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Sample records for platelet activating factor

  1. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) by platelet factor 4.

    PubMed

    Dumenco, L L; Everson, B; Culp, L A; Ratnoff, O D

    1988-09-01

    Platelet factor 4 is a polypeptide constituent of platelet alpha granules that is released during platelet aggregation and inhibits heparin-mediated reactions. Hageman factor (factor XII) is a plasma proenzyme that, when activated by certain negatively charged agents, initiates clotting via the intrinsic pathway of thrombin formation. In earlier studies using crude systems, platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by dextran sulfate or cerebrosides, but not activation of Hageman factor by kaolin or ellagic acid. In the present study we examined the mechanisms of inhibition by platelet factor 4, using purified reagents. Platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by ellagic acid, as measured by amidolysis of a synthetic substrate of activated Hageman factor, an effect inhibited by heparin or by an anti-platelet factor 4 antiserum. Coating glass tubes with platelet factor 4 before addition of normal plasma significantly lengthened the partial thromboplastin time of normal plasma. In addition, the clot-promoting properties of kaolin were inhibited by its prior exposure to platelet factor 4. Thus, the inhibitory properties of platelet factor 4 directed against the activation of Hageman factor were confirmed in a purified system. In this purified system, in contrast to earlier studies using crude systems, platelet factor 4 inhibited activation of Hageman factor by glass, ellagic acid, or kaolin.

  2. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  3. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  4. Inhibitory effect of trichothecene mycotoxins on bovine platelets stimulated by platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, P A; Ross, M L; Bondy, G S

    1987-01-01

    Several species of fungi, which infect cereals and grains, can produce a class of compounds, known as trichothecene mycotoxins, which is characterized by a substituted epoxy-trichothecene ring structure. Cattle are susceptible to intoxication from feeds contaminated with T-2 toxin, one of the more potent trichothecene mycotoxins, while swine refuse to ingest feed contaminated with T-2 toxin. The bovine platelet has been used as a model cell system to evaluate the effects of T-2 toxin and its natural metabolites, HT-2 toxin and T-2 tetraol, on cell function in vitro. Due to the lipophilic nature of these mycotoxins, a biologically active phospholipid was used to stimulate the platelets in the presence and absence of the toxins. The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its major metabolite HT-2 toxin inhibited platelet activating factor-stimulated bovine platelets, suspended in homologous plasma, in a concentration but not time dependent manner. Significant inhibition of platelet function (p less than 0.01) occurred with 135 ng T-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets and with 77 ng HT-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets. These mycotoxins exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the platelet aggregation response. In contrast, the minor metabolite T-2 tetraol had no inhibitory effect on platelet function and had no influence on the responses of T-2 toxin or HT-2 toxin when the mycotoxins were present together in the platelet suspensions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3453270

  5. Platelets in the immune response: Revisiting platelet-activating factor in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Parwinder; Jindal, Nina Lakhani; Jagdis, Amanda; Vadas, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening multisystem allergic reaction resulting from the sudden systemic release of biochemical mediators and chemotactic substances. Release of both preformed granule-associated mediators and newly generated lipid-derived mediators contributes to the amplification and prolongation of anaphylaxis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid-derived mediator the central role of which has been well established in experimental models of both immune-mediated and non-immune mediated anaphylaxis. It is produced and secreted by several types of cells, including mast cells, monocytes, tissue macrophages, platelets, eosinophils, endothelial cells, and neutrophils. PAF is implicated in platelet aggregation and activation through release of vasoactive amines in the inflammatory response, resulting in increased vascular permeability, circulatory collapse, decreased cardiac output, and various other biological effects. PAF is rapidly hydrolyzed and degraded to an inactive metabolite, lysoPAF, by the enzyme PAF acetylhydrolase, the activity of which has shown to correlate inversely with PAF levels and predispose to severe anaphylaxis. In addition to its role in anaphylaxis, PAF has also been implicated as a mediator in both allergic and nonallergic inflammatory diseases, including allergic rhinitis, sepsis, atherosclerotic disease, and malignancy, in which PAF signaling has an established role. The therapeutic role of PAF antagonism has been investigated for several diseases, with variable results thus far. Further investigation of its role in pathology and therapeutic modulation is highly anticipated because of the pressing need for more selective and targeted therapy for the management of severe anaphylaxis.

  6. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  7. pA2 values for antagonists of platelet activating factor on aggregation of rabbit platelets.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, S. R.; Barnett, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. The relative potencies, and equilibrium dissociation constants, for nine antagonists of platelet activating factor (Paf) have been determined on rabbit platelets (in diluted platelet-rich plasma (PRP)) in experiments in which the aggregatory response to Paf was measured. 2. Log concentration-response (% maximum) curves to Paf were obtained in the absence (controls) and presence of different concentrations of each Paf antagonist drug. The antagonists shifted the Paf curves to a higher concentration range and the slopes of the Schild plots, constructed from these data, suggested that the drugs were competitive antagonists of Paf. The slopes of the Schild plots for CV-3988 and SRI 63-119 were greater than 1. 3. The pA2 values (pKB values in parentheses) were: WEB 2086 7.31 (7.63); SRI 63-119 6.95; L-652,731 6.71 (6.73); BN 52021 6.38 (6.47); SRI 63-072 6.36 (6.43); CV-3988 5.87; 48740 RP 4.97 (5.07); ketotifen 4.94 (4.95); thiazinamium 4.73 (4.76). 4. This study provides, for the first time, some functional response data for Paf antagonists (pKB values) which are in an appropriate form for use in classifying putative Paf receptors. The study also provides the comparative potencies of these Paf antagonists in inhibiting Paf-induced platelet aggregation. WEB 2086 was the most potent of the drugs examined. PMID:3293683

  8. Coagulation factor XI promotes distal platelet activation and single platelet consumption in the bloodstream under shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Itakura, Asako; Wiesenekker, Chantal P.; Vetter, Ralf; Maas, Coen; Gailani, David; Tucker, Erik I.; Gruber, András; Gerdes, Christoph; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Coagulation factor XI (FXI) has been shown to contribute to thrombus formation on collagen or tissue factor (TF)-coated surfaces in vitro and in vivo by enhancing thrombin generation. Whether the role of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation is restricted to the local site of thrombus formation is unknown. This study was aimed to determine whether FXI could promote both proximal and distal platelet activation and aggregate formation in the bloodstream. Approach and Results Pharmacological blockade of FXI activation or thrombin activity in blood did not affect local platelet adhesion, yet reduced local platelet aggregation, thrombin localization and fibrin formation on immobilized collagen and TF under shear flow, ex vivo. Downstream of the thrombus formed on immobilized collagen or collagen and 10 pM TF, platelet CD62P expression and microaggregate formation and progressive platelet consumption were significantly reduced in the presence of FXI-function blocking antibodies or a thrombin inhibitor in a shear rate- and time-dependent manner. In a non-human primate model of thrombus formation, we found that inhibition of FXI reduced single platelet consumption in the bloodstream distal to a site of thrombus formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the FXI-thrombin axis contributes to distal platelet activation and procoagulant microaggregate formation in the blood flow downstream of the site of thrombus formation. Our data highlights FXI as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting distal thrombus formation without affecting proximal platelet adhesion. PMID:26769048

  9. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  10. Polyphosphate colocalizes with factor XII on platelet-bound fibrin and augments its plasminogen activator activity

    PubMed Central

    Lionikiene, Ausra S.; Georgiev, Georgi; Klemmer, Anja; Brain, Chelsea; Kim, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) has plasminogen activator capacity but its relative contribution to fibrinolysis is considered marginal compared with urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. Polyphosphate (polyP) is released from activated platelets and mediates FXII activation. Here, we investigate the contribution of polyP to the plasminogen activator function of αFXIIa. We show that both polyP70, of the chain length found in platelets (60-100 mer), and platelet-derived polyP significantly augment the plasminogen activation capacity of αFXIIa. PolyP70 stimulated the autoactivation of FXII and subsequent plasminogen activation, indicating that once activated, αFXIIa remains bound to polyP70. Indeed, complex formation between polyP70 and αFXIIa provides protection against autodegradation. Plasminogen activation by βFXIIa was minimal and not enhanced by polyP70, highlighting the importance of the anion binding site. PolyP70 did not modulate plasmin activity but stimulated activation of Glu and Lys forms of plasminogen by αFXIIa. Accordingly, polyP70 was found to bind to FXII, αFXIIa, and plasminogen, but not βFXIIa. Fibrin and polyP70 acted synergistically to enhance αFXIIa-mediated plasminogen activation. The plasminogen activator activity of the αFXIIa-polyP70 complex was modulated by C1 inhibitor and histidine-rich glycoprotein, but not plasminogen activator inhibitors 1 and 2. Platelet polyP and FXII were found to colocalize on the activated platelet membrane in a fibrin-dependent manner and decorated fibrin strands extending from platelet aggregates. We show that in the presence of platelet polyP and the downstream substrate fibrin, αFXIIa is a highly efficient and favorable plasminogen activator. Our data are the first to document a profibrinolytic function of platelet polyP. PMID:27694320

  11. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  12. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  13. Platelet-activating factor-induced increases in glucose kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Hargrove, D.M.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a postulated mediator of many of the early hemodynamic effects of endotoxin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether in vivo administration of PAF could produce alterations in whole-body glucose metabolism that would mimic those seen during endotoxemia. Glucose kinetics were assessed in chronically catheterized conscious rats by the constant infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose before and for 4 h after either a bolus injection or a constant infusion of PAF. The bolus injection of PAF elevated the rate of glucose appearance (R{sub a}; 44%) for 1.5 h. The lower PAF infusion rate decreased blood pressure 11% to 104 mmHg, whereas the higher infusion rate decreased pressure 34% to 77 mmHg. Both PAF infusion rates produced elevations in plasma glucose and glucose R{sub a} throughout the 4-h infusion period in a dose-related manner. The PAF infusions also induced dose-related increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamine levels throughout the infusion period. Because the constant infusion of PAF did stimulate many of the hemodynamic and metabolic alterations produced by endotoxin, this study provides additional support for the potential importance of PAF as a mediator of the early hemodynamic and metabolic sequela of endotoxin shock. Furthermore, the PAF-induced changes in glucose metabolism appear to be mediated by the resultant elevation in plasma catecholamines.

  14. Gastric secretion of platelet activating factor and precursors in healthy humans: effect of pentagastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, I; Denizot, Y; Hochlaf, S; Rigaud, D; Vatier, J; Benveniste, J; Lewin, M J; Mignon, M

    1993-01-01

    The release of platelet activating factor (PAF-ACETHER or PAF) and its precursors in the gastric lumen was assessed in 13 normal subjects in basal condition and after stimulation by gastrin. Acid, pepsin, and sialic acid outputs were determined under the same conditions. Gastric juice was collected using a nasogastric tube after overnight fast in basal condition for 60 minutes, then under pentagastrin infusion (6 micrograms/kg/hr for 60 minutes). Platelet activating factor was detected at low concentration in 4/13 subjects under basal condition (mean (SEM) 1.2 (0.6) pg/hr) while high concentrations of lyso platelet activating factor (6.1 (1.8) microgram/hr) and of alkyl-acyl-glycerophosphocholine (AAGPC) (11.5 (3) micrograms/hr) were found in 13 and 11 subjects, respectively. Platelet activating factor was not detected during pentagastrin infusion, while lyso platelet activating factor and alkyl-acyl-glycerophosphocholine were detected in 13 and in 12 subjects, respectively. Compared with the basal condition these platelet activating factor precursors increased significantly (p < 0.001) going up to fivefold baseline (31.8 (6.8) micrograms/hr and 53 (9.3) micrograms/hr respectively) in response to pentagastrin. There was a positive correlation between platelet activating factor precursors and acid or pepsin output but not between platelet activating factor precursors and sialic acid. As sialic acid may be considered an index of mucus glycoprotein degradation, it seems that gastrin stimulation of gastric epithelial cells results in a concomittant secretion of platelet activating factor precursors, acid, and pepsin irrespective of mucus glycoprotein degradation. PMID:8174952

  15. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  16. Identification of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in human skin.

    PubMed

    Marques, Mariangela; Pei, Yong; Southall, Michael D; Johnston, John M; Arai, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Takao; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2002-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases are a family of specialized phospholipase A2 enzymes. They serve an anti-inflammatory function by converting the proinflammatory autocoid, PAF, into biologically inactive lyso-PAF, by the removal of the sn-2 acetyl group of this glycerophospholipid. Similarly, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases can also degrade oxidatively modified sn-2 polyunsaturated-fatty-acid-containing phospholipids, which are toxic to cells. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is a recently cloned member of this family of specialized phospholipases. Consistent with a potential role of this intracellular enzyme in protecting membrane phospholipids against oxidative stress, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II has been shown to translocate from cytosol to membranes in response to pro-oxidative stressors, and overexpression of this enzyme decreases the cytotoxic effects of these agents. The objective of this study was to assess whether platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is involved in protecting skin against oxidative stress. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protein was demonstrated in human skin by immunohistochemistry, with the highest levels of the enzyme found in sebaceous glands and lesser amounts in epidermal keratinocytes. Treatment of epidermal cells with t-butylhydroperoxide or ultraviolet B radiation resulted in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II translocation from cytosol to membranes. To assess the role of this enzyme in epidermal function, a recombinant retroviral strategy was used to overexpress platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT. Overexpression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protected HaCaT cells against apop tosis induced by oxidative stressors t-butylhydroperoxide and ultraviolet B radiation. Similar levels of apoptosis, however, were seen in both control and platelet-activating-factor

  17. Essential role of platelet activation via protease activated receptor 4 in tissue factor-initiated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Nathalie; Chobaz-Péclat, Veronique; Hamilton, Justin; Spee, Pieter; Wagtmann, Nicolai; So, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tissue factor (TF) activation of the coagulation proteases enhances inflammation in animal models of arthritis and endotoxemia, but the mechanism of this effect is not yet fully understood – in particular, whether this is primarily due to fibrin formation or through activation of protease activated receptors (PARs). Methods We induced extravascular inflammation by injection of recombinant soluble murine TF (sTF1–219) in the hind paw. The effects of thrombin inhibition, fibrinogen and platelet depletion were evaluated, as well as the effects of PAR deficiency using knockout mice deficient for each of the PARs. Results Injection of soluble TF provoked a rapid onset of paw swelling. Inflammation was confirmed histologically and by increased serum IL-6 levels. Inflammation was significantly reduced by depletion of fibrinogen (P < 0.05) or platelets (P = 0.015), and by treatment with hirudin (P = 0.04) or an inhibitor of activated factor VII (P < 0.001) compared with controls. PAR-4-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced paw swelling (P = 0.003). In contrast, a deficiency in either PAR-1, PAR-2 or PAR-3 did not affect the inflammatory response to soluble TF injection. Conclusion Our results show that soluble TF induces acute inflammation through a thrombin-dependent pathway and both fibrin deposition and platelet activation are essential steps in this process. The activation of PAR-4 on platelets is crucial and the other PARs do not play a major role in soluble TF-induced inflammation. PMID:18412955

  18. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-01-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas. PMID:1385272

  19. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-09-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas.

  20. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  1. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  2. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) is a novel receptor on platelets, activates platelets, and augments nuclear factor kappaB-dependent inflammation in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Roland; Bültmann, Andreas; Fischel, Sina; Gillitzer, Angelika; Cullen, Paul; Walch, Axel; Jost, Philipp; Ungerer, Martin; Tolley, Neal D; Lindemann, Stephan; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schömig, Albert; May, Andreas E

    2008-02-15

    In atherosclerosis, circulating platelets interact with endothelial cells and monocytes, leading to cell activation and enhanced recruitment of leukocytes into the vascular wall. The invasion of monocytes is accompanied by overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are thought to promote atherosclerosis and trigger plaque rupture. Following interaction with itself, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) induces MMP synthesis via a little-known intracellular pathway. Recently, we showed upregulation of EMMPRIN on monocytes during acute myocardial infarction. EMMPRIN also stimulates secretion of MMP-9 by monocytes and of MMP-2 by smooth muscle cells, indicating that it may be an important regulator of MMP activity. Expression of EMMPRIN on platelets has not been described until now. Here, we demonstrate that resting platelets show low surface expression of EMMPRIN, which is upregulated by various platelet stimulators (flow cytometry). EMMPRIN is located in the open canalicular system and in alpha granules of platelets (according to electron microscopy and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation). Platelet stimulation with recombinant EMMPRIN-Fc induced surface expression of CD40L and P-selectin (according to flow cytometry), suggesting that EMMPRIN-EMMPRIN interaction activates platelets. Coincubation of platelets with monocytes induced EMMPRIN-mediated nuclear factor kappaB activation (according to Western blot) in monocytes with increased MMP-9 (zymography), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion (according to ELISA) by monocytes. In conclusion, EMMPRIN displays a new platelet receptor that is upregulated on activated platelets. Binding of EMMPRIN to platelets fosters platelet degranulation. Platelet-monocyte interactions via EMMPRIN stimulate nuclear factor kappaB-driven inflammatory pathways in monocytes, such as MMP and cytokine induction. Thus, EMMPRIN may represent a novel target to diminish the burden of

  3. The Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Chronic Inflammation, Immune Activation, and Comorbidities Associated with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Papakonstantinou, Vasiliki; Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Chini, Maria; Lazanas, Marios C.; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of highly effective antiretroviral therapy, cardiovascular disease has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among people with treated HIV-1, but the pathogenesis is unclear. Platelet-activating factor is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that has immunomodulatory effects and a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular disease. Limited scientific evidence suggests that the platelet-activating factor pathway may be a mechanistic link between HIV-1 infection, systemic inflammation, and immune activation that contribute to pathogenesis of chronic HIV-related comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we examine the mechanisms by which the cross-talk between HIV-1, immune dysregulation, inflammation, and perturbations in the platelet-activating factor pathway may directly affect HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. Understanding the role of platelet-activating factor in HIV-1 infection may pave the way for further studies to explore therapeutic interventions, such as diet, that can modify platelet-activating factor activity and use of platelet-activating factor inhibitors that might improve the prognosis of HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:26616844

  4. Protein disulfide isomerase inhibition blocks thrombin generation in humans by interfering with platelet factor V activation

    PubMed Central

    Stopa, Jack D.; Neuberg, Donna; Puligandla, Maneka; Furie, Bruce; Zwicker, Jeffrey I.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is required for thrombus formation. We previously demonstrated that glycosylated quercetin flavonoids such as isoquercetin inhibit PDI activity and thrombus formation in animal models, but whether extracellular PDI represents a viable anticoagulant target in humans and how its inhibition affects blood coagulation remain unknown. METHODS: We evaluated effects of oral administration of isoquercetin on platelet-dependent thrombin generation in healthy subjects and patients with persistently elevated anti-phospholipid antibodies. RESULTS: Following oral administration of 1,000 mg isoquercetin to healthy adults, the measured peak plasma quercetin concentration (9.2 μM) exceeded its IC50 for inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin in vitro (2.5 ± 0.4 μM). Platelet-dependent thrombin generation decreased by 51% in the healthy volunteers compared with baseline (P = 0.0004) and by 64% in the anti-phospholipid antibody cohort (P = 0.015) following isoquercetin ingestion. To understand how PDI affects thrombin generation, we evaluated substrates of PDI identified using an unbiased mechanistic-based substrate trapping approach. These studies identified platelet factor V as a PDI substrate. Isoquercetin blocked both platelet factor Va and thrombin generation with an IC50 of ~5 μM. Inhibition of PDI by isoquercetin ingestion resulted in a 53% decrease in the generation of platelet factor Va (P = 0.001). Isoquercetin-mediated inhibition was reversed with addition of exogenous factor Va. CONCLUSION: These studies show that oral administration of isoquercetin inhibits PDI activity in plasma and diminishes platelet-dependent thrombin generation predominantly by blocking the generation of platelet factor Va. These pharmacodynamic and mechanistic observations represent an important step in the development of a novel class of antithrombotic agents targeting PDI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01722669) FUNDING: National Heart

  5. Platelet-aggregating activity of released factor(s) from Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Nwagwu, M; Inyang, A L; Molokwu, R I; Essien, E M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of factors derived from Trypanosoma brucei brucei on rat platelets was studied. T. brucei at a concentration of 4 X 10(9) trypanosomes/ml phosphate saline glucose (PSG) was stored at -20 degrees C for 18 h, thawed, and a supernatant fraction, trypanosome-derived supernatant (TDS) was obtained by spinning the sample at 3000 g for 10 min at 20 degrees C. Normal rat platelets, prepared as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), were then incubated with TDS in the absence or presence of ADP (0.05-0.1 microM). The results showed that approximately 83% platelet aggregation was induced by addition of TDS (50 microliters; 113 micrograms protein) to 100 microliters PRP with a platelet count of 10(6). simultaneous addition of ADP and TDS to PRP produced a synergistic effect. It was also shown that a supernatant fraction, obtained by incubating live T. brucei (4 X 10(9)/microliters PSG) at 0 degrees C 1 h and spinning down the trypanosomes (3000 g for 10 min), also induced platelet aggregation. The nature of the factor(s) derived from, or released by, T. brucei inducing platelet aggregation is being investigated but it has been shown not to be ADP.

  6. Thrombin generation by activated factor VII on platelet activated by different agonists. Extending the cell-based model of hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul; Scazziota, Alejandra Silvia; Herrera, Maria de Lourdes; Gonzalez, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is crucial in normal hemostasis. Using a clotting system free of external tissue factor, we investigated whether activated Factor VII in combination with platelet agonists increased thrombin generation (TG) in vitro. Methods and results TG was quantified by time parameters: lag time (LT) and time to peak (TTP), and by amount of TG: peak of TG (PTG) and area under thrombin formation curve after 35 minutes (AUC→35min) in plasma from 29 healthy volunteers using the calibrated automated thrombography (CAT) technique. TG parameters were measured at basal conditions and after platelet stimulation by sodium arachidonate (AA), ADP, and collagen (Col). In addition, the effects of recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa) alone or combined with the other platelet agonists on TG parameters were investigated. We found that LT and TTP were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) and PTG and AUC→35min were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in platelet rich plasma activated with AA, ADP, Col, and rFVIIa compared to non-activated platelet rich plasma from normal subjects (p = 0.01). Furthermore platelet rich plasma activated by the combined effects of rFVIIa plus AA, ADP or Col had significantly reduced LT and TTP and increased AUC→35min (but not PTG) when compared to platelet rich plasma activated with agonists in the absence of rFVIIa. Conclusion Platelets activated by AA, ADP, Col or rFVIIa triggered TG. This effect was increased by combining rFVIIa with other agonists. Our intrinsic coagulation system produced a burst in TG independent of external tissue factor activity an apparent hemostatic effect with little thrombotic capacity. Thus we suggest a modification in the cell-based model of hemostasis. PMID:16630353

  7. Differential procoagulant activity of microparticles derived from monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells: impact of active tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Shustova, Olga N; Antonova, Olga A; Golubeva, Nina V; Khaspekova, Svetlana G; Yakushkin, Vladimir V; Aksuk, Svetlana A; Alchinova, Irina B; Karganov, Mikhail Y; Mazurov, Alexey V

    2016-12-06

    Microparticles released by activated/apoptotic cells exhibit coagulation activity as they express phosphatidylserine and some of them - tissue factor. We compared procoagulant properties of microparticles from monocytes, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells and assessed the impact of tissue factor in observed differences. Microparticles were sedimented (20 000g, 30 min) from the supernatants of activated monocytes, monocytic THP-1 cells, granulocytes, platelets and endothelial cells. Coagulation activity of microparticles was examined using plasma recalcification assay. The size of microparticles was evaluated by dynamic light scattering. Tissue factor activity was measured by its ability to activate factor X. All microparticles significantly accelerated plasma coagulation with the shortest lag times for microparticles derived from monocytes, intermediate - for microparticles from THP-1 cells and endothelial cells, and the longest - for microparticles from granulocytes and platelets. Average diameters of microparticles ranged within 400-600 nm. The largest microparticles were produced by endothelial cells and granulocytes, smaller - by monocytes, and the smallest - by THP-1 cells and platelets. The highest tissue factor activity was detected in microparticles from monocytes, lower activity - in microparticles from endothelial cells and THP-1 cells, and no activity - in microparticles from platelets and granulocytes. Anti-tissue factor antibodies extended coagulation lag times for microparticles from monocytes, endothelial cells and THP-1 cells and equalized them with those for microparticles from platelets and granulocytes. Higher coagulation activity of microparticles from monocytes, THP-1 cells and endothelial cells in comparison with microparticles from platelets and granulocytes is determined mainly by the presence of active tissue factor.

  8. Deficiency of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase is a severity factor for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, Diana M.; Numao, Toshio; Tsodikov, Alexander; Vaitkus, Darius; Fukuda, Takeshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fueki, Naoto; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Makino, Sohei; Prescott, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Asthma, a family of airway disorders characterized by airway inflammation, has an increasing incidence worldwide. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) may play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Its proinflammatory actions are antagonized by PAF acetylhydrolase. A missense mutation (V279F) in the PAF acetylhydrolase gene results in the complete loss of activity, which occurs in 4% of the Japanese population. We asked if PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency correlates with the incidence and severity of asthma in Japan. We found that the prevalence of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency is higher in Japanese asthmatics than healthy subjects and that the severity of this syndrome is highest in homozygous-deficient subjects. We conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase gene is a modulating locus for the severity of asthma. PMID:10194471

  9. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.H.; Abraham, W.M.; Groscurth, P.; Qiao, B.Y.; Perruchoud, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  10. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Block, L H; Abraham, W M; Groscurth, P; Qiao, B Y; Perruchoud, A P

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  11. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  12. Shape changes induced by biologically active peptides and nerve growth factor in blood platelets of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Gudat, F; Laubscher, A; Otten, U; Pletscher, A

    1981-11-01

    1 Nerve growth factor (NGF), substance P (SP) and thymopoietin all caused shape change reactions of rapid onset in rabbit platelets. NGF had the highest maximal effect, and SP the lowest EC50 (concentration causing half maximal shape change). The action of SP was reversible within 5 min, whereas that of NGF lasted for at least 1 h. A series of other peptides were inactive. 2 After preincubation of platelets with SP, a second application of SP no longer caused a shape change reaction, whereas the effect of NGF was not influenced. 3 An oxidized NGF-derivative without biological activity did not cause a shape change reaction, neither did epidermal growth factor. 4 Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) and pretreatment of the platelets with 3% butanol, which counteract the shape changes caused by 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and adenosine 3',5'-diphosphate, also antagonized those induced by NGF and SP. Neither heparin nor methysergide, an antagonist of 5-HT-receptors, influenced the shape change induced by NGF or SP. The action of NGF was also antagonized by a specific antibody to NGF. 5 Thymopoietin, like the basic polypeptide polyornithine (mol. wt. 40,000) was not antagonized by PGE1 and butanol. Heparin, which counteracted the effect of polyornithine, did not influence that of thymopoietin. 6 In conclusion, different modes of action are involved in the shape change of blood platelets induced by polypeptides and proteins. SP and NGF may act by stimulating specific membrane receptors.

  13. Platelet-Derived Short-Chain Polyphosphates Enhance the Inactivation of Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor by Activated Coagulation Factor XI

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Cristina; Tucker, Erik I.; Ivanov, Ivan S.; Gailani, David; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Factor (F) XI supports both normal human hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Activated FXI (FXIa) promotes thrombin generation by enzymatic activation of FXI, FIX, FX, and FV, and inactivation of alpha tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPIα), in vitro. Some of these reactions are now known to be enhanced by short-chain polyphosphates (SCP) derived from activated platelets. These SCPs act as a cofactor for the activation of FXI and FV by thrombin and FXIa, respectively. Since SCPs have been shown to inhibit the anticoagulant function of TFPIα, we herein investigated whether SCPs could serve as cofactors for the proteolytic inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa, further promoting the efficiency of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation to generate thrombin. Methods and Results Purified soluble SCP was prepared by size-fractionation of sodium polyphosphate. TFPIα proteolysis was analyzed by western blot. TFPIα activity was measured as inhibition of FX activation and activity in coagulation and chromogenic assays. SCPs significantly accelerated the rate of inactivation of TFPIα by FXIa in both purified systems and in recalcified plasma. Moreover, platelet-derived SCP accelerated the rate of inactivation of platelet-derived TFPIα by FXIa. TFPIα activity was not affected by SCP in recalcified FXI-depleted plasma. Conclusions Our data suggest that SCP is a cofactor for TFPIα inactivation by FXIa, thus, expanding the range of hemostatic FXIa substrates that may be affected by the cofactor functions of platelet-derived SCP. PMID:27764259

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  15. Salivary Platelet Activating Factor Levels in Periodontal Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    multifarious and is activated through multiple mediators. The inflammatory process can be subdivided into acute and chronic inflammation. Stedman’s Medical...Just recently, inflammed human gingival tissues were analyzed and found to contain PAF (Noguchi, et al, 1989). Thus, multiple components of the...17.9% release of peroxidase, 20.6% release of P-glucuronidase, 22.4% release of alkaline phosphatase and 28.8% release of aryl sulfatase . At higher

  16. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  17. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  18. Vitamin C blocks inflammatory platelet-activating factor mimetics created by cigarette smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, H A; Weyrich, A S; Saetzler, R K; Jurek, A; Arfors, K E; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1997-01-01

    Cigarette smoking within minutes induces leukocyte adhesion to the vascular wall and formation of intravascular leukocyte-platelet aggregates. We find this is inhibited by platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists, and correlates with the accumulation of PAF-like mediators in the blood of cigarette smoke-exposed hamsters. These mediators were PAF-like lipids, formed by nonenzymatic oxidative modification of existing phospholipids, that were distinct from biosynthetic PAF. These PAF-like lipids induced isolated human monocytes and platelets to aggregate, which greatly increased their secretion of IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. Both events were blocked by a PAF receptor antagonist. Similarly, blocking the PAF receptor in vivo blocked smoke-induced leukocyte aggregation and pavementing along the vascular wall. Dietary supplementation with the antioxidant vitamin C prevented the accumulation of PAF-like lipids, and it prevented cigarette smoke-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular wall and formation of leukocyte-platelet aggregates. This is the first in vivo demonstration of inflammatory phospholipid oxidation products and it suggests a molecular mechanism coupling cigarette smoke with rapid inflammatory changes. Inhibition of PAF-like lipid formation and their intravascular sequela by vitamin C suggests a simple dietary means to reduce smoking-related cardiovascular disease. PMID:9153277

  19. Platelet factor 4 stimulates thrombomodulin protein C-activating cofactor activity. A structure-function analysis.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Key, N S

    1994-10-14

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an anionic (pI approximately 4) protein cofactor that promotes thrombin (THR) cleavage of protein C to generate activated protein C (APC), a potent anticoagulant. We find that the cationic platelet alpha-granule protein platelet factor 4 (PF4) stimulates 4-25-fold the cofactor activity of rabbit TM and two differentially glycanated versions of an extracellular domain human TM polypeptide in which the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) is either present (GAG+ TM) or absent (GAG- TM) with an ED50 of 3.3-10 micrograms/ml. No such stimulation occurs in response to beta-thromboglobulin or thrombospondin, or when protein C lacking its gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain is the substrate. Heparin and chondroitin sulfates A and E reverse PF4 stimulation. PF4 minimally affects the Kd for THR but decreases 30-fold (from 8.3 to 0.3 microM) the Km for protein C of APC generation by GAG+ TM. PF4 also strikingly transforms the [Ca2+] dependence profile of rabbit and GAG+ TM to resemble that of GAG- TM. A potential explanation for this is that PF4, like Ca2+, induces heparin-reversible alterations in native (but not Gla-domainless) protein C conformation as assessed by autofluorescence emission analysis. We conclude that PF4 stimulates TM APC generation by interacting electrostatically with both the TM GAG and the protein C Gla domain to enhance markedly the affinity of the THR.TM complex for protein C. By this mechanism, PF4 may play a previously unsuspected role in the physiologic regulation of clotting.

  20. Inhibition of the activation of Hageman factor (factor XII) and of platelet aggregation by extracts of Brugia malayi microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Foster, C B; Flanigan, T P; Kazura, J W; Dumenco, L L; Ratnoff, O D

    1991-05-01

    In human filariasis, large numbers of blood-borne microfilariae circulate unimpeded through the blood stream. How intravascular filarial parasites avoid precipitating thrombosis has not been studied in detail. We hypothesized that extracts of Brugia malayi microfilariae would contain factors that inhibit activation of hemostatic mechanisms. Initial studies demonstrated an inhibitor specific for the intrinsic coagulation cascade. The addition of microfilarial extracts to human plasma prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time in a dose-dependent fashion but did not prolong the prothrombin, thrombin, or Russell's viper venom times. Microfilarial extracts (0.1 mg/ml) completely inhibited activation of Hageman factor (factor XII, at 0.05 U/ml) as measured in an amidolytic assay. Hageman factor previously activated by ellagic acid (factor XIIa) retained full enzymatic activity in the presence of microfilarial extract (0.1 mg/ml). The presence of inhibitory activity in the culture medium of live parasites raises the possibility that microfilariae secrete an inhibitory protein into their local environment. Microfilarial extracts at a final concentration of 0.1 mg/ml also inhibited collagen- and adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation. Arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation was inhibited by microfilarial extracts at a final concentration of 0.6 mg/ml. These results suggest that microfilariae of Brugia malayi, a human filarial parasite, may avoid initiating thrombosis through inhibition of the intrinsic coagulation pathway and platelet aggregation.

  1. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  2. Intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase hydrolyses and inactivates platelet-activating factor by a phospholipase C activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Nilsson, Åke; Jönsson, Bo A. G.; Stenstad, Hanna; Agace, William; Cheng, Yajun; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase (alk-SMase) is a new member of the NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase) family that hydrolyses SM (sphingomyelin) to generate ceramide in the intestinal tract. The enzyme may protect the intestinal mucosa from inflammation and tumorigenesis. PAF (platelet-activating factor) is a pro-inflammatory phospholipid involved in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. We examined whether alk-SMase can hydrolyse and inactivate PAF. [3H]Octadecyl-labelled PAF was incubated with purified rat intestinal alk-SMase or recombinant human alk-SMase expressed in COS-7 cells. The hydrolytic products were assayed with TLC and MS. We found that alkSMase cleaved the phosphocholine head group from PAF and generated 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. Differing from the activity against SM, the activity against PAF was optimal at pH 7.5, inhibited by EDTA and stimulated by 0.1–0.25 mM Zn2+. The activity was abolished by site mutation of the predicted metal-binding sites that are conserved in all NPP members. Similar to the activity against SM, the activity against PAF was dependent on bile salt, particularly taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate. The Vmax for PAF hydrolysis was 374 μmol·h−1·(mg of protein)−1. The hydrolysis of PAF and SM could be inhibited by the presence of SM and PAF respectively, the inhibition of PAF hydrolysis by SM being stronger. The PAF-induced MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) activation and IL-8 (interleukin 8) release in HT-29 cells, and chemotaxis in leucocytes were abolished by alk-SMase treatment. In conclusion, alk-SMase hydrolyses and inactivates PAF by a phospholipase C activity. The finding reveals a novel function, by which alk-SMase may counteract the development of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:16255717

  3. Immune complex induced pancreatitis: effect of BN 52021, a selective antagonist of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Jancar, S; De Giaccobi, G; Mariano, M; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Sirois, P; Braquet, P

    1988-05-01

    A model of acute pancreatitis was developed by induction of an immune complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction in rats. This acute inflammatory reaction was characterized by intense interstitial edema, neutrophil infiltration and margination, and congestion of small vessels whereas serum amylase levels remained unchanged. Microscopic examination of the pancreatic tissue revealed the presence of immune complex deposition around blood vessels and ducts. Vascular permeability, as measured by Evan's blue extravasation increased by 6 fold. In addition, circulating platelets dropped to 50% of normal levels. Injection of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the peritoneal cavity of rats also produced an increase in vascular permeability in the pancreas. A selective PAF-antagonist, BN 52021 reduced by approximately 50% the increase in vascular permeability produced by immune complex in the pancreas as well as that elicited by intraperitoneal injection of PAF. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the pathological manifestations of immune complex-mediated pancreatitis.

  4. Characterization of a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase secreted by the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, M E; Gounaris, K; Selkirk, M E

    1996-01-01

    Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a small nematode parasite of the gastrointestinal tract of rodents, secretes an enzyme that cleaves the proinflammatory molecule platelet-activating factor to its inactive lyso-form. The enzyme activity of Ca(2+)-dependent and does not exhibit interfacial activation. It does not require the addition of reducing agents for maximal activity, and is not inhibited by thiol-active reagents. Sensitivity of inhibitors suggests the involvement of serine and histidine residues in the enzyme activity. As described for other platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases, it cannot cleave, nor is it inhibited by, long-chain diacyl phospholipids that are typical substrates for phospholipases A2. The purified enzyme was resolved by SDS/PAGE as a heterodimer composed of two protein subunits with apparent molecular masses of 38 and 25 kDa. The properties of the nematode enzyme thus differ from those described for the mammalian enzymes, but are more closely related to those of an acetylhydrolase than a phospholipase. PMID:8713083

  5. Cisplatin triggers platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Franconi, M; Caprino, L

    2000-09-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anticancer drugs could contribute to the thrombotic complications of malignancy in treated patients. Thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular thrombotic events have been reported for cisplatin, a drug widely used in the treatment of many solid tumours. The aim of this study is to explore in vitro cisplatin effect on human platelet reactivity in order to define the potentially active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced thrombotic complications. Our results demonstrate that cisplatin increases human platelet reactivity (onset of platelet aggregation wave and thromboxane production) to non-aggregating concentrations of the agonists involving arachidonic acid metabolism. Direct or indirect activation of platelet phospholipase A(2) appears to be implicated. This finding contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombotic complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  6. [Activation and inhibitory mechanisms of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of platelets to subendothelial matrices initiates physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Under high shear stress, von Willebrand factor bridges newly exposed collagen to glycoprotein (GP) Ib on platelets. This initial tethering facilitates association between the collagen receptor GPVI and collagen, which generates tyrosine kinase-dependent activation signals, followed by release of secondary mediators and integrin activation. Activated integrin can bind to their ligands including fibrinogen. The released secondary mediators, ADP and thromboxane A2, activate integrin of flowing platelets, which enables formation of platelet thrombi by binding of activated flowing platelets and adhered platelets to collagen via binding between activated aIIbbeta3 integrin and fibrinogen. Platelets also have inhibitory mechanisms, which help to prevent unwanted platelet activation in vivo.

  7. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  8. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  9. Oligomeric State Regulated Trafficking of Human Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase Type-II

    PubMed Central

    Monillas, Elizabeth S.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Thévenin, Anastasia F.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response. PMID:25707358

  10. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    PubMed

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  11. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety profile of the new platelet-activating factor antagonist apafant in man.

    PubMed

    Brecht, H M; Adamus, W S; Heuer, H O; Birke, F W; Kempe, E R

    1991-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a unique phospholipid mediator with multifunctional properties. Evidence generated in experimental studies suggests that PAF plays a pathogenetic role in anaphylactic, inflammatory and immunogenic reactions. Apafant (WEB 2086, CAS 105219-56-5), a novel synthetic PAF receptor antagonist, was administered to a total of 101 healthy volunteers within 5 studies to investigate its pharmacologic activity, pharmacokinetic behaviour and safety profile. Pharmacologic activity was monitored by inhibition of 5 x 10(-8) mol/l PAF-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo. The following treatment schedules were studied: oral single dose 1.25 to 400 mg; oral multiple dose 100 mg t.i.d. over 7 days; i.v. infusion 0.5 to 50 mg (over 30 min); inhalative administration up to 1.0 mg. PAF induced platelet aggregation was virtually completely inhibited by single oral doses of 20 mg upwards, throughout during the multiple oral dose study, at all dose levels tested in the i.v. study and (significantly but not completely) at 0.5 and 1.0 mg in the inhalative study. Following oral administrations (capsules) apafant is absorbed rapidly (tmax 1 to 2 h), there is linear pharmacokinetics for the mean plasma concentrations of apafant measured by RIA as well as for the areas under the curve (AUCs). Approximately 60% of apafant is bound to plasma protein, the mean volume of distribution is 28 l, about 44% of an oral dose is excreted in the urine, the mean renal clearance is 192 ml/min. No accumulation of the drug occurred in volunteers with normal kidney function. No clinically relevant drug related adverse events or changes in laboratory or vital parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and ECG were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  13. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  14. Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Initiates Contact of Acinetobacter baumannii Expressing Phosphorylcholine with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smani, Younes; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; López-Rojas, Rafael; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; Ibáñez-Martínez, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion is an initial and important step in Acinetobacter baumannii causing infections. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such a step between A. baumannii and the host cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the phosphorylcholine (ChoP)-containing outer membrane protein of A. baumannii binds to A549 cells through platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), resulting in activation of G protein and intracellular calcium. Upon A. baumannii expressing ChoP binding to PAFR, clathrin and β-arrestins, proteins involved in the direction of the vacuolar movement, are activated during invasion of A. baumannii. PAFR antagonism restricts the dissemination of A. baumannii in the pneumonia model. These results define a role for PAFR in A. baumannii interaction with host cells and suggest a mechanism for the entry of A. baumannii into the cytoplasm of host cells. PMID:22689572

  15. Platelet activating factor, lyso-platelet activating factor and arachidonic acid release in normal human skin and the influence of topical steroid treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, R M; Lawlor, F; Judge, M R; Courtney, P; Barlow, R; Kobza Black, A; Mallet, A I; Greaves, M W

    1993-01-01

    1. Previous, in vitro, studies have established the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) by the 're-modelling' pathways in which the activation of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme catalyses the hydrolysis of an ether-acyl-phosphocholine to give concomitant release of lyso-PAF, the immediate precursor of PAF, and arachidonic acid, the precursor of the icosanoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between PAF and eicosanoid release in human skin, and to study the effect of treatment of skin with a topical steroid, on the release of PAF, lyso-PAF and arachidonic acid. 2. A novel assay procedure was developed for the simultaneous assay of PAF and lyso-PAF in skin exudates from abrasions and suction blisters in normal human skin. In addition we assayed arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a representative eicosanoid. 3. The mean amounts of mediator recovered in the first 30 min period following abrasion were PAF 0.43, lyso-PAF 11.9, PGE2 25.7 and arachidonic acid 760 pmol/sample. The molar ratio of PAF:lyso-PAF:arachidonic acid in skin exudates from abrasions was 1:30:1800 and in suction blister exudates was 1:90:3660. 4. Time course studies showed a decline in the recoveries of arachidonic acid and lyso-PAF, of about 50% in 2 h. In contrast, PAF was recovered in exudates at a constant rate over 2 h but PGE2 release decreased by more than 90% after the initial 30 min period. 5. Topical application under occlusion, of 0.05% clobetasol propionate, a potent corticosteroid, significantly reduced lyso-PAF by 30% in suction blister exudates but did not significantly alter the concentrations of PAF or arachidonic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8329291

  16. Crystallization and Preliminary X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of Human Plasma Platelet Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Wilder, C; Bahnson, B

    2009-01-01

    The plasma form of the human enzyme platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) has been crystallized, and X-ray diffraction data were collected at a synchrotron source to a resolution of 1.47 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit cell parameters of a = 116.18, b = 83.06, c = 96.71 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 115.09 and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PAF-AH functions as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger by reducing the levels of the signaling molecule PAF. Additionally, the LDL bound enzyme has been linked to atherosclerosis due to its hydrolytic activities of pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  17. Impact of prostaglandin glaucoma drops on platelet-activating factor action: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Moschos, Marilita M; Nitoda, Eirini; Chatziralli, Irini P; Panos, Georgios D; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different prostaglandin analogs on platelet-activating factor (PAF) levels. Methods Three prostaglandin analogs were selected: bimatoprost 0.3 mg/mL, latanoprost 50 μg/mL, and tafluprost 15 μg/mL. Each drug sample was tested for its ability to cause platelet aggregation, which was measured as PAF-induced aggregation, before and after the addition of various concentrations of the examined sample, creating a linear curve of percentage inhibition (ranging from 0% to 100%) versus different concentrations of the sample. The concentration of the sample that inhibited 50% PAF-induced aggregation was calculated based on this curve, and this value was defined as IC50. In addition, the effect of eye drops on PAF metabolism was examined, through an in vitro analysis on PAF basic metabolic enzymes (PAF-cholinephosphotransferase, PAF-acetyl-CoA:1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine acetyltransferase, and PAF-acetylhydrolase). Results The IC50 values for Lumigan UD® (bimatoprost 0.3 mg/mL), Monoprost® (latanoprost 50 μg/mL), and Saflutan (tafluprost 15 μg/mL) were 8.7, 0.28, and 1.4 μg/mL, respectively. Discussion All three prostaglandin analogs suspended PAF, but bimatoprost induced the most potent inhibition, compared to tafluprost and to the weak effect of latanoprost. PMID:27994439

  18. Platelet quantification and growth factor analysis from platelet-rich plasma: implications for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Barry L; Woodell, Jennifer E; Higgins, Joel

    2004-11-01

    Growth factors released from activated platelets initiate and modulate wound healing in both soft and hard tissues. A recent strategy to promote the wound-healing cascade is to prepare an autologous platelet concentrate suspended in plasma, also known as platelet-rich plasma, that contains growth factors and administer it to wound sites. The purpose of this study was to quantitate platelet number and growth factors released from a prepared platelet concentrate. Whole blood was drawn from 10 healthy patients undergoing cosmetic surgery and concentrated into platelet-rich plasma. Platelet counts on whole blood and platelet-rich plasma were determined using a Cell-Dyn 3200. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB, transforming growth factor-beta1, vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 were measured in the platelet-rich plasma using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. In addition, platelet activation during the concentration procedure was analyzed by measuring P selectin values in blood serum. An 8-fold increase in platelet concentration was found in the platelet-rich plasma compared with that of whole blood (baseline whole blood, 197 +/- 42 x 10 platelets/microl; platelet concentrate, 1600 +/- 330 x 10 platelets/microl). The concentration of growth factors also increased with increasing platelet number. However, growth factor concentration varied from patient to patient. On average for the whole blood as compared with platelet-rich plasma, the platelet-derived growth factor-BB concentration increased from 3.3 +/- 0.9 ng/ml to 17 +/- 8 ng/ml, transforming growth factor-beta1 concentration increased from 35 +/- 8 ng/ml to 120 +/- 42 ng/ml, vascular endothelial growth factor concentration increased from 155 +/- 110 pg/ml to 955 +/- 1030 pg/ml, and endothelial growth factor concentration increased from 129 +/- 61 pg/ml to 470 +/- 320 pg/ml. No increase was found for insulin-like growth factor-1. In addition, no

  19. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome.

  20. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  1. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2017-02-03

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome.

  2. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M.; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome. PMID:28157211

  3. Platelet factor 4 enhances generation of activated protein C in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, Arne; Fernandez, Jose A; Griffin, John H; Key, Nigel S; Long, Janel R; Piegors, Donald J; Lentz, Steven R

    2003-07-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4), an abundant platelet alpha-granule protein, accelerates in vitro generation of activated protein C (APC) by soluble thrombin/thrombomodulin (TM) complexes up to 25-fold. To test the hypothesis that PF4 similarly stimulates endothelium-associated TM, we assessed the influence of human PF4 on thrombin-dependent APC generation by cultured endothelial monolayers. APC generated in the presence of 1 to 100 microg PF4 was up to 5-fold higher than baseline for human umbilical vein endothelial cells, 10-fold higher for microvascular endothelial cells, and unaltered for blood outgrowth endothelial cells. In an in vivo model, cynomolgus monkeys (n = 6, each serving as its own control) were infused with either PF4 (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle buffer, then with human thrombin (1.0 microg/kg/min) for 10 minutes. Circulating APC levels (baseline 3 ng/mL) peaked at 10 minutes, when PF4-treated and vehicle-treated animals had APC levels of 67 +/- 5 ng/mL and 39 +/- 2 ng/mL, respectively (P <.001). The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT; baseline, 28 seconds) increased maximally by 27 +/- 6 seconds in PF4-treated animals and by 9 +/- 1 seconds in control animals at 30 minutes (P <.001). PF4-dependent increases in circulating APC and APTT persisted more than 2-fold greater than that of controls from 10 through 120 minutes (P < or =.04). All APTT prolongations were essentially reversed by monoclonal antibody C3, which blocks APC activity. Thus, physiologically relevant concentrations of PF4 stimulate thrombin-dependent APC generation both in vitro by cultured endothelial cells and in vivo in a primate thrombin infusion model. These findings suggest that PF4 may play a previously unsuspected physiologic role in enhancing APC generation.

