Hard Chromium Plating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    2008 to 00-00-2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrospark Deposition for Depot- and Field-Level Component Repair and Replacement of Hard Chromium... electrospark deposition ESOH environmental, safety and occupational health ESTCP Environmental Security Technology Certification Program GEAE GE...returning components to service more rapidly. Electrospark deposition (ESD), also known as electrospark alloying (ESA), is a microwelding technique that

  8. Investigation of Plasma Spray Coatings as an Alternative to Hard Chrome Plating on Internal Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-20

    Nanophase Electroplating, Electrospark Deposition . (From 3-Team workshop – see Appendix 4.) .............................. 77 xii LIST OF ACRONYMS...e.g., D2002) DOD Department of Defense EHC electrolytic hard chrome EIS electrochemical impedance spectroscopy ESD electrospark deposition ...Pacific Northwest National Labs). This program developed Electrospark Deposition , a microwelding technology. In addition, AFRL has a long-running

  9. Formation of {beta}-nickel hydroxide plate-like structures under mild conditions and their optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Moura, A.P. de; Lima, R.C.; Paris, E.C.; Li, M.S.; Varela, J.A.; Longo, E.

    2011-10-15

    Nanostructural {beta}-nickel hydroxide ({beta}-Ni(OH){sub 2}) plates were prepared using the microwave-hydrothermal (MH) method at a low temperature and short reaction times. An ammonia solution was employed as the coordinating agent, which reacts with [Ni(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}]{sup 2+} to control the growth of {beta}-Ni(OH){sub 2} nuclei. A trigonal {beta}-Ni(OH){sub 2} single phase was observed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, and the crystal cell was constructed with structural parameters and atomic coordinates obtained from Rietveld refinement. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images revealed that the samples consisted of hexagonal-shaped nanoplates with a different particle size distribution. Broad absorption bands assigned as transitions of Ni{sup 2+} in oxygen octahedral sites were revealed by UV-vis spectra. Photoluminescence (PL) properties observed with a maximum peak centered in the blue-green region were attributed to different defects, which were produced during the nucleation process. We present a growth process scheme of the {beta}-Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoplates. - Graphical abstract: Nanostructural {beta}-Ni(OH){sub 2} crystalline powders were prepared by rapid microwave-hydrothermal method for 1, 8 and 32 min. The hexagonal-shaped nanoplates obtained presented PL emission in the blue-green region and each decomposed component represents a different type of electronic transition, which can be linked to the structural arrangement or surface defects. Highlights: > Ammonia solution to control the growth of {beta}-Ni(OH){sub 2} nuclei. > Regular plates-shape related to crystallization-dissolution-recrystallization. > The surface states and lattice defects generated in growth mechanism of crystals. > Different defects produced in the growth process responsible by photoluminescence. > Each component of photoluminescence curve linked to structural arrangement or surface defects.

  10. Graphical method for predicting life of a rocket thrust chamber with half-hard zirconium-copper liner and electroformed nickel closeout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasper, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    A method for estimating the life of a regeneratively cooled rocket thrust chamber was developed and is based on the hot-gas wall temperature and the temperature difference between the hot-gas wall and the outside surface of the closeout. This method permits a quick estimate of the life of a thrust chamber when design changes or test-cycle variations are considered. Strain range and life are presented graphically as functions of these temperature parameters for a typical high-performance rocket thrust chamber with a half-hard zirconium-copper liner and an electroformed nickel closeout.

  11. Simulation and experimental study of aspect ratio limitation in Fresnel zone plates for hard-x-ray optics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianpeng; Shao, Jinhai; Zhang, Sichao; Ma, Yaqi; Taksatorn, Nit; Mao, Chengwen; Chen, Yifang; Deng, Biao; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2015-11-10

    For acquiring high-contrast and high-brightness images in hard-x-ray optics, Fresnel zone plates with high aspect ratios (zone height/zone width) have been constantly pursued. However, knowledge of aspect ratio limits remains limited. This work explores the achievable aspect ratio limit in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) by electron-beam lithography (EBL) under 100 keV, and investigates the lithographic factors for this limitation. Both Monte Carlo simulation and EBL on thick PMMA are applied to investigate the profile evolution with exposure doses over 100 nm wide dense zones. A high-resolution scanning electron microscope at low acceleration mode for charging free is applied to characterize the resultant zone profiles. It was discovered for what we believe is the first time that the primary electron-beam spreading in PMMA and the proximity effect due to extra exposure from neighboring areas could be the major causes of limiting the aspect ratio. Using the optimized lithography condition, a 100 nm zone plate with aspect ratio of 15/1 was fabricated and its focusing property was characterized at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The aspect ratio limit found in this work should be extremely useful for guiding further technical development in nanofabrication of high-quality Fresnel zone plates.

  12. Large-scale Evaluation of Nickel Aluminide Rolls in a Heat-Treat Furnace at Bethelehem Steel's (Now ISG) Burns Harbor Plate Mill

    SciTech Connect

    Mengel, J.

    2003-12-16

    At Bethlehem Steel Burns Harbor Plate Division (now ISG Burns Harbor Plate Inc.)'s annealing furnace, new nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls provide greater high-temperature strength and wear resistance compared to the conventional H series cast austenitic alloys currently used in the industry. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Bethlehem (ISG) partnered under a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technology's Emerging Technology Deployment Program to demonstrate and evaluate the nickel aluminide intermetallic alloy rolls as part of an updated energy efficient large commercial annealing furnace system. Many challenges were involved in this project, including developing welding procedures for joining nickel aluminide intermetallic alloys with H-series austenitic alloys, developing commercial cast roll manufacturing specifications, working with several commercial suppliers to produce a quantity of high quality, reproducible nickel aluminide rolls for a large steel industrial annealing furnace, installing and demonstrating the capability of the rolls in this furnace, performing processing trials to evaluate the benefits of new equipment and processes, and documenting the findings. Updated furnace equipment including twenty-five new automated furnace control dampers have been installed replacing older design, less effective units. These dampers, along with upgraded flame-safety control equipment and new AC motors and roll-speed control equipment, are providing improved furnace control and additional energy efficiency. Energy data shows up to a 34% energy reduction from baseline after the installation of upgraded furnace damper controls along with up to a 34% reduction in greenhouse gases, potential for an additional 3 to 6% energy reduction per campaign of light-up and shutdown, and a 46% energy reduction from baseline for limited trials of a combination of improved damper control and straight-through plate processing. The straight-through processing

  13. Radiation-hard ceramic Resistive Plate Chambers for forward TOF and T0 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinov, A.; Dreyer, J.; Fan, X.; Kämpfer, B.; Kiselev, S.; Kotte, R.; Garcia, A. Laso; Malkevich, D.; Naumann, L.; Nedosekin, A.; Plotnikov, V.; Stach, D.; Sultanov, R.; Voloshin, K.

    2017-02-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers with ceramic electrodes are the main candidates for a use in precise multi-channel timing systems operating in high-radiation conditions. We report the latest R&D results on these detectors aimed to meet the requirements of the forward T0 counter at the CBM experiment. RPC design, gas mixture, limits on the bulk resistivity of ceramic electrodes, efficiency, time resolution, counting rate capabilities and ageing test results are presented.

  14. Electroless plating of nickel phosphorous on surface-modified poly(ethylene terephthalate) films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domenech, S. C.; Lima, E.; Drago, V.; De Lima, J. C.; Borges, N. G.; Avila, A. O. V.; Soldi, V.

    2003-12-01

    Chemical surface preparation for Ni-P electroless metallization of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films without using Chromium-based chemicals, was studied. The applicability of this method was verified by a subsequent metallization process. Thermal analysis was conducted to observe the main thermal transitions and stability of the polymer and metallized films. Contact angle analysis was performed to assess the surface hydrophilicity so as to optimize the substrate preparation process. X-ray diffraction, EDAX and SEM analysis were used to understand the composition and morphology of the polymeric substrate and Ni-P coat growing process. Adherence strength, contact sheet resistivity and optical diffuse reflection were measured on the metallized films. The time of chemical etching affects the polymer surface hydrophilicity, polymer/metal adherence strength, surface resistance and optical diffuse reflection, while Ni coating morphology is controlled by the pH of the electroless bath. High wettability of the polymer surface, adherence strength of 800 N cm -2, high optical diffuse reflection and low surface resistivity of the Ni coating, were found for films etched for 60 min. Metallizations performed at pH 7.5 produce Ni-P coatings with 12.0 wt.% phosphorous content, which were amorphous and flexible. The contact sheet resistivity of the plated films is sensitive to roughness variations of the substrate. The method proposed in this work allows the production of metallized films appropriate for the fabrication of flexible circuits.

  15. Non-destructive method for the analysis of gold(I) cyanide plating baths Complexometric determination of nickel and indium.

    PubMed

    Pribil, R; Veselý, V

    1972-12-01

    A method is described for rapid determination of nickel and indium in gold(I) cyanide baths containing large amounts of citric acid and/or sodium citrate, without previous destruction of organic matter. Gold is removed by extraction with ethyl acetate. In one aliquot of the solution indium is masked with thioglycollic acid and nickel is precipitated with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, extracted into chloroform, stripped into water and determined complexometrically. In a second aliquot indium and nickel are precipitated together with the same reagent and stripped into water, then nickel is masked with 1,10-phenanthroline, and indium is determined by direct titration with EDTA.

  16. Multilayer on-chip stacked Fresnel zone plates: Hard x-ray fabrication and soft x-ray simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kenan; Wojcik, Michael J.; Ocola, Leonidas E.; Divan, Ralu; Jacobsen, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Fresnel zone plates are widely used as x-ray nanofocusing optics. To achieve high spatial resolution combined with good focusing efficiency, high aspect ratio nanolithography is required, and one way to achieve that is through multiple e-beam lithography writing steps to achieve on-chip stacking. A two-step writing process producing 50 nm finest zone width at a zone thickness of 1.14 µm for possible hard x-ray applications is shown here. The authors also consider in simulations the case of soft x-ray focusing where the zone thickness might exceed the depth of focus. In this case, the authors compare on-chip stacking with, and without, adjustment of zone positions and show that the offset zones lead to improved focusing efficiency. The simulations were carried out using a multislice propagation method employing Hankel transforms.

  17. Surface nano-hardness and microstructure of a single crystal nickel base superalloy after laser shock peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, G. X.; Liu, J. D.; Qiao, H. C.; Zhou, Y. Z.; Jin, T.; Zhao, J. B.; Sun, X. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2017-06-01

    Nanoindention tests and SEM microstructure observations were conducted on a single crystal nickel base superalloy after laser shock peening (LSP). Distinct surface hardening behavior was found to occur under the selected LSP technology. A large discrepancy in γʹ areas happened on laser shocked regions and the large plastic deformation embodied in γʹ phases' deformation brought a significant hardening effect.

  18. Analysis of residual stress and hardness in regions of pre-manufactured and manual bends in fixation plates for maxillary advancement.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marcelo Marotta; Lauria, Andrezza; Mendes, Marcelo Breno Meneses; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves; Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze, through Vickers hardness test and photoelasticity analysis, pre-bent areas, manually bent areas, and areas without bends of 10-mm advancement pre-bent titanium plates (Leibinger system). The work was divided into three groups: group I-region without bend, group II-region of 90° manual bend, and group III-region of 90° pre-fabricated bends. All the materials were evaluated through hardness analysis by the Vickers hardness test, stress analysis by residual images obtained in a polariscope, and photoelastic analysis by reflection during the manual bending. The data obtained from the hardness tests were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests at a significance level of 5 %. The pre-bent plate (group III) showed hardness means statistically significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the other groups (I-region without bends, II-90° manually bent region). Through the study of photoelastic reflection, it was possible to identify that the stress gradually increased, reaching a pink color (1.81 δ / λ), as the bending was performed. A general analysis of the results showed that the bent plate region of pre-bent titanium presented the best results.

  19. Effect of friction stir processing on the microstructure and hardness of an aluminum-zinc-magnesium-copper alloy with nickel additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Haider T.; Mohammed, Kahtan S.; Ahmad, Khairel R.

    2015-10-01

    The main object of this study is to investigate the effect of friction stir processing (FSP) on the microstructure and hardness of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys that were produced via casting with the addition of 5 wt % nickel. Furthermore, a single-pass FSP with a rotational speed of 1500 rpm and a traveling speed of 40 mm/min was performed on the alloys. The FSP-treated cast alloys were homogenized, aged at 120°C for 24 h, retrogressed at 180°C for 30 min, and then re-aged at 120°C for 24 h. Microstructural evaluations via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, as well as with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were conducted. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to detect the intermetallics and phases of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloys. Before FSP, the microstructural observations indicated the presence of coarse Ni dispersed particles with a precipitate phase within the matrix. After FSP treatment, the grain refinement led to the uniform space distribution of Ni dispersed particles in the stir zone. The Vickers hardness values for the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy increased after age tempering at T6 and retrogression and re-aging (RRA) treatment because of the increased precipitation and particles dispersity. The hardness of the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu-Ni alloy was enhanced after FSP and a series of heat treatments, especially the RRA process, because of the stirring action of the FSP tool, the grain refinement, the appearance of additional precipitates, and the refinement of dispersed Ni particles.

  20. Electrodeposition of High Quality Nickel Phosphorous Alloys for Pollution Reduction and Energy Conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian

    2003-01-01

    NASA and the University of Alabama in Huntsville have developed ecologically friendly, versatile nickel and nickel cobalt phosphorous electroplating processes. Solutions show excellent performance with high efficiency for vastly extended throughput. Properties include, clean, low temperature operation (40 - 60 C), high Faradaic efficiency, low stress and high hardness. A variety of alloy and plating speed options are easily achieved from the same chemistry using soluble anodes for metal replacement with only 25% of the phosphorous additions required for electroless nickel. Thick deposits are easily achieved unattended, for electroforming freestanding shapes without buildup of excess orthophosphate or stripping of equipment.

  1. Electrodeposition of High Quality Nickel Phosphorous Alloys for Pollution Reduction and Energy Conservation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian

    2004-01-01

    NASA and the University of Alabama in Huntsville have developed ecologically friendly, versatile nickel and nickel cobalt phosphorous electroplating processes. Solutions show excellent performance with high efficiency for vastly extended throughput. Properties include, clean, low temperature operation (40 - 60 C), high Faradaic efficiency, low stress and high hardness. A variety of alloy and plating speed options are easily achieved from the same chemistry using soluble anodes for metal replacement with only 25% of the phosphorous additions required for electroless nickel. Thick deposits are easily achieved unattended, for electroforming freestanding shapes without buildup of excess orthophosphate or stripping of equipment.

  2. Interlaced zone plate optics for hard X-ray imaging in the 10 nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Rösner, Benedikt; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; McNulty, Ian; Winarski, Robert; Holt, Martin V.; David, Christian

    2017-03-01

    Multi-keV X-ray microscopy has been particularly successful in bridging the resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy. However, resolutions below 20 nm are still considered challenging, as high throughput direct imaging methods are limited by the availability of suitable optical elements. In order to bridge this gap, we present a new type of Fresnel zone plate lenses aimed at the sub-20 and the sub-10 nm resolution range. By extending the concept of double-sided zone plate stacking, we demonstrate the doubling of the effective line density and thus the resolution and provide large aperture, singlechip optical devices with 15 and 7 nm smallest zone widths. The detailed characterization of these lenses shows excellent optical properties with focal spots down to 7.8 nm. Beyond wave front characterization, the zone plates also excel in typical imaging scenarios, verifying their resolution close to their diffraction limited optical performance.

  3. Interlaced zone plate optics for hard X-ray imaging in the 10 nm range

    PubMed Central

    Mohacsi, Istvan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Rösner, Benedikt; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Guzenko, Vitaliy A.; McNulty, Ian; Winarski, Robert; Holt, Martin V.; David, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Multi-keV X-ray microscopy has been particularly successful in bridging the resolution gap between optical and electron microscopy. However, resolutions below 20 nm are still considered challenging, as high throughput direct imaging methods are limited by the availability of suitable optical elements. In order to bridge this gap, we present a new type of Fresnel zone plate lenses aimed at the sub-20 and the sub-10 nm resolution range. By extending the concept of double-sided zone plate stacking, we demonstrate the doubling of the effective line density and thus the resolution and provide large aperture, singlechip optical devices with 15 and 7 nm smallest zone widths. The detailed characterization of these lenses shows excellent optical properties with focal spots down to 7.8 nm. Beyond wave front characterization, the zone plates also excel in typical imaging scenarios, verifying their resolution close to their diffraction limited optical performance.

  4. Mach 6 electroformed nickel nozzle refurbishment: FNAS investigation of ultra-smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rood, Robert; Griffith, Charles; Engelhaupt, Darell; Cernosek, John

    1992-01-01

    The task objective has been to apply a coating of nickel-phosphorous alloy to a laminar flow wind tunnel nozzle by catalytic deposition and then polish and inspect the inside surface using optical device processes. The surface of the nozzle was coated with a nickel-phosphorous alloy of sufficient hardness and corrosion resistance to improve the durability. Due to plating defects that were clearly process related and not inherent, the final polished part was less than the desired quality. Surface finishing processes and lapping media were identified which produced a submicron surface finish on the interior plated surface. Defects apparently manifested by the first plating attempt were repaired using a small brush plating process demonstrating that individual small defects can be repaired. Measurement and analysis by profilometry demonstrated that quantitative control of the surface can be achieved.

  5. Special Features of Electron-Beam Alloying of Replaceable Polyhedral Hard-Alloy Plates Under a Complex Surface Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, S. V.; Oganyan, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    Thermochemical treatment of a hard alloy is implemented by alloying its surface with the help of a low-energy strong-current electron beam prior to depositing a wear-resistant coating. The method increases substantially the service life of the tool. The laws of formation of refractory compounds in the surface layer due to initiation of a reaction of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis in the mode of thermal explosion are determined. The change in the wear behavior of the modified tools is studied.

  6. Preliminary design of a zone plate based hard X-ray monochromatic diffraction nanoprobe for materials studies at APS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhonghou; Liu, Wenjun; Tischler, Jonathan Z.; Shu, Deming; Xu, Ruqing; Schmidt, Oliver

    2013-09-01

    Aiming at studies of the micro/nano-structures of a broad range materials and electronic devices, Advance Photon Source (APS) is developing a dedicated diffraction nanoprobe (DNP) beamline for the needs arising from a multidiscipline research community. As a part of the APS Upgrade Project, the planed facility, named Sub-micron 3-D Diffraction (S3DD) beamline1, integrates the K-B mirror based polychromatic Laue diffraction and the Fresnel zone-plate based monochromatic diffraction techniques that currently support 3D/2D microdiffraction programs at the 34-ID-E and 2-ID-D of the APS, respectively. Both diffraction nanoprobes are designed to have a 50-nm or better special resolution. The zone-plate based monochromatic DNP has been preliminarily designed and will be constructed at the sector 34-ID. It uses an APS-3.0-cm period or APS-3.3-cm period undulator, a liquid-nitrogen cooled mirror as its first optics, and a water cooled small gap silicon double-crystal monochromator with an energy range of 5-30 keV. A set of zone plates have been designed to optimize for focusing efficiency and the working distance based on the attainable beamline length and the beam coherence. To ensure the nanoprobe performance, high stiffness and high precision flexure stage systems have been designed or demonstrated for optics mounting and sample scanning, and high precision temperature control of the experimental station will be implemented to reduce thermal instability. Designed nanoprobe beamline has a good management on thermal power loading on optical components and allows high degree of the preservation of beam brilliance for high focal flux and coherence. Integrated with variety of X-ray techniques, planed facility provides nano-XRD capability with the maximum reciprocal space accessibility and allows micro/nano-spectroscopy studies with K-edge electron binding energies of most elements down to Vanadium in the periodic table. We will discuss the preliminary design of the zone-plate

  7. Comparison of Petrifilm Staph Express Count System with the bacteriological analytical manual direct-plating method for enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in artificially contaminated hard cheese.

    PubMed

    Fedio, Willis M; Wendakoon, Chitra N; Zapata, Ruben; Carrillo, Christina; Browning, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The 3M Petrifilm Staph Express Count System was compared with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) direct-plate count method for the enumeration of Staphylococcus aureus in 6 types of artificially contaminated hard cheese (Asiago, Cheddar, Gruyère, Parmesan, Romano, and Swiss). Five different samples of each cheese type were inoculated with S. aureus (ATCC 25923) to achieve low, medium, and high inoculum levels. S. aureus was enumerated by the Petrifilm and BAM methods, and the results were compared. Multivariate analysis of variance revealed no significant differences (P<0.05) between the 2 methods. The Petrifilm method compared favorably with the BAM procedure. The rapid method was more convenient to use, considerably faster, and less expensive to perform than the BAM method.

  8. Temperature of Heating and Cooling of Massive, Thin, and Wedge-Shaped Plates from Hard-to-Machine Steels During Their Grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dement‧ev, V. B.; Ivanova, T. N.; Dolginov, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Grinding of flat parts occurs by solid abrasive particles due to the physicomechanical process of deformation and to the action of a process liquid at high temperatures in a zone small in volume and difficult for observation. The rate of heating and cooling depends on the change in the intensity of the heat flux and in the velocity and time of action of the heat source. A study has been made of the regularities of the influence of each of these parameters on the depth and character of structural transformations during the grinding of flat parts from hard-to-machine steels. A procedure to calculate temperature in grinding massive, thin, and wedge-shaped parts has been developed with account taken of the geometric and thermophysical parameters of the tool and the treated part, and also of cutting regimes. The procedure can be used as a constituent part in developing a system for automatic design of the technological process of grinding of flat surfaces. A relationship between the temperature in the grinding zone and the regimes of treatment has been established which makes it possible to control the quality of the surface layer of massive, thin, and wedge-shaped plates from hard-to-machine steels. The rational boundaries of shift of cutting regimes have been determined.

  9. Submicrometer hard X-ray focusing using a single-bounce ellipsoidal capillary combined with a Fresnel zone plate.

    PubMed

    Snigirev, A; Bjeoumikhov, A; Erko, A; Snigireva, I; Grigoriev, M; Yunkin, V; Erko, M; Bjeoumikhova, S

    2007-03-01

    A single-bounce capillary with an ellipsoidal shape has been used for two-step focusing in combination with a Fresnel zone plate (FZP). The FZP serves as a first microfocusing element and produces a demagnified micrometer image of the source, before the elliptical capillary makes a last final compression of the beam. With 15 keV X-rays from the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility BM5 bending magnet, the two-step demagnification system produced a focus of about 250 nm with a gain of more than 1000. The use of an ellipsoidal capillary as a micro-mirror under off-axis illumination using micro-prefocusing optics might open up new opportunities in nanofocusing developments.

  10. Nickel Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    Nickel allergy Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Nickel allergy is a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis — an itchy rash that appears where your skin touches a usually harmless substance. Nickel ...

  11. Hard x-ray spectroscopy and imaging by a reflection zone plate in the presence of astigmatism

    SciTech Connect

    Braig, Christoph; Lochel, Heike; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Hafner, Aljosa; Rehanek, Jens; Wojcik, Michael; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen; Erko, Alexei

    2015-12-17

    Here, the feasibility of an off-axis x-ray reflection zone plate to perform wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, on-axis point focusing, and two-dimensional imaging is demonstrated by means of one and the same diffractive optical element (DOE) at a synchrotron radiation facility. The resolving power varies between 3 × 101 and 4 × 102 in the range of 7.6 keV to 9.0 keV, with its maximum at the design energy of 8.3 keV. This result is verified using an adjustable entrance slit, by which horizontal (H) and vertical (V) focusing to 0.85 μm(H) and 1.29 μm(V) is obtained near the sagittal focal plane of the astigmatic configuration. An angular and axial scan proves an accessible field of view of at least 0.6 arcmin × 0.8 arcmin and a focal depth of ±0.86 mm. Supported by the grating efficiency of around 17.5% and a very short pulse elongation, future precision x-ray fluorescence and absorption studies of transition metals at their K-edge on an ultrashort timescale could benefit from our findings.

  12. Hard x-ray spectroscopy and imaging by a reflection zone plate in the presence of astigmatism

    DOE PAGES

    Braig, Christoph; Lochel, Heike; Firsov, Alexander; ...

    2015-12-17

    Here, the feasibility of an off-axis x-ray reflection zone plate to perform wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy, on-axis point focusing, and two-dimensional imaging is demonstrated by means of one and the same diffractive optical element (DOE) at a synchrotron radiation facility. The resolving power varies between 3 × 101 and 4 × 102 in the range of 7.6 keV to 9.0 keV, with its maximum at the design energy of 8.3 keV. This result is verified using an adjustable entrance slit, by which horizontal (H) and vertical (V) focusing to 0.85 μm(H) and 1.29 μm(V) is obtained near the sagittal focal plane ofmore » the astigmatic configuration. An angular and axial scan proves an accessible field of view of at least 0.6 arcmin × 0.8 arcmin and a focal depth of ±0.86 mm. Supported by the grating efficiency of around 17.5% and a very short pulse elongation, future precision x-ray fluorescence and absorption studies of transition metals at their K-edge on an ultrashort timescale could benefit from our findings.« less

  13. Nickel cobalt phosphorous low stress electroplating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell E. (Inventor); Ramsey, Brian D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An electrolytic plating process is provided for electrodepositing a nickel or nickel cobalt alloy which contains at least about 2% to 25% by atomic volume of phosphorous. The process solutions contains nickel and optionally cobalt sulfate, hypophosphorous acid or a salt thereof, boric acid or a salt thereof, a monodentate organic acid or a salt thereof, and a multidentate organic acid or a salt thereof. The pH of the plating bath is from about 3.0 to about 4.5. An electroplating process is also provided which includes electroplating from the bath a nickel or nickel cobalt phosphorous alloy. This process can achieve a deposit with high microyield of at least about 84 kg/mm.sup.2 (120 ksi) and a density lower than pure nickel of about 8.0 gm/cc. This process can be used to plate a deposit of essentially zero stress at plating temperatures from ambient to 70.degree. C.

  14. Development of ion-plated aluminide diffusion coatings for thermal cyclic oxidation and hot corrosion protection of a nickel-based superalloy and a stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsawy, Abdel Raouf

    This project was carried out at the University of Toronto and Cametoid Ltd of Whitby, Ontario. Ohno continuous casting; a novel net shape casting technique, was used to generate, Al-Y, Al-Ce, Al-La, and Al-Si-Y, in form of 1.6 to 1.7 mm diameter alloy wires. These alloy wires exhibited suitable properties for use as feed materials to an Ion Vapor Deposition facility. The deposition parameters were optimized to provide coatings with a compact and cohesive columnar structure with reduced porosity and diffusion barriers that were essential to ensure the success of the diffusion process in the subsequent stage. Solid-state diffusion heat treatment processes were developed in order to form the stable aluminide phases, AlNi and FeAl, on IN738 and S310 substrates, respectively. Experiments simulating the coating service conditions and environments encountered during the prospective aerospace and fuel cell applications were conducted to evaluate the performance of each aluminide coating developed during this study. Thermal cyclic oxidation and molten sulfate corrosion studies were performed on coated IN738 pins at 1050°C and 900°C, respectively, simulating the service environment of turbine engine blades and other hot section components. Molten carbonate corrosion behavior was investigated for coated S310 coupons that were immersed in, or covered with a thin film of molten carbonate, at 650°C, in air plus 30%CO2, to simulate the operating conditions of the cathode-side separator plates of molten carbonate fuel cells. The behavior of the reactive elements, yttrium, cerium, lanthanum, and silicon in enhancing the adhesion of the protective aluminum oxide scale was determined by weight variation experiments, structural examination and compositional analysis. The influence of the base material elements, nickel, chromium, and iron, on the formation of protective oxides was investigated. All coatings were found to provide significant improvement for thermal cyclic oxidation

  15. Electrochemical deposition of iridium and iridium-nickel-alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Näther, J.; Köster, F.; Freudenberger, R.; Schöberl, C.; Lampke, T.

    2017-03-01

    To develop durable and reliable electronic contacts, precious metals are still very important for finish plating of contact surfaces. The lesser-known iridium might be an interesting alternative to substitute gold alloys, platinum or rhodium for applications with highest demands to wear and corrosion resistance such as sliding and plug contacts. As matters stand there is no commercial electrolyte for iridium plating. Initial investigation screened the parameter range for different iridium compounds when an iridium layer occurred on the substrates. This approach showed that the oxidation state of iridium is crucial to reach contenting deposits. Best results came from Ir(IV) electrolyte with high bromine concentration coming from the starting compound, while electrolytes made from Ir(III) compounds gave very poor deposits. In subsequent experiments different organic compounds were added to the electrolytes to improve plating efficiency and stability of the solutions. So found electrolytes gave crack-free deposits up to two microns with a micro-hardness of 600 HV. To reduce the iridium content in the layer, iridium-nickel-alloys were investigated, finding that a nickel-content of 10 wt% raised the layer hardness to more than 900 HV.

  16. Fatigue crack growth in 7475-T651 aluminum alloy plate in hard vacuum and water vapor. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicus, D. L.

    1981-01-01

    Compact specimens of 25 mm thick aluminum alloy plate were subjected to constant amplitude fatigue testing at a load ratio of 0.2. Crack growth rates were determined at frequencies of 1 Hz and 10 Hz in hard vacuum and laboratory air, and in mixtures of water vapor and nitrogen at water vapor partial pressures ranging from 94 Pa to 3.8 kPa. A significant effect of water vapor on fatigue crack growth rates was observed at the lowest water vapor pressure tested. Crack rates changed little for pressures up to 1.03 kPa, but abruptly accelerated at higher pressures. At low stress intensity factor ranges, cracking rates at the lowest and highest water vapor pressure tested were, respectively, two and five times higher than rates in vacuum. Although a frequency was observed in laboratory air, cracking rates in water vapor and vacuum are insensitive to a ten-fold change in frequency. Surfaces of specimens tested in water vapor and vacuum exhibited different amounts of residual deformation. Reduced deformation on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in water vapor suggests embrittlement of the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip as a result of environmental interaction.

  17. PROCESS OF COATING WITH NICKEL BY THE DECOMPOSITION OF NICKEL CARBONYL

    DOEpatents

    Hoover, T.B.

    1959-04-01

    An improved process is presented for the deposition of nickel coatings by the thermal decomposition of nickel carbonyl vapor. The improvement consists in incorporating a small amount of hydrogen sulfide gas in the nickel carbonyl plating gas. It is postulated that the hydrogen sulfide functions as a catalyst. i

  18. The Development of Hard-X-Ray Optics at MSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, R. F.; Engelhaupt, D. E.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Speegle, C. O.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Six, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We are fabricating optics for the hard-x-ray region using electroless nickel replication. The attraction of this process, which has been widely used elsewhere, is that the resulting full shell optics are inherently table and thus can have very good angular resolution. The challenge with this process is to develop lightweight optics (nickel has a relatively high density of 8.9 g / cu cm), and to keep down the costs of mandrel fabrication. We accomplished the former through the development of high-strength nickel alloys that permit very thin shells without fabrication- and handling-induced deformations. For the latter, we have utilized inexpensive grinding and diamond turning to figure the mandrels and then purpose-built polishing machines to finish the surface. In-house plating tanks and a simple water-bath separation system complete the process. To date we have built shells ranging in size from 5 cm diameter to 50 cm, and with thickness down to 100 micron. For our HERO (high energy replicated optics) balloon program, we are fabricating over 200 iridium-coated shells, 250 microns thick, for hard-x-ray imaging up to 75 keV. Early test results on these have indicated half-power-diameters of 15 arcsec. The status of these and other hard-x-ray optics will be reviewed.

  19. AN ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF ION EXCHANGE AND RECENTLY COMMERCIALIZED ELECTROCHEMICAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE RECOVERY OF RINSE WATER IN BRIGHT NICKEL PLATING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Researchers at USEPA are testing and evaluating two commercial electrochemical technologies for the purification of rinse water and the recovery of copper and nickel from a variety of electroplating processes. One of the investigated technologies is based on the application of hi...

  20. NICKEL HYDROXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    MCBREEN,J.

    1997-11-01

    Nickel hydroxides have been used as the active material in the positive electrodes of several alkaline batteries for over a century. These materials continue to attract a lot of attention because of the commercial importance of nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries. This review gives a brief overview of the structure of nickel hydroxide battery electrodes and a more detailed review of the solid state chemistry and electrochemistry of the electrode materials. Emphasis is on work done since 1989.

  1. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  2. Binding of nickel and copper to fish gills predicts toxicity when water hardness varies, but free-ion activity does not

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Bobbitt, J.P.; Debrey, L.D.; Boese, C.J.; Bergman, H.L.; Santore, R.C.; Paquin, P.R.; Ditoro, D.M.; Allen, H.E.

    1999-03-15

    Based on a biotic-ligand model (BLM), the authors hypothesized that the concentration of a transition metal bound to fish gills ([M{sub gill}]) will be a constant predictor of mortality, whereas a free-ion activity model is generally interpreted to imply that the chemical activity of the aquo (free) ion of the metal will be a constant predictor of mortality. In laboratory tests, measured [Ni{sub gill}] and calculated [Cu{sub gill}] were constant predictors of acute toxicity of Ni and Cu to fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) when water hardness varied up to 10-fold, whereas total aqueous concentrations and free-ion activities of Ni and Cu were not. Thus, the BLM, which simultaneously accounts for (a) metal speciation in the exposure water and (b) competitive binding of transition-metal ions and other cations to biotic ligands predicts acute toxicity better than does free-ion activity of Ni or Cu. Adopting a biotic-ligand modeling approach could help establish a more defensible, mechanistic basis for regulating aqueous discharges of metals.

  3. The Beynon Gabor zone plate: a new tool for de Broglie matter waves and hard X-rays? An off axis and focus intensity investigation.

