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Sample records for platelet decorated von

  1. von Willebrand factor binds to platelets and induces aggregation in platelet-type but not type IIB von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, J L; Kupinski, J M; Castella, A; Ruggeri, Z M

    1983-01-01

    Platelet-type von Willebrand disease (vWD) and pseudo-vWD are two recently described intrinsic platelet defects characterized by enhanced ristocetin-induced agglutination in platelet-rich plasma. A similar finding is also typical of type IIB vWD, where it has been related to a von Willebrand factor (vWF) rather than a platelet abnormality. Platelet aggregation induced by unmodified human vWF in the absence of other stimuli has been reported in pseudo-vWD. In this study we demonstrate that vWF induces aggregation in platelet-type but not type IIB vWD. Aggregation is observed when normal plasma cryoprecipitate or purified vWF are added to platelet-rich plasma. Cryoprecipitate also aggregates washed platelets, although at higher concentrations than required for platelet-rich plasma. Purified vWF, however, induces significant aggregation of washed platelets only when plasma is added. EDTA inhibits vWF-induced aggregation. Its effect can be overcome by calcium but much less effectively by magnesium ions. Unstimulated platelets in platelet-rich plasma from patients with platelet-type but not type IIB vWD bind 125I-vWF in a specific and saturable manner. All different sized multimers of vWF become associated with platelets. Both aggregation and binding exhibit a similar vWF concentration dependence, suggesting that a correlation exists between these two events. Removal of ADP by appropriate consuming systems is without effect upon such binding or upon vWF-induced aggregation. Thrombin-induced 125I-vWF binding to washed platelets is normal in platelet-type as well as type IIB vWD. These results demonstrate that a specific binding site for unmodified human vWF is exposed on unstimulated platelets in platelet-type vWD. The relatively high vWF concentrations required for aggregation and binding may explain the lack of significant in vivo aggregation and thrombocytopenia in these patients. Moreover, these studies provide additional evidence that platelet-type and type IIB v

  2. Diagnostic Value of Measuring Platelet Von Willebrand Factor in Von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Casonato, Alessandra; Cattini, Maria Grazia; Daidone, Viviana; Pontara, Elena; Bertomoro, Antonella; Prandoni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Von Willebrand disease (VWD) may be caused by an impaired von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesis, its increased clearance or abnormal function, or combinations of these factors. It may be difficult to recognize the different contributions of these anomalies. Here we demonstrate that VWD diagnostics gains from measuring platelet VWF, which can reveal a defective VWF synthesis. Measuring platelet VWF revealed that: severe type 1 VWD always coincided with significantly lower platelet and plasma VWF levels, whereas mild forms revealed low plasma VWF levels associated with low or normal platelet VWF levels, and the latter were associated with a slightly shorter VWF survival; type Vicenza (the archetype VWD caused by a reduced VWF survival) featured normal platelet VWF levels despite significantly reduced plasma VWF levels; type 2B patients could have either normal platelet VWF levels associated with abnormal multimer patterns, or reduced platelet VWF levels associated with normal multimer patterns; type 2A patients could have reduced or normal platelet VWF levels, the former associated mainly with type 2A-I, the latter with type 2A-II; plasma and platelet VWF levels were normal in type 2N, except when the defect was associated with a quantitative VWF mutation. Our findings show that measuring platelet VWF helps to characterize VWD, especially the ambiguous phenotypes, shedding light on the mechanisms underlying the disorder. PMID:27532107

  3. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-04-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.There is substantial

  4. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    PubMed

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  5. Altered glycosylation of platelet-derived von Willebrand factor confers resistance to ADAMTS13 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Rachel T; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Byrne, Barry; O'Sullivan, Jamie M; Rawley, Orla; O'Kennedy, Richard; Voorberg, Jan; Preston, Roger J S; O'Donnell, James S

    2013-12-12

    Platelet-von Willebrand factor (VWF) is stored within α-granules and accounts for ∼20% of total VWF in platelet-rich plasma. This platelet-VWF pool is distinct from plasma-VWF and is enriched in high molecular weight multimers (HMWM). Previous studies have described significant functional discrepancies between platelet-VWF and plasma-VWF; however, the molecular basis of these differences is not well understood. We have characterized terminal glycan expression on platelet-VWF. Our findings demonstrate that platelet-VWF exists as a distinct natural glycoform. In particular, N-linked sialylation is markedly reduced (>50%) compared with plasma-VWF. Moreover, unlike plasma-VWF, platelet-VWF does not express AB blood group determinants, although precursor H antigen expression is similar to that on plasma-VWF. Because of this differential glycosylation, platelet-VWF exhibits specific resistance to ADAMTS13 proteolysis. Thus platelet activation at sites of vascular injury results in the release of high local concentrations of HMWM platelet-VWF that is more resistant to ADAMTS13, thereby facilitating platelet-plug formation. PMID:24106205

  6. Type I von Willebrand disease, subtype 'platelet low': decreased platelet adhesion can be explained by low synthesis of von Willebrand factor in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Federici, A B; de Groot, P G; Moia, M; Ijsseldijk, M J; Sixma, J J; Mannucci, P M

    1993-01-01

    Endothelial cells (EC) were isolated from the umbilical vein of a newborn girl with type I 'platelet low' von Willebrand disease (I vWD) and endothelial localization and release and the ability of subendothelial von Willebrand factor (vWF) to support platelet adhesion were compared with those of normal EC. vWF was detectable by immunofluorescence in Weibel-Palade bodies, but the number of Weibel-Palade bodies positive for vWF was lower than in control EC. Patient EC released into the medium significantly smaller amount of vWF, both constitutively and after their stimulation. The vWF content of the extracellular matrix of patient EC was 38% that of control EC matrix. Platelet adhesion studies were performed under flow conditions with umbilical arteries and EC matrices of cultured EC. Using normal citrated whole blood as perfusate, platelet adhesion was lower in the umbilical artery of the patient (9 +/- 1% v 35 +/- 4% for the control) and in her EC matrix (7 +/- 1% v 21 +/- 2% of control). When patient EC matrix was perfused with vWF-deficient reconstituted blood, adhesion was 17 +/- 3% v 32 +/- 3% for control EC matrix; preincubation of patient EC matrix with 1 U/ml vWF increased the adhesion to 30 +/- 6%. These data establish that low contents of vWF in EC and subendothelium are important characteristics of type I vWD 'platelet low', and that such characteristics correlate with low platelet adhesion to the subendothelium. PMID:8435340

  7. Mutation in the gene encoding the. alpha. chain of platelet glycoprotein Ib in platelet-type von Willebrand disease

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L.; Cunningham, D.; Lyle, V.A.; Finch, C.N. )

    1991-06-01

    Platelet-type von Willebrand disease (PT-vWD) is an autosomal dominant bleeding disorder characterized by abnormally enhanced binding of von Willebrand factor (vWF) by patient platelets. Although the platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ib/IX complex is known to constitute the platelet's ristocetin-dependent receptor for vWF, a unique structural abnormality within this complex has not previously been identified in PT-vWD. Using the poly merase chain reaction to amplify genomic DNA coding for the {alpha} chain of GP Ib (GP IB{alpha}) and then sequencing the amplified DNA following cloning into M13mp18 and M13mp19 phage vectors, the authors have found a single point mutation in the GP Ib{alpha} coding region of PT-vWD DNA resulting in the substitution of valine for glycine at residue 233. This substitution within the vWF-binding region of GP Ib{alpha} is likely to exert a significant influence on the conformation of the resulting protein. Competitive oligonucleotide primer assay for this mutation showed a homozygous wild-type pattern in genomic DNA from the 161 normal volunteers studied and from 6 phenotypically normal members of a PT-vWD family. All 7 affected members of this family studied were heterozygous for the mutant allele. Platelet GP Ib{alpha} mRNA reverse-transcribed and studied by competitive oligonucleotide primer assay showed similar expression of the mutant and wild-type alleles in the affected PT-vWD patients. Absence in the normal population, tight linkage with phenotypic expression of disease, and absence of any additional abnormality of GP Ib{alpha} in these patients identify the glycine-to-valine substitution as a point mutation underlying functional abnormality of the vWF receptor in PT-vWD.

  8. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets†

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassa n; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide–lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet’s primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF’s D′–D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF’s A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF’s A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP. PMID

  9. Mechanism of platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor and microparticle formation under high shear stress

    PubMed Central

    Reininger, Armin J.; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Schumann, Hannah; Specht, Hanno M.; Schramm, Wolfgang; Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the mechanism of platelet adhesion to immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF) and subsequent formation of platelet-derived microparticles mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) under high shear stress. As visualized in whole blood perfused in a flow chamber, platelet attachment to VWF involved one or few membrane areas of 0.05 to 0.1 μm2 that formed discrete adhesion points (DAPs) capable of resisting force in excess of 160 pN. Under the influence of hydrodynamic drag, membrane tethers developed between the moving platelet body and DAPs firmly adherent to immobilized VWF. Continued stretching eventually caused the separation of many such tethers, leaving on the surface tube-shaped or spherical microparticles with a diameter as low as 50 to 100 nm. Adhesion receptors (GPIbα, αIIbβ3) and phosphatidylserine were expressed on the surface of these microparticles, which were procoagulant. Shearing platelet-rich plasma at the rate of 10 000 s–1 in a cone-and-plate viscosimeter increased microparticle counts up to 55-fold above baseline. Blocking the GPIb-VWF interaction abolished microparticle generation in both experimental conditions. Thus, a biomechanical process mediated by GPIbα-VWF bonds in rapidly flowing blood may not only initiate platelet arrest onto reactive vascular surfaces but also generate procoagulant microparticles that further enhance thrombus formation. PMID:16449527

  10. Platelet interaction with von Willebrand factor is enhanced by shear-induced clustering of glycoprotein Ibα

    PubMed Central

    Gitz, Eelo; Koopman, Charlotte D.; Giannas, Alèkos; Koekman, Cornelis A; van den Heuvel, Dave J.; Deckmyn, Hans; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Gerritsen, Hans C.; Urbanus, Rolf T.