  4. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  5. Antigen-and ionophore-stimulated synthesis of platelet-activating factor by the cloned mast cell line, MC9

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, M.W.; Billah, M.M.; Siegel, M.I.

    1987-05-14

    MC9 mast cells stimulated by a soluble (calcium ionophore A23187) or by an Fc epsilon-receptor agonist (IgE plus hapten) produce platelet activating factor (PAF). MC9 cells incorporate either exogenous (/sup 3/H)acetic acid or (/sup 3/H)lyso-PAF into PAF. PAF was identified by mobility on thin layer chromatography, platelet aggregatory activity inhibitable by known PAF antagonists, and by enzymatic modification. Quantified by aggregation of rabbit platelets, MC9 cells produce 6 pmoles PAF/10(6) cells. MC9 cells express acetyltransferase activity of 0.19 nmole/5 min-mg protein. Analysis of MC9 phospholipids by HPLC showed that MC9 cells contain large amounts of phosphatidylcholine (82 nmoles/10(7) cells) but contain little ether-linked phosphatidylcholine (4 nmoles/10(7) cells).

  6. Protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 differentially regulate factor V expression from human platelets.

    PubMed

    Duvernay, Matthew; Young, Summer; Gailani, David; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Hamm, Heidi E; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    With the recent interest of protease-activated receptors (PAR) 1 and PAR4 as possible targets for the treatment of thrombotic disorders, we compared the efficacy of protease-activated receptor (PAR)1 and PAR4 in the generation of procoagulant phenotypes on platelet membranes. PAR4-activating peptide (AP)-stimulated platelets promoted thrombin generation in plasma up to 5 minutes earlier than PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. PAR4-AP-mediated factor V (FV) association with the platelet surface was 1.6-fold greater than for PAR1-AP. Moreover, PAR4 stimulation resulted in a 3-fold greater release of microparticles, compared with PAR1 stimulation. More robust FV secretion and microparticle generation with PAR4-AP was attributable to stronger and more sustained phosphorylation of myosin light chain at serine 19 and threonine 18. Inhibition of Rho-kinase reduced PAR4-AP-mediated FV secretion and microparticle generation to PAR1-AP-mediated levels. Thrombin generation assays measuring prothrombinase complex activity demonstrated 1.5-fold higher peak thrombin levels on PAR4-AP-stimulated platelets, compared with PAR1-AP-stimulated platelets. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced PAR4-AP-mediated peak thrombin generation by 25% but had no significant effect on PAR1-AP-mediated thrombin generation. In conclusion, stimulation of PAR4 on platelets leads to faster and more robust thrombin generation, compared with PAR1 stimulation. The greater procoagulant potential is related to more efficient FV release from intracellular stores and microparticle production driven by stronger and more sustained myosin light chain phosphorylation. These data have implications about the role of PAR4 during hemostasis and are clinically relevant in light of recent efforts to develop PAR antagonists to treat thrombotic disorders.

  7. Platelet-activating factor receptor agonists mediate xeroderma pigmentosum A photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongxue; Harrison, Kathleen A; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Murphy, Robert C; Rezania, Samin; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-03-16

    To date, oxidized glycerophosphocholines (Ox-GPCs) with platelet-activating factor (PAF) activity produced non-enzymatically have not been definitively demonstrated to mediate any known disease processes. Here we provide evidence that these Ox-GPCs play a pivotal role in the photosensitivity associated with the deficiency of the DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPA). It should be noted that XPA-deficient cells are known to have decreased antioxidant defenses. These studies demonstrate that treatment of human XPA-deficient fibroblasts with the pro-oxidative stressor ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and PAF receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity in comparison with gene-corrected cells. The UVB irradiation-generated PAF-R agonists were inhibited by antioxidants. UVB irradiation of XPA-deficient (Xpa-/-) mice also resulted in increased PAF-R agonistic activity and skin inflammation in comparison with control mice. The increased UVB irradiation-mediated skin inflammation and TNF-α production in Xpa-/- mice were blocked by systemic antioxidants and by PAF-R antagonists. Structural characterization of PAF-R-stimulating activity in UVB-irradiated XPA-deficient fibroblasts using mass spectrometry revealed increased levels of sn-2 short-chain Ox-GPCs along with native PAF. These studies support a critical role for PAF-R agonistic Ox-GPCs in the pathophysiology of XPA photosensitivity.

  8. Platelet activating factor produced in vitro by Kaposi's sarcoma cells induces and sustains in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Arese, M; Montrucchio, G; Barra, L; Primo, L; Benelli, R; Sanavio, F; Aglietta, M; Ghigo, D; Rola-Pleszczynski, M R

    1995-01-01

    Imbalance in the network of soluble mediators may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). In this study, we demonstrated that KS cells grown in vitro produced and in part released platelet activating factor (PAF), a powerful lipid mediator of inflammation and cell-to-cell communication. IL-1, TNF, and thrombin enhanced the synthesis of PAF. PAF receptor mRNA and specific, high affinity binding site for PAF were present in KS cells. Nanomolar concentration of PAF stimulated the chemotaxis and chemokinesis of KS cells, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. The migration response to PAF was inhibited by WEB 2170, a hetrazepinoic PAF receptor antagonist. Because neoangiogenesis is essential for the growth and progression of KS and since PAF can activate vascular endothelial cells, we examined the potential role of PAF as an instrumental mediator of angiogenesis associated with KS. Conditioned medium (CM) from KS cells (KS-CM) or KS cells themselves induced angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment in a murine model in which Matrigel was injected subcutaneously. These effects were inhibited by treating mice with WEB 2170. Synthetic PAF or natural PAF extracted from plasma of patients with classical KS also induced angiogenesis, which in turn was inhibited by WEB 2170. The action of PAF was amplified by expression of other angiogenic factors and chemokines: these included basic and acidic fibroblast growth factor, placental growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and its specific receptor flk-1, hepatocyte growth factor, KC, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Treatment with WEB 2170 abolished the expression of the transcripts of these molecules within Matrigel containing KS-CM. These results indicate that PAF may cooperate with other angiogenic molecules and chemokines in inducing vascular development in KS. Images PMID:7543496

  9. Phospholipase A2 from bovine seminal plasma is a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Soubeyrand, S; Lazure, C; Manjunath, P

    1998-01-01

    The major phospholipase A2 activity from bovine seminal plasma was recently purified [Soubeyrand, Khadir, Brindle and Manjunath (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 222-227]. We here show that the 60 kDa enzyme is in fact a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Sequences of the N-terminus as well as of internal fragments showed 100% identity with the cDNA-deduced sequences of bovine plasma PAF-AH. The enzyme has kinetic properties similar to those of the human serum PAF-AH. Although capable of hydrolysing long-chained phosphatidylcholine, it displayed a highly preferential activity towards PAF. The enzyme activity towards phosphatidylcholine, but not PAF, was Ca2+-dependent. Biochemical characterization revealed that the enzyme is extensively N-glycosylated and that it exists predominantly as a dimer in solution. Western blot analysis revealed that the enzyme is highly heterogeneous in charge, with a maximal distribution at an isoelectric point of approx. 5.7. The enzyme was expressed exclusively in the seminal vesicles and the ampulla. No association of the enzyme with either epididymal or ejaculated spermatozoa could be detected. PMID:9405273

  10. Platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism targets neuroinflammation in experimental epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Samii, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with the inflammatory process related to the basic mechanisms that lead to seizure susceptibility and brain damage. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent, short-lived phospholipid mediator of inflammation participates in physiological signaling in the brain. However, after seizures PAF accumulates in the brain and activates intracellular signaling related with inflammation-mediated excitotoxicity and hippocampal hyperexcitability. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of PAF antagonism on hippocampal hyperexcitability, seizure susceptibility and neuroprotection using the kindling paradigm and pilocarpine-induced seizure damage models. Methods The PAF antagonist, LAU-0901 (60 mg/kg, i.p.), or vehicle was administrated each day of kindling or daily during the four weeks after status epilepticus (SE). We analyzed seizure severity, electrical activity, cellular damage and inflammation in the hippocampi of both treated groups. Results LAU-0901 limits the progression of kindling and attenuates seizure susceptibility one week after the kindling procedure. Also, under the seizure-damage conditions studied here, we observed that LAU-0901 induces hippocampal neuroprotection and limits somatostatin interneuronal cell loss and inflammation. Discussion Our results indicate that modulation of PAF over-activity attenuates seizure susceptibility, hippocampal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation. PMID:21204830

  11. Interleukin 1 stimulates platelet-activating factor production in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Breviario, F; Tetta, C; Aglietta, M; Mantovani, A; Dejana, E

    1986-01-01

    Monocyte-derived interleukin 1 (IL-1) was found to be a potent inducer of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HEC). The product was identified as PAF by its behavior in chromatographic systems, its recovery of biological activity, and its physico-chemical properties and susceptibility to lipases. The response of HEC to IL-1 was concentration-dependent, took more than 2 h to become apparent, and decreased after 18 h of incubation. Most of the PAF produced was cell-associated and only a small amount (about 25% of the total) was released in the culture medium. To study the mechanism of IL-1-induced HEC-PAF production we tested the activity of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl/coenzyme A acetyltransferase in HEC. Acetyltransferase activity measured in IL-1-stimulated HEC lysates showed a three to five times greater maximum velocity, but the same Michaelis constant, as untreated cells. The regulation of PAF generation in HEC by IL-1 may be an important aspect of the two-way interaction between immunocompetent cells and vascular tissue. PMID:2872233

  12. Serum platelet factor 4 is a reliable activity parameter in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Yu, Na; Jia, Ya-Xu; Wan, Shu-Jun; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the diagnostic utility of serum platelet factor 4 (PF4) levels and to assess its accuracy in detecting inflammatory bowel disease activity. This study included 45 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 45 patients with Crohn disease (CD), and 30 control subjects at Jinling Hospital between May 2014 and July 2015. Laboratory tests measured white blood count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count. PF4 was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to disease activity: active and inactive. Median PF4 values dramatically increased in UC and CD patients compared with the healthy group (UC: 26.64 [20.00–36.22] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63–26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.002; CD: 25.56 [18.57–36.36] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63–26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.014); however, the serum PF4 levels between UC and CD failed to show a significant difference (26.64 [20.00–36.22] mg/mL vs 25.56 [18.57–36.36] mg/mL, P = 0.521). Furthermore, serum PF4 levels were elevated in both UC and CD patients with active disease (UC: 20.19 [14.89–23.53] mg/mL vs 28.86 [22.57–37.29] mg/mL, P < 0.001; CD: 18.33 [16.72–25.77] mg/mL vs 34.38 [22.58–39.92] mg/mL, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed higher PF4 level as an independent predictor of disease activity in UC and CD patients (UC: odds ratio 30.375, P = 0.002; CD: odds ratio 54.167, P < 0.001). The cut-off level of PF4 for distinguishing active from inactive UC patients was 24.1 mg/mL. While in CD patients, the cut-off level of PF4 was 19.24 mg/mL. Serum PF4 levels could be a potential biomarker for monitoring the disease activity of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:28296751

  13. Purified human platelet-derived growth factor receptor has ligand-stimulated tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bishayee, S; Ross, A H; Womer, R; Scher, C D

    1986-01-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R), a 180-kDa single-chain polypeptide, was purified from membranes of the human osteogenic sarcoma cell line MG-63. Purification was achieved by treatment of membranes with PDGF and ATP, followed by solubilization with nonionic detergent and successive chromatography on solid-phase anti-phosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody and DEAE-cellulose. The PDGF-R, which was estimated to be 50-80% pure by NaDodSO4/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of 32P-labeled preparations, was free of contaminating epidermal growth factor receptor and had no detectable phosphatase activity. It specifically bound 125I-labeled PDGF, a reaction quantified by binding of the ligand-PDGF-R complex to the anti-phosphotyrosine antibody. The purified receptor displayed PDGF-stimulatable tyrosine kinase activity, assayed by autophosphorylation of PDGF-R at tyrosine residues and by phosphorylation of angiotensin II. The Km for ATP in the autophosphorylation reaction was 7.5 microM. Addition of PDGF did not change the Km but increased the Vmax 1.7-fold. Images PMID:3018745

  14. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  15. Hydroxyl-platelet-activating factor exists in blood of healthy volunteers and periodontal patients.

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Tsoupras, Alexandros; Baltas, George; Kotsifaki, Helen; Mantzavinos, Zacharias; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2003-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are localized chronic inflammatory conditions of the gingival and underlying bone and connective tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory phospholipid mediator that has been previously detected in elevated levels in inflamed gingival tissues, in gingival crevicular fluid and in saliva, is implicated in periodontal disease. Our results from previous studies showed that the biologically active phospholipid detected in gingival crevicular fluid is a hydroxyl-PAF analogue. In this study, hydroxyl-PAF analogue was detected for the first time in human blood derived from patients with chronic periodontitis as well as from periodontally healthy volunteers. The hydroxyl-PAF analogue was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, detected by biological assays and identified by electrospray analysis. In addition, the quantitative determination of PAF and hydroxyl-PAF analogue (expressed as PAF-like activity) showed a statistically significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyl-PAF analogue levels to PAF levels in periodontal patients, suggesting that this bioactive lipid may play a role in oral inflammation. PMID:14514473

  16. Oxygen radicals inhibit human plasma acetylhydrolase, the enzyme that catabolizes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, G; Oriente, A; Napoli, C; Palumbo, G; Chiariello, P; Marone, G; Condorelli, M; Chiariello, M; Triggiani, M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) can exert profound inflammatory effects at very low concentrations. In plasma, PAF is hydrolyzed to lyso-PAF by acetylhydrolase, an enzyme that circulates bound to LDL. Previous studies suggest that oxygen radicals may act synergistically with PAF to potentiate tissue injury. However, mechanisms underlying this interaction have not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether oxygen radicals may inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase activity was measured in human plasma and purified LDL before and after exposure to radicals (10-20 nmol/min per ml) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase. Oxygen radicals induced > 50% loss of PAF acetylhydrolase activity within 60 s and almost complete inactivation by 10 min. This phenomenon was irreversible and independent of oxidative modification of LDL. Inactivation occurred without changes in the affinity constant of the enzyme (Km was 17.9 microM under control conditions and 15.1 microM after exposure to oxygen radicals). Inactivation was prevented by the scavengers superoxide dismutase or dimethylthiourea or by the iron chelator deferoxamine. Thus, superoxide-mediated, iron-catalyzed formation of hydroxyl radicals can rapidly and irreversibly inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. Since concomitant production of PAF and oxygen radicals can occur in various forms of tissue injury, inactivation of acetylhydrolase might represent one mechanism by which oxygen radicals may potentiate and prolong the proinflammatory effects of PAF. Images PMID:8200975

  17. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  18. Inhibition of platelet activation by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS)-silenced (tearless) onion juice.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Susan J; Rippon, Paula; Butts, Chrissie; Olsen, Sarah; Shaw, Martin; Joyce, Nigel I; Eady, Colin C

    2013-11-06

    Onion and garlic are renowned for their roles as functional foods. The health benefits of garlic are attributed to di-2-propenyl thiosulfinate (allicin), a sulfur compound found in disrupted garlic but not found in disrupted onion. Recently, onions have been grown with repressed lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) activity, which causes these onions to produce increased amounts of di-1-propenyl thiosulfinate, an isomer of allicin. This investigation into the key health attributes of LFS-silenced (tearless) onions demonstrates that they have some attributes more similar to garlic and that this is likely due to the production of novel thiosulfinate or metabolites. The key finding was that collagen-induced in vitro platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by tearless onion extract over normal onion extract. Thiosulfinate or derived compounds were shown not to be responsible for the observed changes in the inflammatory response of AGS (stomach adenocarcinoma) cells to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) when pretreated with model onion juices. A preliminary rat feeding trial indicated that the tearless onions may also play a key role in reducing weight gain.

  19. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  20. Endogenous platelet factor 4 stimulates activated protein C generation in vivo and improves survival after thrombin or lipopolysaccharide challenge

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Lambert, Michele P.; Poncz, Mortimer; Slungaard, Arne

    2007-01-01

    Pharmacologic infusion of activated protein C (APC) improves survival in severe sepsis, and platelet factor 4 (PF4) accelerates APC generation in a primate thrombin-infusion model. We now tested whether endogenous platelet PF4 content affects APC generation. Mice completely deficient in PF4 (mPF4−/−) had impaired APC generation and survival after thrombin infusion, similar to the impairment seen in heterozygote protein C–deficient (PC+/−) mice. Transgenic mice overexpressing human PF4 (hPF4+) had increased plasma APC generation. Overexpression of platelet PF4 compensated for the defect seen in PC+/− mice. In both a thrombin and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) survival model, hPF4+ and PC+/−/hPF4+ mice had improved survival. Further, infusion of hPF4+ platelets improved survival of wild-type mice after an LPS challenge. These studies suggest that endogenous PF4 release may have biologic consequences for APC generation and survival in clinical sepsis. Infusions of PF4-rich platelets may be an effective strategy to improve outcome in this setting. PMID:17540840

  1. Endogenous platelet factor 4 stimulates activated protein C generation in vivo and improves survival after thrombin or lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, M Anna; Mahmud, Shawn A; Lambert, Michele P; Poncz, Mortimer; Slungaard, Arne

    2007-09-15

    Pharmacologic infusion of activated protein C (APC) improves survival in severe sepsis, and platelet factor 4 (PF4) accelerates APC generation in a primate thrombin-infusion model. We now tested whether endogenous platelet PF4 content affects APC generation. Mice completely deficient in PF4 (mPF4(-/-)) had impaired APC generation and survival after thrombin infusion, similar to the impairment seen in heterozygote protein C-deficient (PC(+/-)) mice. Transgenic mice overexpressing human PF4 (hPF4(+)) had increased plasma APC generation. Overexpression of platelet PF4 compensated for the defect seen in PC(+/-) mice. In both a thrombin and a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) survival model, hPF4(+) and PC(+/-)/hPF4(+) mice had improved survival. Further, infusion of hPF4(+) platelets improved survival of wild-type mice after an LPS challenge. These studies suggest that endogenous PF4 release may have biologic consequences for APC generation and survival in clinical sepsis. Infusions of PF4-rich platelets may be an effective strategy to improve outcome in this setting.

  2. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  3. Levels of gingival tissue platelet activating factor after conventional and regenerative periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Keles, Gonca Cayir; Cetinkaya, Burcu Ozkan; Ayas, Bulent; Isildak, Ibrahim; Diraman, Emine; Koprulu, Hulya; Acikgoz, Gokhan

    2007-12-01

    The hypothesis, a relationship between gingival tissue platelet activating factor (PAF) levels and healing after periodontal surgery, was tested by measuring PAF levels in gingival tissues collected from sites that had undergone flap surgery and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or flap surgery alone. Using a split-mouth design, 20 intrabony defects were randomly assigned to treatment with flap surgery and GTR (group 1) or with flap surgery alone (group 2). Gingival tissue samples were obtained at surgery (baseline) and at 6-month follow-up evaluation visit. One half of each sample was used for analysis of PAF levels by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the other half of the sample was used for histomorphometric analysis that included measurements of number and diameter of blood vessels. PAF levels and diameter of blood vessels were significantly decreased (p < 0.01), and the number of blood vessels was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in both groups after 6 months compared to the baseline values. Postoperative number of blood vessels were significantly higher in group 1 (p < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference in postoperative PAF levels between the two groups (p > 0.05). Based on the reported results, it is suggested that a decrease in gingival PAF levels might be found after conventional and regenerative periodontal surgery.

  4. Polycistronic expression of human platelet factor 4 with heparin-neutralizing activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yitao; Wang, Zhe; Wu, Wei; Fang, Zhenjiang; Huang, He

    2012-01-01

    Human platelet factor 4 (hPF4) was evaluated as a clinical alternative to protamine for heparin neutralization, a protector against radiation injury and an anti-neoplastic. To achieve high-level expression of hPF4, expression vectors pET-28a(+)-nf PF4 (n=4, 5, 6) containing n tandem repeats of PF4 were constructed and transformed into the Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain. A higher expression level, about 45% of the total proteins (TP), was obtained for E. coli BL21(DE3)/pET28a(+)-nf PF4 (n=4, 5, 6). The purified His-PF4 protein was further identified by cleavage with enterokinase and MS, and its heparin-neutralizing activity was determined by colony formation assay. This study represents a novel approach to large-scale production of PF4 in E. coli, one that might be applied to large-scale production of PF4 protein for possible clinical application. It also provides theoretical points for the expression and purification of other small-molecule peptides.

  5. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor as a promising target for cancer cell repopulation after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Jr, I A; Chammas, R; Lepique, A P; Jancar, S

    2017-01-01

    A major drawback of radiotherapy is the accelerated growth of the surviving tumor cells. Radiotherapy generates a variety of lipids that bind to the receptor for platelet-activating factor, expressed by cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, using the TC-1 tumor cell line, we found that irradiation induced a twofold increase in receptor expression and generated agonists of receptor. Irradiated cells induced a 20-fold increase in live TC-1 proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, subcutaneous co-injection of irradiated TC-1 cells with TC-1 expressing luciferase (TC-1 fluc+) markedly increased TC-1 fluc+ proliferation in a receptor-dependent way. Moreover we used a human carcinoma cell line not expressing the PAF receptor (KBM) and the same cell transfected with the receptor gene (KBP). Following co-injection of live KBP cells with irradiated KBM in RAG mice, the tumor growth was significantly increased compared with tumor formed following co-injection of live KBM with irradiated KBM. This tumor cell repopulation correlated with increased infiltration of tumor-promoting macrophages (CD206+). We propose that receptor represents a possible target for improving the efficacy of radiotherapy through inhibition of tumor repopulation. PMID:28134937

  6. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  7. Platelet-activating factor: a candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced neurotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gelbard, H A; Nottet, H S; Swindells, S; Jett, M; Dzenko, K A; Genis, P; White, R; Wang, L; Choi, Y B; Zhang, D

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of central nervous system disease during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection revolves around productive viral infection of brain macrophages and microglia. Neuronal losses in the cortex and subcortical gray matter accompany macrophage infection. The question of how viral infection of brain macrophages ultimately leads to central nervous system (CNS) pathology remains unanswered. Our previous work demonstrated high-level production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, arachidonic acid metabolites, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) from HIV-infected monocytes and astroglia (H. E. Gendelman, P. Genis, M. Jett, and H. S. L. M. Nottet, in E. Major, ed., Technical Advances in AIDS Research in the Nervous System, in press; P. Genis, M. Jett, E. W. Bernton, H. A. Gelbard, K. Dzenko, R. Keane, L. Resnick, D. J. Volsky, L. G. Epstein, and H. E. Gendelman, J. Exp. Med. 176:1703-1718, 1992). These factors, together, were neurotoxic. The relative role(s) of each of these candidate neurotoxins in HIV-1-related CNS dysfunction was not unraveled by these initial experiments. We now report that PAF is produced during HIV-1-infected monocyte-astroglia interactions. PAF was detected at high levels in CSF of HIV-1-infected patients with immunosuppression and signs of CNS dysfunction. The biologic significance of the results for neurological disease was determined by addition of PAF to cultures of primary human fetal cortical or rat postnatal retinal ganglion neurons. Here, PAF at concentrations of > or = 300 pg/ml produced neuronal death. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 or memantine partially blocked the neurotoxic effects of PAF. The identification of PAF as an HIV-1-induced neurotoxin provides new insights into how HIV-1 causes neurological impairment and how it may ultimately be ameliorated. PMID:8207837

  8. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action.

  9. Platelet factor 4: a chemokine enigma.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, Arne

    2005-06-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is a platelet alpha-granule protein sequenced over 25 years ago that is a founding member of the C-X-C chemokine family, yet its physiologic function has yet to be definitively established. Initial investigations focused on possible procoagulant roles for PF4 in platelet function and plasmatic coagulation. Subsequent in vitro studies have, however, described a puzzling array of other apparently unrelated biologic functions, including inhibition of angiogenesis and hematopoiesis, promotion of neutrophil adhesion, and activation, enhancement of oxy-LDL binding to the LDL receptor and stimulation of anti-coagulant activated protein C generation by the thrombomodulin/protein C system. Preliminary studies with a just-described PF4 knockout mouse line support a role for PF4 in platelet-dependent thrombosis in vivo.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  11. Potential angiogenic role of platelet-activating factor in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Montrucchio, G; Sapino, A; Bussolati, B; Ghisolfi, G; Rizea-Savu, S; Silvestro, L; Lupia, E; Camussi, G

    1998-11-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34-and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested.

  12. Human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase. Oxidatively fragmented phospholipids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Stremler, K E; Stafforini, D M; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase hydrolyzes the sn-2 acetyl residue of PAF, but not phospholipids with long chain sn-2 residues. It is associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, and is the LDL-associated phospholipase A2 activity that specifically degrades oxidatively damaged phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., Zimmerman, G. A., and McIntyre, T. M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 5331-5334). To identify potential substrates, we synthesized phosphatidylcholines with sn-2 residues from two to nine carbon atoms long, and found the V/k ratio decreased as the sn-2 residue was lengthened: the C5 homolog was 50%, the C6 20%, while the C9 homolog was only 2% as efficient as PAF. However, the presence of an omega-oxo function radically affected hydrolysis: the half-life of the sn-2 9-aldehydic homolog was identical to that of PAF. We oxidized [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine and isolated a number of more polar phosphatidylcholines. We treated these with phospholipase C, derivatized the resulting diglycerides for gas chromatographic/mass spectroscopic analysis, and found a number of diglycerides where the m/z ratio was consistent with a series of short to medium length sn-2 residues. We treated the polar phosphatidylcholines with acetylhydrolase and derivatized the products for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The liberated residues were more polar than straight chain standards and had m/z ratios from 129 to 296, consistent with short to medium chain residues. Therefore, oxidation fragments the sn-2 residue of phospholipids, and the acetylhydrolase specifically degrades such oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  13. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Levine, B A; Olson, M S

    1993-05-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  14. Effects of platelet activating factor and related lipids on phase transition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bratton, D L; Harris, R A; Clay, K L; Henson, P M

    1988-06-07

    Recent evidence localizing the inflammatory mediator, platelet activating factor, (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) to the membranes of stimulated neutrophils raises the possibility that PAF may, in addition to its activities as a mediator, alter the physical properties of membranes. Accordingly, the effects of PAF and related alkyl ether and acyl analogs on phase transition thermodynamics of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were studied using fluorescence polarization of the fluorescent probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). PAF, its ester analog (1-palmitoyl-2-acetylphosphatidylcholine) and both the corresponding alkyl and acyl lysophospholipid analogs (each at a concentration of 10 mol%) significantly decreased the phase transition temperature and broadened the phase transition of DPPC (P less than 0.05). The relative potency of the lipids in causing this effect was ester-PAF greater than or equal to PAF greater than or equal to lyso-PAF greater than lyso-PC suggesting that the fluidization of the synthetic membranes was attributable to both the 2-position acetyl group and the 1-position alkyl linkage. Furthermore, using various related compounds, increases in chain length and degree of unsaturation in the 2-position were shown to enhance the depression in transition temperature and broadening of the phase transition. Phase transition thermodynamics were also assessed using differential scanning calorimetry. Similar depression in the phase transition temperature was measured for PAF and both the alkyl and acyl lysophospholipids. Broadening of the phase transition for DPPC by the various analogs was assessed by calculation of transition peak width and cooperative unit. Data from fluorescence polarization and differential scanning calorimetry provide similar though not identical results and support the hypothesis that the unique features of PAF may alter membrane physical properties and could ultimately explain some of its biologic

  15. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR(-/-)) mice were inoculated intracranially with 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR(-/-) mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR(-/-) mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR(-/-) mice showed less TCD4(+), TCD8(+) and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR(-/-) mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  16. Potential Angiogenic Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Sapino, Anna; Bussolati, Benedetta; Ghisolfi, Gianpiero; Rizea-Savu, Simona; Silvestro, Luigi; Lupia, Enrico; Camussi, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34- and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested. PMID:9811351

  17. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W.; Levine, B. A.; Olson, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494049

  18. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  19. Renal metabolism and urinary excretion of platelet-activating factor in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Noris, M.; Perico, N.; Macconi, D.; Nanni, V.; Dadan, J.; Peterlongo, F.; Remuzzi, G. )

    1990-11-15

    The origin of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the urine remains ill defined. The present study documents that (3H)PAF (3.5 mu Ci) injected into the renal artery of isolated control rat kidney preparations perfused at constant pressure with a cell-free medium containing 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) was excreted in negligible amounts (0.034%) in the urine, whereas 6% was retained by the kidney. When kidneys were perfused with a BSA-free medium, 0.029 and 71% of the total radioactivity added to the perfusate was recovered in the urine and in the renal tissue, respectively. (3H)PAF urine excretion in proteinuric kidneys from adriamycin-treated rats was still negligible (0.015%). Analysis of the renal tissue-retained radioactivity in control and proteinuric kidneys perfused with 1% BSA indicated metabolism into long chain acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine species, lyso-PAF, glycerols, and intact PAF. Thin layer chromatography analysis of (3H)glycerol fraction in these renal extracts showed two major components comigrating with 1-O-alkylglycerol and 1-O-alkyl-2-fatty acylglycerol. Isolated proximal tubules, but not glomeruli from nephrotic rats exposed to increasing concentrations of BSA (0-4%), had a higher PAF uptake than control tubules for BSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.1%. Our findings in the isolated perfused kidneys indicate that, in normal conditions, circulating PAF is excreted in the urine in negligible amounts and that the altered glomerular permeability to proteins does not affect this excretion rate. Moreover, analysis of renal tissue radioactivity documented that the renal metabolism of PAF is comparable in control and nephrotic kidneys.

  20. Platelet activating factors alters calcium homeostasis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF), a potent in vivo mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, induced a rapid (onset less than 30 s), concentration-dependent (threshold approximately 10(-11) M, half-maximal approximately 10(-10) M, maximal approximately 10(-8)-10(-7) M) efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from preloaded cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In contrast, deacetylated and other PAF analogues were essentially ineffective. PAF (10(-7) M) was also shown to increase cytosolic free calcium (49 +/- 5%) in suspensions of quin 2 (calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye)-loaded BAEC. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was not blocked by aspirin treatment (100 or 500 microM, 30 min). In the absence of external calcium, PAF was still highly effective in stimulating unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting that PAF mobilized a sequestered pool of intracellular calcium. CV-3988, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BAEC with PAF (10(-8) M, 15 min), but not with other PAF analogues, resulted in a decrease in subsequent PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting an agonist-specific desensitization. PAF also stimulated a 30% net decrease in the equilibrium /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ content of BAEC within 1 min, which gradually recovered to prestimulus levels in 10-15 min. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also observed in endothelial cells cultured from human umbilical vein and baboon cephalic vein but not from cultured human dermal fibroblasts or bovine aortic smooth muscle. These studies provide direct evidence for agonist- and cell-specific effects of PAF on vascular endothelium.

  1. Interaction of platelet-activating factor with cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, L; Chilton, F H; Proud, D

    1991-01-01

    The present study has examined the interaction of platelet-activating factor (PAF) with cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells (GTE). PAF stimulated GTE to release endogenous arachidonic acid and metabolize it to prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha (PGE2 and PGF2 alpha). Prostanoid production by GTE in response to PAF was dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) and was maximal within 5 min. PGE2 and PGF2 alpha levels increased by 3.3 +/- 0.8 and 3.2 +/- 0.6 ng/10(6) cells respectively over basal levels in response to 100 nM-PAF. The ability of GTE to synthesize and/or catabolize PAF was also examined. GTE readily incorporated [3H]acetate into a product which migrated on t.l.c. with PAF. However, further characterization of this product suggested that label had not been incorporated into PAF, but rather that it was incorporated into another lipid product with chromatographic characteristics similar to those of PAF. In contrast, GTE readily metabolized PAF to inactive products. When [3H]PAF was incubated with GTE, 50% of the total [3H]PAF added was catabolized in approx. 15 min. The major route of catabolism of PAF by GTE was the deacetylation-reacylation pathway, which yielded 1-O-[3H]alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine. Determination of the nature of the long-chain acyl group incorporated into the sn-2 position of the newly synthesized products revealed that oleic and linoleic acids were the major fatty acids present. Taken together, these results suggest that respiratory epithelial cells respond to stimulation by PAF with enhanced production of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, and also have the capacity to modulate inflammatory reactions in the airways by their ability to degrade this potent inflammatory mediator. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2064601

  2. Stimulus-response coupling in human platelets. Changes evoked by platelet-activating factor in cytoplasmic free calcium monitored with the fluorescent calcium indicator quin2.

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, T J; Sanchez, A; Rink, T J

    1984-01-01

    The role of changes in cytoplasmic free calcium, [Ca2+]i, in the responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF) was studied in human platelets loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator, quin2. In the presence of 1 mM external calcium, PAF raised [Ca2+]i 8-10-fold in a few seconds to peak near 1 microM. [Ca2+]i then declined over several minutes towards the basal level. In the absence of external calcium there was a much smaller increase in [Ca2+]i of similar pattern. These findings suggest that PAF increases [Ca2+]i partly by discharge of internal Ca2+, but mainly by stimulated influx. Blockade of cyclo-oxygenase with aspirin only slightly reduced the [Ca2+]i changes, indicating that thromboxane A2 is not a major mediator of the calcium movements. In control conditions PAF could stimulate shape-change, aggregation and secretion. Aggregation and secretion were roughly halved by blockade of cyclo-oxygenase. Shape-change and secretion still occurred under conditions where the [Ca2+]i rise was small or suppressed, indicating a role for intracellular activators other than Ca2+. The possible involvement of products of phosphoinositide breakdown is discussed. PMID:6426464

  3. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase deficiency. A missense mutation near the active site of an anti-inflammatory phospholipase.

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, D M; Satoh, K; Atkinson, D L; Tjoelker, L W; Eberhardt, C; Yoshida, H; Imaizumi, T; Takamatsu, S; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Gray, P W; Prescott, S M

    1996-01-01

    Deficiency of plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase is an autosomal recessive syndrome that has been associated with severe asthma in Japanese children. Acquired deficiency has been described in several human diseases usually associated with severe inflammation. PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the degradation of PAF and related phospholipids, which have proinflammatory, allergic, and prothrombotic properties. Thus, a deficiency in the degradation of these lipids should increase the susceptibility to inflammatory and allergic disorders. Miwa et al. reported that PAF acetylhydrolase activity is absent in 4% of the Japanese population, which suggests that it could be a common factor in such disorders, but the molecular basis of the defect is unknown. We show that inherited deficiency of PAF acetylhydrolase is the result of a point mutation in exon 9 and that this mutation completely abolishes enzymatic activity. This mutation is the cause of the lack of enzymatic activity as expression in E. coli of a construct harboring the mutation results in an inactive protein. This mutation as a heterozygous trait is present in 27% in the Japanese population. This finding will allow rapid identification of subjects predisposed to severe asthma and other PAF-mediated disorders. PMID:8675689

  4. Characterization of streptococcal platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase variants that are involved in innate immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsE(M1)) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsE(M1) and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsE(M28)) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsE(M28) is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsE(M28) or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsE(M1) and SsE(M28) had kcat values of 373 s(-1) and 467 s(-1), respectively, that were ≥ 30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s(-1)). The comparison of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsE(M28) possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsE(M1) but have similar potency with SsE(M1) in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sse(M28) in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsE(M28) in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion.

  5. Platelet-derived growth factor agonist activity of a secreted form of the v-sis oncogene product

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, A.; Betsholtz, C.; von der Helm, K.; Heldin, C.H.; Westermark, B.

    1985-03-01

    The authors have compared the functional properties of a growth factor partially purified from medium conditioned by simian sarcoma virus-transformed cells with those of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). The factor mimicked the effects induced by PDGF: it bound to and activated human fibroblast PDGF receptors and stimulated DNA synthesis. The factor behaved as a secretory protein, since about 95% of the receptor-binding activity was found in the medium after a 48-hr serum-free incubation. Structural characterization of the PDGF-like activity revealed a M/sub r/ 24,000 intracellular protein and two polypeptides of M/sub r/ 13,000 and 11,500 released into the medium. The M/sub r/ 13,000 component bound to human fibroblasts; this binding was competitively inhibited by PDGF. The data support the possibility that oncogene products may elicit transforming activity by interacting with the normal cellular mitogenic pathway.

  6. Platelet-activating factor in the enteric nervous system of the guinea pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Fang, Xiu-Cai; Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Xia, Yun

    2006-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory mediator that may influence neuronal activity in the enteric nervous system (ENS). Electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR were used to study the action of PAF and the expression of PAF receptor (PAFR) in the ENS. PAFR immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by 6.9% of the neurons in the myenteric plexus and 14.5% of the neurons in the submucosal plexus in all segments of the guinea pig intestinal tract as determined by double staining with anti-human neuronal protein antibody. PAFR IR was found in 6.1% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 35.8% of the neurons with IR for neuropeptide Y (NPY), 30.6% of the neurons with IR for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and 1.96% of the neurons with IR for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the submucosal plexus. PAFR IR was also found in 1.5% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 51.1% of the neurons with IR for NPY, and 32.9% of the neurons with IR for ChAT in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, exposure to PAF (200-600 nM) evoked depolarizing responses (8.2 +/- 3.8 mV) in 12.4% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.5% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology, whereas in the myenteric preparations, depolarizing responses were elicited by a similar concentration of PAF in 9.5% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.0% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology. The results suggest that subgroups of secreto- and musculomotor neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses express PAFR. Coexpression of PAFR IR with ChAT IR in the myenteric plexus and ChAT IR and VIP IR in the submucosal plexus suggests that PAF, after release in the inflamed bowel, might act to elevate the excitability of submucosal secretomotor and myenteric musculomotor

  7. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor in SZ95 sebocytes results in inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin E2 production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2006-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a group of phosphocholines with various biological effects mediated by the PAF receptor (PAF-R). Activation of the epidermal PAF-R induces the expression of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). The upregulation of COX-2 expression has been shown to be involved in sebocyte proliferation, sebaceous gland inflammation and carcinogenesis. The present study was designed to investigate whether PAF-R activation could induce the expression of COX-2 and production of PGE(2), as well as secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), in the immortalized sebaceous gland cell line SZ95. Using calcium mobilization studies, we first confirmed that PAF can signal through PAF-R in SZ95 sebocytes. We then found that the production of IL-8 was induced following treatment with PAF-R agonist, however blocked by a specific PAF-R antagonist. Induction of COX-2 expression and increased PGE(2) production were observed in SZ95 sebocytes after PAF-R activation. Finally, it was demonstrated that the production of PGE(2), induced by PAF-R activation and mediated by COX-2 expression, was blocked following PAF-R antagonism in SZ95 sebocytes. These studies suggest that SZ95 sebocytes express functional PAF-Rs and PAF-Rs are involved in regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators, including COX-2, PGE(2) and IL-8.

  8. Attenuation of Folic Acid-Induced Renal Inflammatory Injury in Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Negishi, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Nakao, Akihide; Fujita, Toshiro; Toda, Akiko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Noiri, Eisei

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator with various biological activities, plays an important role in inflammation by recruiting leukocytes. In this study we used platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR)-deficient mice to elucidate the role of PAF in inflammatory renal injury induced by folic acid administration. PAFR-deficient mice showed significant amelioration of renal dysfunction and pathological findings such as acute tubular damage with neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation observed with antibody to 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (day 2), and interstitial fibrosis with macrophage infiltration associated with expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the kidney (day 14). Acute tubular damage was attenuated by neutrophil depletion using a monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to acute phase injury. Macrophage infiltration was also decreased when treatment with a PAF antagonist (WEB2086) was started after acute phase. In vitro chemotaxis assay using a Boyden chamber demonstrated that PAF exhibits a strong chemotactic activity for macrophages. These results indicate that PAF is involved in pathogenesis of folic acid-induced renal injury by activating neutrophils in acute phase and macrophages in chronic interstitial fibrosis. Inhibiting the PAF pathway might be therapeutic to kidney injury from inflammatory cells. PMID:16651609

  9. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770

  10. An essential role for platelet-activating factor in activating mast cell migration following ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Chen, Limo; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D.; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y.; Ma, Ying; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The UVB (290–320 nm) radiation in sunlight is responsible for inducing skin cancer. Exposure to UV radiation is also immunosuppressive, and the systemic immune suppression induced by UV is a well-recognized risk factor for cancer induction. As UVB radiation is absorbed within the upper layers of the skin, indirect mechanisms must play a role in activating systemic immune suppression. One prominent example is mast cell migration, which from the skin to the draining LN is an essential step in the cascade of events leading to immune suppression. What triggers mast cell migration is not entirely clear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAF, a lipid mediator of inflammation produced by the skin in response to UV exposure, is involved. Mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh/W-sh) are resistant to the suppressive effect of UV radiation, and reconstituting mast cell-deficient mice with normal bone marrow-derived mast cells restores susceptibility to immunosuppression. However, when mast cells from PAFR−/− mice were used, the reconstituted mice were not susceptible to the suppressive effects of UV. Furthermore, PAFR−/− mice showed impaired UV-induced mast cell migration when compared with WT mice. Finally, injecting PAF into WT mice mimicked the effect of UV irradiation and induced mast cell migration but not in PAFR−/− mice. Our findings indicate that PAFR binding induces mast cells to migrate from the skin to the LNs, where they mediate immune suppression. PMID:24009177

  11. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s−1, regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates. PMID:28058084

  12. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-11-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s(-1), regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates.

  13. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE. PMID:27651919

  14. Nitric oxide released from activated platelets inhibits platelet recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, J E; Loscalzo, J; Barnard, M R; Alpert, C; Keaney, J F; Michelson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Vessel injury and thrombus formation are the cause of most ischemic coronary syndromes and, in this setting, activated platelets stimulate platelet recruitment to the growing thrombus. Recently, a constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been identified in human platelets. To further define the capacity of platelets to produce nitric oxide (NO), as well as to study the role of this NO in platelet recruitment, we adapted a NO-selective microelectrode for use in a standard platelet aggregometer, thereby permitting simultaneous measurement of platelet aggregation and NO production. Treatment of platelets with the NO synthase inhibitor -NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), reduced NO production by 92+/-8% in response to 5 microM ADP compared to control but increased aggregation by only 15+/-2%. In contrast, L-NAME had a more pronounced effect on platelet recruitment as evidenced by a 35+/-5% increase in the extent of aggregation, a 33+/-3% decrease in cyclic GMP content, and a 31+/-5% increase in serotonin release from a second recruitable population of platelets added to stimulated platelets at the peak of NO production. To study platelet recruitment accurately, we developed an assay that monitors two platelet populations simultaneously. Nonbiotinylated platelets were incubated with L-NAME or vehicle and activated with ADP. At peak NO production, biotinylated platelets were added. As measured by three-color flow cytometry, there was a 56+/-11% increase in the number of P selectin- positive platelets in the nonbiotinylated population treated with L-NAME as compared to control. When biotinylated platelets were added to the L-NAME-treated nonbiotinylated population, the number of P selectin positive biotinylated plate-lets increased by 180+/-32% as compared to biotinylated platelets added to the control. In summary, stimulated platelets produce NO that modestly inhibits platelet activation but markedly inhibits additional platelet recruitment. These data suggest

  15. Thrombin-activated platelets induce proliferation of human skin fibroblasts by stimulating autocrine production of insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    Giacco, Ferdinando; Perruolo, Giuseppe; D'Agostino, Elio; Fratellanza, Giorgio; Perna, Enzo; Misso, Saverio; Saldalamacchia, Gennaro; Oriente, Francesco; Fiory, Francesca; Miele, Claudia; Formisano, Salvatore; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2006-11-01

    Platelet components have found successful clinical utilization to initiate or to accelerate tissue-repair mechanisms. However, the molecular pathways by which platelet factors contribute to tissue regeneration have not been fully elucidated. We have studied the effect of thrombin-activated platelets (TAPs) on cell growth in vivo and in cultured cell systems. Application of TAPs to ulcerative skin lesions of diabetic patients induced local activation of ERK1/2 and Akt/PKB. Moreover, when applied to cultured human skin fibroblasts, TAPs promoted cell growth and DNA synthesis and activated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor tyrosine kinases. PDGF was released by TAPs and rapidly achieved a plateau. At variance, the release of IGF-1 was mainly provided by the TAPs-stimulated fibroblasts and progressively increased up to 48 h. The PDGF-R blocker Ag1296 reduced the activation of Akt/PKB and, at a lesser extent, of ERK1/2. Conversely, inhibition of IGF-1 signaling by Ag1024 and expression of a dominant-negative IGF-1R mutant selectively reduced the stimulation of ERK1/2 by TAPs and fibroblast-released factors, with minor changes of Akt/PKB activity. Thus, platelet factors promote fibroblast growth by acutely activating Akt/PKB and ERK1/2. Sustained activation of ERK1/2, however, requires autocrine production of IGF-1 by TAPs-stimulated fibroblasts.

  16. Protective effect of platelet activating factor antagonists on cultured endothelial cell lysis induced by elastase or activated neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, P.; Vicart, P.; Paulin, D.; Chignard, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The mechanism(s) responsible for injury of endothelial cells induced by human leukocyte elastase (HLE) was investigated in an immortalized venous human endothelial cell line (IVEC). 2. First, the proteinase concentrations and incubation delays necessary to trigger a significant IVEC cytotoxicity were determined by chromium assays. Thus, exposure of IVEC for 6 h to 10 micrograms ml-1 HLE resulted in 22 +/- 2.8% lysis and 36.4 +/- 5.4% detachment (mean +/- s.e. mean; n = 4; P < 0.05). 3. WEB 2086, a specific platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, induced a significant concentration-dependent decrease of such a lysis (39.6 +/- 7.7% protection at 100 microM; n = 4). This potential role for PAF was confirmed with two other antagonists of this lipid mediator, i.e., BN 52021 and RP 48740. 4. Finally, we demonstrated that pretreatment of IVEC with WEB 2086 protected significantly against cell lysis induced by stimulated human neutrophils, an experimental model in which HLE participates. PMID:8851508

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor activity and mRNA expression in healing vascular grafts in baboons. Association in vivo of platelet-derived growth factor mRNA and protein with cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Golden, M A; Au, Y P; Kirkman, T R; Wilcox, J N; Raines, E W; Ross, R; Clowes, A W

    1991-01-01

    In a baboon graft model of arterial intimal thickening, smooth muscle cells (SMC) have been observed to proliferate underneath an intact monolayer of endothelium and in the absence of platelet adherence. Because platelets are not present and therefore cannot be a major source of growth stimulus, we have proposed that the vascular wall cells in the graft intima express mitogens and regulate SMC proliferation. To test this hypothesis, we assayed the grafts for mitogenic activity and expression of growth factor genes. Segments of healing graft and of normal artery, when perfused ex vivo, released mitogenic activity into the perfusate. The graft released more mitogen than the normal arterial segment, and some of the activity was inhibitable with an antibody to human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). In addition, Northern analysis of total RNA demonstrated higher expression of PDGF-A chain mRNA in the graft intima compared to normal artery. PDGF-B chain mRNA was barely detectable in both tissues. PDGF mRNA levels within the graft interstices were not measured. In situ hybridization of 7.5- or 12-wk grafts indicated that some luminal endothelial cells and adjacent intimal SMC contained PDGF-A chain mRNA. By thymidine autoradiography, intimal SMC were observed to be proliferating in the inner third of the intima. These data demonstrate a difference in the pattern of PDGF transcript expression and luminal perfusate activity in graft as compared with control arteries. The association of intimal smooth muscle cell proliferation with intimal PDGF mRNA expression and release of PDGF-like protein supports the hypothesis that factors from cells that have grown into the graft or populated its surface rather than platelets may regulate intimal smooth muscle cell proliferation in this model. Images PMID:1825089

  18. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  19. Evidence for Lipid Packaging in the Crystal Structure of the GM2-Activator Complex with Platelet Activating Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Christine S.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2010-11-16

    GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP) is a lipid transfer protein that has the ability to stimulate the enzymatic processing of gangliosides as well as T-cell activation through lipid presentation. Our previous X-ray crystallographic studies of GM2-AP have revealed a large lipid binding pocket as the central overall feature of the structure with non-protein electron density within this pocket suggesting bound lipid. To extend these studies, we present here the 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of GM2-AP complexed with platelet activating factor (PAF). PAF is a potent phosphoacylglycerol whose toxic patho-physiological effects can be inhibited by GM2-AP. The structure shows an ordered arrangement of two bound lipids and a fatty acid molecule. One PAF molecule binds in an extended conformation within the hydrophobic channel that has an open and closed conformation, and was seen to contain bound phospholipid in the low pH apo structure. The second molecule is submerged inside the pocket in a U-shaped conformation with its head group near the single polar residue S141. It was refined as lyso-PAF as it lacks electron density for the sn-2 acetate group. The alkyl chains of PAF interact through van der Waals contacts, while the head groups bind in different environments with their phosphocholine moieties in contact with aromatic rings (Y137, F80). The structure has revealed further insights into the lipid binding properties of GM2-AP, suggesting an unexpected unique mode of lipid packaging that may explain the efficiency of GM2-AP in inhibiting the detrimental biological effects of PAF.