    PubMed

    Greve, Martin M; Vial, Alexandre M; Stamnes, Jakob J; Holst, Bodil

    2013-11-18

    Optical elements based on Fresnel zones are used in a range of applications, from X-ray telescopy to microscopy and recently also in the manipulation of de Broglie matter waves. In 1992 Beynon and co-workers presented a binary Gabor type zone plate (henceforth referred to as the Beynon Gabor zone plate). Because this zone plate has no higher order foci, it is in principle a very attractive candidate for focusing of de Broglie matter waves and in some cases X-rays. So far the Beynon Gabor zone plate investigations presented in the literature have concentrated on the intensity distribution along the optical axis and in the focal plane. Here we present a detailed numerical investigation of the Beynon Gabor zone plate, including an investigation of the off-optical axis, off focal plane intensity distribution for point source illumination. We show that at integer fractions of the focal length, the beam becomes nearly toroidal (doughnut-shaped). This offers potentially interesting new possibilities for de Broglie matter wave and X-ray optics, for example in STED-like applications. We further show that the increased intensity at the focal point predicted in the literature for a particular Beynon Gabor zone plate transmission function configuration is an artifact due to the lack of sampling nodes. We support our calculations with experimental measurements in the visible light range, using a Beynon Gabor zone plate fabricated with electron beam lithography.

  4. Identification of red-green colour deficiency: sensitivity of the Ishihara and American Optical Company (Hard, Rand and Rittler) pseudo-isochromatic plates to identify slight anomalous trichromatism.

    PubMed

    Birch, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    Screening sensitivity, based on a specific number of errors, of the Ishihara plates and of the American Optical Company (Hardy, Rand and Rittler) plates (HRR plates) was determined by reviewing data obtained for 486 male anomalous trichromats identified and classified with the Nagel anomaloscope. Data were obtained for the 16 screening plates, with Transformation and Vanishing numeral designs, of the 38 plate Ishihara test, and for the four red-green screening plates (with six Vanishing designs) of the HRR test. Sensitivity of the Ishihara plates was found to be 97.7% on 4 errors and 98.4% on 3 errors. Only anomalous trichromats with slight deficiency, according to the anomaloscope matching range, made 8 errors or fewer. One screening error, a single missed figure, is normally allowed as a pass on the HRR test and 3 errors is often recommended as the fail criterion to eliminate false positive results. Twenty-three subjects made no error on the HRR screening plates and 12 subjects made a single error (35 anomalous trichromats). Screening sensitivity was therefore 92.8% using 2 errors as the fail criterion. Screening sensitivity was reduced to 87% when 3 errors was the fail criterion, and some deuteranomalous trichromats with moderate deficiency, according to the anomaloscope matching range, were not identified. Individuals who make a maximum of 2 errors on the HRR test, or on the Richmond HRR 4th Edition, should be re-examined with the Ishihara plates to determine their colour vision status. The present review confirms that the Ishihara test is a very sensitive screening test and identifies people with slight anomalous trichromatism. The HRR test is unsatisfactory for screening and should not be chosen solely for this purpose.

  5. Process for forming a nickel foil with controlled and predetermined permeability to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Engelhaupt, Darell E.

    1981-09-22

    The present invention provides a novel process for forming a nickel foil having a controlled and predetermined hydrogen permeability. This process includes the steps of passing a nickel plating bath through a suitable cation exchange resin to provide a purified nickel plating bath free of copper and gold cations, immersing a nickel anode and a suitable cathode in the purified nickel plating bath containing a selected concentration of an organic sulfonic acid such as a napthalene-trisulfonic acid, electrodepositing a nickel layer having the thickness of a foil onto the cathode, and separating the nickel layer from the cathode to provide a nickel foil. The anode is a readily-corrodible nickel anode. The present invention also provides a novel nickel foil having a greater hydrogen permeability than palladium at room temperature.

  6. Cadmium plating replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Groshart, E.C.

    1995-03-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  7. Cadmium plating replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Mary J.; Groshart, Earl C.

    1995-01-01

    The Boeing Company has been searching for replacements to cadmium plate. Two alloy plating systems seem close to meeting the needs of a cadmium replacement. The two alloys, zinc-nickel and tin-zinc are from alloy plating baths; both baths are neutral pH. The alloys meet the requirements for salt fog corrosion resistance, and both alloys excel as a paint base. Currently, tests are being performed on standard fasteners to compare zinc-nickel and tin-zinc on threaded hardware where cadmium is heavily used. The Hydrogen embrittlement propensity of the zinc-nickel bath has been tested, and just beginning for the tin-zinc bath. Another area of interest is the electrical properties on aluminum for tin-zinc and will be discussed. The zinc-nickel alloy plating bath is in production in Boeing Commercial Airplane Group for non-critical low strength steels. The outlook is promising that these two coatings will help The Boeing Company significantly reduce its dependence on cadmium plating.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of electrowinning for nickel scrap processing

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.M.; Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Wilson, D.F.

    1996-12-01

    Purification of the 70,000 to 245,000 tons of diffusion plant nickel scrap permit its use in a variety of DOE and, with establishment of de minimus standards, foreign and domestic industrial applications. Nickel recycle would also substantially decrease DOE legacy wastes. This report presents data on electrolytes and separations which could be used in electrolytic purification of radiologically contaminated nickel scrap from first generation diffusion plants. Potentiometric scans and plating tests indicate that both industrial electrolytes, buffered nickel sulfate-sodium chloride and nickel chloride, provide good current densities. Electrolytes which contain ammonium thiocyanate or ammonium chloride also perform well. Nickel does not plate appreciably from nitrate solutions because the nitrate was preferentially reduced to nitrite. Solvent extractions of cobalt, a common contaminant in commercial nickel, and pertechnate, a radiological contaminant expected in DOE nickel scrap, are also successful.

  9. METHOD OF APPLYING NICKEL COATINGS ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1959-07-14

    A method is presented for protectively coating uranium which comprises etching the uranium in an aqueous etching solution containing chloride ions, electroplating a coating of nickel on the etched uranium and heating the nickel plated uranium by immersion thereof in a molten bath composed of a material selected from the group consisting of sodium chloride, potassium chloride, lithium chloride, and mixtures thereof, maintained at a temperature of between 700 and 800 deg C, for a time sufficient to alloy the nickel and uranium and form an integral protective coating of corrosion-resistant uranium-nickel alloy.

  10. ELECTRODEPOSITION OF NICKEL ON URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-08-26

    A method is described for preparing uranium objects prior to nickel electroplating. The process consiats in treating the surface of the uranium with molten ferric chloride hexahydrate, at a slightiy elevated temperature. This treatment etches the metal surface providing a structure suitable for the application of adherent electrodeposits and at the same time plates the surface with a thin protective film of iron.

  11. Electrocomposite of Alumina in Nickel Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong-Skiba, Pei; Hulguin, Ryan; Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Nickel/aluminum oxide composite was electroformed in a sulfamate bath with 50 g/L of 0.05-micron aluminum oxide powder. Different plating methods including direct current plating, periodic pulse plating, and periodic reverse pulse plating were used. With conventional direct current plating, the maximum particle inclusion in the nickel matrix remains about 2% (wt). However, much higher percentile particle inclusions were achieved when a specific pulse reversal plating technique was applied. The particle incorporation approaches theoretical maximum when the deposit thickness per cycle approaches the particle diameter size at lower duty cycle. The highest particle incorporation achieved is 23% (by weight). Conceptual models interpreting the dramatic differences in the results of these plating methods were also proposed.

  12. Development of a micro-fiber nickel electrode for nickel-hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1995-01-01

    Development of a high specific energy nickel electrode is the main goal of the lightweight nickel electrode program at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The approach has been to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen cell. Small fiber diameter nickel plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products and have an advantage of increased surface area available for the deposition of active material. Initial tests include activation and capacity measurements at different discharge levels followed by half-cell cycle testing at 80 percent depth-of-discharge in a low-Earth-orbit regime. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle-tested in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell before flightweight designs are built and tested.

  13. [Occupational asthma caused by chromium and nickel].

    PubMed

    Cruz, María Jesus; Costa, Roser; Marquilles, Eduard; Morell, Ferran; Muñoz, Xavier

    2006-06-01

    We report the case of a 40-year-old woman who developed occupational asthma following exposure to chromium and nickel in the nickel-plating section of a metalworks company. Skin prick tests for specific antibodies proved positive for nickel chloride at a concentration of 1 mg/mL and negative for potassium dichromate. The specific bronchial provocation test confirmed the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to exposure to chromium and nickel. The patient presented a late positive reaction to nickel chloride (0.1 mg/mL) and an immediate positive reaction to a 10 mg/mL solution of potassium dichromate. These results indicate a dual response to nickel and chromium in this patient.

  14. SURFACE MODIFICATION OF ZIRCALOY-4 SUBSTRATES WITH NICKEL ZIRCONIUM INTERMETALLICS

    SciTech Connect

    Luscher, Walter G.; Gilbert, Edgar R.; Pitman, Stan G.; Love, Edward F.

    2013-02-01

    Surfaces of Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) substrates were modified with nickel-zirconium (NiZr) intermetallics to tailor oxidation performance for specialized applications. Surface modification was achieved by electroplating Zr-4 substrates with nickel (Ni) and then performing thermal treatments to fully react the Ni plating with the substrates, which resulted in a coating of NiZr intermetallics on the substrate surfaces. Both plating thickness and thermal treatment were evaluated to determine the effects of these fabrication parameters on oxidation performance and to identify an optimal surface modification process. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed on surface-modified materials at 290°, 330°, and 370°C under a constant partial pressure of oxidant (i.e., 1 kPa D2O in dry Ar at 101 kPa) for 64 days. Test results revealed an enhanced, transient oxidation rate that decreased asymptotically toward the rate of the Zr-4 substrate. Oxidation kinetics were analyzed from isothermal weight gain data, which were correlated with microstructure, hydrogen pickup, strength, and hardness.

  15. [Efficiency of tritium enrichment by electrolytic cell with multi-nickel-plates electrode and its application to the determination of tritium in environmental water].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Y; Sasaki, M; Kimura, S

    1984-06-01

    For the purpose of speeding up the tritium enrichment by electrolysis, we have produced an electrolytic cell with the multi-plate-electrode system instead of the commonly used single-plate-electrode, and examined the efficiencies for the tritium enrichment under the conditions of different current densities and electrode gaps. From the results, the tritium recovery and the separation factor beta were found to be maximized under the condition of 70 mA/cm2 of current density and 1.6 mm of electrode gap, and they were 90 percent and 23, respectively. Using this cell, it took 28 hours to reduce 100 ml of a sample water to 10 ml, and took 2 days, including the time required for other operations, to determine the tritium concentration of 1.85 Bq/l (50 pCi/l) with the counting error of within +/- 10 percent. This method has been applied to determining the tritium concentrations of environmental samples from Yamato River region during July 1981-February 1983. They were in the range of 1.11-9.48 Bq/l (30-256 pCi/l).

  16. Effect of Heat Treatment on Wear Resistance of Nickel Aluminide Coatings Deposited by HVOF and PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benegra, M.; Santana, A. L. B.; Maranho, O.; Pintaude, G.

    2015-08-01

    This study aims to compare the wear resistance of nickel aluminide coatings deposited using plasma transferred arc (PTA) and high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) processes. Wear resistance was measured in rubber wheel abrasion tests. In both deposition processes, the same raw material (nickel aluminide powder) was atomized and deposited on a 316L steel plate substrate. After deposition, specimens were subjected to thermal cycling, aiming solubilization and precipitation. Coatings deposited using PTA developed different microstructures as a result of the incorporation of substrate elements. However, despite the presence of these microstructures, they performed better than coatings processed using HVOF before the heat treatment. After thermal cycling, the superficial hardness after the wear tests for both processes was similar, resulting in similar mass losses.

  17. Lightweight porous plastic plaque. [nickel cadmium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, M.

    1978-01-01

    The porosity and platability of various materials were investigated to determine a suitable substrate for nickel-plated electrodes. Immersion, ultrasonics, and flow-through plating techniques were tried using nonproprietary formulations, and proprietary phosphide and boride baths. Modifications to the selected material include variations in formulation and treatment, carbon loading to increase conductivity, and the incorporation of a grid. Problems to be solved relate to determining conductivities and porosities as a function of amount of nickel plated on the plastics; loading; charge and discharge curves of electrodes at different current densities; cell performance; and long-term degradation of electrodes.

  18. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  19. Enhanced electrochemical performance and carbon anti-coking ability of solid oxide fuel cells with silver modified nickel-yttrium stabilized zirconia anode by electroless plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaoyan; Tian, Yu; Zhang, Jun; Zuo, Wei; Kong, Xiaowei; Wang, Jinghui; Sun, Kening; Zhou, Xiaoliang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, silver (Ag) particles are introduced into the conventional Ni/YSZ anode by utilizing electroless plating method to improve its carbon anti-coking ability in hydrocarbons. The experimental results show that electrochemical performances of the decorated cells in H2, CH4 and C2H6 are all increased as compared to the cell with unmodified Ni/YSZ anode, which are verified by impedance spectrums as well. The durability experiment is carried out for as long as 24 h at the current density of 0.33 A/cm2 where the modified anode is subjected to dry C2H6 indicating the anti-coking ability of the anode is greatly improved. Scanning electron microscope shows that the slight decreasing in the cell terminal voltage can be attributed to the minimized carbon deposition which maybe resulted from the aggregation of silver particles at high temperature. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy line scanning results after long-term stability operation of the anode suggest that the carbon deposition can be depressed effectively both inside the anode and on the surface of the anode. Therefore, the results show that silver is a promising candidate material for modifying the Ni/YSZ anode with regard to improving electrochemical performance and suppressing the carbon deposition when taking the hydrocarbons as fuels.

  20. Hardness and Microstructure of Binary and Ternary Nitinol Compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    The hardness and microstructure of twenty-six binary and ternary Nitinol (nickel titanium, nickel titanium hafnium, nickel titanium zirconium and nickel titanium tantalum) compounds were studied. A small (50g) ingot of each compound was produced by vacuum arc remelting. Each ingot was homogenized in vacuum for 48 hr followed by furnace cooling. Specimens from the ingots were then heat treated at 800, 900, 1000 or 1100 degree C for 2 hr followed by water quenching. The hardness and microstructure of each specimen was compared to the baseline material (55-Nitinol, 55 at.% nickel - 45 at.% titanium, after heat treatment at 900 degC). The results show that eleven of the studied compounds had higher hardness values than the baseline material. Moreover, twelve of the studied compounds had measured hardness values greater 600HV at heat treatments from 800 to 900 degree C.

  1. Electrodeposition of Low Stress Nickel Phosphorous Alloys for Precision Component Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelhaupt, Darell; Ramsey, Brian; Speegle, Chet; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nickel alloys are favored for electroforming precision components. Nickel phosphorous and nickel cobalt phosphorous are studied in this work. A completely new and innovative electrolytic process eliminates the fumes present in electroless processes and is suitable for electroforming nickel phosphorous and nickel cobalt phosphorous alloys to any desirable thickness, using soluble anodes, without stripping of tanks. Solutions show excellent performance for extended throughput. Properties include, cleaner low temperature operation (40 - 45 C), high Faradaic efficiency, low stress, Rockwell C 52 - 54 hardness and as much as 2000 N per square millimeter tensile strength. Performance is compared to nickel and nickel cobalt electroforming.

  2. Development of a Micro-Fiber Nickel Electrode for Nickel-Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    The development of a high specific energy battery is one of the objectives of the lightweight nickel-hydrogen (NiH2) program at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The approach has been to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen fuel cell. Small fiber diameter nickel plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products and have an advantage of increased surface area available for the deposition of active materials. Initial tests include activation and capacity measurements at different discharge levels followed by half-cell cycle testing at 80 percent depth-of-discharge in a low Earth orbit regime. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle tested in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell before flightweight designs are built and tested.

  3. Skin deposition of nickel, cobalt, and chromium in production of gas turbines and space propulsion components.

    PubMed

    Julander, Anneli; Skare, Lizbet; Mulder, Marie; Grandér, Margaretha; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2010-04-01

    Skin exposure to nickel, cobalt, and chromium may cause sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis and it is known that many alloys and platings may release significant amounts of the metals upon contact with skin. Occupational exposure to these sensitizing metals has been studied in different settings with regards to airborne dust and different biological end points, but little is known about deposition on skin from airborne dust and direct contact with materials containing the metals. In this study, skin deposition was studied in 24 workers in an industry for development and manufacturing of gas turbines and space propulsion components. The workers were employed in three departments, representing different exposure scenarios: tools sharpening of hard metal items, production of space propulsion structures, and thermal application of different metal-containing powders. A novel acid wipe sampling technique was used to sample metals from specific skin surfaces on the hands and the forehead of the workers. Total amounts of nickel, cobalt, and chromium were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The result showed that nickel, cobalt, and chromium could be detected on all skin surfaces sampled. The highest level of nickel was 15 microg cm(-2) h(-1), the highest for cobalt was 4.5 microg cm(-2) h(-1), and for chromium 0.6 microg cm(-2) h(-1). The three departments had different exposures regarding the metals. The highest levels of nickel on the skin of the workers were found in the thermal applications department, cobalt in the tools sharpening department, and chromium in the space propulsion components department. In conclusion, the workers' exposure to the metals was more likely to come from direct skin contact with items, rather than from airborne dust, based on the fact that the levels of metals were much higher on the fingers than on the back side of the hands and the forehead. The skin exposure levels of nickel and cobalt detected are judged

  4. High-temperature ductility of electro-deposited nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dini, J. W.; Johnson, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Work done during the past several months on high temperature ductility of electrodeposited nickel is summarized. Data are presented which show that earlier measurements made at NASA-Langley erred on the low side, that strain rate has a marked influence on high temperature ductility, and that codeposition of a small amount of manganese helps to improve high temperature ductility. Influences of a number of other factors on nickel properties were also investigated. They included plating solution temperature, current density, agitation, and elimination of the wetting agent from the plating solution. Repair of a large nozzle section by nickel plating is described.

  5. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same

  6. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  7. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  8. Nickel carbonyl

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel carbonyl ; CASRN 13463 - 39 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  9. Nickel subsulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel subsulfide ; CASRN 12035 - 72 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogen

  10. Occupational asthma due to chrome and nickel electroplating

    PubMed Central

    Bright, P.; Burge, P. S.; O'Hickey, S. P.; Gannon, P. F.; Robertson, A. S.; Boran, A.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to chromium during electroplating is a recognised though poorly characterised cause of occupational asthma. The first series of such patients referred to a specialist occupational lung disease clinic is reported. METHODS: The diagnosis of occupational asthma was made from a history of asthma with rest day improvement and confirmed by specific bronchial provocation testing with potassium dichromate and nickel chloride. RESULTS: Seven workers had been exposed to chrome and nickel fumes from electroplating for eight months to six years before asthma developed. One subject, although exposed for 11 years without symptoms, developed asthma after a single severe exposure during a ventilation failure. This was the only subject who had never smoked. The diagnosis was confirmed by specific bronchial challenges. Two workers had isolated immediate reactions, one a late asthmatic reaction, and four a dual response following exposure to nebulised potassium dichromate at 1-10 mg/ml. Two of the four subjects were also challenged with nebulised nickel chloride at 0.1-10 mg/ml. Two showed isolated late asthmatic reactions, in one at 0.1 mg/ml, where nickel was probably the primary sensitising agent. Four workers carried out two hourly measurements of peak expiratory flow over days at and away from work. All were scored as having occupational asthma using OASYS-2. Breathing zone air monitoring was carried out in 60 workers from four decorative and two hard chrome plating shops from workers with similar jobs to those sensitised. No measurement exceeded the current occupational exposure standard for chromate or nickel, the mean levels of chromate exposure for jobs similar to those of the affected workers were 9-15 micrograms/m3. CONCLUSION: Chrome used in electroplating is a potential cause of occupational asthma. Sensitivity to chrome in electroplaters may occur in situations where exposure levels are likely to be within the current exposure standards. There may

  11. Remediation System Evaluation, Peerless Plating Site

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Peerless Plating Superfund Site is located at 2554 South Getty Street, north of the intersection of South Getty Street and East Sherman Boulevard in Muskegon, Michigan. Copper, nickel, chromium, cadmium, and zinc electroplating operations as well as...

  12. Reducing chromium losses from a chromium plating bath. 1987 summer intern report. Project conducted at New Dimension Plating, Hutchinson, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Achman, D.

    1987-12-31

    The company employs about forty people and operates for one or two eight hour shifts with an average of 315 racks of chrome plating per eight hour day. They plate a variety of metals including copper, nickel, gold, brass and chromium. Chromium is the major metal plated and is usually the last step in plating cycle. Most parts are copper plated and then nickel plated in preparation for chrome plating. The main difference between New Dimension Plating and other plating shops is the variety of parts plated. As New Dimension Plating is a job shop, a wide range of parts such as motorcycle accessories, stove parts, and custom items are metal finished. The plating lines are manual, meaning employees dip the racks into the tanks by hand. This fact along with the fact that parts vary greatly in size and shape accounts for the significant drag-out on the chromium plating line.

  13. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  14. Tribological characteristics of gold films deposited on metals by ion plating and vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    The graded interface between an ion-plated film and a substrate is discussed as well as the friction and wear properties of ion-plated gold. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling and microhardness depth profiling were used to investigate the interface. The friction and wear properties of ion-plated and vapor-deposited gold films were studied both in an ultra high vacuum system to maximize adhesion and in oil to minimize adhesion. The results indicate that the solubility of gold on the substrate material controls the depth of the graded interface. Thermal diffusion and chemical diffusion mechanisms are thought to be involved in the formation of the gold-nickel interface. In iron-gold graded interfaces the gold was primarily dispersed in the iron and thus formed a physically bonded interface. The hardness of the gold film was influenced by its depth and was also related to the composition gradient between the gold and the substrate. The graded nickel-gold interface exhibited the highest hardness because of an alloy hardening effect. The effects of film thickness on adhesion and friction were established.

  15. Nickel coated graphite fiber conductive composites

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.E.; Hall, D.E.; Luxon, B.A.

    1986-07-01

    Nickel coated graphite (NCG) fiber, consisting of a thin continuous plating of high purity nickel over an aerospace-grade graphite core, offers performance added features by combining the lightweight and high structural reinforcement of graphite fiber with the thermal and electrical conductivity of nickel. These NCG filaments, which are composite constructions in their own right, can be processed and impregnated with thermosetting or thermoplastic resins in the same manner that graphite fiber tows are processed and impregnated to produce roving, tape or fabric prepreg. Therefore, NCG fibers can be readily integrated into structural laminate assemblies using established composites-manufacturing practices.

  16. Thermal spray coatings replace hard chrome

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.; Unger, R.

    1997-08-01

    Hard chrome plating provides good wear and erosion resistance, as well as good corrosion protection and fine surface finishes. Until a few years ago, it could also be applied at a reasonable cost. However, because of the many environmental and financial sanctions that have been imposed on the process over the past several years, cost has been on a consistent upward trend, and is projected to continue to escalate. Therefore, it is very important to find a coating or a process that offers the same characteristics as hard chrome plating, but without the consequent risks. This article lists the benefits and limitations of hard chrome plating, and describes the performance of two thermal spray coatings (tungsten carbide and chromium carbide) that compared favorably with hard chrome plating in a series of tests. It also lists three criteria to determine whether plasma spray or hard chrome plating should be selected.

  17. Glass-bead peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    Peen plating of aluminum, copper, and nickel powders was investigated. Only aluminum was plated successfully within the range of peen plating conditions studied. Optimum plating conditions for aluminum were found to be: (1) bead/powder mixture containing 25 to 35% powder by weight, (2) peening intensity of 0.007A as measured by Almen strip, and (3) glass impact bead diameter of at least 297 microns (0.0117 inches) for depositing-100 mesh aluminum powder. No extensive cleaning or substrate preparation is required beyond removing loose dirt or heavy oil.

  18. Lubrication characteristics of nano-oil with different degrees of surface hardness of sliding members.

    PubMed

    Ku, Boncheol; Han, Youngcheol; Lee, Kwangho; Choi, Youngmin; Koo, Bonyoung; Hwang, Yujin; Lee, Jaekeun

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the lubrication characteristics of sliding members were compared with the changes in the hardness of friction surfaces and the application of nano-oil. The materials of the specimens were gray cast iron (AISI 35 and AISI 60) and nickel chromium molybdenum steel (AISI 4320). The friction coefficients and the temperature variations of the frictional surfaces were measured with a disk-on-disk tribotester under a fixed rotation speed. The friction surfaces were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The friction coefficients of the plate surface increased as the hardness difference increased. The friction coefficient after the lubrication with nano-oil was less than that after lubrication with mineral oil. This is because a spherical nanoparticle plays the role of a tiny ball bearing between the frictional surfaces that improve the lubrication characteristics.

  19. NICKEL COATED URANIUM ARTICLE

    DOEpatents

    Gray, A.G.

    1958-10-01

    Nickel coatings on uranium and various methods of obtaining such coatings are described. Specifically disclosed are such nickel or nickel alloy layers as barriers between uranium and aluminum- silicon, chromium, or copper coatings.

  20. Nickel anode electrode

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Benedict, Mark

    1987-01-01

    A nickel anode electrode fabricated by oxidizing a nickel alloying material to produce a material whose exterior contains nickel oxide and whose interior contains nickel metal throughout which is dispersed the oxide of the alloying material and by reducing and sintering the oxidized material to form a product having a nickel metal exterior and an interior containing nickel metal throughout which is dispersed the oxide of the alloying material.

  1. Systems and Methods for the Electrodeposition of a Nickel-cobalt Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogozalek, Nance Jo (Inventor); Wistrand, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrodepositing a nickel-cobalt alloy using a rotating cylinder electrode assembly with a plating surface and an electrical contact. The assembly is placed within a plating bath and rotated while running a plating cycle. Nickel-cobalt alloy deposition is selectively controlled by controlling current density distribution and/or cobalt content in the plating bath while running the plating cycle to deposit an alloy of a desired yield strength onto the plating surface in a single plating cycle. In various embodiments, the rotating cylinder may be used as an insitu monitoring method to assist in obtaining the properties desired.

  2. A simple and efficient method of nickel electrodeposition for the cyclotron production of (64)Cu.

    PubMed

    Manrique-Arias, Juan C; Avila-Rodriguez, Miguel A

    2014-07-01

    Nickel targets for the cyclotron production of (64)Cu were prepared by electrodeposition on a gold backing from nickel chloride solutions using boric acid as buffer. Parameters studied were nickel chloride and boric acid concentration, temperature and current density. All plating conditions studied were successful obtaining efficiencies of approximately 90% in 2-3 h, reaching almost quantitative plating (>97%) in 10-20 h depending on the current density. All plated targets withstood proton irradiations up to 40 µA for 2 h. Recovered nickel was successfully recycled and reused with an overall efficiency >95%.

  3. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Niranjan, Ram Rout, R. K. Srivastava, R. Gupta, Satish C.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  4. Response of nickel surface to pulsed fusion plasma radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjan, Ram; Rout, R. K.; Srivastava, R.; Chakravarthy, Y.; Patel, N. N.; Alex, P.; Gupta, Satish C.

    2014-04-01

    Nickel based alloys are being projected as suitable materials for some components of the next generation fusion reactor because of compatible thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. Pure nickel material is tested here for possibility of similar application purpose. Nickel samples (> 99.5 % purity) are exposed here to plasma radiations produced due to D-D fusion reaction inside an 11.5 kJ plasma focus device. The changes in the physical properties of the nickel surface at microscopic level which in turn change the mechanical properties are analyzed using scanning electron microscope, optical microscope, glancing incident X-ray diffractometer and Vicker's hardness gauge. The results are reported here.

  5. Wetlife Study of Nickel Hydrogen Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the residual Nickel Precharge, and to understand the Performance and Cycle Life of Aged Nickel Hydrogen cells that were in cold storage up to thirteen (13) years. Comsat Technical Services, Aerospace Corporation, and NSWC/Crane test data to date indicate a nominal electrical performance with a small second plateau and the presence of Nickel Precharge in the cells: Cell Teardown, Plate (active Nickel Precharge determination), and Electrolyte Analyses are in progress. Preliminary Thermal Imaging data indicates that older the cell greater the heat generation, but cell over charge (capacity) could dominate heat generation. U.S. Govt. cells has completed 1150 nominal 60% LEO cycles. The completion date for this study is January 31, 2008.

  6. Electroless Cu Plating on Anodized Al Substrate for High Power LED.

    PubMed

    Rha, Sa-Kyun; Lee, Youn-Seoung

    2015-03-01

    Area-selective copper deposition on screen printed Ag pattern/anodized Al/Al substrate was attempted using a neutral electroless plating processes for printed circuit boards (PCBs), according to a range of variation of pH 6.5-pH 8 at 70 °C. The utilized basic electroless solution consisted of copper(II) sulfate pentahydrate, sodium phosphinate monohydrate, sodium citrate tribasic dihydrate, ammonium chloride, and nickel(II) sulfate hexahydrate. The pH of the copper plating solutions was adjusted from pH 6.5 to pH 8 using NH4OH. Using electroless plating in pH 6.5 and pH 7 baths, surface damage to the anodized Al layer hardly occurred; the structure of the plated Cu-rich films was a typical fcc-Cu, but a small Ni component was co-deposited. In electroless plating at pH 8, the surface of the anodized Al layer was damaged and the Cu film was composed of a lot of Ni and P which were co-deposited with Cu. Finally, in a pH 7 bath, we can make a selectively electroless plated Cu film on a PCB without any lithography and without surface damage to the anodized Al layer.

  7. Second Plateau Voltage in Nickel-cadmium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasanth, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Sealed nickel cadmium cells having large number of cycles on them are discharged using Hg/HgO reference electrode. The negative electrode exhibits the second plateau. A SEM of negative plates of such cells show a number of large crystals of cadmium hydroxide. The large crystals on the negative plates disappear after continuous overcharging in flooded cells.

  8. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiling and tribological characterization of ion-plated gold on various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    For the case of ion-plated gold, the graded interface between gold and a nickel substrate and a nickel substrate, such tribological properties as friction and microhardness are examined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and depth profiling. Sliding was conducted against SiC pins in both the adhesive process, where friction arises from adhesion between sliding surfaces, and abrasion, in which friction is due to pin indentation and groove-plowing. Both types of friction are influenced by coating depth, but with opposite trends: the graded interface exhibited the highest adhesion, but the lowest abrasion. The coefficient of friction due to abrasion is inversely related to hardness. Graded interface microhardness values are found to be the highest, due to an alloying effect. There is almost no interface gradation between the vapor-deposited gold film and the substrate.

  9. Long life nickel electrodes for a nickel-hydrogen cell: Cycle life tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, the cycle life of nickel electrodes was tested in Ni/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45 minute low Earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. It is shown that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength does not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. It is found that the best plaque is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has median pore size of 13 micron.

  10. Preparation of magnetic nickel hollow fibers with a trilobe structure using cellulose acetate fibers as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changfeng; Li, Ping; Zhang, Lixiong

    2013-02-01

    Nickel hollow fibers with trilobe shape in cross section and monolithic nickel structures composed of trilobe shaped nickel hollow fibrous networks were prepared by using cellulose acetate fibers from cigarette filters as the template. Magnetic ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers were then fabricated by using the nickel-based hollow fibers as the support. The samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction. The results indicate that nickel hollow fibers and ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers retain the morphology of the cellulose acetate fibers, and the monolithic nickel structures can be prepared by pre-shaping the cellulose acetate fibers. The thickness of the nickel layer can be regulated by controlling the electroless plating times. The saturation magnetization and coercivity of the trilobe shaped nickel hollow fibers and ZSM-5/Ni hollow fibers are 27.78 and 21.59 emu/g and 78 and 61 Oe, respectively.

  11. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  12. Quality assurance in small plating shops

    SciTech Connect

    McNabb, W.J. )

    1993-10-01

    The potential for electroless nickel coatings in oilfield and petrochemical applications is quite high. The greatest obstacle to their use has been a reputation for poor quality due to a lack of quality control in many plating shops. To overcome this, electroless nickel shops should not only have a quality control program in their operation, but must also document its use and success. This article describes how a plating shoe can develop the necessary procedures, manuals, and paperwork trail to offer quality assurance and to satisfy customers.

  13. Nickel transfer by fingers.

    PubMed

    Isnardo, D; Vidal, J; Panyella, D; Vilaplana, J

    2015-06-01

    We investigated fingers as a potential source of nickel transfer to the face in patients with allergic contact dermatitis to nickel and a history of facial dermatitis. Samples were collected from the fingers and cheeks of volunteers using the stripping method with standard adhesive tape, and nickel levels were quantified using mass spectrometry. Fingers and cheeks of individuals who had handled coins were both positive for nickel, with levels ranging from 14.67 to 58.64 ppm and 1.28 to 8.52 ppm, respectively. The levels in a control group were considerably and significantly lower. Transfer of nickel from a person's fingers to their face after handling a nickel-containing object could explain the presence of facial dermatitis in patients with nickel hypersensitivity.

  14. Nickel aluminides: Breaking into the marketplace

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C.

    1995-12-31

    Nurtured by ORNL researchers for almost 15 years, nickel aluminides may have found their niche. ORNL`s modified nickel aluminides are receiving considerable attention by the heat-treating industry in the United States and may have arrived just in the nick of time to make some companies more competitive. Nickel aluminides are intermetallic materials that have long been considered potentially useful because, thanks to their ordered crystal structure, they are very strong and hard and melt only at very high temperatures. But they had a serious weakness: they were too brittle to be shaped into reliable components. Then, in 1982, ORNL researchers led by Chain T. Liu in the Metals and Ceramics Division found the secret recipe for producing a ductile nickel aluminide alloy: add trace amounts of a few alloying elements in the right proportion. It was like turning peanut brittle into taffy. Their most important discovery was that the addition of a small amount of boron (200 parts per million) to a nickel aluminide alloy (Ni{sub 3}Al) makes the alloy highly ductile at room temperature. To address the safety concerns of the alloy preparation industry, Vinod Sikka and Joseph Vought developed a new process in collaboration with Seetharama Deevi, who was on a 1-year sabbatical at ORNL from the Research Center at Philip Morris in Richmond, Virginia. The development is called the Exo-Melt process.