    2013-01-01

    Initial platelet arrest at the exposed arterial vessel wall is mediated through glycoprotein Ibα binding to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor. This interaction occurs at sites of elevated shear force, and strengthens upon increasing hydrodynamic drag. The increased interaction requires shear-dependent exposure of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain, but the contribution of glycoprotein Ibα remains ill defined. We have previously found that glycoprotein Ibα forms clusters upon platelet cooling and hypothesized that such a property enhances the interaction with von Willebrand factor under physiological conditions. We analyzed the distribution of glycoprotein Ibα with Förster resonance energy transfer using time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. Perfusion at a shear rate of 1,600 s−1 induced glycoprotein Ibα clusters on platelets adhered to von Willebrand factor, while clustering did not require von Willebrand factor contact at 10,000 s−1. Shear-induced clustering was reversible, not accompanied by granule release or αIIbβ3 activation and improved glycoprotein Ibα-dependent platelet interaction with von Willebrand factor. Clustering required glycoprotein Ibα translocation to lipid rafts and critically depended on arachidonic acid-mediated binding of 14-3-3ζ to its cytoplasmic tail. This newly identified mechanism emphasizes the ability of platelets to respond to mechanical force and provides new insights into how changes in hemodynamics influence arterial thrombus formation. PMID:23753027

  11. Structural origins of misfolding propensity in the platelet adhesive von Willebrand factor A1 domain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Michael T; Tischer, Alexander; Whitten, Steven T; Auton, Matthew

    2015-07-21

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 and A3 domains are structurally isomorphic yet exhibit distinct mechanisms of unfolding. The A1 domain, responsible for platelet adhesion to VWF in hemostasis, unfolds through a molten globule intermediate in an apparent three-state mechanism, while A3 unfolds by a classical two-state mechanism. Inspection of the sequences or structures alone does not elucidate the source of this thermodynamic conundrum; however, the three-state character of the A1 domain suggests that it has more than one cooperative substructure yielding two separate unfolding transitions not present in A3. We investigate the extent to which structural elements contributing to intermediate conformations can be identified using a residue-specific implementation of the structure-energy-equivalence-of-domains algorithm (SEED), which parses proteins of known structure into their constituent thermodynamically cooperative components using protein-group-specific, transfer free energies. The structural elements computed to contribute to the non-two-state character coincide with regions where Von Willebrand disease mutations induce misfolded molten globule conformations of the A1 domain. This suggests a mechanism for the regulation of rheological platelet adhesion to A1 based on cooperative flexibility of the α2 and α3 helices flanking the platelet GPIbα receptor binding interface. PMID:26200876

  12. Structural Origins of Misfolding Propensity in the Platelet Adhesive Von Willebrand Factor A1 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michael T.; Tischer, Alexander; Whitten, Steven T.; Auton, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1 and A3 domains are structurally isomorphic yet exhibit distinct mechanisms of unfolding. The A1 domain, responsible for platelet adhesion to VWF in hemostasis, unfolds through a molten globule intermediate in an apparent three-state mechanism, while A3 unfolds by a classical two-state mechanism. Inspection of the sequences or structures alone does not elucidate the source of this thermodynamic conundrum; however, the three-state character of the A1 domain suggests that it has more than one cooperative substructure yielding two separate unfolding transitions not present in A3. We investigate the extent to which structural elements contributing to intermediate conformations can be identified using a residue-specific implementation of the structure-energy-equivalence-of-domains algorithm (SEED), which parses proteins of known structure into their constituent thermodynamically cooperative components using protein-group-specific, transfer free energies. The structural elements computed to contribute to the non-two-state character coincide with regions where Von Willebrand disease mutations induce misfolded molten globule conformations of the A1 domain. This suggests a mechanism for the regulation of rheological platelet adhesion to A1 based on cooperative flexibility of the α2 and α3 helices flanking the platelet GPIbα receptor binding interface. PMID:26200876

  13. Effect of carbohydrate modifications of factor VIII/von Willebrand factor on binding to platelets.

    PubMed

    Goudemand, J; Mazurier, C; Samor, B; Bouquelet, S; Montreuil, J; Goudemand, M

    1985-06-24

    This study compares the ability of unmodified and carbohydrate-modified forms of factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (FVIII/vWF) protein to bind to platelets in the presence of ristocetin or thrombin. Treatment of intact FVIII/vWF with alpha-D-neuraminidase results in more than 95% desialylation. Asialo FVIII/vWF retains total activity in ristocetin- and thrombin-mediated binding to platelets as demonstrated by direct and competitive binding assays. Examination of its multimeric pattern by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose electrophoresis reveals a normal multimeric structure. Treatment of intact FVIII/vWF with beta-D-galactosidase results in the removal of 20% of galactose (agalacto FVIII/vWF) whereas 55% of galactose is released from asialo FVIII/vWF (asialo agalacto FVIII/vWF). Agalacto and asialo-agalacto FVIII/vWF are both unable to bind to platelets in the presence of ristocetin. In contrast, they still bind to thrombin-stimulated human (except thrombasthenic) platelets. Removal of either ultimate (agalacto FVIII/vWF) or ultimate and penultimate (asialo-agalacto FVIII/vWF) galactose results in the same loss of the larger molecular weight multimers and in an increase of smaller multimers. These results suggest (1) that sialic acid does not play a significant role in ristocetin- or thrombin-mediated FVIII/vWF-platelets interactions and multimeric structure of FVIII/vWF (2) that ultimate beta-linked galactose residues are essential for the maintenance of a normal multimer organization (3) that ristocetin- and thrombin-mediated binding of FVIII/vWF to platelets differ in FVIII/vWF galactose requirement.

  14. Platelet Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... higher risk of blood clots. With other platelet disorders, the platelets do not work as they should. For example, in von Willebrand Disease, the platelets cannot stick together or cannot attach ...

  15. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  16. Platelet deposition on von Willebrand factor-deficient vessels. Extracorporeal perfusion studies in swine with von Willebrand's disease using native and heparinized blood.

    PubMed

    Badimon, L; Badimon, J J; Rand, J; Turitto, V T; Fuster, V

    1987-11-01

    Native (nonanticoagulated) and heparinized blood from both normal swine and swine with von Willebrand's disease was exposed to de-endothelialized thoracic aorta from normal pigs under controlled flow conditions. We have shown that these normal de-endothelialized vessel segments do not contain von Willebrand factor (vWF) in the subendothelial surface; thus, the vascular model that we are using here is representative of the conditions in severe von Willebrand's disease. The blood was recirculated for selected periods of time through an extracorporeal circuit (carotid-jugular shunt), containing a tubular perfusion chamber that held the vessel segment. Flow rates and chamber diameters were selected such that the wall shear rates at the vascular segment were 212 to 3380 sec-1. Platelets were labeled with indium 111 and their total deposition determined by a gamma counter; selected areas were also observed by electron microscopy. When native blood was perfused, the deposition of platelets depended on platelet-plasma vWF only at high wall shear rates (1690 sec-1 or greater) typical of the microcirculation, but not at the lower shear rates (212 and 424 sec-1), more characteristic of the larger arteries and veins. In contrast, when heparinized blood was perfused, platelet deposition on the vascular segments depended on the presence of vWF over the entire range of shear conditions studied. These findings demonstrate in an extracorporeal perfusion system that the defect in platelet-vessel wall interaction in swine with von Willebrand's disease is influenced by both the local flow conditions and the level of activation of the coagulation system. In the presence of an intact coagulation system a synergistic interaction between procoagulant moieties and vWF was observed at high shear rates.

  17. Identification of a point mutation in type IIB von Willebrand disease illustrating the regulation of von Willebrand factor affinity for the platelet membrane glycoprotein Ib-IX receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.; Dent, J.A.; Azuma, Hiroyuki; Sugimoto, Mitsuhiko; Kyrle, P.A.; Yoshioka, Akira; Ruggeri, Z.M. )

    1991-04-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) supports platelet adhesion on thrombogenic surfaces by binding to platelet membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib in the GP Ib-IX receptor complex. This interaction is physiologically regulated so that it does not occur between circulating vWF and platelets but, rather, only at a site of vascular injury. The abnormal vWF found in type IIB von Willebrand disease, however, has a characteristically increased affinity for GP Ib and binds to circulating platelets. The authors have analyzed the molecular basis of this abnormality by sequence analysis of a type IIB vWF cDNA and have identified a single amino acid change, Trp{sup 550} to Cys{sup 550}, located in the GP IB-binding domain of the molecule comprising residues 449-728. Bacterial expression of recombinant fragments corresponding to this vWF domain yielded molecules that, whether containing a normal Trp{sup 550} or a mutant Cys{sup 550} residue, bound directly to GP Ib in the absence of modulators and with similar affinity. These results identify a region of vWF that, although not thought to be directly involved in binding to GP Ib, may modulate the interaction through conformational changes.