  20. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  1. Equid Herpesvirus Type 1 Activates Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  2. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  3. Platelet activation of platelet concentrates derived from buffy coat and apheresis methods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Soleimany Ferizhandy

    2011-02-01

    Preparation for storage may cause platelet activation. The quality of platelet concentrates plays an important role in transfusion therapy. Platelet concentrates are produced by different centrifugation methods; buffy coat (buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates-BC) and plateletpheresis (apheresis-derived platelet concentrates-APC). Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: platelet, WBC and RBC counts pH, volume, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and Annexin V. The present paper compares the quality of both platelet preparations in vitro. In this experimental study, 30 platelet concentrates were harvested with the Haemonetics MCS plus and 30 units via the buffy coat (BC) method. The percentages of Annexin V expression, PF4 levels, platelet, WBC and RBC counts, pH and volume were measure immediately after collection and after 3 days of storage. During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed, no significant pH or RBC, difference in comparison with apheresis preparations (p>0.05). During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed a significant increase in the PF4 and Annexin V expression, compared to the apheresis preparations on day three (p<0.05). The kinetics of PF4 and Annexin V levels are influenced by the method used to prepare platelets for storage. The different levels of PF4 and Annexin V in BCs and APCs clearly demonstrates a progressive activation of BC platelets exceeding that of APC. However, in vivo studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  4. Activity of platelet hemostasis in children with spinal deformities.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N; Lapshina, E V; Zavalishina, S Yu

    2010-10-01

    An increase of adhesion and aggregation functions of platelets in vivo and in vitro was detected in 5-6-year-old children with scoliosis. These disorders were caused by hyperproduction of von Willebrand's factor in the vascular wall and intensification of thromboxane production in blood platelets. Activation of thromboxane formation is the main cause of platelet hyperactivity in children with scoliosis. Correction of platelet hemostasis may include pathogenetically substantiated complex of therapeutic exercises, swimming, and massage.

  5. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Walker, Chelsey P.; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M.; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15–16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  6. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS.

  7. Preparation of biologically active platelet-derived growth factor type BB from a fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, J.; Weich, H.A.; Eichner, W. )

    1989-04-04

    Preparations of the mitogen platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from human platelets contain two related polypeptides termed A chain and B chain. PDGF-B is highly homologous to a portion of p28{sup v-sis}, the transforming protein of simian sarcoma virus. The authors have studied the mitogenic potential of a PDGF-BB-like homodimer by expressing the sequence coding for the mature part of PDGF-B in Escherichia coli. Expression was achieved as cro-{beta}-gal-PDGF-B fusion protein which was exclusively found in the inclusion bodies. A monomeric PDGF-B fragment shortened by 12 amino acid residues from the NH{sub 2} terminus was excised from the fusion protein by CNBr cleavage. After protection of thiols by S-sulfonation, this fragment was purified by gel permeation chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. This monomeric protein was dimerized in the presence of a mixture of reduced and oxidized glutathione to yield biologically active rPDGF-BB with an overall yield of {approx}0.7 mg of rPDGF-BB/L of culture. Escherichia coli rPDGF-BB stimulated ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation into AKR2B fibroblast at concentrations of about 1 ng/mL.

  8. Phospholipid-esterified eicosanoids are generated in agonist-activated human platelets and enhance tissue factor-dependent thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher P; Morgan, Lloyd T; Maskrey, Benjamin H; Murphy, Robert C; Kühn, Hartmut; Hazen, Stanley L; Goodall, Alison H; Hamali, Hassan A; Collins, Peter W; O'Donnell, Valerie B

    2010-03-05

    Here, a group of specific lipids, comprising phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)- or phosphatidylcholine (PC)-esterified 12S-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12S-HETE), generated by 12-lipoxygenase was identified and characterized. 12S-HETE-PE/PCs were formed within 5 min of activation by thrombin, ionophore, or collagen. Esterified HETE levels generated in response to thrombin were 5.85 +/- 1.42 (PE) or 18.35 +/- 4.61 (PC), whereas free was 65.5 +/- 17.6 ng/4 x 10(7) cells (n = 5 separate donors, mean +/- S.E.). Their generation was stimulated by triggering protease-activated receptors-1 and -4 and signaling via Ca(2+) mobilization secretory phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase, src tyrosine kinases, and protein kinase C. Stable isotope labeling showed that they form predominantly by esterification that occurs on the same time scale as free acid generation. Unlike free 12S-HETE that is secreted, esterified HETEs remain cell-associated, with HETE-PEs migrating to the outside of the plasma membrane. 12-Lipoxygenase inhibition attenuated externalization of native PE and phosphatidylserine and HETE-PEs. Platelets from a patient with the bleeding disorder, Scott syndrome, did not externalize HETE-PEs, and liposomes supplemented with HETE-PC dose-dependently enhanced tissue factor-dependent thrombin generation in vitro. This suggests a role for these novel lipids in promoting coagulation. Thus, oxidized phospholipids form by receptor/agonist mechanisms, not merely as an undesirable consequence of vascular and inflammatory disease.

  9. Coronary vasoconstriction in the rat, isolated perfused heart induced by platelet-activating factor is mediated by leukotriene C4.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, P. J.; Stewart, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (Paf, 0.04-4.50 nmol) dose-dependently induced coronary vasoconstriction and decreased cardiac contractility in rat, isolated perfused hearts and concomitantly released leukotriene-like bioactivity into the cardiac effluent. Platelet-activating factor (0.9 nmol) induced an increase in 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) of cardiac effluents following partial purification using C18 Sep-Paks. The leukotriene-like bioactivity released by Paf was identified as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) using a combination of isolation on reverse phase-h.p.l.c. (r.p.h.p.l.c.) and quantitation by RIA. In addition, LTB4 was also identified by r.p.h.p.l.c. and the levels, determined by RIA, were within the range having biological activity. The release of cyclo-oxygenase products by Paf was prevented by indomethacin (2.8 microM), markedly attenuated by diethylcarbamazine (7.7 mM) but unaffected by FPL 55712 (1.9 microM)-pretreatment. Furthermore, LTC4 (50 pmol) did not increase the release of the cyclo-oxygenase products measured. The release of LTB4 and LTC4 appeared to be unaffected by indomethacin pretreatment whereas diethylcarbamazine-pretreatment markedly inhibited release. The coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf (0.9 nmol) was attenuated by pretreatment with indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine, whereas FPL 55712 caused a marked inhibition of the response. In contrast, the decrease in cardiac contractility was prevented by indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine and unaffected by FPL 55712 pretreatment. It is concluded that LTC4 may be largely responsible for the coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf with cyclo-oxygenase products having a possible modulatory role whereas the latter appear to be involved in the Paf-induced decrease in cardiac contractility. PMID:3091131

  10. Effects of Physical (In)activity on Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Heber, Stefan; Volf, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    As platelet activation is closely related to the liberation of growth factors and inflammatory mediators, platelets play a central role in the development of CVD. Virtually all cardiovascular risk factors favor platelet hyperreactivity and, accordingly, also physical (in)activity affects platelet function. Within this paper, we will summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the impact of acute and habitual exercise on platelet function. Although there are apparent discrepancies regarding the reported effects of acute, strenuous exercise on platelet activation, a deeper analysis of the available literature reveals that the applied exercise intensity and the subjects' cardiorespiratory fitness represent critical determinants for the observed effects. Consideration of these factors leads to the summary that (i) acute, strenuous exercise can lead to platelet activation, (ii) regular physical activity and/or physical fitness diminish or prevent platelet activation in response to acute exercise, and (iii) habitual physical activity and/or physical fitness also favorably modulate platelet function at physical rest. Notably, these effects of exercise on platelet function show obvious similarities to the well-recognized relation between exercise and the risk for cardiovascular events where vigorous exercise transiently increases the risk for myocardial infarction and a physically active lifestyle dramatically reduces cardiovascular mortality. PMID:26557653

  11. Optimized preparation method of platelet-concentrated plasma and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrates: maximization of platelet concentration and removal of fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2012-03-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230-270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations.

  12. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor by cultured rat Kupffer cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W; Siafaka-Kapadai, A; Olson, M S; Hanahan, D J

    1989-01-01

    Cultured rat Kupffer cells synthesize and release platelet-activating factor (PAF) when stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The production of PAF is concentration- and time-dependent and, based upon [3H]serotonin release assays, approx. 1.0 pmol of PAF is formed per 8 x 10(6) cells during 10 min of ionophore stimulation. It is suggested that Kupffer cells are important cellular components which produce and release PAF in order to facilitate communication between hepatic sinusoidal and parenchymal cells. Further, it is suggested that such mediator production in response to reticulo-endothelial cell stimulation causes the hepatic glycogenolytic response previously in the isolated perfused rat liver. PMID:2494988

  13. Human blood platelets lack nitric oxide synthase activity.

    PubMed

    Böhmer, Anke; Gambaryan, Stepan; Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Reports on expression and functionality of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in human blood platelets and erythrocytes are contradictory. We used a specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method to detect NOS activity in human platelets. The method measures simultaneously [(15)N]nitrite and [(15)N]nitrate formed from oxidized (15)N-labeled nitric oxide ((15)NO) upon its NOS-catalyzed formation from the substrate l-[guanidino-(15)N2]-arginine. Using this GC-MS assay, we did not detect functional NOS in non-stimulated platelets and in intact platelets activated by various agonists (adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin, or von Willebrand factor) or lysed platelets. l-[guanidino-nitro]-Arginine-inhibitable NOS activity was measured after addition of recombinant human endothelial NOS to lysed platelets. Previous and recent studies from our group challenge expression and functionality of NOS in human platelets and erythrocytes.

  14. Desmopressin (DDAVP) improves recruitment of activated platelets to collagen but simultaneously increases platelet endothelial interactions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Calmer, Simone; Ferkau, Annika; Larmann, Jan; Johanning, Kai; Czaja, Eliana; Hagl, Christian; Echtermeyer, Frank; Goudeva, Lilia; Heuft, Hans-Gert; Theilmeier, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Platelet dysfunction can cause clinically relevant bleeding. Treatment with DDAVP is advocated for this condition. DDAVP increases von Willebrand factor (VWF) on endothelial cells (ECs) and in plasma. VWF could facilitate platelet deposition on subendothelial collagen. VWF also facilitates platelet/EC interactions. Therefore DDAVP could precipitate thromboembolic events. We used a flow chamber model to study in vitro and ex vivo if DDAVP alters recruitment of platelets to EC and collagen. Resting or TRAP-activated platelets and EC were treated individually or simultaneously with 0.4 ng/ml DDAVP. Fluorophor-labeled platelets (10(6)/ml) were resuspended in reconstituted blood and superfused across EC and collagen in an in vitro flow chamber model at arterial shear (320 s(-1)). Adhesion of platelets to the respective surface was recorded fluorescence microscopically and platelet covered area was assessed. TRAP significantly induced adhesiveness of platelets for collagen and EC. DDAVP pretreatment of platelets did not affect adhesiveness of resting or TRAP-activated platelets for collagen or EC. Adhesiveness of resting but not TRAP-activated platelets was induced on DDAVP-treated EC. DDAVP-conditioned EC supernatant contained vWF and significantly increased platelet deposition on collagen. Platelets from patients with clinically suspected platelet dysfunction undergoing aortic valve replacement exhibited decreased platelet deposition on collagen surfaces. In summary, our data confirm that DDAVP can induce release of platelet adhesion promoting factors from EC, which is most likely vWF. DDAVP has no direct effect on platelets. Blood samples from DDAVP-treated patients do not exhibit significantly augmented platelet deposition on collagen ex vivo. This influence of released promoting factors might cause an increase of undesirable interactions of platelets with EC.

  15. Platelet factor XIII increases the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by accelerating the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin to fibrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, G. L.; Matsueda, G. R.; Haber, E.

    1992-01-01

    Platelet clots resist fibrinolysis by plasminogen activators. We hypothesized that platelet factor XIII may enhance the fibrinolytic resistance of platelet-rich clots by catalyzing the crosslinking of alpha 2-antiplasmin (alpha 2AP) to fibrin. Analysis of plasma clot structure by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting revealed accelerated alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinking in platelet-rich compared with platelet-depleted plasma clots. A similar study of clots formed with purified fibrinogen (depleted of factor XIII activity), isolated platelets, and specific factor XIII inhibitors indicated that this accelerated crosslinking was due to the catalytic activity of platelet factor XIII. Moreover, when washed platelets were aggregated by thrombin, there was evidence of platelet factor XIII-mediated crosslinking between platelet alpha 2AP and platelet fibrin(ogen). Specific inhibition (by a monoclonal antibody) of the alpha 2AP associated with washed platelet aggregates accelerated the fibrinolysis of the platelet aggregate. Thus in platelet-rich plasma clots, and in thrombin-induced platelet aggregates, platelet factor XIII actively formed alpha 2AP-fibrin crosslinks, which appeared to enhance the resistance of platelet-rich clots to fibrinolysis.

  16. Evidence for immunoglobulin Fc receptor-mediated prostaglandin2 and platelet-activating factor formation by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwirth, R.; Singhal, P.; Diamond, B.; Hays, R.M.; Lobmeyer, L.; Clay, K.; Schlondorff, D.

    1988-09-01

    The possibility of Fc-dependent uptake of IgG immune complexes was examined in subcultured rat mesangial cells free of monocytes. 195Au-labeled colloidal gold particles were coated either with BSA only or with BSA followed by rabbit anti-BSA-IgG or the F(ab')2 fragment of the IgG. Mesangial cells preferentially took up 195Au particles covered with BSA-anti-BSA-IgG over those covered with BSA or the F(ab')2 fragment. This uptake was a time-dependent and saturable process inhibitable by sodium azide or cytochalasin B. Using phase-contrast microscopy in the light reflectance mode, it was established that essentially all mesangial cells took up IgG-coated gold particles. By electron microscopy the process was shown to consist of vesicular uptake with delivery to endosomes. Mesangial binding-uptake of the IgG-covered particles was associated with stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and production of platelet-activating factor, a lipid mediator of inflammation. To characterize the potential Fc receptor for IgG we used the rosetting technique with sheep red blood cells coated with IgG subclass-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies. 50% of mesangial cells exhibited rosetting with red cells coated with mouse IgG2a, whereas negligible rosetting was observed with IgG2b or IgG1. Competition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgG2a binding. We conclude that cultured rat mesangial cells exhibit specific receptors for IgG and that occupancy of Fc receptors results in endocytosis and is associated with generation of PGE2 and platelet-activating factor. These observations may be of significance for immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulates glycogen synthase activity in 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C.P.; Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.; Krebs, E.G.

    1986-05-01

    Hormonal regulation of glycogen synthase, an enzyme that can be phosphorylated on multiple sites, is often associated with changes in its phosphorylation state. Enzyme activation is conventionally monitored by determining the synthase activity ratio ((activity in the absence of glucose 6-P)/(activity in the presence of glucose 6-P)). Insulin causes an activation of glycogen synthase with a concomitant decrease in its phosphate content. In a previous report, the authors showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) increases the glycogen synthase activity ratio in Swiss 3T3 cells. The time and dose-dependency of this response was similar to that of insulin. Their recent results indicate that PDGF also stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Enzyme activation was maximal after 30 min. of incubation with PDGF; the time course observed was very similar to that with insulin and EGF. At 1 ng/ml (0.03nM), PDGF caused a maximal stimulation of 4-fold in synthase activity ratio. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at 0.2 ng/ml (6 pM). The time course of changes in enzyme activity ratio closely followed that of /sup 125/I-PDGF binding. The authors data suggest that PDGF, as well as EFG and insulin, may be important in regulating glycogen synthesis through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation mechanisms.

  18. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-06-06

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED.

  19. Neutrophil migration across monolayers of cytokine-prestimulated endothelial cells: a role for platelet-activating factor and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that neutrophils respond with a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i during adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells (EC), caused by EC membrane-associated platelet-activating factor (PAF). In the present study, we investigated whether this form of PAF was important in neutrophil adherence and migration across monolayers of rIL-1 beta- or rTNF alpha-prestimulated EC. PAF receptor antagonists prevented neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated EC by approximately 60% (P less than 0.005) without interfering with the process of adherence. The antagonists WEB 2086 and L-652,731 had no effect on neutrophil migration across resting EC induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). A murine anti-IL-8 antiserum was found to also partially inhibit the neutrophil transmigration across cytokine-activated EC. When the anti-IL-8 antiserum was used in combination with a PAF receptor antagonist, neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated monolayers of EC was completely prevented. During transmigration, LAM-1 and CD44 on the neutrophils were down-modulated; both WEB 2086 and anti-IL-8 antiserum partially prevented this down-modulation caused by cytokine- prestimulated EC. Our results indicate that human neutrophils are activated and guided by EC-associated PAF and EC-derived IL-8 during the in vitro diapedesis in between cytokine-stimulated EC. PMID:1315317

  20. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) biosynthesis is inhibited by phenolic compounds in U-937 cells under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Vlachogianni, Ioanna C; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Stamatakis, George M; Kostakis, Ioannis K; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induced platelet activating factor (PAF) synthesis in U-937 cells through stimulation of acetyl-CoA:lysoPAF-acetyltransferase (lyso PAF-AT) at 3 h and DTT-independentCDP-choline-1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol cholinophosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) at 0.5 h. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tyrosol (T), resveratrol (R) and their acetylated derivatives(AcDs) which exhibit enhanced bioavailability, on PAF synthesis in U-937 after IL-1β stimulation. The specific activity of PAF enzymes and intracellular levels were measured in cell homogenates. T and R concentration capable of inducing 50% inhibition in IL-1β effect on lyso PAF-AT was 48 μΜ ± 11 and 157 μΜ ± 77, for PAF-CPT 246 μΜ ± 61 and 294 μΜ ± 102, respectively. The same order of concentration was also observed on inhibiting PAF levels produced by IL-1β. T was more potent inhibitor than R (p<0.05). AcDs of T retain parent compound inhibitory activity, while in the case of R only two AcDs retain the activity. The observed inhibitory effect by T,R and their AcDs, may partly explain their already reported beneficial role.

  1. Serum platelet factor 4 is a reliable activity parameter in adult patients with inflammatory bowel disease: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Yu, Na; Jia, Ya-Xu; Wan, Shu-Jun; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the diagnostic utility of serum platelet factor 4 (PF4) levels and to assess its accuracy in detecting inflammatory bowel disease activity.This study included 45 patients with ulcerative colitis (UC), 45 patients with Crohn disease (CD), and 30 control subjects at Jinling Hospital between May 2014 and July 2015. Laboratory tests measured white blood count, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and platelet count. PF4 was examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to disease activity: active and inactive.Median PF4 values dramatically increased in UC and CD patients compared with the healthy group (UC: 26.64 [20.00-36.22] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63-26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.002; CD: 25.56 [18.57-36.36] mg/mL vs 20.02 [14.63-26.83] mg/mL, P = 0.014); however, the serum PF4 levels between UC and CD failed to show a significant difference (26.64 [20.00-36.22] mg/mL vs 25.56 [18.57-36.36] mg/mL, P = 0.521). Furthermore, serum PF4 levels were elevated in both UC and CD patients with active disease (UC: 20.19 [14.89-23.53] mg/mL vs 28.86 [22.57-37.29] mg/mL, P < 0.001; CD: 18.33 [16.72-25.77] mg/mL vs 34.38 [22.58-39.92] mg/mL, P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed higher PF4 level as an independent predictor of disease activity in UC and CD patients (UC: odds ratio 30.375, P = 0.002; CD: odds ratio 54.167, P < 0.001). The cut-off level of PF4 for distinguishing active from inactive UC patients was 24.1 mg/mL. While in CD patients, the cut-off level of PF4 was 19.24 mg/mL.Serum PF4 levels could be a potential biomarker for monitoring the disease activity of inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  3. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  4. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  5. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  6. Hysteresis-like binding of coagulation factors X/Xa to procoagulant activated platelets and phospholipids results from multistep association and membrane-dependent multimerization.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kurasawa, James H; Sarafanov, Andrey G; Chambost, Herve; Vasil'ev, Sergey A; Demina, Irina A; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-06-01

    Binding of coagulation factors X (fX) and Xa (fXa) to activated platelets is required for the formation of membrane-dependent enzymatic complexes of intrinsic tenase and prothrombinase. We carried out an in-depth characterization of fX/fXa binding to phospholipids and gel-filtered, thrombin-activated platelets. Flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance, and computational modeling were used to investigate interactions of fX/fXa with the membranes. Confocal microscopy was employed to study fXa binding to platelet thrombi formed in flowing whole blood under arterial conditions. Binding of fX/fXa to either vesicles or procoagulant platelets did not follow a traditional one-step reversible binding model. Their dissociation was a two-step process resulting in a plateau that was up to 10-fold greater than the saturation value observed in the association experiments. Computational modeling and experimental evidence suggested that this was caused by a combination of two-step association (mainly for fX) and multimerization on the membrane (mainly for fXa). Importantly, fX formed multimers with fXa, thereby improving its retention. The same binding/dissociation hysteresis was observed for annexin V known to form trimers on the membranes. Experiments with platelets from gray syndrome patients showed that alpha-granular factor Va provided an additional high-affinity binding site for fXa that did not affect the hysteresis. Confocal microscopy observation of fXa binding to platelet thrombi in a flow chamber and its wash-out confirmed that this phenomenon persisted under physiologically relevant conditions. This suggests its possible role of "locking" coagulation factors on the membrane and preventing their inhibition in plasma and removal from thrombi by flow.

  7. Characterization of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Stafforini, D M; Imaizumi, T; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated as a mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. A specific degradative enzyme found in plasma, PAF acetylhydrolase, plays important roles in various pathophysiological events induced by PAF. Human macrophages and Hep G2 cells secrete PAF acetylhydrolase with characteristics identical to the plasma activity. Other investigators reported that apolipoprotein B may possess phospholipase A2 activity, which suggested that apolipoprotein B might be a zymogen for PAF acetylhydrolase. However, while macrophages express PAF acetylhydrolase activity, we did not detect cDNAs for apolipoprotein B in a cDNA library from these cells, indicating that macrophages do not express this protein. In contrast, Hep G2 cells had high levels of cDNA for apolipoprotein B, as expected. We next injected Xenopus laevis oocytes with poly(A)+ RNA extracted from cultured human macrophages and Hep G2 cells. Twenty-five to 50% of Xenopus oocytes injected with poly(A)+ RNA from macrophages or Hep G2 cells secreted a PAF acetylhydrolase activity (1.0-7.8 nmol/ml per h) that also utilized a synthetic oxidized phospholipid as substrate. The activity secreted by poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes associated with lipoproteins and transferred between the particles in a pH-dependent manner, much like the plasma activity. These experiments establish that the properties of the enzyme released from poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes are identical to those of the plasma form of PAF acetylhydrolase and that the activity detected is not the expression of a domain in apolipoprotein B. Images PMID:7937948

  8. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-07-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency.

  9. Effect of platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase on the formation and action of minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A D; Navab, M; Hama, S Y; Sevanian, A; Prescott, S M; Stafforini, D M; McIntyre, T M; Du, B N; Fogelman, A M; Berliner, J A

    1995-01-01

    Mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein (MM-LDL) produced by oxidative enzymes or cocultures of human artery wall cells induces endothelial cells to produce monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and to bind monocytes. HDL prevents the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures of artery wall cells. Using albumin treatment and HPLC we have isolated and partially characterized bioactive oxidized phospholipids in MM-LDL. Platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), a serine esterase, hydrolyzes short chain acyl groups esterified to the sn-2 position of phospholipids such as PAF and particular oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. Treatment of MM-LDL with PAF-AH (2-4 x 10(-2) U/ml) eliminated the ability of MM-LDL to induce endothelial cells to bind monocytes. When HDL protected against the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures, lysophosphatidylcholine was detected in HDL; whereas when HDL was pretreated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, HDL was no longer protective and lysophosphatidylcholine was undetectable. HPLC analysis also revealed that the active oxidized phospholipid species in MM-LDL had been destroyed after PAF-AH treatment. In addition, treatment of MM-LDL with albumin removed polar phospholipids that, when reisolated, induced monocyte binding to endothelial cells. These polar phospholipids, when treated with PAF-AH, lost biological activity and were no longer detected by HPLC. These results suggest that PAF-AH in HDL protects against the production and activity of MM-LDL by facilitating hydrolysis of active oxidized phospholipids to lysolipids, thereby destroying the biologically active lipids in MM-LDL. PMID:7860760

  10. Serum-induced platelet procoagulant activity: an assay for the characterization of prothrombotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Warner, M N; Pavord, S; Moore, J C; Warkentin, T E; Hayward, C P; Kelton, J G

    1999-02-01

    Platelets contribute to hemostasis by forming a platelet plug and by providing a procoagulant surface for the assembly and activation of the coagulation factors. The contribution of platelets to prothrombotic disorders has been difficult to analyze. Recently an assay was reported that measured the procoagulant activity of test platelets by making the platelet lipid surface the limiting factor in the production of thrombin. In this report we describe a novel technique, based on this assay, that we used to study patient serum factors that activate control platelets and in turn initiate measurable procoagulant activity. Using this assay we investigated a group of patients with prothrombotic disorders. The patient test serum was incubated with normal platelets in the presence of activated factor Xa. The resultant thrombin was measured in a chromogenic assay. The rate-limiting step was the presence of any potential platelet-activating factors, such as antibodies in the heat-treated test serum, that would allow the Xa to bind to the platelet phospholipid surface. Serum samples from patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) and the anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome enhanced platelet procoagulant activity, while samples from patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) did not. HIT serum samples also induced platelet activation, as measured by platelet microparticle shedding, carbon 14-labeled serotonin release, and platelet aggregation. The measurement of serum-induced platelet procoagulant activity provides a method for the investigation of circulating platelet agonists in prothrombotic disorders.

  11. Radioimmunoassay of factor V in human plasma and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, P.B.; Eide, L.L.; Bowie, E.J.W.; Mann, K.G.

    1982-07-01

    Homogeneous, single-chain human factor V was used to develop a double antibody competition radioimmunoassay to measure factor V concentrations in plasma and platelets. Standard curves were constructed that allow for the detection of as little as 20 ng factor V/ml of plasma. Normal factor V concentrations range from 4 to 14 ..mu..g/ml of plasma with an average value of 7.0 +/- 2.0 ..mu..g/ml (n = 64). No correlation was observed between antigen levels and age or sex. The radioimmunoassay data are consistent with factor V clotting assays, providing freshly drawn plasma is used in the bioassay. Radioimmunoassay of washed platelets indicate that 0.63-1.93 ..mu..g of factor V is present per 2.5 X 10/sup 8/ platelets (6412-14128 molecules of factor V per platelet). When normalized to individual hematocrits and platelet count, the data indicated that platelets contribute approximately 18%-25% of the factor V found in whole blood. In addition, two individuals with functionally deficient factor V were examined and found to be deficient in both antigen and activity.

  12. Risk factors for coronary heart disease and platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Renaud, S

    1984-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that several environmental factors are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Most of them are predisposing factors known also as risk factors. Other factors appear to have preventive effects. Blood lipids have been considered the main blood mediator between most of these factors and CHD. In recent years, this concept has been challenged since many of these factors did not affect serum lipids. By contrast blood platelets, involved in both thrombosis and atherosclerosis, appear to have their functions markedly changed by most of the factors associated with CHD. To determine whether saturated fats would affect platelet functions as shown in animals and in pilot studies in man, groups of male farmers (40-45 years) from 2 regions of France (Var and Moselle) in which the mortality rate from CHD differed markedly were studied, particularly regarding their platelet functions in relation to the intake of saturated fats. No difference could be observed in blood between the 2 regions concerning total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides, the coagulation was markedly accelerated, as well as the platelet clotting activity in farmers from Moselle. The response of platelets mostly to thrombin but also to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), epinephrine, and collagen was more elevated in Moselle farmers. In Moselle farmers, there was significantly higher intake of saturated fats (16% of the calories) as compared to Var (12%). To determine whether the abnormal platelet response in Moselle farmers was really due to the diet or whether a genetic factor might be involved, a group of 50 Moselle farmers were persuaded to change their dietary habits in order to lower their intake of saturated fats to 10% of the calories and that of polyunsaturated to approximately 12%. 1 year after diet modification, the clotting time (PCT) and clotting activity of platelets were considerably prolonged and the response to thrombin drastically reduced. These

  13. Sequential expression of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor in rat hippocampal neurons after fluid percussion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqiang; Shu, Qingming; Li, Lingzhi; Ge, Maolin; Zhang, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes gene expression changes in different brain regions. Occurrence and development of traumatic brain injury are closely related, involving expression of three factors, namely cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. However, little is known about the correlation of these three factors and brain neuronal injury. In this study, primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons were subjected to fluid percussion injury according to Scott's method, with some modifications. RT-PCR and semi-quantitative immunocytochemical staining was used to measure the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. Our results found that cyclooxygenase-2 expression were firstly increased post-injury, and then decreased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached peaks at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Similar sequential changes in glutamate receptor 2 were observed, with highest levels mRNA and protein expression at 8 and 12 hours post-injury respectively. On the contrary, the expressions of platelet activating factor receptor were firstly decreased post-injury, and then increased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached the lowest levels at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Totally, our findings suggest that these three factors are involved in occurrence and development of hippocampal neuronal injury. PMID:25206921

  14. Differential effects of interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 on immunomodulatory role of platelet-activating factor in human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Patke, C L; Green, C G; Shearer, W T

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a naturally occurring phospholipid cytokine, is a potent mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, as well as a modulator of immune responses. In the present study we showed that PAF is involved in early B-cell activation, as demonstrated by the increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) generation by PAF in a time- and dose-dependent manner in anti-mu antibody- plus B-cell growth factor-activated normal human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. PAF also regulated differentiation by causing a biphasic response on immunoglobulin M (IgM) production with an inhibitory signal generated at 10(-6) M and a stimulatory signal generated at 10(-8) to 10(-10) M. PAF enhanced IgA secretion. The regulation exerted by PAF was shown to be specific because the addition of the PAR antagonist CV-3988 abrogated these effects and the inactive form of PAF, lyso-PAF, induced neither cAMP generation nor immunoglobulin secretion in normal human B cells. Other cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4, potent mediators of the immune response, were unable to elicit a cAMP response in B cells. However, the addition of PAF (10(-6) M) with wither IL-2 or IL-4 enhanced cAMP production above the levels enhanced by the addition of PAF alone. IL-2 or IL-4, individually, stimulated IgM production, yet costimulation with PAF resulted in a differential effect between IL-2 and IL-4. PAF down-regulated the IL-4-induced IgM secretion, whereas the IL-2-induced IgM secretion was enhanced. The presence of CV-3988 returned all valued to those obtained with IL-2 or IL-4 alone, demonstrating the specificity of PAF. These data suggest that PAF is an important B-cell immunomodulator which can interact with other leukocyte cell mediators. PMID:8556480

  15. An oxidized derivative of phosphatidylcholine is a substrate for the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Stremler, K E; Stafforini, D M; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1989-04-05

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a glycerophospholipid that has diverse potent biological actions. A plasma enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acetoyl group of PAF and thereby abolishes its bioactivity. This PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for phospholipids, such as PAF, with a short acyl group at the sn-2 position. The majority of it (60-70%) is associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the remainder is with high density lipoprotein (HDL). LDL also has a phospholipase A2 activity that is specific for oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may be important in determining how LDL is recognized by cellular receptors. We previously have purified and characterized the PAF acetylhydrolase from human plasma. We now have found that the purified PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the oxidized fragments of arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of phosphatidylcholine. One of the preferred substrates appeared by mass spectrometry to have 5-oxovalerate at the sn-2 position. We synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and found that the PAF acetylhydrolase had the same apparent Km for it (11.3 microM) as for PAF (12.5 microM), with Vmax values of 100 and 167 mumol/h/mg of protein, respectively. We also conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase is the sole activity in LDL that degrades oxidized phospholipids since we found co-localization of the activity against both substrates to LDL and HDL, and precipitation of enzyme activity with an antibody to the PAF acetylhydrolase. Thus, the PAF acetylhydrolase in human plasma degrades oxidized phospholipids, which may be involved in the modification of apolipoprotein B100 and other pathological processes.

  16. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  17. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheremata, William A; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Yeon S; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS) patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP), P-selectin expression (CD62p), circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg)], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p < 0.001) and CD62p expression was also markedly elevated (p < 0.001). Both are markers of platelet activation. Platelet-associated IgM, but not IgG, was marginally elevated in MS (p = 0.01). Protein S in MS patients did not differ significantly from normal values. Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted. PMID:18588683

  18. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  19. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  20. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  1. Identification and functional characterization of platelet-activating factor receptors in human leukocyte populations using polyclonal anti-peptide antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, E; Dagenais, P; Alami, N; Rola-Pleszczynski, M

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the successful cloning of a receptor for platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator of inflammation, was reported. Here we investigated the distribution and potential diversity of human PAF receptors (hPAF-Rs) among individual leukocyte populations by (i) hPAF-R mRNA transcription studies and (ii) analysis of cell surface expression of hPAF-R protein using a polyclonal anti-peptide antibody (anti-hPAF-R164-173). Northern blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting with anti-hPAF-R antibody indicated that monocytic, neutrophilic, and B-lymphocytic cell lines all shared a similar hPAF-R species, whereas resting T-cell and natural killer cell lines failed to express detectable levels of either hPAF-R protein or mRNA. Peripheral blood leukocyte populations showed a distribution of hPAF-R cell surface expression similar to that of the corresponding cell lines. Furthermore, binding of anti-hPAF-R164-173 antiserum, purified IgG, or Fab and F(ab')2 fragments to the receptor of all investigated PAF-R-positive cell lines induced an increase in intracellular free calcium concentration. The characterization of the expression of a lipid ligand receptor using antibodies against an intrinsic portion of the receptor protein has, to our knowledge, never been reported previously. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8390683

  2. Short term effects of indomethacin on rat small intestinal permeability. Role of eicosanoids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mion, F; Cuber, J C; Minaire, Y; Chayvialle, J A

    1994-01-01

    Short term effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability were studied on a model of rat isolated vascularly perfused terminal ileum. The objectives of this study were (a) to assess the effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability and histology; (b) to assess the effects of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and platelet activating factor (PAF) on the same parameters; (c) to evaluate the role of these inflammation mediators on indomethacin induced permeability modifications. Intravascular administration of 1.25 and 2.5 mM indomethacin induced a significant increase of 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate. Histological analysis showed only mucosal oedema. Pretreatment with 16,16 dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 did not reverse these changes. Intravascular administration of PAF, leukotrienes B4 and D4 provoked a significant rise in 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate and intraluminal protein leakage, with an intense vascocongestion of the mucosal capillaries. These changes were completely prevented by perfusion of the respective specific antagonists (BN52021 for PAF, LY255,583 for leukotriene B4 and MK571 for leukotriene D4). None of these three antagonists, however, or MK886, a selective 5'-lipo-oxygenase inhibitor, could reverse the indomethacin induced permeability changes. Indomethacin induced increased intestinal permeability at these high concentrations does not seem to be a result of changed prostanoid or PAF metabolism. Alternative mechanisms of the initial damage of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs should be sought. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8174986

  3. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers.

    PubMed

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica; Burgos, Rafael Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response.

  4. Semi-synthetic preparation of 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) using plant cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, N.; Mangold, H.K.

    1985-04-01

    Incubation of photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and heterotrophic cell suspension cultures of soya (Glycine max) with 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycerol or rac-1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecylglycerol leads in high yield (up to 78%) to labeled 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. Alkaline hydrolysis of the choline glycerophospholipids yields pure 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. 1-O-(1'-14C)Hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) is obtained by acetylating the lyso compound. The semi-synthetic preparation described leads to labeled platelet activating factor in an overall yield of 50-60% without loss of specific activity.

  5. A Novel Direct Factor Xa Inhibitory Peptide with Anti-Platelet Aggregation Activity from Agkistrodon acutus Venom Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meimei; Ye, Xiaohui; Ming, Xin; Chen, Yahui; Wang, Ying; Su, Xingli; Su, Wen; Kong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Snake venom is a natural substance that contains numerous bioactive proteins and peptides, nearly all of which have been identified over the last several decades. In this study, we subjected snake venom to enzymatic hydrolysis to identify previously unreported bioactive peptides. The novel peptide ACH-11 with the sequence LTFPRIVFVLG was identified with both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities. ACH-11 inhibited the catalytic function of FXa towards its substrate S-2222 via a mixed model with a Ki value of 9.02 μM and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP and U46619 in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, ACH-11 exhibited potent antithrombotic activity in vivo. It reduced paralysis and death in an acute pulmonary thrombosis model by 90% and attenuated thrombosis weight in an arterio-venous shunt thrombosis model by 57.91%, both at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Additionally, a tail cutting bleeding time assay revealed that ACH-11 did not prolong bleeding time in mice at a dose of 3 mg/kg. Together, our results reveal that ACH-11 is a novel antithrombotic peptide exhibiting both FXa inhibition and anti-platelet aggregation activities, with a low bleeding risk. We believe that it could be a candidate or lead compound for new antithrombotic drug development. PMID:26035670

  6. Purification of human platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes a method for purification of human platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from outdated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) using commonly available laboratory reagents and yielding a mitogen purified 800,000-fold over the starting material. (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into DNA of cultured cells responsive to PDGF represents the most readily available method to follow its purification and define the biological activity of a purified preparation. Other assays to quantitate PDGF include radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay.

  7. Local shear conditions and platelet aggregates regulate the incorporation and activity of circulating tissue factor in ex-vivo thrombi.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Viji; Vele, Oana; Nemerson, Yale

    2002-11-01

    The presence of thrombogenic blood-borne or circulating tissue factor (cTF) has recently been demonstrated. These observations have implicated cTF to be a key determinant of thrombus propagation by depositing on platelets in nascent thrombi. Previously, we detected cTF by detergent solubilization and addition of phospholipids. We now report the direct demonstration of TF activity in ex-vivo thrombi. Collagen-coated substrates were exposed to native blood at shear rates of 0, 650, and 2,000 s(-1) for 10 min in a modified rotating Teflon cone and plate viscometer. Substrates were then gently rinsed to remove 'loose' (unadherent) components of blood. cTF activity was measured by adding a solution containing 10 nM FVIIa, 100 nM FX, and 5 mM CaCl(2) to the substrates exposed to blood. Samples of this mixture were obtained at intervals for 30 min and the amount of Xa generated was quantified by adding a chromogenic substrate, Spectrozyme Xa, and measuring the increase in OD at 405 nm. Our studies show that a minimal amount of generated Xa (approximately 1nM) can be measured from ex-vivo thrombi. Static and shear samples generated the same amount of Xa, with the exception of blood subjected to 650 s(-1) shear. At 650 s(-1) shear rate, the amount of Xa generated reached a maximum of 4 nM at 5 min and then decreased to approximately 1 nM. Immunohistological stains and fluorescent images demonstrate the presence of cTF antigen at 650 s(-1) wall shear rate.

  8. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides via phospholipase A2 in primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, T.; Hasegawa, K.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-07-01

    Addition of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to cells doubly labeled with (/sup 14/C)glycerol plus (/sup 3/H)arachidonic acid resulted in a transient decrease of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI) and a transient increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). (/sup 3/H)Arachidonate-labeled PI, on the other hand, decreased in a time-dependent manner. The radioactivity in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylserine did not change significantly. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio decreased in PI in a time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of a phospholipase A2 activity. Although PAF also induced a gradual increase of diacylglycerol (DG), the increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled DG paralleled the loss of triacyl (/sup 14/C)glycerol and the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of DG was 16 times smaller than that of PI. Thus, DG seemed not to be derived from PI. In myo- (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled cells, PAF induced a transient decrease of (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (TPI) and (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) at 1 min. PAF stimulation of cultured hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/Pi induced a transient decrease of (/sup 32/P)polyphosphoinositides at 20 sec to 1 min. (/sup 32/P)LPI appeared within 10 sec after stimulation and paralleled the loss of (/sup 32/P)PI. (/sup 3/H)Inositol triphosphate, (/sup 3/H)inositol diphosphate, and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate, which increased in a time-dependent manner upon stimulation with adrenaline, did not accumulate with the stimulation due to PAF. These observations indicate that PAF causes degradation of inositol phospholipids via phospholipase A2 and induces a subsequent resynthesis of these phospholipids.

  9. Fish oil supplementation decreases oxidative stress but does not affect platelet-activating factor bioactivity in lungs of asthmatic rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, A L; Miranda, D T S Z; Dias, B C L; Campos, R M; Massaro, M C; Michelotto, P V; West, A L; Miles, E A; Calder, P C; Nishiyama, A

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fish oil supplementation increases the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cellular membranes. The highly unsaturated nature of n-3 PUFA could result in an enhanced lipid peroxidation in the oxidative environment characteristic of asthma. The oxidative reaction cascade culminates in an increased production of components associated to oxidative stress and of an important proinflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like lipid. We evaluated the effect of fish oil supplementation in asthmatic rats upon the PAF bioactivity and parameters related to oxidative stress in the lung. Fish oil supplementation of asthmatic rats resulted in lower concentrations of nitrite (1.719 ± 0.137 vs. 2.454 ± 0.163 nmol/mL) and lipid hydroperoxide (72.190 ± 7.327 vs. 120.200 ± 11.270 nmol/mg protein). In asthmatic animals, fish oil increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (33.910 ± 2.325 vs. 24.110 ± 0.618 U/mg protein) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) (164.100 ± 31.250 vs. 12.590 ± 5.234 U/mg protein). However, fish oil did not affect PAF bioactivity in lung tissue of asthmatic rats (0.545 ± 0.098 340/380 vs. 0.669 ± 0.101 340/380 nm ratio). Considering the two-step process--oxidative stress and PAF bioactivity--fish oil exhibited a divergent action on these aspects of asthmatic inflammation, since the supplement lowered oxidative stress in the lungs of asthmatic rats, presenting an antioxidant effect, but did not affect PAF bioactivity. This suggests a dual effect of fish oil on oxidative stress and inflammation in asthma.

  10. Expression of platelet-derived growth factor and its receptors in normal human liver and during active hepatic fibrogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Pinzani, M.; Milani, S.; Herbst, H.; DeFranco, R.; Grappone, C.; Gentilini, A.; Caligiuri, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Ngo, D. V.; Romanelli, R. G.; Gentilini, P.

    1996-01-01

    Expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and its receptor (R) subunits was evaluated in normal human liver and in cirrhotic liver tissue by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. In normal liver, PDGF and PDGF-R subunit expression was limited to a few mesenchymal cells of the portal tract stroma and vessels. In cirrhotic liver, PDGF-A and -B chain mRNA expression was markedly increased and was co-distributed with immunoreactivity for PDGF-AA and -BB in infiltrating inflammatory cells and along vascular structures within fibrous septa. These aspects were paralleled by a marked overexpression of PDGF-R alpha- and beta-subunit mRNAs and of the relative immunoreactivities in a wide range of mesenchymal cells in fibrous septa and in perisinusoidal alpha-smooth-muscle-actin-positive cells. In general expression and distribution of PDGF-R subunits appeared to be related to the activation of different mesenchymal cell types involved in the fibroproliferative process. Therefore, we evaluated the expression of PDGF-R subunits in liver tissue specimens with increasing degrees of necroinflammatory activity. The results of this additional study confirmed that expression of PDGF-R subunits is highly correlated with the severity of histological lesions and collagen deposition. Our results, providing evidence for a functional involvement of PDGF/PDGF-R in liver fibrogenesis, greatly support the results of previous in vitro studies and direct attention toward pharmacological strategies able to affect the series of signaling events arising from the autophosphorylation of PDGF-R subunits. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8774134

  11. Platelet actively cooled thermal management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueggenburg, H. H.; Hidahl, J. W.; Kessler, E. L.; Rousar, D. C.

    1992-07-01

    An overview of 28 years of actively-cooled platelet thermal management devices design and development history is presented. Platelet devices are created by bonding together thin metal sheets (platelets) which contain chemically-etched coolant pasages. The bonding process produces an intricate and precise matrix of coolant passages and structural walls contained within a monolithic structure. Thirteen specific applications for platelet thermal management devices are described. These devices are cooled using convective, film, and transpiration cooling techniques. Platelet thermal management devices have been fabricated from a variety of metals, cooled with a variety of fluids, and operated at heat fluxes up to 200 Btu/sq in.-sec.

  12. Platelet activating factor: release from colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis and its effect on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1996-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis. They may stimulate intestinal secretion and contribute to the production of diarrhoea. Platelet activating factor (PAF) may be responsible for a high proportion of this secretory response. Biopsy specimens from inflamed and quiescent mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis and normal human colonic mucosa were cultured or co-cultured. The release of PAF, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene D4 into the culture medium was measured and the ability of this culture medium, from inflamed and normal tissues, to influence secretion in rat colonic mucosa was assessed. PAF was liberated by inflamed tissue. Its release from quiescent but not normal tissue was stimulated by medium in which inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues had been cultured and by exogenous bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, but not by histamine. PAF stimulated eicosanoid production. The rise in short circuit current produced in vitro by inflamed tissue culture medium was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist (CV 6209) (46%) (32.4 (2.9) v 17.5 (1.19) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005) and further by combined cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) (58%) (32.4 (2.9) v 13.6 (1.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005). Mepacrine and hydrocortisone attenuated considerably the electrical response evoked by medium from inflamed mucosa to a similar extent (32.4 (2.9) v 6.3 (1.2) v 5.1 (0.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.001). These data suggest that PAF accounted for 46% of the culture medium secretory effect. Thus, any attempt to block its release in patients with ulcerative colitis may have only a partial effect on their symptoms. PMID:8675086

  13. Memory enhancement by intrahippocampal, intraamygdala, or intraentorhinal infusion of platelet-activating factor measured in an inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, I; Fin, C; Schmitz, P K; Da Silva, R C; Jerusalinsky, D; Quillfeldt, J A; Ferreira, M B; Medina, J H; Bazan, N G

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is thought to be a retrograde messenger in long-term potentiation (LTP), enhances glutamate release and LTP through an action on presynaptic nerve endings. The PAF antagonist BN 52021 blocks CA1 LTP in hippocampal slices, and, when infused into rat dorsal hippocampus pre- or posttraining, blocks retention of inhibitory avoidance. Here we report that memory is affected by pre- or posttraining infusion of the PAF analog 1-O-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (mc-PAF) into either rat dorsal hippocampus, amygdala, or entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in these brain regions. After recovery from surgery, the animals were trained in step-down inhibitory avoidance or in a spatial habituation task and tested for retention 24 h later. mc-PAF (1.0 microgram per side) enhanced retention test performance of the two tasks when infused into the hippocampus before training without altering training session performance. In addition, mc-PAF enhanced retention test performance of the avoidance task when infused into (i) the hippocampus 0 but not 60 min after training; (ii) the amygdala immediately after training; and (iii) the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. In confirmation of previous findings, BN 52021 (0.5 microgram per side) was found to be amnestic for the avoidance task when infused into the hippocampus or the amygdala immediately but not 30 or more minutes after training or into the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. These findings support the hypothesis that memory involves PAF-regulated events, possibly LTP, generated at the time of training in hippocampus and amygdala and 100 min later in the entorhinal cortex. PMID:7761446

  14. Cbl proteins in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Tsygankov, Alexander; Sanjay, Archana; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Their functional responses have to be tightly controlled as any disturbance may lead to bleeding disorders or thrombosis. It is thus important to clearly identify and understand the signaling mechanisms involved in platelet function. An important role of c-Cbl and Cbl-b ubiquitin ligases in platelet functional responses and in hematological malignancies has been recently described. Cbl proteins perform negative and positive regulation of several signaling pathways in platelets. In this review, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in platelet functional responses.