  15. Progress in the Development of Lightweight Nickel Electrode for Nickel-Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1999-01-01

    Development of a high specific energy battery is one of the objectives of the lightweight nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) program at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The approach has been to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen cell. Small fiber diameter nickel plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products and have an advantage of increased surface area available for the deposition of active material. Initial tests include activation and capacity measurements at five different discharge levels, C/2, 1.0 C, 1.37 C, 2.0 C, and 2.74 C. The electrodes are life cycle tested using a half-cell configuration at 40 and 80% depths-of-discharge (DOD) in a low-Earth-orbit regime. The electrodes that pass the initial tests are life cycle-tested in a boiler plate nickel-hydrogen cell before flight weight design are built and tested.

  16. Advanced nickel-cadmium batteries for geosynchronous spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, David F.; Lim, Hong S.; Krause, Stanley J.; Verzwyvelt, Scott A.

    1987-01-01

    A nickel cadmium battery was developed that can be operated at 80 percent depth of discharge in excess of 10 years in a geosynchronous orbit application, and has about a 30 percent weight savings per spacecraft over present nickel cadmium batteries when used with a 1000 watts eclipse load. The approach used in the development was to replace nylon separators with inert polymer impregnated zirconia, use electrochemically deposited plates in place of conventional chemically precipitated ones, and use an additive to extend negative plate lifetime. The design has undergone extensive testing using both engineering and protoflight cell configurations.

  17. A REVIEW OF NICKEL PLATING BATH LIFE EXTENSION, NICKEL RECOVERY & COPPER RECOVERY FROM NICKEL BATHS

    EPA Science Inventory

    For metal finishing operations to remain competitive and in compliance with environmental requirements, companies must focus their efforts on pollution prevention to reduce waste generation and disposal costs, limit liability and restore maximum profits. By applying the pollutio...

  18. INVESTIGATION INTO THE REJUVENATION OF SPENT ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATHS BY ELECTRODIALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Electroless nickel plating generates substantially more waste than other metal-finishing processes due to the inherent limited bath life and the need for regular bath disposal. Electrodialysis can be used to generate electroless nickel baths, but poor membrane permselectivity, l...

  19. A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W.

    1996-08-01

    One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

  20. Comparative study of electroless nickel film on different organic acids modified cuprammonium fabric (CF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hang; Lu, Yinxiang

    2016-01-01

    Nickel films were grown on citric acid (CA), malic acid (MA) and oxalic acid (OA) modified cuprammonium fabric (CF) substrates via electroless nickel deposition. The nickel films were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their individual deposition rate and electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) were also investigated to compare the properties of electroless nickel films. SEM images illustrated that the nickel film on MA modified CF substrate was smooth and uniform, and the density of nickel nuclei was much higher. Compared with that of CA modified CF, the coverage of nickel nuclei on OA and MA modified CF substrate was very limited and the nickel particles size was too big. XRD analysis showed that the nickel films deposited on the different modified CF substrates had a structure with Ni (1 1 1) preferred orientation. All the nickel coatings via different acid modification were firmly adhered to the CF substrates, as demonstrated by an ultrasonic washing test. The result of tensile test indicated that the electroless nickel plating on CF has ability to strengthen the CF substrate while causes limited effect on tensile elongation. Moreover, the nickel film deposited on MA modified CF substrate showed more predominant in EMI SE than that deposited on CA or OA modified CF.

  1. Contaminated nickel scrap processing

    SciTech Connect

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Hayden, H.W.; Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Wilson, D.F.

    1994-12-01

    The DOE will soon choose between treating contaminated nickel scrap as a legacy waste and developing high-volume nickel decontamination processes. In addition to reducing the volume of legacy wastes, a decontamination process could make 200,000 tons of this strategic metal available for domestic use. Contaminants in DOE nickel scrap include {sup 234}Th, {sup 234}Pa, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 239}Pu (trace), {sup 60}Co, U, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 237}Np (trace). This report reviews several industrial-scale processes -- electrorefining, electrowinning, vapormetallurgy, and leaching -- used for the purification of nickel. Conventional nickel electrolysis processes are particularly attractive because they use side-stream purification of process solutions to improve the purity of nickel metal. Additionally, nickel purification by electrolysis is effective in a variety of electrolyte systems, including sulfate, chloride, and nitrate. Conventional electrorefining processes typically use a mixed electrolyte which includes sulfate, chloride, and borate. The use of an electrorefining or electrowinning system for scrap nickel recovery could be combined effectively with a variety of processes, including cementation, solvent extraction, ion exchange, complex-formation, and surface sorption, developed for uranium and transuranic purification. Selected processes were reviewed and evaluated for use in nickel side-stream purification. 80 refs.

  2. The chemical precipitation of nickel on ion exchangers and active carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorol'Skaya, S. V.; Zolotukhina, E. V.; Polyanskii, L. N.; Peshkov, S. V.; Kravchenko, T. A.; Krysanov, V. A.

    2010-12-01

    The chemical precipitation of nickel in the form of poorly soluble precipitates in ion exchanger matrices and on active carbons from solutions of nickel chloride and chemical nickel plating electrolytes was studied. The sorption of nickel ions from a solution of nickel chloride occurs most effectively on Purolite D24002 macroporous chelate forming ion exchanger, KU-23-15/100 sulfo cation exchanger, and KU-2-8 gel sulfo cation exchanger. Nickel enters sulfo cation exchangers in the form of counterions, and is adsorbed on Purolite D24002 largely because of complex formation. The subsequent precipitation of nickel in the solid state in matrix pores liberates ionogenic centers, which allows repeated sorption cycles to be performed. After three chemical precipitation cycles under static conditions, the amount of nickel is higher by 170-250% than the ion exchange capacity of the sorbents. The electrolyte of chemical nickel plating contains nickel predominantly in the form of negatively charged and neutral complexes with glycine, which cannot form bonds with the matrices under study. It is therefore reasonable to perform sorption at decreased solution pH values.

  3. Dermatitis from a chromium dental plate.

    PubMed

    Hubler, W R; Hubler, W R

    1983-09-01

    Systemic absorption of metal or metallic salts from dental and orthopedic surgical implants can produce a cutaneous allergic dermatitis in susceptible individuals. Mercury, nickel and cobalt are the most common metals to elicit such systemic allergic reactions from chronic internal exposure. A case is presented of a generalized eczematoid dermatitis apparently caused by allergy to chromium liberated from a metal dental plate.

  4. Nickel-Cadmium Cell Design Variable Program Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A program was undertaken in conjunction with the General Electric Company to evaluate 9 of the more important nickel cadmium aerospace cell designs that are currently being used or that have been used in the past 15 years. Design variables tested in this program included teflonated negative plates, silver treated negative plates, light plate loading level, no positive plate cadmium treatment, plate design of 1968 utilizing both old and new processing techniques, and electrochemically impregnated positive plates. The data acquired from these test packs in a low Earth orbit cycling regime is presented and analyzed here. This data showed conclusively that the cells manufactured with no positive plate cadmium treatment outperformed all other cell designs in all aspects of the program and that the cells with teflonated negative electrodes performed very poorly.

  5. Nickel Curie Point Engine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-01-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient…

  6. The nickel problem.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Dalmau, L

    1982-07-01

    Clinical use of the new base-metal alloys in restorative dentistry involves a risk for both dentist and patient. It is the responsibility of the dentist to determine if a patient is allergic to nickel prior to treatment with a restoration containing a nickel alloy. A patch test is recommended for nickel sensitivity in every patient when such a restoration is planned. In addition, the dentist should include in the work authorization order to the dental laboratory the type of alloy he wants for a particular patient. The dentist should be prepared to check for the presence of nickel in a casting suspected of containing it using the dimethylglyoxime test. The evaluation record for nickel sensitivity should include the patient's name, age, history of allergies, medication, name of drug, dosage, and reaction. The record should be kept in the patient's chart.

  7. Boronization of nickel and nickel clad materials for potential use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Kim, Jin Yong Y.; Xia, Gordon; Coleman, J. E.; Yang, Z Gary

    2006-12-20

    A new low-cost, nickel clad bipolar plate concept is currently being developed for use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Reported in this paper are the details of a powder-pack boronization process that would be used to establish a passivation layer on the electrolyte exposed surfaces of the bipolar plate in the final stage of manufacture. Results from energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy indicate that under moderate boronization conditions a homogeneous Ni3B layer grows on the exposed surfaces of the nickel clad material, the thickness of which depends on the time and temperature of boronization according to a Wagner-type scale growth relationship. At higher temperatures and longer reaction times, a Ni2B overlayer forms on top of the Ni3B during boronization.

  8. Development of a brazing process for the production of water- cooled bipolar plates made of chromium-coated metal foils for PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, M.; Hoehlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Lampke, T.; Hollaender, U.; Maier, H. J.

    2016-03-01

    Beside lithium batteries, PEM fuel cells are the most promising strategy as a power source to achieve the targets for introducing and increasing the usage of electric vehicles. Due to limited space and weight problems, water cooled, metallic bipolar plates in a fuel cell metal stack are preferred in motor vehicles. These plates are stamped metal sheets with a complex structure, interconnected media-tight. To meet the multiple tasks and requirements in use, complex and expensive combinations of materials are currently in use (carbon fiber composites, graphite, gold-plated nickel, stainless and acid resistant steel). The production of such plates is expensive as it is connected with considerable effort or the usage of precious metals. As an alternative, metalloid nitrides (CrN, VN, W2N, etc.) show a high chemical resistance, hardness and a good conductivity. So this material category meets the basic requirements of a top layer. However, the standard methods for their production (PVD, CVD) are expensive and have a slow deposition rate and a lower layer thicknesses. Because of these limitations, a full functionality over the life cycle of a bipolar plate is not guaranteed. The contribution shows the development and quantification of an alternative production process for bipolar plates. The expectation is to get significant advantages from the combination of chromium electrodeposition and thermochemical treatment to form chromium nitrides. Both processes are well researched and suitable for series production. The thermochemical treatment of the chromium layer also enables a process-integrated brazing.

  9. Welding and brazing of nickel and nickel-base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mortland, J. E.; Evans, R. M.; Monroe, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The joining of four types of nickel-base materials is described: (1) high-nickel, nonheat-treatable alloys, (2) solid-solution-hardening nickel-base alloys, (3) precipitation-hardening nickel-base alloys, and (4) dispersion-hardening nickel-base alloys. The high-nickel and solid-solution-hardening alloys are widely used in chemical containers and piping. These materials have excellent resistance to corrosion and oxidation, and retain useful strength at elevated temperatures. The precipitation-hardening alloys have good properties at elevated temperature. They are important in many aerospace applications. Dispersion-hardening nickel also is used for elevated-temperature service.

  10. Ion plating with an induction heating source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.; Brainard, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Induction heating is introduced as an evaporation heat source in ion plating. A bare induction coil without shielding can be directly used in the glow discharge region with no arcing. The only requirement is to utilize an rf inductive generator with low operating frequency of 75 kHz. Mechanical simplicity of the ion plating apparatus and ease of operation is a great asset for industrial applications; practically any metal such as nickel, iron, and the high temperature refractories can be evaporated and ion plated.

  11. Nickel silicide for Ni/Cu contact mono-silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Seon Kyu; Kim, Dong Ho; Lee, Soo Hong

    2013-07-01

    A solar cell contact needs to be as thin as possible and have high conductivity since a thick contact causes shading loss and reduced current. Plating is a very suitable method for making a metal contact, and nickel is a high conductivity metal which is easy to form into a contact using electroless plating. After the nickel is plated on the silicon substrate, the nickel contact should be fired in order to form nickel silicide. Nickel silicide is used for the seed layer of the Cu contact for silicon solar cells. In this study, we replaced the screen-printed contact of the Passivated Emitter Solar Cell (PESC) with a Ni/Cu contact that has a selective emitter. The nickel layer was used as the seed layer, adhesion layer, and Cu diffusion barrier. The main contact was formed by plating the copper. The firing conditions of a conventional furnace were varied in order to form nickel silicide. Consequently, we achieved the best solar cell efficiency of 18.15%.

  12. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartal, Muhammet; Uysal, Mehmet; Gul, Harun; Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%).

  13. Laser cladding of nickel-based alloy coatings on copper substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Prabu; Rea, Edward; Deng, Justin

    2015-07-01

    The wear resistance of high-value copper components used in the metal casting, automotive, aerospace and electrical equipment industries can be improved by applying nickel (Ni)-based coatings through laser cladding. A high-power diode laser array providing continuous power levels up to 10 kilowatts with beam-shaping optics providing a rectangular focal region of various dimensions was used to deposit Ni-based alloy coatings with controlled thickness ranging from 0.3 mm to 1.6 mm in a single pass on copper (Cu) substrates. Slotted powder feeding plates with various discrete widths delivered uniform streams of powdered metal particles entrained in a carrier gas, matching the selected focal spot dimensions. To enhance laser beam coupling with the substrate and to avoid defects such as cracks, delamination and porosity, Cu substrates were preheated to a temperature of 300°C. The effect of heat input on microstructure of the cladding and extent of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) was evaluated using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Excessive heat input with longer interaction time increased dilution, porosity and expanded HAZ that significantly reduced the hardness of both the clad and the Cu substrates. Average microhardness of the Ni-C-B-Si-W alloy coating was 572 HV, which was almost 7 times greater than the hardness of the Cu substrate (84 HV).

  14. Separating the strengthening phase in nickel-cobalt alloys doped with tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaipov, R. Kh.; Kerimov, E. Yu.; Slyusarenko, E. M.

    2017-02-01

    The hardness values of monophasic (fcc solid solution) and biphasic (fcc solid solution and separated phase) nickel-cobalt alloys doped with tantalum are determined using the Vickers method. Based on the resulting data, a composition-structure-hardness diagram is devised for the Co-Ni-Ta system.

  15. Mechanical properties of nickel-graphene composites synthesized by electrochemical deposition.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhaodi; Meng, Nan; Shehzad, Khurram; Xu, Yang; Qu, Shaoxing; Yu, Bin; Luo, J K

    2015-02-13

    Graphene (Gr) nanosheets with multilayer structures were dispersed in a nickel (Ni) plating solution by using a surfactant with a magnetic stirring method. Gr nanosheets were incorporated into a Ni matrix through a plating process to form Ni-Gr composites on a target substrate. Gr nanosheets were uniformly dispersed in the Ni matrix, and the oxygen radicals present in the Gr were reduced during the electro-deposition process. The incorporation of Gr in the Ni matrix increases both the inter-planar spacing and the degree of preferred orientation of crystalline Ni. With the addition of Gr content as low as 0.05 g L(-1), the elastic modulus and hardness of the Ni-Gr composites reach 240 GPa and 4.6 GPa, respectively, which are about 1.7 and 1.2 times that of the pure Ni deposited under the same condition. The enhancement in mechanical properties of the composites is attributed to the preferred formation of the Ni crystalline phases in its (111) plane, the high interaction between Ni and Gr and the prevention of the dislocation sliding in the Ni matrix by the Gr. The results suggest that the method of using Gr directly instead of graphene oxide (GO) is efficient and scalable.

  16. Automated finishing of diamond turned dies for hard x-ray and EUV optics replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T. H.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Freeman, Richard R.

    2012-10-01

    Ultra-precision diamond turning can deliver very accurate form, often less than 100nm P-V. A possible manufacturing method for thin Wolter type-1 mirrors in hard X-ray space telescopes thus involves generating electroless nickel plated mandrels by diamond turning, before coating them with a reflective film and substrate. However, the surface texture after turning falls far short from the requirements of X-ray and EUV applications. The machining marks need to be removed, with hand polishing still widely employed. There is thus a compelling need for automated finishing of turned dies. A two step finishing method is presented that combines fluid jet and precessed bonnet polishing on a common 7-axis CNC platform. This method is capable of finishing diamond turned electroless nickel plated dies down to 0.28nm rms roughness, while deterministically improving form error down to 30nm P-V. The fluid jet polishing process, which consists of pressurizing water and abrasive particles for delivery through a nozzle, has been specially optimized with a newly designed slurry delivery unit and computer simulations, to remove diamond turning marks without introducing another waviness signature. The precessed bonnet polishing method, which consists of an inflated membrane rotated at an angle from the local normal to the surface and controlled by geometrical position relative to the work-piece, is subsequently employed with a novel control algorithm to deliver scratch-free surface roughness down to 0.28 nm rms. The combination of these two deterministic processes to finish aspheric and freeform dies promises to unlock new frontiers in X-ray and EUV optics fabrication.

  17. Nickel Curie point engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaverina, Chris; Lisensky, George

    2014-04-01

    Ferromagnetic materials such as nickel, iron, or cobalt lose the electron alignment that makes them attracted to a magnet when sufficient thermal energy is added. The temperature at which this change occurs is called the "Curie temperature," or "Curie point." Nickel has a Curie point of 627 K, so a candle flame is a sufficient heat source. A simple but elegant device illustrates this phenomenon beautifully.

  18. Aquatic Toxicity and Fate of Nickel Coated Graphite Fibers, With Comparisons to Iron and Aluminum Coated Glass Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    The toxicity of nickel coated graphite was examined using Daphnia magna , the water flea (48 hr assay) and Cyprinodon variegatus, the sheepshead...signs up to 1000 mg/L nickel fibers. Fate studies (21 days) were conducted using various water hardness and salt water media. Daphnia magna , Sheepshead minnow, Environmental toxicity, EC50, Marine amphipods.

  19. CAPSULE REPORT: HARD CHROME FUME SUPPRESSANTS & CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    All existing information which includes the information extrapolated from the Hard Chrome Pollution Prevention Demonstration Project(s) and other sources derived from plating facilities and industry contacts, will be condensed and featured in this document. At least five chromium...

  20. Peen plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babecki, A. J. (Inventor); Haehner, C. L.

    1973-01-01

    A process for metal plating which comprises spraying a mixture of metallic powder and small peening particles at high velocity against a surface is described. The velocity must be sufficient to impact and bond metallic powder onto the surface. In the case of metal surfaces, the process has as one of its advantages providing mechanical working (hardening) of the surface simultaneously with the metal plating.

  1. Environmentally friendly process for nickel electroplating of ABS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzaoui, M.; Martins, J. I.; Bazzaoui, E. A.; Albourine, A.

    2012-08-01

    Nickel electroplating of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) plastic has been achieved successfully without any chromium or palladium pretreatment. Once the ABS is coated with polypyrrole (PPy), the sample may be electroplated. The process is fast, economic and involves three stages. Firstly, chemical deposition of PPy on ABS, secondly, copper deposition and finally nickel electroplating. A homogenous and adherent PPy has been synthesized chemically on ABS plate by using pyrrole as monomer and iron (III) chloride as oxidant. Copper and nickel were deposited galvanostatically from industrial plating baths. The metallic coatings were homogeneous and the adherence was estimated at 100%. The thickness of copper and nickel depend on the electrolysis time. As the current density increases, the Cu and Ni thickness raises. This result was confirmed from SEM characterization and RX map. The Ni coating is characterized by a globular structure with globules of different sizes. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis shows the presence of Ni with some amount of carbon and oxygen due to the nickel oxides and contaminant from the bath solution.

  2. ELECTRODIALYSIS AS A TECHNIQUE FOR EXTENDING ELECTROLESS NICKEL BATH LIFE-IMPROVING SELECTIVITY AND REDUCING LOSSES OF VALUABLE BATH COMPONENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade electrodialysis has emerged as an effective technique for removing accumulated reactant counterions (sodium and sulfate) and reaction products (orthophosphite) that interfere with the electroless nickel plating process, thus extending bath life by up to 50 me...

  3. Production method of nickel electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikeda, H.; Ohira, T.

    1982-01-01

    A nickel electrode having improved charging efficiency, an increased coefficient of discharging utilization, and large capacity is disclosed. Nickel hydroxide or nickel oxide is retained in a porous nickel substrate which is immersed in an aqueous solution of cobalt acetate with a pH 4.0 to 6.8. The electrode thus obtained is then immersed in an alkaline solution or heated to change cobalt acetate into cobalt hydroxide or cobalt oxide whereby the surface of nickel active material is covered with cobalt crystals and alloying of cobalt and nickel is promoted at the same time.

  4. Soil, nickel and low nickel food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chami, Ziad Al; Cavoski, Ivana; Mondelli, Donato; Mimiola, Giancarlo; Miano, Teodoro

    2013-04-01

    Nickel is an ubiquitous trace element and occurs in soil, water, air and in the biosphere. Ni is an essential element for several plants, microorganisms and vertebrates. Human requirement for Ni has not been conclusively demonstrated. Nickel is normally present in human tissues at low concentration and, under conditions of high exposure, these levels may increase significantly. Food is the major source of Ni exposure. Nickel is present in many food products, especially vegetables. The amount of Ni present in vegetables is increasing because of environmental contamination and cultural practices. It has been demonstrated that the consumption of a Ni-rich diet can cause an increase of immunological disorders including Systemic Ni Allergy Syndrome (SNAS). The SNAS patients are currently treated with a diet that is closely Ni-free. Therefore, there is a need to produce certified and guaranteed vegetables with a low Ni concentration in the market. The proposed research aims to develop new methods for vegetable production and innovative cultural practices through a suitable choice of agricultural soil, cultivar, amendments and fertilizers as well as good agricultural practices in order to reduce Ni plant uptake and its translocation to the edible plant parts and therefore to produce Ni-free food products for SNAS patients.

  5. Nanoindentation studies of nickel zinc ferrite embedded mesoporous silica template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, S.; Hajra, P.; Mada, M. R.; Bandopadhyay, S.; Chakravorty, D.

    2013-02-01

    Nickel zinc ferrite (NZF) embedded mesoporous silica KIT-6 nanocomposite (NZFMS) was synthesized via impregnation method. The microstructure of the samples was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nanoindentation (NI) studies were carried out on both mesoporous silica (MS) and the nanocomposite NZFMS. It was found that the young's modulus (E) and hardness (H) of the NZFMS were higher than that of the MS. From creep measurement it was observed that the creep-strain rate was greater for NZFMS compared to MS. This arose due to diffusion of Fe3+ ions from nickel zinc ferrite to the silica glass. The results indicate that the NZFMS material shows superplastic behaviour at room temperature.

  6. Copper plating on the polyimide film by electroless plating techniques for EMI shielding.

    PubMed

    Ji, Eun Sun; Cha, Hyun Gil; Kim, Chang Woo; Kang, Dong In; Kang, Young Soo

    2009-12-01

    In this work, the metal plated film was prepared by electroless plating techniques. The film was prepared for the fabrication of EMI shielding. Polyimide film was treated by base solution for etching and then activated by silver. The modified polyimide film was immersed into the electroless copper plating solution which has different molar ratios of nickel in the solution. The thickness and surface morphology of copper layer on the polyimide films were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, EMI shielding ability of the film was calculated by measuring reflectivity of EM wave on the film surface using the equation of Schelkunoff theory.

  7. Underwater electrical discharge in plate to plate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmashuk, Vitaliy

    2016-09-01

    Two main configurations of high voltage electrodes submersed in water have been used for an electrical discharge generation: pin to pin and pin to plate. An electrical breakdown between plate electrodes is generally difficult to reproduce, because there is a uniform and weak electric field. One major advantage of using plate electrodes is their greater ``wear hardness'' to high-energy discharges. The plate electrodes can withstand extremely high energy deposition at which the pin electrode is quickly destroyed. The electrical discharge between plate electrodes can be initiated by creating an inhomogeneity in the electrical field. Two methods of discharge initiation between plate electrodes are proposed for this aim: 1) focusing of a shock wave in the interelectrode region; 2) a bubble injection into the electrode gap. The shock wave creates favourable conditions for the electrical breakdown between the two plate electrodes: it causes that numerous microbubbles of dissolved air start to grow and serve as locations for streamer initiation. In the second method the gas bubble is injected from the one of the electrodes, which has a gas inlet hole on the lateral face for this purpose. A ``volcano'' like morphology of positive streamers are observed in the experiments with weak electric field. The authors are grateful to MEYS grant INGO LG 15013.

  8. Study of Nickel Ion Release in Simulated Body Fluid from C+-IMPLANTED Nickel Titanium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafique, Muhammad Ahsan; Murtaza, G.; Saadat, Shahzad; Zaheer, Zeeshan; Shahnawaz, Muhammad; Uddin, Muhammad K. H.; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-05-01

    Nickel ion release from NiTi shape memory alloy is an issue for biomedical applications. This study was planned to study the effect of C+ implantation on nickel ion release and affinity of calcium phosphate precipitation on NiTi alloy. Four annealed samples are chosen for the present study; three samples with oxidation layer and the fourth without oxidation layer. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra reveal amorphization with ion implantation. Proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) result shows insignificant increase in Ni release in simulated body fluid (SBF) and calcium phosphate precipitation up to 8×1013ions/cm2. Then Nickel contents show a sharp increase for greater ion doses. Corrosion potential decreases by increasing the dose but all the samples passivate after the same interval of time and at the same level of VSCE in ringer lactate solution. Hardness of samples initially increases at greater rate (up to 8×1013ions/cm2) and then increases with lesser rate. It is found that 8×1013ions/cm2 (≈1014) is a safer limit of implantation on NiTi alloy, this limit gives us lesser ion release, better hardness and reasonable hydroxyapatite incubation affinity.

  9. Nickel and chromium cycles: Stocks and flows project part IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reck, Barbara K.; Gordon, Robert B.

    2008-07-01

    Nickel and chromium are essential ingredients in alloys increasingly important for energy-efficient, environmentally friendly modern technology. Quantitative assessment of the flows of these metals through the world economy from resource extraction to final disposal informs resource policy, energy planning, environmental science, and waste management. This article summarizes the worldwide technological cycles of nickel and chromium in 2000. Stainless steel is the major use of these metals, but they serve numerous other special needs, as in superalloys for high-temperature service, as plating materials, and in coinage. Because they are used primarily in alloys, novel recycling issues arise as their use becomes more widespread.

  10. NASA Lewis advanced IPV nickel-hydrogen technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Britton, Doris L.

    1993-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts. Some of the advancements are as follows: to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life and performance, to modify the state of the art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes and further improve cycle life, and to develop a lightweight nickel electrode to reduce battery mass, hence reduce launch and/or increase satellite payload. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 80 percent DOD compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. Results of the boiler plate cell tests have been validated at NWSC, Crane, Indiana. Forty-eight ampere-hour flight cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH have undergone real time LEO cycle life testing at an 80 percent DOD, 10 C. The three cells containing 26 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 19,500. The three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 6,400. Validation testing of NASA Lewis 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells is also being conducted at NWSC, Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis contract. This consists of characterization, storage, and cycle life testing. There was no capacity degradation after 52 days of storage with the cells in the discharged state, on open circuit, 0 C, and a hydrogen pressure of 14.5 psia. The catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 22,694 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. All three of the non-catalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9,588; 13,900; and 20,575). Cycle life test results of the Fibrex nickel electrode has demonstrated the feasibility of an improved nickel electrode giving a higher specific energy nickel-hydrogen cell. A nickel-hydrogen boiler plate cell using an 80

  11. Nickel ferrule applicators: a source of nickel exposure in children.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Rizk, Christopher; Silverberg, Nanette

    2015-01-01

    Eye makeup has been investigated for nickel content and found to have no direct association with nickel allergy and cosmetic dermatitis. However, the tools used (e.g., eyelash curlers, hairdressing scissors, hair curlers, and eye shadow and makeup applicators) may be sources. Nickel is ubiquitous and a wide range of sources have been reported, and makeup applicators (ferrules) now join the list.

  12. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for a Nickel-hydrogen Cell: Cycle Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, H. S.; Verzwyvelt, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    In order to develop a long life nickel electrode for a Ni/H2 cell, cycle life tests of nickel electrodes were carried out in Hi/H2 boiler plate cells. A 19 test cell matrix was made of various nickel electrode designs including three levels each of plaque mechanical strength, median pore size of the plaque, and active material loading. Test cells were cycled to the end of their life (0.5v) in a 45-minute low earth orbit cycle regime at 80% depth-of-discharge. The results show that the active material loading level affects the cycle life the most with the optimum loading at 1.6 g/cc void. Mechanical strength did not affect the cycle life noticeably in the bend strength range of 400 to 700 psi. The best plaque type appears to be one which is made of INCO nickel powder type 287 and has a median pore size of 13 micron.

  13. Nickel gradient electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, A.H.

    1988-03-31

    This invention relates generally to rechargeable batteries, and, in particular, relates to batteries that use nickel electrodes. It provides an improved nickel electrode with a selected gradient of additive materials. The concentration of additives in the impregnating solution are controlled during impregnation such that an additive gradient is generated. In the situation where the highest ionic conductivity is needed at the current collector boundary with the active material, the electrochemical impregnating solution is initially high in additive, and at the end of impregnation has been adjusted to significantly lower additive concentration. For chemical impregnation, the electrodes are similarly dipped in solutions that are initially high in additive. This invention is suitable for conventional additives such as cobalt, cadmium, barium, manganese, and zinc. It is therefore one objective of the invention to provide an improved nickel electrode of a battery cell with an additive in the active material to increase the life of the battery cell. Another objective is to provide for an improved nickel electrode having a greater concentration of additive near the current collector of nickel.

  14. Progress in nickel toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S.S.; Sunderman, F.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Nickel Metabolism and Toxicology was held at the PLM St Jacques Hotel in Paris in September 1984, under the joint sponsorship of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the Association of Clinical Scientists, and the Nickel Producers Environmental Research Association (NiPERA). The Paris Conference was attended by 150 participants from 19 countries, including many of the world's authorities on nickel in the areas of trace analysis, biochemistry, radiochemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, pathology, immunology, industrial hygiene, epidemiology, occupational health and clinical medicine. The text of the Richard T. Barton memorial lecture and synopses of the scientific papers that were presented at the Conference are published in this volume.

  15. Gyroid Nickel Nanostructures from Diblock Copolymer Supramolecules

    PubMed Central

    Vukovic, Ivana; Punzhin, Sergey; Voet, Vincent S. D.; Vukovic, Zorica; de Hosson, Jeff Th. M.; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Loos, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Nanoporous metal foams possess a unique combination of properties - they are catalytically active, thermally and electrically conductive, and furthermore, have high porosity, high surface-to-volume and strength-to-weight ratio. Unfortunately, common approaches for preparation of metallic nanostructures render materials with highly disordered architecture, which might have an adverse effect on their mechanical properties. Block copolymers have the ability to self-assemble into ordered nanostructures and can be applied as templates for the preparation of well-ordered metal nanofoams. Here we describe the application of a block copolymer-based supramolecular complex - polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine)(pentadecylphenol) PS-b-P4VP(PDP) - as a precursor for well-ordered nickel nanofoam. The supramolecular complexes exhibit a phase behavior similar to conventional block copolymers and can self-assemble into the bicontinuous gyroid morphology with two PS networks placed in a P4VP(PDP) matrix. PDP can be dissolved in ethanol leading to the formation of a porous structure that can be backfilled with metal. Using electroless plating technique, nickel can be inserted into the template's channels. Finally, the remaining polymer can be removed via pyrolysis from the polymer/inorganic nanohybrid resulting in nanoporous nickel foam with inverse gyroid morphology. PMID:24797367

  16. Gyroid nickel nanostructures from diblock copolymer supramolecules.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Ivana; Punzhin, Sergey; Voet, Vincent S D; Vukovic, Zorica; de Hosson, Jeff Th M; ten Brinke, Gerrit; Loos, Katja

    2014-04-28

    Nanoporous metal foams possess a unique combination of properties - they are catalytically active, thermally and electrically conductive, and furthermore, have high porosity, high surface-to-volume and strength-to-weight ratio. Unfortunately, common approaches for preparation of metallic nanostructures render materials with highly disordered architecture, which might have an adverse effect on their mechanical properties. Block copolymers have the ability to self-assemble into ordered nanostructures and can be applied as templates for the preparation of well-ordered metal nanofoams. Here we describe the application of a block copolymer-based supramolecular complex - polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine)(pentadecylphenol) PS-b-P4VP(PDP) - as a precursor for well-ordered nickel nanofoam. The supramolecular complexes exhibit a phase behavior similar to conventional block copolymers and can self-assemble into the bicontinuous gyroid morphology with two PS networks placed in a P4VP(PDP) matrix. PDP can be dissolved in ethanol leading to the formation of a porous structure that can be backfilled with metal. Using electroless plating technique, nickel can be inserted into the template's channels. Finally, the remaining polymer can be removed via pyrolysis from the polymer/inorganic nanohybrid resulting in nanoporous nickel foam with inverse gyroid morphology.

  17. Variation of solar-selective properties of black chrome with plating time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E.; Curtis, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The spectral reflectance properties of a commercially prepared black chrome over dull nickel, both plated on steel, for various plating times of the black chrome were measured. The plating current was 180 amperes per square foot. Values of absorptance integrated over the solar spectrum, and of infrared emittance integrated over black-body radiation at 250 F were obtained. It is shown that plating between one and two minutes produces the optimum combination of highest heat absorbed and lowest heat lost by radiation.

  18. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  19. Indium Alloy as Cadmium Brush Plating Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-17

    Aged In- Sn Aged Cd In- Sn before Aging Cd before Aging Sn -Zn (12V) before Aging 18 Temperature Cycling Table 6. Temperature Cycling Conditions for Each...selection Key Requirements Candidate Cd Plating Replacement Processing Al Zn Ni Sn Zn-Ni Sn -Ni Sn -Zn Sn -In Meet Environmental Health and Safety (EHS...Corrosion Protection P P F P ? ? P P Whisker Growth (FOR INFO) ? F P F P P ? ? Al = Aluminum; In = Indium; Ni = Nickel; Sn =

  20. Manufacturing Systems Demonstration: Bimetallic Friction STIR Joining of AA6061 and High Hardness Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    DESCRIPTION OF FRICTION STIR PROCESSES ................................................... 2 D. DEVELOPMENT OF BIMETALLIC ( ALUMINUM - STEEL ) FRICTION STIR...to successfully join AA6061 aluminum alloy and High Hardness Armor (HHA) steel using the friction stir process (FSP). Metallographic analysis...32262: Detail Specification, Armor Plate Aluminum Alloy, Unweldable Applique 6061 2 MIL-DTL-46100E: Armor Plate, Steel , Wrought, High-Hardness

  1. Aeroheating model advancements featuring electroless metallic plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalmach, C. J., Jr.; Goodrich, W. D.