  18. Molecular Imaging of Platelet-Endothelial Interactions and Endothelial Von Willebrand Factor In Early and Mid-Stage Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Chi Young; Liu, Ya Ni; Atkinson, Tamara; Xie, Aris; Foster, Ted; Davidson, Brian P.; Treible, Mackenzie; Qi, Yue; López, José A.; Munday, Adam; Ruggeri, Zaverio; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-thrombotic platelet-endothelial interactions may contribute to atherosclerotic plaque development, although in vivo studies examining mechanism without platelet pre-activation are lacking. Using in vivo molecular imaging at various stages of atherosclerosis, we quantified platelet-endothelial interactions and evaluated the contribution of major adhesion pathways. Methods and Results Mice deficient for the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1 were studied as an age-dependent model of atherosclerosis at 10, 20, 30, and 40 wks of age, which provided progressive increase in stage from very early fatty streak (10 wks) to large complex plaques without rupture (40 wks). Platelet-targeted contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of the thoracic aorta performed with microbubbles targeted to GPIbα demonstrated selective signal enhancement as early as 10 weeks of age. This signal increased progressively with age (almost 8-fold increase from 10 to 40 weeks, ANOVA p<0.001). Specificity for platelet targeting was confirmed by the reduction in platelet-targeted signal commensurate with the decrease in platelet count after immunodepletion with anti-GPIb or anti-CD41 antibody. Inhibition of P-selectin in 20 and 40 wk atherosclerotic mice resulted in a small (15-30%) reduction in platelet signal. Molecular imaging with microbubbles targeted to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor (VWF) demonstrated selective signal enhancement at all time points which did not significantly increase with age. Treatment of 20 and 40 week mice with recombinant ADAMTS13 eliminated platelet and VWF molecular imaging signal. Conclusions Platelet-endothelial interactions occur in early atherosclerosis. These interactions are in part due to endothelial VWF large multimers which can be reversed with exogenous ADAMTS13. PMID:26156014

  19. Adhesion of platelets to purified solid-phase von Willebrand factor: effects of wall shear rate, ADP, thrombin, and ristocetin.

    PubMed

    Olson, J D; Zaleski, A; Herrmann, D; Flood, P A

    1989-07-01

    When platelets are stimulated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thrombin, or ristocetin, they bind soluble von Willebrand factor (vWF). In contrast, platelets adhere to solid-phase vWF without apparent stimulus. This work characterizes the adhesion of washed human platelets to highly purified solid-phase human vWF. VWF (iodine 125-labeled vWF) was demonstrated to bind in a quantifiable fashion to the internal surfaces of glass capillary tubes, saturating at a surface density of 3.0 mg/ml. The multimeric structure of bound vWF was the same as that of normal vWF. Platelets were washed, labeled with indium 111, and resuspended with washed red blood cells (RBCs) in balanced salt solution containing Ca++, Mg++, and apyrase. The washed platelet RBC suspension was aspirated through capillary tubes to which vWF was adsorbed. Adhesion of platelets to adsorbed vWF was directly dependent on the surface density of vWF. Increasing wall shear rate (100 to 5000 sec-1) produced increasing platelet adhesion to maximum reached at 2500 sec-1. Platelets bound to the solid-phase vWF in an irreversible fashion, and, as demonstrated with scanning electron microscopy, they spread on the surface. When used to stimulate the platelets, ADP, thrombin, and ristocetin all increased the platelet adhesion to solid-phase vWF. ADP- and thrombin-stimulated reactions were inhibited by prior treatment of the platelets with 5'-p-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine. This inhibitor of ADP binding had no effect on the baseline platelet adhesion reaction (without ADP or thrombin). Adenosine in concentration up to 1 mmol/L failed to inhibit adhesion. The data demonstrate that washed platelets adhere to solid-phase vWF without added agonists, that the reaction is dependent on surface density vWF and wall shear rate, that they bind irreversibly, and that they demonstrate surface spreading. In addition, these platelets can be stimulated to increase their adherence to vWF by using ADP, thrombin, and ristocetin.

  20. Evaluation of Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire in Turkish Children With Von Willebrand Disease and Platelet Function Disorders.

    PubMed

    Belen, Burcu; Kocak, Ulker; Isik, Melek; Keskin, Ebru Yilmaz; Oner, Nergiz; Sal, Ertan; Kaya, Zuhre; Yenicesu, Idil; Gursel, Turkiz

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis of mild bleeding disorders is not easy as most of the "healthy" individuals also report bleeding symptoms. In order to get a precise bleeding history, Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire (PBQ) has been developed. In our study, Turkish children diagnosed with Von Willebrand disease (VWD), platelet function defect (PFD), and healthy children without any symptoms (control group 1) and healthy children with symptoms but found hemostatically normal (control group 2) were analyzed with PBQ. The cut off level for "positive bleeding score" was found to be ≥2 (area under the curve [AUC]: 0.785, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.718-0.852). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of PBQ to define VWD versus control group 1 was 100%, 97.4%, 96.4%, and 100%; VWD versus control group 2 was 100%, 53.1%, 64.3%, and 100%; PFD versus control group 1 was 93.3%, 53.1%, 73.7%, and 85%; and PFD versus control group 2 was 93.3%, 53.1%, 73.7%, and 85%, respectively.

  1. Von Willebrand factor restores impaired platelet thrombogenesis in copper-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Lominadze, D; Saari, J T; Miller, F N; Catalfamo, J L; Schuschke, D A

    1997-07-01

    Dietary copper restriction reduces microvascular thrombogenesis. We have now examined the roles of shear forces and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in in vivo thrombus formation in the cremaster microcirculation of copper-deficient rats. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were fed purified diets that were either copper-adequate (6.3 mg Cu/kg) or copper-deficient (0.3 mg Cu/kg) for 4 wk. Intravascular fluorescein isothiocyanate tagged to bovine serum albumin was activated with 450-490 nm light to induce thrombus formation in microvessels. Thrombus initiation time was significantly prolonged in copper-deficient rats; after thrombus appearance, however, vessel occlusion was significantly accelerated. The greater shear rates of arterioles compared with venules significantly increased the thrombus initiation time in both groups. However, vessel occlusion time and thrombus growth time were independent of shear rate. Intravascular vWF (0.2 u/100 g body wt) decreased thrombus initiation time in the CuD group without affecting thrombus growth time. The data suggest that decreased thrombogenesis in copper-deficient rats is not a result of altered rheological factors or arteriolar-venular differences, but appears to result from decreased platelet-to-endothelial cell adhesion.

  2. von Willebrand factor (VWF) propeptide binding to VWF D′D3 domain attenuates platelet activation and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Madabhushi, Sri R.; Shang, Chengwei; Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.; Rittenhouse-Olson, Kate; Murphy, Mary; Ryan, Thomas E.; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Noncovalent association between the von Willebrand factor (VWF) propeptide (VWFpp) and mature VWF aids N-terminal multimerization and protein compartmentalization in storage granules. This association is currently thought to dissipate after secretion into blood. In the present study, we examined this proposition by quantifying the affinity and kinetics of VWFpp binding to mature VWF using surface plasmon resonance and by developing novel anti-VWF D′D3 mAbs. Our results show that the only binding site for VWFpp in mature VWF is in its D′D3 domain. At pH 6.2 and 10mM Ca2+, conditions mimicking intracellular compartments, VWFpp-VWF binding occurs with high affinity (KD = 0.2nM, koff = 8 × 10−5 s−1). Significant, albeit weaker, binding (KD = 25nM, koff = 4 × 10−3 s−1) occurs under physiologic conditions of pH 7.4 and 2.5mM Ca2+. This interaction was also observed in human plasma (KD = 50nM). The addition of recombinant VWFpp in both flow-chamber–based platelet adhesion assays and viscometer-based shear-induced platelet aggregation and activation studies reduced platelet adhesion and activation partially. Anti-D′D3 mAb DD3.1, which blocks VWFpp binding to VWF-D′D3, also abrogated platelet adhesion, as shown by shear-induced platelet aggregation and activation studies. Our data demonstrate that VWFpp binding to mature VWF occurs in the circulation, which can regulate the hemostatic potential of VWF by reducing VWF binding to platelet GpIbα. PMID:22452980

  3. A molten globule intermediate of the von Willebrand factor A1 domain firmly tethers platelets under shear flow.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Blancas-Mejia, Luis M; Auton, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Clinical mutations in patients diagnosed with Type 2A von Willebrand disease (VWD) have been identified that break the single disulfide bond linking N- and C-termini in the vWF A1 domain. We have modeled the effect of these mutations on the disulfide-bonded structure of A1 by reducing and carboxy-amidating these cysteines. Solution biophysical studies show that loss of this disulfide bond induces a molten globule conformational state lacking global tertiary structure but retaining residual secondary structure. The conformational dependence of platelet adhesion to these native and molten globule states of A1 is quantitatively compared using real-time high-speed video microscopy analysis of platelet translocation dynamics under shear flow in a parallel plate microfluidic flow chamber. While normal platelets translocating on surface-captured native A1 domain retain the catch-bond character of pause times that increase as a function of shear rate at low shear and decrease as a function of shear rate at high shear, platelets that interact with A1 lacking the disulfide bond remain stably attached and do not translocate. Based on these findings, we propose that the shear stress-sensitive regulation of the A1-GPIb interaction is due to folding the tertiary structure of this domain. Removal of the tertiary structure by disrupting the disulfide bond destroys this regulatory mechanism resulting in high-strength interactions between platelets and vWF A1 that are dependent only on residual secondary structure elements present in the molten globule conformation. PMID:24265179

  4. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE.