  15. Vascular endothelial (VEGF) and epithelial growth factor (EGF) as well as platelet-activating factor (PAF) and receptors are expressed in the early pregnant canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Somi, S; Sabitzer, S; Klein, D; Reinbacher, E; Kanca, H; Beceriklisoy, H B; Aksoy, O A; Kucukaslan, I; Macun, H C; Aslan, S

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the course of expression of platelet-activating factor (PAF), PAF-receptor (PAF-R), epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGF-R, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in uterine tissue during canine pregnancy. For this purpose, 20 bitches were ovariohysterectomized at days 10-12 (n = 10), 18-25 (n = 5) and 28-45 (n = 5) days after mating, respectively. The pre-implantation group was proven pregnant by embryo flushing of the uterus after the operation, the others by sonography. Five embryo negative, that is, non-pregnant, bitches in diestrus (day 10-12) served as controls. Tissue samples from the uterus (placentation sites and horn width, respectively) were excised and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen after embedding in Tissue Tec(®). Extraction of mRNA for RT-PCR was performed with Tri-Reagent. In the embryos, mRNA from all factors except VEGF was detected. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of PAF and PAFR as well as VEGF and VEGFR2 during the pre-implantation stage than in all other stages and a strong upregulation of EGF during implantation were characteristic. The course of EGF was in diametrical opposition to the course of the receptor. These results point towards an increased demand for VEGF, EGF and PAF during the earliest stages of canine pregnancy.

  16. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII.

    PubMed

    Mattheij, Nadine J A; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C F M J; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Beckers, Erik A M; Suylen, Dennis P L; Nolte, Marc W; Hackeng, Tilman M; McCarty, Owen J T; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Cosemans, Judith M E M

    2016-04-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin α(IIb)β3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin α(IIb)β3 Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin α(IIb)β3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in α(IIb)β3(Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial α(IIb)β3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin α(IIb)β3.

  17. Coated platelets function in platelet-dependent fibrin formation via integrin αIIbβ3 and transglutaminase factor XIII

    PubMed Central

    Mattheij, Nadine J.A.; Swieringa, Frauke; Mastenbroek, Tom G.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; May, Frauke; Baaten, Constance C.F.M.J.; van der Meijden, Paola E.J.; Henskens, Yvonne M.C.; Beckers, Erik A.M.; Suylen, Dennis P.L.; Nolte, Marc W.; Hackeng, Tilman M.; McCarty, Owen J.T.; Heemskerk, Johan W.M.; Cosemans, Judith M.E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Coated platelets, formed by collagen and thrombin activation, have been characterized in different ways: i) by the formation of a protein coat of α-granular proteins; ii) by exposure of procoagulant phosphatidylserine; or iii) by high fibrinogen binding. Yet, their functional role has remained unclear. Here we used a novel transglutaminase probe, Rhod-A14, to identify a subpopulation of platelets with a cross-linked protein coat, and compared this with other platelet subpopulations using a panel of functional assays. Platelet stimulation with convulxin/thrombin resulted in initial integrin αIIbβ3 activation, the appearance of a platelet population with high fibrinogen binding, (independently of active integrins, but dependent on the presence of thrombin) followed by phosphatidylserine exposure and binding of coagulation factors Va and Xa. A subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound Rhod-A14 both in suspension and in thrombi generated on a collagen surface. In suspension, high fibrinogen and Rhod-A14 binding were antagonized by combined inhibition of transglutaminase activity and integrin αIIbβ3. Markedly, in thrombi from mice deficient in transglutaminase factor XIII, platelet-driven fibrin formation and Rhod-A14 binding were abolished by blockage of integrin αIIbβ3. Vice versa, star-like fibrin formation from platelets of a patient with deficiency in αIIbβ3 (Glanzmann thrombasthenia) was abolished upon blockage of transglutaminase activity. We conclude that coated platelets, with initial αIIbβ3 activation and high fibrinogen binding, form a subpopulation of phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets, and function in platelet-dependent star-like fibrin fiber formation via transglutaminase factor XIII and integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26721892

  18. Effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcoenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) on tissue paraoxonase 1 and plasma platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase activities.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Jamroz, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of pravastatin and fluvastatin on paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity in plasma, liver, heart, and kidney, as well as on plasma platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in the rat. The animals received pravastatin at doses of 4 and 40 mg/kg/d or fluvastatin at doses of 2 or 20 mg/kg/d for 3 weeks. Fluvastatin (20 mg/kg/d) reduced plasma PON1 activity toward paraoxon and phenyl acetate by 23.6% and 17.4%, respectively. The lower dose of this drug as well as both doses of pravastatin had no effect on plasma PON1. PON1 activity toward paraoxon in the liver of rats treated with 20 mg/kg/d fluvastatin was 27.5% lower than in the control group, and the activity toward phenyl acetate was reduced by 25.4% and 35.9% in rats receiving 2 and 20 mg/kg/d of this drug, respectively. Fluvastatin at 2 and 20 mg/kg/d also decreased cardiac PON1 by 31.3% and 27.3%, respectively. Both statins reduced PON1 activity in the renal cortex and medulla. Statins had no effect on plasma PAF-AH. It is concluded that fluvastatin reduces PON1 activity more efficiently than does pravastatin. Reducing effect on PON1 may negatively modulate atheroprotective potential of statins and may contribute to differences in antiatherosclerotic properties of different drugs in this group.

  19. Inhibition of platelet-activating factor- and zymosan-activated serum-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils by nedocromil sodium, BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, P. L.; Warringa, R. A.; Kok, P. T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inflammatory cells such as eosinophils and neutrophils are thought to contribute actively to the pathogenesis of asthma since they infiltrate into the lung tissue. These cells are mobilized by lipid-like and protein-like chemotactic factors. As illustrative examples of both groups, platelet-activating-factor (Paf) and zymosan-activated-serum (ZAS) were used in this study. The inhibitory effects of nedocromil sodium, the Paf antagonist BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate on Paf- and ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were evaluated. 2. All tested drugs inhibited Paf-induced neutrophil chemotaxis with approximately the same potency (IC50 approximately 1 nM). 3. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were equally potent in inhibiting ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (IC50 = 0.1-1 microM), whereas BN 52021 was considerably less potent (IC30 = 10 microM). 4. To find out whether the drugs tested could inhibit early events in cell activation, their capacity to inhibit Paf- and ZAS-induced cytosolic free Ca2+-mobilization was investigated. BN 52021, at a concentration of 100 microM, completely inhibited Paf-induced Ca2+-mobilization and inhibited ZAS-induced Ca2+-mobilization by about 50%. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were ineffective. PMID:2551444

  20. Identification of selective covalent inhibitors of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 from the screening of an oxadiazolone-capped peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bani Kanta; Liu, Xiaodan; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A potent and selective inhibitor of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 (PAFAH1B2) is described. The compound was derived by improvement of a modest affinity primary hit isolated from the screening of a bead-displayed peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library tethered to an oxadiazolone 'warhead'. The oxadiazolone moiety of the inhibitors was found to react covalently with the active site serine residue of PAFAH1B2. This screening strategy may be useful for the identification of many selective, covalent inhibitors of serine hydrolases.

  1. Targeting factor VIII expression to platelets for hemophilia A gene therapy does not induce an apparent thrombotic risk in mice.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, C K; Mattson, J G; Weiler, H; Shi, Q; Montgomery, R R

    2017-01-01

    Essentials Platelet-Factor (F) VIII gene therapy is a promising treatment in hemophilia A. This study aims to evaluate if platelet-FVIII expression would increase the risk for thrombosis. Targeting FVIII expression to platelets does not induce or elevate thrombosis risk. Platelets expressing FVIII are neither hyper-activated nor hyper-responsive.

  2. Effect of intravascular neutrophil chemotactic factors on blood neutrophil and platelet kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Issekutz, A.C.; Ripley, M.

    1986-02-01

    Intravenous infusion of an analogue (f-met-leu-phe (FMLP)) of a bacterial-derived polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) chemotactic factor, or of the complement-derived chemotactic stimulus, zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP, containing C5ades Arg) into rabbits induces acute PMNL margination in the pulmonary vasculature. The pulmonary PMNL sequestration is accompanied by thrombocytopenia. Because of the role platelets and PMNLs play in hemostasis and defense against infection, we studied the fate of these blood elements following sequestration induced by chemotactic factors. By employing 111In-labelled platelets and external radioisotope scanning, platelets were found to sequester in the pulmonary vasculature during FMLP infusion. Simultaneous 51Cr PMNL and 111In-platelet studies showed that following sequestration, PMNLs returned to the circulation and disappeared with a normal half-life (T1/2) whereas the T1/2 of the platelets was markedly shortened (T1/2 of control = 49 +/- 3.0 hr; FMLP or ZAP infused T1/2 = 27 +/- 2.7 hr). Infusion of platelet-activating factor (PAF) induced PMN and platelet sequestration with similar abnormalities in platelet kinetics. Studies with 51Cr- and 14C-serotonin-labelled platelets showed that platelets did not release serotonin during FMLP, ZAP, or low dose PAF-induced sequestration. In contrast to platelet survival, platelet size, platelet aggregation responses, and platelet glycoproteins were not affected by transient sequestration. These results indicate that during PMNL margination induced by relatively pure PMNL stimuli such as FMLP, platelets may reversibly marginate and subsequently be cleared at an accelerated rate. The reason for accelerated platelet clearance is not a result of circulating platelet aggregates or detectable proteolytic modification of membrane glycoproteins.

  3. Evidence for a novel signal transduction pathway activated by platelet-derived growth factor and by double-stranded RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D.J.; Jones, S.D.; Rollins, B.J.; Stiles, C.D. ); Stiles, C.D. ); Kaplan, D.R.; Whitman, M. )

    1989-04-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and the synthetic double-stranded RNA poly(I) x poly(C) (poly(I x C)) stimulate transcription of the JE gene in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts. The response of JE to poly(I x C) does not appear to be channeled through any known component of the PDGF receptor signal transduction apparatus. In addition, JE sequences upstream of the transcription start site are devoid of previously identified poly(I x C)-responsive elements, such as those found in the beta-interferon gene. These data suggest that a novel signal transduction pathway regulates the JE response to PDGF and double-stranded RNA. The c-myc and c-fos proto-oncogenes also respond to this pathway but with poor efficiency. However, this pathway operates very efficiently on other PDGF-inducible genes that encode the secretory proteins KC and M-CSF.

  4. Platelet function and fibrinolytic activity following distance running.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, J B; Brodthagen, U; Gormsen, J; Jordal, R; Nørregaard-Hansen, K; Paulev, P E

    1982-11-01

    6 long distance runners from the Danish marathon elite and 6 non-runners completed test runs of 28 and 12 km, respectively. Distance runners and non-runners showed the same responses in platelet function. We found a significant decrease in ADP induced platelet aggregability, a decreased serotonin release induced by ADP and collagen and an increase in platelet factor 4 immediately following the run. The antithrombin III levels remained constant. Euglobulin lysis time was shortened (by approximately 50%) and the plasminogen levels significantly increased. The last 2 findings indicate an equal increase in fibrinolytic activity during distance running in both groups. While short term, strenuous exercise induces platelet hyperaggregation, long term distance running induces a state of exhaustion of platelet aggregation capacity.

  5. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-04-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.There is substantial

  6. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  7. Exosomes: novel effectors of human platelet lysate activity.

    PubMed

    Torreggiani, E; Perut, F; Roncuzzi, L; Zini, N; Baglìo, S R; Baldini, N

    2014-09-22

    Despite the popularity of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) in orthopaedic practice, the mechanism of action and the effectiveness of these therapeutic tools are still controversial. So far, the activity of PRP and PL has been associated with different growth factors (GF) released during platelet degranulation. This study, for the first time, identifies exosomes, nanosized vesicles released in the extracellular compartment by a number of elements, including platelets, as one of the effectors of PL activity. Exosomes were isolated from human PL by differential ultracentrifugation, and analysed by electron microscopy and Western blotting. Bone marrow stromal cells (MSC) treated with three different exosome concentrations (0.6 μg, 5 μg and 50 μg) showed a significant, dose-dependent increase in cell proliferation and migration compared to the control. In addition, osteogenic differentiation assays demonstrated that exosome concentration differently affected the ability of MSC to deposit mineralised matrix. Finally, the analysis of exosome protein content revealed a higher amount of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) as compared to PL. In regards to RNA content, an enrichment of small RNAs in exosomes as compared to donor platelets has been found. These results suggest that exosomes consistently contribute to PL activity and could represent an advantageous nanodelivery system for cell-free regeneration therapies.

  8. Terminal platelet production is regulated by von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Nguyen, Kim Anh; Pietrzyk, Audrey; Casari, Caterina; Veyradier, Agnes; Denis, Cecile V; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    It is established that proplatelets are formed from mature megakaryocytes (MK) as intermediates before platelet production. Recently, the presence of proplatelets was described in blood incubated in static conditions. We have previously demonstrated that platelet and proplatelet formation is upregulated by MK exposure to high shear rates (1800 s(-1)) on immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether VWF is involved in the regulation of terminal platelet production in blood. To this end, Vwf (-/-) mice, a model of severe von Willebrand disease, were used to create a situation in which blood cells circulate in a vascular tree that is completely devoid of VWF. Murine platelets were isolated from Vwf (-/-) and Vwf (+/+) blood, exposed to VWF at 1800 s(-1) in a microfluidic platform, and examined by means of videomicroscopy, as well as fluorescence and activation studies. Proplatelets became visible within 5 minutes, representing 38% of all platelets after 12 minutes and 46% after 28 min. The proportion of proplatelets was 1.8-fold higher in blood from Vwf(-/-) mice than from Vwf(+/+) mice, suggesting a role of VWF in vivo. Fragmentation of these proplatelets into smaller discoid platelets was also observed in real-time. Platelets remained fully activatable by thrombin. Compensation of plasmatic VWF following hydrodynamic gene transfer in Vwf(-/-) mice reduced the percentage of proplatelets to wild-type levels. A thrombocytopenic mouse model was studied in the flow system, 7 days after a single 5-FU injection. Compared to untreated mouse blood, a 2-fold increase in the percentage of proplatelets was detected following exposure to 1800 s(-1) on VWF of samples from mice treated with 5-FU. In conclusion, VWF and shear stress together appear to upregulate proplatelet reorganization and platelet formation. This suggests a new function for VWF in vivo as regulator of bloodstream thrombopoiesis.

  9. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.F.; Chap, H.; Braquet, P.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1987-02-15

    /sup 32/P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca/sup 2 +/ from internal stores (Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca/sup 2 +/ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor.

  10. Purification of human platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Antoniades, H N; Scher, C D; Stiles, C D

    1979-01-01

    Human platelets contain a polypeptide growth factor that stimulates the proliferation of connective tissue cells. Purification of this platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was accomplished by heat (100 degrees C) treatment of washed platelets and subsequent ion-exchange chromatography, gel filtration in 1 M acetic acid, isoelectric focusing, and preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PDGF has an isoelectric point of 9.8 and a molecular weight ranging from 13,000 to 16,000 as judged by gel filtration in 1 M acetic acid or analytical sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions. The specific activity of the purified PDGF is 20 million times greater than that found in unfractionated human serum. Purified PDGF stimulates replicative DNA synthesis and cell proliferation in quiescent density-arrested cultures of BALB/c 3T3 cells at concentrations of 1 ng/ml (0.1 nM). Images PMID:287022

  11. Activated platelets signal chemokine synthesis by human monocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Weyrich, A S; Elstad, M R; McEver, R P; McIntyre, T M; Moore, K L; Morrissey, J H; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A

    1996-01-01

    Human blood monocytes adhere rapidly and for prolonged periods to activated platelets that display P-selectin, an adhesion protein that recognizes a specific ligand on leukocytes, P-selectin glycoprotein-1. We previously demonstrated that P-selectin regulates expression and secretion of cytokines by stimulated monocytes when it is presented in a purified, immobilized form or by transfected cells. Here we show that thrombin-activated platelets induce the expression and secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and IL-8 by monocytes. Enhanced monokine synthesis requires engagement of P-selectin glycoprotein-1 on the leukocyte by P-selectin on the platelet. Secretion of the chemokines is not, however, directly signaled by P-selectin; instead, tethering of the monocytes by P-selectin is required for their activation by RANTES (regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed presumed secreted), a platelet chemokine not previously known to induce immediate-early gene products in monocytes. Adhesion of monocytes to activated platelets results in nuclear translocation of p65 (RelA), a component of the NF-kappaB family of transcription factors that binds kappaB sequences in the regulatory regions of monocyte chemotactic protein-1, IL-8, and other immediate-early genes. However, expression of tissue factor, a coagulation protein that also has a kappaB sequence in the 5' regulatory region of its gene, is not induced in monocytes adherent to activated platelets. Thus, contact of monocytes with activated platelets differentially affects the expression of monocyte products. These experiments suggest that activated platelets regulate chemokine secretion by monocytes in inflammatory lesions in vivo and provide a model for the study of gene regulation in cell-cell interactions. PMID:8617886

  12. Aspirin Hydrolysis in Plasma Is a Variable Function of Butyrylcholinesterase and Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase 1b2 (PAFAH1b2)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Hartiala, Jaana; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman; Tang, W. H. Wilson; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin is rapidly hydrolyzed within erythrocytes by a heterodimer of PAFAH1b2/PAFAH1b3 but also in plasma by an unidentified activity. Hydrolysis in both compartments was variable, with a 12-fold variation in plasma among 2226 Cleveland Clinic GeneBank patients. Platelet inhibition by aspirin was suppressed in plasma that rapidly hydrolyzed aspirin. Plasma aspirin hydrolysis was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery disease compared with control subjects (16.5 ± 4.4 versus 15.1 ± 3.7 nmol/ml/min; p = 3.4 × 10−8). A genome-wide association study of 2054 GeneBank subjects identified a single locus immediately adjacent to the BCHE (butyrylcholinesterase) gene associated with plasma aspirin hydrolytic activity (lead SNP, rs6445035; p = 9.1 × 10−17). However, its penetrance was low, and plasma from an individual with an inactivating mutation in BCHE still effectively hydrolyzed aspirin. A second aspirin hydrolase was identified in plasma, the purification of which showed it to be homomeric PAFAH1b2. This is distinct from the erythrocyte PAFAH1b2/PAFAH1b3 heterodimer. Inhibitors showed that both butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and PAFAH1b2 contribute to aspirin hydrolysis in plasma, with variation primarily reflecting non-genetic variation of BChE activity. Therefore, aspirin is hydrolyzed in plasma by two enzymes, BChE and a new extracellular form of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, PAFAH1b2. Hydrolytic effectiveness varies widely primarily from non-genetic variation of BChE activity that affects aspirin bioavailability in blood and the ability of aspirin to inhibit platelet aggregation. PMID:23508960

  13. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Negative T cells than B6.lpr mice. This suggests that the absence of PF4 alleviates some tissue damage in the lupus prone mice. 6...mice with PF4-/- mice may alleviate multi organ dysfunction in Lupus prone mice. Reportable Outcomes Nothing to report Conclusions We have...dysfunction in lupus models. We have evaluated the relationship between Syk and platelets and have thus far identified a role for Syk in platelet lodging in

  14. High glucose concentration induces the overexpression of transforming growth factor-beta through the activation of a platelet-derived growth factor loop in human mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Di Paolo, S.; Gesualdo, L.; Ranieri, E.; Grandaliano, G.; Schena, F. P.

    1996-01-01

    High glucose concentration has been shown to induce the overexpression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 mRNA and protein in different cell types, including murine mesangial cells, thus possibly accounting for the expansion of mesangial extracellular matrix observed in diabetic glomerulopathy. In the present study, we evaluated platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain and PDGF-beta receptor gene expression in human mesangial cells (HMCs) exposed to different concentrations of glucose and then sought a possible relationship between a PDGF loop and the modulation of TGF-beta 1 expression. HMC [3H]thymidine incorporation was upregulated by 30 mmol/L glucose (HG) up to 24 hours, whereas it was significantly inhibited at later time points. Neutralizing antibodies to PDGF BB abolished the biphasic response to HG, whereas anti-TGF-beta antibodies reversed only the late inhibitory effect of hyperglycemic medium. HG induced an early and persistent increase of PDGF B-chain gene expression, as evaluated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, whereas PDGF-beta receptor mRNA increased by twofold after 6 hours, thereafter declining at levels 70% lower than in controls after 24 hours. 125I-Labeled PDGF BB binding studies in HMCs exposed to HG for 24 hours confirmed the decrease of PDGF-beta receptor expression. TGF-beta 1-specific transcripts showed 43 and 78% increases after 24 and 48 hours of incubation in HG, respectively, which was markedly diminished by anti-PDGF BB neutralizing antibodies or suramin. We conclude that HG induces an early activation of a PDGF loop that, in turn, causes an increase of TGF-beta 1 gene expression, thus modulating both HMC proliferation and mesangial matrix production. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8952542

  15. The impact of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like mediators on the functional activity of neutrophils: anti-inflammatory effects of human PAF-acetylhydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, T W; Van Den Berg1, J M; Tool, A T J; Roos, D

    2001-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory agent in infectious and inflammatory diseases, partly due to the activation of infiltrating phagocytes. PAF exerts its actions after binding to a monospecific PAF receptor (PAFR). The potent bioactivity is reflected by its ability to activate neutrophils at picomolar concentrations, as defined by changes in levels of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and induction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization at nanomolar concentration. The role of PAF in neutrophil survival is, however, less well appreciated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of synthetic PAFR-antagonists on various neutrophil functions were compared with the effect of recombinant human plasma-derived PAF-acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH), as an important enzyme for PAF degradation in blood and extracellular fluids. We found that endogenously produced PAF (–like) substances were involved in the spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils. At concentrations of 8 µg/ml or higher than normal plasma levels, rPAF-AH prevented spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis (21 ± 4% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; control) versus 62 ± 12% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; rPAF-AH 20 µg/ml); P < 0·01), during overnight cultures of 15 h. This effect depended on intact enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH and was not due to the resulting product lyso-PAF. The anti-inflammatory activity of rPAF-AH toward neutrophils was substantiated by its inhibition of PAF-induced chemotaxis and changes in [Ca2+]i. In conclusion, the efficient and stable enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH over so many hours of coculture with neutrophils demonstrates the potential for its use in the many inflammatory processes in which PAF (–like) substances are believed to be involved. PMID:11298128

  16. Aspirin can stimulate luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oksana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Vasilieva, Elena

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary investigation was conducted into the influence of aspirin on the luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelets stimulated with platelet-activating factor (PAF). Ten coronary artery disease patients and six volunteers without coronary artery disease were included in the study. All the patients received aspirin (daily dose, 100 mg) for at least 10 days before in vitro experiments. Luminol-enhanced luminescence of platelet-rich plasma samples mixed with a PAF solution was measured. After stimulation of platelets with PAF, we did not find a luminol-enhanced chemiluminescent response either in the non-coronary artery disease volunteers or in eight out of the 10 coronary artery disease patients examined. However, in samples from two patients where platelets were stimulated with PAF reactive oxygen species were formed. This ability was expressed as an intensive luminol-enhanced luminescence of activated platelets. Such a reaction was observed against the background of the administration of aspirin. The addition of aspirin to a test tube considerably enhanced the intensity of chemiluminescence. In one case, the cancellation of aspirin was accompanied by diminution of the intensity of luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelets. The clinical significance of this phenomenon is unknown.

  17. Inhibitory effects of acetylmelodorinol, chrysin and polycarpol from Mitrella kentii on prostaglandin E₂ and Thromboxane B₂ production and platelet activating factor receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Saadawi, Sakina; Jalil, Juriyati; Jasamai, Malina; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2012-04-26

    Acetylmelodorinol, chrysin and polycarpol, together with benzoic acid, benzoquinone and stigmasterol were isolated from the leaves of Mitrella kentii (Bl.) Miq. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) production in human whole blood using a radioimmunoassay technique. Their inhibitory effect on platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor binding to rabbit platelet was determined using ³H-PAF as a ligand. Among the compounds tested, chrysin showed a strong dose-dependent inhibitory activity on PGE(2) production (IC₅₀ value of 25.5 µM), which might be due to direct inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymatic activity. Polycarpol, acetylmelodorinol and stigmasterol exhibited significant and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on TXB₂ production with IC₅₀ values of 15.6, 19.1 and 19.4 µM, respectively, suggesting that they strongly inhibited COX-1 activity. Polycarpol and acetylmelodorinol showed strong dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PAF receptor binding with IC₅₀ values of 24.3 and 24.5 µM, respectively.

  18. Platelet-rich preparations to improve healing. Part II: platelet activation and enrichment, leukocyte inclusion, and other selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Davis, Vicki L; Abukabda, Alaeddin B; Radio, Nicholas M; Witt-Enderby, Paula A; Clafshenkel, William P; Cairone, J Vito; Rutkowski, James L

    2014-08-01

    Multiple platelet-rich preparations have been reported to improve wound and bone healing, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). The different methods employed during their preparation are important, as they influence the quality of the product applied to a wound or surgical site. Besides the general protocol for preparing the platelet-rich product (discussed in Part 1 of this review), multiple choices need to be considered during its preparation. For example, activation of the platelets is required for the release and enmeshment of growth factors, but the method of activation may influence the resulting matrix, growth factor availability, and healing. Additionally, some methods enrich leukocytes as well as platelets, but others are designed to be leukocyte-poor. Leukocytes have many important roles in healing and their inclusion in PRP results in increased platelet concentrations. Platelet and growth factor enrichment reported for the different types of platelet-rich preparations are also compared. Generally, TGF-β1 and PDGF levels were higher in preparations that contain leukocytes compared to leukocyte-poor PRP. However, platelet concentration may be the most reliable criterion for comparing different preparations. These and other criteria are described to help guide dental and medical professionals, in large and small practices, in selecting the best procedures for their patients. The healing benefits of platelet-rich preparations along with the low risk and availability of simple preparation procedures should encourage more clinicians to incorporate platelet-rich products in their practice to accelerate healing, reduce adverse events, and improve patient outcomes.

  19. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  20. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  1. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5ppm for 6h) or sub-chronic (1ppm, 6h/day for 4days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  2. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in leukocytes and body composition in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Panagiotakos, Demosthenis B; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2009-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) also known as serum platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity constitutes a novel risk marker for cardiovascular disease. Leukocytes constitute one main cellular source of circulating Lp-PLA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of both serum and leukocyte PAF-AH activities with fat distribution and lean tissue. One hundred healthy volunteers without cardiovascular disease history participated in this study (n = 52 men, 44 ± 13 years and n = 48 women, 43 ± 13 years). Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, while anthropometrical indices were also measured. The activity of Lp-PLA2 and levels of lipid and glycemic parameters were determined in fasting samples. Results Mean Lp-PLA2 activity was 24.8 ± 4.5 and 19.6 ± 5.0 nmol/min/mL in men and women, respectively (P < 0.001). Mean activity of PAF-AH in leukocyte homogenates was 386 ± 127 pmol/min/mg and 292 ± 92 pmol/min/mg in men and women, correspondingly (P < 0.001). In multiple regression models upper and total adiposity measures were positively associated with Lp-PLA2 activity in men after adjusting for LDL-cholesterol, age, smoking, hs-CRP and physical activity, whereas no associations were found with PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity. Hierarchical analysis revealed that the variables with the highest explanatory ability of Lp-PLA2 activity in men, were DXA deriving L1–L4 region of interest and arms fat (increase in R2 = 0.136, P = 0.005 and increase in R2 = 0.118, P = 0.009, respectively), followed by trunk fat and total fat. In women, no association of body composition variables with Lp-PLA2 nor PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity was found. Conclusion Lp-PLA2 activity is differentiated across levels of adiposity and topology of adipose tissue, whereas no association was found regarding PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity. Our findings suggest that Lp-PLA2 may

  3. Oxidatively modified LDL contains phospholipids with platelet-activating factor-like activity and stimulates the growth of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heery, J M; Kozak, M; Stafforini, D M; Jones, D A; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative modification of lipoproteins is believed to be important in the genesis of atherosclerosis. We established cultures of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and exposed them to native LDL or oxidized LDL. Oxidized LDL, but not native LDL, was mitogenic as measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into DNA. This effect was concentration dependent, averaged 288% of control, and was blocked by a platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that phospholipids with PAF-like activity were generated during the oxidation of LDL. To test this hypothesis we extracted phospholipids from copper-oxidized LDL and assayed for PAF-like activity. Phospholipids extracted from oxidized LDL and purified by HPLC induced neutrophil adhesion equivalent to PAF (10 nM) and were mitogenic for smooth muscle cells. These effects were not seen with phospholipids extracted from native LDL and were blocked by two structurally different, competitive antagonists of the PAF receptor. The effects of these lipids were also abolished by pretreating them with PAF acetylhydrolase. Finally, we used Chinese hamster ovary cells that had seen stably transfected with a cDNA for the PAF receptor to confirm that phospholipids from oxidized LDL act via this receptor. We found that PAF (control) and the oxidized phospholipids each induced release of arachidonic acid from the transfected cells, but had no effect on wildtype Chinese hamster ovary cells, which lack the PAF receptor. This effect was also blocked by a PAF receptor antagonist. Thus, phospholipids generated during oxidative modification of LDL may participate in atherosclerosis by stimulating SMC proliferation and leukocyte activation. Images PMID:7593619

  4. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  5. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor increases the platelet volume in peripheral stem cell apheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Akihiro; Matsui, Keiko; Minami, Ryouta; Uchida, Shuzou; Ueda, Shuji; Nishiura, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the short-term influence of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration on platelet counts and platelet indices in 12 donors (8 males and 4 females; median age 34 years, range 16-49) for peripheral stem cell transplantation using an automated blood cell analyzer. On day 3 (D3) compared with D0, 11 donors with normal laboratory and physical findings showed increases in platelet indices (chi(2) = 12.0, p = 0.0025). Furthermore, mean platelet volume (MPV) was significantly increased (p = 0.04). Also, platelet count decreased, and platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio were increased, but these were not significant. On the contrary, 1 donor with abnormal laboratory findings who had large platelets (MPV 11.4 fl) before G-CSF administration showed decreases in platelet indices (MPV 10.3 fl) on D3, although platelet count (18.2 x 10(4)/microl) decreased after G-CSF administration. G-CSF administration induces an inflammatory process with endothelial cell activation. This is probably the reason why platelet volume increases after G-CSF use. This is the first report showing that G-CSF administration immediately induces increases in large platelets in peripheral stem cell transplant donors before harvest.

  6. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  7. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  8. Release of 1-O-alkylglyceryl 3-phosphorylcholine, O-deacetyl platelet-activating factor, from leukocytes: chemical ionization mass spectrometry of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, J; Tencé, M; Varenne, P; Das, B C; Lunel, J; Benveniste, J

    1980-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the simultaneous release of platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) and of its deacetylated derivative (lyso-PAF-acether) from hog leukocytes. On the basis of spectroscopy and chemical reactions, the structure of O-deacetyl-PAF is shown to be 1-O-alkylglyceryl 3-phosphorylcholine, an alkyl ether analog of lyso-phosphatidylcholine. Acetylation of lyso-PAF yields a compound with biological activity and chromatographical behavior indistinguishable from those of native PAF. Lyso-PAF may be considered to be either the precursor or the enzymatic degradation product of PAF. The usefulness of chemical ionization mass spectrometry for structural determination of phospholipids is also demonstrated. PMID:6938950

  9. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  10. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    2004; Danese et al., 2003). Recent studies have demonstrated a role for platelets in the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses...mediated modulation of adaptive immunity. A communication link between innate and adaptive immune compartments. Immunity 19:9-19. 4. Fleming, S.D., M...Monestier, and G.C. Tsokos. 2004. Accelerated ischemia/reperfusion- induced injury in autoimmunity-prone mice. Journal of immunology 173:4230-4235

  11. Acetylglyceryl ether phosphorylcholine (AGEPC; platelet-activating factor)-induced stimulation of rabbit platelets: correlation between phosphatidic acid level, 45Ca2+ uptake, and (3H)serotonin secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Hanahan, D.J.

    1984-08-01

    When 32P-labeled rabbits platelet were incubated with 5 X 10(-10) M 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine (AGEPC), either in the presence or absence (0.1 mM EGTA) of added Ca2+, there was a three- to five-fold increase in the (32P)phosphatidic acid (PA) pool within 15 to 20 s. This event was followed by a gradual decrease in the (32P)PA level to near basal level in 5 min. AGEPC effected this change in (32P)PA in a characteristic dose- and time-dependent manner. Polar head group analogs of AGEPC, such as AGEDME and AGEMME, also effected an increase in PA labeling at levels comparable to those previously reported for their activity toward rabbit platelets. Other analogs, i.e., lysoGEPC and the enantiomer, sn-1-AGEPC, which are inactive toward rabbit platelets, also showed no effect on the level of (32P)PA. The finding that the PA level in rabbit platelets could be manipulated by the addition of AGEPC, without any added Ca2+, provided an excellent model system for establishing a correlation between the uptake of Ca2+, serotonin release, and PA level. Thus, PA must be regarded as a sensitive indicator of a reaction mechanism important to the platelet response to AGEPC, and could be the focal point in promoting calcium uptake during the stimulation process.

  12. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Navdaev, Alexey; Subramanian, Hariharan; Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  13. Formation of a highly stable complex between BN 50730 [tetrahydro-4,7,8,10 methyl-1(chloro-2 phenyl)-6 (methoxy-4 phenyl-carbamoyl)-9 pyrido [4',3'-4,5] thieno [3,2-f] triazolo-1,2,4 [4,3-a] diazepine-1,4] and the platelet-activating factor receptor in rabbit platelet membranes.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Cruz, H N; Violante, F A; Cordeiro, R S; Martins, M A; Noël, F

    1996-01-26

    BN 50730 [tetrahydro-4,7,8,10 methyl-1(chloro-2 phenyl)-6 (methoxy-4 phenyl-carbamoyl)-9 pyrido [4',3'-4,5] thieno [3,2-f] triazolo-1,2,4 [4,3-alpha] diazepine-1,4], a novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist with a hetrazepine structure, decreased the maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of [3H]PAF in rabbit platelet membranes without altering its dissociation constant. Platelet aggregation induced by 1 microM PAF was prevented by preincubation with 1 microM BN 50730. The washing of the platelets preincubated with BN 50730 failed to revert its inhibitory effects. We conclude that BN 50730 acts as a non-competitive antagonist of the PAF receptor, due to the formation of a highly stable drug-receptor complex.

  14. Factors associated with hyperdynamic or hypodynamic circulation and role of platelet-activating factor in hemodynamic alterations in bacterial peritonitis in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Novo, C; Ais, G; López-Farré, A; Romeo, J M; Pérez-Barriocanal, F; López-Novoa, J M

    1995-12-01

    Male Wistar rats injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 10(9) U Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 developed acute bacterial peritonitis. Hemodynamic studies, with microspheres labeled with 103Ru 57Co, and 113Sn, were performed before, 30 min after bacterial injection, and 30 min after administration of either the platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist BN-52021 (5 mg/kg body weight) or isotonic saline. A blood sample of 0.3 ml was obtained for bacterial culture and endotoxemia measurements. Plasma PAF levels were measured in a different group of 10 control rats and 20 animals with experimental peritonitis. One group of rats injected with E. coli (n = 13) displayed hyperdynamic circulation, with an increase in cardiac output (CO) from 15.1 +/- 1.2 to 19.4 +/- 1.1 ml/min/100 g body weight and a decrease in total peripheral resistance (TPR) from 19.5 +/- 2.4 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 dynes.s.cm-5 10(-4). Furthermore, these rats showed high endotoxin blood concentrations and low hemoculture levels. The remaining 7 peritonitic rats showed a significant decrease in CO from 16.3 +/- 1.6 to 12.7 +/- 1.2 ml/min/100 g body weight and an increase in TPR from 17.3 +/- 1.8 to 22.6 +/- 2.8 dynes.s.cm-5 10(-4). In addition, these rats showed low endotoxin blood concentrations and high hemoculture levels. Endotoxin blood concentrations were positively correlated with the change in CO (r = 0.87, p < 0.05), and cell hemocultures were positively correlated with CO (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Rats with high endotoxin blood levels showed higher PAF plasma levels than control rats or peritonitic rats with low endotoxin blood levels. When peritonitic rats were injected with the specific PAF-receptor blocker BN-52021 (5 mg/kg body weight) as a bolus, CO and TPR returned to baseline values in both groups of animals. These data suggest that the hemodynamic changes induced by bacterial peritonitis depend on endotoxemia and bacteremia in opposite ways. In addition, PAF appears to be involved in both the

  15. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  16. Activation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release via protein kinase C-alpha in HEC-1B human endometrial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Dearn, S.; Rahman, M.; Lewis, A.; Ahmed, Z.; Eggo, M. C.; Ahmed, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impairment of the fertility in the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor transgenic female mice suggests changes in PAF functions can influence uterine receptivity. We hypothesized that vasodilatory actions of PAF in the uterus was exerted by PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) release via activation of isoenzyme-specific protein kinase C (PKC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Inducible and endothelial NOS was shown by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR in cDNA synthesized from RNA extract of proliferative and secretory endometrium as well endometrial epithelial cell lines HEC-1B. The effect of WEB2170, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and Ro31-8220 on PAF mediated NO release by HEC-1B cell was determined. PAF induced translocation of PKCalpha in HEC-1B cell and its antagonist effect by Ro 31-8220 was studied by Western immunoblot analysis. PKC isoenzyme regulated by PAF was determined in HEC-1B cell lysate by immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: PAF-evoked a rapid and concentration-dependent biphasic increase in total NO in human HEC-1B endometrial epithelial cell line [as measured by a Sievers NOA 280A NO Chemiluminescent Analyser.] This increase in NO release was attenuated by the PAF receptor antagonist, WEB2170. Inhibition of NO synthesis by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine produced marked dose-dependent attenuation of PAF-mediated NO release, indicating nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation. PAF-mediated NO release was also inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 and by the removal of extracellular calcium, suggesting a dependency on PKC and calcium, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed expression of inducible NOS and endothelial NOS in human endometrium, myometrium and HEC-1B cells. Western immunoblot analysis showed PKCalpha, betaII and iota were the principal isozymes present in the HEC-1B cell line and normal endometrium, suggesting that both HEC-1B cells and normal endometrium have similar PKC isozymes. PAF induced the translocation of

  17. Roles of platelets and proteinase-activated receptors in gastric ulcer healing.

    PubMed

    Perini, Rafael; Wallace, John L; Ma, Li

    2005-10-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are expressed on the surface of many cells, but those on the platelet have been among the most thoroughly characterized. PARs act as key receptors mediating the proaggregatory and pro-secretory effects of thrombin. In addition to contributing to hemostasis, platelets are increasingly being viewed as important contributors to healing and to tumor growth. This is attributable to the many pro- and anti-angiogenic factors that are stored within platelets, which can be released at the sites of injury and new vessel growth. In this paper, we review the importance of the platelet in gastric ulcer healing, the contribution of platelet-contained angiogenic factors to the healing of gastric ulcers, and the role of PARs in regulating the release of angiogenic factors from platelets. Taken together, our results suggest that PARs, including those expressed on platelets, are a rational therapeutic target for modulating healing processes and tumor growth.

  18. Size Dependent Platelet Subpopulations: Relationship of Platelet Volume to Ultrastructure Enzymatic Activity, and Function.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-10

    of the present apheresis instruments to separate the larger more functional platelets from the smaller ones. The selective isolation of large... PLATELET VOLUME T. -(U) BOSTON UNIV MA SCHOOL OF I MEDICINE C B THOMPSON ET RL 10 MAR 83 BUSM-93-89 UNIIDN919CA89 /68 6ilfflfllflflflflll l...N00014-79-C-0168 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 83-08 SIZE DEPENDENT PLATELET SUBPOPULATIONS: RELATIONSHIP OF PLATELET VOLUME TO ULTRASTRUCTURE. ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY

  19. Immunoassay of human platelet factor 4(PF4, antiheparin factor) by radial immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, S; Lowery, C T; Hawiger, J; Millman, M; Timmons, S

    1976-04-01

    Human platelet factor 4 antigen (PF4 antigen) was measured in platelets and in plasma by means of single radial immunodiffusion. Anti-PF4 antibody obtained in rabbits by injecting highly purified human PF4 was monospecific in double immunodiffusion and in quantitative "rocket" immunoelectrophoresis. A high degree of correlation was observed between the precipitation zones in the radial immunodiffusion method and the amount of purified PF4 (in the range of 0.6 to 50.0 mug per milliliter) or the number of platelets in plasma (in the range of 5 x 10(6) to 1.6 x 10(8) platelets per milliliter applied. The sensitivity of the method was 30 to 125 times higher as compared with clotting assay (antiheparin activity) and the standard error of the method was 2.3 per cent. The method was specific for the antigen present in platelets since human leukocytes and erythrocytes gave negative results. Release of PF4 antigen from washed platelets challenged with thrombin, collagen, ADP, and antigen-antibody complexes was measured by the radial immunodiffusion assay. It usually paralleled the release of 3H-serotonin but PF4 antigen was a more sensitive marker for platelet release reaction. Release of PF4 antigen was usually 2 to 4 times higher than release of the antiheparin activity as measured by clotting assay when both were compared as percentage of total content in platelets. The level of PF4 antigen was determined in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-free plasma (PFP) obtained from 12 healthy volunteers. While the mean level of extraplatelet pool of PF4 antigen in PFP was 0.72 +/- 0.92 mug per milliliter, PRP contained 80 +/- 22 mug of PF4 antigen per 10(9) platelets. Addition of thrombin (1 U. per milliliter) liberated all of the PF4 antigen (78 +/- 24 mug) present in PRP but ADP (50 muM) released only 31 +/- 22 mug of PF4 antigen per 10(9) platelets. The presence of heparin did not interfere with the assay of intraplatelet or extraplatelet PF4 by single radial

  20. Platelet factor 4 binds to glycanated forms of thrombomodulin and to protein C. A potential mechanism for enhancing generation of activated protein C.

    PubMed

    Dudek, A Z; Pennell, C A; Decker, T D; Young, T A; Key, N S; Slungaard, A

    1997-12-12

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is an abundant platelet alpha-granule heparin-binding protein. We have previously shown that PF4 accelerates up to 25-fold the proteolytic conversion of protein C to activated protein C by the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex by increasing its affinity for protein C 30-fold. This stimulatory effect requires presence of the gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain in protein C and is enhanced by the presence of a chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan (GAG) domain on thrombomodulin. We hypothesized that cationic PF4 binds to both protein C and thrombomodulin through these anionic domains. Qualitative SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of avidin extracts of solutions containing biotinylated PF4 and candidate ligands shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ but not GAG- forms of thrombomodulin and native but not Gla-domainless protein C. Quantitative analysis using the surface plasmon resonance-based BIAcoreTM biosensor system confirms the extremely high affinity of PF4 for heparin (KD = 4 nM) and shows that PF4 binds to GAG+ thrombomodulin with a KD of 31 nM and to protein C with a KD of 0.37 microM. In contrast, PF4 had no measurable interaction with GAG- thrombomodulin or Gla-domainless protein C. Western blot analysis of normal human plasma extracted with biotinylated PF4 demonstrates PF4 binding to protein C in a physiologic context. Thus, PF4 binds with relative specificity and high affinity to the GAG- domain of thrombomodulin and the Gla domain of protein C. These interactions may enhance the affinity of the thrombin.thrombomodulin complex for protein C and thereby promote the generation of activated protein C.

  1. Understanding the connection between platelet-activating factor, a UV-induced lipid mediator of inflammation, immune suppression and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    Lipid mediators of inflammation play important roles in several diseases including skin cancer, the most prevalent type of cancer found in the industrialized world. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen and is the primary cause of skin cancer. UV radiation is also a potent immunosuppressive agent, and UV-induced immunosuppression is a well-known risk factor for skin cancer induction. An essential mediator in this process is the glyercophosphocholine 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine commonly referred to as platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is produced by keratinocytes in response to diverse stimuli and exerts its biological effects by binding to a single specific G-protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) expressed on a variety of cells. This review will attempt to describe how this lipid mediator is involved in transmitting the immunosuppressive signal from the skin to the immune system, starting from its production by keratinocytes, to its role in activating mast cell migration in vivo, and to the mechanisms involved that ultimately lead to immune suppression. Recent findings related to its role in regulating DNA repair and activating epigenetic mechanisms, further pinpoint the importance of this bioactive lipid, which may serve as a critical molecular mediator that links the environment (UVB radiation) to the immune system and the epigenome.

  2. Resveratrol inhibits polyphosphoinositide metabolism in activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2005-08-15

    The effects of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) on activation responses and the polyphosphoinositide metabolism in human blood platelets have been studied. Resveratrol partially inhibited secretory responses (liberation of dense granule nucleotides and lysosomal acid hydrolases), microparticle formation and protein phosphorylations induced by thrombin. The effects of resveratrol on phosphoinositide metabolites, phosphatidate (PtdOH), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns-4(5)-P), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns-4,5-P2), phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4-P2) and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4,5-P3) were monitored in blood platelets prelabelled with [32P]Pi. Resveratrol not only inhibited the marked increase in levels of PtdOH in platelets activated by thrombin (0.1 U/ml) but it decreased the steady state levels of the other polyphosphoinositide metabolites. The distribution of 32P in phosphoinositides in activated platelets was consistent with inhibition of CDP-DAG inositol transferase and a weak inhibition of PtdIns-4(5)-P kinase. These observations show that resveratrol has a profound effect on phospholipids, particularly on polyphosphoinositide metabolism, and may decrease the amount of PtdIns-4,5-P2 available for signalling in these cells.

  3. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2: modulation by cytosolic phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor, and cyclooxygenase-2 in neuronal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2003-02-27

    Activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) is an early event in brain injury, which leads to the formation and accumulation of bioactive lipids: platelet-activating factor (PAF), free arachidonic acid, and eicosanoids. A cross-talk between secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) and cPLA(2) in neural signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment of neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates a neuronal signaling cascade that includes activation of cPLA(2), arachidonic acid release, PAF production, and induction of COX-2.

  4. Platelet-activating factor-mediated transmembrane signaling in human B lymphocytes is regulated through a pertussis- and cholera toxin-sensitive pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mazer, B D; Sawami, H; Tordai, A; Gelfand, E W

    1992-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates human B cells, resulting in elevation of intracellular calcium and the release of inositol phosphates. This signaling pathway is inhibited in the presence of pertussis (PT) or cholera toxin (CT). Preincubation of human B cells with either toxin, but not their inactive subunits, for 3 h blocked these PAF-induced responses in two B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. This effect was time dependent, with some inhibition noted at 30 min, but only after preincubation for 2-3 h was maximum inhibition achieved. This inhibitory activity was also dose dependent. The toxins blocked both PAF-induced transmembrane uptake of Ca2+ as well as release of Ca2+ from internal stores, and were selective in that activation events after cross-linking of surface IgM were not affected. Further, the toxins did not appear to act through elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP. These data, coupled with previous observations on the absence of heterologous desensitization between PAF and sIgM receptors, may delineate distinct signaling pathways in human B cells. This may reflect different roles for GTP-binding proteins in the activation of human B cells. PMID:1325997

  5. Anti-platelet factor 4/heparin antibodies from patients with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia provoke direct activation of microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Tavor, Sigal; Praprotnik, Sonja; Boffa, Marie Claire; Weksler, Babette; Walenga, M Jeanine; Amiral, Jean; Eldor, Amiram

    2002-02-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is a serious complication that occurs in approximately 1-5% of patients treated with heparin and may be associated with severe thrombotic events. HIT is mediated by antibodies directed mostly to epitope(s) formed by complexes between heparin or other anionic mucopolysaccharides and platelet factor 4 (PF4). Anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies from six patients with HIT were affinity purified and assessed for interaction with human microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells (EC). The antibodies directly activated primary cultures of human bone marrow microvascular EC (HBMEC) and SV40 immortalized HBMEC (TrHBMEC) only in the presence of PF4, but did not activate macrovascular human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) under the same conditions. These antibodies were found to bind to TrHBMEC through the F(ab)(2) portion of the anti-PF4/heparin IgG. TrHBMEC activation was characterized by an augmented release of IL-6, von Willebrand factor, soluble thrombomodulin, and by an elevated expression of the adhesion molecules P-selectin, E-selectin and vascular cellular endothelial molecule-I to different degrees. Enhanced monocyte adhesion to PF4/heparin antibody-treated TrHBMEC (33-72% adhesion) was also observed. None of these effects occurred with unstimulated HUVEC. However, pre-treatment of HUVEC with tumor necrosis factor-alpha resulted in the same changes observed with microvascular EC exposed to the HIT antibodies. Our findings indicate that anti-PF4/heparin antibodies directly activate microvascular EC while interaction with macrovascular EC requires pre-activation. These results may explain some of the specific clinical manifestations in HIT.