    1976-01-01

    Discussed are advancements in wind tunnel model construction methods and hypersonic test data demonstrating the methods. The general objective was to develop model fabrication methods for improved heat transfer measuring capability at less model cost. A plated slab model approach was evaluated with cast models containing constantan wires that formed single-wire-to-plate surface thermocouple junctions with a seamless skin of electroless nickel alloy. The surface of a space shuttle orbiter model was selectively plated with scaled tiles to simulate, with high fidelity, the probable misalignments of the heatshield tiles on a flight vehicle. Initial, Mach 8 heating results indicated a minor effect of tile misalignment roughness on boundary layer transition, implying a possible relaxation of heatshield manufacturing tolerances. Some loss of the plated tiles was experienced when the model was tested at high heating rates.

  2. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  3. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Roger W.; Neff, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  4. Nickel and Epigenetic Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hong; Shamy, Magdy; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    Insoluble nickel compounds are well-established human carcinogens. Occupational exposure to these compounds leads to increased incidence of lung and nasal cancer in nickel refinery workers. Apart from its weak mutagenic activity and hypoxia mimicking effect there is mounting experimental evidence indicating that epigenetic alteration plays an important role in nickel-induced carcinogenesis. Multiple epigenetic mechanisms have been identified to mediate nickel-induced gene silencing. Nickel ion is able to induce heterochromatinization by binding to DNA-histone complexes and initiating chromatin condensation. The enzymes required for establishing or removing epigenetic marks can be targeted by nickel, leading to altered DNA methylation and histone modification landscapes. The current review will focus on the epigenetic changes that contribute to nickel-induced gene silencing. PMID:24705264

  5. Iron induced nickel deficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is increasingly apparent that economic loss due to nickel (Ni) deficiency likely occurs in horticultural and agronomic crops. While most soils contain sufficient Ni to meet crop requirements, situations of Ni deficiency can arise due to antagonistic interactions with other metals. This study asse...

  6. Nickel refinery dust

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel refinery dust ; no CASRN Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  7. Nickel, soluble salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Nickel , soluble salts ; CASRN Various Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  8. Nickel-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylation with Diarylmethane Pronucleophiles: Reaction Development and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Sha, Sheng-Chun; Jiang, Hui; Mao, Jianyou; Bellomo, Ana; Jeong, Soo A; Walsh, Patrick J

    2016-01-18

    Palladium-catalyzed allylic substitution reactions are among the most efficient methods to construct C-C bonds between sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms. In contrast, much less work has been done with nickel catalysts, perhaps because of the different mechanisms of the allylic substitution reactions. Palladium catalysts generally undergo substitution by a "soft"-nucleophile pathway, wherein the nucleophile attacks the allyl group externally. Nickel catalysts are usually paired with "hard" nucleophiles, which attack the metal before C-C bond formation. Introduced herein is a rare nickel-based catalyst which promotes substitution with diarylmethane pronucleophiles by the soft-nucleophile pathway. Preliminary studies on the asymmetric allylic alkylation are promising.

  9. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  10. Life test data and flight predictions for nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H/sub 2/) batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E.

    1982-08-01

    A substantial test data base is accumulating on Ni-H/sub 2/ cells, batteries and positive plates to support life predictions of greater than 10 years in synchronous and elliptical orbits and greater than 5000 cycles in low earth orbit, all at high (80 percent) depth of discharge. All cells, batteries, and positive plates used for this test data base are of a common design. The cell is the Air Force/ Hughes ''pineapple slice'' cell. The positive plate is the Air Force/EPI Colorado Springs dry sinter electrochemically impregnated plate. Cell testing includes real time tests of cells and/or batteries in all three (low earth, elliptical, synchronous) orbits. Plate testing includes real time and accelerated tests in boilerplate assemblies. Life predictions are based on understanding cell wearout modes and comparing wearout rates of nickel-hydrogen components to those of nickel-cadmium cells.

  11. Plate electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Using a Cray T3D supercomputer and a simple assumption about the physical character of Earth's mantle, a pair of researchers from the University of California at Berkeley have built a computer model that may help explain why the planet's tectonic plates look the way they do.In creating a three-dimensional numerical simulation of convection in the Earth's interior, UC researchers Hans-Peter Bunge and Mark Richards simplified their model to account for just one major physical effect: that the viscosity of the mantle increases with depth. Reviewing some recent—but not yet widely accepted—seismic data, Bunge and Richards assumed for the sake of the model that the viscosity of the mantle increases by a factor of 30 from the lithosphere to the core-mantle boundary. Relying on that assumption, the pair ran the model for nearly three weeks on a supercomputer at Los Alamos National Laboratory and found that the simulation produced an effect similar to what we see on the surface of Earth. The model produced a surface paralleling the actual width of plates and the geometry of the plate boundaries.

  12. Solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire anodes for organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Ian E; Rathmell, Aaron R; Yan, Liang; Ye, Shengrong; Flowers, Patrick F; You, Wei; Wiley, Benjamin J

    2014-06-07

    This work describes a process to make anodes for organic solar cells from copper-nickel nanowires with solution-phase processing. Copper nanowire films were coated from solution onto glass and made conductive by dipping them in acetic acid. Acetic acid removes the passivating oxide from the surface of copper nanowires, thereby reducing the contact resistance between nanowires to nearly the same extent as hydrogen annealing. Films of copper nanowires were made as oxidation resistant as silver nanowires under dry and humid conditions by dipping them in an electroless nickel plating solution. Organic solar cells utilizing these completely solution-processed copper-nickel nanowire films exhibited efficiencies of 4.9%.

  13. Development of technique for air coating and nickel and copper metalization of solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Solar cells were made with a variety of base metal screen printing inks applied over silicon nitride AR coating and copper electroplated. Fritted and fritless nickel and fritless tin base printing inks were evaluated. Conversion efficiencies as high as 9% were observed with fritted nickel ink contacts, however, curve shapes were generally poor, reflecting high series resistance. Problems encountered in addition to high series reistance included loss of adhesion of the nickel contacts during plating and poor adhesion, oxidation and inferior curve shapes with the tin base contacts.

  14. Nickel foil microcantilevers for magnetic manipulation and localized heating.

    PubMed

    Gaitas, Angelo; McNaughton, Brandon H

    2013-12-01

    Cellular manipulation has been investigated by a number of techniques. In this manuscript nickel foil microcantilevers were used for magnetophoresis and manipulation of microparticles and magnetically labeled HeLa cells. The cantilevers were also used for localized heating in liquid, reaching biologically relevant temperatures. This work aims to develop cantilevers for sample enrichment, manipulation, and thermal applications, offering an inexpensive and versatile solution compatible with standard tools in research and clinical diagnostic testing, such as microwell plates.

  15. Nickel foil microcantilevers for magnetic manipulation and localized heating

    PubMed Central

    Gaitas, Angelo; McNaughton, Brandon H.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular manipulation has been investigated by a number of techniques. In this manuscript nickel foil microcantilevers were used for magnetophoresis and manipulation of microparticles and magnetically labeled HeLa cells. The cantilevers were also used for localized heating in liquid, reaching biologically relevant temperatures. This work aims to develop cantilevers for sample enrichment, manipulation, and thermal applications, offering an inexpensive and versatile solution compatible with standard tools in research and clinical diagnostic testing, such as microwell plates. PMID:25541581

  16. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  17. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  18. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  19. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  20. 49 CFR 173.198 - Nickel carbonyl.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nickel carbonyl. 173.198 Section 173.198... Nickel carbonyl. (a) Nickel carbonyl must be packed in specification steel or nickel cylinders as prescribed for any compressed gas except acetylene. A cylinder used exclusively for nickel carbonyl may...

  1. Corrosion of separator plate constituents in molten carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vossen, Jack

    To improve the corrosion resistance of the separator plates, insight in the corrosion behavior of the materials used is necessary. Especially, a detailed knowledge of the dissolution and passivation mechanisms as a function of the electrode potential will be useful. It is very difficult to unravel the corrosion mechanism of commercially available materials because it depends on several factors. Therefore, to obtain a first insight, the corrosion mechanism of pure metals and binary model alloys has been investigated and described in this thesis. The pure metals investigated are gold, nickel and chromium. The alloys that were investigated in this thesis are nickel-chromium, nickel-iron and nickel-aluminium alloys. Some commercially available materials have been investigated as a first attempt to understand the corrosion and passivation mechanisms of more complicated alloys.

  2. Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Ovshinsky, Stanford R.; Corrigan, Dennis; Venkatesan, Srini; Young, Rosa; Fierro, Christian; Fetcenko, Michael A.

    1994-01-01

    A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

  3. NICKEL ALLERGY: Surgeons Beware.

    PubMed

    Axe, Jeremie M; Sinz, Nathan J; Axe, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    When performing an orthopaedic device implantation, it should be routine practice for the surgeon to ask the patient if he or she has a metal allergy, and more specifically a nickel allergy. Ask the patient about costume jewelry or button reactions. If it is an elective surgery, obtain a confirmatory test with the aid of a dermatologist or allergist. It is recommended to use a non-nickel implant if the surgery is urgent, the patient has a confirmed allergy, or the patient does not want to undergo testing, as these implants are readily available in 2015. Finally, if the patient has a painful joint arthroplasty and all other causes have been ruled out, order a metal allergy test to aid in diagnosis.

  4. 76 FR 57913 - Amendments to National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Area Sources: Plating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... received from a semiconductor wafer and photovoltaic (PV) cell manufacturer who performs electroless nickel... electrolytic plating, as stated in the materials submitted by the commenter. In both these plating processes... electroplating processes as well as for complying with the management practices for both electrolytic...

  5. On the dynamic stability of multilayer sandwich plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, A. M.; Chen, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Study of the dynamic stability of plates which are constructed of several alternating soft and hard layers and are subjected to time-dependent periodic in-plane loads. A theory that accounts for all of these effects is presented for multilayer sandwich plates. The plate thickness consists of (k - 1) orthotropic soft core layers sandwiched between k hard isotropic membrane layers, each of which may have a different thickness and elastic properties. It is assumed that the core layers carry only the transverse shear stresses, while the hard membrane layers carry the in-plane normal and shear stresses. The complementary variational principle for dynamics is used to derive the governing differential equations and the necessary boundary conditions for the dynamic stability of the sandwich plate. The equations governing the vibration of the plate and those governing its static stability are deduced from the more general equations for dynamic stability.

  6. Raney nickel catalytic device

    DOEpatents

    O'Hare, Stephen A.

    1978-01-01

    A catalytic device for use in a conventional coal gasification process which includes a tubular substrate having secured to its inside surface by expansion a catalytic material. The catalytic device is made by inserting a tubular catalytic element, such as a tubular element of a nickel-aluminum alloy, into a tubular substrate and heat-treating the resulting composite to cause the tubular catalytic element to irreversibly expand against the inside surface of the substrate.

  7. Microstructure and surface mechanical properties of pulse electrodeposited nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hamid, A.; Dafalla, H.; Quddus, A.; Saricimen, H.; Al-Hadhrami, L. M.

    2011-09-01

    The surface of carbon steel was modified by electrochemical deposition of Ni in a standard Watt's bath using dc and pulse plating electrodeposition. The aim was to compare the microstructure and surface mechanical properties of the deposit obtained by both techniques. Materials characterization was conducted using field emission scanning electron microscope fitted with scanning transmission electron detector, atomic force microscope and X-ray diffractometer. Nanoindentation hardness, elastic modulus, adhesion, coefficients of friction and wear rates were determined for both dc and pulse electrodeposits. Experimental results indicate that pulse electrodeposition produced finer Ni grains compared to dc plating. Size of Ni grains increased with deposition. Both dc and pulse deposition resulted in grain growth in preferred (2 0 0) orientation. However, presence of Ni (1 1 1) grains increased in deposits produced by pulse deposition. Pulse plated Ni exhibited higher hardness, creep and coefficient of friction and lower modulus of elasticity compared to dc plated Ni.

  8. Comparison of BR3 surveillance and vessel plates to the surrogate plates representative of the Yankee Rowe PWR vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Fabry, A.; Chaouadi, R.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Van de Velde, J.; Biemiller, E.C.; Rosinski, S.T.; Carter, R.G.

    1999-10-01

    The sister pressure vessels at the BR3 and Yankee Rowe PWR plants were operated at lower-than-usual temperature ({approx}260 C) and their plates were austenitized at higher-than-usual temperature ({approx}970 C) -- a heat treatment leading to a coarser microstructure than is typical for the fine grain plates considered in development of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.99. The surveillance programs provided by Westinghouse for the two plants were limited to the same A302-B plate representative of the Rowe vessel upper shell plate; this material displayed outlier behavior characterized by a 41J. Charpy-V Notch shift significantly larger than predicted by Regulatory Guide 1.99. Because lower irradiation temperature and nickel alloying are generally considered detrimental to irradiation sensitivity, there was a major concern that the nickel-modified lower Rowe plate and the nickel-modified BR3 plate may become too embrittled to satisfy the toughness requirements embodied in the PTS screening criterion. This paper compares three complementary studies undertaken to clarify these uncertainties: (1) The accelerated irradiation and test program launched in 1990 by Yankee Atomic Electric Company using typical vessel plate materials containing 0.24% copper at two nickel levels: YA1, 0.63% (A533-B) and YA9, 0.19% (A302-B). These were heat-treated to produce the coarse and fine grain microstructures representative of the Yankee/BR3 and the Regulatory Guide plates, respectively; (2) The BR3 surveillance and vessel testing program; this vessel was wet-annealed in 1984, relicensed for operation till the plant shutdown in 1987, and was trepanned in early 1995; (3) The accelerated irradiations in the Belgian test reactor BR2 of the Yankee coarse grain plates YA1 and YA9 together with BR3 vessel specimens extracted at nozzle elevation, a location with negligible radiation exposure. It is contended that the PTS screening criterion was never attained by the BR3 and Rowe plates, and that the

  9. Research Investigation of Armor Plate Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1942-02-20

    location at which the ballistic limits were determined. Ballistic limits and average hardness values from the 16 duplicate plates are given in Table 10 ...OF ARMOR PLATE STEELS Plate Nuzuber %C %.Mn %Si %Ni. %Cr %Mo %cu *7111 .46 1.58 .20 . 10 /.20 7276 .50 1.07 .3o 7277 .39 .35 .23 7278 .47 .91 .26 7279...26 2.3/2.7 7328 .34 .89 .20 1.3/1.7 .35/.46 * 7329 .34 .88 .25 1.3/1.7 10 /.20 7330 .46 .86 .24 .25/.35 : 10 /.20 734 .46 .84 .29 W 5. 35 7341 .34 .94

  10. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, D.A.; Roggli, V.L. )

    1989-05-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predicted nickel concentrations that were in the range of those of persons without known nickel exposure. Nickel is a suspected carcinogen and has been associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among nickel workers. However, before the nickel content of cigarettes can be implicated in the etiology of lung cancer, further studies are needed to evaluate the independent effects of smoking and exposure to nickel.

  11. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs.

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, D A; Roggli, V L

    1989-01-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predicted nickel concentrations that were in the range of those of persons without known nickel exposure. Nickel is a suspected carcinogen and has been associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among nickel workers. However, before the nickel content of cigarettes can be implicated in the etiology of lung cancer, further studies are needed to evaluate the independent effects of smoking and exposure to nickel. PMID:2759060

  12. Electroless plating of PVC plastic through new surface modification method applying a semi-IPN hydrogel film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming-Qiu; Yan, Jun; Du, Shi-Guo; Li, Hong-Guang

    2013-07-01

    A novel palladium-free surface activation process for electroless nickel plating was developed. This method applied a semi-Interpenetrating Polymer Network (semi-IPN) hydrogel film to modify the poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) surface by chemical bonds. The activation process involved the formation of semi-IPN hydrogel film on the PVC surface and the immobilization of catalyst for electroless plating linking to the pretreated substrate via Nsbnd Ni chemical bond. The hydrogel layer was used as the chemisorption sites for nickel ions, and the catalyst could initiate the subsequent electroless nickel plating onto the PVC surface. Finally, a Ni-P layer was deposited on the nickel-activated PVC substrate by electroless plating technique. The composition and morphology of nickel-plated PVC foils were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results of SEM and XRD show that a compact and continuous Ni-P layer with amorphous nickel phase is formed on the PVC surface. EDS shows that the content of the nickel and the phosphorus in the deposits is 89.4 wt.% and 10.6 wt.%, respectively.

  13. METHOD FOR ELECTRO-NICKEL PLATING WOLFRAM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Slatin, H.L.

    1959-05-01

    A WC body can be electroplated with Ni after anodic etching in Na/sub 4/ P/sub 2/O/sub 7/ solution (200 g/l) with a Pb cathode. A current density of 2 amp/in./sup 2/ for 10 min is sufficient. This allows Ni to be electrodeposited in an adherent coating which is weldable. (T.R.H.)

  14. Nickel contact hypersensitivity in children.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B; Licht, Jonah; Friedler, Suzanne; Sethi, Shika; Laude, Teresita A

    2002-01-01

    Nickel allergic contact dermatitis is the most prevalent allergy in North America, with an incidence of 14.3%. It is on the rise from 10 years ago, when the incidence was 10%. This has been presumed to represent an increased exposure to nickel in the environment-especially in costume jewelry and belt buckles. We examined a group of 30 pediatric patients who had either a personal history of umbilical or wrist dermatitis, or a family history of nickel allergic contact dermatitis. All of these patients had a positive patch test to nickel sulfate 5%. Moreover, 50% of patients had an id reaction; all of these patients had positive patch tests that were papular in nature, similar to their papular id reaction. We posit that the presence of a positive family history may be a positive predictor of nickel allergic contact dermatitis, requiring nickel avoidance, especially in atopic children. Based on the high level of positive reactions in patients with umbilical dermatitis and an id reaction, patch testing to nickel in these patients is most likely to yield a useful result. Knowledge of reactivity to nickel would then allow parents and patients to initiate nickel avoidance earlier in life.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1537 - Nickel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nickel. 184.1537 Section 184.1537 Food and Drugs....1537 Nickel. (a) Elemental nickel (CAS Reg. No. 7440-02-0) is obtained from nickel ore by transforming it to nickel sulfide (Ni3S2). The sulfide is roasted in air to give nickel oxide (NiO). The oxide...

  16. Lightweight Electrode For Nickel/Hydrogen Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1994-01-01

    Improved substrate for nickel electrode increases specific energy of nickel/hydrogen cell. Consists of 50 percent by weight nickel fiber, 35 percent nickel powder, and 15 percent cobalt powder. Porosity and thickness of nickel electrodes affect specific energy, initial performance, and cycle life of cell. Substrate easily manufactured with much larger porosities than those of heavy-sintered state-of-art nickel substrate.

  17. Ordering of hard particles between hard walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowska, A.; Teixeira, P. I. C.; Ehrentraut, H.; Cleaver, D. J.

    2001-05-01

    The structure of a fluid of hard Gaussian overlap particles of elongation κ = 5, confined between two hard walls, has been calculated from density-functional theory and Monte Carlo simulations. By using the exact expression for the excluded volume kernel (Velasco E and Mederos L 1998 J. Chem. Phys. 109 2361) and solving the appropriate Euler-Lagrange equation entirely numerically, we have been able to extend our theoretical predictions into the nematic phase, which had up till now remained relatively unexplored due to the high computational cost. Simulation reveals a rich adsorption behaviour with increasing bulk density, which is described semi-quantitatively by the theory without any adjustable parameters.

  18. Electrolyte management considerations in modern nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cell and battery designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Zimmerman, A. H.

    1995-01-01

    In the early 1980's the NASA Lewis group addressed the topic of designing nickel hydrogen cells for LEO applications. As published in 1984, the design addressed the topics of gas management, liquid management, plate expansion, and the recombination of oxygen during overcharge. This design effort followed principles set forth in an earlier Lewis paper that addressed the topic of pore size engineering. At about that same time, the beneficial effect on cycle life of lower electrolyte concentrations was verified by Hughes Aircraft as part of a Lewis funded study. A succession of life cycle tests of these concepts have been carried out that essentially verified all of this earlier work. During these past two decades, some of the mysteries involved in the active material of the nickel electrode have been resolved by careful research efforts carried out at several laboratories. At The Aerospace Corporation, Dr. Zimmerman has been developing a sophisticated model of an operating nickel hydrogen cell which will be used to model certain mechanisms that have contributed to premature failures in nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cells. During the course of trying to understand and model abnormal nickel hydrogen cell behaviors, we have noted that not enough attention has been paid to the potassium ion content in these cells, and more recently batteries. Several of these phenomenon have been well known in the area of alkaline fuel cells, but only recently have they been examined as they might impact alkaline cell designs. This paper will review three general areas where the potassium ion content can impact the performance and life of nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium devices, Once these phenomenon are understood conceptually, the impact of potassium content on a potential cell design can be evaluated with the aid of an accurate model of an operating cell or battery. All three of these areas are directly related to the volume tolerance and pore size engineering aspects of the

  19. Electrolyte management considerations in modern nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cell and battery designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Zimmerman, A. H.

    1995-04-01

    In the early 1980's the NASA Lewis group addressed the topic of designing nickel hydrogen cells for LEO applications. As published in 1984, the design addressed the topics of gas management, liquid management, plate expansion, and the recombination of oxygen during overcharge. This design effort followed principles set forth in an earlier Lewis paper that addressed the topic of pore size engineering. At about that same time, the beneficial effect on cycle life of lower electrolyte concentrations was verified by Hughes Aircraft as part of a Lewis funded study. A succession of life cycle tests of these concepts have been carried out that essentially verified all of this earlier work. During these past two decades, some of the mysteries involved in the active material of the nickel electrode have been resolved by careful research efforts carried out at several laboratories. At The Aerospace Corporation, Dr. Zimmerman has been developing a sophisticated model of an operating nickel hydrogen cell which will be used to model certain mechanisms that have contributed to premature failures in nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium cells. During the course of trying to understand and model abnormal nickel hydrogen cell behaviors, we have noted that not enough attention has been paid to the potassium ion content in these cells, and more recently batteries. Several of these phenomenon have been well known in the area of alkaline fuel cells, but only recently have they been examined as they might impact alkaline cell designs. This paper will review three general areas where the potassium ion content can impact the performance and life of nickel hydrogen and nickel cadmium devices, Once these phenomenon are understood conceptually, the impact of potassium content on a potential cell design can be evaluated with the aid of an accurate model of an operating cell or battery. All three of these areas are directly related to the volume tolerance and pore size engineering aspects of the

  20. A modified feeding plate for a newborn with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Mustafa; Karaçay, Seniz; Atay, Arzu; Günay, Yumuşhan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives : Cleft palate is a common congenital maxillofacial defect. We wish to present the fabrication of a modified feeding plate that will adapt to the changing palatal and velopharyngeal morphology during function. Case Report : A neonate with unilateral cleft lip and palate was referred to our clinic for the fabrication of a feeding plate. Intraoral examination revealed a cleft involving the uvula and the soft palate, with an alveolar defect on the left side. An impression was taken and a dental cast was obtained. A 1-mm Bioplast clear soft plate was pressed on the model. After trimming the edges of the plate, several retentive holes were made for its attachment to the hard plate. With the Bioplast soft plate replaced on the cast, plaster was used to cover parts of the soft plate that were not to come in contact with the hard plate. Biocryl resin was put on the retentive holes and 2-mm Biocryl C Rosa-transparent plate was pressed. The edges of the plate were cut, trimmed, and polished. Conclusion : This modified feeding plate effectively obstructed the soft palate defect. The adaptation of the flexible bulb of the appliance with the soft palate was excellent. Evaluation with nasoendoscopy revealed the synchronized movement of the bulb of the appliance with the soft palate during swallowing. Soft extension of the feeding plate eliminated the risk of irritation, and the baby accepted the appliance easily.

  1. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  2. Bending Properties of Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Wilson, Richard M.; Keller, Dennis; Corner, Ralph

    1995-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries that fail prematurely by electrical shorting, This failure is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. In this study the bending properties of nickel electrodes are investigated in an attempt to correlate the bending properties of the electrode with its propensity to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. The effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied, and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variations were addressed. Two color-imaging techniques were employed to differentiate between the phases within the electrodes. These techniques aided in distinguishing the relative amounts of nickel hyroxide surface loading on each electrode, thereby relating surface loading to bend strength. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  3. Bending properties of nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1995-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries which fail prematurely by electrical shorting. This is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. This study investigates the bending properties of nickel electrodes in an attempt to correlate the bending properties with the propensity of the electrode to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. Effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variation were addressed. Two color imaging techniques were employed which allowed differentiation of phases within the electrodes. These techniques aided in distinguishing the relative amounts of nickel hydroxide surface loading on each electrode, relating surface loading to bend strength. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  4. Cold charge nickel hydrogen geosynchronous satellite batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.C.

    1997-12-01

    It has been well recognized for the last twenty years that the capacity of nickel hydrogen batteries is improved if the batteries are operated at relatively cool temperatures ({approximately}0 to 10 C). This is somewhat contra-intuitive relative to other batteries and is generally ascribed to the competition between the useful nickel electrode recharge reaction and the parasitic electrolysis of water. The Cold Charge concept exploits the difference in charge vs. discharge kinetics and the fixed rates and periods of geosynchronous operation to increase the name plate capacity of IPV Ni/H{sub 2} by forcing discharge to occur at a higher temperature than charge. In practice battery recharge is completed ({approximately}90% {yields} 100% SOC) under taper charge conditions (C/10 {yields} C/100) with a battery temperature {approximately}{minus}20 C. Prior to high rate discharge the temperature of the battery is artificially increased (via the battery heaters) to {minus}10C to 0C. The net result is a 15% increase in practical battery capacity and hence reduction in battery weight. This is achieved with essentially no increase in battery cell cost. The Cold Charge process is fully qualified and is presently in use on two large geosynchronous communications satellites. It is base lined for all future Space Systems/Loral geosynchronous spacecraft.

  5. Bipolar nickel-hydrogen battery design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, C. W.; Applewhite, A. Z.; Kuo, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The initial design for the NASA-Lewis advanced nickel-hydrogen battery is discussed. Fabrication of two 10-cell boilerplate battery stacks will soon begin. The test batteries will undergo characterization testing and low Earth orbit life cycling. The design effectively deals with waste heat generated in the cell stack. Stack temperatures and temperature gradients are maintained to acceptable limits by utilizing the bipolar conduction plate as a heat path to the active cooling fluid panel external to the edge of the cell stack. The thermal design and mechanical design of the battery stack together maintain a materials balance within the cell. An electrolyte seal on each cell frame prohibits electrolyte bridging. An oxygen recombination site and electrolyte reservoir/separator design does not allow oxygen to leave the cell in which it was generated.

  6. Nickel-hydrogen component development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charleston, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Light weight energy storage systems for future space missions are investigated. One of the systems being studied is the nickel hydrogen battery. This battery is designed to achieve longer life, improve performance, and higher energy densities for space applications. The nickel hydrogen component development is discussed. Test data from polarization measurements of the hydrogen electrode component is presented.

  7. Nickel: Relevance to orchard profitability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional physiology of essential micronutrients in pecan, especially that of nickel, is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recognized micronutrient, is meager. ...

  8. Nickel: Impact on horticultural characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge by practitioners regarding the potential impact of nickel nutritional physiology on pecan orchard profitability is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recogni...

  9. Direct laser engraving of intaglio printing plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deinhammer, Harald; Loos, Franz; Schwarzbach, Daniel; Fajmann, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Traditionally, Intaglio printing is one of the key security elements for banknotes and security documents, providing high-resolution fine-line elements and the characteristic tactility easily recognized by the public. The conventional process of creating Intaglio printing-plates involves multiple production steps from the hand-engraving of the artist and the computer-aided-design of security elements to the final, print-ready metal plate. We present the results of a feasibility study regarding the direct laser engraving of Intaglio printing-plates. Results of our studies on laser optics and choice of material to achieve optimal line quality are presented. In our studies we have found a novel plate material superior to galvanic nickel regarding plate lengthening and have achieved line widths in the 10μm range. The process found, allows reintroducing true three-dimensional elements with line-depth and -profiling control independent of line-width, while decreasing lead-times in the production of security documents. We give a comparison between direct laser engraving and traditional platemaking, comparing aspects such as resolution, plate performance and production time.

  10. Characterization and assessment of dermal and inhalable nickel exposures in nickel production and primary user industries.

    PubMed

    Hughson, G W; Galea, K S; Heim, K E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel in the skin contaminant layer of workers involved in specific processes and tasks within the primary nickel production and primary nickel user industries. Dermal exposure samples were collected using moist wipes to recover surface contamination from defined areas of skin. These were analysed for soluble and insoluble nickel species. Personal samples of inhalable dust were also collected to determine the corresponding inhalable nickel exposures. The air samples were analysed for total inhalable dust and then for soluble, sulfidic, metallic, and oxidic nickel species. The workplace surveys were carried out in five different workplaces, including three nickel refineries, a stainless steel plant, and a powder metallurgy plant, all of which were located in Europe. Nickel refinery workers involved with electrolytic nickel recovery processes had soluble dermal nickel exposure of 0.34 microg cm(-2) [geometric mean (GM)] to the hands and forearms. The GM of soluble dermal nickel exposure for workers involved in packing nickel salts (nickel chloride hexahydrate, nickel sulphate hexahydrate, and nickel hydroxycarbonate) was 0.61 microg cm(-2). Refinery workers involved in packing nickel metal powders and end-user powder operatives in magnet production had the highest dermal exposure (GM = 2.59 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The hands, forearms, face, and neck of these workers all received greater dermal nickel exposure compared with the other jobs included in this study. The soluble nickel dermal exposures for stainless steel production workers were at or slightly above the limit of detection (0.02 microg cm(-2) soluble nickel). The highest inhalable nickel concentrations were observed for the workers involved in nickel powder packing (GM = 0.77 mg m(-3)), although the soluble component comprised only 2% of the total nickel content. The highest airborne soluble nickel exposures were associated with refineries using

  11. Hardness Tester for Polyur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, D. L.; Buras, D. F.; Corbin, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Rubber-hardness tester modified for use on rigid polyurethane foam. Provides objective basis for evaluation of improvements in foam manufacturing and inspection. Typical acceptance criterion requires minimum hardness reading of 80 on modified tester. With adequate correlation tests, modified tester used to measure indirectly tensile and compressive strengths of foam.

  12. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  13. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Cells: Fiber Substrates Nickel Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Howard H.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of nickel fiber mat electrodes were investigated over a wide range of fiber diameters, electrode thickness, porosity and active material loading levels. Thickness' were 0.040, 0.060 and 0.080 inches for the plaque: fiber diameters were primarily 2, 4, and 8 micron and porosity was 85, 90, and 95%. Capacities of 3.5 in. diameter electrodes were determined in the flooded condition with both 26 and 31% potassium hydroxide solution. These capacity tests indicated that the highest capacities per unit weight were obtained at the 90% porosity level with a 4 micron diameter fiber plaque. It appeared that the thinner electrodes had somewhat better performance, consistent with sintered electrode history. Limited testing with two-positive-electrode boiler plate cells was also carried out. Considerable difficulty with constructing the cells was encountered with short circuits the major problem. Nevertheless, four cells were tested. The cell with 95% porosity electrodes failed during conditioning cycling due to high voltage during charge. Discharge showed that this cell had lost nearly all of its capacity. The other three cells after 20 conditioning cycles showed capacities consistent with the flooded capacities of the electrodes. Positive electrodes made from fiber substrates may well show a weight advantage of standard sintered electrodes, but need considerably more work to prove this statement. A major problem to be investigated is the lower strength of the substrate compared to standard sintered electrodes. Problems with welding of leads were significant and implications that the electrodes would expand more than sintered electrodes need to be investigated. Loading levels were lower than had been expected based on sintered electrode experiences and the lower loading led to lower capacity values. However, lower loading causes less expansion and contraction during cycling so that stress on the substrate is reduced.

  14. Electroformed Nickel-Graphite Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong-Skiba, Pei

    2005-01-01

    Future x-ray astronomy will demand larger optics than Chandra, currently in orbit. Ways must be devised to produce cheaper and lighter x-ray mirrors to save the cost of manufacturing and launching this future telescope. One technique, being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center and elsewhere, is electroformed nickel replication technique, wherein mirror shells are electroformed (using pure nickel or a nickel alloy) onto super-polished and figured aluminum mandrels and are subsequently released by cooling. This technique can produce relatively inexpensive mirrors, but is hampered by the high density of nickel (8.9 g / cm3). An alternative is to develop a composite, with lower mass density and compatible mechanical properties to the nickel cobalt alloy, as the mirror shell material.

  15. Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, J.B.

    1994-03-29

    Perforated plates having very small holes with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a [open quotes]wire drawing[close quotes] process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er[sub 3]Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er[sub 3]Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations, one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed. 10 figures.

  16. Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, John B.

    1994-01-01

    Perforated plates (10) having very small holes (14) with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a "wire drawing" process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er.sub.3 Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans (20) containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array (53) with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er.sub.3 Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations (38, 42), one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed.

  17. Crystallographic Mechanism of Local Lattice Turn Under Growth of Single Crystals of Refractory Nickel Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kablov, D. E.; Kraposhin, V. S.; Talis, A. L.

    2017-03-01

    Amechanism of local formation of crystals of random orientation in growth of single-crystal billets of refractory nickel alloys for blades of gas turbine engines is suggested. Aturn of the lattice is initiated at the place of contact between the initial melt and the surface of hard particles of NbC carbide and/or TiN nitride.

  18. ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM HARD CHROMIUM PLATING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The University of Central Florida Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is investigating methods for improved estimation of chemical releases which require reporting under provisions of SARA Title III (Toxic Release Inventory, Form R). This paper describes results fr...

  19. Subgroup report on hard x-ray microprobes

    SciTech Connect

    Ice, G.E.; Barbee, T.; Bionta, R.; Howells, M.; Thompson, A.C.; Yun, W.