  5. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE. PMID:27651919

  6. Modification of the platelet binding domain of von Willebrand Factor (vWF)

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, C.; Mascelli, M.A.; Karl, D.W.; Kirby, E.P.

    1986-05-01

    Bovine vWF has been modified with /sup 125/I-Bolton Hunter reagent (I/sup */-BHR) with a concomittant loss of its platelet agglutinating activity and a reduction in its ability to bind to platelets. BHR labels free alpha and epsilon amino groups. The I/sup */-BHR-vWF migrated as a single band of M/sub r/ = 210kD on reduced SDS polyacrylamide gels. Its multimeric composition on SDS agarose gels was identical to unlabeled vWF. Incorporation of an average of 1.2 moles of I/sup */-BHR/subunit vWF at pH 8.5 caused a 50% loss of platelet agglutinating activity. This represents less than 2% of the 118 lysine residues in each subunit vWF. No I/sup */-BHR was released after treatment with 1M hydroxylamine which would cleave O-acylated tyrosines. Digestion of both unlabeled and I/sup */-BHR-vWF with Protease 1, a metalloprotease from the venom of western diamondback rattlesnake, produces two fragments which have an M/sub r/ of 250kD and 200kD. The 250kD fragment contains the platelet binding site and is composed of 3 peptide chains with M/sub r/ 125kD, 78kD and 45kD. Gels of the 250kD fragment from I/sup */-BHR-vWF revealed radioactivity predominantly in the 125kD fragment, suggesting that the platelet binding site resides on the 125kD fragment.

  7. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Vincenzo C.; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R.; Eikenboom, Jeroen C.; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C.; Watson, Steve P.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder. PMID:26630678

  8. Apoptotic Platelet Events Are Not Observed in Severe von Willebrand Disease-Type 2B Mutation p.V1316M

    PubMed Central

    Berrou, Eliane; Kauskot, Alexandre; Adam, Frédéric; Harel, Amélie; Legendre, Paulette; Lavenu Bombled, Cécile; Rothschild, Chantal; Prevost, Nicolas; Christophe, Olivier D.; Lenting, Peter J.; Denis, Cécile V.; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Bryckaert, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia and increased platelet clearance observed in von Willebrand disease-type 2B (VWD-2B) may be explained by platelet apoptosis triggered by the constitutive binding of VWF to its receptor, glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). Apoptosis was assessed in platelets from two patients with a severe VWD-2B mutation VWF/p.V1316M and from mice transiently expressing VWF/p.V1316M. We now report that the VWD-2B mutation VWF/p.V1316M which binds spontaneously to its receptor GPIbα does not induce apoptosis. In 2 unrelated patients (P1 and P2) exhibiting different VWF plasma levels (70% and 36%, respectively, compared with normal pooled human plasma given as 100%), inner transmembrane depolarization of mitochondria, characteristic of apoptotic events was undetectable in platelets, whether washed or in whole blood. No or a moderate phosphatidyl serine (PS) exposure as measured by annexin-V staining was observed for P1 and P2, respectively. Expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bak and Bax, and caspase-3 activity were similar to control platelets. In the VWD-2B mouse model expressing high levels of mVWF/p.V1316M (423%), similar to what is found in inflammatory pathologies, no significant difference was observed between mice expressing mVWF/WT and mVWF/p.V1316M. These results strongly argue against apoptosis as a mechanism for the thrombocytopenia of severe VWD-2B exhibiting the VWF/p.V1316M mutation. PMID:26645283

  9. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  10. Platelets and primary haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2012-03-01

    Platelets have a critical role in haemostasis when vessel wall is injured. Platelet receptors are involved in sequence in this process by slowing platelets down via GPIb/von Willebrand factor to bring them into contact with exposed collagen, then activating them via GPVI to release granule contents and express integrins in a matrix protein binding state. More platelets are incorporated into the growing thrombus and a series of events are set off that finishes with the exposed subendothelium protected by a non-thrombogenic platelet surface and tissue repair underway and the blood flow through the vessel maintained. GPIb is also involved in thrombin activation and, together with GPVI, in the formation of COAT platelets. In thrombosis, pathological changes occur that may lead to life-threatening blockage of vessels. Prevention of thrombosis while maintaining haemostasis remains a major goal of medical research.

  11. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  12. Platelet Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shifrin, Megan M; Widmar, S Brian

    2016-03-01

    Antithrombotic medications have become standard of care for management of acute coronary syndrome. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation are essential components of platelet function; platelet-inhibiting medications interfere with these components and reduce incidence of thrombosis. Active bleeding is a contraindication for administration of platelet inhibitors. There is currently no reversal agent for platelet inhibitors, although platelet transfusion may be used to correct active bleeding after administration of platelet inhibitors. PMID:26897422

  13. Platelet GpIbα Binding to von Willebrand Factor Under Fluid Shear: Contributions of the D'D3‐Domain, A1‐Domain Flanking Peptide and O‐Linked Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Madabhushi, Sri R.; Zhang, Changjie; Kelkar, Anju; Dayananda, Kannayakanahalli M.; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Background Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) A1‐domain binding to platelet receptor GpIbα is an important fluid‐shear dependent interaction that regulates both soluble VWF binding to platelets, and platelet tethering onto immobilized VWF. We evaluated the roles of different structural elements at the N‐terminus of the A1‐domain in regulating shear dependent platelet binding. Specifically, the focus was on the VWF D′D3‐domain, A1‐domain N‐terminal flanking peptide (NFP), and O‐glycans on this peptide. Methods and Results Full‐length dimeric VWF (ΔPro‐VWF), dimeric VWF lacking the D′D3 domain (ΔD′D3‐VWF), and ΔD′D3‐VWF variants lacking either the NFP (ΔD′D3NFP─‐VWF) or just O‐glycans on this peptide (ΔD′D3OG─‐VWF) were expressed. Monomeric VWF‐A1 and D′D3‐A1 were also produced. In ELISA, the apparent dissociation constant (KD) of soluble ΔPro‐VWF binding to immobilized GpIbα (KD≈100 nmol/L) was 50‐ to 100‐fold higher than other proteins lacking the D′D3 domain (KD~0.7 to 2.5 nmol/L). Additionally, in surface plasmon resonance studies, the on‐rate of D′D3‐A1 binding to immobilized GpIbα (kon=1.8±0.4×104 (mol/L)−1·s−1; KD=1.7 μmol/L) was reduced compared with the single VWF‐A1 domain (kon=5.1±0.4×104 (mol/L)−1·s−1; KD=1.2 μmol/L). Thus, VWF‐D′D3 primarily controls soluble VWF binding to GpIbα. In contrast, upon VWF immobilization, all molecular features regulated A1‐GpIbα binding. Here, in ELISA, the number of apparent A1‐domain sites available for binding GpIbα on ΔPro‐VWF was ≈50% that of the ΔD′D3‐VWF variants. In microfluidics based platelet adhesion measurements on immobilized VWF and thrombus formation assays on collagen, human platelet recruitment varied as ΔPro‐VWF<ΔD′D3‐VWF<ΔD′D3NFP─‐VWF<ΔD′D3OG─‐VWF. Conclusions Whereas VWF‐D′D3 is the major regulator of soluble VWF binding to platelet GpIbα, both the D′D3‐domain and N

  14. Collection Development "Budget Decorating": Decorating Cents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumaran, Maha

    2008-01-01

    Home decorating is a popular idea these days as seen in the rise of cable television channels like TLC and HGTV (Home & Garden Television) and TV shows like "Trading Spaces, Take This House and Sell It, Design on a Dime, Decorating Cents," and many others. Throughout history, humans have always expressed the desire to personalize and beautify…

  15. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  16. New Horizons in Platelets Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Saboor, Muhammad; Moinuddin, Moinuddin; Ilyas, Samina

    2013-01-01

    Platelet flow cytometry is an emerging tool in diagnostic and therapeutic hematology. It is eminently suited to study the expression of platelet surface receptors both qualitatively as well as quantitatively. It can serve as a useful marker for the documentation of in vivo platelet activation, and thus, fore-warn the risk of thromboembolism in patients with diabetes mellitus, coronary syndromes, peripheral vascular diseases, and pre-eclampsia. This technique can also be extended to study and compare the effect of various antiplatelet drugs on the level of activation of platelets and to establish any dose-effect relationship of these drugs. Topographical localization of platelet granules and study of platelet-platelet and platelet-leukocyte interaction is also possible by this procedure. All these parameters serve as pointers towards the presence of activated platelets in the circulation with its thromboembolic consequences. This is a simple reliable and cost effective technique which has a wide application in the diagnosis of various inherited and acquired platelet disorders. Study of platelet cluster of differentiation (CD) markers in various inherited disorders i.e. Bernard Soulier’s disease, von Willebrand disease, Glanzman’s disease, and Grey platelet syndrome may help categories the molecular lesions in these oft under-studied disorders. PMID:23983579

  17. Platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pulkrabek, S M

    1996-12-01

    The proper diagnosis of patients with immune-mediated thrombocytopenias can be accomplished by using the advances made in the field of platelet serology. These techniques range from solid phase red cell adherence to sequencing platelet antigen amino acids by polymerase chain reaction. This article describes platelet antigens, the clinical tests available to detect platelet antigens and antibodies, and the value of these tests in supporting clinical diagnoses.