  6. Application of an optimized flow cytometry-based quantification of Platelet Activation (PACT): Monitoring platelet activation in platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; Henskens, Yvonne M. C.; de Laat, Bas; Huskens, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that flow cytometry is a reliable test to quantify platelet function in stored platelet concentrates (PC). It is thought that flow cytometry is laborious and hence expensive. We have optimized the flow cytometry-based quantification of agonist induced platelet activation (PACT) to a labor, time and more cost-efficient test. Currently the quality of PCs is only monitored by visual inspection, because available assays are unreliable or too laborious for use in a clinical transfusion laboratory. Therefore, the PACT was applied to monitor PC activation during storage. Study design and methods The optimized PACT was used to monitor 5 PCs during 10 days of storage. In brief, optimized PACT uses a ready-to-use reaction mix, which is stable at -20°C. When needed, a test strip is thawed and platelet activation is initiated by mixing PC with PACT. PACT was based on the following agonists: adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide (CRP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP-6). Platelet activation was measured as P-selectin expression. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) was performed as a reference. Results Both PACT and LTA showed platelet function decline during 10-day storage after stimulation with ADP and collagen/CRP; furthermore, PACT showed decreasing TRAP-induced activation. Major differences between the two tests are that PACT is able to measure the status of platelets in the absence of agonists, and it can differentiate between the number of activated platelets and the amount of activation, whereas LTA only measures aggregation in response to an agonist. Also, PACT is more time-efficient compared to LTA and allows high-throughput analysis. Conclusion PACT is an optimized platelet function test that can be used to monitor the activation of PCs. PACT has the same accuracy as LTA with regard to monitoring PCs, but it is superior to both LTA and conventional flow cytometry based tests with regard to labor

  7. Dynamic redistribution of major platelet surface receptors after contact-induced platelet activation and spreading. An immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, N.; Guichard, J.; Breton-Gorius, J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors used an immunogold labeling procedure to investigate the redistribution of platelet receptors and their ligands on the surface of contact-activated adherent platelets before and after thrombin stimulation. During the initial stage of platelet adhesion, a typical segregation of receptors occurred. Gold particles identifying glycoprotein (GP) Ib (CD42b) and GPIIb-IIIa (CD41a) remained distributed over the entire platelet surface, whereas gold particles identifying GPIa-IIa (CDw 49b) and GPIV (CD36) were found essentially overlying the granulomere; p24 (CD9) was present at the peripheral platelet rim and over the cell body. An increased labeling of GPIIb-IIIa, GPIV and p24 was also observed on pseudopods, with GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV concentrated at the enlarged extremities and at sites of contact between two platelets, whereas GPIb was absent from pseudopods. After thrombin stimulation of adherent platelets, GPIb underwent a relocation to the cell center, in contrast to GPIIb-IIIa which still remained randomly distributed over the cell body. To investigate whether ligand distribution paralleled this receptor segregation, platelet released von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen (Fg) and thrombospondin (TSP) were visualized. During the early stages of platelet activation, surface labeling for all three adhesive proteins was minimal and almost undetectable. Occasionally, intragranular Fg and vWF was accessible to gold-coupled antibodies, with vWF exhibiting the typical eccentric alpha-granular localization. At later stages of activation and especially after thrombin stimulation, no surface labeling for vWF was observed, whereas immunogold particles identifying vWF were still present inside enlarged clear vacuoles. In contrast, labeling of Fg and TSP was increased over the granulomere and extended to the cell periphery and the pseudopods, but was absent from the hyalomere, despite the presence of GPIIb-IIIa molecules. Double labeling experiments showed

  8. Contribution of the platelet activating factor signaling pathway to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction during experimental sepsis by ExoU producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Plotkowski, Maria Cristina; Estato, Vanessa; Santos, Sabrina Alves; da Silva, Mauricio Costa Alves; Miranda, Aline Silva; de Miranda, Pedro Elias; Pinho, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo; Morandi, Verônica; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Vianna, Albanita; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy was used to assess the involvement of ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, in dysfunction of cerebral microcirculation during experimental pneumosepsis. Cortical vessels from mice intratracheally infected with low density of the ExoU-producing PA103 P. aeruginosa strain exhibited increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venule endothelium, decreased capillar density and impaired arteriolar response to vasoactive acetylcholine. These phenomena were mediated by the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) pathway because they were reversed in mice treated with a PAFR antagonist prior to infection. Brains from PA103-infected animals exhibited a perivascular inflammatory infiltration that was not detected in animals infected with an exoU deficient mutant or in mice treated with the PAFR antagonist and infected with the wild type bacteria. No effect on brain capillary density was detected in mice infected with the PAO1 P. aeruginosa strain, which do not produce ExoU. Finally, after PA103 infection, mice with a targeted deletion of the PAFR gene exhibited higher brain capillary density and lower leukocyte adhesion to venule endothelium, as well as lower increase of systemic inflammatory cytokines, when compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, our results establish a role for PAFR in mediating ExoU-induced cerebral microvascular failure in a murine model of sepsis. PMID:26187894

  9. The platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene derived from Trichoderma harzianum induces maize resistance to Curvularia lunata through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Gao, Jinxin; Wang, Meng; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum was upregulated by the interaction of T. harzianum with maize roots or the foliar pathogen Curvularia lunata. PAF-AH was associated with chitinase and cellulase expressions, but especially with chitinase, because its activity in the KO40 transformant (PAF-AH disruption transformant) was lower, compared with the wild-type strain T28. The result demonstrated that the colonization of maize roots by T. harzianum induced systemic protection of leaves inoculated with C. lunata. Such protection was associated with the expression of inducible jasmonic acid pathway-related genes. Moreover, the data from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the concentration of jasmonic acid in maize leaves was associated with the expression level of defense-related genes, suggesting that PAF-AH induced resistance to the foliar pathogen. Our findings showed that PAF-AH had an important function in inducing systemic resistance to maize leaf spot pathogen.

  10. SDF-1α is a novel autocrine activator of platelets operating through its receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tony G; Harper, Matthew T; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and secrete the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α upon platelet activation, but the ability of platelet-derived SDF-1α to signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner mediating functional platelet responses relevant to thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. We sought to explore the role of platelet-derived SDF-1α and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in facilitating platelet activation and determine the mechanism facilitating SDF-1α-mediated regulation of platelet function. Using human washed platelets, CXCR4 inhibition, but not CXCR7 blockade significantly abrogated collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and thromboxane (Tx) A2 production. Time-dependent release of SDF-1α from collagen-activated platelets supports a functional role for SDF-1α in this regard. Using an in vitro whole blood perfusion assay, collagen-induced thrombus formation was substantially reduced with CXCR4 inhibition. In washed platelets, recombinant SDF-1α in the range of 20-100 ng/mL(-1) could significantly enhance platelet aggregation responses to a threshold concentration of collagen. These enhancements were completely dependent on CXCR4, but not CXCR7, which triggered TxA2 production and dense granule secretion. Rises in cAMP were significantly blunted by SDF-1α, which could also enhance collagen-mediated Ca2+ mobilisation, both of which were mediated by CXCR4. This potentiating effect of SDF-1α primarily required TxA2 signalling acting upstream of dense granule secretion, whereas blockade of ADP signalling could only partially attenuate SDF-1α-induced platelet activation. Therefore, this study supports a potentially novel autocrine/paracrine role for platelet-derived SDF-1α during thrombosis and haemostasis, through a predominantly TxA2-dependent and ADP-independent pathway.

  11. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively.

  12. Transcellular activation of platelets and endothelial cells by bioactive lipids in platelet microparticles.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, O. P.; Pratico, D.; Lawson, J. A.; FitzGerald, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Microparticles are released during platelet activation in vitro and have been detected in vivo in syndromes of platelet activation. They have been reported to express both pro- and anticoagulant activities. Nevertheless, their functional significance has remained unresolved. To address the mechanism(s) of cellular activation by platelet microparticles, we examined their effects on platelets and endothelial cells. Activation of human platelets by diverse stimuli (thrombin, 0.1 U/ml; collagen, 4 microg/ml; and the calcium ionophore A23187, 1 microM) results in shedding of microparticles. Pretreatment of these particles, but not membrane fractions from resting platelets, with (s)PLA2 evokes a dose-dependent increase in platelet aggregation, intracellular [Ca2+] movement, and inositol phosphate formation. These effects localize to the arachidonic acid fraction of the microparticles and are mimicked by arachidonic acid isolated from them. However, platelet activation requires prior metabolism of microparticle arachidonic acid to thromboxane A2. Thus, pretreatment of platelets with the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin (20 microM), the thromboxane antagonist SQ29,548 (1 microM), or the protein kinase C inhibitor GF109203X (5 microM) prevents platelet activation by microparticles. However, platelet microparticles fail to evoke an inositol phosphate response directly, via either of the cloned thromboxane receptor isoforms stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Prelabeling platelets with [2H(8)] arachidonate was used to demonstrate platelet metabolism of the microparticle-derived substrate to thromboxane. Platelet microparticles can also induce expression of COX-2 and prostacyclin (PGI2) production, but not expression of COX-1, in human endothelial cells. These effects are prevented by pretreatment with actinomycin D (12 microM) or cycloheximide (5 microg/ml). Expression of COX-2 is again induced by the microparticle arachidonate fraction

  13. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  14. Effect of twenty minutes of aerobic exercise on in vivo platelet release in moderately trained females: radioimmunoassay of platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin

    SciTech Connect

    Rudmann, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    Circulating blood platelets serve an important role in the physiological process of hemostasis. Physical exercise has been documented to result in alterations in many hemostatic parameters including platelet size, number and function. Most published research data support the hypotheses that both hemostasis and fibrinolysis become activated as a consequence of various levels of physical exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of twenty minutes aerobic exercise on platelet activation in vivo. Platelet activation in vivo is associated with the release of platelet granular contents. Platelet alpha granules contain two platelet specific proteins: platelet factor 4 (PF4) and beta-thromboglobulin (BTG). Elevated plasma levels of these proteins are a specific marker of in vivo platelet activation. Subjects were moderately trained female volunteers between the ages of 22 and 40 years. Subjects were exercised or twenty minutes on a bicycle ergometer at workloads that represented 65 to 75% of their functional capacity. Blood specimens were drawn within five minutes of exercise. Plasma samples from exercise and control subjects were assayed for PF4 and BTG using a sensitive competitive-binding radioimmunoassay procedure. The mean plasma levels of both proteins were significantly greater in the exercising subjects when compared with the non-exercising controls. Data from this study support the following research hypotheses: BTG plasma levels will be significantly higher in exercising subjects than in non-exercising controls, and PF4 plasma levels will be significantly higher in exercising subjects than in non-exercising controls.

  15. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge.

  16. Rapidly regulating platelet activity in vivo with an antidote controlled platelet inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Lohrmann, Jens D; Wang, Haichen; Snyder, David J; Cummings, Thomas J; Becker, Richard C; Oney, Sabah; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2012-02-01

    Millions of individuals are prescribed platelet inhibitors, such as aspirin and clopidogrel, to reduce their risk of thrombosis-related clinical events. Unfortunately many platelet inhibitors are contraindicated in surgical settings because of their inherent bleeding risk complicating the treatment of patients who require surgery. We describe the development of a potent antiplatelet agent, an RNA aptamer-termed Ch-9.14-T10 that binds von Willebrand factor (VWF) with high affinity and inhibits thrombosis in a murine carotid artery damage model. As expected, when this potent antiplatelet agent is administered, it greatly increases bleeding from animals that are surgically challenged. To improve this antiplatelet agent's safety profile, we describe the generation of antidotes that can rapidly reverse the activity of Ch-9.14-T10 and limit blood loss from surgically challenged animals. Our work represents the first antidote controllable antiplatelet agent, which could conceivably lead to improved medical management of patients requiring antiplatelet medication who also need surgery.

  17. Expression, purification and characterization of a human serine-dependent phospholipase A2 with high specificity for oxidized phospholipids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, S Q; Southan, C; Boyd, H F; Terrett, J A; MacPhee, C H; Moores, K; Gloger, I S; Tew, D G

    1998-01-01

    Using expressed sequence tag (EST) homology screening, a new human serine dependent phospholipase A2 (HSD-PLA2) was identified that has 40% amino acid identity with human low density lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LDL-PLA2). HSD-PLA2 has very recently been purified and cloned from brain tissue but named PAF-AH II. However, because the homology with LDL-PLA2 suggested a broader substrate specificity than simply platelet activating factor (PAF), we have further characterized this enzyme using baculovirus-expressed protein. The recombinant enzyme, which was purified 21-fold to homogeneity, had a molecular mass of 44kDa and possessed a specific activity of 35 micromol min-1 mg-1 when assayed against PAF. Activity could also be measured using 1-decanoyl-2-(4-nitrophenylglutaryl) phosphate (DNGP) as substrate. Like LDL-PLA2, HSD-PLA2 was able to hydrolyse oxidatively modified phosphatidylcholines when supplemented to human LDL prior to copper-stimulated oxidation. A GXSXG motif evident from sequence information and inhibition of its activity by 3,4, dichloroisocoumarin, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DENP) confirm that the enzyme is serine dependent. Moreover, sequence comparison indicates the HSD-PLA2 probable active site triad positions are shared with LDL-PLA2 and a C. elegans homologue, suggesting that these sequences comprise members of a new enzyme family. Although clearly structurally related with similar substrate specificities further work reported here shows HSD-PLA2 and LDL-PLA2 to be different with respect to chromosomal localization and tissue distribution. PMID:9494101

  18. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction.

  19. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. PMID:28049146

  20. Platelet-activating factor levels of serum and gingival crevicular fluid in nonsmoking patients with periodontitis and/or coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zheng, Pei; Zhu, Haihua; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhao, Lili; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Eberhard, Jörg; Lins, Markus; Jepsen, Søren

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate systemic and local levels of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent proinflammatory mediator implicated in cardiovascular pathophysiology in adult nonsmoking patients with periodontitis with or without coronary heart disease (CHD). Eighty-seven volunteers, 25 periodontitis patients, 19 periodontitis with CHD patients, 19 CHD patients, and 24 healthy controls were included, and periodontal conditions were assessed. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and venous blood were collected, and PAF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PAF levels in serum (303.3 ± 204 pg/ml) and in GCF (26.3 ± 6 pg/μl) of the periodontitis group with CHD, the periodontitis group (serum, 302.4 ± 241 pg/ml and GCF, 26.3 ± 8 pg/μl) and the CHD group (serum, 284.7 ± 192 pg/ml and GCF, 20.8 ± 6 pg/μl) were significantly higher than the healthy control group (serum, 65.4 ± 35 pg/ml and GCF, 7.7 ± 3 pg/μl; p < 0.05). In summary, the present study could demonstrate that in patients with periodontitis, the inflammatory mediator PAF is released into serum at least in the same range as for patients with coronary heart disease. However, no additive effects were seen when both conditions were present.

  1. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, generates two bioactive products during the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein: use of a novel inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, C H; Moores, K E; Boyd, H F; Dhanak, D; Ife, R J; Leach, C A; Leake, D S; Milliner, K J; Patterson, R A; Suckling, K E; Tew, D G; Hickey, D M

    1999-01-01

    A novel and potent azetidinone inhibitor of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), i.e. platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is described for the first time. This inhibitor, SB-222657 (Ki=40+/-3 nM, kobs/[I]=6. 6x10(5) M-1.s-1), is inactive against paraoxonase, is a poor inhibitor of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and has been used to investigate the role of Lp-PLA2 in the oxidative modification of lipoproteins. Although pretreatment with SB-222657 did not affect the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by Cu2+ or an azo free-radical generator as determined by assay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, in both cases it inhibited the elevation in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Moreover, the significantly increased monocyte chemoattractant activity found in a non-esterified fatty acid fraction from LDL oxidized by Cu2+ was also prevented by pretreatment with SB-222657, with an IC50 value of 5.0+/-0.4 nM. The less potent diastereoisomer of SB-222657, SB-223777 (Ki=6.3+/-0.5 microM, kobs/[I]=1.6x10(4) M-1.s-1), was found to be significantly less active in both assays. Thus, in addition to generating lysophosphatidylcholine, a known biologically active lipid, these results demonstrate that Lp-PLA2 is capable of generating oxidized non-esterified fatty acid moieties that are also bioactive. These findings are consistent with our proposal that Lp-PLA2 has a predominantly pro-inflammatory role in atherogenesis. Finally, similar studies have demonstrated that a different situation exists during the oxidation of high-density lipoprotein, with enzyme(s) other than Lp-PLA2 apparently being responsible for generating lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:10024526

  2. Vasoactive side effects of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations in a rat model and their treatment with recombinant platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Teeling, J L; Verhoeven, A J; Rigter, G M; Agterberg, J; Tool, A T; Koenderman, A H; Kuijpers, T W; Hack, C E

    2000-03-01

    Previously, we observed in a rat model that intravenous administration of intramuscular immunoglobulin preparations induced a long-lasting hypotension, which appeared to be associated with the presence of IgG polymers and dimers in the preparations, but unrelated to complement activation. We found evidence that this hypotensive response is mediated by platelet-activating factor (PAF) produced by macrophages. In this study, we compared the vasoactive effects of 16 intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products from 10 different manufacturers, in anesthetized rats. Eight of the IVIG preparations showed no hypotensive effects (less than 15% decrease), whereas the other 8 had relatively strong effects (15%-50% decrease). The hypotensive effects correlated with the IgG dimer content of the preparations. Pretreatment of the rats with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase completely prevented the hypotensive reaction on IVIG infusion, and administration after the onset of hypotension resulted in normalization of the blood pressure. We also observed PAF production on in vitro incubation of human neutrophils with IVIG, which could be blocked by anti-Fcgamma receptor antibodies. This indicates that induction of PAF generation may also occur in a human system. Our findings support the hypothesis that the clinical side effects of IVIG in patients may be caused by macrophage and neutrophil activation through interaction of IgG dimers with Fcgamma receptors. Because phagocyte activation may also lead to the release of other inflammatory mediators, recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) provides a useful tool to determine whether PAF plays a role in the clinical side effects of IVIG. If so, rPAF-AH can be used for the treatment of those adverse reactions. (Blood. 2000;95:1856-1861)

  3. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  4. Gray platelet syndrome: immunoelectron microscopic localization of fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor in platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Cramer, E M; Vainchenker, W; Vinci, G; Guichard, J; Breton-Gorius, J

    1985-12-01

    An immunogold method was used for investigating the subcellular localization of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and fibrinogen (Fg) in platelets and cultured megakaryocytes from normal subjects and from three patients with the gray platelet syndrome (GPS), a rare congenital disorder characterized by the absence of alpha-granules. In normal platelets at rest, vWF was detected exclusively in alpha-granules, with a characteristic distribution: gold particles were localized at one pole of each labeled granule, outlining the inner face of its membrane. vWF was distributed similarly in the alpha-granules of megakaryocytes at day 12 of culture, where it was also found in small vesicles near the Golgi complex. In contrast, Fg was observed in the whole matrix of all platelet alpha-granules but not in the nucleoids. In platelets from three patients with GPS, vWF and Fg were distributed homogeneously in the rare normal alpha-granules, which could be recognized by their size, and also in small granules identified as abnormal alpha-granules, which were similar in size to the small, possibly immature granules present in normal megakaryocytes. In addition, in some unstimulated platelets, Fg labeling was associated with dense material in the lumen of the surface-connected canalicular system (SCCS). At day 12 of culture, megakaryocytes from the patients with GPS contained some small alpha-granules labeled for Fg and vWF identical to those found in mature platelets. The majority of alpha-granules of normal size appeared partially or completely empty. Thus, we conclude that vWF is distributed differently from Fg in normal alpha-granules, and that unstimulated platelets from patients with GPS contain Fg and vWF in a population of small granules identifiable as abnormal alpha-granules only by immunoelectron microscopy. In addition, the presence of Fg in the SCCS of gray platelets suggests a spontaneous release of the alpha-granule content.

  5. Heparanase expression upregulates platelet adhesion activity and thrombogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Österholm, Cecilia; Zhang, Xiao; Hedin, Ulf; Vlodavsky, Israel; Li, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-glucuronidase that specifically cleaves heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin polysaccharides. The enzyme is expressed at low levels in normal tissues, but is often upregulated under pathological conditions such as cancer and inflammation. Normal human platelets express exceptionally high levels of heparanase, but the functional consequences of this feature remain unknown. We investigated functional roles of heparanase by comparing the properties of platelets expressing high (Hpa-tg) or low (Ctr) levels of heparanase. Upon activation, Hpa-tg platelets exhibited a much stronger adhesion activity as compared to Ctr platelets, likely contributing to a higher thrombotic activity in a carotid thrombosis model. Furthermore, we found concomitant upregulated expression of both heparanase and CD62P (P-selectin) upon activation of mouse and human platelets. As platelets play important roles in tumor metastasis, these findings indicate contribution of the platelet heparanase to hyper-thrombotic conditions often seen in patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:27129145

  6. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. Methods PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Results Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation

  7. Release of platelet activating factor in rabbits with antibody-mediated injury of the lung: the role of leukocytes and of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Camussi, G; Pawlowski, I; Bussolino, F; Caldwell, P R; Brentjens, J; Andres, G

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes the release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) into the circulation of rabbits with acute pulmonary injury induced by antibody reacting with pulmonary endothelium. Eight rabbits were injected i.v. with 2 mg/kg of body weight of goat anti-rabbit lung angiotensin-converting enzyme gamma-globulin (GtARbACE). All animals developed acute pneumonitis, characterized by severe endothelial damage, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and platelets (Plt) in the lumina of alveolar capillaries, and deposits of goat IgG and rabbit C3 along alveolar capillary walls. Six of the rabbits died from acute pulmonary edema. PAF was detected in the plasma of all animals within 5 min after injection of GtARbACE. Five other rabbits were depleted of leukocytes by nitrogen mustard and then injected with 2 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE. In three of these rabbits release of PAF was demonstrated, though in amounts smaller than in non-leukocyte-depleted rabbits; all three animals died from pulmonary edema. After injection of 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE in six additional rabbits, three of them leukocyte-depleted, small amounts of PAF were detected in the circulation. None of these six rabbits died of pulmonary edema. PAF release was not observed in ten rabbits injected i.v. with 2 or 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of normal goat gamma-globulin. In separate experiments in vitro, incubation of isolated lung or thoracic aorta with GtARbACE resulted in deposits of goat IgG along endothelia and significant release of PAF. PAF was also released from endothelial cells removed from thoracic aorta by cellulose acetate paper and then incubated with GtARbACE. When segments of thoracic aorta were stripped of endothelium and then incubated with GtARbACE, PAF release could not be shown. The data obtained are consistent with the interpretation that PAF released into the circulation after binding of GtARbACE to the endothelia of lung and aorta originates from

  8. Role of multiligand/RAGE axis in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-03-01

    In the context of plaque progression, platelet hyperactivity associated with hyperlipidemia contributes to the development of a pro-thrombotic state. In this context, it has been demonstrated that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) significantly increases platelet activation and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression at the platelet surface membrane. In addition to AGEs, other ligands (S100, HMGB1 and amyloid β, among others) of RAGE have raised particular attention in platelet activation. Therefore, in this article we describe platelet hyperactivity by AGEs via RAGE-independent and RAGE-dependent pathways.

  9. Platelet function, activation and apoptosis during and after apheresis.

    PubMed

    Bakry, Rania; Sayed, Douaa; Galal, Hanan; Shaker, Sanaa

    2010-10-01

    Platelets are known to undergo shape change, activation, release reaction and apoptosis/necrosis during processing and storage. Apheresis may have a deleterious impact on platelet achievability and functional integrity. Platelet concentrates from 50 male volunteers obtained by COBE spectra were screened for platelet activation (CD62 and CD154) and apoptosis (phosphatidylserine detected by Annexin V). Donor samples before separation, during apheresis and at the third day of storage were used as baseline donor samples. Platelet aggregation to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen was performed. There was a statistically significant increase in the expression of activation markers in two different samples (during separation samples and third day samples). Although the increase in Annexin V expression was not so observable, it showed a significant increase also. There was marked decline in the platelet aggregation. The correlations between the values of CD62, CD154 and Annexin V were detected in baseline samples and increased during separation and at the third day of platelets storage. Correlation between values of platelet aggregation to collagen and Annexin V was relevant only in the baseline samples. No other correlations were encountered between platelet aggregation and markers of activation and apoptosis during apheresis and storage. Initial platelet activation induced by apheresis may have an impact on phosphatidylserine expression with no impact on aggregation function of platelets during storage.

  10. Loss of platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated phospholipase activity in NIH-3T3 cells expressing the EJ-ras oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, C.W.; Tarpley, W.G.; Gorman, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    Data indicating that the 21-kDa protein (p21) Harvey-ras gene product shares sequence homology with guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) has stimulated research on the influence(s) of p21 on G-protein-regulated systems in vertebrate cells. Previous work demonstrated that NIH-3T3 mouse cells expressing high levels of the cellular ras oncogene isolated from the EJ human bladder carcinoma (EJ-ras) exhibited reduced hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. The authors now report that in these cells another enzyme system thought to be regulated by G proteins is inhibited, namely phospholipases A/sub 2/ and C. NIH-3T3 cells incubated in plasma-derived serum release significant levels of prostaglandin E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 2/) as determined by radioimmunoassay when exposed to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) at 2 units/ml. The lack of PDGF-stimulated PGE/sub 2/ release from EJ-ras-transfected cells is not due to a defect in the prostaglandin cyclooxygenase enzyme, since incubation of control cells and EJ-ras-transfected cells in 0.33, 3.3, or 33 ..mu..M arachidonate resulted in identical levels of PGE/sub 2/ release. The lack of PDGF-stimulated PGE/sub 2/ release from EJ-ras-transfected cells also does not result from the loss of functional PDGF receptors. EJ-ras-transformed cells bind 70% as much /sup 125/I-labeled PDGF as control cells and are stimulated to incorporate (/sup 3/H)thymidine and to proliferate after exposure to PDGF. Determination of total water-soluble inositolphospholipids and changes in the specific activities of phosphatidylcholine in control and EJ-ras-transfected cells demonstrated that PDGF-stimulated phospholipase C and A/sub 2/ activities are inhibited in the EJ-ras-transfected cells.

  11. Ligand-Independent Activation of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor β during Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Transactivator of Transcription and Cocaine-Mediated Smooth Muscle Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Pranjali N; Gupta, Vijayalaxmi G; Griffin, Brooke R; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy; Dhillon, Navneet K

    2015-09-01

    Our previous study supports an additive effect of cocaine to human immunodeficiency virus infection in the development of pulmonary arteriopathy through enhancement of proliferation of pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMCs), while also suggesting involvement of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) activation in the absence of further increase in PDGF-BB ligand. Redox-related signaling pathways have been shown to regulate tyrosine kinase receptors independent of ligand binding, so we hypothesized that simultaneous treatment of SMCs with transactivator of transcription (Tat) and cocaine may be able to indirectly activate PDGFR through modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the need for PDGF binding. We found that blocking the binding of ligand using suramin or monoclonal IMC-3G3 antibody significantly reduced ligand-induced autophosphorylation of Y1009 without affecting ligand-independent transphosphorylation of Y934 residue on PDGFRβ in human pulmonary arterial SMCs treated with both cocaine and Tat. Combined treatment of human pulmonary arterial SMCs with cocaine and Tat resulted in augmented production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide when compared with either treatment alone. Inhibition of this ROS generation prevented cocaine- and Tat-mediated Src activation and transphosphorylation of PDGFRβ at Y934 without any changes in phosphorylation of Y1009, in addition to attenuation of smooth muscle hyperplasia. Furthermore, pretreatment with an Src inhibitor, PP2, also suppressed cocaine- and Tat-mediated enhanced Y934 phosphorylation and smooth muscle proliferation. Finally, we report total abrogation of cocaine- and Tat-mediated synergistic increase in cell proliferation on inhibition of both ligand-dependent and ROS/Src-mediated ligand-independent phosphorylation of PDGFRβ.

  12. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs.

    PubMed

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors.

  13. Concentration of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma from Goettingen minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Pascal; Grassmann, Jan-Peter; Thelen, Simon; Wild, Michael; Sager, Martin; Windolf, Joachim; Hakimi, Mohssen

    2014-01-01

    In minipigs little is known about the concentration of growth factors in plasma, despite their major role in several patho-physiological processes such as healing of fractures. This prompted us to study the concentration of platelets and selected growth factors in plasma and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) preparation of sixteen Goettingen minipigs. Platelet concentrations increased significantly in PRP in comparison to native blood plasma. Generally, significant increase in the concentration of all growth factors tested was observed in the PRP in comparison to the corresponding plasma or serum. Five of the plasma samples examined contained detectable levels of bone morphogenic protein 2 (BMP-2) whereas eleven of the plasma or serum samples contained minimal amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-bb) respectively. On the other hand variable concentrations of bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP-7) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) were measured in all plasma samples. In contrast, all PRP samples contained significantly increased amounts of growth factors. The level of BMP-2, BMP-7, TGF-β1, VEGF and PDGF-bb increased by 17.6, 1.5, 7.1, 7.2 and 103.3 fold, in comparison to the corresponding non-enriched preparations. Moreover significant positive correlations were found between platelet count and the concentrations of BMP-2 (r=0.62, p<0.001), TGF-β1 (r=0.85, p<0.001), VEGF (r=0.46, p<0.01) and PDGF-bb (r=0.9, p<0.001). Our results demonstrate that selected growth factors are present in the platelet-rich plasma of minipigs which might thus serve as a source of autologous growth factors. PMID:26504722

  14. Activated platelets inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell differentiation and promote tumor progression via platelet-tumor cell binding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingchao; Li, Bing; Liu, Yue-Jian; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongfu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of differentiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with increased circulating platelet size. We measured platelet activation and plasma adenosine diphosphate (ADP) levels in HCC patients based on differentiation status. Local platelet accumulation and platelet-hepatoma cell binding were measured using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Using a xenograft assay in NON/SCID mice, we tested the effects of the anti-platelet drug clopidogrel on platelet activation, platelet infiltration, platelet-tumor cell binding and tumor cell differentiation. HCC patients with poor differentiation status displayed elevated platelet activation and higher ADP levels. Platelets accumulated within poorly differentiated tissues and localized at hepatoma cell membranes. Platelet-tumor cell binding was existed in carcinoma tissues, largely mediated by P-selectin on platelets. NOD/SCID mice with xenograft tumors also exhibited increased platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. Clopidogrel therapy triggered hepatoma cell differentiation by attenuating platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. TCF4 knockdown promoted HepG-2 cell differentiation and inhibited tumor formation, and TCF4 could be the potential downstream target for clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27542264

  15. The effect of platelet activating factor antagonist BN 52021 on bacterial translocation and ICAM-I expression in experimental obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Akyürek, Nusret; Salman, Bülent; Irkörücü, Oktay; Tezcaner, Tugan; Azili, Cem; Erdem, Ozlem; Akca, Gülçin; Akin, Okan; Tatlicioglu, Ertan

    2005-01-01

    Expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in an obstructive jaundice model and the potential protective role of platelet activating factor antagonist over small intestine and liver together with its effects on bacterial translocation are examined in this study. Forty-eight male Wistar albino rats were assigned into four equal groups of 12. In groups I and II, animals were sham operated. In groups III and IV, common bile duct ligation and division were performed. In group I and group III, 0.5 ml/day normal saline was applied intraperitoneally daily from day 2 to 6 of the study; in group II and group IV, 1 mg/kg/day BN 52021 was applied intraperitoneally daily from day 2 to 6 of the study. All animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. ICAM-1 expression (CD54 positivity) was analyzed in the liver and ileum tissue by immunohistochemical method. Samples from blood, liver mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen were cultured under aerobic conditions. It is revealed that ICAM-1 expression was statistically higher in group III, with highest bacterial translocation and liver and spleen injury when compared to other groups. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), bilirubin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin 1beta(IL-1beta) values were at the highest level in group III, and there was a statistical decrease in group IV compared to group III. The administration of BN52021 in experimental obstructive jaundice is a useful way to reduce liver and intestinal mucosal villi damage by inhibiting bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response.

  16. Platelets and atherogenesis: Platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection from tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    PALOMO, IVÁN; FUENTES, EDUARDO; PADRÓ, TERESA; BADIMON, LINA

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that platelets are not only involved in the arterial thrombotic process, but also that they play an active role in the inflammatory process of atherogenesis from the beginning. The interaction between platelets and endothelial cells occurs in two manners: activated platelets unite with intact endothelial cells, or platelets in resting adhere to activated endothelium. In this context, inhibition of the platelet function (adhesion/aggregation) could contribute to the prevention of atherothrombosis, the leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity. This can be achieved with antiplatelet agents. However, at the public health level, the level of primary prevention, a healthy diet has also been shown to exert beneficial effects. Among those elements of a healthy diet, the consumption of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) stands out for its effect on platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection, which may be beneficial for cardiovascular health. This article briefly discusses the involvement of platelets in atherogenesis and the possible mechanisms of action provided by tomatoes for platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection. PMID:22969932

  17. Relative sensitivities of plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and paraoxonase to in vitro gas-phase cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, J K; Knoff, L J; Tribble, D L; Forte, T M

    2001-03-01

    In order to identify potential atherogenic properties of gas-phase cigarette smoke, we utilized an in vitro exposure model to determine whether the activities of several putative anti-atherogenic enzymes associated with plasma lipoproteins were compromised. Exposure of heparinized human plasma to gas-phase cigarette smoke produced a dose-dependent reduction in the activity of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Reductions of nearly 50% in PAF-AH activity were observed following exposure to gas-phase smoke from four cigarettes over an 8-h period. During this time of exposure, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was rendered almost completely inactive (>80%). In contrast, paraoxonase was totally unaffected by cigarette smoke. Supplementation of plasma with 1 mM reduced glutathione was found to protect both PAF-AH and LCAT from cigarette smoke, suggesting that cysteine modifications may have contributed to the inhibition of these two enzymes. To evaluate this possibility, we blocked the free cysteine residues of these enzymes with the reversible thiol-modifying reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid (DTNB). Reversal of the DTNB-cysteine adducts following cigarette smoke exposures revealed that LCAT, but not PAF-AH, was protected. Moreover, high doses (1.0-10 mM) of acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal, reactive aldehydic species associated with cigarette smoke, completely inhibited plasma LCAT activity, whereas PAF-AH was resistant to such exposures. Taken together, these results indicate a divergence regarding the underlying mechanism of PAF-AH and LCAT inhibition upon exposure to gas-phase cigarette smoke. While LCAT was sensitive to exposure to volatile aldehydic products involving, in part, cysteine and/or active site modifications, the enzyme PAF-AH exhibited an apparent resistance. The latter suggests that the active site of PAF-AH is in a microenvironment that lacks free cysteine residues and/or is shielded from volatile aldehydic combustion

  18. Ligustrazine attenuates oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by interrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor-mediated ERK and p38 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ni, Chunyan; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2012-11-15

    Hepatic fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing reactions with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis. Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress is concomitant with liver fibrosis irrespective of the underlying etiology. Natural antioxidant ligustrazine exhibits potent antifibrotic activities, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Our studies were to investigate the ligustrazine effects on HSC activation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative stress in liver fibrogenesis, and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 μM significantly stimulated HSC proliferation and expression of marker genes of HSC activation; whereas ligustrazine dose-dependently suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-activated HSCs, and attenuated expression of fibrotic marker genes. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ligustrazine reduced platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR) expression and blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase, two downstream effectors of PDGF-βR. Further molecular evidence suggested that ligustrazine interruption of ERK and p38 pathways was dependent on the blockade of PDGF-βR and might be involved in ligustrazine reduction of fibrotic marker gene expression under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation. Furthermore, ligustrazine modulated some proteins critical for HSC activation and ECM homeostasis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HSCs. These data collectively indicated that ligustrazine could attenuate HSC activation caused by oxidative stress, providing novel insights into ligustrazine as a therapeutic option for hepatic fibrosis. Highlights: ► Ligustrazine inhibits oxidative stress-induced HSC activation.

  19. Geometric complexity is increased in in vitro activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Bianciardi, Giorgio

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates the use of computerized fractal analysis for objective characterization of the complexity of platelets in vitro stimulated by low level thrombin (0.02 U mL(-1) ), collected from healthy individuals and observed by means of transmission electron microscopy. Platelet boundaries were extracted by means of automatically image analysis. Local fractal dimension was evaluated by the box-counting technique (measure of geometric complexity of the platelet outline). The results showed that the platelet boundary is fractal when observed by transmission electron microscopy and that, after an in vitro platelet activation test, the shape of platelets present increased geometric complexity in comparison to the no stimulated platelets (P < 0.001), with 100% correct classification. Computerized fractal analysis of platelet shape by transmission electron microscopy can provide accurate, quantitative, data to study platelet activation. The results may play important roles in the evaluation of the platelets status in pathological conditions, like as atherosclerosis and diabetes mellitus, where in in vivo activated platelets have been described.

  20. A platelet alpha granule membrane protein that is associated with the plasma membrane after activation. Characterization and subcellular localization of platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, C L; Yeo, E L; Wencel-Drake, J D; Furie, B C; Ginsberg, M H; Furie, B

    1986-01-01

    We have identified and purified a platelet integral membrane protein (140,000 mol wt), using the KC4 monoclonal antibody specific for activated platelets, that is internal in resting platelets but exposed on activated platelets (Hsu-Lin S.-C., C.L. Berman, B.C. Furie, D. August, and B. Furie, 1984, J. Biol. Chem. 259: 9121-9126.). The expression of the protein on the platelet surface is secretion-dependent. This protein has been named platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane (PADGEM) protein. PADGEM protein is distinct from the surface glycoproteins of resting platelets, but identical to the S12 antigen, GMP-140. Using immunofluorescent staining, resting platelets failed to stain for PADGEM protein with the KC4 antibody, but after permeabilization showed a punctate staining of the cell interior. Thrombin-stimulated intact platelets stained with a peripheral rim pattern thus demonstrating the translocation of PADGEM protein from an internal location to the cell surface. PADGEM protein expression on the platelet surface at varying thrombin concentrations correlated with alpha granule release, as measured by the secretion of platelet factor 4. Further evidence for an alpha granule localization of PADGEM protein was provided by nitrogen cavitation of resting platelets followed by metrizamide density gradient centrifugation; PADGEM protein codistributed with platelet factor 4. Using immunoelectron microscopy, the protein was localized to the alpha granule in frozen ultrathin sections of resting platelets labeled using rabbit anti-PADGEM protein antibodies, whereas in thrombin-activated platelets, the plasma membrane was labeled. These studies indicate that PADGEM protein is a component of the alpha granule membrane of resting platelets and is incorporated into the plasma membrane upon activation and secretion. Images PMID:2941452

  1. Platelet-derived growth factor-D modulates extracellular matrix homeostasis and remodeling through TIMP-1 induction and attenuation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinase activities

    SciTech Connect

    Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan Alexi, Pascal; Tihaa, Lidia; Haas, Ute; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2015-02-13

    Platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D) is a more recent recognized growth factor involved in the regulation of several cellular processes, including cell proliferation, transformation, invasion, and angiogenesis by binding to and activating its cognate receptor PDGFR-β. After bile duct ligation or in the carbon tetrachloride-induced hepatic fibrosis model{sub ,} PDGF-D showed upregulation comparable to PDGF-B. Moreover, adenoviral PDGF-D gene transfer induced hepatic stellate cell proliferation and liver fibrosis. We here investigated the molecular mechanism of PDGF-D involvement in liver fibrogenesis. Therefore, the GRX mouse cell line was stimulated with PDGF-D and evaluated for fibrotic markers and PDGF-D signaling pathways in comparison to the other PDGF isoforms. We found that PDGF-D failed to enhance Col I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) production but has capacity to upregulate expression of the tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 1 (TIMP-1) resulting in attenuation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinase activity as indicated by gelatinase zymography. This phenomenon was restored through application of a PDGF-D neutralizing antibody. Unexpectedly, PDGF-D incubation decreased both PDGFR-α and -β in mRNA and protein levels, and PDGF-D phosphorylated typrosines specific for PDGFR-α and -β. We conclude that PDGF-D intensifies fibrogenesis by interfering with the fibrolytic activity of the TIMP-1/MMP system and that PDGF-D signaling is mediated through both PDGF-α and -β receptors. - Highlights: • PDGF-D signals through PDGF receptor type α and β. • PDGF-D modulates extracellular matrix homeostasis and remodeling. • Like PDGF-B, PDGF-D triggers phosphorylation of PLC-γ, Akt/PKB, JNK, ERK1/2, and p38. • PDGF-D induces TIMP-1 expression through ERK and p38 MAPK. • PDGF-D attenuates MMP-2 and MMP-9 gelatinase activities.

  2. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  3. Interaction of Platelet Membrane Receptors with von Willebrand Factor, Ristocetin, and the Fc Region of Immunoglobulin G

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Anne; Ross, Gordon D.; Nachman, Ralph L.

    1978-01-01

    The agglutination of human platelets by ristocetin and von Willebrand factor was inhibited by aggregated immunoglobulin (Ig)G and by Fc fragments of IgG, but not by Fab, F(ab′)2 or pFc fragments of IgG. Because this inhibition occurred with formalin-fixed platelets as well as with normal platelets, a generalized aggregation of fluid membrane components by Fc fragments was not responsible for this inhibition of ristocetin and von Willebrand factor-induced agglutination. Reciprocal inhibition of platelet Fc receptors was produced by prior incubation of platelets with von Willebrand factor and ristocetin. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation studies demonstrated that aggregated IgG did not form fluid-phase complexes with von Willebrand factor and ristocetin. Furthermore, passage of von Willebrand factor and ristocetin through a column of immobilized heat-aggregated IgG did not alter platelet agglutinating activity which indicates that aggregated IgG did not inactivate von Willebrand factor or ristocetin. Thus, it was likely that the IgG-mediated interference with platelet agglutination by ristocetin and von Willebrand factor did not occur in the fluid phase but at the platelet surface. These studies suggest that the platelet membrane Fc receptor may be either a part of, or sterically related to, the membrane glycoprotein I complex that interacts with von Willebrand factor, and that occupation of one of these surface components blocks the availability of the other. PMID:309473

  4. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain gene expression by activated blood monocytes precedes the expression of the PDGF A-chain gene

    SciTech Connect

    Martinet, Y.; Jaffe, H.A.; Yamauchi, K.; Betsholtz, C.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H.; Crystal, R.G.

    1987-05-01

    When activated, normal human blood monocytes are known to express the c-sis proto-oncogene coding for PDGF B-chain. Since normal human platelet PDGF molecules are dimers of A and B chains and platelets and monocytes are derived from the same marrow precursors, activated blood monocytes were simultaneously evaluated for their expression of PDGF A and B chain genes. Human blood monocytes were purified by adherence, cultured with or without activation by lipopolysaccharide and poly(A)+ RNA evaluated using Northern analysis and /sup 32/P-labeled A-chain and B-chain (human c-sis) probes. Unstimulated blood monocytes did not express either A-chain or B-chain genes. In contrast, activated monocytes expressed a 4.2 kb mRNA B-chain transcript at 4 hr, but the B-chain mRNA levels declined significantly over the next 18 hr. In comparison, activated monocytes expressed very little A-chain mRNA at 4 hr, but at 12 hr 1.9, 2.3, and 2.8 kb transcripts were observed and persisted through 24 hr. Thus, activation of blood monocytes is followed by PDGF B-chain gene expression preceding PDGF A-chain gene expression, suggesting a difference in the regulation of the expression of the genes for these two chains by these cells.

  5. Effect of bovine serum albumin on the synthesis of prostaglandin and incorporation of (/sup 3/H)acetate into platelet-activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Heinsohn, C.; Polgar, P.; Fishman, J.; Taylor, L.

    1987-09-01

    The binding of fatty acids by bovine serum albumin (BSA) is well documented. However, the interaction between the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) and the trapping of arachidonate released from cellular lipid stores is not as well understood. In this communication, we relate the trapping of fatty acids to the synthesis of PGs and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)acetate into platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our results show that, as determined by radioimmunoassay, BSA inhibits bradykinin (BK) (5 ng/ml) and ionophore A23187 (10 microM)-stimulated synthesis of PGs in human embryo lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments using prelabel with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate followed by extraction and thin-layer chromatography show that, in the presence of 2 mg/ml BSA, IMR-90 release essentially only fatty acid following stimulation with bradykinin. Little if any prostaglandin and no endoperoxide are detected. In the same experiment, in absence of BSA, about 70% of the released label is detected as prostaglandin. alpha-Cyclodextrin, another trapper of fatty acid, inhibits PG synthesis in much the same way. BSA and alpha-cyclodextrin also inhibit prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells derived from the calf pulmonary artery. However, the inhibition of PG synthesis in these cells is not as complete as that in the IMR-90. In contrast to the effect of the trappers on PG synthesis, BSA and alpha-cyclodextrin are observed to potentiate BK- and ionophore-stimulated incorporation of (3H)acetate into PAF in the endothelial cells. The labeled PAF is not released from the cells in either the presence or absence of the trappers, leading us to conclude that BSA causes an increase in acetate-labeled cellular PAF by trapping released fatty acid.

  6. Higher plasma platelet-activating factor levels are associated with increased risk of vertebral fracture and lower bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonmok; Kim, Beom-Jun; Ahn, Seong Hee; Lee, Seung Hun; Koh, Jung-Min

    2015-11-01

    Despite experimental and animal evidence showing the detrimental effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on bone metabolism, there are no clinical studies relating PAF to osteoporosis-related phenotypes. This case-control study investigates the association between plasma PAF, osteoporotic vertebral fracture (VF), and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Korean women. Among 474 eligible women not taking any drug or having any disease that could affect bone metabolism, we identified 73 cases defined as subjects with radiological VF. The controls were randomly selected from the remaining 401 subjects and matched 1:1 to cases in terms of both age and body mass index (BMI). Lateral thoracolumbar radiographs, BMD, and plasma PAF levels were determined for all subjects. Postmenopausal women with VF demonstrated 34.6 % higher plasma PAF levels than subjects without VF after adjusting for age, BMI, smoking habits, alcohol intake, regular exercise, and parental history of osteoporotic fractures (P = 0.021). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that the odds ratio for VF linearly increased across increasing PAF quartiles (P for trend = 0.040) and the odds for VF were 2.88-fold higher in subjects in the highest quartile in comparison with those in the lowest quartile (95 % CI 1.04-8.01). Plasma PAF levels were inversely correlated with BMD at various sites (γ = -0.253 to -0.176, P = 0.003-0.041). These findings suggest that plasma PAF may be a potential biomarker for predicting poor bone health in postmenopausal women.

  7. Platelet activation during exercise induced asthma: effect of prophylaxis with cromoglycate and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C E; Belfield, P W; Davis, S; Cooke, N J; Spencer, A; Davies, J A

    1986-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin were measured before and after exercise in nine asthmatic patients and 12 non-asthmatic volunteers. Exercise was preceded by administration in random order of either placebo, salbutamol 200 micrograms, or sodium cromoglycate 2 mg from a pressurised inhaler. In control subjects there were minimal changes in PEF and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin. In the asthmatic patients the typical changes in PEF were seen on exercise; plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin rose significantly in parallel, the rise preceding the fall in PEF. The changes in peak flow and platelet activation induced by exercise were attenuated by prior administration of salbutamol or cromoglycate. These results indicate that exercise induced asthma is associated with a rise in platelet release products similar to that observed in antigen induced asthma. PMID:2943049

  8. Equine platelets inhibit E. coli growth and can be activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid although superoxide anion production does not occur and platelet activation is not associated with enhanced production by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Aktan, I; Dunkel, B; Cunningham, F M

    2013-04-15

    Activated platelets can contribute to host defense through release of products with bactericidal actions such as antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as by forming heterotypic aggregates with neutrophils and enhancing their antimicrobial properties. Whilst release of vasoactive mediators from equine platelets in response to stimuli including bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been documented, neither ROS production, nor the effects of activated platelets on equine neutrophil ROS production, have been reported. This study first sought evidence that activated equine platelets inhibit bacterial growth. Platelet superoxide production in response to stimuli including Escherichia coli-derived LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus was then determined. The ability of LPS and LTA to up-regulate platelet P-selectin expression and induce platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation was investigated and the effect of co-incubating activated platelets with neutrophils on superoxide production measured. Growth of E. coli was inhibited in a time-dependent manner, and to a similar extent, by addition of platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet poor plasma (PPP) obtained by centrifugation of PRP. Activation of platelets in PRP by addition of thrombin led to a significant increase in the inhibitory action between 0.5 and 2h. Although phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) caused superoxide production by equine platelets in a protein kinase C-dependent manner, thrombin, platelet activating factor (PAF), LPS, LTA and formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP) were without effect. LPS and LTA did induce platelet activation, measured as an increase in P-selectin expression (% positive cells: 17±3 (un-stimulated); 63±6 (1μg/ml LPS); 64±6 (1μg/ml LTA); n=5) but not platelet superoxide production or heterotypic aggregate formation. Co-incubation of activated platelets with neutrophils did not increase neutrophil superoxide production. This

  9. Involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B in platelet CD40 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hachem, Ahmed; Yacoub, Daniel; Zaid, Younes; Mourad, Walid; Merhi, Yahye

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer sCD40L induces TRAF2 association to CD40 and NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation downstream of CD40L/CD40 signaling is independent of p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer I{kappa}B{alpha} is required for sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of aggregation. -- Abstract: CD40 ligand (CD40L) is a thrombo-inflammatory molecule that predicts cardiovascular events. Platelets constitute the major source of soluble CD40L (sCD40L), which has been shown to potentiate platelet activation and aggregation, in a CD40-dependent manner, via p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 signaling. In many cells, the CD40L/CD40 dyad also induces activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). Given that platelets contain NF-{kappa}B, we hypothesized that it may be involved in platelet CD40 signaling and function. In human platelets, sCD40L induces association of CD40 with its adaptor protein the tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 2 and triggers phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, which are abolished by CD40L blockade. Inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation without affecting p38 MAPK phosphorylation. On the other hand, inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation has no effect on I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation, indicating a divergence in the signaling pathway originating from CD40 upon its ligation. In functional studies, inhibition of I{kappa}B{alpha} phosphorylation reverses sCD40L-induced platelet activation and potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to a sub-threshold concentration of collagen. This study demonstrates that the sCD40L/CD40 axis triggers NF-{kappa}B activation in platelets. This signaling pathway plays a critical role in platelet activation and aggregation upon sCD40L stimulation and may represent an important target against thrombo

  10. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization, thromboxane A(2) formation, hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A(2) formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca(2+)](i) and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  12. Platelet factor XIIIa release during platelet aggregation and plasma clot strength measured by thrombelastography in patients with coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A

    2015-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as reference, and ADP 5 µM as agonist. Kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5 µM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24%, p < 0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r = 0.48, p < 0.0001), but not in PPP (r = 0.15, p = 0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet-derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p = 0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p = 0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet-derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus, in part, provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets.