    1994-09-01

    The increasing availability of synchrotron x-ray sources has stimulated the development of advanced hard x-ray (E{>=}5 keV) microprobes. New x-ray optics have been demonstrated which show promise for achieving intense submicron hard x-ray probes. These probes will be used for extraordinary elemental detection by x-ray fluorescence/absorption and for microdiffraction to identify phase and strain. The inherent elemental and crystallographic sensitivity of an x-ray microprobe and its inherently nondestructive and penetrating nature makes the development of an advanced hard x-ray microprobe an important national goal. In this workshop state-of-the-art hard x-ray microprobe optics were described and future directions were discussed. Gene Ice, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), presented an overview of the current status of hard x-ray microprobe optics and described the use of crystal spectrometers to improve minimum detectable limits in fluorescent microprobe experiments. Al Thompson, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), described work at the Center for X-ray Optics to develop a hard x-ray microprobe based on Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) optics. Al Thompson also showed the results of some experimental measurements with their KB optics. Malcolm Howells presented a method for bending elliptical mirrors and Troy Barbee commented on the use of graded d spacings to achieve highest efficiency in KB multilayer microfocusing. Richard Bionta, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), described the development of the first hard x-ray zone plates and future promise of so called {open_quotes}jelly roll{close_quotes} or sputter slice zone plates. Wenbing Yun, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), described characterization of jelly roll and lithographically produced zone plates and described the application of zone plates to focus extremely narrow bandwidths by nuclear resonance. This report summarizes the presentations of the workshop subgroup on hard x-ray microprobes.

  20. Abrasive-assisted Nickel Electroforming Process with Moving Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    REN, Jianhua; ZHU, Zengwei; XIA, Chunqiu; QU, Ningsong; ZHU, Di

    2017-03-01

    In traditional electroforming process for revolving parts with complex profiles, the drawbacks on surface of deposits, such as pinholes and nodules, will lead to varying physical and mechanical properties on different parts of electroformed components. To solve the problem, compositely moving cathode is employed in abrasive-assisted electroforming of revolving parts with complicated profiles. The cathode translates and rotates simultaneously to achieve uniform friction effect on deposits without drawbacks. The influences of current density and translation speed on the microstructure and properties of the electroformed nickel layers are investigated. It is found that abrasive-assisted electroforming with compound cathode motion can effectively remove the pinholes and nodules, positively affect the crystal nucleation, and refine the grains of layer. The increase of current density will lead to coarse microstructure and lower micro hardness, from 325 HV down to 189 HV. While, faster translational linear speed produces better surface quality and higher micro hardness, from 236 HV up to 283 HV. The weld-ability of the electroformed layers are also studied through the metallurgical analysis of welded joints between nickel layer and 304 stainless steel. The electrodeposited nickel layer shows fine performance in welding. The novel compound motion of cathode promotes the mechanical properties and refines the microstructure of deposited layer.

  1. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOEpatents

    Hollands, K. G. Terry; Sibbitt, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  2. Preparation of nickel nanowire arrays electrode for urea electro-oxidation in alkaline medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fen; Ye, Ke; Cheng, Kui; Wang, Guiling; Cao, Dianxue

    2015-03-01

    Fully metallic nickel nanowire arrays (NWAs) electrode is prepared by electrodepositing nickel within the pores and over-plating on the surface of polycarbonate template (PCT) with subsequent dissolution of the template in dichloromethane. The as-prepared electrode is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Urea electro-oxidation reaction in KOH solution on the nickel NWAs electrode is investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. The results show that the nickel NWAs electrode achieves an onset oxidation potential of 0.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and a peak current density of 160 mA cm-2 in 5 mol L-1 KOH and 0.33 mol L-1 urea accompanied with considerable stability.

  3. Non-cyanide silver plating

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.

    1995-11-07

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Technic, Inc. have entered into a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) with the goal of providing industry with an environmentally benign alternative to the presently used silver cyanide plating process. This project has been in place for about six months and results are quite promising. The main objective, that of deposition of deposits as thick as 125 um (5 mils), has been met. Property data such as stress and hardness have been obtained and the structure of the deposit has been analyzed via metallography and x-ray diffraction. These results will be presented in this paper, along with plans for future work.

  4. Electrolyte management considerations in modern nickel/hydrogen and nickel/cadmium cell and battery designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Zimmerman, Albert H.

    In the early 1980s, the battery group at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) reviewed the design issues associated with nickel/hydrogen cells for low-earth orbit applications. In 1984, these issues included gas management, liquid management, plate expansion, and the recombination of oxygen during overcharge. The design effort by that group followed principles set forth in an earlier LeRC paper that introduced the topic of pore size engineering. Also in 1984, the beneficial effect of lower electrolyte concentrations on cycle life was verified by Hughes Aircraft as part of a LeRC-funded study. Subsequent life cycle tests of these concepts have been carried out that essentially have verified all of this earlier work. During the past decade, some of the mysteries involved in the active material of the nickel electrode have been resolved by careful research done at several laboratories. While attention has been paid to understanding and modeling abnormal nickel/hydrogen cell behaviors, not enough attention has been paid to the potassium ion content in these cells, and more recently, in batteries. Examining the potassium ion content of different portions of the cell or battery is a convenient way of following the conductivity, mass transport properties, and electrolyte volume in each of the cell or battery portions under consideration. Several of the consequences of solvent and solute changes within fuel cells have been well known for some time. However, only recently have these consequences been applied to nickel/hydrogen and nickel/cadmium cell designs. As a result of these studies, several unusual cell performance signatures can now be satisfactorily explained in terms of movement of the solvent and solute components in the electrolyte. This paper will review three general areas where the potassium ion content can impact the performance and life of nickel/hydrogen and nickel/cadmium cells. Sample calculations of the concentration or volume changes that can take

  5. Hard error generation by neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Boos, R.E.; Block, R.C.

    1987-01-01

    We have observed that neutron-induced fission of uranium contaminants present in alumina ceramic package lids results in the release of fission fragments that can cause hard errors in metal nitride-oxidenonvolatile RAMs (MNOS NVRAMs). Hard error generation requires the simultaneous presence of (1) a fission fragment with a linear energy transfer (LET) greater than 20 MeV/mg/cm/sup 2/ moving at an angle of 30/sup 0/ or less from the electric field in the high-field, gate region of the memory transistor and (2) a WRITE or ERASE voltage on the oxide-nitride transistor gate. In reactor experiments, we observe these hard errors when a ceramic lid is used on both MNOS NVRAMs and polysilicon-nitride-oxide-semiconductor (SNOS) capacitors, but hard errors are not observed when a gold-plated kovar lid is used on the package containing these die. We have mapped the tracks of the fission fragments released from the ceramic lids with a mica track detector and used a Monte Carlo model of fission fragment transport through the ceramic lid to measure the concentration of uranium present in the lids. Our concentration measurements are in excellent agreement with others' measurements of uranium concentration in ceramic lids. Our Monte Carlo analyses also agree closely with our measurements of hard error probability in MNOS NVRAMs. 15 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Thick tellurium electrodeposition on nickel-coated copper substrate for 124I production.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, M; Dastan, M; Ensaf, M R; Tehrani, A Abaspour; Tenreiro, C; Avila, M

    2008-10-01

    Tellurium electrodeposition on a nickel-coated copper substrate was investigated for production of iodine-124. The electrodeposition experiments were carried out by the alkali plating baths. The optimum conditions of the electrodeposition of tellurium were as follows: 6 g l(-1) tellurium, pH=10, DC current density of ca. 8.55 mA cm(-2) and room temperature.

  7. Selective coating for solar panels. [using black chrome and black nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, G. E. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The energy absorbing properties of solar heating panels are improved by depositing a black chrome coating of controlled thickness on a specially prepared surface of a metal substrate. The surface is prepared by depositing a dull nickel on the substrate, and the black chrome is plated on this low emittance surface to a thickness between 0.5 micron and 2.5 microns.

  8. Initial capacity conditioning on electrochemical nickel hydroxide electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. H.

    1981-01-01

    Conditioning is the initial cycling where cell capacity is usually unstable. The causes of the initial capacity build were examined. Gridless electrodes were fabricated to ensure mechanical homogeneity, so that a strain measured in one direction would be typical of a strain measured in the other directions. Plate hardness was also determined. These two parameters stabilize together.

  9. Growth Plate Fractures

    MedlinePlus

    .org Growth Plate Fractures Page ( 1 ) The bones of children and adults share many of the same risks for injury. But because they ... to a unique injury called a growth plate fracture. Growth plates are areas of cartilage located near ...

  10. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  11. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells. An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  12. Effect of KOH concentration on LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells - An update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1991-01-01

    An update of validation test results confirming the breakthrough in LEO cycle life of nickel-hydrogen cells containing 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte is presented. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells is reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH.

  13. Dynamic hardness of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xuecheng

    Dynamic hardness (Pd) of 22 different pure metals and alloys having a wide range of elastic modulus, static hardness, and crystal structure were measured in a gas pulse system. The indentation contact diameter with an indenting sphere and the radius (r2) of curvature of the indentation were determined by the curve fitting of the indentation profile data. r 2 measured by the profilometer was compared with that calculated from Hertz equation in both dynamic and static conditions. The results indicated that the curvature change due to elastic recovery after unloading is approximately proportional to the parameters predicted by Hertz equation. However, r 2 is less than the radius of indenting sphere in many cases which is contradictory to Hertz analysis. This discrepancy is believed due to the difference between Hertzian and actual stress distributions underneath the indentation. Factors which influence indentation elastic recovery were also discussed. It was found that Tabor dynamic hardness formula always gives a lower value than that directly from dynamic hardness definition DeltaE/V because of errors mainly from Tabor's rebound equation and the assumption that dynamic hardness at the beginning of rebound process (Pr) is equal to kinetic energy change of an impact sphere over the formed crater volume (Pd) in the derivation process for Tabor's dynamic hardness formula. Experimental results also suggested that dynamic to static hardness ratio of a material is primarily determined by its crystal structure and static hardness. The effects of strain rate and temperature rise on this ratio were discussed. A vacuum rotating arm apparatus was built to measure Pd at 70, 127, and 381 mum sphere sizes, these results exhibited that Pd is highly depended on the sphere size due to the strain rate effects. P d was also used to substitute for static hardness to correlate with abrasion and erosion resistance of metals and alloys. The particle size effects observed in erosion were

  14. Extreme ultraviolet reflection efficiencies of diamond-turned aluminum, polished nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces. [for telescope mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malina, R. F.; Cash, W.

    1978-01-01

    Measured reflection efficiencies are presented for flat samples of diamond-turned aluminum, nickel, and evaporated gold surfaces fabricated by techniques suited for EUV telescopes. The aluminum samples were 6.2-cm-diameter disks of 6061-T6, the electroless nickel samples were formed by plating beryllium disks with 7.5-microns of Kanigen. Gold samples were produced by coating the aluminum and nickel samples with 5 strips of evaporated gold. Reflection efficiencies are given for grazing angles in the 5-75 degree range. The results indicate that for wavelengths over about 100 A, the gold-coated nickel samples yield highest efficiencies. For shorter wavelengths, the nickel samples yield better efficiencies. 500 A is found to be the optimal gold thickness.

  15. Investigation of hydrogen evolution activity for the nickel, nickel-molybdenum nickel-graphite composite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang

    2016-03-01

    The nickel, nickel-molybdenum alloy, nickel-graphite and nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coatings were obtained by the electrodeposition technique from a nickel sulfate bath. Nanocrystalline molybdenum, graphite and reduced graphene oxide in nickel coatings promoted hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. However, the nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating exhibited the highest electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction in 0.5 M H2SO4 solution at room temperature. A large number of gaps between 'cauliflower' like grains could decrease effective area for hydrogen evolution reaction in slight amorphous nickel-molybdenum alloy. The synergistic effect between nickel and reduced graphene oxide promoted hydrogen evolution, moreover, refined grain in nickel-reduced graphene oxide composite coating and large specific surface of reduced graphene oxide also facilitated hydrogen evolution reaction.

  16. Bioaccumulation of nickel by algae

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.K.; Wood, J.M.

    1984-02-01

    Six strains of algae and one Euglena sp. were tested for their ability to bioaccumulate nickel. Radioactive /sup 63/Ni was used together with a microplate technique to determine the conditions for nickel removal by axenic cultures of cyanobacteria, green algae, and one euglenoid. The cyanobacteria tested were found to be more sensitive to nickel toxicity than the green algae or the Euglena sp. The concentration factor (CF) for nickel was determined under a variety of conditions and found to be in the range from 0 to 3.0 x 10/sup 3/. The effect of environmental variables on nickel uptake was examined, and a striking pH effect for biaccumulation was observed, with most of the algal strains accumulating nickel optimally at approximately pH 8.0. Competition experiments for binding sites between nickel and other cations as well as with other complexing anions, showed that /sup 63/Ni uptake was affected only by cobalt and by humic acids.

  17. 21 CFR 184.1537 - Nickel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nickel. 184.1537 Section 184.1537 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1537 Nickel. (a) Elemental nickel (CAS Reg. No. 7440-02-0) is obtained from nickel ore by transforming it to nickel sulfide (Ni3S2). The sulfide is roasted in air to give...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1537 - Nickel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nickel. 184.1537 Section 184.1537 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1537 Nickel. (a) Elemental nickel (CAS Reg. No. 7440-02-0) is obtained from nickel ore by transforming it to nickel sulfide (Ni3S2). The sulfide is roasted in air to give...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1537 - Nickel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nickel. 184.1537 Section 184.1537 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1537 Nickel. (a) Elemental nickel (CAS Reg. No. 7440-02-0) is obtained from nickel ore by transforming it to nickel sulfide (Ni3S2). The sulfide is roasted in air to give...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1537 - Nickel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nickel. 184.1537 Section 184.1537 Food and Drugs... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1537 Nickel. (a) Elemental nickel (CAS Reg. No. 7440-02-0) is obtained from nickel ore by transforming it to nickel sulfide (Ni3S2). The sulfide is roasted in air to give...

  1. Practical handbook of stainless steels and nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, S.

    1999-07-01

    This new handbook is an up-to-date technical guide to the grades, properties, fabrication characteristics, and applications of stainless steels and nickel alloys. The individual chapters were written by industry experts and focus on the key properties and alloy characteristics important in material selection and specification as well as the practical factors that influence the development and application of these materials. The contents include: alloy grades and their welding and fabrication characteristics and their application; monel metal; iron-based and nickel-based alloys; ferritic, austenitic, superaustenitic, and martensitic stainless steels; hastelloys; alloys 20, G, and 825; AOD and new refining technology; duplex stainless steels; 6-Mo alloys; corrosion-resistant castings; specification cross-reference tables; trade names; hardness conversions; list of common abbreviations.

  2. Recent Advances in Nickel Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Preface The field of nickel catalysis has made tremendous advances in the past decade. There are several key properties of nickel that have allowed for a broad range of innovative reaction development, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and leveraged to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Herein, we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism. PMID:24828188

  3. Analysis of 12 AH aerospace nickel-cadmium cells from the design variable program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasanth, Kunigahalli L.; Morrow, George

    1987-01-01

    The Design Variable Program of NASA/GSFC provided a systematic approach to evaluate the performance of 12 Ampere-Hour Nickel-Cadmium cells of different designs. Design Variables tested in this program included teflonated negative plates, silver treated negative plates, lightly loaded negative plates, positive plates with no cadmium treatment, plate design of 1968 utilizing old and new processing techniques and electrochemically impregnated positive plates. These cells were life cycled in a Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) regime for 3 to 4 years. Representative cells taken from the Design Variable Program were examined via chemical, electrochemical and surface analyses. The results indicate the following: (1) positive swelling and carbonate content in the electrolyte increase as a function of number of cycles; (2) electrolyte distribution follows a general order NEG greater than POS greater than SEP; (3) control and No PQ groups outperformed the rest of the groups; and (4) the polyproylene group exhibited heavy cadmium migration and poor performance.

  4. Bending Properties of Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Wilson, Richard M.; Keller, Dennis; Corner, Ralph

    1996-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries that fail prematurely by electrical shorting. This failure is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. In this study, the bending properties of nickel electrodes are investigated in an attempt to correlate the bending properties of the electrode with its propensity to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. The effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied, and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variations were addressed. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  5. Organizing Your Hard Disk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocker, H. Robert; Hilton, Thomas S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Suggests strategies that make hard disk organization easy and efficient, such as making, changing, and removing directories; grouping files by subject; naming files effectively; backing up efficiently; and using PATH. (JOW)

  6. Radiation from hard objects

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-02-01

    The inference of the diameter of hard objects is insensitive to radiation efficiency. Deductions of radiation efficiency from observations are very sensitive - possibly overly so. Inferences of the initial velocity and trajectory vary similarly, and hence are comparably sensitive.

  7. Acidic Fluids Across Mars: Detections of Magnesium-Nickel Sulfates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Rampe, E. B.; Vaniman, D. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Morris, R. V.; Clark, B. C.; VanBommel, S. J.

    2017-01-01

    Calcium, magnesium and ferric iron sulfates have been detected by the instrument suites on the Mars rovers. A subset of the magnesium sulfates show clear associations with nickel. These associations indicate Ni(2+) co-precipitation with or substitution for Mg(2+) from sulfate-saturated solutions. Nickel is ex-tracted from primary rocks almost exclusively at pH values less than 6, constraining the formation of these Mg-Ni sulfates to mildly to strongly acidic conditions. There is clear evidence for aqueous alteration at the rim of Endeavour Crater (Meridiani Planum), in the Murray formation mudstone (Gale Crater), and near Home Plate (Gusev Crater). The discovery of Mg-Ni sulfates at these locations indicates a history of fluid-rock interactions at low pH.

  8. AC impedance study of degradation of porous nickel battery electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lenhart, Stephen J.; Macdonald, D. D.; Pound, B. G.

    1987-01-01

    AC impedance spectra of porous nickel battery electrodes were recorded periodically during charge/discharge cycling in concentrated KOH solution at various temperatures. A transmission line model (TLM) was adopted to represent the impedance of the porous electrodes, and various model parameters were adjusted in a curve fitting routine to reproduce the experimental impedances. Degradation processes were deduced from changes in model parameters with electrode cycling time. In developing the TLM, impedance spectra of planar (nonporous) electrodes were used to represent the pore wall and backing plate interfacial impedances. These data were measured over a range of potentials and temperatures, and an equivalent circuit model was adopted to represent the planar electrode data. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the characteristics of the oxygen evolution reaction on planar nickel electrodes during charging, since oxygen evolution can affect battery electrode charging efficiency and ultimately electrode cycle life if the overpotential for oxygen evolution is sufficiently low.

  9. Silicon solar cells with nickel/solder metallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, R. C.; Muleo, A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of nickel plus solder is shown to be feasible for contact metallization for silicon solar cells by offering a relatively inexpensive method of making electrical contact with the cell surfaces. Nickel is plated on silicon solar cells using an electroless chemical deposition method to give contacts with good adhesion, and in some cases where adhesion is poor initially, sintering under relatively mild conditions will dramatically improve the quality of the bond without harming the p-n junction of the cell. The cells can survive terrestrial environment stresses, which is demonstrated by a 1000 hour test at 85 C and 85% relative humidity under constant forward bias of 0.45 volt.

  10. Ageing of nickel used as sensitive material for early detection of sudomotor dysfunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Hanna; Lair, Virginie; Griveau, Sophie; Galtayries, Anouk; Brunswick, Philippe; Bedioui, Fethi; Cassir, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The surface ageing of nickel electrodes was studied in the frame of the development of non-invasive biomedical devices, dedicated to the detection of sudomotor dysfunction manifested by an alteration of the ionic balance in human sweat. In this kind of technology, low voltage potentials with variable amplitudes are applied to nickel electrodes, placed on skin regions with a high density of sweat glands, and the electrical responses are measured. The trick is that nickel electrodes play alternately the role of anode and cathode, thus the analysis of the temporal evolution of the physico-chemical properties of nickel is of prime importance to ensure the good performance of the device. Electrochemical measurements coupled to surface chemical characterizations (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Time of Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS)) were performed on pure Ni samples, immersed in buffered chloride solutions mimicking human sweat. The shapes of voltammograms, recorded in a restricted anodic potential range, show that the nickel surface was gradually passivated as a function of the number of scans. This was confirmed by XPS data, with the formation of a 1 nm thick duplex layer composed by nickel hydroxide (outermost layer) and nickel oxide (inner layer). In a negative extended potential range, though the electrochemical behavior of electrodes was not modified upon cycling the potential, XPS data show that the inner layer was thickening, indicating a surface degradation of the nickel electrode. Below pitting potentials, adsorbed chloride was only hardly detected by XPS, and the surface composition of the nickel samples was similar after treatments in chloride or chloride-free buffered solutions. In a larger potential range enabling to reach the breakdown potential, the highly chemically sensitive ToF-SIMS characterization pointed out that the surface concentration of adsorbed chloride was higher in pits than elsewhere on the surface sample.

  11. Hot Microfissuring in Nickel Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. G.; Nunes, A.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments in intergranular cracking of nickel alloy near solidus temperature discussed in contractor report. Purpose of investigation development of schedule for welding, casting, forging, or other processing of alloy without causing microfissuring.

  12. Sputtering and ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on sputtering and ion plating are presented. Subjects discussed are: (1) concepts and applications of ion plating, (2) sputtering for deposition of solid film lubricants, (3) commercial ion plating equipment, (4) industrial potential for ion plating and sputtering, and (5) fundamentals of RF and DC sputtering.

  13. Non-Sintered Nickel Electrode

    DOEpatents

    Bernard, Patrick; Dennig, Corinne; Cocciantelli, Jean-Michel; Alcorta, Jose; Coco, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    A non-sintered nickel electrode contains a conductive support and a paste comprising an electrochemically active material containing nickel hydroxide and a binder which is a mixture of an elastomer and a crystalline polymer. The proportion of the elastomer is in the range 25% to 60% by weight of the binder and the proportion of the crystalline polymer is in the range 40% to 75% by weight of the binder.

  14. Nickel Hydrogen Battery Expert System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Yvette B.; Mccall, Kurt E.

    1992-01-01

    The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System-2, or 'NICBES-2', which was used by the NASA HST six-battery testbed, was subsequently converted into the Nickel Hydrogen Battery Expert System, or 'NICHES'. Accounts are presently given of this conversion process and future uses being contemplated for NICHES. NICHES will calculate orbital summary data at the end of each orbit, and store these files for trend analyses and rules-generation.

  15. Nickel-Magnesia Cermet Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1952-06-01

    alumin " oxide cermet. To develop a bond between these tw components it in first necessary to produce a controlled film of Cr 203 on the Cr grains...somewhat more refractory. A cobalt - magnesia cermet may be made in the same way as the nickel - magnesia cermet, the bond being through the agency...of the oxide CoO. However, cobalt is not as oxidation resistant as nickel and is more strategic. Iron will wet probably all oxides and silicates and

  16. Effect of nickel content on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of Ni-Mo-Cr steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Lee, Bong-Sang; Suh, Dong-Woo; Lee, Hu-Chul

    2013-11-01

    The influence of nickel on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of Ni-Mo-Cr reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was investigated using alloys containing nickel in the range of 0.9-3.5 wt%. In all investigated alloys, the neutron irradiation with two dose conditions of 4.5 × 1019 neutron/cm2 at 290 °C and 9.0 × 1019 neutron/cm2 at 290 °C, respectively, increased the hardness and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). However, the increases of the hardness and DBTT resulting from the neutron irradiation were primarily affected by the irradiation dose that is closely related to the generation of irradiation defects, but not by the nickel content. In addition, a linear relationship between the changes in the hardness and DBTT subjected to the irradiation was confirmed. These results demonstrate that increasing the nickel content up to 3.5 wt% does not have a harmful effect on the irradiation embrittlement of Ni-Mo-Cr reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels.

  17. Optimal interaction of indenter with inhomogeneous plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aptukov, Valery N.

    1991-01-01

    Consideration is given to a new class of problems dealing with an optimal design of an inhomogeneous plate during dynamic penetration of the rigid indenter. The quality criterion of the process is defined by the specific mass of the target, which absorbs the given kinetic mass of the indenter. Parameters of control are expressed in terms of mechanical characteristics, i.e., distribution of density and the related hardness across the plate thickness. The maximum principle of Pontryagin is used to search for the piecewise continuous control function. With consideration of impact conditions and characteristics for a given class of material, an optimal target structure criterion was estimated for engineering applications.

  18. Nuclear Hardness Management.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-28

    1017, Neutron Irradiation, MIL-STD 750-C, May 1982. DoD Adopted ASTM Standards 1. ASTM E263-77, Standard Method for Determining Fast- Neutron "’i. Flux by...Radioactivation of Iron, June 1982. 2. ASTM E264-77, Standard Method for Determining Fast- Neutron Flux by Radioactivation of Nickel, June 1982...34’ ’ 3. ASTM E265-77, Standard Method For Determining Fast- Neutron %, Flux by Radioactivation of Sulfur, June 1982. " 4. ASTM E720-80, Standard Guide For

  19. Nickel-Resistant Bacteria from Anthropogenically Nickel-Polluted and Naturally Nickel-Percolated Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Stoppel, R.; Schlegel, H. G.

    1995-01-01

    DNA fragments harboring the nickel resistance determinants from bacteria isolated from anthropogenically polluted ecosystems in Europe and Zaire were compared with those harboring the nickel resistance determinants from bacteria isolated from naturally nickel-percolated soils from New Caledonia by DNA-DNA hybridization. The biotinylated DNA probes were derived from the previously described Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans 31A, Alcaligenes denitrificans 4a-2, and Klebsiella oxytoca CCUG 15788 and four new nickel resistance-determining fragments cloned from strains isolated from soils under nickel-hyperaccumulating trees. Nine probes were hybridized with endonuclease-cleaved plasmid and total DNA samples from 56 nickel-resistant strains. Some of the New Caledonian strains were tentatively identified as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas mendocina, Comamonas, Hafnia alvei, Burkholderia, Arthrobacter aurescens, and Arthrobacter ramosus strains. The DNA of most strains showed homologies to one or several of the following nickel resistance determinants: the cnr and ncc operons of the strains A. eutrophus CH34 and A. xylosoxidans 31A, respectively, the nre operon of strain 31A, and the nickel resistance determinants of K. oxytoca. On the basis of their hybridization reactions the nickel resistance determinants of the strains could be assigned to four groups: (i) cnr/ncc type, (ii) cnr/ncc/nre type, (iii) K. oxytoca type, and (iv) others. The majority of the strains were assigned to the known groups. Among the strains from Belgium and Zaire, exclusively the cnr/ncc and the cnr/ncc/nre types were found. Among the New Caledonian strains all four types were represented. Homologies to the nre operon were found only in combination with the cnr/ncc operon. The homologies to the cnr/ncc operon were the most abundant and were detected alone or together with homologies to the nre operon. Only the DNA of the strains isolated from soil in Scotland and the United States

  20. Nickel nanoparticles in carbon structures prepared by solid-phase pyrolysis of nickel-phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manukyan, A. S.; Mirzakhanyan, A. A.; Badalyan, G. R.; Shirinyan, G. H.; Fedorenko, A. G.; Lianguzov, N. V.; Yuzyuk, Yu I.; Bugaev, L. A.; Sharoyan, E. G.

    2012-07-01

    By using a modified method of solid-phase pyrolysis of metal-phthalocyanines, we have synthesized ferromagnetic Ni nanoparticles in different carbon structures: amorphous carbon plates, multiwall carbon nanotubes, carbon fibers, and graphitized capsules. The composition, structure and morphology of prepared composite materials have been studied by energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction technique. It has been found that the sizes of nickel nanoparticles (10-500 nm) and the type of carbon structures strongly depend on the pyrolysis conditions. By using the X-band ferromagnetic resonance measurements, we have revealed features of the temperature dependence of resonance spectra of single-domain and multi-domain Ni nanoparticles in Ni/C composites.

  1. Nickel hydrogen batteries: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A LeRC innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass,volume, and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a reduction in

  2. Development of a lightweight nickel electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, D. L.; Reid, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel electrodes made using lightweight plastic plaque are about half the weight of electrodes made from state of the art sintered nickel plaque. This weight reduction would result in a significant improvement in the energy density of batteries using nickel electrodes (nickel hydrogen, nickel cadmium and nickel zinc). These lightweight electrodes are suitably conductive and yield comparable capacities (as high as 0.25 AH/gm (0.048 AH/sq cm)) after formation. These lightweight electrodes also show excellent discharge performance at high rates.

  3. A mathematical approach for evaluating nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leibecki, H. F.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical equation is presented which gives a quantitative relationship between time-voltage discharge curves, when a cell's ampere-hour capacity is determined at a constant discharge current. In particular the equation quantifies the initial exponential voltage decay; the rate of voltage decay; the overall voltage shift of the curve and the total capacity of the cell at the given discharge current. The results of 12 nickel-hydrogen boiler plate cells cycled to 80 percent depth-of-discharge (DOD) are discussed in association with these equations.

  4. Electrodeposited tungsten-nickel-boron: A replacement for hexavalent chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01

    Chromium, deposited from acidic solutions of its hexavalent ion, has been the rule for wear resistant, corrosion resistant coatings for many years. Although chromium coatings are durable, the plating process generates air emissions, effluent rinse waters, and process solutions that are toxic, suspected carcinogens, and a risk to human health and the environment. Tungsten-nickel-boron (W-Ni-B) alloy deposition is a potential substitute for hexavalent chrome. It has excellent wear, corrosion, and mechanical properties and also may be less of an environmental risk. This study examines the electroplating process and deposit properties of W-Ni-B and compares them with those of hexavalent chrome.

  5. Processing of nanostructured nickel by severe plastic deformation consolidation of ball-milled powder

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, R.Z. |; Mishral, R.S.; Grozal, J.; Mukherjee, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    Severe plastic deformation consolidation process of the ball-milled powder has been able to produce fully dense nanocrystalline nickel with a grain size of {approximately}20 nm. The processed samples are characterized by very high elastic strains, very likely caused by a presence of high density of extrinsic grain boundary dislocations. The combined effect of the smallest nanoscale grain size in nickel, as obtained in this study, along with the effect of high elastic strains, resulted in the high level of hardness and also the lower experimentally measured density of these severe plastic deformation consolidation samples.

  6. Evaluation of the Mechanical Properties of Multi-nano Layered Copper-Nickel Thin Film by the Dynamic-Nano Indentation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yong

    2016-11-01

    The dynamic nano-indentation method was applied to study the effect of interface moving behavior with heat treatment on the nano-mechanical properties of multi-nano-layered copper-nickel thin film. Layer-by-layer depositions of copper and nickel of nano-sized thickness were prepared by two-step pulse electro-deposition in a modified copper-nickel sulfate bath at 25°C. The multi-layered copper-nickel thin sheet was composed of a 20-nm-thick copper-rich nickel phase, and a 25-nm-thick nickel-rich copper phase. Thermal vacuum annealing influenced the interface morphology between copper and nickel nano-layers. Inter-diffusion mainly occurred after annealing at 500°C for 6 h. The interface disappeared after annealing at 600°C to form a completely solid solution. Thermal annealing reduced the nano-hardness and elastic recovery. The average nano-hardness of the multi-layered nano-copper-nickel thin film for the specimens of as-received, 300°C, 500°C and 600°C were 7.9 Gpa, 6.1 Gpa, 4.7 Gpa and 3.0 GPa, respectively. The elastic stiffness was 15.77 × 104 Nm-1 for the as-received specimen, which finally became 2.98 × 104 Nm-1 for the specimen after annealing at 600°C for 6 h.

  7. Nickel in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Dominic A.; Garland, Thomas R.; Wildung, Raymond E.

    1978-01-01

    The absorption of Ni2+ by 21-day-old soybean plants (Glycine max cv. Williams) was investigated with respect to its concentration dependence, transport kinetics, and interactions with various nutrient cations. Nickel absorption, measured as a function of concentration (0.02 to 100 μm), demonstrated the presence of multiple absorption isotherms. Each of the three isotherms conforms to Michaelis-Menten kinetics; kinetic constants are reported for uptake by the intact plant and for transfer from root to shoot tissues. The absorption of Ni2+ by the intact plant and its transfer from root to shoot were inhibited by the presence of Cu2+, Zn2+, Fe2+, and Co2+. Competition kinetic studies showed Cu2+ and Zn2+ to inhibit Ni2+ absorption competitively, suggesting that Ni2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ are absorbed using the same carrier site. Calculated Km and Ki constants for Ni2+ in the presence and absence of Cu2+ were 6.1 and 9.2 μm, respectively, whereas Km and Ki constants were calculated to be 6.7 and 24.4 μm, respectively, for Ni2+ in the presence and absence of Zn2+. The mechanism of inhibition of Ni2+ in the presence of Fe2+ and Co2+ was not resolved by classical kinetic relationships. PMID:16660559

  8. Welding of titanium and nickel alloy by combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Malyutina, Yu. N. Bataev, A. A. Shevtsova, L. I.; Mali, V. I. Anisimov, A. G.

    2015-10-27

    A possibility of titanium and nickel-based alloys composite materials formation using combination of explosive welding and spark plasma sintering technologies was demonstrated in the current research. An employment of interlayer consisting of copper and tantalum thin plates makes possible to eliminate a contact between metallurgical incompatible titanium and nickel that are susceptible to intermetallic compounds formation during their interaction. By the following spark plasma sintering process the bonding has been received between titanium and titanium alloy VT20 through the thin powder layer of pure titanium that is distinguished by low defectiveness and fine dispersive structure.