  18. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  19. Basic Cake Decorating Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdany, Mel

    Included in this student workbook for basic cake decorating are the following: (1) Drawings of steps in a basic way to ice a layer cake, how to make a paper cone, various sizes of flower nails, various sizes and types of tin pastry tubes, and special rose tubes; (2) recipes for basic decorating icings (buttercream, rose paste, and royal icing);…

  20. Laboratory testing for platelet function disorders.

    PubMed

    Israels, S J

    2015-05-01

    Platelet function testing is both complex and labor intensive. A stepwise approach to the evaluation of patients with suspected platelet disorders will optimize the use of laboratory resources, beginning with an appropriate clinical evaluation to determine whether the bleeding is consistent with a defect of primary hemostasis. Bleeding assessment tools, evaluation of platelet counts, and review of peripheral blood cell morphology can aid the initial assessment. For patients requiring further laboratory testing, platelet aggregometry, secretion assays, and von Willebrand factor assays are the most useful next steps and will direct further specialized testing including flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and molecular diagnostics. Guidelines and recommendations for standardizing platelet function testing, with a particular focus on light transmission aggregometry, are available and can provide a template for clinical laboratories in establishing procedures that will optimize diagnosis and assure quality results. This review outlines an approach to platelet function testing and reviews testing methods available to clinical laboratories.

  1. Platelet proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  2. Ceramics with decorative aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voica, Cezara

    2009-08-01

    The last decades brought the development of bone china techniques used for producing the decorative articles. These products can be glazed with a transparent and thin glaze layer, even with more special (decorative) ones which gives new aesthetic aspect. The present article presents the results obtained after the studies performed for matte glazes for decorative bone china. As microcrystalization agent were used zinc oxide; the content of this oxide bring some changes of the basic glaze thus the chemical composition must be adjusted as the fluxes would present the desired properties after the heating process.

  3. Platelet lipidomic.

    PubMed

    Dolegowska, B; Lubkowska, A; De Girolamo, L

    2012-01-01

    Lipids account for 16-19 percent dry platelet matter and includes 65 percent phospholipids, 25 percent neutral lipids and about 8 percent glycosphingolipids. The cell membrane that surrounds platelets is a bilayer that contains different types phospholipids symmetrically distributed in resting platelets, such as phosphatidylserine (PS), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin. The collapse of lipid asymmetry is exposure of phosphatidylserine in the external leaflet of the plasma bilayer, where it is known to serve at least two major functions: providing a platform for development of the blood coagulation cascade and presenting the signal that induces phagocytosis of apoptotic cells. During activation, this asymmetrical distribution becomes disrupted, and PS and PE become exposed on the cell surface. The transbilayer movement of phosphatidylserine is responsible for the platelet procoagulant activity. Exposure of phosphatidylserine is a flag for macrophage recognition and clearance from the circulation. Platelets, stored at room temperature for transfusion for more than 5 days, undergo changes collectively known as platelet storage lesions. Thus, the platelet lipid composition and its possible modifications over time are crucial for efficacy of platelet rich plasma therapy. Moreover, a number of substances derived from lipids are contained into platelets. Eicosanoids are lipid signaling mediators generated by the action of lipoxygenase and include prostaglandins, thromboxane A2, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Isoprostanes have a chemical structure similar to this of prostanoids, but are differently produced into the particle, and are ligands for prostaglandins receptors, exhibiting biological activity like thromboxane A2. Endocannabinoids are derivatives from arachidonic acid which could reduce local pain. Phospholipids growth factors (sphingolipids, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-activating factor) are involved in tissue

  4. Platelet Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... rash Small purplish spots on the skin called purpura, caused by bleeding under the skin Testing may ... Idiopathic thrombocytopenia (ITP), also known as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, is the result of antibody production against platelets. ...

  5. Platelets and infections - complex interactions with bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Damien, Pauline; Chabert, Adrien; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-like receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb-IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet-bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis, or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet-bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the aggregation response

  6. Congenital platelet function defects

    MedlinePlus

    Platelet storage pool disorder; Glanzmann's thrombasthenia; Bernard-Soulier syndrome; Platelet function defects - congenital ... disorder may also cause severe bleeding. Platelet storage pool disorder (also called platelet secretion disorder) occurs when ...

  7. Platelet-mimetic strategies for modulating the wound environment and inflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Platelets closely interface with the immune system to fight pathogens, target wound sites, and regulate tissue repair. Natural platelet levels within the body can be depleted for a variety of reasons, including excessive bleeding following traumatic injury, or diseases such as cancer and bacterial or viral infections. Platelet transfusions are commonly used to improve platelet count and hemostatic function in these cases, but transfusions can be complicated by the contamination risks and short storage life of donated platelets. Lyophilized platelets that can be freeze-dried and stored for longer periods of time and synthetic platelet-mimetic technologies that can enhance or replace the functions of natural platelets, while minimizing adverse immune responses have been explored as alternatives to transfusion. Synthetic platelets typically comprise nanoparticles surface-decorated with peptides or ligands to recreate specific biological characteristics of platelets, including targeting of wound and disease sites and facilitating platelet aggregation. Recent efforts in synthetic platelet design have additionally focused on matching platelet shape and mechanics to recreate the marginalization and clot contraction capabilities of natural platelets. The ability to specifically tune the properties of synthetic platelet-mimetic materials has shown utility in a variety of applications including hemostasis, drug delivery, and targeted delivery of cancer therapeutics. PMID:27190260

  8. Evidence that plasma fibrinogen and platelet membrane GPIIb-IIIa are involved in the adhesion of platelets to an artificial surface exposed to plasma.

    PubMed

    Nagai, H; Handa, M; Kawai, Y; Watanabe, K; Ikeda, Y

    1993-09-15

    We investigated the molecular mechanism(s) by which platelets adhere to an artificial surface exposed to plasma, using polystyrene microtiter plates pretreated with plasma. Washed platelets labelled with 51Cr were incubated with the plates under static conditions. Prostaglandin E1(PGE1) was added to the platelets to prevent platelet-platelet interactions. Adhesion required the presence of a divalent cation such as Mg++ or Ca++. Polyclonal anti-fibrinogen antibody inhibited adhesion by 70%. Polyclonal antibodies against fibronectin, vitronectin, von Willebrand's Factor, and the Fc portion of human IgG, had no effect on adhesion. Platelets adhered normally to a surface pretreated with plasma from a patient with severe von Willebrand's disease. No platelet adhesion occurred when the surface was pretreated with an afibrinogenemic plasma. Monoclonal antibodies against platelet membrane GPIIb-IIIa, potent inhibitors of ADP-induced fibrinogen binding to platelets, completely inhibited adhesion. Monoclonal antibodies against the GPIb alpha subunit and GPIc(VLA alpha 5) showed no inhibitory effects on adhesion. Platelets from a patient with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (type I) did not adhere to the surface pretreated with normal plasma. These results suggest that plasma fibrinogen adsorbed onto the surface and that platelet membrane glycoprotein(GP)IIb-IIIa were responsible for adhesion in an activation-independent manner.

  9. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis. PMID:26903190

  10. Analysis of aggregation of platelets in thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    Platelets are key players in thrombus formation by first rolling over collagen bound von Willebrand factor followed by formation of a stable interaction with collagen. The first adhered platelets bind additional platelets until the whole injury is sealed off by a platelet aggregate. The coagulation system stabilizes the formed platelet plug by creating a tight fibrin network, and then wound contraction takes place because of morphological changes in platelets. Coagulation takes place by platelet activation and aggregation mainly through fibrinogen polymerization into fibrin fibers. The process includes multiple factors, such as thrombin, plasmin, and local shear-rate which regulate and control the process. Coagulation can be divided into two pathways: the intrinsic pathway and the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is initiated by the exposure of a negatively charged. It is able to activate factor XII, using a complex reaction that includes prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen as cofactors.. Thrombin is the final enzyme that is needed to convert fibrinogen into fibrin. The extrinsic pathway starts with the exposure of tissue factor to the circulating blood, which is the major initiator of coagulation. There are several feedback loops that reinforce the coagulation cascade, resulting in large amounts of thrombin. It is dependent on the presence of pro-coagulant surfaces of cells expressing negatively charged phospholipids--which include phosphatidylserine (PS)--on their outer membrane. PS-bearing surfaces are able to increase the efficiency of the reactions by concentrating and co-localizing coagulation factors.. Aggregation of platelets are analyzed and compared to adhesion of platelet to erythrocyte and to endothelial cells. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-020003.