  13. Systemic platelet dysfunction is the result of local dysregulated coagulation and platelet activation in the brain in a rat model of isolated traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ploplis, Victoria A; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; MorenoCaffaro, Maria; Sheets, Patrick; Thomas, Scott G; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Coagulopathy after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been extensively reported. Clinical studies have identified a strong relationship between diminished platelet-rich thrombus formation, responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate agonism, and severity of TBI. The mechanisms that lead to platelet dysfunction in the acute response to TBI are poorly understood. The development of a rodent model of TBI that mimics the coagulopathy observed clinically has recently been reported. Using immunohistochemical techniques and thromboelastography platelet mapping, the current study demonstrated that the expression of coagulation (tissue factor and fibrin) and platelet activation (P-selectin) markers in the injured brain paralleled the alteration in systemic platelet responsiveness to the agonists, adenosine diphosphate and arachodonic acid. Results of this study demonstrate that local procoagulant changes in the injured brain have profound effects on systemic platelet function.

  14. Polyethylene glycol modification of adenovirus reduces platelet activation, endothelial cell activation, and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Sean E; Mok, Hoyin; Gushiken, Francisca C; Lopez, Jose A; Barry, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the complications for in vivo administration of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors after intravenous injection. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of Ad5-induced thrombocytopenia and how these effects are attenuated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of Ad5 (Ad-PEG). After intravenous injection, accelerated platelet loss was observed in Ad-injected mice but not in their Ad-PEG-injected counterparts. This platelet loss induced by Ad5 corresponded with increases in coagulation D-dimer levels, splenomegaly, and, later, production of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. In contrast, these responses were blunted or ablated after injection of Ad-PEG. Ad5 activated both platelets and endothelial cells directly in vitro as evidenced by induction of P-selectin and the formation of von Willebrand factor-platelet strings and in vivo as evidenced by the induction of E-selectin messenger RNA. PEGylation blunted these observed activations. These data suggest that Ad5 may induce thrombocytopenia by direct activation of endothelial cells in addition to its direct effects on platelets. This link provides an important clue for the understanding of the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia associated with Ad5. Given that PEGylation blunted interactions of Ad with platelets and endothelial cells, reduced D-dimer formation, reduced thrombocytopenia, and reduced splenomegaly, these data suggest that this simple vector modification may have utility to improve the safety of Ad vectors for human gene therapy.

  15. Redox Proteomics and Platelet Activation: Understanding the Redox Proteome to Improve Platelet Quality for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sonego, Giona; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Blood banks use pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies to increase the safety of platelet concentrates (PCs). The characteristics of PI-treated PCs slightly differ from those of untreated PCs, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. One possible cause is the generation of oxidative stress during the PI process. This is of great interest since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers in platelet functions. Furthermore, there are links between protein oxidation and phosphorylation, another mechanism that is critical for cell regulation. Current research efforts focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and identifying new target proteins. Proteomics technologies represent powerful tools for investigating signaling pathways involving ROS and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, while quantitative techniques enable the comparison of the platelet resting state versus the stimulated state. In particular, redox cysteine is a key player in platelet activation upon stimulation by different agonists. This review highlights the experiments that have provided insights into the roles of ROS in platelet function and the implications for platelet transfusion, and potentially in diseases such as inflammation and platelet hyperactivity. The review also describes the implication of redox mechanism in platelet storage considerations. PMID:28208668

  16. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  17. Modification of Pulsed Electric Field Conditions Results in Distinct Activation Profiles of Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Frelinger, Andrew L.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Garner, Allen L.; Torres, Andrew S.; Caiafa, Antonio; Morton, Christine A.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neculaes, V. Bogdan; Michelson, Alan D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Activated autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) used in therapeutic wound healing applications is poorly characterized and standardized. Using pulsed electric fields (PEF) to activate platelets may reduce variability and eliminate complications associated with the use of bovine thrombin. We previously reported that exposing PRP to sub-microsecond duration, high electric field (SMHEF) pulses generates a greater number of platelet-derived microparticles, increased expression of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, and differential release of growth factors compared to thrombin. Moreover, the platelet releasate produced by SMHEF pulses induced greater cell proliferation than plasma. Aims To determine whether sub-microsecond duration, low electric field (SMLEF) bipolar pulses results in differential activation of PRP compared to SMHEF, with respect to profiles of activation markers, growth factor release, and cell proliferation capacity. Methods PRP activation by SMLEF bipolar pulses was compared to SMHEF pulses and bovine thrombin. PRP was prepared using the Harvest SmartPreP2 System from acid citrate dextrose anticoagulated healthy donor blood. PEF activation by either SMHEF or SMLEF pulses was performed using a standard electroporation cuvette preloaded with CaCl2 and a prototype instrument designed to take into account the electrical properties of PRP. Flow cytometry was used to assess platelet surface P-selectin expression, and annexin V binding. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), endothelial growth factor (EGF) and platelet factor 4 (PF4), and were measured by ELISA. The ability of supernatants to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture was also evaluated. Controls included vehicle-treated, unactivated PRP and PRP with 10 mM CaCl2 activated with 1 U/mL bovine thrombin. Results PRP activated with SMLEF bipolar pulses or thrombin had similar light scatter profiles, consistent with the

  18. Isolation and characterization of lipid-protein particles containing platelet factor 3 released from human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, H; Andersson, L O; Höglund, S

    1982-01-01

    Lipid-protein particles with platelet factor 3 measured by the Stypven clotting-time test [Hardisty & Hutton (1966) Br. J. Haematol. 12, 764-776] have been isolated from platelet-release supernatant. Starting material was washed platelets, which were released by treatment with collagen. Purification of the particles from other components in the release material was accomplished by gel filtration on Sepharose CL-4B followed by affinity chromatography on poly-L-lysine-Sepharose CL-4B gel. Chemical characterization showed that the particles were composed of 40% protein, 42% phospholipids, 13% cholesterol and 5% triacylglycerols. The phospholipid composition was 38% phosphatidylcholine, 25% phosphatidylethanolamine, 9% phosphatidylserine, 2% phosphatidic acid and 26% sphingomyelin. No carbohydrate was detected. Electron-microscopic studies revealed the presence of membranous particles with diameters between 70 and 170 nm. Images PLATE 1 Fig. 3. PMID:7103943

  19. Platelet-derived growth factor stimulated mechanisms of glucosamine incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, M.A.; Pledger, W.J. )

    1987-10-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) treatment of density-arrested BALB/c-3T3 cells results in increased ({sup 3}H)glucosamine (GlcN) incorporation into cellular material. The enhanced GlcN incorporation is not due to a preferential increase in proteoglycan synthesis as measured by ({sup 35}S)H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} incorporation. Approximately 50% of the GlcN incorporated in PDGF or platelet-poor plasma (PPP)-treated cultures enters N-linked glycoproteins. Addition of dolichol-phosphate (dolichol-P), a required intermediate in N-linked glycosylation, did not alter ({sup 3}H)GlcN incorporation in PDGF-treated cells but did increase incorporation in PPP-treated cultures to a level comparable to that observed for PDGF-treated cultures. PDGF-treated cultures contained twofold greater quantities of ({sup 3}H)GlcN dolichol intermediates and lipid-free glycoprotein. Over a 12-h time course 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) activity was similar in cultures treated with PDGF or PPP. Results of these studies reveal that enhanced protein glycosylation in response to PDGF treatment is not the result of a direct effect on HMG CoA reductase.

  20. How does fluoroaluminate activate human platelets?

    PubMed

    Rendu, F; Lebret, M; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S

    1990-01-15

    Platelet activation induced by NaF or fluoroaluminate (AlF4-) was studied. The latter has been described to substitute for the gamma-phosphate group of the GTP molecule. With 10 mM-NaF, a concentration unable to induce any measurable Ca2+ mobilization (as measured with Indo 1), addition of AlCl3 potentiated platelet aggregation, thromboxane synthesis, diacylglycerol formation and p43 phosphorylation, without any increase in intracellular Ca2+. Neither phosphoinositide hydrolysis nor phosphatidic acid formation could be detected. AlF4- induced the release through a granule centralization within a microtubule bundle, although no myosin light-chain phosphorylation could be detected. Addition of flurbiprofen (10 microM) resulted in only partial inhibition of diacylglycerol formation, with no effect on the release reaction or on p43 phosphorylation. The present results suggest that AlF4- does not stimulate a G-protein governing the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. The AlF4(-)-induced diacylglycerol formation is discussed. Moreover, these results bring evidence that there is no correlation between granule centralization and myosin light-chain phosphorylation.

  1. How does fluoroaluminate activate human platelets?

    PubMed Central

    Rendu, F; Lebret, M; Tenza, D; Levy-Toledano, S

    1990-01-01

    Platelet activation induced by NaF or fluoroaluminate (AlF4-) was studied. The latter has been described to substitute for the gamma-phosphate group of the GTP molecule. With 10 mM-NaF, a concentration unable to induce any measurable Ca2+ mobilization (as measured with Indo 1), addition of AlCl3 potentiated platelet aggregation, thromboxane synthesis, diacylglycerol formation and p43 phosphorylation, without any increase in intracellular Ca2+. Neither phosphoinositide hydrolysis nor phosphatidic acid formation could be detected. AlF4- induced the release through a granule centralization within a microtubule bundle, although no myosin light-chain phosphorylation could be detected. Addition of flurbiprofen (10 microM) resulted in only partial inhibition of diacylglycerol formation, with no effect on the release reaction or on p43 phosphorylation. The present results suggest that AlF4- does not stimulate a G-protein governing the phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C. The AlF4(-)-induced diacylglycerol formation is discussed. Moreover, these results bring evidence that there is no correlation between granule centralization and myosin light-chain phosphorylation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2302176

  2. Influence of activating hormones on human platelet membrane Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Resink, T.J.; Dimitrov, D.; Stucki, S.; Buehler, F.R.

    1986-07-16

    Intact platelets were pretreated with hormones and thereafter membranes were prepared and Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity determined. Thrombin decreased the V/sub max/ of Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase after pretreatment of intact platelets. Platelet activating factor, vasopressin and ADP also decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or A23187 or ionomycin alone had no effect, while the simultaneous pretreatment with TPA and Ca/sup 2 +/-ionophore decreased Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase activity. cAMP elevating agents prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/) and forskolin had no influence per se on Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase, but antagonized the inhibitory effect of thrombin. The data suggest a close connection between phosphoinositide metabolism and the Ca/sup 2 +/-ATPase system.

  3. Platelets: active players in the pathogenesis of arthritis and SLE.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Blanco, Patrick; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2012-09-01

    Nearly one trillion platelets circulate in the blood to monitor and preserve the integrity of the vasculature. However, haemostasis is not their only function. Platelets are also potent immune cells capable of a range of effector responses. Studies have shown that platelets can have unexpected roles in rheumatic diseases. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), IL-1-containing platelet-derived vesicles called microparticles are abundant in arthritic joint fluid. These microparticles can elicit production of inflammatory mediators from resident synovial fibroblasts, which have an integral role in the development of arthritis. Platelets also serve as a source of prostaglandins that contribute to synovial inflammation. Furthermore, serotonin released by platelets helps drive the persistent vascular permeability that characterizes the microvasculature of the inflamed synovium, an unexpected function for a cell that more typically serves as a guardian of vascular integrity. Beyond RA, platelet activation has been observed in systemic lupus erythematosus, mediated at least in part through the interaction of circulating immune complexes with platelet Fc receptors and by promotion of interferon release from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. These findings point to a distinct role for platelets in autoimmunity and support the possibility that platelets are an attractive target in rheumatic disease.

  4. TMEM16F is required for phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release in activated mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Toshihiro; Sakata, Asuka; Nishimura, Satoshi; Eto, Koji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-10-13

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of activated platelets requires the action of a phospholipid scramblase(s), and serves as a scaffold for the assembly of the tenase and prothrombinase complexes involved in blood coagulation. Here, we found that the activation of mouse platelets with thrombin/collagen or Ca(2+) ionophore at 20 °C induces PtdSer exposure without compromising plasma membrane integrity. Among five transmembrane protein 16 (TMEM16) members that support Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipid scrambling, TMEM16F was the only one that showed high expression in mouse platelets. Platelets from platelet-specific TMEM16F-deficient mice exhibited defects in activation-induced PtdSer exposure and microparticle shedding, although α-granule and dense granule release remained intact. The rate of tissue factor-induced thrombin generation by TMEM16F-deficient platelets was severely reduced, whereas thrombin-induced clot retraction was unaffected. The imaging of laser-induced thrombus formation in whole animals showed that PtdSer exposure on aggregated platelets was TMEM16F-dependent in vivo. The phenotypes of the platelet-specific TMEM16F-null mice resemble those of patients with Scott syndrome, a mild bleeding disorder, indicating that these mice may provide a useful model for human Scott syndrome.

  5. Roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, platelet-activating factor, and arachidonic acid metabolites in interleukin-1-induced resistance to infection in neutropenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogels, M T; Hermsen, C C; Huys, H L; Eling, W M; van der Meer, J W

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge in granulocytopenic and in normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. The mechanism behind this protection has only partially been elucidated. Since IL-1 induces production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), and arachidonic acid metabolites, we investigated the potential role of these substances in IL-1-induced protection. Low doses of murine TNF-alpha but not of human TNF-alpha enhanced survival, suggesting an effect via the type II TNF receptor rather than the type I TNF receptor, which has little species specificity. In line with this TNF-alpha-induced protection from infection, pretreatment with a low dose of a rat anti-murine TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody tended to inhibit IL-1-induced protection, suggesting a role of TNF-alpha as a mediator of IL-1-induced enhanced resistance to infection. Pretreatment with higher doses of anti-TNF-alpha, however, showed a dose-related protective effect per se, which could be further enhanced by a suboptimal dose of IL-1. A combination of optimal doses of anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1 produced an increase in survival similar to that produced by separate pretreatments. This lack of further enhancement of survival by combined optimal pretreatments suggests a similar mechanism of protection, most likely attenuation of deleterious effects of overproduced proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha during lethal infection. Pretreatment with different doses of GM-CSF before a lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge in neutropenic mice did not enhance survival. Different doses of WEB 2170, a selective PAF receptor antagonist, of MK-886, a selective inhibitor of leukotriene biosynthesis, or of several cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not reduce the protective effect of IL-1 pretreatment. We conclude that IL-1-induced nonspecific

  6. Methods for studying the platelet-derived growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen-Pope, D.F.; Ross, R.

    1985-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a basic 30,000-dalton protein circulating in normal blood sequestered within the platelet alpha granule. Radioiodinated PDGF shows saturable (e.g., 60,000-120,000 receptors per diploid human fibroblast) high affinity binding to culture PDGF-responsive cells. The apparent dissociation constant reported for this binding interaction has varied widely. This paper focuses on factors which affect (/sup 125/I)PGDF binding and on the development of a radioreceptor assay for PDGF.

  7. Influenza virus H1N1 activates platelets through FcγRIIA signaling and thrombin generation.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Paré, Guillaume; Rousseau, Matthieu; Cloutier, Nathalie; Dubuc, Isabelle; Lévesque, Tania; Borgeat, Pierre; Flamand, Louis

    2014-05-01

    Platelets play crucial functions in hemostasis and the prevention of bleeding. During H1N1 influenza A virus infection, platelets display activation markers. The platelet activation triggers during H1N1 infection remain elusive. We observed that H1N1 induces surface receptor activation, lipid mediator synthesis, and release of microparticles from platelets. These activation processes require the presence of serum/plasma, pointing to the contribution of soluble factor(s). Considering that immune complexes in the H1N1 pandemic were reported to play a pathogenic role, we assessed their contribution in H1N1-induced platelet activation. In influenza-immunized subjects, we observed that the virus scaffolds with immunoglobulin G (IgG) to form immune complexes that promote platelet activation. Mechanistically, this activation occurs through stimulation of low-affinity type 2 receptor for Fc portion of IgG (FcγRIIA), a receptor for immune complexes, independently of thrombin. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we found that the antibodies from H3N2-immunized mice activate transgenic mouse platelets that express FcγRIIA when put in the presence of H1N1, suggesting that cross-reacting influenza antibodies suffice. Alternatively, H1N1 can activate platelets via thrombin formation, independently of complement and FcγRIIA. These observations identify both the adaptive immune response and the innate response against pathogens as 2 intertwined processes that activate platelets during influenza infections.

  8. Platelet Serotonin Transporter Function Predicts Default-Mode Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kasess, Christian H.; Meyer, Bernhard M.; Hofmaier, Tina; Diers, Kersten; Bartova, Lucie; Pail, Gerald; Huf, Wolfgang; Uzelac, Zeljko; Hartinger, Beate; Kalcher, Klaudius; Perkmann, Thomas; Haslacher, Helmuth; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kasper, Siegfried; Freissmuth, Michael; Windischberger, Christian; Willeit, Matthäus; Lanzenberger, Rupert; Esterbauer, Harald; Brocke, Burkhard; Moser, Ewald; Sitte, Harald H.; Pezawas, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Background The serotonin transporter (5-HTT) is abundantly expressed in humans by the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4 and removes serotonin (5-HT) from extracellular space. A blood-brain relationship between platelet and synaptosomal 5-HT reuptake has been suggested, but it is unknown today, if platelet 5-HT uptake can predict neural activation of human brain networks that are known to be under serotonergic influence. Methods A functional magnetic resonance study was performed in 48 healthy subjects and maximal 5-HT uptake velocity (Vmax) was assessed in blood platelets. We used a mixed-effects multilevel analysis technique (MEMA) to test for linear relationships between whole-brain, blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity and platelet Vmax. Results The present study demonstrates that increases in platelet Vmax significantly predict default-mode network (DMN) suppression in healthy subjects independent of genetic variation within SLC6A4. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses indicate that platelet Vmax is related to global DMN activation and not intrinsic DMN connectivity. Conclusion This study provides evidence that platelet Vmax predicts global DMN activation changes in healthy subjects. Given previous reports on platelet-synaptosomal Vmax coupling, results further suggest an important role of neuronal 5-HT reuptake in DMN regulation. PMID:24667541

  9. Apelin: an antithrombotic factor that inhibits platelet function.

    PubMed

    Adam, Frédéric; Khatib, Abdel-Majid; Lopez, Jose Javier; Vatier, Camille; Turpin, Sabrina; Muscat, Adeline; Soulet, Fabienne; Aries, Anne; Jardin, Isaac; Bobe, Régis; Stepanian, Alain; de Prost, Dominique; Dray, Cédric; Rosado, Juan Antonio; Valet, Philippe; Feve, Bruno; Siegfried, Geraldine

    2016-02-18

    Apelin peptide and its receptor APJ are directly implicated in various physiological processes ranging from cardiovascular homeostasis to immune signaling. Here, we show that apelin is a key player in hemostasis with an ability to inhibit thrombin- and collagen-mediated platelet activation. Mice lacking apelin displayed a shorter bleeding time and a prothrombotic profile. Their platelets exhibited increased adhesion and a reduced occlusion time in venules, and displayed a higher aggregation rate after their activation by thrombin compared with wild-type platelets. Consequently, human and mouse platelets express apelin and its receptor APJ. Apelin directly interferes with thrombin-mediated signaling pathways and platelet activation, secretion, and aggregation, but not with ADP and thromboxane A2-mediated pathways. IV apelin administration induced excessive bleeding and prevented thrombosis in mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that apelin and/or APJ agonists could potentially be useful adducts in antiplatelet therapies and may provide a promising perspective for patients who continue to display adverse thrombotic events with current antiplatelet therapies.

  10. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  12. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  13. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  14. 21 CFR 864.7695 - Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Platelet factor 4 radioimmunoassay. 864.7695 Section 864.7695 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7695...

  15. Autologous blood preparations rich in platelets, fibrin and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    FIORAVANTI, C.; FRUSTACI, I.; ARMELLIN, E.; CONDÒ, R.; ARCURI, C.; CERRONI, L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality after infectious diseases. The greatest regenerative power was obtained with autologous tissue, primarily the bone alive, taken from the same site or adjacent sites, up to the use centrifugation of blood with the selection of the parts with the greatest potential regenerative. In fact, various techniques and technologies were chronologically successive to cope with an ever better preparation of these concentrates of blood. Our aim is to review these advances and discuss the ways in which platelet concentrates may provide such unexpected beneficial therapeutic effects. Methods The research has been carried out in the MEDLINE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database by choosing keywords as “platelet rich plasma”, “platelet rich fibrin”, “platelet growth factors”, and “bone regeneration” and “dentistry”. Results Autologous platelet rich plasma is a safe and low cost procedure to deliver growth factors for bone and soft tissue healing. Conclusion The great heterogeneity of clinical outcomes can be explained by the different PRP products with qualitative and quantitative difference among substance. PMID:28042422

  16. [Activators, receptors and signal transduction pathways of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Shaturnyĭ, V I; Shakhidzhanov, S S; Sveshnikova, A N; Panteleev, M A

    2014-01-01

    Platelet participation in hemostatic plug formation requires transition into an activated state (or, rather, variety of states) upon action of agonists like ADP, thromboxane A , collagen, thrombin, and others. The mechanisms of action for different agonists, their receptors and signaling pathways associated with them, as well as the mechanisms of platelet response inhibition are the subject of the present review. Collagen exposed upon vessel wall damage induced initial platelet attachment and start of thrombus formation, which involves numerous processes such as aggregation, activation of integrins, granule secretion and increase of intracellular Ca2+. Thrombin, ADP, thromboxane A , and ATP activated platelets that were not initially in contact with the wall and induce additional secretion of activating substances. Vascular endothelium and secretory organs also affect platelet activation, producing both positive (adrenaline) an d negative (prostacyclin, nitric oxide) regulators, thereby determining the relation of activation and inhibition signals, which plays a significant role in the formation of platelet aggregate under normal and pathological conditions. The pathways of platelet signaling are still incompletely understood, and their exploration presents an important objective both for basic cell biology and for the development of new drugs, the methods of diagnostics and of treatment of hemostasis disorders.

  17. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 5 is mediated by PDGF beta-receptor and is not dependent on c-src, fyn, jak1 or jak2 kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Paukku, K; Valgeirsdóttir, S; Saharinen, P; Bergman, M; Heldin, C H; Silvennoinen, O

    2000-01-01

    Several growth factors activate signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) but the mechanism of Stat activation in receptor tyrosine kinase signalling has remained elusive. In the present study we have analysed the roles of different platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced tyrosine kinases in the activation of Stat5. Co-expression experiments in insect and mammalian cells demonstrated that both PDGF beta-receptor (PDGF beta-R) and Jak1, but not c-Src, induced the activation of Stat5. Furthermore, immune-complex-purified PDGF beta-R was able to phosphorylate Stat5 directly. The role of the cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases in the PDGF-induced activation of Stat5 was further investigated by overexpressing kinase-negative (KN) and wild-type Jak and c-Src kinases. Jak1-KN or Jak2-KN had no effect but both Src-KN and wild-type c-Src similarly decreased the PDGF-beta-R-induced activation of Stat5. The activation of both Src and Stat5 is dependent on the same tyrosine residues Tyr(579) and Tyr(581) in PDGF beta-R; thus the observed inhibition by Src might result from competition for binding of Stat5 to the receptor. Finally, fibroblasts derived from Src(-/-) and Fyn(-/-) mice showed normal pattern of PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of Stat5. Taken together, these results indicate that Stat5 is a direct substrate for PDGF beta-R and that the activation does not require Jak1, Jak2, c-Src or Fyn tyrosine kinases. PMID:10642538

  18. Platelet activation, adhesion, inflammation, and aggregation potential are altered in the presence of electronic cigarette extracts of variable nicotine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hom, Sarah; Chen, Li; Wang, Tony; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke extracts prepared from both mainstream and sidestream smoking have been associated with heightened platelet activation, aggregation, adhesion, and inflammation. Conversely, it has been shown that pure nicotine inhibits similar platelet functions. In this work, we 1) evaluated the effects of e-cigarette extracts on platelet activities and 2) elucidated the differences between the nicotine-dependent and non-nicotine dependent (e.g. fine particulate matter or toxic compounds) effects of tobacco and e-cigarette products on platelet activities. To accomplish these goals, platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 50) were exposed to tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts, and pure nicotine and changes in platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and inflammation were evaluated, using optical aggregation, flow cytometry, and ELISA methods. Interestingly, the exposure of platelets to e-vapor extracts induced a significant up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory gC1qR and cC1qR and induced a marked increase in the deposition of C3b as compared with traditional tobacco smoke extracts. Similarly, platelet activation, as measured by a prothrombinase based assay, and platelet aggregation were also significantly enhanced after exposure to e-vapor extracts. Finally, platelet adhesion potential toward fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other platelets was also enhanced after exposure to e-cigarette vapor extracts. In the presence of pure nicotine, platelet functions were observed to be inhibited, which further suggests that other constituents of tobacco smoke and electronic vapor can antagonize platelet functions, however, the presence of nicotine in extracts somewhat perpetuated the platelet functional changes in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Coagulation factors bound to procoagulant platelets concentrate in cap structures to promote clotting.

    PubMed

    Podoplelova, Nadezhda A; Sveshnikova, Anastasia N; Kotova, Yana N; Eckly, Anita; Receveur, Nicolas; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu; Obydennyi, Sergey I; Kireev, Igor I; Gachet, Christian; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Mangin, Pierre H; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-09-29

    Binding of coagulation factors to phosphatidylserine (PS)-exposing procoagulant-activated platelets followed by formation of the membrane-dependent enzyme complexes is critical for blood coagulation. Procoagulant platelets formed upon strong platelet stimulation, usually with thrombin plus collagen, are large "balloons" with a small (∼1 μm radius) "cap"-like convex region that is enriched with adhesive proteins. Spatial distribution of blood coagulation factors on the surface of procoagulant platelets was investigated using confocal microscopy. All of them, including factors IXa (FIXa), FXa/FX, FVa, FVIII, prothrombin, and PS-sensitive marker Annexin V were distributed nonhomogeneously: they were primarily localized in the "cap," where their mean concentration was by at least an order of magnitude, higher than on the "balloon." Assembly of intrinsic tenase on liposomes with various PS densities while keeping the PS content constant demonstrated that such enrichment can accelerate this reaction by 2 orders of magnitude. The mechanisms of such acceleration were investigated using a 3-dimensional computer simulation model of intrinsic tenase based on these data. Transmission electron microscopy and focal ion beam-scanning electron microscopy with Annexin V immunogold-labeling revealed a complex organization of the "caps." In platelet thrombi formed in whole blood on collagen under arterial shear conditions, ubiquitous "caps" with increased Annexin V, FX, and FXa binding were observed, indicating relevance of this mechanism for surface-attached platelets under physiological flow. These results reveal an essential heterogeneity in the surface distribution of major coagulation factors on the surface of procoagulant platelets and suggest its importance in promoting membrane-dependent coagulation reactions.

  20. Platelet activation of mechanical versus bioprosthetic heart valves during systole.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-03-11

    Thrombus formation is a major concern for recipients of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), which requires them to take anticoagulant drugs for the rest of their lives. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) do not require life-long anticoagulant therapy but deteriorate after 10-15years. The thrombus formation is initiated by the platelet activation which is thought to be mainly generated in MHVs by the flow through the hinge and the leakage flow during the diastole. However, our results show that the activation in the bulk flow during the systole phase might play an essential role as well. This is based on our results obtained by comparing the thrombogenic performance of a MHV and a BHV (as control) in terms of shear induced platelet activation under exactly the same conditions. Three different mathematical activation models including linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model are tested to quantify the platelet activation during systole using the previous simulations of the flow through MHV and BHV in a straight aorta under the same physiologic flow conditions. Results indicate that the platelet activation in the MHV at the beginning of the systole phase is slightly less than the BHV. However, at the end of the systole phase the platelet activation by the bulk flow for the MHV is several folds (1.41, 5.12, and 2.81 for linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model, respectively) higher than the BHV for all tested platelet activation models.

  1. Unaltered Angiogenesis-Regulating Activities of Platelets in Mild Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus despite a Marked Platelet Hyperreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Xinyan; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Zhangsen

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is associated with platelet dysfunction and impaired angiogenesis. Aim of the study is to investigate if platelet dysfunction might hamper platelet angiogenic activities in T2DM patients. Sixteen T2DM patients and gender/age-matched non-diabetic controls were studied. Flow cytometry and endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) tube formation on matrigel were used to assess platelet reactivity and angiogenic activity, respectively. Thrombin receptor PAR1-activating peptide (PAR1-AP) induced higher platelet P-selectin expression, and evoked more rapid and intense platelet annexin V binding in T2DM patients, seen as a more rapid increase of annexin V+ platelets (24.3±6.4% vs 12.6±3.8% in control at 2 min) and a higher elevation (30.9±5.1% vs 24.3±3.0% at 8 min). However, PAR1-AP and PAR4-AP induced similar releases of angiogenic regulators from platelets, and both stimuli evoked platelet release of platelet angiogenic regulators to similar extents in T2DM and control subjects. Thus, PAR1-stimulated platelet releasate (PAR1-PR) and PAR4-PR similarly enhanced capillary-like network/tube formation of ECFCs, and the enhancements did not differ between T2DM and control subjects. Direct supplementation of platelets to ECFCs at the ratio of 1:200 enhanced ECFC tube formation even more markedly, leading to approximately 100% increases of the total branch points of ECFC tube formation, for which the enhancements were also similar between patients and controls. In conclusion, platelets from T2DM subjects are hyperreactive. Platelet activation induced by high doses of PAR1-AP, however, results in similar releases of angiogenic regulators in mild T2DM and control subjects. Platelets from T2DM and control subjects also demonstrate similar enhancements on ECFC angiogenic activities. PMID:27612088

  2. Interaction of the von Willebrand factor with platelets and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Perutelli, P; Mori, P G

    1997-11-01

    The human von Willebrand factor (vWf) is a multimeric glycoprotein present in plasma, platelets, endothelial cells and subendothelium and synthesized in endothelial cells and megakaryocytes. vWf plays a pivotal role in the mechanisms of blood clotting and platelet thrombus formation; quantitative and qualitative abnormalities of vWf cause the most common congenital bleeding disorder in man, the von Willebrand disease. vWf stabilizes factor VIII and interacts with subendothelial components and with platelet membrane receptors. The multimeric structure of vWf provides an array of binding sites which allows multivalent interactions with its ligands, thus supporting the formation of stable platelet aggregates at the site of vascular injury, particularly under flow conditions characterized by high shear stress. In the last years, remarkable progress has been made toward understanding the structure of vWf protein and gene, and the elucidation of many structure-function relationships, which may result in improved therapeutic intervention for vWD patients, and in the development of effective strategies for antithrombotic therapy.

  3. Expression and activation of platelet-derived growth factor β receptor, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Altamura, Gennaro; Uberti, Barbara Degli; Galiero, Giorgio; Martano, Manuela; Pirro, Antonella; Russo, Marco; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2017-02-01

    Canine mammary tumours are frequent neoplasms mostly affecting intact female dogs, for which no 100% efficient therapy is available. Platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) is a tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) with a potential role in human breast cancer and a series of canine tumours. In this study we demonstrated, for the first time, expression of PDGFβR and its downstream transduction molecules, mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), as well as their activated forms in canine mammary tumours by both biochemical analysis and immunohistochemistry. PDGFβR was expressed and hyperphosphorylated in the majority of tumour samples and tumour derived cell lines. Additionally, both MEK and ERK were expressed and activated in cell lines as well as biopsies. TKR inhibitors (TKRi) are currently under investigation as possible therapy in human breast and several canine tumours, thus our in vivo and in vitro findings pave the way for future studies aimed at establishing a potential therapeutic employment of TKRi for the treatment of canine mammary cancer.

  4. Platelet activation through a Bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    Platelet activation is one of the major drawbacks of the Mechanical Heart Valves (MHVs) which can increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients. The platelet activation in MHVs can be due to the abnormal shear stress during the systole, the backward leakage flow during the diastole, and the flow through the hinge region. We investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanism to the activation of platelets in MHVs by performing simulations of the flow through the MHV and in the hinge region. The large scale heart valve simulations are performed in a straight aorta using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm under physiological flow conditions. In addition, in order to perform the simulation of hinge region the flow field boundary conditions are obtained from the largescale simulations during a whole cardiac cycle. In order to investigate the role of hinge flow on platelet activation in MHVs, a 23mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve hinge with three different gap sizes is tested along with different platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of our results with different activation models. We compare the platelet activation of the hinge region against the bulk of the flow during one cardiac cycle. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  5. Fibroblast-led cancer cell invasion is activated by epithelial-mesenchymal transition through platelet-derived growth factor BB secretion of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neri, Shinya; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Hashimoto, Hiroko; Suda, Yoshitaka; Ishibashi, Masayuki; Kii, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Hirotada; Kuwata, Takeshi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Goto, Koichi; Menju, Toshi; Sonobe, Makoto; Date, Hiroshi; Ochiai, Atsushi; Ishii, Genichiro

    2017-06-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF)-dependent local invasion is the process by which cancer cells invade the extracellular matrix using tracks that have been physically remodeled by CAFs. In the present study, we investigated the process by which the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells affect CAF-dependent local invasion. Using an in vitro collagen invasion assay, we showed cancer cells undergoing EMT to promote the matrix-remodeling ability of CAFs and thereby enhance CAF-dependent local cancer cell invasion. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB secretion was significantly elevated in cancer cells undergoing EMT, and this induced an increase in the invasion ability of both CAFs and cancer cells. Conversely, knockdown of PDGF-B expression in cancer cells undergoing EMT, or treatment with a PDGF-receptor inhibitor, decreased the invasion ability of both CAFs and cancer cells. By analyzing the gene expression profiles of 442 patients with lung adenocarcinomas, we established that high expression of PDGF-B and presentation of mesenchymal-like tumors were significantly associated with a high rate of disease recurrence and poor patient prognosis. Thus, cancer cells undergoing EMT may accelerate their own ability to invade local tissues via PDGF-BB secretion to promote CAF matrix remodeling. Therefore, targeting PDGF signaling between cancer cells undergoing EMT and CAFs is a promising therapeutic target to inhibit cancer progression and improve patient prognosis.

  6. Polyphenols enhance platelet nitric oxide by inhibiting protein kinase C-dependent NADPH oxidase activation: effect on platelet recruitment.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Di Santo, S; Buchetti, B; Sanguigni, V; Brunelli, A; Violi, F

    2006-06-01

    Several studies demonstrated an inverse association between polyphenol intake and cardiovascular events. Platelet recruitment is an important phase of platelet activation at the site of vascular injury, but it has never been investigated whether polyphenols influence platelet recruitment. The aim of the study was to analyze in vitro whether two polyphenols, quercetin and catechin, were able to affect platelet recruitment. Platelet recruitment was reduced by NO donors and by NADPH oxidase inhibitors and was enhanced by L-NAME, an inhibitor of NO synthase. Quercetin and catechin, but not single polyphenol, significantly inhibited platelet recruitment in a concentration-dependent fashion. The formation of superoxide anion was significantly inhibited in platelets incubated with quercetin and catechin but was unaffected by a single polyphenol. Incubation of platelets with quercetin and catechin resulted in inhibition of PKC and NADPH oxidase activation. Treatment of platelets with quercetin and catechin resulted in an increase of NO and also down-regulated the expression of GpIIb/IIIa glycoprotein. This study shows that the polyphenols quercetin and catechin synergistically act in reducing platelet recruitment via inhibition of PKC-dependent NADPH oxidase activation. This effect, resulting in NO-mediated platelet glycoprotein GpIIb/IIIa down-regulation, could provide a novel mechanism through which polyphenols reduce cardiovascular disease.

  7. Calpain-controlled detachment of major glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton regulates adhesive properties of activated phosphatidylserine-positive platelets.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Elena O; Yakimenko, Alena O; Pichugin, Alexey V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-02-15

    In resting platelets, adhesive membrane glycoproteins are attached to the cytoskeleton. On strong activation, phosphatidylserine(PS)-positive and -negative platelet subpopulations are formed. Platelet activation is accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, although the glycoprotein attachment status in these two subpopulations is not clear. We developed a new, flow cytometry-based, single-cell approach to investigate attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton in cell subpopulations. In PS-negative platelets, adhesive glycoproteins integrin αIIbβ3, glycoprotein Ib and, as shown for the first time, P-selectin were associated with the cytoskeleton. In contrast, this attachment was disrupted in PS-positive platelets; it was retained to some extent only in the small convex regions or 'caps'. It correlated with the degradation of talin and filamin observed only in PS-positive platelets. Calpain inhibitors essentially prevented the disruption of membrane glycoprotein attachment in PS-positive platelets, as well as talin and filamin degradation. With the suggestion that detachment of glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton may affect platelet adhesive properties, we investigated the ability of PS-positive platelets to resist shear-induced breakaway from the immobilized fibrinogen. Shear rates of 500/s caused PS-positive platelet breakaway, but their adhesion stability increased more than 10-fold after pretreatment of the platelets with calpain inhibitor. In contrast, the ability of PS-positive platelets to adhere to immobilized von Willebrand's factor at 100/s was low, but this was not affected by the preincubation of platelets with a calpain inhibitor. Our data suggest that calpain-controlled detachment of membrane glycoproteins is a new mechanism that is responsible for the loss of ability of the procoagulant platelets to resist detachment from thrombi by high shear stress.

  8. NF-κB Links TLR2 and PAR1 to Soluble Immunomodulator Factor Secretion in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Damien, Pauline; Cognasse, Fabrice; Payrastre, Bernard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Eyraud, Marie-Ange; Phipps, Richard P.; McNicol, Archibald; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind

    2017-01-01

    The primary toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated immune cell response pathway common for all TLRs is MyD88-dependent activation of NF-κB, a seminal transcription factor for many chemokines and cytokines. Remarkably, anucleate platelets express the NF-κB machinery, whose role in platelets remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the contribution of NF-κB in the release of cytokines and serotonin by human platelets, following selective stimulation of TLR2 and protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), a classical and non-classical pattern-recognition receptor, respectively, able to participate to the innate immune system. We discovered that platelet PAR1 activation drives the process of NF-κB phosphorylation, in contrast to TLR2 activation, which induces a slower phosphorylation process. Conversely, platelet PAR1 and TLR2 activation induces similar ERK1/2, p38, and AKT phosphorylation. Moreover, we found that engagement of platelet TLR2 with its ligand, Pam3CSK4, significantly increases the release of sCD62P, RANTES, and sCD40L; this effect was attenuated by incubating platelets with a blocking anti-TLR2 antibody. This effect appeared selective since no modulation of serotonin secretion was observed following platelet TLR2 activation. Platelet release of sCD62P, RANTES, and sCD40L following TLR2 or PAR1 triggering was abolished in the presence of the NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082, while serotonin release following PAR1 activation was significantly decreased. These new findings support the concept that NF-κB is an important player in platelet immunoregulations and functions. PMID:28220122

  9. Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriani, M.; Ghittori, S.; Prestinoni, A.; Longoni, P.; Cascone, G.; Gamba, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on hemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27 mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data, and smoking habits, were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.

  10. Platelets aggregation in pathological conditions: role of local shear rates and platelet activation delay time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zarif Khalili Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the initiation and formation of a thrombus, however their detailed motion in blood vessels with complex geometries, such as in the aneurysmal vessel or stenotic vessel in atherosclerosis, has not been studied systematically. Here, we perform spectral element simulations (NEKTAR code) to obtain the 3D flow field in blood vessel with cavities, and we apply the force coupling method (FCM) to simulate the motion of platelets in blood flow. Specifically, simulations of platelets are performed in a 0.25 mm diameter circular blood vessel with 1 mm length. Corresponding coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide input to the NEKTAR-FCM code. Simulations are conducted at several different Reynolds numbers (Re). An ellipsoid-shaped cavity is selected to intersect with the middle part of the circular vessel to represent the aneurysmal part of the blood vessel. Based on the simulation results, we quantify how the platelets motion and aggregation in the blood vessel cavities depend on Re, platelet activation delay time, and the geometry of the cavities.

  11. RGS10 Negatively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Tansey, Malú G.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins act as GTPase activating proteins to negatively regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Although several RGS proteins including RGS2, RGS16, RGS10, and RGS18 are expressed in human and mouse platelets, the respective unique function(s) of each have not been fully delineated. RGS10 is a member of the D/R12 subfamily of RGS proteins and is expressed in microglia, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and platelets. We used a genetic approach to examine the role(s) of RGS10 in platelet activation in vitro and hemostasis and thrombosis in vivo. GPCR-induced aggregation, secretion, and integrin activation was much more pronounced in platelets from Rgs10-/- mice relative to wild type (WT). Accordingly, these mice had markedly reduced bleeding times and were more susceptible to vascular injury-associated thrombus formation than control mice. These findings suggest a unique, non-redundant role of RGS10 in modulating the hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets in mice. RGS10 thus represents a potential therapeutic target to control platelet activity and/or hypercoagulable states. PMID:27829061

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated release of platelet-derived growth factor from cultured endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a 30,000-Mr glycoprotein that is chemotactic and mitogenic for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). It is also a potent vasoconstrictor. In the present study, we found that the macrophage-derived polypeptide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), releases a factor from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EC) that is mitogenic for SMC. Postculture medium from TNF-stimulated EC induced a 90% increase in mitogenesis is compared with controls. This effect was half-maximal at a TNF dose of 114 pM, reflected a 2.5-fold increase in PDGF-specific mRNA synthesis, and peaked at 15 h of TNF stimulation. Mitogenic activity was completely abrogated by preincubation of postculture medium with antibody to platelet PDGF. Stimulation of EC with IL-1 (60-240 pM) led to the release of similar mitogenic activity. Thus, in addition to its effects on the hemostatic and adhesive properties of EC, TNF also promotes release of PDGF, which may serve to modulate proliferation of vascular SMC during wound healing, inflammation, and atherogenesis. PMID:3598461

  13. Calreticulin Transacetylase mediated activation of human platelet nitric oxide synthase by acetyl group donor compounds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Sushama, Anupam; Manral, Sushma; Sinha, Rajesh; Joshi, Rini; Singh, Usha; Rohil, Vishwajeet; Prasad, Ashok K; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols have attracted immense interest because of their diverse biological and pharmacological activities. Surprisingly, not much is documented about the biological activities of acetoxy derivatives of polyphenol called polyphenolic acetates (PA). In our previous reports, we have conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by PA. In the present work, specificity of CRTAase to various classes of PA was characterized in human platelet. The effect of PA, on platelet NOS and intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation were studied in an elaborated manner. Platelet CRTAase exhibited differential specificities to polyphenolic acetates upon incubation with l-arginine leading to activation of NOS. The intraplatelet generation of NO was studied by flowcytometry using DCFH-DA. The differential specificities of CRTAase to PA were found to positively correlate with increased production of NO upon incubation of PRP with PA and l-arginine. Further, the inhibitory effect of l-NAME on PA induced NO formation in platelets substantiated the CRTAase catalyzed activation of NOS. The real-time RT-PCR profile of NOS isoforms confirmed the preponderance of eNOS over iNOS in human platelets on treatment with PA. Western blot analysis also reiterated the differential pattern of acetylation of eNOS by PA. PA were also found effective in increasing the intraplatelet cGMP levels and inhibiting ADP-induced platelet aggregation. It is worth mentioning that the effects of PA were found to be in tune with the specificities of platelet CRTAase to PA as the substrates.

  14. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  15. Establishment of Epithelial Attachment on Titanium Surface Coated with Platelet Activating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Shiho; Maeno, Masahiko; Lee, Cliff; Nagai, Shigemi; Kim, David M.; Da Silva, John; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce epithelial attachment on a typical implant abutment surface of smooth titanium. A challenging complication that hinders the success of dental implants is peri-implantitis. A common cause of peri-implantitis may results from the lack of epithelial sealing at the peri-implant collar. Histologically, epithelial sealing is recognized as the attachment of the basement membrane (BM). BM-attachment is promoted by activated platelet aggregates at surgical wound sites. On the other hand, platelets did not aggregate on smooth titanium, the surface typical of the implant abutment. We then hypothesized that epithelial BM-attachment was produced when titanium surface was modified to allow platelet aggregation. Titanium surfaces were coated with a protease activated receptor 4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP). PAR4-AP coating yielded rapid aggregation of platelets on the titanium surface. Platelet aggregates released robust amount of epithelial chemoattractants (IGF-I, TGF-β) and growth factors (EGF, VEGF) on the titanium surface. Human gingival epithelial cells, when they were co-cultured on the platelet aggregates, successfully attached to the PAR4-AP coated titanium surface with spread laminin5 positive BM and consecutive staining of the epithelial tight junction component ZO1, indicating the formation of complete epithelial sheet. These in-vitro results indicate the establishment of epithelial BM-attachment to the titanium surface. PMID:27741287

  16. Serotonin transporter activity in platelets and canine aggression.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Belén; García-Belenguer, Sylvia; Palacio, Jorge; Chacón, Gema; Villegas, Ainara; Alcalde, Ana I

    2010-10-01

    Several studies have suggested an inhibitory action of the serotonergic system in the regulation of canine aggression, but the role of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (5-HTT) has not been investigated. Platelet 5-HT uptake has been proposed as a peripheral marker of brain 5-HTT. The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between platelet 5-HTT activity and canine aggression by measuring the rate of 5-HT uptake mediated by 5-HTT in platelets and serum concentrations of 5-HT in both aggressive (n=14) and non-aggressive dogs (n=17). Aggressive dogs showed significantly higher 5-HT uptake by 5-HTT in platelets and lower serum concentrations of 5-HT, compared with the control group. These results suggested an association between an alteration in the serotonergic system and canine aggression, possibly mediated by an increased 5-HT transport.

  17. Platelet activation as a marker of heart attack.

    PubMed

    Blann, Andrew D; Draper, Zoe

    2011-05-12

    A key component of the pathology of myocardial infarction (i.e. heart attack) is platelet-rich thrombosis within the coronary arteries. In many cases this occurs despite the use of anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin, and this, alongside other evidence, prompts the search for novel markers of platelet activity, such as levels of platelet product soluble P selectin in the plasma. However, by themselves, high levels of soluble P-selectin are of insufficient sensitivity and specificity to contribute to the management of the chest pain that may be a heart attack. Conversely, the current report shows that low levels of soluble P selectin contribute to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction because, as low levels are so rarely found in this condition, heart attack can be ruled out. If confirmed, this will be a major step forward in the management of acute chest pain.