  9. Clear double layer Bioplast feeding plate for neonates with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, R. Burcu Nur; Mutlu, Meltem; Germec-Cakan, Derya

    2015-01-01

    An infant with cleft palate was referred to cleft clinic of the Orthodontic Department. The mother was concerned to feed the child because of the escape of milk from the nose. Intraoral examination revealed a large palatal cleft extending from hard to soft palate involving uvula. The impression was taken and dental cast obtained. A 3 mm soft and afterward a 1 mm hard Bioplast plate was pressed using Biostar device (Scheu-Dental Gmbh, Iserlohn, Germany) on the model. Finally, a hole was prepared on the anterior part to put a thread through it. The infant tolerated the plate immediately and encounters no difficulties during feeding. The inlaying soft Bioplast plates eliminate the risk of tissue irritation, whereas the covering hard Bioplast plate supplies endurance. The fabrication of the clear Bioplast feeding plate is easy and less time-consuming compared with acrylic plates and may be recommended in crowded and overloaded cleft centers. PMID:26929704

  10. Clear double layer Bioplast feeding plate for neonates with cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, R Burcu Nur; Mutlu, Meltem; Germec-Cakan, Derya

    2015-01-01

    An infant with cleft palate was referred to cleft clinic of the Orthodontic Department. The mother was concerned to feed the child because of the escape of milk from the nose. Intraoral examination revealed a large palatal cleft extending from hard to soft palate involving uvula. The impression was taken and dental cast obtained. A 3 mm soft and afterward a 1 mm hard Bioplast plate was pressed using Biostar device (Scheu-Dental Gmbh, Iserlohn, Germany) on the model. Finally, a hole was prepared on the anterior part to put a thread through it. The infant tolerated the plate immediately and encounters no difficulties during feeding. The inlaying soft Bioplast plates eliminate the risk of tissue irritation, whereas the covering hard Bioplast plate supplies endurance. The fabrication of the clear Bioplast feeding plate is easy and less time-consuming compared with acrylic plates and may be recommended in crowded and overloaded cleft centers.

  11. Diffuse reflectivity of gold plating with high power laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Pengling; Wang, Zhenbao; Tao, Mengmeng; Liu, Fuhua; Feng, Guobin

    2015-05-01

    The discoloration and optical characteristics of the gold plating film under long-time high power laser irradiation are investigated. The fabrication process of gold plating on nickel underplate on rough surface of copper and aluminum alloy substrates is introduced. The measurement results of the diffuse reflectivity for the samples with different surface roughness indicate that roughness of the gold layer surface should be 4μm to obtain the maximum value of diffuse reflectivity. The discoloration and variation of diffuse reflectivity are experimentally studied under 2000W irradiation. The research results show that the discoloration and degrading of reflectivity are caused by the diffusion of Ni to the gold plating surface and forming NiO thin film due to the porosity of the gold film and high temperature treatment. A change of diffuse reflectivity related mechanism is described. Several plating solution recipes are used to eliminate the discoloration and mitigate the degrading of the reflectivity on gold surface.

  12. Budgeting in Hard Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrino, Frank M.

    2003-01-01

    Interviews with school board members and administrators produced a list of suggestions for balancing a budget in hard times. Among these are changing calendars and schedules to reduce heating and cooling costs; sharing personnel; rescheduling some extracurricular activities; and forming cooperative agreements with other districts. (MLF)

  13. Running in Hard Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John N., III

    2009-01-01

    Roberta Stevens and Kent Oliver are campaigning hard for the presidency of the American Library Association (ALA). Stevens is outreach projects and partnerships officer at the Library of Congress. Oliver is executive director of the Stark County District Library in Canton, Ohio. They have debated, discussed, and posted web sites, Facebook pages,…

  14. CSI: Hard Drive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Acting on information from students who reported seeing a classmate looking at inappropriate material on a school computer, school officials used forensics software to plunge the depths of the PC's hard drive, searching for evidence of improper activity. Images were found in a deleted Internet Explorer cache as well as deleted file space.…

  15. Nickel and cobalt allergy before and after nickel regulation--evaluation of a public health intervention.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2011-09-01

    Over the 20th century, the frequent use of nickel in consumer products resulted in an increasing prevalence of nickel allergy. Risk items included suspenders in the 1950s-1960s; buttons, zippers and rivets in the 1970s; and ear-piercing jewellery in the 1980s. When subjects allergic to nickel were exposed to nickel in high concentrations, it often resulted in allergic nickel contact dermatitis and hand eczema. In 1990, the Danish government began to regulate consumer nickel exposure as a response to the increasing nickel allergy problem. In 1994, the EU Nickel Directive was passed, a regulation that was based on the Danish and Swedish nickel regulations. These major public health interventions were expected to change the epidemiology of nickel allergy and dermatitis in Europe. Furthermore, it was debated whether nickel would be replaced by cobalt in inexpensive jewellery and result in higher prevalence of cobalt allergy. An evaluation of the possible effects of the European nickel regulations is of importance to ensure protection of consumers and dermatitis patients. This doctoral thesis aimed to evaluate the effects of regulatory interventions on nickel exposure by investigating the development of nickel allergy and dermatitis before and after nickel regulation. Furthermore, a change in the association between nickel allergy and hand eczema was evaluated. The nickel spot test was validated to determine its value when used for screening purposes. Possible explanations for the persistence of nickel allergy were explored including genetic predisposition and consumer nickel exposure from jewellery and accessories. A cobalt spot test was developed and validated. Finally, it was evaluated whether a cobalt allergy epidemic had replaced the nickel allergy epidemic after nickel regulation in terms of increasing cobalt sensitization and cobalt exposure. The thesis showed that the prevalence of nickel allergy decreased significantly after nickel regulation in young Danish

  16. The effects of platinum on nickel electrodes in the nickel hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions of platinum and platinum compounds with the nickel electrode that are possible in the nickel hydrogen cell, where both the nickel electrode and a platinum catalyst hydrogen electrode are in intimate contact with the alkaline electrolyte, are examined. Additionally, a mechanism of nickel cobalt oxyhydroxide formation in NiH2 cells is presented.

  17. Development of technique for AR coating and nickel and copper metallization of solar cells: FPS project, product development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rominger, C. G.

    1981-01-01

    Silicon nitride and nickel pastes are investigated in conjunction with a brush copper plating process for the purpose of identifying one or more fabrication sequences which yield at least 10 percent efficient N(+)/P(+) flat plate solar cells. The adhesion of all nickel pastes is reduced significantly when subjected to acidic and alkaline brush copper plating solutions as a result of a combination of thermally induced stress and chemical attack of the frit, which occurs at the interface with the silicon solar cell. The AgF is penetrating the 800 a of Si3N4 and ohmic contact is occurring at all fire-in tempertures. During the brush plating process, fingers and buss bars tend to spread.

  18. Nickel-responsive transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Musiani, Francesco; Zambelli, Barbara; Bazzani, Micaela; Mazzei, Luca; Ciurli, Stefano

    2015-09-01

    Nickel is an essential micronutrient for a large number of living organisms, but it is also a toxic metal ion when it accumulates beyond the sustainable level as it may result if and when its cellular trafficking is not properly governed. Therefore, the homeostasis and metabolism of nickel is tightly regulated through metal-specific protein networks that respond to the available Ni(II) concentration. These are directed by specific nickel sensors, able to couple Ni(II) binding to a change in their DNA binding affinity and/or specificity, thus translating the cellular level of Ni(II) into a modification of the expression of the proteins devoted to modulating nickel uptake, efflux and cellular utilization. This review describes the Ni(II)-dependent transcriptional regulators discovered so far, focusing on their structural features, metal coordination modes and metal binding thermodynamics. Understanding these properties is essential to comprehend how these sensors correlate nickel availability to metal coordination and functional responses. A broad and comparative study, described here, reveals some general traits that characterize the binding stoichiometry and Ni(II) affinity of these metallo-sensors.

  19. Nickel hydrogen battery cell storage matrix test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.; Dodson, Gary W.

    1993-01-01

    Test were conducted to evaluate post storage performance of nickel hydrogen cells with various design variables, the most significant being nickel precharge versus hydrogen precharge. Test procedures and results are presented in outline and graphic form.

  20. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2005-07-26

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum, ruthenium, and nickel, wherein the nickel is at a concentration that is less than about 10 atomic percent.

  1. Advances in lightweight nickel electrode technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Paul, Gary; Wheeler, James R.; Daugherty, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Studies are currently underway to further the development of lightweight nickel electrode technology. Work is focused primarily on the space nickel-hydrogen system and nickel-iron system but is also applicable to the nickel-cadmium and nickel-zinc systems. The goal is to reduce electrode weight while maintaining or improving performance thereby increasing electrode energy density. Two basic electrode structures are being investigated. The first is the traditional nickel sponge produced from sintered nickel-carbonyl powder and the second is a new material for this application which consists of a non-woven mat of nickel fiber. Electrodes are being manufactured, tested and evaluated at the electrode and cell level.

  2. Advances in lightweight nickel electrode technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine; Paul, Gary; Daugherty, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Studies are currently underway to further the development of lightweight nickel electrode technology. Work is focused primarily on the space nickel-hydrogen system and nickel-iron system but is also applicable to the nickel-cadmium and nickel-zinc systems. The goal is to reduce electrode weight while maintaining or improving performance, thereby increasing electrode energy density. Two basic electrode structures are being investigated. The first is the traditional nickel sponge produced from sintered nickel-carbonyl powder. The second is a new material for this application which consists of a non-woven mat of nickel fiber. Electrodes are being manufactured, tested, and evaluated at the electrode and cell level.

  3. The results and analysis of irradiation experiments conducted on reactor vessel plate and weld materials

    SciTech Connect

    Biemiller, E.C.; Carter, R.G.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1996-09-01

    This paper documents the extensive amount of experimental work on radiation damage to reactor vessel materials carried out by Yankee Atomic Electric Company (YAEC) and others in support of a licensing effort to restart the Yankee Rowe nuclear power plant. The effect of plate nickel content and microstructure on irradiation damage sensitivity was assessed. Typical reactor pressure vessel plate materials each containing 0.24% (by weight) copper, but different nickel contents at 0.19% and 0.63% were heat treated to produce different microstructures. A Linde 80 weld containing 0.30% copper and 1.00% nickel was produced and heat treated to test microstructure effects on the irradiation response of weld metal. Materials taken from plate surface locations (vs 1/4%) were included to test whether or not the improved toughness properties of the plate surface layer, resulting from a rapid quench, is maintained after irradiation. Irradiations were conducted at two irradiation temperatures, 500 F (260 C) and 550 F (288 C), to determine the effect of irradiation temperature on embrittlement. The results of this irradiation testing and additional data from a DOE/Sandia National Laboratories irradiation study show an irradiation temperature effect that is not consistent, but varies with the materials tested. The test results demonstrate that for nickel bearing steels, the superior toughness of plate surface material is maintained even after irradiation to high fluences, and for the copper content tested, nickel has little effect on irradiation response. A mixed effect of microstructure/heat treatment on the materials` irradiation response was noted. Phosphorus potentially played a role in the irradiation response of the low nickel material irradiated at 500 F (288 C) but did not show prominence in the irradiations for the same material conducted at 500 F (260 C).

  4. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Stabilization of Nickel and Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles: A Green Adeptness

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Aneela

    2016-01-01

    Green protocols for the synthesis of nanoparticles have been attracting a lot of attention because they are eco-friendly, rapid, and cost-effective. Nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been synthesized by green routes and characterized for impact of green chemistry on the properties and biological effects of nanoparticles in the last five years. Green synthesis, properties, and applications of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles have been reported in the literature. This review summarizes the synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles using different biological systems. This review also provides comparative overview of influence of chemical synthesis and green synthesis on structural properties of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles and their biological behavior. It concludes that green methods for synthesis of nickel and nickel oxide nanoparticles are better than chemical synthetic methods. PMID:27413375

  5. Nanostructured nickel-free austenitic stainless steel/hydroxyapatite composites.

    PubMed

    Tulinski, Maciej; Jurczyk, Mieczyslaw

    2012-11-01

    In this work Ni-free austenitic stainless steels with nanostructure and their nanocomposites with hydroxyapatite are presented and characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and optical profiling. The samples were synthesized by mechanical alloying, heat treatment and nitriding of elemental microcrystalline powders with addition of hydroxyapatite (HA). In our work we wanted to introduce into stainless steel hydroxyapatite ceramics that have been intensively studied for bone repair and replacement applications. Such applications were chosen because of their high biocompatibility and ability to bond to bone. Since nickel-free austenitic stainless steels seem to have better mechanical properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility compared to 316L stainless steels, it is possible that composite made of this steel and HA could improve properties, as well. Mechanical alloying and nitriding are very effective technologies to improve the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. Similar process in case of nanocomposites of stainless steel with hydroxyapatite helps achieve even better mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Hence nanocrystalline nickel-free stainless steels and nickel-free stainless steel/hydroxyapatite nanocomposites could be promising bionanomaterials for use as a hard tissue replacement implants, e.g., orthopedic implants. In such application, the surface roughness and more specifically the surface topography influences the proliferation of cells (e.g., osteoblasts).

  6. Strength of Rectangular Flat Plates Under Edge Compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuman, Louis; Back, Goldie

    1931-01-01

    Flat rectangular plates of duralumin, stainless iron, monel metal, and nickel were tested under loads applied at two opposite edges and acting in the plane of the plate. The edges parallel to the direction of loading were supported in V grooves. The plates were all 24 inches long and varied in width from 4 to 24 inches by steps of 4 inches, and in thickness from 0.015 to 0.095 inch by steps of approximately 0.015 inch. There were also a few 1, 2, 3, and 6 inch wide specimens. The loads were applied in the testing machine at the center of a bar which rested along the top of the plate. Load was applied until the plate failed to take any more load. The tests show that the loads carried by the plates generally reached a maximum for the 8 or 12 inch width and that there was relatively small drop in load for the greater widths. Deflection and set measurement perpendicular to the plane of the plate were taken and the form of the buckle determined. The number of buckles were found to correspond in general to that predicted by the theory of buckling of a plate uniformly loaded at two opposite edges and simply supported at the edges.

  7. Earth's Decelerating Tectonic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, A M; Moucha, R; Rowley, D B; Quere, S; Mitrovica, J X; Simmons, N A; Grand, S P

    2008-08-22

    Space geodetic and oceanic magnetic anomaly constraints on tectonic plate motions are employed to determine a new global map of present-day rates of change of plate velocities. This map shows that Earth's largest plate, the Pacific, is presently decelerating along with several other plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres. These plate decelerations contribute to an overall, globally averaged slowdown in tectonic plate speeds. The map of plate decelerations provides new and unique constraints on the dynamics of time-dependent convection in Earth's mantle. We employ a recently developed convection model constrained by seismic, geodynamic and mineral physics data to show that time-dependent changes in mantle buoyancy forces can explain the deceleration of the major plates in the Pacific and Indo-Atlantic hemispheres.

  8. Stabilized nickel-zinc battery

    SciTech Connect

    Himy, A.; Wagner, O.C.

    1982-04-27

    An alkaline nickel-zinc cell which has (1) a nickel-nickel hydroxide cathode; (2) a zinc-zinc oxide anode containing (A) a corrosion inhibitor such as PBO, SNO2, Tl2O3, in(OH)3 or mixtures thereof; (B) a slight corrosion accelerator such as cdo, bi2o3, ga2o3, or mixtures thereof; and (C) a zinc active material; (3) a mass-transport separator; (4) an alkaline electrolyte; and (5) means for charging the cell with an interrupted current having a frequency of from more than zero to 16 hertz with a rest period of not less than 60 milliseconds. Another desirable feature is the use of a pressure-cutoff switch to terminate charging when the internal pressure of the cell reaches a selected value in the range of from 5 to 8 psig.

  9. Method of Making a Nickel Fiber Electrode for a Nickel Based Battery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The general purpose of the invention is to develop a high specific energy nickel electrode for a nickel based battery system. The invention discloses a method of producing a lightweight nickel electrode which can be cycled to deep depths of discharge (i.e., 40% or greater of electrode capacity). These deep depths of discharge can be accomplished by depositing the required amount of nickel hydroxide active material into a lightweight nickel fiber substrate.

  10. High-temperature nickel-brazing alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, A. H.; Thompson, S. R.

    1970-01-01

    Gold-nickel brazing alloy, with 5 percent indium added to depress the melting point, is used for brazing of nickel-clad silver electrical conductors which operate at temperatures to 1200 deg F. Alloy has low resistivity, requires no flux, and is less corrosive than other gold-nickel, gold-copper alloys.

  11. Accelerated plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D L

    1975-03-21

    The concept of a stressed elastic lithospheric plate riding on a viscous asthenosphere is used to calculate the recurrence interval of great earthquakes at convergent plate boundaries, the separation of decoupling and lithospheric earthquakes, and the migration pattern of large earthquakes along an arc. It is proposed that plate motions accelerate after great decoupling earthquakes and that most of the observed plate motions occur during short periods of time, separated by periods of relative quiescence.

  12. Obliquity along plate boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippon, Mélody; Corti, Giacomo

    2016-12-01

    Most of the plate boundaries are activated obliquely with respect to the direction of far field stresses, as roughly only 8% of the plate boundaries total length shows a very low obliquity (ranging from 0 to 10°, sub-orthogonal to the plate displacement). The obliquity along plate boundaries is controlled by (i) lateral rheological variations within the lithosphere and (ii) consistency with the global plate circuit. Indeed, plate tectonics and magmatism drive rheological changes within the lithosphere and consequently influence strain localization. Geodynamical evolution controls large-scale mantle convection and plate formation, consumption, and re-organization, thus triggering plate kinematics variations, and the adjustment and re-orientation of far field stresses. These geological processes may thus result in plate boundaries that are not perpendicular but oblique to the direction of far field stresses. This paper reviews the global patterns of obliquity along plate boundaries. Using GPlate, we provide a statistical analysis of present-day obliquity along plate boundaries. Within this framework, by comparing natural examples and geological models, we discuss deformation patterns and kinematics recorded along oblique plate boundaries.

  13. Plating Tank Control Software

    SciTech Connect

    Krafcik, John

    1998-03-01

    The Plating Tank Control Software is a graphical user interface that controls and records plating process conditions for plating in high aspect ratio channels that require use of low current and long times. The software is written for a Pentium II PC with an 8 channel data acquisition card, and the necessary shunt resistors for measuring currents in the millampere range.

  14. Rotatable shear plate interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Duffus, Richard C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable shear plate interferometer comprises a transparent shear plate mounted obliquely in a tubular supporting member at 45.degree. with respect to its horizontal center axis. This tubular supporting member is supported rotatably around its center axis and a collimated laser beam is made incident on the shear plate along this center axis such that defocus in different directions can be easily measured.

  15. Nickel cadmium battery expert system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1986-11-01

    The applicability of artificial intelligence methodologies for the automation of energy storage management, in this case, nickel cadmium batteries, is demonstrated. With the Hubble Space Telescope Electrical Power System (HST/EPS) testbed as the application domain, an expert system was developed which incorporates the physical characterization of the EPS, in particular, the nickel cadmium batteries, as well as the human's operational knowledge. The expert system returns not only fault diagnostics but also status and advice along with justifications and explanations in the form of decision support.

  16. Nickel cadmium battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The applicability of artificial intelligence methodologies for the automation of energy storage management, in this case, nickel cadmium batteries, is demonstrated. With the Hubble Space Telescope Electrical Power System (HST/EPS) testbed as the application domain, an expert system was developed which incorporates the physical characterization of the EPS, in particular, the nickel cadmium batteries, as well as the human's operational knowledge. The expert system returns not only fault diagnostics but also status and advice along with justifications and explanations in the form of decision support.

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Nickel Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masako; Arakaki, Rieko; Yamada, Akiko; Tsunematsu, Takaaki; Kudo, Yasusei; Ishimaru, Naozumi

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity to metals is a delayed-type allergy. Although various metals are known to produce an allergic reaction, nickel is the most frequent cause of metal allergy. Researchers have attempted to elucidate the mechanisms of metal allergy using animal models and human patients. Here, the immunological and molecular mechanisms of metal allergy are described based on the findings of previous studies, including those that were recently published. In addition, the adsorption and excretion of various metals, in particular nickel, is discussed to further understand the pathogenesis of metal allergy. PMID:26848658

  18. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, Norman F.; Williams, Joe L.

    1983-01-01

    The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  19. Unemployment: Hard-Core or Hard-Shell?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauer, Robert H.

    1972-01-01

    The term hard-core'' makes the unemployed culpable; the term hard shell'' shifts the burden to the employer, and the evidence from the suburban plant indicates that a substantial part of the problem must lie there. (DM)

  20. Influence of the divertor plate material on the plasma performance in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Zagórski, R.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes integrated numerical modeling applied to DEMO discharges with different divertor plate materials (nickel, molybdenum and tungsten) in a slab geometry, using the COREDIV code. Calculations are performed for the inductive DEMO scenario with argon seeding. Simulations shown that for Mo and Ni, it is possible to achieve H-mode plasma operation (power to SOL > power threshold for L-H transition) with acceptable levels of power to the target plates.

  1. Base plate mechanics of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite).

    PubMed

    Ramsay, David B; Dickinson, Gary H; Orihuela, Beatriz; Rittschof, Daniel; Wahl, Kathryn J

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of barnacle base plates were measured using a punch test apparatus, with the purpose of examining the effect that the base plate flexural rigidity may have on adhesion mechanics. Base plate compliance was measured for 43 Balanus amphitrite (=Amphibalanus amphitrite) barnacles. Compliance measurements were used to determine flexural rigidity (assuming a fixed-edge circular plate approximation) and composite modulus of the base plates. The barnacles were categorized by age and cement type (hard or gummy) for statistical analyses. Barnacles that were 'hard' (> or =70% of the base plate thin, rigid cement) and 'gummy' (>30% of the base plate covered in compliant, tacky cement) showed statistically different composite moduli but did not show a difference in base plate flexural rigidity. The average flexural rigidity for all barnacles was 0.0020 Nm (SEM +/- 0.0003). Flexural rigidity and composite modulus did not differ significantly between 3-month and 14-month-old barnacles. The relatively low flexural rigidity measured for barnacles suggests that a rigid punch approximation is not sufficient to account for the contributions to adhesion mechanics due to flexing of real barnacles during release.

  2. Super-Hard Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Philip; Prozorov, Ruslan

    2005-03-01

    We present the magnetic response of Type-II superconductivity in the extreme pinning limit, where screening currents within an order of magnitude of the Ginzburg-Landau depairing critical current density develop upon the application of a magnetic field. We show that this ``super-hard'' limit is well approximated in highly disordered, cold drawn, Nb wire whose magnetization response is characterized by a cascade of Meissner-like phases, each terminated by a catastrophic collapse of the magnetization. Direct magneto-optic measurements of the flux penetration depth in the virgin magnetization branch are in excellent agreement with the exponential model in which Jc(B)=Jco(-B/Bo), where Jco˜5x10^6 A/cm^2 for Nb. The implications for the fundamental limiting hardness of a superconductor will be discussed.

  3. Malachite green photosensitive plates.

    PubMed

    Solano, C

    1989-08-15

    An experimental study of the behavior of malachite green sensitized plates was carried out. The transmittance variation of the irradiated plates was taken as a parameter. It has been observed that photoreduction in the malachite green plates is present only when ammonium dichromate is added to the plates. The introduction of external electron donors does not improve the photochemical reaction. It has been determined that malachite green molecules form a weak complex with the dichromate molecules and this complex can only be destroyed photochemically. This effect can explain the limited response of the malachite green dichromated plates.

  4. An improved plating process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, John C.

    1994-01-01

    An alternative to the immersion process for the electrodeposition of chromium from aqueous solutions on the inside diameter (ID) of long tubes is described. The Vessel Plating Process eliminates the need for deep processing tanks, large volumes of solutions, and associated safety and environmental concerns. Vessel Plating allows the process to be monitored and controlled by computer thus increasing reliability, flexibility and quality. Elimination of the trivalent chromium accumulation normally associated with ID plating is intrinsic to the Vessel Plating Process. The construction and operation of a prototype Vessel Plating Facility with emphasis on materials of construction, engineered and operational safety and a unique system for rinse water recovery are described.

  5. Nickel isotopes and methanogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubeck, A.; Ivarsson, M.

    2013-12-01

    Methanogens require Ni for their growth and as a consequence the microbial fractionation of Ni isotopes can be used as a biomarker for activity of methanogenic communities1. Anaerobic laboratory experiments was performed using methanogens to investigate methanogenic growth in a modified nutrient media2 with olivine Fo91 (5g/l) added as an additional mineral nutrient source and as the only H2 provider. One of the investigated methanogens showed an increased growth in the experiments with added olivine. There were also a close relationship between the mobilized Ni and the growth of the methanogen. Ni is an element that previously has been neglected in the study of fossilized microorganisms and their interaction with mineral substrates and, thus, there are no records or published data of Ni in association with microfossils. However, we have detected enrichments of Ni in fossilized microorganisms and ichno-fossils, respectively, from three separate locations. Ni is not present in the host rock in any of the samples. Thus, Ni is present in association with fossilized microorganisms from environments and more extensive analysis is required to understand the magnitude, uptake, preservation and fractionation of Ni in microfossils. In order to analyze Ni isotope fractionation from microbe-mineral interaction, we plan to use a high-resolution Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (LMS)3. In situ profile ablation will provide detailed and localized data on fractionation patterns between microfossils and their host rock. Also, this technique will allow us to identify the change in Ni isotopic fractionation in rock samples caused by abiotic and biogenic processes in a faster and easier way and with less risk for contamination compared to the wet chemistry analyses of Ni isotopes. 1. Cameron, V., Vance, D., Archer, C. & House, C. H. A biomarker based on the stable isotopes of nickel. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 106, 10944-10948 (2009). 2. Schn

  6. Recycling nickel electroplating rinse waters by low temperature evaporation and reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, T.C.; Randall, P.M.

    1993-08-01

    Low temperature evaporation and reverse osmosis systems were each evaluated (on a pilot scale) on their respective ability to process rinse water collected from a nickel electroplating operation. Each system offered advantages under specific operating conditions. The low temperature evaporation system was best suited to processing solutions with relatively high (greater than 4,000 to 5,000 mg/L) nickel concentrations. The reverse osmosis system was best adapted to conditions where the feed solution had a relatively low (less than4,000 to 5,000 mg/L) nickel concentration. In electroplating operations where relatively dilute rinse water solutions must be concentrated to levels acceptable for replacement in the plating bath, a combination of the two technologies might provide the best process alternative.

  7. Pecoraite, Ni6Si4O10(OH)8, nickel analog of clinochrysotile, formed in the wolf creek meteorite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Faust, G.T.; Fahey, J.J.; Mason, B.; Dwornik, E.J.

    1969-01-01

    Pecoraite is a new phase in the natural system H2O-NiO-MgO- SiO2, the nickel analog of clinochrysotile. It occurs in cracks in the Wolf Creek meteorite in Australia where it was formed under hydrothermal conditions. Particles of pecoraite are very small curved plates which have begun to coil; some have achieved spiral form.

  8. Direct Alloying of Steel with Nickel Concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Proshunin, I. E.

    2016-08-01

    A technology of alloying steel with nickel reduced from nickel concentrate is analysed and developed. Limits of reduction concentration areas are defined. An optimal composition of nickel concentrate pellets and a method of feeding them into the furnace are deduced from experiments. It is proved that when pellets made of nickel concentrate and coke are added into the charge during steel smelting by the technology of alloyed scrap remelting, nickel recovery achieves 92-95%. The technology was tested by smelting DSP-40 steel.

  9. Method of manufacturing positive nickel hydroxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Gutjahr, M.A.; Schmid, R.; Beccu, K.D.

    1975-12-16

    A method of manufacturing a positive nickel hydroxide electrode is discussed. A highly porous core structure of organic material having a fibrous or reticular texture is uniformly coated with nickel powder and then subjected to a thermal treatment which provides sintering of the powder coating and removal of the organic core material. A consolidated, porous nickel support structure is thus produced which has substantially the same texture and porosity as the initial core structure. To provide the positive electrode including the active mass, nickel hydroxide is deposited in the pores of the nickel support structure.

  10. Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Nicholas Cole

    2013-01-01

    The world is currently facing an energy and environmental crisis for which new technologies are needed. Development of cost-competitive materials for catalysis and hydrogen storage on-board motor vehicles is crucial to lead subsequent generations into a more sustainable and energy independent future. This thesis presents work toward the scalable synthesis of bimetallic heterostructures that can enable hydrogen to compete with carbonaceous fuels by meeting the necessary gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and by enhancing hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics near ambient temperatures and pressures. Utilizing the well-known phenomenon of hydrogen spillover, these bimetallic heterostructures could work by lowering the activation energy for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of metals. Herein, we report a novel method for the scalable synthesis of silica templated zero-valent nickel particles (Ni⊂SiO2) that hold promise for the synthesis of nickel nanorods for use in bimetallic heterostructures for hydrogen storage. Our synthesis proceeds by chemical reduction of a nickel-hydrazine complex with sodium borohydride followed by calcination under hydrogen gas to yield silica encapsulated nickel particles. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the general morphology of the resultant nanocapsules as well as the crystalline phases of the incorporated Ni0 nanocrystals. The structures display strong magnetic behavior at room temperature and preliminary data suggests nickel particle size can be controlled by varying the amount of nickel precursor used in the synthesis. Calcination under different environments and TEM analysis provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni⊂SiO2 nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle growth occurs

  11. Templated synthesis of nickel nanoparticles: Toward heterostructured nanocomposites for efficient hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Nicholas Cole

    The world is currently facing an energy and environmental crisis for which new technologies are needed. Development of cost-competitive materials for catalysis and hydrogen storage on-board motor vehicles is crucial to lead subsequent generations into a more sustainable and energy independent future. This thesis presents work toward the scalable synthesis of bimetallic heterostructures that can enable hydrogen to compete with carbonaceous fuels by meeting the necessary gravimetric and volumetric energy densities and by enhancing hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics near ambient temperatures and pressures. Utilizing the well-known phenomenon of hydrogen spillover, these bimetallic heterostructures could work by lowering the activation energy for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation of metals. Herein, we report a novel method for the scalable synthesis of silica templated zero-valent nickel particles (Ni⊂SiO2) that hold promise for the synthesis of nickel nanorods for use in bimetallic heterostructures for hydrogen storage. Our synthesis proceeds by chemical reduction of a nickel-hydrazine complex with sodium borohydride followed by calcination under hydrogen gas to yield silica encapsulated nickel particles. Transmission electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the general morphology of the resultant nanocapsules as well as the crystalline phases of the incorporated Ni0 nanocrystals. The structures display strong magnetic behavior at room temperature and preliminary data suggests nickel particle size can be controlled by varying the amount of nickel precursor used in the synthesis. Calcination under different environments and TEM analysis provides evidence for an atomic migration mechanism of particle formation. Ni⊂SiO2 nanocapsules were used as seeds to induce heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth within the nanocapsule via electroless nickel plating. Nickel nanoparticle growth occurs under high temperature alkaline

  12. Multicolor printing plate joining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An upper plate having ink flow channels and a lower plate having a multicolored pattern are joined. The joining is accomplished without clogging any ink flow paths. A pattern having different colored parts and apertures is formed in a lower plate. Ink flow channels each having respective ink input ports are formed in an upper plate. The ink flow channels are coated with solder mask and the bottom of the upper plate is then coated with solder. The upper and lower plates are pressed together at from 2 to 5 psi and heated to a temperature of from 295 F to 750 F or enough to melt the solder. After the plates have cooled and the pressure is released, the solder mask is removed from the interior passageways by means of a liquid solvent.

  13. Secondary hardening steel having improved combination of hardness and toughness

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.; Bhat, Manjeshwar S.; Garrison, Jr., Warren M.

    1979-01-01

    A secondary hardening alloy steel composition consisting essentially of about 0.25-0.5% carbon, about 0.5-1.0% manganese, about 1.5-3.0% nickel, about 0-1.0% chromium, about 1.75-2.5% molybdenum, about 0-0.4% vanadium, and an additive selected from about 1-3% aluminum and a combination of at least about 1% aluminum and at least about 1% silicon for a combined Al+Si content of about 2-4%, the balance being iron and impurity elements. The present steel composition has the following characteristics: it exhibits a flat tempering response, it is hardenable upon tempering to a Rockwell C hardness of at least 50, and it has an improved combination of hardness vs. toughness properties after tempering in the secondary hardening range. A method of preparation is also described.

  14. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler; Huffnagle, Ian; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegansand P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  15. Assaying environmental nickel toxicity using model nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D; Huffnagle, Ian M; Besser, John M; Ingersoll, Christopher G

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species.

  16. Assaying Environmental Nickel Toxicity Using Model Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rudel, David; Douglas, Chandler D.; Huffnagle, Ian M.; Besser, John M.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2013-01-01

    Although nickel exposure results in allergic reactions, respiratory conditions, and cancer in humans and rodents, the ramifications of excess nickel in the environment for animal and human health remain largely undescribed. Nickel and other cationic metals travel through waterways and bind to soils and sediments. To evaluate the potential toxic effects of nickel at environmental contaminant levels (8.9-7,600 µg Ni/g dry weight of sediment and 50-800 µg NiCl2/L of water), we conducted assays using two cosmopolitan nematodes, Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus. We assayed the effects of both sediment-bound and aqueous nickel upon animal growth, developmental survival, lifespan, and fecundity. Uncontaminated sediments were collected from sites in the Midwestern United States and spiked with a range of nickel concentrations. We found that nickel-spiked sediment substantially impairs both survival from larval to adult stages and adult longevity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, while aqueous nickel showed no adverse effects on either survivorship or longevity, we observed a significant decrease in fecundity, indicating that aqueous nickel could have a negative impact on nematode physiology. Intriguingly, C. elegans and P. pacificus exhibit similar, but not identical, responses to nickel exposure. Moreover, P. pacificus could be tested successfully in sediments inhospitable to C. elegans. Our results add to a growing body of literature documenting the impact of nickel on animal physiology, and suggest that environmental toxicological studies could gain an advantage by widening their repertoire of nematode species. PMID:24116204

  17. Bead temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper bead techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld beads to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld bead placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper bead placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, bead temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.

  18. High-definition micropatterning method for hard, stiff and brittle polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yiping; Truckenmuller, Roman; Levers, Marloes; Hua, Wei-Shu; de Boer, Jan; Papenburg, Bernke

    2017-02-01

    Polystyrene (PS) is the most commonly used material in cell culture devices, such as Petri dishes, culture flasks and well plates. Micropatterning of cell culture substrates can significantly affect cell-material interactions leading to an increasing interest in the fabrication of topographically micro-structured PS surfaces. However, the high stiffness combined with brittleness of PS (elastic modulus 3-3.5GPa) makes high-quality patterning into PS difficult when standard hard molds, e.g. silicon and nickel, are used as templates. A new and robust scheme for easy processing of large-area high-density micro-patterning into PS film is established using nanoimprinting lithography and standard hot embossing techniques. Including an extra step through an intermediate PDMS mold alone does not result in faithful replication of the large area, high-density micropattern into PS. Here, we developed an approach using an additional intermediate mold out of OrmoStamp, which allows for high-quality and large-area micro-patterning into PS. OrmoStamp was originally developed for UV nanoimprint applications; this work demonstrates for the first time that OrmoStamp is a highly adequate material for micro-patterning of PS through hot embossing. Our proposed processing method achieves high-quality replication of micropatterns in PS, incorporating features with high aspect ratio (4:1, height:width), high density, and over a large pattern area. The proposed scheme can easily be adapted for other large-area and high-density micropatterns of PS, as well as other stiff and brittle polymers.