  11. Platelets deficient in glycoprotein I have normal Fc receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pfueller, S L; de Rosbo, N K; Bilston, R A

    1984-04-01

    Platelet glycoprotein I (GPI) is known to be required for the interaction of platelets with ristocetin and factor VIII:von Willebrand factor (VIII:vWf). However, its role as Fc receptor is not clear. Some studies have shown that enzymatic removal of GPI destroys the ability of platelets to react with VIII:vWf but not their ability to bind Ig G (IgG). Others have shown that IgG immune complexes which block the Fc receptor also inhibit VIII:vWf interaction with platelets. This subject has been re-examined by testing the ability of platelets with reduced amounts of GPI to aggregate and undergo the release reaction in response to stimuli which act at the platelet Fc receptor. Platelets from two patients with Bernard-Soulier syndrome, congenitally deficient in GPI, both aggregated and released 14C-serotonin normally when exposed to latex particles coated with IgG. Levels of GPI were decreased experimentally in normal platelets by treating them with chymotrypsin. Platelets treated in this manner did not aggregate or release [14C]serotonin in response to ristocetin-VIII:vWf. They did, however, both aggregate and release when incubated with heat-aggregated IgG, antigen-antibody complexes or latex particles coated with IgG. Thus the presence of GPI is not a prerequisite for platelet stimulation via the Fc receptor. PMID:6231945

  12. Platelets, immune-mediated thrombocytopenias, and fetal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong Ruby; Gallant, Reid C; Ni, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Platelets are small versatile blood cells generated from megakaryocytes in the bone marrow and cleared in the reticuloendothelial system. Platelet accumulation (adhesion and aggregation) at the site of injury has been considered the first wave of hemostasis. Interestingly, although fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor (VWF) are documented to be essential for hemostasis, fibrinogen/VWF-independent platelet aggregation and thrombosis still occur. Following platelet activation and phosphatidylserine expression, platelets also contribute to cell-based thrombin generation and blood coagulation - the second wave of hemostasis. Most recently, deposition of fibronectin and other plasma proteins onto the injured vessel wall was identified as a "protein wave" of hemostasis, in which platelets may release their granule proteins and thus also contribute to this very early hemostatic event. Due to the central roles of platelets in hemostasis, excessive platelet clearance may lead to bleeding disorders as observed in auto- and alloimmune-mediated thrombocytopenias. In this review, we will introduce several new pathways of thrombosis and hemostasis as well as antibody Fc-independent platelet clearance, which may play an important role in immune-mediated thrombocytopenias. We will also discuss the roles of platelets in fetal hemostasis that may deserve further investigation. PMID:27207432

  13. Platelet clearance via shear-induced unfolding of a membrane mechanoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Xu, Yan; Chen, Wenchun; Paul, David S.; Syed, Anum K.; Dragovich, Matthew A.; Liang, Xin; Zakas, Philip; Berndt, Michael C.; Di Paola, Jorge; Ware, Jerry; Lanza, Francois; Doering, Christopher B.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Zhang, X. Frank; Li, Renhao

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms by which blood cells sense shear stress are poorly characterized. In platelets, glycoprotein (GP)Ib–IX receptor complex has been long suggested to be a shear sensor and receptor. Recently, a relatively unstable and mechanosensitive domain in the GPIbα subunit of GPIb–IX was identified. Here we show that binding of its ligand, von Willebrand factor, under physiological shear stress induces unfolding of this mechanosensory domain (MSD) on the platelet surface. The unfolded MSD, particularly the juxtamembrane ‘Trigger' sequence therein, leads to intracellular signalling and rapid platelet clearance. These results illustrate the initial molecular event underlying platelet shear sensing and provide a mechanism linking GPIb–IX to platelet clearance. Our results have implications on the mechanism of platelet activation, and on the pathophysiology of von Willebrand disease and related thrombocytopenic disorders. The mechanosensation via receptor unfolding may be applicable for many other cell adhesion receptors. PMID:27670775

  14. The platelet glycoprotein Ib-IX complex.

    PubMed

    López, J A

    1994-02-01

    The GP Ib-IX complex is part of a conglomerate of polypeptides on the platelet surface that perform several key roles of central importance to the haemostatic function of platelets. When deranged, these interactions can also lead to pathological thrombosis, with potentially disastrous consequences for the organism. In this manuscript, several aspects of the structure and biology of the complex are reviewed, including the structures of its polypeptides and their relationships to other members of a phylogenetically widespread protein family, its topology on the platelet membrane and relationship with cytoskeletal components, peptide sequences involved in binding its ligands, von Willebrand factor and thrombin, its polymorphisms, its biosynthesis, and the organizations of the genes that encode its subunits.

  15. Platelet-like nanoparticles: mimicking shape, flexibility, and surface biology of platelets to target vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa Lynn; Menegatti, Stefano; Kumar, Sunny; Vogus, Douglas R; Tian, Lewis L; Chen, Ming; Squires, Todd M; Sen Gupta, Anirban; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-11-25

    Targeted delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents in the vascular compartment represents a significant hurdle in using nanomedicine for treating hemorrhage, thrombosis, and atherosclerosis. While several types of nanoparticles have been developed to meet this goal, their utility is limited by poor circulation, limited margination, and minimal targeting. Platelets have an innate ability to marginate to the vascular wall and specifically interact with vascular injury sites. These platelet functions are mediated by their shape, flexibility, and complex surface interactions. Inspired by this, we report the design and evaluation of nanoparticles that exhibit platelet-like functions including vascular injury site-directed margination, site-specific adhesion, and amplification of injury site-specific aggregation. Our nanoparticles mimic four key attributes of platelets, (i) discoidal morphology, (ii) mechanical flexibility, (iii) biophysically and biochemically mediated aggregation, and (iv) heteromultivalent presentation of ligands that mediate adhesion to both von Willebrand Factor and collagen, as well as specific clustering to activated platelets. Platelet-like nanoparticles (PLNs) exhibit enhanced surface-binding compared to spherical and rigid discoidal counterparts and site-selective adhesive and platelet-aggregatory properties under physiological flow conditions in vitro. In vivo studies in a mouse model demonstrated that PLNs accumulate at the wound site and induce ∼65% reduction in bleeding time, effectively mimicking and improving the hemostatic functions of natural platelets. We show that both the biochemical and biophysical design parameters of PLNs are essential in mimicking platelets and their hemostatic functions. PLNs offer a nanoscale technology that integrates platelet-mimetic biophysical and biochemical properties for potential applications in injectable synthetic hemostats and vascularly targeted payload delivery. PMID:25318048

  16. Inherited platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Lippi, Giuseppe; Veneri, Dino; Targher, Giovanni; Zaffanello, Marco; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2008-01-01

    Inherited platelet disorders are a rare, but probably underdiagnosed, cause of symptomatic bleeding. They are characterized by abnormalities of platelet number (inherited thrombocytopenias), function (inherited disorders of platelet function) or both. This review briefly discusses the inherited platelet disorders with respect to molecular defects, diagnostic evaluation and treatment strategies.

  17. [Prophylactic platelet transfusions].

    PubMed

    Ilmakunnas, Minna; Remes, Kari; Hiippala, Seppo; Mäkisalo, Heikki; Åberg, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of platelet products in Finland is exceptionally high. For the most part, platelets are transfused pre-operatively to thrombocytopenic patients in order to prevent hemorrhage. Most of the minor procedures could, however, be conducted even if the patients'platelet levels would be lower than usual. In cardiac surgery, platelets are used because of the hemorrhagic diathesis associated with platelet inhibitors. Platelet inhibitors will, however, also bind to transfused platelets, whereby instead of prophylactic platelet transfusions it would be more sensible to leave the thorax open and not carry out ineffective platelet transfusions until the effect of the inhibitors has run out. We outline the prophylactic use of platelets based on recent international clinical practice guidelines. PMID:27400590

  18. Proplatelets and stress platelets.

    PubMed

    Tong, M; Seth, P; Penington, D G

    1987-02-01

    The process of platelet formation by the fragmentation of megakaryocyte pseudopodia, termed proplatelets, demonstrable in the marrow sinusoids is poorly understood. "Stress" platelets produced under conditions of stimulated platelet production differ from normal circulating platelets with respect to volume and a number of functional characteristics. To clarify the relationship of stress platelets to proplatelets, rats were injected with heterologous platelet antiserum. Nondiscoid platelet forms, some characteristically beaded in appearance, strongly resembling bone marrow proplatelets, can be recovered in the circulation of normal rats. During the early period of recovery from acute thrombocytopenia, there was a substantial increase in the proportion of these elongated platelets in the citrated platelet rich plasma. Exposure to EDTA rendered them spherical. Circulating proplatelets may contribute significantly to the prompt increase in platelet volume during recovery from acute thrombocytopenia at a time prior to significant increase in megakaryocyte size and ploidy. PMID:3801667