  18. Influence of red algal sulfated polysaccharides on blood coagulation and platelets activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina V; Byankina, Anna O; Kalitnik, Alexandra A; Kim, Yong H; Bogdanovich, Larisa N; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Yermak, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The influence of sulfated polysaccharides (λ-, κ-, and κ/β-carrageenan and porphyran) - on platelet activation was studied. Carrageenans were much weaker inhibitors of a coagulation process than heparin, while porphyran had not that effect. Results of the aPTT and PT assays suppose that carrageenans affected mostly intrinsic pathway of coagulation, while their effect on the extrinsic pathway is extremely low (λ and κ/β) or absent (κ, LMW derivative of κ-carrageenan). λ-Carrageenan was the most potent anticoagulant agent in TT, aPTT, PT, and anti-factor Xa activity. This sample was also the strongest inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in PRP. Generally, the correlation of anticoagulant and antithrombotic action in PRP is preserved for carrageenans but not for heparin. Carrageenans and porphyran affected platelet adhesion to collagen by influencing glycoprotein VI. Low molecular weight κ-carrageenan had a similar effect on platelet adhesion mediated with both major collagen receptors: integrin α2 β1 and glycoprotein VI as native polysaccharide had. Carrageenans resulted in activation of platelets under platelet adhesion mediated by integrin αIIb β3 with less degree than heparin. The least sulfated κ/β-carrageenan that possessed an inhibiting effect on thrombin- and collagen-induced aggregation of washed platelets and on the PT test but it had no significant effect on TT was the weakest promoter of integrin αIIb β3 mediated platelet activation. In summary, our study showed that the polysaccharide action was complex, since it depended on its molecular mass, sulfation degree, and monosaccharide contents (3,6-anhydrogalactose).

  19. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  20. Platelet growth factors from allogeneic platelet-rich plasma for clinical improvement in split-thickness skin graft

    PubMed Central

    Sonker, Atul; Dubey, Anju; Bhatnagar, Ankur; Chaudhary, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Platelets are a source of numerous growth factors which facilitate repair and healing. Thus platelet rich plasma has been increasingly used as a treatment modality in the field of reconstructive surgeries for wound healing. This preliminary study was carried out to explore whether platelet growth factors from platelet rich plasma could be used for enhancement of split thickness skin graft survival. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (13 males and 7 females) requiring split thickness skin graft for various clinical reasons were enrolled in the study. Platelet rich plasma was collected by apheresis and frozen at −80° C. It was thawed at room temperature immediately before its intended application. PRP was applied only on one half of the wound, while another half served as control. Patient was followed for 6 weeks. The effect was assessed at first dressing in terms of graft uptake and subsequently as time taken for complete healing. Results: There was 100% uptake of the graft in the area where platelet rich plasma was applied. In the control area, there was complete graft loss in 4 cases, partial loss in 7 cases and complete uptake in 9 cases. Conclusion: This study demonstrated promising results on application of PRP to split thickness skin grafts. Further randomized studies with greater sample size may be undertaken to establish platelet rich plasma as a validated treatment modality. PMID:26420935

  1. Collagen-induced binding to human platelets of platelet-derived growth factor leading to inhibition of P43 and P20 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bryckaert, M.C.; Rendu, F.; Tobelem, G.; Wasteson, A.

    1989-03-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is known to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Collagen-induced binding of /sup 125/I-PDGF to human washed platelets was therefore investigated. It was found to be time-dependent, reaching a plateau at 20 degrees C after 30 min, collagen concentration-dependent, specifically inhibited by unlabeled PDGF, and saturable. Scatchard plot analysis showed a single class of sites with 3000 +/- 450 molecules bound/cell and an apparent KD of 1.2 +/- 0.2 10(-8) M. The effects of PDGF on collagen-induced phosphoinositide breakdown and protein phosphorylation were also investigated. At 50 ng/ml PDGF, a concentration which completely inhibited collagen-induced aggregation, the breakdown of (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) and (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) was observed, but the subsequent replenishment of (/sup 32/P)PIP2 was inhibited. The same PDGF concentration totally inhibited collagen-induced phosphatidic acid formation. PDGF also completely prevented phosphorylation of P43 and P20, as a result of protein kinase C activation consecutive to phosphoinositide metabolism. These results suggest that a specific PDGF receptor can be induced by collagen, and PDGF can effect the early events of collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting PIP2 resynthesis and P43 and P20 phosphorylation. It is concluded that PDGF might be involved in a negative feed-back control of platelet activation.

  2. CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) is required for degranulation of human eosinophils induced by human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Kita, H

    1994-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests adhesion molecules play an important role in the function of leukocytes. Because human eosinophils are known to express beta 2 integrins, we hypothesized that these adhesion molecules mediate the effector function of eosinophils. Normal human eosinophils incubated in albumin-coated polystyrene plates released granule protein and produced superoxide anion when stimulated with human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage CSF (rGM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), or PMA. Simultaneous monitoring of eosinophil adhesion and degranulation showed that degranulation was always preceded by cellular adhesion regardless of stimuli. Furthermore, eosinophil degranulation induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was abolished in suspension culture of the cells when the cell suspensions were gently stirred. To identify the molecules involved in this adhesion-dependent degranulation, we have investigated the effects of mAbs (mAb) against beta 2 integrins. mAb reactive with CD18 markedly inhibited the eosinophil adhesion and degranulation induced by PAF and human rGM-CSF. mAb reactive with CD11b also moderately inhibited the adhesion and degranulation. In contrast, mAb reactive with CD11a slightly enhanced or showed no effect on the adhesion and degranulation by human rGM-CSF or PAF. Superoxide production induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was also abolished by the treatment of cells with anti-CD18 mAb. mAb against CD11b and CD18 had little effect on degranulation and superoxide production induced by PMA. These results indicate that CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-dependent cellular adhesion plays an important role in the degranulation and superoxide production of eosinophils induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF, and that these mechanisms may be employed in vivo where eosinophils contact with stromal cells and/or proteins.

  3. Regulation of platelet activating factor synthesis: modulation of 1-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in rat spleen microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1984-05-16

    1-Alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase plays an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor, a potent bioactive mediator. The authors tested the hypothesis that the activity of acetyltransferase may be modulated by enzymatic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The results showed that acetyltransferase activity in rat spleens was 2- to 3-fold higher in microsomes isolated in the presence of F/sup -/ than in those isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/. The microsomal acetyltransferase could be activated by preincubation of microsomes, isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/, with ATP, Mg/sup 2 +/, and the soluble fraction from rat spleen. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerols, plus Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhanced the activity. The increase in the activity of acetyltranferase was abolished by treatment of the activated microsomes with alkaline phosphatase. Conversely, the activity of acetyltransferase can be reactivated in the alkaline phosphatase-treated microsomes with incubation conditions that favor phosphorylation. Therefore, the findings suggest that acetyltransferase activity is regulated by reversible activation/inactivation through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

  4. Streamlining the design of promising clinical trials: in-vitro testing of antithrombotic regimens and multiple agonists of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David J; Sobel, Burton E

    2009-03-01

    Platelets are activated in vivo by multiple agonists; however, platelet function testing in vitro has been performed predominantly with only one or two agonists of platelet activation. Greater insight into anticipated effects of antithrombotic regimens should enhance the design of successful clinical trials. To test this concept, we assessed platelet activation induced by multiple agonists and two antithrombotic regimens, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and eptifibatide compared with bivalirudin and cangrelor. Blood samples from 10 patients with coronary artery disease were spiked with pharmacologic concentrations achieved in vivo of either UFH (1.2 U/ml) and eptifibatide (1.7 microg/ml), or with bivalirudin (8 microg/ml) and cangrelor (500 nmol/l). Platelet function was assessed with the use of flow cytometry. Agonists included thrombin (50 nmol/l), adenosine diphosphate (1 micromol/l), the collagen-mimetic convulxin (5 ng/ml), and platelet-activating factor (10 nmol/l). When platelet activation was identified by the surface expression of P-selectin in response to multiple agonists, the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed activation more than UFH and eptifibatide. When platelet activation was identified by the activation of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (PAC-1 binding), the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor was more effective in suppressing activation in response to thrombin and adenosine diphosphate, whereas UFH and eptifibatide more effectively prevented binding of PAC-1 when platelets were activated with the collagen-mimetic convulxin. In conclusion, bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed platelet activation in response to diverse agonists in vitro more than UFH and eptifibatide. These results and this approach to selection of promising interventions should be helpful in streamlining the design of clinical trials.

  5. Surface proteome analysis identifies platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha as a critical mediator of transforming growth factor-beta-induced collagen secretion.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Noskovičová, Nina; Merl-Pham, Juliane; Preissler, Gerhard; Winter, Hauke; Lindner, Michael; Hatz, Rudolf; Hauck, Stefanie M; Behr, Jürgen; Eickelberg, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    Fibroblasts are extracellular matrix-producing cells in the lung. Fibroblast activation by transforming growth factor-beta leads to myofibroblast-differentiation and increased extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of pulmonary fibrosis. While fibroblast function with respect to migration, invasion, and extracellular matrix deposition has been well-explored, little is known about the surface proteome of lung fibroblasts in general and its specific response to fibrogenic growth factors, in particular transforming growth factor-beta. We thus performed a cell-surface proteome analysis of primary human lung fibroblasts in presence/absence of transforming growth factor-beta, followed by characterization of our findings using FACS analysis, Western blot, and siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments. We identified 213 surface proteins significantly regulated by transforming growth factor-beta, platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha being one of the top down-regulated proteins. Transforming growth factor beta-induced downregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha induced upregulation of platelet derived growth factor receptor-beta expression and phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream target of platelet derived growth factor signaling. Importantly, collagen type V expression and secretion was strongly increased after forced knockdown of platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha, an effect that was potentiated by transforming growth factor-beta. We therefore show previously underappreciated cross-talk of transforming growth factor-beta and platelet derived growth factor signaling in human lung fibroblasts, resulting in increased extracellular matrix deposition in a platelet derived growth factor receptor-alpha dependent manner. These findings are of particular importance for the treatment of lung fibrosis patients with high pulmonary transforming growth factor-beta activity.

  6. Possible mechanisms for the differential effects of high linoleate safflower oil and high alpha-linolenate perilla oil diets on platelet-activating factor production by rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Oh-hashi, K; Takahashi, T; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, T; Okuyama, H

    1997-12-01

    As compared with high dietary linoleate safflower oil, high dietary alpha-linolenate perilla oil decreased platelet-activating factor (PAF) production by nearly half in calcium ionophore (CaI)-stimulated rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In the CaI-stimulated PMN from the perilla oil group, the accumulated amount of arachidonate (AA) plus eicosapentaenoate (EPA) was 30% less and that of lyso-PAF was 50% less, indicating that the decreased availability of lyso-PAF is a factor contributing to the relatively low PAF production. Consistently, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, increased free fatty acids (FFA) and decreased PAF production possibly by decreasing the availability of lyso-PAF. Although, leukotrienes (LTs) have been proposed to stimulate PAF production synergistically, a potent LTB4 receptor antagonist, ONO-4057, decreased the formation of free fatty acids and LTB4, but stimulated PAF production somewhat, indicating that LTB4 may not stimulate PAF production in PMN. Lysophospholipid-induced transacylase (CoA-independent transacylase) activity in PMN homogenates was 25-30% lower in the perilla oil group but no significant differences were observed in the lyso-PAF acetyltransferase and PAF acetylhydrolase activities between the two dietary groups. Thus, decreased transacylase activity is another factor associated with the relatively low PAF production in the perilla oil group.

  7. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA.

    PubMed

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H; Naika, Gajendra S; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J; Poubelle, Patrice E; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2015-07-07

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms.

  8. Imaging the elastic modulus of human platelets during thrombin-induced activation using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Vogel, Sebastian; Seifert, Jan; Schächtele, Marc; Borst, Oliver; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-02-01

    Platelet activation plays a critical role in haemostasis and thrombosis. It is well-known that platelets generate contractile forces during activation. However, their mechanical material properties have rarely been investigated. Here, we use scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to visualise morphological and mechanical properties of live human platelets at high spatial resolution. We found that their mean elastic modulus decreases during thrombin-induced activation by about a factor of two. We observed a similar softening of platelets during cytochalasin D-induced cytoskeleton depolymerisation. However, thrombin-induced temporal and spatial modulations of the elastic modulus were substantially different from cytochalasin D-mediated changes. We thereby provide new insights into the mechanics of haemostasis and establish SICM as a novel imaging platform for the ex vivo investigation of the mechanical properties of live platelets.

  9. The Effects of Platelet-Activating Factor (PAF) and a PAF Antagonist (CV-3988) on Smoke Inhalation Injury in an Ovine Model,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    decyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3- phosphorylcholine ) has following PAF injection. In models of endotoxin shock, been reported to be one of the principal...instillation of 1-0-octadecyl-2- 25. Traber DL, Herndon DN, Stein MD, et al: The pulmonary lesion acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3- phosphorylcholine or of native platelet-ac...glyceryl ether phosphorylcholine infusion in the change (abstr). Proceedings of the American Burn Association rabbit. Am Rev Respir Dis 124:416, 1981 22nd

  10. Effects of Outdoor Air Pollutants on Platelet Activation in People with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Mark W.; Bausch, Jan; Chalupa, David; Hopke, Philip K.; Little, Erika L.; Oakes, David; Stewart, Judith C.; Utell, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that increases in exposure to ambient air pollution are associated with platelet activation and formation of circulating tissue-factor-expressing microparticles. We studied 19 subjects with type 2 diabetes, without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease, who had previously participated in a human clinical study of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Blood was obtained for measurements of platelet activation following an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Center, prior to each of their two pre-exposure visits. Air pollution and meteorological data, including UFP counts, were analyzed for the 5 days prior to the subjects’ arrival at the Clinical Research Center. Contrary to expectations, increases in UFP were associated with decreases in surface expression of platelet activation markers. The number of platelet-leukocyte conjugates decreased by −80 (95% confidence interval (CI) −123 to −37, p=0.001) on the first lag day (20–44 hours prior to the blood draw) and by −85 (CI −139 to −31, p=0.005) on combined lag days 1 to 5, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in UFP particle number (2482). However, levels of soluble CD40L increased 104 (CI 3 to 205, p=0.04) pg/ml per IQR increase in UFP on lag day 1, a finding consistent with prior platelet activation. We speculate that, in people with diabetes, exposure to UFP activates circulating platelets within hours of exposure, followed by an increase in soluble CD40L and a rebound reduction in circulating platelet surface markers. PMID:23033996

  11. Effects of outdoor air pollutants on platelet activation in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Mark W; Bausch, Jan; Chalupa, David; Hopke, Philip K; Little, Erika L; Oakes, David; Stewart, Judith C; Utell, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that increases in exposure to ambient air pollution are associated with platelet activation and formation of circulating tissue factor-expressing microparticles. We studied 19 subjects with type 2 diabetes, without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease, who had previously participated in a human clinical study of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Blood was obtained for measurements of platelet activation following an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Center, prior to each of their two pre-exposure visits. Air pollution and meteorological data, including UFP counts, were analyzed for the 5 days prior to the subjects' arrival at the Clinical Research Center. Contrary to expectations, increases in UFP were associated with decreases in surface expression of platelet activation markers. The number of platelet-leukocyte conjugates decreased by -80 (95% confidence interval (CI) -123 to -37, p = 0.001) on the first lag day (20-44 h prior to the blood draw) and by -85 (CI -139 to -31, p = 0.005) on combined lag days 1 to 5, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in UFP particle number (2482). However, levels of soluble CD40L increased 104 (CI 3 to 205, p = 0.04) pg/ml per IQR increase in UFP on lag day 1, a finding consistent with prior platelet activation. We speculate that, in people with diabetes, exposure to UFP activates circulating platelets within hours of exposure, followed by an increase in soluble CD40L and a rebound reduction in circulating platelet surface markers.

  12. Anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Won; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a critical role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders and strokes. The inhibition of platelet function is beneficial for the treatment and prevention of these diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (EATN), a neolignan isolated from Myristica fragrans, using human platelets. EATN preferentially inhibited thrombin- and platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation without affecting platelet damage in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 3.2 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.3 μM, respectively. However, much higher concentrations of EATN were required to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid. EATN also inhibited thrombin-induced serotonin and ATP release, and thromboxane B2 formation in human platelets. Moreover, EATN caused an increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in thrombin-activated human platelets. Therefore, we conclude that the inhibitory mechanism of EATN on platelet aggregation may increase cAMP levels and subsequently inhibit intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by interfering with a common signaling pathway rather than by directly inhibiting the binding of thrombin or PAF to their receptors. This is the first report of the anti-platelet activity of EATN isolated from M. fragrans.

  13. Dual control of cell growth by somatomedins and platelet-derived growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, C D; Capone, G T; Scher, C D; Antoniades, H N; Van Wyk, J J; Pledger, W J

    1979-01-01

    Quiescent BALB/c 3T3 cells exposed briefly to a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) become "competent" to replicate their DNA but do not "progress" into S phase unless incubated with growth factors contained in platelet-poor plasma. Plasma from hypophysectomized rats is deficient in progression activity; it does not stimulate PDGF-treated competent cells to synthesize DNA, demonstrating that somatomedin C is required for progression. Various growth factors were tested for progression activity and competence activity by using BALB/c 3T3 tissue culture assays. Multiplication stimulating activity and other members of the somatomedin family of growth factors are (like somatomedin C) potent mediators of progression. Other mitogenic agents, such as fibroblast growth factor, are (like PDGF) potent inducers of competence. Growth factors with potent progression activity have little or no competence activity and vice versa. In contrast, simian virus 40 provides both competence and progression activity. Coordinate control of BALB/c 3T3 cell growth in vitro by competence factors and somatomedins may be a specific example of a common pattern of growth regulation in animal tissues. PMID:312500

  14. Release of the angiogenic cytokine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from platelets: significance for VEGF measurements and cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Banks, R E; Forbes, M A; Kinsey, S E; Stanley, A; Ingham, E; Walters, C; Selby, P J

    1998-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic factor with a key role in several pathological processes, including tumour vascularization. Our preliminary observations indicated higher VEGF concentrations in serum samples than in matched plasma samples. We have now demonstrated that this difference is due to the presence of VEGF within platelets and its release upon their activation during coagulation. In eight healthy volunteers, serum VEGF concentrations ranged from 76 to 854 pg ml(-1) and were significantly higher (P < 0.01) than the matched citrated plasma VEGF concentrations, which ranged from < 9 to 42 pg ml(-1). Using platelet-rich plasma, mean (s.d.) platelet VEGF contents of 0.56 (0.36) pg of VEGF 10(-6) platelets were found. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated the cytoplasmic presence of VEGF within megakaryocytes and other cell types within the bone marrow. From examination of the effects of blood sample processing on circulating VEGF concentrations, it is apparent that for accurate measurements, citrated plasma processed within 1 h of venepuncture should be used. Serum is completely unsuitable. The presence of VEGF within platelets has implications for processes involving platelet and endothelial cell interactions. e.g. wound healing, and in tumour metastasis, when platelets adhering to circulating tumour cells may release VEGF at points of adhesion to endothelium, leading to hyperpermeability and extravasation of cells.

  15. Influence of platelet-derived growth factor-AB on tissue development in autologous platelet-rich plasma gels.

    PubMed

    Wirz, Simone; Dietrich, Maren; Flanagan, Thomas C; Bokermann, Gudrun; Wagner, Wolfgang; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan

    2011-07-01

    Fibrin-based scaffolds are widely used in tissue engineering. We postulated that the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in contrast to platelet-poor plasma and pure fibrinogen as the basic material leads to an increased release of autologous platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB, which may have a consequent positive effect on tissue development. Therefore, we evaluated the release of PDGF-AB during the production process and the course of PDGF release during cultivation of plasma gels with and w/o platelets. The influence of PDGF-AB on the proliferation rate of human umbilical cord artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs) was studied using XTT assay. The synthesis of extracellular matrix by HUASMCs in plasma- and fibrin gels was measured using hydroxyproline assay. The use of PRP led to an increase in autologous PDGF-AB release. Further, the platelet-containing plasma gels showed a prolonged release of growth factor during cultivation. Both PRP and platelet-poor plasma gels had a positive effect on the production of collagen. However, PDGF-AB as a supplement in medium and in pure fibrin gel had neither an effect on cell proliferation nor on the collagen synthesis rate. This observation may be due to an absence of PDGF receptors in HUASMCs as determined by flow cytometry. In conclusion, although the prolonged autologous production of PDGF-AB in PRP gels is possible, the enhanced tissue development by HUASMCs within such gels is not PDGF related.

  16. Effect of thrombopoietin and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Schattner, M; Pozner, R G; Gorostizaga, A B; Lazzari, M A

    2000-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be administered together in aplastic patients. We evaluated the effect of both cytokines alone or combined on platelets and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) functional responses. TPO, G-CSF, or the combination of both cytokines, induced neither platelet nor PMN activation. TPO but not G-CSF synergized with threshold ADP concentrations to induce maximal aggregation and ATP release. The synergistic effect of TPO with ADP was not modified by the presence of G-CSF. Flow cytometry studies have shown that thrombin-induced loss of GPIb from platelet surface was significantly increased by pretreatment of platelets with TPO, G-CSF, or both cytokines. P-selectin expression induced by thrombin was augmented by TPO, but not by G-CSF. Coincubation of the cells with TPO and G-CSF did not modify the values obtained with TPO alone. Expression of CD11b on PMN surface was augmented by G-CSF or fMLP. G-CSF-treated PMN increased the effect of fMLP on CD11b expression. TPO did not modify either basal levels of CD11b or the increased expression induced by G-CSF or fMLP. Incubation of PMN with both cytokines showed no differences compared to G-CSF alone. Platelet-PMN aggregates induced by thrombin in whole blood were augmented by TPO. G-CSF alone neither synergized with thrombin nor changed the results observed with TPO. These data show that in vitro functional responses of platelets, or PMN induced by TPO or G-CSF alone, were neither further increased nor inhibited by treatment of the cells with both cytokines.

  17. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Platelet-Endothelial Interactions and Endothelial Von Willebrand Factor In Early and Mid-Stage Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young; Liu, Ya Ni; Atkinson, Tamara; Xie, Aris; Foster, Ted; Davidson, Brian P.; Treible, Mackenzie; Qi, Yue; López, José A.; Munday, Adam; Ruggeri, Zaverio; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-thrombotic platelet-endothelial interactions may contribute to atherosclerotic plaque development, although in vivo studies examining mechanism without platelet pre-activation are lacking. Using in vivo molecular imaging at various stages of atherosclerosis, we quantified platelet-endothelial interactions and evaluated the contribution of major adhesion pathways. Methods and Results Mice deficient for the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1 were studied as an age-dependent model of atherosclerosis at 10, 20, 30, and 40 wks of age, which provided progressive increase in stage from very early fatty streak (10 wks) to large complex plaques without rupture (40 wks). Platelet-targeted contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of the thoracic aorta performed with microbubbles targeted to GPIbα demonstrated selective signal enhancement as early as 10 weeks of age. This signal increased progressively with age (almost 8-fold increase from 10 to 40 weeks, ANOVA p<0.001). Specificity for platelet targeting was confirmed by the reduction in platelet-targeted signal commensurate with the decrease in platelet count after immunodepletion with anti-GPIb or anti-CD41 antibody. Inhibition of P-selectin in 20 and 40 wk atherosclerotic mice resulted in a small (15-30%) reduction in platelet signal. Molecular imaging with microbubbles targeted to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF) demonstrated selective signal enhancement at all time points which did not significantly increase with age. Treatment of 20 and 40 week mice with recombinant ADAMTS13 eliminated platelet and VWF molecular imaging signal. Conclusions Platelet-endothelial interactions occur in early atherosclerosis. These interactions are in part due to endothelial VWF large multimers which can be reversed with exogenous ADAMTS13. PMID:26156014

  19. The effect of shear on in vitro platelet and leukocyte material-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaojian; Gorbet, Maud

    2013-09-01

    The failure to understand the mechanisms of biomaterial-associated thrombosis prevents us from improving the blood compatibility of stents and mechanical heart valves. Blood-material interactions trigger a complex series of events and anticoagulant and anti-platelet therapies are needed to reduce the risks of thrombotic complications with most cardiovascular materials. While material interaction with platelets has been widely studied, little is currently known on material-induced leukocyte activation in the presence of shear. In vitro experiments were performed to assess the effect of flow on blood cell activation induced by medical grade metals, ST316L and TiAl6V4. Blood was circulated in flow chambers preloaded with or without metal wires at shear rates of 100, 500, and 1500 s⁻¹. Platelet and leukocyte activation, leukocyte-platelet aggregation, and tissue factor expression on monocytes were measured by flow cytometry. Metal surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Under physiological shear rates, no significant platelet microparticle formation was observed. However, significant CD11b up-regulation, leukocyte-platelet aggregates, and tissue factor expression were observed at 100 s⁻¹. As shear rate increased to 1500 s⁻¹, leukocyte activation reduced to control values. TiAl6V4-induced leukocyte activation was generally lower than that of ST316L. Adhesion significantly decreased with increasing shear rate to 1500 s⁻¹. In blood, increase within physiological shear rates led to a significant reduction in in vitro material-induced leukocyte activation, suggesting that difference between material biocompatibility may be better identified at low shear rates or under pathological shear conditions.

  20. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (. gamma. -HCH) activates washed rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lalau-Keraly, C.; Delautier, D.; Benveniste, J.; Puiseux-Dao, S.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea-pig macrophages, ..gamma..-HCH triggers activation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Since these two biochemical events are also involved in platelet activation, the authors examined the effects of ..gamma..-HCH on washed rabbit platelets. Release of /sup 14/C-serotonin (/sup 14/C-5HT) and ATP from platelets prelabelled with /sup 14/C-5HT was measured simultaneously with aggregation. ..gamma..-HCH induced shape-change, aggregation and release reaction of platelets. Maximal aggregation (89 arbitrary units, AU), was observed using 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH, and was associated with 38.1 +/- 6.9% and 161 +/- 48 nM for /sup 14/C-5HT and ATP release respectively (mean +/- 1 SD, n=3). Using 80 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH yielded 18 AU, 12.8 +/- 1.0% and 27 +/- 14 nM for aggregation, C-5HT and ATP release respectively (n=3). No effect was observed with 40 ..mu.. M ..gamma..-HCH. Aspirin (ASA), a cyclooxygenase blocker, did not affect ..gamma..-HCH-induced platelet activation. Apyrase (APY), an ADP scavenger, inhibited by 90% aggregation induced by 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH and slightly inhibited (15%) the /sup 14/C-5HT release. In the presence of both ASA and APY, 96% inhibition of aggregation and 48% inhibition of /sup 14/C-5HT release were observed. Thus, ..gamma..-HCH induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner ADP, but not cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonate metabolites, is involved in ..gamma..-HCH-induced aggregation, whereas, both appear to play a role in ..gamma..-HCH-induced release reaction.

  1. Contribution of Chondroitin Sulfate A to the Binding of Complement Proteins to Activated Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lasaosa, Maria; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.; Nilsson, Bo; Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Background Exposure of chondroitin sulfate A (CS-A) on the surface of activated platelets is well established. The aim of the present study was to investigate to what extent CS-A contributes to the binding of the complement recognition molecule C1q and the complement regulators C1 inhibitor (C1INH), C4b-binding protein (C4BP), and factor H to platelets. Principal Findings Human blood serum was passed over Sepharose conjugated with CS-A, and CS-A-specific binding proteins were identified by Western blotting and mass spectrometric analysis. C1q was shown to be the main protein that specifically bound to CS-A, but C4BP and factor H were also shown to interact. Binding of C1INH was dependent of the presence of C1q and then not bound to CS-A from C1q-depleted serum. The specific interactions observed of these proteins with CS-A were subsequently confirmed by surface plasmon resonance analysis using purified proteins. Importantly, C1q, C4BP, and factor H were also shown to bind to activated platelets and this interaction was inhibited by a CS-A-specific monoclonal antibody, thereby linking the binding of C1q, C4BP, and factor H to exposure of CS-A on activated platelets. CS-A-bound C1q was also shown to amplify the binding of model immune complexes to both microtiter plate-bound CS-A and to activated platelets. Conclusions This study supports the concept that CS-A contributes to the binding of C1q, C4BP, and factor H to platelets, thereby adding CS-A to the previously reported binding sites for these proteins on the platelet surface. CS-A-bound C1q also seems to amplify the binding of immune complexes to activated platelets, suggesting a role for this molecule in immune complex diseases. PMID:20886107

  2. [Mean platelet volume: interactions with platelet aggregation activity and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa and Ib expression levels].

    PubMed

    Khaspekova, S G; Ziuriaev, I T; Iakushkin, V V; Naĭmushin, Ia A; Sirotkina, O V; Zaĭtseva, N O; Ruda, M Ia; Mazurov, A V

    2014-01-01

    Increased mean platelet volume (MPV) is an independent risk factor of thrombotic events in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Interactions of MPV with platelet aggregation activity and contents of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa (alphaIIb/beta3 integrin, fibrinogen receptor) and GP Ib (von Willebrand factor receptor) were investigated in this study. Investigation was performed in a group of healthy volunteers (n = 38) and in a group of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In patients blood was collected at days 1, 3-5 and 8-12 after ACS development. As an antiaggregant therapy all patients received acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis) and most of them--clopidogrel (ADP receptor antagonist) with the exception of part of the patients (n = 44) at day 1 who had not taken clopidogrel before first blood collection. In volunteers platelet aggregation was stimulated by 1.25, 2.5, 5 and 20 M ADP, and in patients--by 5 and 20 M ADP. GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib content on platelet surface was measured using 125I-labelled monoclonal antibodies. GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib genetic polymorphisms were determined in ACS patients. In healthy donors significant correlations between MPV and aggregation levels were revealed at 1.25 and 2.5 M ADP (coefficients of correlation (r)--0.396 and 0.373, p < 0.05) and at 5 and 20 those interactions did not reach significant level (r--0.279 and 0.205, p > 0.05). Correlations between MPV and aggregation levels were observed at day 1 of ACS in a subgroup of patients who received ASA but had not started clopidogrel treatment (r--0.526, p < 0.01 and 0.368, p < 0.05 for 5 and 20 M ADP respectively). Interactions between these parameters were not registered upon combined treatment with ASA and clopidogrel. Strong direct correlations between MPV and GP IIb-IIIa and GP Ib contents were detected in healthy donors and ACS patients (at all time points) -r from 0.439 to 0.647 (p < or = 0.001 for all correlations). Genetic

  3. Antigenic polymorphism of human very late activation protein-2 (platelet glycoprotein Ia-IIa). Platelet alloantigen Hca.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, V L; Pischel, K D; Avery, E D; Bluestein, H G

    1989-01-01

    We have found evidence for a human alloantigenic system on the very late activation protein -2 (VLA-2) heterodimer (platelet GPIa/IIa). Sera from two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) contained antibodies that immunoprecipitated surface molecules from platelets and fibroblasts that comigrated on SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional O'Farrell gels with platelet GPIa (VLA-alpha2 chain) and platelet GPIIa (VLA-beta chain). These SLE antibodies were alloreactive as they precipitated VLA molecules from only 5 of 22 normal donors' platelets and did not react with the lupus patients' own platelets, despite the expression of apparently normal amounts of VLA on the donors' cells. Two-dimensional O'Farrell analysis demonstrated no differences in the molecular weight or isoelectric point of GPIa and GPIIa obtained from platelets of alloantibody reactive or unreactive donors. Sequential immunoprecipitation experiments with VLA chain-specific monoclonal antibodies, and the pattern of immunoprecipitation of several different VLA heterodimers demonstrated that the alloantibody-reactive determinant was present on the VLA-2 heterodimer, and not other VLA molecules. Thus, these SLE sera demonstrate a previously unrecognized antigenic polymorphism of the VLA-2 (platelet GPIa/IIa) heterodimer, platelet alloantigen Hca. Images PMID:2646323

  4. Probing platelet factor 4 alpha-granule targeting.

    PubMed

    Briquet-Laugier, V; Lavenu-Bombled, C; Schmitt, A; Leboeuf, M; Uzan, G; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, A; Rosa, J-P

    2004-12-01

    The storage mechanism of endogenous secretory proteins in megakaryocyte alpha-granules is poorly understood. We have elected to study the granule storage of platelet factor 4 (PF4), a well-known platelet alpha-granule protein. The reporter protein green fluorescent protein (GFP), PF4, or PF4 fused to GFP (PF4-GFP), were transfected in the well-characterized mouse pituitary AtT20 cell line, and in the megakaryocytic leukemic DAMI cell line. These proteins were also transduced using a lentiviral vector, in human CD34+ cells differentiated into megakaryocytes in vitro. Intracellular localization of expressed proteins, and colocalization studies were achieved by laser scanning confocal microscopy and immuno-electronmicroscopy. In preliminary experiments, GFP, a non-secretory protein (no signal peptide), localized in the cytoplasm, while PF4-GFP colocalized with adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH)-containing granules in AtT20 cells. In the megakaryocytic DAMI cell line and in human megakaryocytes differentiated in vitro, PF4-GFP localized in alpha-granules along with the alpha granular protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). The signal peptide of PF4 was not sufficient to specify alpha-granule storage of PF4, since when PF4 signal peptide was fused to GFP (SP4-GFP), GFP was not stored into granules in spite of its efficient translocation to the ER-Golgi constitutive secretory pathway. We conclude that the PF4 storage pathway in alpha-granules is not a default pathway, but rather a regular granule storage pathway probably requiring specific sorting mechanisms. In addition PF4-GFP appears as an appropriate probe with which to analyze alpha-granule biogenesis and its alterations in the congenital defect gray platelet syndrome.

  5. Platelets Contain Tissue Factor Pathway Inhibitor-2 Derived from Megakaryocytes and Inhibits Fibrinolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Vadivel, Kanagasabai; Ponnuraj, Sathya-Moorthy; Kumar, Yogesh; Zaiss, Anne K.; Bunce, Matthew W.; Camire, Rodney M.; Wu, Ling; Evseenko, Denis; Herschman, Harvey R.; Bajaj, Madhu S.; Bajaj, S. Paul

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a homologue of TFPI-1 and contains three Kunitz-type domains and a basic C terminus region. The N-terminal domain of TFPI-2 is the only inhibitory domain, and it inhibits plasma kallikrein, factor XIa, and plasmin. However, plasma TFPI-2 levels are negligible (≤20 pm) in the context of influencing clotting or fibrinolysis. Here, we report that platelets contain significant amounts of TFPI-2 derived from megakaryocytes. We employed RT-PCR, Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and confocal microscopy to determine that platelets, MEG-01 megakaryoblastic cells, and bone marrow megakaryocytes contain TFPI-2. ELISA data reveal that TFPI-2 binds factor V (FV) and partially B-domain-deleted FV (FV-1033) with Kd ∼9 nm and binds FVa with Kd ∼100 nm. Steady state analysis of surface plasmon resonance data reveal that TFPI-2 and TFPI-1 bind FV-1033 with Kd ∼36–48 nm and bind FVa with Kd ∼252–456 nm. Further, TFPI-1 (but not TFPI-1161) competes with TFPI-2 in binding to FV. These data indicate that the C-terminal basic region of TFPI-2 is similar to that of TFPI-1 and plays a role in binding to the FV B-domain acidic region. Using pull-down assays and Western blots, we show that TFPI-2 is associated with platelet FV/FVa. TFPI-2 (∼7 nm) in plasma of women at the onset of labor is also, in part, associated with FV. Importantly, TFPI-2 in platelets and in plasma of pregnant women inhibits FXIa and tissue-type plasminogen activator-induced clot fibrinolysis. In conclusion, TFPI-2 in platelets from normal or pregnant subjects and in plasma from pregnant women binds FV/Va and regulates intrinsic coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:25262870

  6. Activation induced morphological changes and integrin αIIbβ3 activity of living platelets.

    PubMed

    Posch, Sandra; Neundlinger, Isabel; Leitner, Michael; Siostrzonek, Peter; Panzer, Simon; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Ebner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Platelets are essential in hemostasis. Upon activation they undergo a shape-change accompanied with receptor presentation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) were used as powerful tools for exploring morphological changes as well as receptor activities of platelets. Imaging time series was accomplished with and without fixation steps at the single platelet level. Hereby the response of mechanical stimulation of the platelet by the AFM cantilever tip was directly observed. We demonstrate that living and fixed platelets develop filopodia after a short activation time followed by their disappearance including cellular bleb formation. Thereafter a second filopodia formation (filopodia extrusion) was observed; those filopodia subsequently disappeared again, and finally platelets detached from the support due to cell death. We determined the influence of mechanical stress on the chronology of morphological changes of platelets and demonstrated shear force induced filopodia formation. Through recordings over several hours, topographical AFM images over the full platelet lifetime - from early activation up to apoptosis - are presented. SMFS measurements on living platelets allowed determining the activation state of the most prominent membrane receptor integrin αIIbβ3 at all different phases of activation. αIIbβ3 was fully activated, independent of the morphological state.

  7. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Osama M.; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K.; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  8. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Osama M; Hughes, Craig E; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P

    2015-09-24

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability.

  9. Crystal structure of phospholipase A2 complex with the hydrolysis products of platelet activating factor: equilibrium binding of fatty acid and lysophospholipid-ether at the active site may be mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying H; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Berg, Otto G; Jain, Mahendra K; Bahnson, Brian J

    2002-12-17

    We have solved the 1.55 A crystal structure of the anion-assisted dimer of porcine pancreatic group IB phospholipase A2 (PLA2), complexed with the products of hydrolysis of the substrate platelet activating factor. The dimer contains five coplanar phosphate anions bound at the contact surface between the two PLA2 subunits. This structure parallels a previously reported anion-assisted dimer that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate of PLA2 bound to a substrate interface [Pan, Y. H., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 609-617]. The dimer structure has a molecule of the product acetate bound in subunit A and the other product 1-octadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC-ether) to subunit B. Therefore, this structure is of the two individual product binary complexes and not of a ternary complex with both products in one active site of PLA2. Protein crystals with bound products were only obtained by cocrystallization starting from the initial substrate. In contrast, an alternate crystal form was obtained when PLA2 was cocrystallized with LPC-ether and succinate, and this crystal form did not contain bound products. The product bound structure has acetate positioned in the catalytic site of subunit A such that one of its oxygen atoms is located 3.5 A from the catalytic calcium. Likewise, a longer than typical Ca-to-Gly(32) carbonyl distance of 3.4 A results in a final Ca coordination that is four-coordinate and has distorted geometry. The other oxygen of acetate makes hydrogen bonds with N(delta)(1)-His(48), O(delta)(1)-Asp(49), and the catalytic assisting water (w7). In contrast, the glycerophosphocholine headgroup of LPC-ether in subunit B makes no contacts with calcium or with the catalytic residues His(48) or Asp(49). The tail of the LPC-ether is located near the active site pocket with the last nine carbons of the sn-1- acyl chain refined in two alternate conformations. The remaining atoms of the LPC-ether product have been modeled into the solvent channel but have their

  10. Assessment of platelet activation in myeloproliferative disorders with complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Emilse; Alberto, Maria F; Meschengieser, Susana S; Lazzari, Maria A

    2004-04-01

    Bleeding and thrombosis in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) are common events, sometimes both are present in the same patient during the course of the disease. Platelet activation in patients with MPD is often suggested. The present study analyses the presence of circulating activated platelets, using simultaneously flow cytometry and aggregometric studies in MPD. We studied 28 patients: 13 with polycythaemia vera, seven with essential thrombocythaemia, and eight chronic myeloid leukaemia. We performed functional tests, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and flow cytometric assays (mepacrine staining and platelet activation markers CD62, CD63 and fibrinogen binding (B-FG)). Twenty-one MPD samples (75%) had reduced aggregation and ATP release. Acquired delta-SPD was detected in 11 of 28 MPD patients (39%), and we found no association between reduced mepacrine labelling and abnormal ATP release. High levels of activation markers were obtained: CD62 in 19 of 28 patients (68%), CD63 in 13 of 28 patients (46%) and B-FG in 19 of 28 patients (68%). The most prevalent abnormality was a reduced aggregation and ATP release. The lack of association between ATP release and mepacrine labelling suggests that other mechanisms, besides the deficit of intraplatelet ATP/adenosine diphosphate, might occur. High levels of activation markers were also observed. We conclude that both tests are complementary and necessary to understand the functional status of platelets in MPD.

  11. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  12. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Meyer, Claudius U.; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen + ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin + UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established. PMID:24749844

  13. Potentiation of Mitogenic Activity of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor by Physiological Concentrations of Insulin via the MAP Kinase Cascade in Rat A10 Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Hitomi; Murakami, Hitomi; Uchigata, Yasuko; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia has been shown to be associated with diabetic angiopathy. Migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are the processes required for the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we attempted to determine whether insulin affects mitogenic signaling induced by plateletderived growth factor (PDGF) in a rat VSMC cell line (A10 cells). PDGF stimulated DNA synthesis which was totally dependent on Ras, because transfection of dominant negative Ras resulted in complete loss of PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis. Initiation of DNA synthesis was preceded by activation of Raf-1, MEK and MAP kinases (Erk 1 and Erk2). Treatment of the cells with PD98059, an inhibitor of MAPK kinase (MEK) attenuated but did not abolish PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, suggesting that MAPK is required but not essential for DNA synthesis. PDGF also stimulated phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) and p70 S6Kinase (p70S6K) in a wortmannin-sensitive manner. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of p70S6K, markedly suppressed DNA synthesis. Low concentrations of insulin (1-10 nmol/l) alone showed little mitogenic activity and no significant effect on MAPK activity. However, the presence of insulin enhanced both DNA synthesis and MAPK activation by PDGF. The enhancing effect of insulin was not seen in cells treated with PD98059. Insulin was without effect on PDGF-stimulated activations of protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) and p70S6K. We conclude that insulin, at pathophysiologically relevant concentrations, potentiates the PDGFstimulated DNA synthesis, at least in part, by potentiating activation of the MAPK cascade. These results are consistent with the notion that hyperinsulinemia is a risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:11991199

  14. Evaluation of two platelet-rich plasma processing methods and two platelet-activation techniques for use in llamas and alpacas.

    PubMed

    Semevolos, Stacy A; Youngblood, Cori D; Grissom, Stephanie K; Gorman, M Elena; Larson, Maureen K

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate 2 processing methods (commercial kit vs conical tube centrifugation) for preparing platelet rich plasma (PRP) for use in llamas and alpacas. SAMPLES Blood samples (30 mL each) aseptically collected from 6 healthy llamas and 6 healthy alpacas. PROCEDURES PRP was prepared from blood samples by use of a commercial kit and by double-step conical tube centrifugation. A CBC was performed for blood and PRP samples. Platelets in PRP samples were activated by means of a freeze-thaw method with or without 23mM CaCl2, and concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1 were measured. Values were compared between processing methods and camelid species. RESULTS Blood CBC values for llamas and alpacas were similar. The commercial kit yielded a significantly greater degree of platelet enrichment (mean increase, 8.5 fold vs 2.8 fold) and WBC enrichment (mean increase, 3.7 fold vs 1.9 fold) than did conical tube centrifugation. Llamas had a significantly greater degree of platelet enrichment than alpacas by either processing method. No difference in WBC enrichment was identified between species. Concentrations of both growth factors were significantly greater in PRP samples obtained by use of the commercial kit versus those obtained by conical tube centrifugation. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For blood samples from camelids, the commercial kit yielded a PRP product with a higher platelet and WBC concentration than achieved by conical tube centrifugation. Optimal PRP platelet and WBC concentrations for various applications need to be determined for llamas and alpacas.

  15. The Role of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor C and Its Splice Variant in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0029 TITLE: The Role of Platelet -Derived Growth Factor C and Its Splice Variant in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...THIS PAGE U UU 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code) Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 The Role of Platelet -Derived...A role of Platelet -Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) signaling in breast cancer has been suggested by mounting evidence. Immunohistochemical analysis

  16. Ibrutinib treatment affects collagen and von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Levade, Marie; David, Elodie; Garcia, Cédric; Laurent, Pierre-Alexandre; Cadot, Sarah; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Tam, Constantine; Sié, Pierre; Ysebaert, Loïc; Payrastre, Bernard

    2014-12-18

    The oral Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib, has recently demonstrated high efficiency in patients with relapsed B-cell malignancies. Occurrence of bleeding events has been reported in a subgroup of ibrutinib-treated patients. We demonstrate that ibrutinib selectively inhibits platelet signaling and functions downstream of the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and strongly affects firm platelet adhesion on von Willebrand factor (VWF) under arterial flow. A longitudinal study of 14 patients indicated a correlation between occurrence of bleeding events and decreased platelet aggregation in response to collagen in platelet-rich plasma and firm adhesion on VWF under arterial flow. The addition of 50% untreated platelets was sufficient to efficiently reverse the effects of ibrutinib, and platelet functions recovered after treatment interruption as physiological platelet renewal occurred. These data have important clinical implications and provide a basis for hemostasis management during ibrutinib treatment.

  17. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood.

  18. Prostanoid production in the presence of platelet activation in hypoxic cocaine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Togna, G; Graziani, M; Sorrentino, C; Caprino, L

    1996-01-01

    To extend our previous in vitro data, we investigated the effects of cocaine on thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) production in vivo in the rat. To obtain the slight platelet activation that our in vitro experiments showed useful to highlight the effect of cocaine, we infused cocaine in rats in the presence of platelet-activating factors (circulation of blood through a perspex vascular device or by infusion of sodium arachidonate) and in various respiratory conditions. Experiments were conducted in rats breathing atmospheric air (normoxic conditions) and in rats breathing an oxygen-poor mixture (hypoxic conditions). In rats under hypoxic conditions cocaine invariably increased TXA2 plasma levels, whereas in normoxic conditions it increased TXA2 only in the presence of platelet-activating factors. Cocaine significantly increased PGI2 plasma levels in arachidonate-treated rats in hypoxic respiratory conditions; in normoxic conditions cocaine left PGI2 levels unchanged. These results support the hypothesis that in cocaine users who have concomitant pathological conditions able to activate platelets, such as atherosclerosis, coronary vasospasm or ischaemia, or both, cocaine may contribute to the onset of thrombotic phenomena by interfering with the prostaglandin system.

  19. Interactive protein network of FXIII-A1 in lipid rafts of activated and non-activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    Lipid-rafts are defined as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids within platelet plasma membrane. Lipid raft-mediated clot retraction requires factor XIII and other interacting proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteins that interact with factor XIII in raft and non-raft domains of activated and non-activated platelet plasma membrane. By lipidomics analysis, we identified cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched areas as lipid rafts. Platelets were activated by thrombin. Proteomics analysis provided an overview of the pathways in which proteins of rafts and non-rafts participated in the interaction network of FXIII-A1, a catalytic subunit of FXIII. "Platelet activation" was the principal pathway among KEGG pathways for proteins of rafts, both before and after activation. Network analysis showed four types of interactions (activation, binding, reaction, and catalysis) in raft and non-raft domains in interactive network of FXIII-A1. FXIII-A1 interactions with other proteins in raft domains and their role in homeostasis highlight the specialization of the raft domain in clot retraction via the Factor XIII protein network.