  19. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Generated by Manufacturers or Users of Nickel, Chromium, or Iron Baghouse bags Raney nickel catalyst Floor... Nickel, chromium, and iron catalysts Nickel-cadmium and nickel-iron batteries Filter cake from...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Generated by Manufacturers or Users of Nickel, Chromium, or Iron Baghouse bags Raney nickel catalyst Floor... Nickel, chromium, and iron catalysts Nickel-cadmium and nickel-iron batteries Filter cake from...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix Xii to Part 266 - Nickel or Chromium-Bearing Materials that may be Processed in Exempt Nickel-Chromium Recovery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Generated by Manufacturers or Users of Nickel, Chromium, or Iron Baghouse bags Raney nickel catalyst Floor... Nickel, chromium, and iron catalysts Nickel-cadmium and nickel-iron batteries Filter cake from...

  2. Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Windt, N.F.; Williams, J.L.

    In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel contianing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

  3. Slip and flow of hard-sphere colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Ballesta, P; Besseling, R; Isa, L; Petekidis, G; Poon, W C K

    2008-12-19

    We study the flow of concentrated hard-sphere colloidal suspensions along smooth, nonstick walls using cone-plate rheometry and simultaneous confocal microscopy. In the glass regime, the global flow shows a transition from Herschel-Bulkley behavior at large shear rate to a characteristic Bingham slip response at small rates, absent for ergodic colloidal fluids. Imaging reveals both the "solid" microstructure during full slip and the local nature of the "slip to shear" transition. Both the local and global flow are described by a phenomenological model, and the associated Bingham slip parameters exhibit characteristic scaling with size and concentration of the hard spheres.

  4. Grain refinement of a nickel and manganese free austenitic stainless steel produced by pressurized solution nitriding

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh Akbari, Alireza

    2014-07-01

    Prolonged exposure at high temperatures during solution nitriding induces grain coarsening which deteriorates the mechanical properties of high nitrogen austenitic stainless steels. In this study, grain refinement of nickel and manganese free Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel plates was investigated via a two-stage heat treatment procedure. Initially, the coarse-grained austenitic stainless steel samples were subjected to an isothermal heating at 700 °C to be decomposed into the ferrite + Cr{sub 2}N eutectoid structure and then re-austenitized at 1200 °C followed by water quenching. Microstructure and hardness of samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and micro-hardness testing. The results showed that the as-solution-nitrided steel decomposes non-uniformly to the colonies of ferrite and Cr{sub 2}N nitrides with strip like morphology after isothermal heat treatment at 700 °C. Additionally, the complete dissolution of the Cr{sub 2}N precipitates located in the sample edges during re-austenitizing requires longer times than 1 h. In order to avoid this problem an intermediate nitrogen homogenizing heat treatment cycle at 1200 °C for 10 h was applied before grain refinement process. As a result, the initial austenite was uniformly decomposed during the first stage, and a fine grained austenitic structure with average grain size of about 20 μm was successfully obtained by re-austenitizing for 10 min. - Highlights: • Successful grain refinement of Fe–22.75Cr–2.42Mo–1.17N steel by heat treatment • Using the γ → α + Cr{sub 2}N reaction for grain refinement of a Ni and Mn free HNASS • Obtaining a single phase austenitic structure with average grain size of ∼ 20 μm • Incomplete dissolution of Cr{sub 2}N during re-austenitizing at 1200 °C for long times • Reducing re-austenitizing time by homogenizing treatment before grain refinement.

  5. Observations on nickel-free, beryllium-free alloys for fixed prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vermilyea, S G; Tamura, J J; Mills, D E

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical properties, electrochemical behavior, heat treatment response, micro-structural features, and compositions of two proprietary nickel-free, beryllium-free fixed prosthodontic alloys were studied. The alloys showed compositional and microstructural differences. Mechanical property values of Biocast and Neobond II are comparable with those of base metal alloys for removable partial dentures. The high hardness, high modulus of elasticity, and low elongation impede adjustment, adaptation of margins, and polishing of the final restoration.

  6. Improvement of black nickel coatings. [product development for use in solar collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, R. E.; Lin, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Selectively absorbing black nickel coatings are among the most optically efficient low cost coatings for use on flat plate solar collectors. However, a current Ni-Zn-S-O coating in use is quite susceptible to a humid environment, degrading badly in less than ten days at 38 C (100 F) at 95 percent relative humidity. Therefore, a black nickel formula was developed which can withstand such exposures with no loss of optical efficiency, solar absorption of 0.92 and an infrared emittance (at 100 C) of 1.00 were still present after 14 days of humidity exposure. This compares to a solar absorptance of only 0.72 for the previous formula after a similar time period. The electroplating bath and conditions were changed to obtain the more stable coating configuration. The effect of bath composition, temperature, pH, and plating current density and time on the coating composition, spectral optical properties and durability were investigated systematically.

  7. NBS: Nondestructive evaluation of nonuniformities in 2219 aluminum alloy plate: Relationship to processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swartzendruber, L.; Boettinger, W.; Ives, L.; Coriell, S.; Ballard, D.; Laughlin, D.; Clough, R.; Biancanieilo, F.; Blau, P.; Cahn, J.

    1980-01-01

    The compositional homogeneity, microstructure, hardness, electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of 2219 aluminum alloy plates are influenced by the process variables during casting, rolling and thermomechanical treatment. The details of these relationships wre investigated for correctly processed 2219 plate as well as for deviations caused by improper quenching after solution heat treatment. Primary emphasis was been placed on the reliability of eddy current electrical conductivity and hardness as NDE tools to detect variations in mechanical properties.

  8. Electrochemical impregnation and cycle life of lightweight nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a high specific energy nickel electrode is the main goal of the lightweight nickel electrode program at NASA-Lewis. The approach was to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen cell. Lightweight plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products that are fabricated into nickel electrodes by electrochemically impregnating them with active material. The electrodes are life cycle tested in a low earth orbit regime at 40 and 80 percent depths-of-discharge.

  9. Electrochemical impregnation and cycle life of lightweight nickel electrodes for nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1990-01-01

    Development of a high specific energy nickel electrode is the main goal of the lightweight nickel electrode program at NASA-Lewis. The approach was to improve the nickel electrode by continuing combined in-house and contract efforts to develop a more efficient and lighter weight electrode for the nickel-hydrogen cell. Lightweight plaques are used as conductive supports for the nickel hydroxide active material. These plaques are commercial products that are fabricated into nickel electrodes by electrochemically impregnating them with active material. The electrodes are life cycle tested in a low Earth orbit regime at 40 and 80 percent depths-of-discharge.

  10. Chromium/molybdenum alloy plating. Part 1: The electrodeposition of low contraction chromium/molybdenum alloys using unipolar (on/off) pulse plating. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.D.; Langston, S.

    1994-03-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of a pulse-plated low contraction (LC) chromium/molybdenum (Cr/Mo) alloy deposit were evaluated and compared to both pulse-plated LC chromium and direct (dc)-plated LC chromium. Molybdenum concentrations as high as approximately 2.4 percent were obtained at a pulsing frequency of 5 Hz (100 ms on-time/100 ms off-time). This represents nearly a 300 percent increase over the percent molybdenum obtained in a dc-plated LC Cr/Mo alloy deposit However, pulse-plated LC Cr/Mo deposits were generally poor in quality with deposits that were frequently cracked and nodular in appearance. Hardness values as high as 900 KHN (50 gm load) were obtained for the pulse-plated LC Cr/Mo alloy deposit. This hardness represents an 18 percent increase over the maximum reported hardness obtained in a dc-plated LC chromium deposit. The maximum cathode current efficiency (CCE) obtained while pulse plating an LC Cr/Mo alloy was 7.3 percent. This is nearly 52 percent less than the reported CCE obtained when dc plating LC chromium.

  11. Ultra-violet protection and water repellency of polyester fabrics treated by surface deposition of nickel under the effect of low temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, C. W.; Yuen, C. W. M.

    2007-12-01

    This paper is aimed at understanding the textile properties of nickel-deposited polyester fabric after treating with low temperature plasma treatment. Low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen gas was employed in this paper to activate a hydrophilic surface for the polyester fabrics and hence facilitate the nickel deposition through an electroless plating process. The textile properties of plasma-induced electroless nickel-plated polyester fabrics were evaluated by different standard testing methods in terms of both physical and chemical performances. The electroless nickel plating with plasma treatment improved significantly the performance of nickel-plated polyester fabrics as reflected by the scanning electron microscopy, tensile strength, ultraviolet protection as well as fabric weight. On the contrary, it also enhanced the fabric thickness and colour fastness to crocking. In addition, there was no influence on the performance of colour fastness to light and colourfastness to laundering. Moreover, the application of plasma treatment adversely affected slightly the performance of contact angle and wrinkle recovery property.

  12. Cold laser machining of nickel-yttrium stabilised zirconia cermets: Composition dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Sola, D.

    2009-09-15

    Cold laser micromachining efficiency in nickel-yttrium stabilised zirconia cermets was studied as a function of cermet composition. Nickel oxide-yttrium stabilised zirconia ceramic plates obtained via tape casting technique were machined using 8-25 ns pulses of a Nd: YAG laser at the fixed wavelength of 1.064 {mu}m and a frequency of 1 kHz. The morphology of the holes, etched volume, drill diameter, shape and depth were evaluated as a function of the processing parameters such as pulse irradiance and of the initial composition. The laser drilling mechanism was evaluated in terms of laser-material interaction parameters such as beam absorptivity, material spallation and the impact on the overall process discussed. By varying the nickel oxide content of the composite the optical absorption (-value is greatly modified and significantly affected the drilling efficiency of the green state ceramic substrates and the morphology of the holes. Higher depth values and improved drilled volume upto 0.2 mm{sup 3} per pulse were obtained for substrates with higher optical transparency (lower optical absorption value). In addition, a laser beam self-focussing effect is observed for the compositions with less nickel oxide content. Holes with average diameter from 60 {mu}m to 110 {mu}m and upto 1 mm in depth were drilled with a high rate of 40 ms per hole while the final microstructure of the cermet obtained by reduction of the nickel oxide-yttrium stabilised zirconia composites remained unchanged.

  13. Copper conducting electrode with nickel as a seed layer for selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ur Rehman, Atteq; Shin, Eun Gu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2014-09-01

    In this research, we investigated selective emitter formation with a single-step photolithography process having a metallization scheme composed of nickel/copper metal stacks. The nickel seed layers were deposited by applying the electroless deposition process while copper was formed by light induced electro-plating arrangements as the main conducting electrode. The electroless deposition of nickel, along with a sintering process, was employed to create a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon. The nickel metal stack below the copper-conducting electrode also helped in lowering the sheet resistance and improving the contact adhesion. The nickel used as a seed layer was successfully demonstrated in the fabrication of a homogeneous 60 Ω/□ emitter and selective emitter cells. Lower series resistances of 0.165 Ω and 0.253 Ω were achieved for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. The best cell efficiency of 18.37% for the selective emitter solar cell was achieved, with average cell efficiencies of 18.17% and 17.3% for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. An approximate efficiency increase of about 0.8% was recorded for the selective emitter solar cells.

  14. Nickel nanofibers synthesized by the electrospinning method

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Yi; Zhang, Xuebin; Zhu, Yajun; Li, Bin; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Jingcheng; Feng, Yi

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► The nickel nanofibers have been obtained by electrospinning method. ► The nickel nanofibers had rough surface which was consisted of mass nanoparticles. ► The average diameter of nickel nanofibers is about 135 nm and high degree of crystallization. ► The Hc, Ms, and Mr were estimated to be 185 Oe, 51.9 and 16.9 emu/g respectively. - Abstract: In this paper, nickel nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning polyvinyl alcohol/nickel nitrate precursor solution followed by high temperature calcination in air and deoxidation in hydrogen atmosphere. The thermal stability of the as-electrospun PVA/Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} composite nanofibers were characterized by TG–DSC. The morphologies and structures of the as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field-emission scanning electronmicroscope (FE-SEM) and field-emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM). The hysteresis loops (M–H loops) were measured by Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS). The results indicate that: the PVA and the nickel nitrate were almost completely decomposed at 460 °C and the products were pure nickel nanofibers with face-centered cubic (fcc) structure. Furthermore, the as-prepared nickel nanofibers had a continuous structure with rough surface and high degree of crystallization. The average diameter of nickel nanofibers was about 135 nm. The nanofibers showed a stronger coercivity of 185 Oe than value of bulk nickel.

  15. Nickel inhibits mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W; Brant, Kelly A; Fabisiak, James P; Goetzman, Eric S

    2015-08-07

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation-the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy-in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with l-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 h), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis.

  16. Nickel Inhibits Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Uppala, Radha; McKinney, Richard W.; Brant, Kelly A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Goetzman, Eric S.

    2015-01-01

    Nickel exposure is associated with changes in cellular energy metabolism which may contribute to its carcinogenic properties. Here, we demonstrate that nickel strongly represses mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation—the pathway by which fatty acids are catabolized for energy—in both primary human lung fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. At the concentrations used, nickel suppresses fatty acid oxidation without globally suppressing mitochondrial function as evidenced by increased glucose oxidation to CO2. Pre-treatment with L-carnitine, previously shown to prevent nickel-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in neuroblastoma cells, did not prevent the inhibition of fatty acid oxidation. The effect of nickel on fatty acid oxidation occurred only with prolonged exposure (>5 hr), suggesting that direct inhibition of the active sites of metabolic enzymes is not the mechanism of action. Nickel is a known hypoxia-mimetic that activates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1α). Nickel-induced inhibition of fatty acid oxidation was blunted in HIF1α knockout fibroblasts, implicating HIF1α as one contributor to the mechanism. Additionally, nickel down-regulated the protein levels of the key fatty acid oxidation enzyme very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) in a dose-dependent fashion. In conclusion, inhibition of fatty acid oxidation by nickel, concurrent with increased glucose metabolism, represents a form of metabolic reprogramming that may contribute to nickel-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:26051273

  17. Hard Metal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bech, A. O.; Kipling, M. D.; Heather, J. C.

    1962-01-01

    In Great Britain there have been no published reports of respiratory disease occurring amongst workers in the hard metal (tungsten carbide) industry. In this paper the clinical and radiological findings in six cases and the pathological findings in one are described. In two cases physiological studies indicated mild alveolar diffusion defects. Histological examination in a fatal case revealed diffuse pulmonary interstitial fibrosis with marked peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia. Radiological surveys revealed the sporadic occurrence and low incidence of the disease. The alterations in respiratory mechanics which occurred in two workers following a day's exposure to dust are described. Airborne dust concentrations are given. The industrial process is outlined and the literature is reviewed. The toxicity of the metals is discussed, and our findings are compared with those reported from Europe and the United States. We are of the opinion that the changes which we would describe as hard metal disease are caused by the inhalation of dust at work and that the component responsible may be cobalt. Images PMID:13970036

  18. Plating methods, a survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkowitz, J. B.; Emerson, N. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of a comprehensive search of the literature available, much of which has been generated by the research centers of NASA and its contractors, on plating and coating methods and techniques. Methods covered included: (1) electroplating from aqueous solutions; (2) electroplating from nonaqueous solutions; (3) electroplating from fused-salt baths; (4) electroforming; (5) electroless plating, immersion plating, and mirroring; (6) electroplating from gaseous plasmas; and (7) anodized films and conversion coatings.

  19. Bonded multilayer Laue Lens for focusing hard x-rays.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Conley, R.; Qian, J.; Kewish, C.M.; Macrander, A.T.; Maser, J.; Kang, H.C.; Yan, H.; Stephenson, G.B.; Advanced Photonics Research Institute; Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology

    2007-11-11

    We have fabricated partial Multilayer Laue Lens (MLL) linear zone plate structures with thousands of alternating WSi{sub 2} and Si layers and various outermost zone widths according to the Fresnel zone plate formula. Using partial MLL structures, we were able to focus hard X-rays to line foci with a width of 30 nm and below. Here, we describe challenges and approaches used to bond these multilayers to achieve line and point focusing. Bonding was done by coating two multilayers with AuSn and heating in a vacuum oven at 280-300 C. X-ray reflectivity measurements confirmed that there was no change in the multilayers after heating to 350 C. A bonded MLL was polished to a 5-25 {micro}m wedge without cracking. SEM image analyses found well-positioned multilayers after bonding. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a bonded full MLL for focusing hard X-rays.

  20. A study of the characteristics and limitations of various platings on cylindrical electrical conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    This work explores the impedance characteristics of copper wires plated with tin, silver, or nickel, the most common type of wiring used in the computer, communications, and aerospace industries. The background of plated wires and a brief review of related research is provided. This is followed by a detailed development of the theory of plated wires, accompanied by a MAPLE code in the appendix that can be used for the numerical analysis of plated wires having two or more plating layers. The code was used to generate a series of curves predicting the impedance behavior of both solid, "pure" metals, as well as copper wire plated with silver, tin, and nickel. Additional curves are provided highlighting the very interesting impedance behavior of nickel plated copper wire. All of these curves are accompanied by a number of observations to point out the more interesting aspects of the behavior. Several impedance measurements of commonly available military specification plated wire stranded conductors are then discussed. A number of the attempted measurements were unable to resolve the very small impedances. Even so, a last attempt worked very well to demonstrate the predicted impedance behavior, as evidenced by the measured raw data curves shown in contrast to the same curves with fixture parasitics removed. Insertion loss measurements were then made of commonly available military specification plated wire twisted shielded pair that provided further confirming evidence for the predictions made from the numerical analysis. In all cases, observations and comments are provided to explain why some measurements were superior to others, and why certain steps were taken to defeat interference from clouding the results. The document closes with recommendations for future efforts and concluding remarks.

  1. Application research of CO2 laser cutting natural stone plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixiu; Song, Jijiang

    2009-08-01

    Now, the processing of natural stone plates is the high performance sawing machine primarily,many researchers deeply studied the processing characters in the sawing process and the strength characters during the processing. In order to realize the profiled-processing and pattern- carving of the natural stone, It lays a solid foundation for the laser cutting and the pattern-carving technology of natural stone plate. The working principle, type and characteristics of laser cutting are briefly described. The paper selects 6 kinds stone plates of natural taken as experimental sample,the experimental sample was China Shanxi Black, Old Spain Golden Yellow, New Spain Golden Yellow, Jazz White, Maple Leaf Red, Cream White respectively. Use high power CO2 laser cutting system,the stone plates cutting experiment of 6 kinds different hardness, the best working speed are obtained,The experimental results indicate that: The laser cutting speed has no correlation with the ingredient content of stone plate.

  2. PLATES WITH OXIDE INSERTS

    DOEpatents

    West, J.M.; Schumar, J.F.

    1958-06-10

    Planar-type fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors are described, particularly those comprising fuel in the oxide form such as thoria and urania. The fuel assembly consists of a plurality of parallel spaced fuel plate mennbers having their longitudinal side edges attached to two parallel supporting side plates, thereby providing coolant flow channels between the opposite faces of adjacent fuel plates. The fuel plates are comprised of a plurality of longitudinally extending tubular sections connected by web portions, the tubular sections being filled with a plurality of pellets of the fuel material and the pellets being thermally bonded to the inside of the tubular section by lead.

  3. CALUTRON FACE PLATE

    DOEpatents

    Brobeck, W.M.

    1959-08-25

    The construction of a removable cover plate for a calutron tank is described. The plate is fabricated of a rectangular frame member to which is welded a bowed or dished plate of thin steel, reinforced with transverse stiffening ribs. When the tank is placed between the poles of a magnet, the plate may be pivoted away from the tank and magnet and is adapted to support the ion separation mechanism secured to its inner side as well as the vacuum load within the tank.

  4. Lightweight nickel electrodes for nickel/hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Hong S.; Zelter, Gabriela R.

    1993-01-01

    Thick nickel electrodes with lightweight substrate material have been prepared and tested in Ni/H2 boilerplate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte. Lightweight substrates used were either 85 or 90 percent in porosity and either 0.8 or 2 mm in thickness, respectively, compared with 80 to 82 percent porosity and 0.75 to 0.8 mm thickness of the state-of-the-art sintered plaque substrate. All of these thick electrodes had substantially improved theoretical (or chemical) capacity over that of state-of-the-art sintered nickel plaque electrodes. However, utilization of the active material was low (65 to 80 percent) compared with that of the state-of-the-art electrodes (approximately 90 percent) in 26 percent KOH. Due to this low utilization, the electrodes using 85 percent porous substrates did not show any advantage over the state-of-the-art ones. The electrodes using a 90 percent porous substrate, however, showed 17 percent higher usable specific capacity (about 0.13 Ah/g in 26 percent KOH) than that of the state-of-the-art nickel electrodes despite the low utilization. These electrodes achieved up to 4860 cycles at 40 percent depth-of-discharge with neither capacity loss nor any significant changes of rate capability and charging efficiency with cycling.

  5. Method for conducting electroless metal-plating processes

    DOEpatents

    Petit, George S.; Wright, Ralph R.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved method for conducting electroless metal-plating processes in a metal tank which is exposed to the plating bath. The invention solves a problem commonly encountered in such processes: how to determine when it is advisable to shutdown the process in order to clean and/or re-passivate the tank. The new method comprises contacting the bath with a current-conducting, non-catalytic probe and, during plating operations, monitoring the gradually changing difference in electropotential between the probe and tank. It has been found that the value of this voltage is indicative of the extent to which nickel-bearing decomposition products accumulate on the tank. By utilizing the voltage to determine when shutdown for cleaning is advisable, the operator can avoid premature shutdown and at the same time avoid prolonging operations to the point that spontaneous decomposition occurs.

  6. Heavy reflector experiments in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor: Stainless steel, carbon steel and nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Adimir dos; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simoes de; Jerez, Rogerio; Liambos Mura, Luis Felipe; Fuga, Rinaldo

    2013-05-06

    New experiments devoted to the measurements of physical parameters of a light water core surrounded by a heavy reflector were performed in the IPEN/MB-01 research reactor facility. These experiments comprise three sets of heavy reflector (SS-304, Carbon Steel, and Nickel) in a form of laminates around 3 mm thick. Each set was introduced individually in the west face of the core of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor. The aim here is to provide high quality experimental data for the interpretation and validation of the SS-304 heavy reflector calculation methods. The experiments of Carbon Steel, which is composed mainly of iron, and Nickel were performed to provide a consistent and an interpretative check for the SS-304 reflector experiment. The experimental results comprise critical control bank positions, temperatures and reactivities as a function of the number of the plates. Particularly to the case of Nickel, the experimental data are unique of its kind. The theoretical analysis was performed by MCNP-5 with the nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0. It was shown that this nuclear data library has a very good performance up to thirteen plates and overestimates the reactivity for higher number of plates independently of the type of the reflector.

  7. Development of technique for AR coating and nickel and copper metallization of solar cells. FPS Project: Product development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W.

    1982-01-01

    Printed nickel overplated with copper and applied on top of a predeposited silicon nitride antireflective coating system for metallizing solar cells was analyzed. The ESL D and E paste formulations, and the new formulations F, G, H, and D-1 were evaluated. The nickel thick films were tested after firing for stability in the cleaning and plating solutions used in the Vanguard-Pacific brush plating process. It was found that the films are very sensitive to the leaning and alkaline copper solutions. Less sensitivity was displayed to the neutral copper solution. Microscopic and SEM observations show segregation of frit at the silicon nitride thick film interface with loose frit residues after lifting off plated grid lines.

  8. Thin plastic sheet eliminates need for expensive plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stremel, R. L.

    1967-01-01

    Gasket of a commercially available plastic material is interposed between the mating surfaces in axial joints where a hard and a soft metal are in intimate contact under stress conditions. This eliminates the fretting problem and is quicker and less expensive than the plating process.

  9. Nickel aluminides and nickel-iron aluminides for use in oxidizing environments

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1988-03-15

    Nickel aluminides and nickel-iron aluminides treated with hafnium or zirconium, boron and cerium to which have been added chromium to significantly improve high temperature ductility, creep resistance and oxidation properties in oxidizing environments.

  10. Characterization of Nickel Diffusion and its Effect on the Microstructure of Nickel PM Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tougas, Bernard; Blais, Carl; Chagnon, François; Pelletier, Sylvain

    2013-02-01

    Admixing pure elements to powder mixes can cause the formation of heterogeneous microstructures in sintered parts. For instance, nickel is renowned for forming nickel-rich areas (NRA) in powder metallurgy (PM) nickel steels due to its poor diffusivity in iron matrix (or lattice). The present work is aimed at characterizing the principal diffusion mechanisms of nickel and their influence on microstructures and properties of PM nickel steels. A new wavelength dispersive X-ray spectrometry (WDS) approach linking line scans and X-ray maps to concentration maps is proposed. Grain boundary and volume diffusion coefficients of admixed nickel have been determined in PM nickel steels using Suzuoka's equation. Results also show that nickel distributes itself in the iron matrix mainly by surface and grain boundary diffusion.

  11. Aerosol Catalysis on Nickel Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Alfred P.; Seipenbusch, Martin; Thanner, Christoph; Kasper, Gerhard

    1999-06-01

    Nickel nanoparticles produced by spark discharges were used as aerosol catalyst for the formation of methane. The available surface area of the particles was determined using different methods. It was found that the surface area available for nitrogen adsorption and, therefore, for the methanation reaction remained virtually constant during restructuring of the agglomerates while the surface area based on the mobility was significantly reduced. In general, the reaction parameters such as activation energy and reaction rates agree well with the values for single nickel crystals and foils. At temperatures above 350°C the activation energy and the photoelectric activity of the particles decrease indicating the formation of graphite on the particle surface. Also the change of the work function points to the build up of multiple layers of graphite on the particle surface. The surprisingly low temperature for the surface deactivation may indicate an enhanced formation of carbon atoms at the surface.

  12. A biokinetic model for systemic nickel

    DOE PAGES

    Melo, Dunstana; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2017-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is updating its suite of reference biokinetic models for internally deposited radionuclides. This paper reviews data for nickel and proposes an updated biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) nickel in adult humans for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current model for nickel, the proposed model is based on a larger set of observations of the behavior of nickel in human subjects and laboratory animals and provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of nickel in the body. For the two most important radioisotopes of nickel, 59Ni andmore » 63Ni, the proposed model yields substantially lower dose estimates per unit of activity reaching blood than the current ICRP model.« less

  13. A biokinetic model for systemic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Melo, Dunstana; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2017-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is updating its suite of reference biokinetic models for internally deposited radionuclides. This paper reviews data for nickel and proposes an updated biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) nickel in adult humans for use in radiation protection. Compared with the ICRP s current model for nickel, the proposed model is based on a larger set of observations of the behavior of nickel in human subjects and laboratory animals and provides a more realistic description of the paths of movement of nickel in the body. For the two most important radioisotopes of nickel, 59Ni and 63Ni, the proposed model yields substantially lower dose estimates per unit of activity reaching blood than the current ICRP model.

  14. Surface Patterning of Ceramic Phosphor Plate for Light Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, An

    , a lift-off procedure developed in this work is demonstrated; involving molecular transfer lithography (MxL) process based on water-soluble nanostructured PVA templates. Nickel hard masks are fabricated using this process and a novel bi-layer resist system suitable for simple, high yield lift-off process. Using this process, TiO2 photonic crystal structures are fabricated on YAG: Ce CPP substrates. In Chapter 4, the optical performance of the fabricated samples is evaluated and discussed. The forward emission of the CPP is measured by placing the CPP on top of a simple blue LED source. The extraction efficiency of the light from the patterned CPP is increased by over 4.5 times compared to the non-patterned CPP. The photonic crystal structure also demonstrates collimation of the emitted light from the CPP in forward direction. A 32.6 % of improvement in forward conversion efficiency for a 300 nm photonic crystal (PhC) patterned TiO2-YAG:Ce CPP has been achieved relative to non-patterned YAG:Ce CPP. In conclusion, this thesis demonstrates that the use of non-scattering ceramic phosphors has advantages for fabricating efficient phosphor converted LED structures. The concept and fabrication process is also applicable to other ceramic phosphor plate designs for improved light extraction. A lift-off process using bi-layer resists and using nanopatterned PVA templates is developed to fabricate nanostructures used in this study. The process could be extended to large scale, low lost nanostructure fabrication for a very wide variety of applications due to its simplicity and scalability.

  15. Plate Thickness Variation Effects on Crack Growth Rates in 7050-T7451 Alloy Thick Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubbe, Joel J.

    2011-02-01

    A study has been accomplished to characterize the fatigue crack growth rates and mechanisms in thick plate (16.51 cm) commercial grade 7050-T7451 aluminum plate in the L-S orientation. Examination of the effects of potential property gradients in the plate material was accomplished through hardness measurements along the short transverse direction and with compact tension tests. Tests exhibited a distinct trend of reduced center plane hardness in the plates. Compact tension specimens and the compliance method were used to determine crack growth rates for specimens machined from the t/4 and t/2 planar locations and oriented for L-S crack growth. Crack growth rate data (long crack) from the tests highlighted significant growth rate differences between the t/4 and t/2 locations. No significant effect of R-ratio was observed in the 0.05-0.3 range tested. Additionally, crack front splitting was noted in all specimens to differing degrees with data showing significant retardation of growth rate curves for the L-S orientation above 13 MPa √m in the center plane, and 10 MPa √m at quarter plane, where branching and splitting parallel to the load axis are dominant growth mechanisms.

  16. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  17. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  18. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  19. 40 CFR 415.470 - Applicability; description of the nickel salts production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... nickel salts production subcategory. 415.470 Section 415.470 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Nickel Salts Production Subcategory § 415.470 Applicability; description of the nickel... nickel salts, including (a) nickel sulfate, nickel chloride, nickel nitrate, and nickel fluoborate,...

  20. Hard X-ray Optics Technology Development for Astronomy at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail; Ramsey, Brian; Kilaru, Kiranmayee

    2009-01-01

    Grazing-incidence telescopes based on Wolter 1 geometry have delivered impressive advances in astrophysics at soft-x-ray wavelengths, while the hard xray region remains relatively unexplored at fine angular resolution and high sensitivities. The ability to perform ground-breaking science in the hard-x-ray energy range had been the motivation for technology developments aimed at fabricating low-cost, light-weight, high-quality x-ray mirrors. Grazing-incidence x-ray optics for high-energy astrophysical applications is being developed at MSFC using the electroform-nickel replication process.

  1. Thermomagnetic analysis of hydrogenated nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, S. S. M.; Miraglia, S.; Lafuente, A.; Fruchart, D.

    2002-04-01

    The effect of hydrogen inserted by electrolytic charging on the magnetic properties of nickel is discussed by taking into account the thermomagnetic analysis (TMA), X-ray diffraction and saturation magnetization results. After hydrogenation, thin foils of nickel presented a biphasic structure of metastable β-NiH x ( x=0.67±0.07) and α-Ni (with <0.03 at% H). During room temperature aging the β-NiH x hydride decomposes into α-Ni and H 2. The TMA heating curves obtained just after hydrogenation show two magnetic transitions, the first one in the range 100-120°C and the second that of Curie point of Ni. Between the first and the second transition an abrupt increase of magnetization is observed, which is due to the formation of more ferromagnetic nickel from the hydride decomposition. On the other hand, the first transition of the TMA curve can only be attributed to the ferromagnetism of some regions of phase β.

  2. Trapped Field Characteristics of Stacked YBCO Thin Plates for Compact NMR Magnets: Spatial Field Distribution and Temporal Stability.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Seungyong; Kim, Seok Beom; Ahn, Min Cheol; Voccio, John; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents experimental and analytical results of trapped field characteristics of a stack of square YBCO thin film plates for compact NMR magnets. Each YBCO plate, 40 mm × 40 mm × 0.08 mm, has a 25-mm diameter hole at its center. A total of 500 stacked plates were used to build a 40-mm long magnet. Its trapped field, in a bath of liquid nitrogen, was measured for spatial field distribution and temporal stability. Comparison of measured and analytical results is presented: the effects on trapped field characteristics of the unsaturated nickel substrate and the non-uniform current distribution in the YBCO plate are discussed.

  3. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, Michael L.; Goodwin, Gene M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys.

  4. Nickel aluminide alloys with improved weldability

    DOEpatents

    Santella, M.L.; Goodwin, G.M.

    1995-05-09

    Weldable nickel aluminide alloys which are essentially free, if not entirely free, of weld hot cracking are provided by employing zirconium concentrations in these alloys of greater than 2.6 wt. % or sufficient to provide a substantial presence of Ni--Zr eutectic phase in the weld so as to prevent weld hot cracking. Weld filler metals formed from these so modified nickel aluminide alloys provide for crack-free welds in previously known nickel aluminide alloys. 5 figs.

  5. Nickel absorption and kinetics in human volunteers

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderman, F.W. Jr.; Hopfer, S.M. ); Sweeney, K.R. ); Marcus, A.H.; Creason, J. ); Most, B.M. )

    1989-05-01

    Mathematical modeling of the kinetics of nickel absorption, distribution, and elimination was performed in healthy human volunteers who ingested NiSO{sub 4} drinking water (Experiment 1) or added to food (Experiment 2). Nickel was analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry in serum, urine, and feces collected during 2 days before and 4 days after a specified NiSO{sub 4} dose (12 {mu}g of nickel/kg, n = 4; 18 {mu}g of nickel/kg, n = 4; or 50 {mu}g of nickel/kg, n = 1). Absorbed nickel averaged 27 {plus minus} 17% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the dose ingested in water vs. 0.7 {plus minus} 0.4% of the same dose ingested in food (a 40-fold difference); rate constants for nickel absorption, transfer, and elimination were not significantly influenced by the oral vehicle. The elimination half-time for absorbed nickel averaged 28 {plus minus} 9 hr. Renal clearance of nickel averaged 8.3 {plus minus} 2.0 ml/min/1.73 m{sup 2} in Experiment 1 and 5.8 {plus minus} 4.3 ml/min/1.73 m{sub 2} in Experiment 2. This study confirms that dietary constituents profoundly reduce the bioavailability of Ni{sup 2+} for alimentary absorption; approximately one-quarter of nickel ingested in drinking water after an over-night fast is absorbed from the human intestine and excreted in urine, compared with only 1% of nickel ingested in food. The compartmental model and kinetic parameters provided by this study will reduce the uncertainty of toxicologic risk assessments of human exposures to nickel in drinking water and food.