  19. Proteasome proteolysis supports stimulated platelet function and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nilaksh; Li, Wei; Willard, Belinda; Silverstein, Roy L.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Proteasome inhibitors are in use to treat hematologic cancers, but also reduce thrombosis. Whether the proteasome participates in platelet activation or function is opaque since little is known of the proteasome in these terminally differentiated cells. Approach and Results Platelets displayed all three primary proteasome protease activities, which MG132 and bortezomib (Velcade®) inhibited. Proteasome substrates are marked by ubiquitin, and platelets contained a functional ubiquitination system that modified the proteome by mono- and poly-ubiquitination. Systemic MG132 strongly suppressed formation of occlusive, platelet-rich thrombi in FeCl3-damaged carotid arteries. Transfusion of platelets treated ex vivo with MG132 and washed prior to transfusion into thrombocytopenic mice also reduced carotid artery thrombosis. Proteasome inhibition reduced platelet aggregation by low thrombin concentrations and ristocetin-stimulated agglutination through the GPIb-IX-V complex. This receptor was not appropriately internalized after proteasome inhibition in stimulated platelets, and spreading and clot retraction after MG132 exposure also were decreased. The effects of proteasome inhibitors were not confined to a single receptor as MG132 suppressed thrombin-, ADP-, and LPS-stimulated microparticle shedding. Proteasome inhibition increased ubiquitin decoration of cytoplasmic proteins, including the cytoskeletal proteins Filamin A and Talin-1. Mass spectrometry revealed a single MG132-sensitive tryptic cleavage after R1745 in an extended Filamin A loop, which would separate its actin-binding domain from its carboxy terminal GPIbα binding domain. Conclusions Platelets contain a ubiquitin/proteasome system that marks cytoskeletal proteins for proteolytic modification to promote productive platelet-platelet and platelet-wall interactions. PMID:24177323

  20. Fire-Retardant, Decorative Inks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D.; Nir, Z.; Mikroyannidis, J.

    1987-01-01

    Effectiveness of fire-retardant additives evaluated. Fire retardance of decorative acrylic printing inks for aircraft interiors enhanced by certain commercial and experimental fire-retardant additives, according to study.

  1. Anucleate platelets generate progeny

    PubMed Central

    Schwertz, Hansjörg; Köster, Sarah; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Michetti, Noemi; Kraemer, Bjoern F.; Weitz, David A.; Blaylock, Robert C.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Greinacher, Andreas; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are classified as terminally differentiated cells that are incapable of cellular division. However, we observe that anucleate human platelets, either maintained in suspension culture or captured in microdrops, give rise to new cell bodies packed with respiring mitochondria and α-granules. Platelet progeny formation also occurs in whole blood cultures. Newly formed platelets are structurally indistinguishable from normal platelets, are able to adhere and spread on extracellular matrix, and display normal signal-dependent expression of surface P-selectin and annexin V. Platelet progeny formation is accompanied by increases in biomass, cellular protein levels, and protein synthesis in expanding populations. Platelet numbers also increase during ex vivo storage. These observations indicate that platelets have a previously unrecognized capacity for producing functional progeny, which involves a form of cell division that does not require a nucleus. Because this new function of platelets occurs outside of the bone marrow milieu, it raises the possibility that thrombopoiesis continues in the bloodstream. PMID:20086251

  2. Acidosis downregulates platelet haemostatic functions and promotes neutrophil proinflammatory responses mediated by platelets.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Carestia, Agostina; Pozner, Roberto Gabriel; Romaniuk, María Albertina; D'Atri, Lina Paola; Klement, Giannoula Lakka; Schattner, Mirta

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis is one of the hallmarks of tissue injury such as trauma, infection, inflammation, and tumour growth. Although platelets participate in the pathophysiology of all these processes, the impact of acidosis on platelet biology has not been studied outside of the quality control of laboratory aggregation assays or platelet transfusion optimization. Herein, we evaluate the effect of physiologically relevant changes in extracellular acidosis on the biological function of platelets, placing particular emphasis on haemostatic and secretory functions. Platelet haemostatic responses such as adhesion, spreading, activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, ATP release, aggregation, thromboxane B2 generation, clot retraction and procoagulant activity including phosphatidilserine exposure and microparticle formation, showed a statistically significant inhibition of thrombin-induced changes at pH of 7.0 and 6.5 compared to the physiological pH (7.4). The release of alpha granule content was differentially regulated by acidosis. At low pH, thrombin or collagen-induced secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor and endostatin were dramatically reduced. The release of von Willebrand factor and stromal derived factor-1α followed a similar, albeit less dramatic pattern. In contrast, the induction of CD40L was not changed by low pH, and P-selectin exposure was significantly increased. While the generation of mixed platelet-leukocyte aggregates and the increased chemotaxis of neutrophils mediated by platelets were further augmented under acidic conditions in a P-selectin dependent manner, the increased neutrophil survival was independent of P-selectin expression. In conclusion, our results indicate that extracellular acidosis downregulates most of the haemostatic platelet functions, and promotes those involved in amplifying the neutrophil-mediated inflammatory response.

  3. Platelets and Infections – Complex Interactions with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Damien, Pauline; Chabert, Adrien; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-like receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb–IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet-bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis, or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet–bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the aggregation response

  4. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  5. The evolutionary ecology of decorating behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Ruxton, Graeme D.; Stevens, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Many animals decorate themselves through the accumulation of environmental material on their exterior. Decoration has been studied across a range of different taxa, but there are substantial limits to current understanding. Decoration in non-humans appears to function predominantly in defence against predators and parasites, although an adaptive function is often assumed rather than comprehensively demonstrated. It seems predominantly an aquatic phenomenon—presumably because buoyancy helps reduce energetic costs associated with carrying the decorative material. In terrestrial examples, decorating is relatively common in the larval stages of insects. Insects are small and thus able to generate the power to carry a greater mass of material relative to their own body weight. In adult forms, the need to be lightweight for flight probably rules out decoration. We emphasize that both benefits and costs to decoration are rarely quantified, and that costs should include those associated with collecting as well as carrying the material. PMID:26041868

  6. Effects of microgravity and hypergravity on platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Dai, Kesheng; Wang, Yuedan; Yan, Rong; Shi, Quanwei; Wang, Zhicheng; Yuan, Yanhong; Cheng, Hong; Li, Suping; Fan, Yubo; Zhuang, Fengyuan

    2009-05-01

    Many serious thrombotic and haemorrhagic diseases or fatalities have been documented in human being exposed to microgravity or hypergravity environments, such as crewmen in space, roller coaster riders, and aircrew subjected to high-G training. Some possible related organs have been examined to explore the mechanisms underlying these gravity change-related diseases. However, the role of platelets which are the primary players in both thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. Here we show that platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin or collagen and platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) were significantly decreased after platelets were exposed to simulated microgravity. Conversely, these platelet functions were increased after platelets were exposed to hypergravity. The tail bleeding time in vivo was significantly shortened in mice exposed to high-G force, whereas, was prolonged in hindlimb unloaded mice. Furthermore, three of 23 mice died after 15 minutes of -8 Gx stress. Platelet thrombi disseminated in the heart ventricle and blood vessels in the brain, lung, and heart from the dead mice. Finally, glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha surface expression and its association with the cytoskeleton were significantly decreased in platelets exposed to simulated microgravity, and obviously increased in hypergravity-exposed platelets. These data indicate that the platelet functions are inhibited in microgravity environments, and activated under high-G conditions, suggesting a novel mechanism for gravity change-related haemorrhagic and thrombotic diseases. This mechanism has important implications for preventing and treating gravity change-related diseases, and also suggests that special attentions should be paid to human actions under different gravity conditions. PMID:19404544

  7. Integrin receptors and platelet adhesion to synthetic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Goodman, S L; Cooper, S L; Albrecht, R M

    1993-05-01

    The activation-independent and -dependent integrin receptors--glycoproteins GPIc-IIa (alpha 5-beta 1) and GPIIb-IIIa (alpha IIb-beta 3)--are involved in platelet adhesion and thrombus growth on damaged subendothelium through interactions with fibrinogen, fibronectin, von Willebrand factor, and other adhesive proteins. Because these receptors are used in normal in vivo hemostatic adhesion, they may also have a role for adhesion onto synthetic surfaces in the vasculature. Platelet adhesion in vitro was examined onto Formvar, glass, and four polyurethaneureas with various soft segment chemistries and surface properties. Platelets were pretreated with RGD peptides before and after adhesion. RGD peptide pretreatment inhibited spreading and close contact formation compared to treatment with saline or control RGE peptides, with no observable effect on the number of adherent platelets per area. High-voltage electron microscopy showed abnormally sparse and short microfilament structures with RGD peptide treatment, suggesting an indirect inhibition of actin filament formation. Video-enhanced light microscopy showed a cessation of spreading and a partial reversal of close contacts following RGD peptide application to adherent platelets. Because minimal amounts of plasma proteins are present in column-washed platelet suspensions, and as platelet secretion appeared to be minimal in these experiments, these observations suggest that RGD binding integrin receptors may function in platelet spreading even in the absence of exogenous ligand. As RGD peptides did not affect the numbers of adherent platelets, while producing substantial decreases in the extent of spreading, we suggest that platelet integrins, possibly GPIIb-IIIa, are involved in spreading on synthetic surfaces but not for initial adhesion.

  8. Thioredoxin Inhibitors Attenuate Platelet Function and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Ramasubramoni, Anjana; Pula, Giordano; Harper, Matthew T.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Coxon, Carmen H.