  20. Human platelet heparanase: purification, characterization and catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, C; Parish, C R

    1998-01-01

    Heparan sulphate (HS) is an important component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the vasculature basal lamina (BL) which functions as a barrier to the extravasation of metastatic and inflammatory cells. Platelet-tumour cell aggregation at the capillary endothelium results in activation and degranulation of platelets. Cleavage of HS by endoglycosidase or heparanase activity produced in relatively large amounts by the platelets and the invading cells may assist in the disassembly of the ECM and BL, and thereby facilitate cell migration. Using a recently published rapid, quantitative assay for heparanase activity towards HS [Freeman, C. and Parish, C.R. (1997), Biochem. J., 325, 229-237], human platelet heparanase has now been purified 1700-fold to homogeneity in 19% yield by a five column procedure, which consists of concanavalin A-Sepharose, Zn2+-chelating-Sepharose, Blue A-agarose, octyl-agarose and gel filtration chromatography. The enzyme, which was shown to be an endoglucuronidase that degrades both heparin and HS, has a native molecular mass of 50 kDa when analysed by gel filtration chromatography and by SDS/PAGE. Platelet heparanase degraded porcine mucosal HS in a stepwise fashion from a number average molecular mass of 18.5 to 13, to 8 and finally to 4.5 kDa fragments as determined by gel filtration analysis. Bovine lung heparin was degraded from 8.9 to 4.8 kDa while porcine mucosal heparin was degraded from 8.1 kDa to 3.8 and finally to 2.9 kDa fragments. Studies of the enzyme's substrate specificity using modified heparin analogues showed that substrate cleavage required the presence of carboxyl groups, but O- and N-sulphation were not essential. Inhibition studies demonstrated an absolute requirement for the presence of O-sulphate groups. Platelet heparanase was inhibited by heparin analogues which also inhibited tumour heparanase, suggesting that sulphated polysaccharides which inhibit tumour metastasis may act to prevent both tumour cell and

  1. Diagnostic Value of Measuring Platelet Von Willebrand Factor in Von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, Alessandra; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Daidone, Viviana; Pontara, Elena; Bertomoro, Antonella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be caused by an impaired von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesis, its increased clearance or abnormal function, or combinations of these factors. It may be difficult to recognize the different contributions of these anomalies. Here we demonstrate that VWD diagnostics gains from measuring platelet VWF, which can reveal a defective VWF synthesis. Measuring platelet VWF revealed that: severe type 1 VWD always coincided with significantly lower platelet and plasma VWF levels, whereas mild forms revealed low plasma VWF levels associated with low or normal platelet VWF levels, and the latter were associated with a slightly shorter VWF survival; type Vicenza (the archetype VWD caused by a reduced VWF survival) featured normal platelet VWF levels despite significantly reduced plasma VWF levels; type 2B patients could have either normal platelet VWF levels associated with abnormal multimer patterns, or reduced platelet VWF levels associated with normal multimer patterns; type 2A patients could have reduced or normal platelet VWF levels, the former associated mainly with type 2A-I, the latter with type 2A-II; plasma and platelet VWF levels were normal in type 2N, except when the defect was associated with a quantitative VWF mutation. Our findings show that measuring platelet VWF helps to characterize VWD, especially the ambiguous phenotypes, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the disorder. PMID:27532107

  2. Intraosseous delivery of lentiviral vectors targeting factor VIII expression in platelets corrects murine hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefeng; Shin, Simon C; Chiang, Andy F J; Khan, Iram; Pan, Dao; Rawlings, David J; Miao, Carol H

    2015-04-01

    Intraosseous (IO) infusion of lentiviral vectors (LVs) for in situ gene transfer into bone marrow may avoid specific challenges posed by ex vivo gene delivery, including, in particular, the requirement of preconditioning. We utilized IO delivery of LVs encoding a GFP or factor VIII (FVIII) transgene directed by ubiquitous promoters (a MND or EF-1α-short element; M-GFP-LV, E-F8-LV) or a platelet-specific, glycoprotein-1bα promoter (G-GFP-LV, G-F8-LV). A single IO infusion of M-GFP-LV or G-GFP-LV achieved long-term and efficient GFP expression in Lineage(-)Sca1(+)c-Kit(+) hematopoietic stem cells and platelets, respectively. While E-F8-LV produced initially high-level FVIII expression, robust anti-FVIII immune responses eliminated functional FVIII in circulation. In contrast, IO delivery of G-F8-LV achieved long-term platelet-specific expression of FVIII, resulting in partial correction of hemophilia A. Furthermore, similar clinical benefit with G-F8-LV was achieved in animals with pre-existing anti-FVIII inhibitors. These findings further support platelets as an ideal FVIII delivery vehicle, as FVIII, stored in α-granules, is protected from neutralizing antibodies and, during bleeding, activated platelets locally excrete FVIII to promote clot formation. Overall, a single IO infusion of G-F8-LV was sufficient to correct hemophilia phenotype for long term, indicating that this approach may provide an effective means to permanently treat FVIII deficiency.

  3. Mechanism study of endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation of low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anjin; Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jie; Zhao, Xue; Yan, Meixing

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have indicated that fucoidan fractions with low molecular weight and different sulfate content from Laminaria japonica could inhibit the activation of platelets directly by reducing the platelet aggregation. To explore the direct effect of LMW fucoidan on the platelet system furthermore and examine the possible mechanism, the endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation effects of two LMW fucoidan were investigated. In the present study, Endothelial injury model of rats was made by injection of adrenaline (0.4 mg kg-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured. vWF level was be investigated in vivo and in vitro as an important index of endothelial injury. LMW fucoidan could significantly reduce vWF level in vascular endothelial injury rats and also significantly reduce vWF level in vitro. The number of EMPs was be detected as another important index of endothelial injury. The results showed that LMW fucoidan reduced EMPs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor. In this study, it was found that by inhibiting platelet adhesion, LMW fucoidan played a role in anti-thrombosis and the specific mechanism of action is to inhibit the flow of extracellular Ca2+. All in a word, LMW fucoidan could inhibit the activation of platelets indirectly by reducing the concentration of EMPs and vWF, at the same time; LMW fucoidan inhibited the activation of platelets directly by inhibiting the flow of extracellular Ca2+.

  4. Lipoteichoic acid from Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits the expression of platelet-activating factor receptor induced by Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in human monocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hangeun; Jung, Bong Jun; Jeong, Jihye; Chun, Honam; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2014-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) plays an important role in bacterial infection and inflammation. We examined the effect of the bacterial cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus plantarum (pLTA) and Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA) on PAFR expression in THP-1, a monocyte-like cell line. LPS and aLTA, but not pLTA, significantly increased PAFR expression, whereas priming with pLTA inhibited LPSmediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, and CD14 increased with LPS and aLTA treatments, but was inhibited by pLTA pretreatment. Neutralizing antibodies against TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 showed that these receptors were important in LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. PAFR expression is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Blocking PAF binding to PAFR using a PAFR inhibitor indicated that LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAF expression affected TNF-α production. In the mouse small intestine, pLTA inhibited PAFR, TLR2, and TLR4 expression that was induced by heat-labile toxin. Our data suggested that pLTA has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the expression of PAFR that was induced by pathogenic ligands.

  5. Platelet Activation and Biofilm Formation by Aerococcus urinae, an Endocarditis-Causing Pathogen▿

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Oonagh; Mörgelin, Matthias; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Aerococcus urinae can cause infectious endocarditis (IE) in older persons. Biofilm formation and platelet aggregation are believed to contribute to bacterial virulence in IE. Five A. urinae isolates from human blood were shown to form biofilms in vitro, and biofilm formation was enhanced by the presence of human plasma. Four of the A. urinae isolates caused platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors. The Au3 isolate, which induced platelet aggregation in all donors, also activated platelets, as determined by flow cytometry. Platelet aggregation was dependent on bacterial protein structures and on platelet activation since it was sensitive to both trypsin and prostaglandin E1. Plasma proteins at the bacterial surface were needed for platelet aggregation; and roles of the complement system, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G were demonstrated. Complement-depleted serum was unable to support platelet aggregation by Au3 and complement blockade using compstatin-inhibited platelet activation. Platelet activation by Au3 was inhibited by blocking of the platelet fibrinogen receptor, and this isolate was also shown to bind to radiolabeled fibrinogen. Removal of IgG from platelet-rich plasma by a specific protease inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by A. urinae, and blockade of the platelet FcRγIIa hindered platelet activation induced by Au3. Convalescent-phase serum from a patient with A. urinae IE transferred the ability of the bacterium to aggregate platelets in an otherwise nonresponsive donor. Our results show that A. urinae exhibits virulence strategies of importance for IE. PMID:20696834

  6. Dynamic regulation of platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF-D) activity and extracellular spatial distribution by matriptase-mediated proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2015-04-03

    The oncogenic roles of PDGF-D and its proteolytic activator, matriptase, have been strongly implicated in human prostate cancer. Latent full-length PDGF-D (FL-D) consists of a CUB domain, a growth factor domain (GFD), and the hinge region in between. Matriptase processes the FL-D dimer into a GFD dimer (GFD-D) in a stepwise manner, involving generation of a hemidimer (HD), an intermediate product containing one FL-D subunit and one GFD subunit. Although the HD is a pro-growth factor that can be processed into the GFD-D by matriptase, the HD can also act as a dominant-negative ligand that prevents PDGF-B-mediated β-PDGF receptor activation in fibroblasts. The active GFD-D can be further cleaved into a smaller and yet inactive form if matriptase-mediated proteolysis persists. Through mutagenesis and functional analyses, we found that the R(340)R(341)GR(343)A (P4-P1/P1') motif within the GFD is the matriptase cleavage site through which matriptase can deactivate PDGF-D. Comparative sequence analysis based on the published crystal structure of PDGF-B predicted that the matriptase cleavage site R(340)R(341)GR(343)A is within loop III of the GFD, a critical structural element for its binding with the β-PDGF receptor. Interestingly, we also found that matriptase processing regulates the deposition of PDGF-D dimer species into the extracellular matrix (ECM) with increased binding from the FL-D dimer, to the HD, and to the GFD-D. Furthermore, we provide evidence that R(340)R(341)GR(343)A within the GFD is critical for PDGF-D deposition and binding to the ECM. In this study, we report a structural element crucial for the biological function and ECM deposition of PDGF-D and provide molecular insight into the dynamic functional interplay between the serine protease matriptase and PDGF-D.

  7. Neutrophils scan for activated platelets to initiate inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sreeramkumar, Vinatha; Adrover, José M.; Ballesteros, Ivan; Cuartero, Maria Isabel; Rossaint, Jan; Bilbao, Izaskun; Nácher, Maria; Pitaval, Christophe; Radovanovic, Irena; Fukui, Yoshinori; McEver, Rodger P.; Filippi, Marie-Dominique; Lizasoain, Ignacio; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesús; Zarbock, Alexander; Moro, María A.; Hidalgo, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses require leukocytes to migrate within and through the vasculature, a process that is facilitated by their capacity to switch to a polarized morphology with asymmetric distribution of receptors. We report that neutrophil polarization within activated venules served to organize a protruding domain that engaged activated platelets present in the bloodstream. The selectin ligand PSGL-1 transduced signals emanating from these interactions, resulting in redistribution of receptors that drive neutrophil migration. Consequently, neutrophils unable to polarize or to transduce signals through PSGL-1 displayed aberrant crawling, and blockade of this domain protected mice against thrombo-inflammatory injury. These results reveal that recruited neutrophils scan for activated platelets, and suggest that their bipolarity allows integration of signals present at both the endothelium and the circulation before inflammation proceeds. PMID:25477463

  8. Mechanism of platelet activation induced by endocannabinoids in blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Brantl, S Annette; Khandoga, Anna L; Siess, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis, and circulating endocannabinoids might modulate platelet function. Previous studies concerning effects of anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) on platelets, mainly performed on isolated cells, provided conflicting results. We therefore investigated the action of three main endocannabinoids [anandamide, 2-AG and virodhamine (arachidonoylethanolamine)] on human platelets in blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). 2-AG and virodhamine induced platelet aggregation in blood, and shape change, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in PRP. The EC50 of 2-AG and virodhamine for platelet aggregation in blood was 97 and 160 µM, respectively. Lower concentrations of 2-AG (20 µM) and virodhamine (50 µM) synergistically induced aggregation with other platelet stimuli. Platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine resembled arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation: shape change, the first platelet response, ATP secretion and aggregation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine were all blocked by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or the specific thromboxane A2 (TXA2) antagonist daltroban. In addition, platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine in blood and PRP were inhibited by JZL184, a selective inhibitor of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). In contrast to 2-AG and virodhamine, anandamide, a substrate of fatty acid amidohydrolase, was inactive. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) agonists lacked stimulatory as well as inhibitory platelet activity. We conclude that 2-AG and virodhamine stimulate platelets in blood and PRP by a MAGL-triggered mechanism leading to free AA and its metabolism by platelet cyclooxygenase-1/thromboxane synthase to TXA2. CB1, CB2 or non-CB1/CB2 receptors are not involved. Our results imply that ASA and MAGL inhibitors will protect platelets from activation by high endocannabinoid levels, and that

  9. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of anti-platelet-active compounds from the root of Ashitaba (Angelica keiskei Koidz.).

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ju; Park, Ye Oak; Yu, Chengguang; Lee, Sung Eun; Park, Young Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is fundamental to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including the induction of thrombosis and arteriosclerosis. Anti-platelet activity of a crude methanol extract and solvent fractions of Ashitaba roots (Angelica keiskei Koidz.) was evaluated using a turbidimetric method using washed rabbit platelets. We identified the anti-platelet activities of two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of Ashitaba roots by using a bioassay-guided isolation method. 4-Hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol effectively inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (IC50 of 41.9 and 35.9 μM, respectively), platelet-activating factor (IC50 of 46.1 and 42.3 μM, respectively) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (IC50 of 16.5 and 45.9 μM, respectively). These compounds did not inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (IC50 of>80 μM). The results suggest that the chalcones 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol may be potent anti-thrombotic components of A. keiskei Koidz.

  10. The platelet strip. II. Pharmacomechanical coupling in thrombin-activated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Salganicoff, L; Sevy, R W

    1985-09-01

    A model of contracted, irreversibly aggregated thrombin-activated human platelets relaxes when treated with ethyleneglycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether-N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) in the presence of Mg2+. Inhibition of the cyclooxygenase or blockade of the thromboxane A2 receptor decreases the tension partially, but EGTA treatment is needed for full relaxation. After a stable relaxation has been achieved (3-4 h), Ca2+ addition in a cumulative manner does not reinduce contraction. Whether in the absence or presence of external Ca2+, the relaxed preparation contracts when stimulated with ADP, epinephrine, thromboxane A2 or its analogues, or thrombin. At supramaximal doses, each of the agonists activates only a partial amount of the total tension capable of being generated. Addition of an agonist of a different class to the partially contracted preparation further increases its force. The contractile responses are reversible on washout, with kinetics dependent on the class of agonist and time of contact with the preparation. The contraction induced by the prolonged simultaneous stimulation with ADP, arachidonate, and thrombin reverts very slowly on washout of the agonists and for all practical purposes reproduces the initial state of irreversible platelet contraction.

  11. Platelet high-density lipoprotein activates transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators, MAPPs, following thrombin digestion.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Wu, Bin; Nagai, Yumiko; Tanaka, Sumiko; Onodera, Masayuki; Ogawa, Takafumi; Ueno, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular activators of phagocytosis from platelets (MAPPs), transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators released from platelets, activate leukocytic phagocytosis via Fcγ receptors. It has been found that MAPPs can be prepared using stored platelets or their lysate. Using this artificial MAPP production system, it has been found that they can be produced from precursors (tetrameric and dimeric transferrins) following reaction with a low-molecular-weight (LMW) activator of MAPPs, which is liberated from a high-molecular-weight activator of MAPP (HMW activator) by reaction with thrombin. In this study, the HMW activator in platelet lysate was characterized by assaying phagocytosis of washed neutrophils. In an ultracentrifugation study of the platelet lysate, HMW activator activity was observed in the fraction corresponding to the density of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The activity was observed in the apolipoproteins obtained from the HDL fraction. Among the apolipoproteins tested only apolipoprotein CIII showed the activity to produce MAPP in vitro. Affinity chromatography of the apolipoproteins from the HDL fraction of the platelet lysate using an anti-apolipoprotein CIII column revealed that the substance that binds with the antibody showed MAPP-forming activity. In a gel filtration study of thrombin-treated apolipoprotein CIII, a peak of LMW activator activity was observed for fractions with a molecular size smaller than that of apolipoprotein CIII. Finally, MAPP-forming activity of HDL obtained from the plasma was examined. MAPP was formed only when delipidized HDL was used. In conclusion, it is suggested that platelet HDL is the HMW activator and that this activation is achieved via apolipoprotein CIII after thrombin reaction in platelets.

  12. Platelet-independent adhesion of calcium-loaded erythrocytes to von Willebrand factor

    PubMed Central

    Bierings, Ruben; Meems, Henriet; Mul, Frederik P. J.; Geerts, Dirk; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Voorberg, Jan; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2017-01-01

    Adhesion of erythrocytes to endothelial cells lining the vascular wall can cause vaso-occlusive events that impair blood flow which in turn may result in ischemia and tissue damage. Adhesion of erythrocytes to vascular endothelial cells has been described in multiple hemolytic disorders, especially in sickle cell disease, but the adhesion of normal erythrocytes to endothelial cells has hardly been described. It was shown that calcium-loaded erythrocytes can adhere to endothelial cells. Because sickle erythrocyte adhesion to ECs can be enhanced by ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers, we investigated whether calcium loading of erythrocytes could promote binding to endothelial cells via ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers. We used (immunofluorescent) live-cell imaging of washed erythrocytes perfused over primary endothelial cells at venular flow rate. Using this approach, we show that calcium-loaded erythrocytes strongly adhere to histamine-stimulated primary human endothelial cells. This adhesion is mediated by ultra-large von Willebrand factor multimers. Von Willebrand factor knockdown or ADAMTS13 cleavage abolished the binding of erythrocytes to activated endothelial cells under flow. Platelet depletion did not interfere with erythrocyte binding to von Willebrand factor. Our results reveal platelet-independent adhesion of calcium-loaded erythrocytes to endothelium-derived von Willebrand factor. Erythrocyte adhesion to von Willebrand factor may be particularly relevant for venous thrombosis, which is characterized by the formation of erythrocyte-rich thrombi. PMID:28249049

  13. Partially transformed, anchorage-independent human diploid fibroblasts result from overexpression of the c-sis oncogene: Mitogenic activity of an apparent monomeric platelet-derived growth factor 2 species

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, C.W.; Brondyk, W.H.; Burgess, J.A.; Manoharan, T.H.; Hane, B.G.; Fahl, W.E.

    1988-05-01

    A human c-sis cDNA in an expression vector was introduced into human diploid fibroblasts by transfection or electroporation. Fibroblast clones showing an aberrant, densely packed colony morphology were isolated and found to overexpress a 3.6-kilobase sis mRNA species and associated immunoprecipitable platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) 2 proteins. Parallel analyses in cell clones of sis mRNA expression and colony formation in agar indicated that, above a threshold, a linear, positive correlation existed between sis overexpression and acquired anchorage independence. The sis-overexpressing cells formed transient, regressing tumor nodules when injected into nude mice, consistent with the finite life span which they retained. Protein products generated from the transfected c-sis construct in two overexpressing clones were immunoprecipitated with anti-human PDGF antibodies. One clone contained an apparent PDGF dimer of 21 kilodaltons; the second clone contained only on apparent PDGF monomer of 12 kilodaltons, which was shown to account for all of the mitogenic activity present in the cells, essentially all of which was concentrated in the membrane fraction. The results demonstrate a clear link between sis overexpression and acquisition of a partially transformed, anchorage-independent phenotype, and when combined with previous observations of sis overexpression in human tumors, clearly implicate sis overexpression as a genetic mechanism which contributes to human cell transformation.

  14. Internalization of Tissue Factor-Rich Microvesicles by Platelets Occurs Independently of GPIIb-IIIa, and Involves CD36 Receptor, Serotonin Transporter and Cytoskeletal Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Galan, Ana M; Roque, Merce; Caballo, Carolina; Molina, Patricia; White, James G; Escolar, Gines

    2016-02-01

    Platelets are important in hemostasis, but also detect particles and pathogens in the circulation. Phagocytic and endocytic activities of platelets are widely recognized; however, receptors and mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that platelets internalize and store phospholipid microvesicles enriched in human tissue factor (TF+MVs) and that platelet-associated TF enhances thrombus formation at sites of vascular damage. Here, we investigate the mechanisms implied in the interactions of TF+MVs with platelets and the effects of specific inhibitory strategies. Aggregometry and electron microscopy were used to assess platelet activation and TF+MVs uptake. Cytoskeletal assembly and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and RhoA were analyzed by western blot and ELISA. Exposure of platelets to TF+MVs caused reversible platelet aggregation, actin polymerization and association of contractile proteins to the cytoskeleton being maximal at 1 min. The same kinetics were observed for activation of PI3K and translocation of RhoA to the cytoskeleton. Inhibitory strategies to block glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa), scavenger receptor CD36, serotonin transporter (SERT) and PI3K, fully prevented platelet aggregation by TF+MVs. Ultrastructural techniques revealed that uptake of TF+MVs was efficiently prevented by anti-CD36 and SERT inhibitor, but only moderately interfered by GPIIb-IIIa blockade. We conclude that internalization of TF+MVs by platelets occurs independently of receptors related to their main hemostatic function (GPIIb-IIIa), involves the scavenger receptor CD36, SERT and engages PI3-Kinase activation and cytoskeletal assembly. CD36 and SERT appear as potential therapeutic targets to interfere with the association of TF+MVs with platelets and possibly downregulate their prothrombotic phenotype.

  15. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  16. Platelet-Activating Factor Blockade Inhibits the T-Helper Type 17 Cell Pathway and Suppresses Psoriasis-Like Skin Disease in K5.hTGF-β1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Huettner, Barbara; Koefeler, Harald; Mayer, Gerlinde; Bambach, Isabella; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Michael P.; Wolf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent biolipid mediator, is involved in a variety of cellular transduction pathways and plays a prominent role in inducing inflammation in different organs. We used K5.hTGF-β1 transgenic mice, which exhibit an inflammatory skin disorder and molecular and cytokine abnormalities with strong similarities to human psoriasis, to study the pathogenic role of PAF. We found that injecting PAF into the skin of transgenic mice led to inflammation and accelerated manifestation of the psoriatic phenotype by a local effect. In contrast, injecting mice with PAF receptor antagonist PCA-4248 lowered the PAF level (most likely by depressing an autocrine loop) and neutrophil, CD68+ cell (monocyte/macrophage), and CD3+ T-cell accumulation in the skin and blocked progression of the psoriasis-like phenotype. This effect of PAF blockade was specific and similar to that of psoralen–UV-A and was paralleled by a decrease in abnormally elevated mRNA and/or protein levels of T-helper type 17 cell–related cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-23, IL-12A, and IL-6 and its transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. In contrast, PCA-4248 treatment up-regulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-10 in dorsal skin and release of IL-10 in serum and skin. Interfering with PAF may offer the opportunity to develop novel therapeutic strategies for inflammatory psoriasis and associated comorbidities, including metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, in which the IL-17 axis may be involved. PMID:21281802

  17. Sulforaphane inhibits platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by targeting mTOR/p70S6kinase signaling independent of Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Shawky, Noha M; Segar, Lakshman

    2017-02-14

    Activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a transcription factor) and/or inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) are implicated in the suppression of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. The present study has examined the likely regulatory effects of sulforaphane (SFN, an antioxidant) on Nrf2 activation and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced mTOR signaling in VSMCs. Using human aortic VSMCs, nuclear extraction and siRNA-mediated downregulation studies were performed to determine the role of Nrf2 on SFN regulation of PDGF-induced proliferative signaling. Immunoprecipitation and/or immunoblot studies were carried out to determine how SFN regulates PDGF-induced mTOR/p70S6K/S6 versus ERK and Akt signaling. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed to determine SFN regulation of S6 phosphorylation in the injured mouse femoral artery. SFN (5μM) inhibits PDGF-induced activation of mTOR without affecting mTOR association with raptor in VSMCs. While SFN inhibits PDGF-induced phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 (downstream targets of mTOR), it does not affect ERK or Akt phosphorylation. In addition, SFN diminishes exaggerated phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein (a downstream target of p70S6K) in VSMCs in vitro and in the neointimal layer of injured artery in vivo. Although SFN promotes Nrf2 accumulation to upregulate cytoprotective genes (e.g., heme oxygenase-1 and thioredoxin-1), downregulation of endogenous Nrf2 by target-specific siRNA reveals an Nrf2-independent effect for SFN-mediated inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling and suppression of VSMC proliferation. Strategies that utilize local delivery of SFN at the lesion site may limit restenosis after angioplasty by targeting mTOR/p70S6K/S6 axis in VSMCs independent of Nrf2 activation.

  18. Ultrastructural Localization of Peroxidase Activity in Human Platelets and Megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Breton-Gorius, Janine; Guichard, Josette

    1972-01-01

    Normal human platelets and megakaryocytes were examined for peroxidase activity by the diaminobenzidine (DAB) cytochemical technic. When the fixation and the incubation were adequate, a strong reaction was present in the dense tubular system of platelets suspended in plasma or spread on carbon. The black reaction product was ascribed to enzyme activity, since the reaction was completely eliminated when H2O2 or DAB were omitted, or when H2O2 was in excess. In addition, the reaction was inhibited by aminotriazole, cyanide and azide. In the human megakaryocytes, the reaction was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum including the perinuclear envelope. The Golgi complex and the clear vacuolar system were negative for the reaction. After platelet release, the reaction was always seen in the perinuclear space. The nature and function of the enzyme, as well as its possible relationships with catalase, are discussed. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 12Fig 13Fig 14Fig 15Fig 16 PMID:5009974

  19. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice and activate platelets via TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Byzova, Tatiana V.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  20. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S.; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L.; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y.; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2−/− mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2−/− SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations. PMID:23591991

  1. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Papke, Christina L; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2(-/-) mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2(-/-) SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations.

  2. Rapid intracellular calcium changes in U937 monocyte cell line: transient increases in response to platelet-activating factor and chemotactic peptide but not interferon-gamma or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Maudsley, D J; Morris, A G

    1987-01-01

    The dye fura-2, a potentially more sensitive successor to quin2 for measuring intracellular free calcium ion concentrations [(Ca2+]i), has been applied here to investigate the possible involvement of early changes in [Ca2+]i in the stimulation of the human monocyte-macrophage-like cell line U937. The calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin, known pharmacological stimuli for macrophages, were found to cause sharp rises in [Ca2+]i as expected. Responses analogous to those reported for a murine macrophage cell (J774) were obtained on stimulation of U937 cells with ATP which caused rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 200 mM). In addition to ATP, several agents known to activate macrophages were used as stimuli. In particular, platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) was found to cause rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 400 nM) even at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. This contrasts with responses to ATP that were markedly reduced at 10(-6) M compared with 10(-5) M or above, suggesting that PAF is a highly potent stimulus for intracellular calcium mobilization in macrophages. Similar responses were obtained with chemotactic peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine). On the other hand, two agents known to be potent activators of macrophages, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide, had no rapid effect on [Ca2+]i. This may reflect differences in the kinetics of signal-response coupling or alternatively a different mechanism of action by-passing the need for rapid elevation of [Ca2+]i. PMID:3110054

  3. Complex formation with nucleic acids and aptamers alters the antigenic properties of platelet factor 4

    PubMed Central

    Jaax, Miriam E.; Krauel, Krystin; Marschall, Thomas; Brandt, Sven; Gansler, Julia; Fürll, Birgitt; Appel, Bettina; Fischer, Silvia; Block, Stephan; Helm, Christiane A.; Müller, Sabine; Preissner, Klaus T.

    2013-01-01

    The tight electrostatic binding of the chemokine platelet factor 4 (PF4) to polyanions induces heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, a prothrombotic adverse drug reaction caused by immunoglobulin G directed against PF4/polyanion complexes. This study demonstrates that nucleic acids, including aptamers, also bind to PF4 and enhance PF4 binding to platelets. Systematic assessment of RNA and DNA constructs, as well as 4 aptamers of different lengths and secondary structures, revealed that increasing length and double-stranded segments of nucleic acids augment complex formation with PF4, while single nucleotides or single-stranded polyA or polyC constructs do not. Aptamers were shown by circular dichroism spectroscopy to induce structural changes in PF4 that resemble those induced by heparin. Moreover, heparin-induced anti-human–PF4/heparin antibodies cross-reacted with human PF4/nucleic acid and PF4/aptamer complexes, as shown by an enzyme immunoassay and a functional platelet activation assay. Finally, administration of PF4/44mer–DNA protein C aptamer complexes in mice induced anti–PF4/aptamer antibodies, which cross-reacted with murine PF4/heparin complexes. These data indicate that the formation of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies in postoperative patients may be augmented by PF4/nucleic acid complexes. Moreover, administration of therapeutic aptamers has the potential to induce anti-PF4/polyanion antibodies and a prothrombotic diathesis. PMID:23673861

  4. Factor XII Contact Activation.

    PubMed

    Naudin, Clément; Burillo, Elena; Blankenberg, Stefan; Butler, Lynn; Renné, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Contact activation is the surface-induced conversion of factor XII (FXII) zymogen to the serine protease FXIIa. Blood-circulating FXII binds to negatively charged surfaces and this contact to surfaces triggers a conformational change in the zymogen inducing autoactivation. Several surfaces that have the capacity for initiating FXII contact activation have been identified, including misfolded protein aggregates, collagen, nucleic acids, and platelet and microbial polyphosphate. Activated FXII initiates the proinflammatory kallikrein-kinin system and the intrinsic coagulation pathway, leading to formation of bradykinin and thrombin, respectively. FXII contact activation is well characterized in vitro and provides the mechanistic basis for the diagnostic clotting assay, activated partial thromboplastin time. However, only in the past decade has the critical role of FXII contact activation in pathological thrombosis been appreciated. While defective FXII contact activation provides thromboprotection, excess activation underlies the swelling disorder hereditary angioedema type III. This review provides an overview of the molecular basis of FXII contact activation and FXII contact activation-associated disease states.

  5. Phage-Derived Protein Induces Increased Platelet Activation and Is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Amelieke J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Meis, Jacques F.; Roeleveld, Nel; Bentley, Stephen D.; Pastura, Alexander S.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van der Ven, Andre J.; de Mast, Quirijn; Zomer, Aldert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding about the severity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we investigated the association between the genotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae and disease outcomes for 349 bacteremic patients. A pneumococcal genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a strong correlation between 30-day mortality and the presence of the phage-derived gene pblB, encoding a platelet-binding protein whose effects on platelet activation were previously unknown. Platelets are increasingly recognized as key players of the innate immune system, and in sepsis, excessive platelet activation contributes to microvascular obstruction, tissue hypoperfusion, and finally multiorgan failure, leading to mortality. Our in vitro studies revealed that pblB expression was induced by fluoroquinolones but not by the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin G. Subsequently, we determined pblB induction and platelet activation by incubating whole blood with the wild type or a pblB knockout mutant in the presence or absence of antibiotics commonly administered to our patient cohort. pblB-dependent enhancement of platelet activation, as measured by increased expression of the α-granule protein P-selectin, the binding of fibrinogen to the activated αIIbβ3 receptor, and the formation of platelet-monocyte complex occurred irrespective of antibiotic exposure. In conclusion, the presence of pblB on the pneumococcal chromosome potentially leads to increased mortality in patients with an invasive S. pneumoniae infection, which may be explained by enhanced platelet activation. This study highlights the clinical utility of a bacterial GWAS, followed by functional characterization, to identify bacterial factors involved in disease severity. PMID:28096486

  6. The Role of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor C and Its Splice Variant in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Clin, 2014. 64(1): p. 9-29. 2. Tsai, Y.J., et al., Identification of a novel platelet -derived growth factor-like gene, fallotein, in the human ...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0029 TITLE: The Role of Platelet -Derived Growth Factor C and Its Splice Variant in Breast Cancer...2011–14 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0029 The Role of Platelet -Derived Growth Factor C and its Splice Variant in

  7. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT).

  8. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  9. Exogenous modification of platelet membranes with the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA reduces platelet procoagulant activity and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Larson, Mark K; Tormoen, Garth W; Weaver, Lucinda J; Luepke, Kristen J; Patel, Ishan A; Hjelmen, Carl E; Ensz, Nicole M; McComas, Leah S; McCarty, Owen J T

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have implicated the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in inhibition of normal platelet function, suggesting a role for platelets in EPA- and DHA-mediated cardioprotection. However, it is unclear whether the cardioprotective mechanisms arise from alterations to platelet-platelet, platelet-matrix, or platelet-coagulation factor interactions. Our previous results led us to hypothesize that EPA and DHA alter the ability of platelets to catalyze the generation of thrombin. We tested this hypothesis by exogenously modifying platelet membranes with EPA and DHA, which resulted in compositional changes analogous to increased dietary EPA and DHA intake. Platelets treated with EPA and DHA showed reductions in the rate of thrombin generation and exposure of platelet phosphatidylserine. In addition, treatment of platelets with EPA and DHA decreased thrombus formation and altered the processing of thrombin precursor proteins. Furthermore, treatment of whole blood with EPA and DHA resulted in increased occlusion time and a sharply reduced accumulation of fibrin under flow conditions. These results demonstrate that EPA and DHA inhibit, but do not eliminate, the ability of platelets to catalyze thrombin generation in vitro. The ability of EPA and DHA to reduce the procoagulant function of platelets provides a possible mechanism behind the cardioprotective phenotype in individuals consuming high levels of EPA and DHA.

  10. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor signaling prevents muscle fiber growth during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Sugg, Kristoffer B; Korn, Michael A; Sarver, Dylan C; Markworth, James F; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-03-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor receptors alpha and beta (PDGFRα and PDGFRβ) mark fibroadipogenic progenitor cells/fibroblasts and pericytes in skeletal muscle, respectively. While the role that these cells play in muscle growth and development has been evaluated, it was not known whether the PDGF receptors activate signaling pathways that control transcriptional and functional changes during skeletal muscle hypertrophy. To evaluate this, we inhibited PDGFR signaling in mice subjected to a synergist ablation muscle growth procedure, and performed analyses 3 and 10 days after induction of hypertrophy. The results from this study indicate that PDGF signaling is required for fiber hypertrophy, extracellular matrix production, and angiogenesis that occur during muscle growth.

  11. Platelet microparticles are internalized in neutrophils via the concerted activity of 12-lipoxygenase and secreted phospholipase A2-IIA

    PubMed Central

    Duchez, Anne-Claire; Boudreau, Luc H.; Naika, Gajendra S.; Bollinger, James; Belleannée, Clémence; Cloutier, Nathalie; Laffont, Benoit; Mendoza-Villarroel, Raifish E.; Lévesque, Tania; Rollet-Labelle, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Matthieu; Allaeys, Isabelle; Tremblay, Jacques J.; Poubelle, Patrice E.; Lambeau, Gérard; Pouliot, Marc; Provost, Patrick; Soulet, Denis; Gelb, Michael H.; Boilard, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are anucleated blood elements highly potent at generating extracellular vesicles (EVs) called microparticles (MPs). Whereas EVs are accepted as an important means of intercellular communication, the mechanisms underlying platelet MP internalization in recipient cells are poorly understood. Our lipidomic analyses identified 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetranoic acid [12(S)-HETE] as the predominant eicosanoid generated by MPs. Mechanistically, 12(S)-HETE is produced through the concerted activity of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), present in inflammatory fluids, and platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO), expressed by platelet MPs. Platelet MPs convey an elaborate set of transcription factors and nucleic acids, and contain mitochondria. We observed that MPs and their cargo are internalized by activated neutrophils in the endomembrane system via 12(S)-HETE. Platelet MPs are found inside neutrophils isolated from the joints of arthritic patients, and are found in neutrophils only in the presence of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO in an in vivo model of autoimmune inflammatory arthritis. Using a combination of genetically modified mice, we show that the coordinated action of sPLA2-IIA and 12-LO promotes inflammatory arthritis. These findings identify 12(S)-HETE as a trigger of platelet MP internalization by neutrophils, a mechanism highly relevant to inflammatory processes. Because sPLA2-IIA is induced during inflammation, and 12-LO expression is restricted mainly to platelets, these observations demonstrate that platelet MPs promote their internalization in recipient cells through highly regulated mechanisms. PMID:26106157

  12. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  13. Effect of steroids on the activation status of platelets in patients with Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP).

    PubMed

    Bhoria, Preeti; Sharma, Saniya; Varma, Neelam; Malhotra, Pankaj; Varma, Subhash; Luthra-Guptasarma, Manni

    2015-01-01

    The activation status of platelets in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients--which is still somewhat controversial--is of potential interest, because activated platelets tend to aggregate (leading to excessive clotting or thromboembolic events) but cannot do so when platelet numbers are low, as in ITP. Although corticosteroids are the first line of therapy in ITP, the effect of steroids on activation of platelets has not been evaluated so far. We examined the status of platelet activation (with and without stimulation with ADP) in ITP patients, at the start of therapy (pre-steroid treatment, naive) and post-steroid treatment (classified on the basis of steroid responsiveness). We used flow cytometry to evaluate the levels of expression of P-selectin, and PAC-1 binding to platelets of 55 ITP patients and a similar number of healthy controls, treated with and without ADP. We found that platelets in ITP patients exist in an activated state. In patients who are responsive to steroids, the treatment reverses this situation. Also, the fold activation of platelets upon treatment with ADP is more in healthy controls than in ITP patients; treatment with steroids causes platelets in steroid-responsive patients to become more responsive to ADP-activation, similar to healthy controls. Thus steroids may cause changes in the ability of platelets to get activated with an agonist like ADP. Our results provide new insights into how, and why, steroid therapy helps in the treatment of ITP.

  14. Shear-mediated platelet activation in patients implanted with continuous flow LVADs: A preliminary study utilizing the platelet activity state (PAS) assay.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Consolo, Filippo; Bluestein, Danny; Tran, Phat; Slepian, Marvin; Redaelli, Alberto; Pappalardo, Federico

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have emerged as vital life-saving therapeutic systems for patients with advanced and end-stage heart failure (HF). Despite their efficacy, VAD systems remain limited by post-implantation thrombotic complications. Shear-mediated platelet activation is the major driver of such complications in these devices. Nowadays few platelet function assays are routinely utilized in assessing the degree of platelet activation in VAD implanted patients. No assays exist that specifically target shear-mediated platelet activation. The platelet activity state (PAS) is a novel assay that has been well validated in vitro, measuring thrombin release as a surrogate for shear-mediated platelet activation. To date limited data exist as to the utility of this assay in the clinical setting. In the present study we evaluated eight LVAD patients' platelet activation level using the PAS assay. Simultaneous measurements of conventional prothrombotic and hemolysis markers, - i.e. fibrinogen and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) - were also performed. Trends as to alteration from baseline were studied. We observed that the PAS assay allowed detection of an abnormal level of platelet activation in one patient in our series who suffered from an overt thrombosis. Interestingly in the same patient no signal of major abnormality in fibrinogen or LDH was detected. Further for 7/8 patients who were free of thrombosis, no significant level of platelet activation was detected via PAS assay, while elevation in fibrinogen and LDH were observed. As such, from our observational series it appears that the PAS assay is a sensitive and specific indicator of shear-mediated platelet activation. Further patients' experience will help elucidate the role of this promising assay in the management of LVAD implanted patients.

  15. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes.

  16. Trigramin: Primary structure and its inhibition of von Willebrand factor binding to glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Turfu; Holt, J.C.; Kirby, E.P.; Niewiarowski, S.

    1989-01-24

    Trigramin, a naturally occurring peptide purified from Trimeresurus gramineus snake venom, inhibits platelet aggregation and the binding of {sup 125}I-fibrinogen to ADP-stimulated platelets without affecting the platelet-release reaction. {sup 125}I-trigramin binds to ADP-stimulated and to chymotrypsin-treated normal platelets but not to thrombasthenic platelets. {sup 125}I-trigramin binding to platelets is blocked by monoclonal antibodies directed against the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex and by Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (RGDS). The authors determined the primary structure of trigramin, which is composed of a single polypeptide chain of 72 amino acid residues and six disulfide bridges. The molecular weight of trigramin calculated on the basis of amino acid sequence was 7500, and the average pI was 5.61. An RGD sequence appeared in the carboxy-terminal domain of trigramin. An amino-terminal fragment (7-33) of trigramin showed 39% homology with a region (1555-1581) of von Willebrand factor (vWF). Trigramin also showed 36% identity in a 42 amino acid overlap and 53% identity in a 15 amino acid overlap when compared with two adhesive proteins, collagen {alpha}{sub 1} (I) and laminin B{sub 1}, respectively. Trigramin blocked binding of human vWF to the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa complex in thrombin-activated platelets in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, the data suggest that the biological activity of trigramin may depend upon the presence of an RGD sequence, the secondary structure of the molecule, and perhaps some other sequences that it shares with adhesive proteins.

  17. The Y’s that bind: negative regulators of Src family kinase activity in platelets

    PubMed Central

    NEWMAN, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases play important roles in platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation. The purpose of this review is to summarize current knowledge regarding how Src family kinase activity is regulated in general, to describe what is known about mechanisms underlying SFK activation in platelets, and to discuss platelet proteins that contribute to SFK inactivation, particularly those that use phosphotyrosine-containing sequences to recruit phosphatases and kinases to sites of SFK activity. PMID:19630799

  18. HMGB1 binds to activated platelets via the receptor for advanced glycation end products and is present in platelet rich human coronary artery thrombi.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Ingo; Chen, Yung-Chih; Topcic, Danijal; Bode, Michael; Haenel, David; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Seeba, Hannah; Duerschmied, Daniel; Bassler, Nicole; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A; Sweet, Matthew J; Agrotis, Alex; Bobik, Alex; Peter, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) acts as both a nuclear protein that regulates gene expression, as well as a pro-inflammatory alarmin that is released from necrotic or activated cells. Recently, HMGB1-expression in human atherosclerotic plaques was identified. Therapeutic blockade of HMGB1 reduced the development of diet-induced atherosclerosis in ApoE knockout mice. Thus, we hypothesised an interaction between HMGB1 and activated platelets. Binding of recombinant HMGB1 to platelets was assessed by flow cytometry. HMGB1 bound to thrombin-activated human platelets (MFI 2.49 vs 25.01, p=0.0079). Blood from wild-type, TLR4 and RAGE knockout mice was used to determine potential HMGB1 receptors on platelets. HMGB1 bound to platelets from wild type C57Bl6 (MFI 2.64 vs 20.3, p< 0.05), and TLR4-/- mice (MFI 2.11 vs 25.65, p< 0.05) but failed to show binding to platelets from RAGE-/- mice (p > 0.05). RAGE expression on human platelets was detected by RT-PCR with mRNA extracted from highly purified platelets and confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Platelet activation increased RAGE surface expression (MFI 4.85 vs 6.74, p< 0.05). Expression of HMGB1 in human coronary artery thrombi was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and revealed high expression levels. Platelets bind HMGB1 upon thrombin-induced activation. Platelet specific expression of RAGE could be detected at the mRNA and protein level and is involved in the binding of HMGB1. Furthermore, platelet activation up-regulates platelet surface expression of RAGE. HMGB1 is highly expressed in platelet-rich human coronary artery thrombi pointing towards a central role for HMGB1 in atherothrombosis, thereby suggesting the possibility of platelet targeted anti-inflammatory therapies for atherothrombosis.

  19. Ligand-induced interaction between. alpha. - and. beta. -type platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors: Role of receptor heterodimers in kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakaraj, P.; Raj, S.; Bishayee, S. ); Khan, S.A. )

    1991-02-19

    Two types of PDGF receptors have been cloned and sequenced. Both receptors are transmembrane glycoproteins with a ligand-stimulatable tyrosine kinase site. The authors have shown earlier that ligand-induced activation of the {beta}-type PDGF receptor is due to the conversion of the monomeric form of the receptor to the dimeric form. In the present studies, they have established the ligand-binding specificity of two receptor types and extended it further to investigate the ligand-induced association state of the {alpha}-receptor and the role of {alpha}-receptor in the activation of {beta}-receptor. These studies were conducted with cells that express one or the other type of PDGF receptor as well as with cells that express both types of receptors. Moreover, ligand-binding characteristics of the receptor were confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the receptor-{sup 125}I-PDGF covalent complex with type-specific anti-PDGF receptor antibodies. These studies revealed that all three isoforms of PDGF bind to {alpha}-receptor, and such binding leads to dimerization as well as activation of the receptor. In contrast, {beta}-receptor can be activated only by PDGF BB and not by PDGF AB or PDGF AA. However, by using antipeptide antibodies that are specific for {alpha}- or {beta}-type PDGF receptor, they demonstrated that in the presence of {alpha}-receptor, {beta}-receptor kinase can be activated by PDGF AB. They present here direct evidence that strongly suggests that such PDGF AB induced activation of {beta}-receptor is due to the formation of a noncovalently linked {alpha}-{beta} receptor heterodimer.

  20. Human platelet glycoprotein Ia. One component is only expressed on the surface of activated platelets and may be a granule constituent

    SciTech Connect

    Bienz, D.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1989-01-05

    Glycoprotein Ia (GP Ia) is a relatively minor component of human blood platelets thought to be a receptor involved in collagen-induced platelet activation. However, some difficulties exist with the definition of this glycoprotein. The expression of GP Ia on resting (prostacyclin analogue-treated) and thrombin-activated platelets was compared by surface labeling with /sup 125/I-lactoperoxidase. Intact platelets or platelets solubilized in sodium dodecyl sulfate were labeled with periodate/(/sup 3/H)NaBH/sub 4/. Analysis on two-dimensional isoelectric focusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels showed that GP Ia is very poorly labeled in resting platelets. After activation a new spot (GP Ia*) appears with the same relative molecular mass as GP Ia under reducing conditions. GP Ia and Ia* can be clearly separated by two-dimensional nonreduced/reduced gel electrophoresis. Therefore, two glycoproteins which have been termed GP Ia exist in platelets with similar molecular weight and pI under reducing conditions. One of these (GP Ia*) is only surface-labeled when platelets are activated, indicating that it is only exposed on the surface of activated platelets. Supernatant from activated platelets contains this glycoprotein as well as other granule components. This glycoprotein is missing in platelets from two patients with collagen-response defects.

  1. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  2. An Inhibition of p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Delays the Platelet Storage Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Skripchenko, Andrey; Awatefe, Helen; Thompson-Montgomery, Dedeene; Myrup, Andrew; Turgeon, Annette; Wagner, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Platelets during storage undergo diverse alterations collectively known as the platelet storage lesion, including metabolic, morphological, functional and structural changes. Some changes correlate with activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Another MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), is involved in PLT activation. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of platelets stored in plasma in the presence or absence of p38 and ERK MAPK inhibitors. Materials and Methods A single Trima apheresis platelet unit (n = 12) was aliquoted into five CLX storage bags. Two aliquots were continuously agitated with or without MAPK inhibitors. Two aliquots were subjected to 48 hours of interruption of agitation with or without MAPK inhibitors. One aliquot contained the same amount of solvent vehicle used to deliver the inhibitor. Platelets were stored at 20–24°C for 7 days and sampled on Days 1, 4, and 7 for 18 in vitro parameters. Results Inhibition of p38 MAPK by VX-702 leads to better maintenance of all platelet in vitro storage parameters including platelet mitochondrial function. Accelerated by interruption of agitation, the platelet storage lesion of units stored with VX-702 was diminished to that of platelets stored with continuous agitation. Inhibition of ERK MAPK did not ameliorate decrements in any in vitro platelet properties. Conclusion Signaling through p38 MAPK, but not ERK, is associated with platelet deterioration during storage. PMID:23967093

  3. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited.

  4. Activated platelet chemiluminescence and presence of CD45+ platelets in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gabbasov, Zufar; Ivanova, Oxana; Kogan-Yasny, Victor; Ryzhkova, Evgeniya; Saburova, Olga; Vorobyeva, Inna; Vasilieva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    It has been found that in 15% of acute myocardial infarction patients' platelets generate reactive oxygen species that can be detected with luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence of platelet-rich plasma within 8-10 days after acute myocardial infarction. This increase in generate reactive oxygen species production coincides with the emergence of CD45(+) platelets. The ability of platelets to carry surface leukocyte antigen implies their participation in exchange of specific proteins in the course of acute myocardial infarction. Future studies of CD45(+) platelets in peripheral blood of acute myocardial infarction patients in association with generate reactive oxygen species production may provide a new insight into the complex mechanisms of cell-cell interactions associated with acute myocardial infarction.

  5. Personality characteristics and platelet MAO activity in women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH).

    PubMed

    Helleday, J; Edman, G; Ritzén, E M; Siwers, B

    1993-01-01

    Personality traits and platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity were studied in 22 women, 17-34 years old, with prenatal virilization due to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) (21-hydroxylase deficiency) and 22 healthy controls. The CAH group differed significantly on two of the eight scales of the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP), which have earlier shown significant gender differences. Both differences were in the masculine direction, with a high, male level, score for Detachment and a lower score for Indirect Aggression. The Detachment scale reflects distance in social relations, and has earlier been shown to be strongly gender differentiating. There was no significant difference in platelet MAO activity between the CAH group and the controls. Although an influence of psychosocial factors cannot be excluded, the results suggest a possible association between prenatal androgen exposure and the high Detachment score for the CAH group. Gender differences in empathy, affiliation motivation, intimacy and maternal behavior may be relevant parallels.

  6. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Platelets Activated by Pro-Thrombotic Oxidized Phospholipids and Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Titz, Bjoern; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Biswas, Sudipta; Graeber, Thomas G.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36) promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s) induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites) and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites) respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (de)phosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36. PMID:24400094

  7. Platelet-derived Factor Concentrates with Hyaluronic Acid Scaffolds for Treatment of Deep Burn Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Minabe, Toshiharu; Yamakawa, Tomomi; Araki, Jun; Sano, Hitomi; Yoshimura, Kotaro

    2016-01-01

    Summary: A deep burn wound is a critical condition that generally necessitates vascularized tissue coverage. We performed the injection of platelet-derived factor concentrates combined with non–cross-linked hyaluronic acid scaffolds for 2 patients with critical burn wounds with bone and tendon exposure and achieved successful healing. Hyaluronic acid was considered to have served as a controlled-release carrier of platelet-derived factors, being clinically effective for the treatment of deep burn wounds. PMID:27826482