  6. Copper-Nickel Cladding on Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    steel,. Monel (65Ni/35Cu) alloy consumables should be used as they can tolerate more iron dilution from the steel than the 70-30 copper-nickel alloy ...Cooper Alloys , 400 , K-500 Stainless Steel - Tyles 302, 304, 321, 347 N ickel 200 Silver Braze Alloys Nickel-Chromium Alloy 600 Nickel-Aluminum Bronze 70...cladding of austenitic stainless steels may also offer some ballistic, non-magnetic, and electromagnetic signature advantages over current hull alloys and

  7. Recent advances in homogeneous nickel catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasker, Sarah Z.; Standley, Eric A.; Jamison, Timothy F.

    2014-05-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in nickel catalysis over the past decade. Several key properties of nickel, such as facile oxidative addition and ready access to multiple oxidation states, have allowed the development of a broad range of innovative reactions. In recent years, these properties have been increasingly understood and used to perform transformations long considered exceptionally challenging. Here we discuss some of the most recent and significant developments in homogeneous nickel catalysis, with an emphasis on both synthetic outcome and mechanism.

  8. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  9. Earthquakes and plate tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1977-01-01

    An explanation is to be found in plate tectonics, a concept which has revolutionized thinking in the Earth sciences in the last 10 years. The theory of plate tectonics combines many of the ideas about continental drift (originally proposed in 1912 by Alfred Wegener in Germany) and sea-floor spreading (suggested originally by Harry Hess of Princeton University). 

  10. Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in nickel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Donovan, J. A.; Caskey, G. R., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of hydrogen transport in pure polycrystalline nickel foils and rods at 300-550 K shows that both trapping and short-circuit diffusion are present and have small yet significant effects on permeation, evolution, and absorption. Both effects appear to be associated primarily with the dislocation substructure of nickel. Relations describing hydrogen transport in nickel are obtained using the data on deuterium permeation, tritium absorption, and outgassing in pure polycrystalline nickel together with earlier measurements of diffusivity and solubility of hydrogen isotopes.

  11. Mineral resource of the month: nickel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuck, Peter H.

    2006-01-01

    Together with chromium, nickel makes steel more resistant to corrosion. Stainless steel thus accounts for more than 65 percent of primary nickel consumption in the world. One of the more common grades of stainless steel is Type 304, which contains 18 to 20 percent chromium and 10.5 to 12 percent nickel. Owing to their high corrosion resistance, nickel-bearing stainless steels are widely used in the transportation sector, the energy sector, the food preparation and processing industry, the beverage industry, the pharmaceutical industry and the medical community.

  12. Air Force standards for nickel hydrogen battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Warren; Milden, Martin

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed are presented in viewgraph form and include Air Force nickel hydrogen standardization goals, philosophy, project outline, cell level standardization, battery level standardization, and schedule.

  13. Turbine vane plate assembly

    DOEpatents

    Schiavo Jr., Anthony L.

    2006-01-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes a turbine vane having first and second shrouds with an elongated airfoil extending between. Each end of the airfoil transitions into a shroud at a respective junction. Each of the shrouds has a plurality of cooling passages, and the airfoil has a plurality of cooling passages extending between the first and second shrouds. A substantially flat inner plate and an outer plate are coupled to each of the first and second shrouds so as to form inner and outer plenums. Each inner plenum is defined between at least the junction and the substantially flat inner plate; each outer plenum is defined between at least the substantially flat inner plate and the outer plate. Each inner plenum is in fluid communication with a respective outer plenum through at least one of the cooling passages in the respective shroud.

  14. Research, development, and demonstration of nickel-iron batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The program has progressed to the stage of evaluating full-sized (220 Ah) cells, multicell modules, and 22 kWh batteries. Nickel electrodes that display stable capacities of up to 24 Ah/plate (at C/3 drain rate) at design thickness (2.5 mm) in tests at 200/sup +/ test cycles. Iron electrodes of the composite-type are also delivering 24 Ah/plate (at C/3) at target thickness (1.0 mm). Iron plates are displaying capacity stability for 300/sup +/ test cycles in continuing 3 plate cell tests. Best finished cells are delivering 57 to 63 Wh/kg at C/3, based on cell weights of the finished cells, and in the actual designed cell volume. 6-cell module (6-1) performance has demonstrated 239 Ah, 1735 Wh, 53 WH/kg at the C/3 drain rate. This module is now being evaluated at the National Battery Test Laboratory. The 2 x 4 battery has been constructed, tested, and delivered for engineering test and evaluation. The battery delivered 22.5 kWh, as required (199 Ah discharge at 113 V-bar) at the C/3 drain rate. The battery has performed satisfactorily under dynamometer and constant current drain tests. Some cell problems, related to construction, necessitated changing 3 modules, but the battery is now ready for further testing. Reduction in nickel plate swelling (and concurrent stack electrolyte starvation), to improve cycling, is one area of major effort to reach the final battery objectives. Pasted nickel electrodes are showing promise in initial full-size cell tests and will continue to be evaluated in finished cells, along with other technology advancements. 30 figures, 14 tables.

  15. A location method for vehicle license plate based on color image and black-white texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Liu, Chang; He, Mingquan; Huang, Xiyue

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents an effective location algorithm employing color features and black-white texture analysis of the image to extract a vehicle license plate from a complicated background image. According to the background color of the license plate in RGB spaces, we transform the RGB image into a grayscale image as strengthening the color of the license plate, and partition the intensity image to obtain a binary image which can outstand the license plate part. We leach away the color which is similar to the license plate by analyzing the texture characteristic. The test shows that this location method can hardly be influenced by all of the factors including illumination, license plate position, license plate size, license plate angle, car position, image background and so on. Meanwhile, it can gain a high speed, better effects and a wide application area.

  16. Hard X-ray Microscopic Imaging Of Human Breast Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung H.; Kim, Hong T.; Kim, Jong K.; Jheon, Sang H.; Youn, Hwa S.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray microscopy with synchrotron radiation will be a useful tool for innovation of x-ray imaging in clinical and laboratory settings. It helps us observe detailed internal structure of material samples non-invasively in air. And, it also has the potential to solve some tough problems of conventional breast imaging if it could evaluate various conditions of breast tissue effectively. A new hard x-ray microscope with a spatial resolution better than 100 nm was installed at Pohang Light Source, a third generation synchrotron radiation facility in Pohang, Korea. The x-ray energy was set at 6.95 keV, and the x-ray beam was monochromatized by W/B4C monochromator. Condenser and objective zone plates were used as x-ray lenses. Zernike phase plate next to condenser zone plate was introduced for improved contrast imaging. The image of a sample was magnified 30 times by objective zone plate and 20 times by microscope objective, respectively. After additional 10 times digital magnification, the total magnifying power was up to 6000 times in the end. Phase contrast synchrotron images of 10-μm-thick female breast tissue of the normal, fibroadenoma, fibrocystic change and carcinoma cases were obtained. By phase contrast imaging, hard x-rays enable us to observe many structures of breast tissue without sample preparations such as staining or fixation.

  17. A study of nickel silicide in a conventional furnace for Ni/Cu contact monocrystalline-silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Seon Kyu; Lee, Soo Hong

    2013-01-01

    High-conductivity contacts in place of screen-printed contacts are in demand for commercial solar cells. Also, simplifying the process steps is required for commercial solar cells. In addition, very expensive metals are necessary improved efficiency without using scarce. In this research, we replaced screen-printed contacts with Ni/Cu contacts in passivated emitter solar cells. A layer of nickel was used as the seed and the adhesion layer. The main contact was formed by plating with copper. Firing conditions in a conventional furnace were varied so as to form nickel silicide. The best cell showed a solar cell efficiency of 18.76%.

  18. Validation test of advanced technology for IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells: Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts with the intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement was to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another advancement was to modify the state-of-the-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes. The modified design is referred to as the advanced design. A breakthrough in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. An advanced 125 Ah IPV nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are: extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion. The advanced cell design is in the process of being validated using real time LEO cycle life testing of NWSC, Crane, Indiana. An update of validation test results confirming this technology is presented.

  19. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  20. Pixelated neutron image plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlapp, M.; Conrad, H.; von Seggern, H.

    2004-09-01

    Neutron image plates (NIPs) have found widespread application as neutron detectors for single-crystal and powder diffraction, small-angle scattering and tomography. After neutron exposure, the image plate can be read out by scanning with a laser. Commercially available NIPs consist of a powder mixture of BaFBr : Eu2+ and Gd2O3 dispersed in a polymer matrix and supported by a flexible polymer sheet. Since BaFBr : Eu2+ is an excellent x-ray storage phosphor, these NIPs are particularly sensitive to ggr-radiation, which is always present as a background radiation in neutron experiments. In this work we present results on NIPs consisting of KCl : Eu2+ and LiF that were fabricated into ceramic image plates in which the alkali halides act as a self-supporting matrix without the necessity for using a polymeric binder. An advantage of this type of NIP is the significantly reduced ggr-sensitivity. However, the much lower neutron absorption cross section of LiF compared with Gd2O3 demands a thicker image plate for obtaining comparable neutron absorption. The greater thickness of the NIP inevitably leads to a loss in spatial resolution of the image plate. However, this reduction in resolution can be restricted by a novel image plate concept in which a ceramic structure with square cells (referred to as a 'honeycomb') is embedded in the NIP, resulting in a pixelated image plate. In such a NIP the read-out light is confined to the particular illuminated pixel, decoupling the spatial resolution from the optical properties of the image plate material and morphology. In this work, a comparison of experimentally determined and simulated spatial resolutions of pixelated and unstructured image plates for a fixed read-out laser intensity is presented, as well as simulations of the properties of these NIPs at higher laser powers.

  1. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-08-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  2. Overview - Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, James C.

    1992-03-24

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling Organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  3. Overview: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The Hard Rock Penetration program is developing technology to reduce the costs of drilling and completing geothermal wells. Current projects include: lost circulation control, rock penetration mechanics, instrumentation, and industry/DOE cost shared projects of the Geothermal Drilling organization. Last year, a number of accomplishments were achieved in each of these areas. A new flow meter being developed to accurately measure drilling fluid outflow was tested extensively during Long Valley drilling. Results show that this meter is rugged, reliable, and can provide useful measurements of small differences in fluid inflow and outflow rates. By providing early indications of fluid gain or loss, improved control of blow-out and lost circulation problems during geothermal drilling can be expected. In the area of downhole tools for lost circulation control, the concept of a downhole injector for injecting a two-component, fast-setting cementitious mud was developed. DOE filed a patent application for this concept during FY 91. The design criteria for a high-temperature potassium, uranium, thorium logging tool featuring a downhole data storage computer were established, and a request for proposals was submitted to tool development companies. The fundamental theory of acoustic telemetry in drill strings was significantly advanced through field experimentation and analysis. A new understanding of energy loss mechanisms was developed.

  4. Electroless nickel bath recycle. Project accomplishment summary for DOE Technology Transfer Initiative project 93-Y12P-086-C1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-22

    The Lockheed Martin Energy Systems plating group has decades of experience in electroless nickel plating. The group conceived of, established the validity of, and patented the ENVIRO-CP process for plating bath rejuvenation, which eliminates the generation of hazardous waste from plating processes. Fidelity Chemical Products Corporation supplies chemicals to and has knowledge of the plating industry. A second partner (CRADA identity protected) conducts production plating. The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) project was to transfer the ENVIRO-CP process to the plating industry. Energy Systems personnel were to evaluate and modify the general process so that it could be used for a specific plating process, working in concert with the partner. Technical results/accomplishments: the plating solutions and the ENVIRO-CP process were analyzed and modified for direct use in the partner`s plating facility. An engineering flowsheet and pilot plant production-scale equipment were designed. Some pilot-scale equipment was fabricated; the balance will be procured and the system tested when the partner is able to budget for purchase of the remaining equipment.

  5. Magnetic Properties of Nanocrystalline Nickel-Cobalt Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, D. K.; Villaseñor-Cendejas, L. M.; Thakur, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    In this study, the nanocrystalline nickel-cobalt ferrites were prepared via the citrate route method at . The samples were calcined at for 3 h. The crystalline structure and the single-phase formations were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Prepared materials showed the cubic spinel structure with m3m symmetry and Fd3m space group. The analyses of XRD patterns were carried out using POWD software. It gave an estimation of lattice constant “” of 8.3584 Å, which was in good agreement with the results reported in JCPDS file no. 742081. The crystal size of the prepared materials calculated by Scherer’s formula was 27.6 nm and the electrical conductivity was around . The permeability component variations with frequency were realized. The magnetic properties of the prepared materials were analyzed by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). It showed a saturation magnetization of and the behavior of a hard magnet.

  6. Magnetic properties of maraging steels in relation to nickel concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.; Nasim, I.; Ayub, H.; Hasnain, K.

    1995-07-01

    Magnetic properties of maraging steels have been investigated as a function of nickel concentration. The alloys nickel content varied from 12 to 24 wt pct, while other alloying constituents were kept at a level maintained in the 18Ni-2,400 MPA-grade maraging steel. The magnetic properties were determined following aging for 1 hour in the temperature range of 450 to 750 C. In every alloy investigated, the coercive field increased with aging temperature, reaching a maximum around 670 C {+-} 30 C. The saturation magnetization values were lowest around temperatures where maximum coercive field was observed. The coercive field increased from {approximately}55 to {approximately}175 Oe ({approximately}4,380 to {approximately} 13,900 amp/meter) and the corresponding saturation magnetization decreased from {approximately}18,500 to {approximately}4,000 G ({approximately}1.85 to {approximately}0.4 T) in the alloys containing 12 and 24 wt pct Ni, respectively. The reverted austenite increased from 25 vol pct at 12 wt pct Ni to 10 vol pct at 24 wt pct Ni. The hardness and Charpy impact strength of the alloys have also been determined. An attempt has been made to correlate magnetic properties with different phase transformations occurring in maraging steels.

  7. HighP–TNano-Mechanics of Polycrystalline Nickel

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We have conducted highP–Tsynchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments as well as indentation measurements to study equation of state, constitutive properties, and hardness of nanocrystalline and bulk nickel. Our lattice volume–pressure data present a clear evidence of elastic softening in nanocrystalline Ni as compared with the bulk nickel. We show that the enhanced overall compressibility of nanocrystalline Ni is a consequence of the higher compressibility of the surface shell of Ni nanocrystals, which supports the results of molecular dynamics simulation and a generalized model of a nanocrystal with expanded surface layer. The analytical methods we developed based on the peak-profile of diffraction data allow us to identify “micro/local” yield due to high stress concentration at the grain-to-grain contacts and “macro/bulk” yield due to deviatoric stress over the entire sample. The graphic approach of our strain/stress analyses can also reveal the corresponding yield strength, grain crushing/growth, work hardening/softening, and thermal relaxation under highP–Tconditions, as well as the intrinsic residual/surface strains in the polycrystalline bulks. From micro-indentation measurements, we found that a low-temperature annealing (T < 0.4 Tm) hardens nanocrystalline Ni, leading to an inverse Hall–Petch relationship. We explain this abnormal Hall–Petch effect in terms of impurity segregation to the grain boundaries of the nanocrystalline Ni. PMID:21794186

  8. High P-T Nano-Mechanics of Polycrystalline Nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yusheng; Shen, T. D.; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2007-10-01

    We have conducted high P-T synchrotron X-ray and time-of-flight neutron diffraction experiments as well as indentation measurements to study equation of state, constitutive properties, and hardness of nanocrystalline and bulk nickel. Our lattice volume-pressure data present a clear evidence of elastic softening in nanocrystalline Ni as compared with the bulk nickel. We show that the enhanced overall compressibility of nanocrystalline Ni is a consequence of the higher compressibility of the surface shell of Ni nanocrystals, which supports the results of molecular dynamics simulation and a generalized model of a nanocrystal with expanded surface layer. The analytical methods we developed based on the peak-profile of diffraction data allow us to identify “micro/local” yield due to high stress concentration at the grain-to-grain contacts and “macro/bulk” yield due to deviatoric stress over the entire sample. The graphic approach of our strain/stress analyses can also reveal the corresponding yield strength, grain crushing/growth, work hardening/softening, and thermal relaxation under high P-T conditions, as well as the intrinsic residual/surface strains in the polycrystalline bulks. From micro-indentation measurements, we found that a low-temperature annealing ( T < 0.4 Tm) hardens nanocrystalline Ni, leading to an inverse Hall-Petch relationship. We explain this abnormal Hall-Petch effect in terms of impurity segregation to the grain boundaries of the nanocrystalline Ni.

  9. Nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures for active hydrogen evolution electrocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ming; Zhou, Wu; Tsai, Mon-Che; Zhou, Jigang; Guan, Mingyun; Lin, Meng-Chang; Zhang, Bo; Hu, Yongfeng; Wang, Di-Yan; Yang, Jiang; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hwang, Bing-Joe; Dai, Hongjie

    2014-08-01

    Active, stable and cost-effective electrocatalysts are a key to water splitting for hydrogen production through electrolysis or photoelectrochemistry. Here we report nanoscale nickel oxide/nickel heterostructures formed on carbon nanotube sidewalls as highly effective electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction with activity similar to platinum. Partially reduced nickel interfaced with nickel oxide results from thermal decomposition of nickel hydroxide precursors bonded to carbon nanotube sidewalls. The metal ion-carbon nanotube interactions impede complete reduction and Ostwald ripening of nickel species into the less hydrogen evolution reaction active pure nickel phase. A water electrolyzer that achieves ~20 mA cm-2 at a voltage of 1.5 V, and which may be operated by a single-cell alkaline battery, is fabricated using cheap, non-precious metal-based electrocatalysts.

  10. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  11. Nickel: Impact on leaf morphology and growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional physiology of essential micronutrients in pecan, especially that of nickel, is a limiting factor in optimization of physiological efficiency of orchard enterprises. Knowledge by farmers and extension specialists about the role of nickel, a newly recognized micronutrient, is meager. ...

  12. Formation of alumina-nickel-molybdenum catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V.I.; Basov, V.G.; Vagin, A.I.; Kalechits, I.V.

    1982-06-01

    On the basis of the results obtained in physical and chemical studies of alumina-nickel-molybdenum oxide catalysts as well as binary system and the individual oxides, the conclusions show that the commercial catalyst consists mainly of nickel and aluminium molybdates, aluminium molybdates, molybdenum oxide, and the alumina support. 4 figures.

  13. Graphene-nickel interfaces: a review.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Arjun; Batzill, Matthias

    2014-03-07

    Graphene on nickel is a prototypical example of an interface between graphene and a strongly interacting metal, as well as a special case of a lattice matched system. The chemical interaction between graphene and nickel is due to hybridization of the metal d-electrons with the π-orbitals of graphene. This interaction causes a smaller separation between the nickel surface and graphene (0.21 nm) than the typical van der Waals gap-distance between graphitic layers (0.33 nm). Furthermore, the physical properties of graphene are significantly altered. Main differences are the opening of a band gap in the electronic structure and a shifting of the π-band by ∼2 eV below the Fermi-level. Experimental evidence suggests that the ferromagnetic nickel induces a magnetic moment in the carbon. Substrate induced geometric and electronic changes alter the phonon dispersion. As a consequence, monolayer graphene on nickel does not exhibit a Raman spectrum. In addition to reviewing these fundamental physical properties of graphene on Ni(111), we also discuss the formation and thermal stability of graphene and a surface-confined nickel-carbide. The fundamental growth mechanisms of graphene by chemical vapor deposition are also described. Different growth modes depending on the sample temperature have been identified in ultra high vacuum surface science studies. Finally, we give a brief summary for the synthesis of more complex graphene and graphitic structures using nickel as catalyst and point out some potential applications for graphene-nickel interfaces.

  14. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1990-07-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99% gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  15. Study made of Raney nickel technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, W. B.

    1967-01-01

    Raney nickel study indicates that its improved storage life is due to gaseous hydrogen and that the mechanism of its ignitions is catalytic and due to chemisorbed hydrogen atoms. It shows that reacted Raney nickel powder can be reactivated and can introduce multiple ignitions in a hydrogen gas stream.

  16. Gold-nickel-titanium brazing alloy

    DOEpatents

    Mizuhara, Howard

    1995-01-03

    A brazing alloy in accordance with this invention has the following composition, by weight: 91 to 99 gold, 0.5 to 7% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium. Alternatively, with palladium present, the composition is as follows, by weight: 83 to 96% gold; 3 to 10% palladium; 0.5 to 5% nickel; 0.10 to 2% titanium.

  17. Nickel hydrogen cell tests. [recharging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, V. C.

    1981-01-01

    Some parametric tests followed by cycling tests are described for the characterization of the service life of nickel hydrogen cells. Three cells were automatically cycled in simulated low Earth orbit in 35 minute discharge, 55 minute charge, with charging voltage limited, temperature compensated. The cells were mounted in a fixture that conducts heat to an aluminum baseplate. The baseplate in turn, is bounded in a temperature controlled bath to remove the heat from the mounted fixture. One cell was tested with a zircar separator, which failed after 2473 cyles. Two other cells were tested one with a zircar separator; the other with asbestos. More than 400 cycles were achieved.

  18. Nickel-hydrogen separator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1986-01-01

    The separator technology is a critical element in the nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) systems. Previous research and development work carried out at NASA Lewis Research Center has determined that separators made from zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and potassium titanate (PKT) fibers will function satisfactorily in Ni-H2 cells without exhibiting the problems associated with the asbestos separators. These separators and their characteristics were previously discussed. A program was established to transfer the separator technology into a commercial production line. A detailed plan of this program will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  19. Nickel-hydrogen separator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1986-01-01

    The separator technology is a critical element in the nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) systems. Previous research and development work carried out at NASA Lewis Research Center has determined that separators made from zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and potassium titanate (PKT) fibers will function satisfactorily in Ni-H2 cells without exhibiting the problems associated with the asbestos separators. A program has been established to transfer the separator technology into a commercial production line. A detailed plan of this program will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  20. Designer Magnetoplasmonics with Nickel Nanoferromagnets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new perspective on magnetoplasmonics in nickel nanoferromagnets by exploiting the phase tunability of the optical polarizability due to localized surface plasmons and simultaneous magneto-optical activity. We demonstrate how the concerted action of nanoplasmonics and magnetization can manipulate the sign of rotation of the reflected light’s polarization (i.e., to produce Kerr rotation reversal) in ferromagnetic nanomaterials and, further, how this effect can be dynamically controlled and employed to devise conceptually new schemes for biochemosensing. PMID:22029387

  1. Designing Assemblies Of Plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, F. W.; Kennedy, D.; Butler, R.; Aston, G.; Anderson, M. S.

    1992-01-01

    VICONOPT calculates vibrations and instabilities of assemblies of prismatic plates. Designed for efficient, accurate analysis of buckling and vibration, and for optimum design of panels of composite materials. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Plate tectonics: Metamorphic myth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Clear evidence for subduction-induced metamorphism, and thus the operation of plate tectonics on the ancient Earth has been lacking. Theoretical calculations indicate that we may have been looking for something that cannot exist.

  3. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors.

  4. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  5. Reduction of astrometric plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, J.

    1984-01-01

    A rapid and accurate method for the reduction of comet or asteroid plates is described. Projection equations, scale length correction, rotation of coordinates, linearization, the search for additional reference stars, and the final solution are examined.

  6. What's On Your Plate?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Table of Contents What's On Your Plate? Smart Food Choices for Healthy Aging www.nia.nih.gov/health/ ... calories in" and "calories out," and making good food choices as you age. Shopping Tips See how planning ...

  7. Feynman's wobbling plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleja, Slavomir; Gazovic, Boris; Tomori, Alexander; Hanc, Jozef

    2007-03-01

    In the book Surely You Are Joking, Mr. Feynman! Richard Feynman tells a story of a Cornell cafeteria plate being tossed into the air. As the plate spun, it wobbled. Feynman noticed a relation between the two motions. He solved the motion of the plate by using the Lagrangian approach. This solution didn't satisfy him. He wanted to understand the motion of the plate by analyzing the motion of its individual particles and the forces acting on them. He was successful, but he didn't tell us how he did it. We provide an elementary explanation for the two-to-one ratio of wobble to spin frequencies, based on an analysis of the motion of the particles and the forces acting on them. We also demonstrate the power of numerical simulation and computer animation to provide insight into a physical phenomenon and guidance on how to do the analysis.

  8. Flat plate solar oven

    SciTech Connect

    Parikh, M.

    1981-01-01

    The construction of an Indian Rs. 186 (US $20.33) flat-plate solar oven is described. Detailed drawings are provided and relevant information on cooking times and temperature for different foods is given.

  9. The effect of nickel addition on antimicrobial, physical, and mechanical properties of copper-nickel alloy against suspensions of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhayani, Dinni; Korda, Akhmad A.

    2015-09-01

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) infection can cause serious illness. Humans can be infected by E. coli via contact with the contaminated food and water. Copper and copper alloys were known for their antimicrobial properties and were applied in several healthcare setting as antimicrobial material. However, the people preference in the appearance of stainless steel and aluminum contribute to the low application of copper and its alloy. In this study, the mechanical, physical, and antibacterial properties of copper and copper-nickel alloy compared with stainless steel 304 were tested. The antibacterial activity of stainless steel, copper, and copper-nickel alloy was evaluated by inoculating 7.5 × 106 - 2.5 × 107 CFU/ml suspensions of E. coli. The bacterial colonies were investigated after 0-4 hour incubation at 37°C. The result showed that on the observation time, copper and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloys have antibacterial activity while the bacteria in stainless steel remain existed. The appearance (color / shade) of Cu-Ni alloys in some composition is silvery which is stainless steel-like. For the mechanical properties, copper-nickel alloys have lower hardness than stainless steel (SS 304). This research proved that copper-nickel alloys have the ability to reduce the amount of E. col colonies. The copper content may affect the antibacterial activity but not directly linked. Cu-Ni alloys also have the appearance and mechanical properties that quite similar compared to SS304. Therefore, Cu-Ni alloys have the potential to be applied as substitution or complementary material of SS304 in various applications for preventing the bacterial contamination especially E. coli.

  10. Nickel alloys in the oral environment.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Drury, Jeanie L; Chung, Whasun O

    2013-07-01

    The use of nickel casting alloys for long-term restorations in dentistry has long been controversial. A 'tug-of-war' between economic, engineering and biological considerations is central to this controversy; nickel-casting alloys have low costs and favorable physical properties, but are corrosion-prone in the oral environment. Clinicians and researchers have questioned the safety of nickel-containing dental alloys because several nickel compounds are known to cause adverse biological effects in vivo and in vitro in contexts outside of dentistry. The debate revolves around the extent to which corrosion products from oral restorations cause intraoral or systemic biological problems. Current evidence suggests that nickel alloys may be used successfully and safely in dentistry if clinical risks are taken into account. However, these alloys may cause significant clinical problems, primarily allergenic and inflammatory, if the risks are ignored.

  11. APT characterization of high nickel RPV steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; Sokolov, M. A.; Nanstad, R. K.; Russell, K. F.

    2006-06-01

    The microstructures of three high nickel content pressure vessel steels have been characterized by atom probe tomography to investigate the influence of high nickel levels on the response to neutron irradiation of high and low copper pressure vessel steels. The high-nickel, low-manganese, low-copper VVER-1000 weld and forging exhibited lower than predicted levels of embrittlement during neutron irradiation. The Palisades weld exhibits a Δ T41 J of 102 °C which was significantly lower than the value of 154 °C predicted by Reg. Guide 1.99 Rev. 2. Atom probe tomography revealed nickel-, manganese-, and silicon-enriched precipitates in both the VVER-1000 base and weld materials after neutron irradiation. A high number density of copper-, nickel-, manganese-, silicon- and phosphorus-enriched precipitates were observed in the Palisades weld after neutron irradiation. Atom probe tomography also revealed high levels of phosphorus segregation to the dislocations in all three materials.

  12. Fractal multifiber microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Lee M.; Feller, W. B.; Kenter, Almus T.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1992-01-01

    The construction and performance of microchannel plates (MCPs) made using fractal tiling mehtods are reviewed. MCPs with 40 mm active areas having near-perfect channel ordering were produced. These plates demonstrated electrical performance characteristics equivalent to conventionally constructed MCPs. These apparently are the first MCPs which have a sufficiently high degree of order to permit single channel addressability. Potential applications for these devices and the prospects for further development are discussed.

  13. Positive battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

  14. Cirrus Dopant Nano-Composite Coatings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    Nickel Phosphorus versus cirrus Zr nano-composite Nickel Phosphorus on Magnesium cirrus wear resistance 590 1025 1,045 0 200 400 600 800...micron duplex Nickel versus cirrus Ti nano- composite Nickel on Mild Steel cirrus corrosion resistance Duplex Ni Cirrus Ti doped Ni 340 430 503 0...100 200 300 400 500 600 HARDNESS (HV) MICROHARDNESS - ELECTROPLATED NICKEL STANDARD DC PLATED DOPED DC PLATED DOPED PULSE PLATED ↑48% 10

  15. Hard error generation by neutron-induced fission fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, J.S.; Gover, J.E.; Wrobel, T.F.; Hass, K.J.; Nasby, R.D.; Simpson, R.L.; Posey, L.D.; Boos, R.E.; Block, R.C.

    1987-12-01

    The authors observed that neutron-induced fission of uranium contaminants present in alumina ceramic package lids results in the release of fission fragments that can cause hard errors in metal-nitride-oxide nonvolatile RAMs (MNOS NVRAMs). Hard error generation requires the simultaneous presence of (1) a fission fragment with a linear energy transfer (LET) greater than 20 MeV/mg/cm/sup **2/ moving at an angle of 30 degrees or less from the electric field in the high-field, gate region of the memory transistor, and (2) a WRITE or ERASE voltage on the oxide-nitride transistor gate. In reactor experiments, they observe these hard errors when a ceramic lid is used on both MNOS NVRAMs and polysilicon-nitride-oxide (SNOS) capacitors, but hard errors are not observed when a gold-plated kovar lid is used on the package containing these die. They mapped the tracks of the fission fragments released from the ceramic lids with a mica track detector and used a Monte Carlo model of fission fragment transport through the ceramic lid to measure the concentration of uranium present in the lids. The authors' concentration measurements are in excellent agreement with other's measurement of uranium concentration in ceramic lids. The authors' Monte Carlo analyses also agree closely with their measurements of hard error probability in MNOS NVRAMs.

  16. Modeling of Bullet Penetration in Explosively Welded Composite Armor Plate

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vasant S.; Carney, Theodore C.

    2006-07-28

    Normal impact of high-speed armor piercing bullet on titanium-steel composite has been investigated using smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code. The objective is to understand the effects of impact during the ballistic testing of explosively welded armor plates. These plates have significant microstructural differences within the weld region, heat-affected zone and the base metal. The variances result in substantial ductility, hardness and strength differences, important criteria in determining the failure mode, specifically whether it occurs at the joint or within the virgin base metal. Several configurations of composite plates with different material combinations were modeled. The results were used to modify the heat treatment process of explosively welded plates, making them more likely to survive impact.

  17. Chromium plating pollution source reduction by plasma source ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, A.; Sridharan, K.; Dodd, R.A.; Conrad, J.R.; Qiu, X.; Hamdi, A.H.; Elmoursi, A.A.; Malaczynski, G.W.; Horne, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    There is growing concern over the environmental toxicity and workers` health issues due to the chemical baths and rinse water used in the hard chromium plating process. In this regard the significant hardening response of chromium to nitrogen ion implantation can be environmentally beneficial from the standpoint of decreasing the thickness and the frequency of application of chromium plating. In this paper the results of a study of nitrogen ion implantation of chrome plated test flats using the non-line-of-sight Plasma Source Ion Implantation (PSII) process, are discussed. Surface characterization was performed using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), and Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis (ESCA). The surface properties were evaluated using a microhardness tester, a pin-on-disk wear tester, and a corrosion measurement system. Industrial field testing of nitrogen PSII treated chromium plated parts showed an improvement by a factor of two compared to the unimplanted case.

  18. Nickel hydrogen battery expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiva, Sajjan G.

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Telescope Battery Testbed at MSFC uses the Nickel Cadmium (NiCd) Battery Expert System (NICBES-2) which supports the evaluation of performance of Hubble Telescope spacecraft batteries and provides alarm diagnosis and action advice. NICBES-2 provides a reasoning system along with a battery domain knowledge base to achieve this battery health management function. An effort is summarized which was used to modify NICBES-2 to accommodate Nickel Hydrogen (NiH2) battery environment now in MSFC testbed. The NICBES-2 is implemented on a Sun Microsystem and is written in SunOS C and Quintus Prolog. The system now operates in a multitasking environment. NICBES-2 spawns three processes: serial port process (SPP); data handler process (DHP); and the expert system process (ESP) in order to process the telemetry data and provide the status and action advice. NICBES-2 performs orbit data gathering, data evaluation, alarm diagnosis and action advice and status and history display functions. The adaptation of NICBES-2 to work with NiH2 battery environment required modification to all of the three component processes.

  19. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  20. Thin coatings and films hardness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matyunin, V. M.; Marchenkov, A. Yu; Demidov, A. N.; Karimbekov, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    The existing thin coatings and films hardness evaluation methods based on indentation with pyramidal indenter on various scale levels are expounded. The impact of scale factor on hardness values is performed. The experimental verification of several existing hardness evaluation methods regarding the substrate hardness value and the “coating - substrate” composite hardness value is made.