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is an oxidoreductase with important physiological function. Imbalances in the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system are associated with a number of pathologies, particularly cancer, and a number of clinical trials for thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase inhibitors have been carried out or are underway. Due to the emerging role and importance of oxidoreductases for haemostasis and the current interest in developing inhibitors for clinical use, we thought it pertinent to assess whether inhibition of the NADPH/thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system affects platelet function and thrombosis. We used small molecule inhibitors of Trx (PMX 464 and PX-12) to determine whether Trx activity influences platelet function, as well as an unbiased proteomics approach to identify potential Trx substrates on the surface of platelets that might contribute to platelet reactivity and function. Using LC-MS/MS we found that PMX 464 and PX-12 affected the oxidation state of thiols in a number of cell surface proteins. Key surface receptors for platelet adhesion and activation were affected, including the collagen receptor GPVI and the von Willebrand factor receptor, GPIb. To experimentally validate these findings we assessed platelet function in the presence of PMX 464, PX-12, and rutin (a selective inhibitor of the related protein disulphide isomerase). In agreement with the proteomics data, small molecule inhibitors of thioredoxin selectively inhibited GPVI-mediated platelet activation, and attenuated ristocetin-induced GPIb-vWF-mediated platelet agglutination, thus validating the findings of the proteomics study. These data reveal a novel role for thioredoxin in regulating platelet reactivity via proteins required for early platelet responses at sites of vessel injury (GPVI and GPIb). This work also highlights a potential opportunity for repurposing of PMX 464 and PX-12 as antiplatelet agents. PMID:27716777

  9. Fibrin formation by staphylothrombin facilitates Staphylococcus aureus-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Vanassche, Thomas; Kauskot, Alexandre; Verhaegen, Jan; Peetermans, Willy E; van Ryn, Joanne; Schneewind, Olaf; Hoylaerts, Marc F; Verhamme, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Interactions of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and platelets play an important role in the pathogenesis of intravascular infections such as infective endocarditis (IE). A typical feature of S. aureus is the ability to generate thrombin activity through the secretion of two prothrombin activating molecules, staphylocoagulase and von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp), which bind to human prothrombin to form the enzymatically active staphylothrombin complex. The role of staphylothrombin in the interaction between S. aureus and platelets has not yet been studied. We found that in contrast with thrombin, staphylothrombin did not directly activate human platelets. However, the staphylothrombin-mediated conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin initiated platelet aggregation and secondary activation and facilitated S. aureus-platelet interactions. Both the genetic absence of staphylocoagulase and vWbp and pharmacological inhibition of staphylothrombin increased the lag time to aggregation, and reduced platelet trapping by S. aureus in high shear stress conditions. The combined inhibition of staphylothrombin and immunoglobulin binding to platelets completely abolished the ability of S. aureus to aggregate platelets in vitro. In conclusion, although staphylothrombin did not directly activate platelets, the formation of a fibrin scaffold facilitated bacteria-platelet interaction, and the inhibition of staphylothrombin resulted in a reduced activation of platelets by S. aureus. PMID:22437005

  10. Low-power laser irradiation of blood inhibits platelet function: role of cyclic GMP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Alexander G.; Brill, Gregory E.; Shenkman, Boris; Tamarin, Ilya; Dardik, Rima; Varon, David; Savion, Naphtali

    1998-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate effect of low power laser irradiation (LPLI) on platelet function in vitro. He-Ne laser (Optronix, USA; (lambda) - 632.8 nm, output power - 7 mW) was employed. Platelet adhesion and aggregation in whole blood (WB) under defined shear conditions were assayed by a Cone and Plate(let) Analyzer. Platelet activation was evaluated by flow cytometry. Level of platelet cGMP was estimated by immunoenzyme assay. Experiments performed showed that LPLI of WB resulted in decrease of platelet deposition on extracellular matrix at high shear rate (1300 s-1). Similar results were obtained using surfaces precoated with either collagen type I or von Willebrand factor. LPLI inhibited fibrinogen binding as well as P-selectin expression on the platelet membrane, induced by thrombin analogue. It was found out that primary acceptor of laser energy responsible for the effect on platelets was located in platelets themselves and not in blood plasma or in other blood cells. LPLI of gel- filtered platelets resulted in increase of intracellular level of cGMP both in the absence and in presence of izobutylmethylxantine (phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suggesting stimulation of synthesis rather than destruction of cGMP under the influence of LPLI. It is suggested that guanylate cyclase and/or NO-synthase might serve as primary acceptors of He-Ne laser light in platelets.

  11. Schistosomes versus platelets.

    PubMed

    Da'dara, Akram A; Skelly, Patrick J

    2014-12-01

    Schistosomes are parasitic platyhelminths that currently infect >200million people and cause the chronic debilitating disease schistosomiasis. While these large intravascular parasites can disturb blood flow, they do not appear to activate platelets and provoke thrombus formation. Host-interactive tegumental molecules have been proposed to be important in this regard. For example, tegumental apyrase, SmATPDase1 can degrade the platelet-activating molecule ADP in the extracellular environment. The parasites themselves can produce prostaglandins (or may induce prostaglandin production by host cells) which could inhibit platelet aggregation. Additional tegumental proteins have been proposed to impede the coagulation cascade and to promote fibrinolysis. Platelets have been shown to be directly toxic to schistosomes. Platelets recovered from infected rats are able to kill larval parasites in culture and platelets obtained at later times post-infection are generally better at killing. Even platelets from uninfected rats can rapidly kill larval schistosomes if first exposed to a variety of activators (such as: serum from infected rats, the IgE fraction of that serum, C-reactive protein, cytokines (TNFα or TNFβ)). Passive transfer of stimulated platelets can protect rats against a challenge schistosome infection. Cytokines (TNFα, TNFβ, IFNγ or IL-6) have been shown to similarly promote normal human platelet killing of schistosomes in vitro. Platelet antimicrobial effector molecules (e.g. platelet microbicidal proteins) may mediate such killing. While platelets can be protective against schistosomes following infection of humans and mice, platelet numbers decline (but not so in the non-permissive rat host) and coagulopathy becomes more apparent as schistosome-induced pathology increases.

  12. von Willebrand Factor Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Platelet Count , Platelet Function Tests , Complete Blood Count , Coagulation Factor VIII , PT , PTT At a Glance Test ... a protein , one of several components of the coagulation system that work together to stop bleeding and ...

  13. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun with Dr. Eberhard Rees and R.W. Cook at a press conference concerning Dr. Von Braun's assignment to NASA headquarters and Dr. Rees' subsequent assignment as Marshall Center director.

  14. Sources of variability in platelet accumulation on type 1 fibrillar collagen in microfluidic flow assays.

    PubMed

    Neeves, Keith B; Onasoga, Abimbola A; Hansen, Ryan R; Lilly, Jessica J; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B; Irish, Andrew T; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J; Di Paola, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s⁻¹ through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (Lag(T)), the rate of platelet accumulation (V(PLT)), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to V(PLT) and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer Lag(T) for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s⁻¹ and 300 s⁻¹. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  15. Sources of Variability in Platelet Accumulation on Type 1 Fibrillar Collagen in Microfluidic Flow Assays

    PubMed Central

    Neeves, Keith B.; Onasoga, Abimbola A.; Hansen, Ryan R.; Lilly, Jessica J.; Venckunaite, Diana; Sumner, Meghan B.; Irish, Andrew T.; Brodsky, Gary; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J.; Di Paola, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidic flow assays (MFA) that measure shear dependent platelet function have potential clinical applications in the diagnosis and treatment of bleeding and thrombotic disorders. As a step towards clinical application, the objective of this study was to measure how phenotypic and genetic factors, as well as experimental conditions, affect the variability of platelet accumulation on type 1 collagen within a MFA. Whole blood was perfused over type 1 fibrillar collagen at wall shear rates of 150, 300, 750 and 1500 s−1 through four independent channels with a height of 50 µm and a width of 500 µm. The accumulation of platelets was characterized by the lag time to 1% platelet surface coverage (LagT), the rate of platelet accumulation (VPLT), and platelet surface coverage (SC). A cohort of normal donors was tested and the results were correlated to plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) levels, platelet count, hematocrit, sex, and collagen receptors genotypes. VWF levels were the strongest determinant of platelet accumulation. VWF levels were positively correlated to VPLT and SC at all wall shear rates. A longer LagT for platelet accumulation at arterial shear rates compared to venous shear rates was attributed to the time required for plasma proteins to adsorb to collagen. There was no association between platelet accumulation and hematocrit or platelet count. Individuals with the AG genotype of the GP6 gene had lower platelet accumulation than individuals with the AA genotype at 150 s−1 and 300 s−1. Recalcified blood collected into sodium citrate and corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) resulted in diminished platelet accumulation compared to CTI alone, suggesting that citrate irreversibly diminishes platelet function. This study the largest association study of MFA in healthy donors (n = 104) and will likely set up the basis for the determination of the normal range of platelet responses in this type of assay. PMID:23355889

  16. Platelet size in man.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J M

    1975-09-01

    The shape and parameters of platelet size distributions were studied in 50 normal persons and 97 patients in order to test the proposed thesis that platelet size heterogeneity results mainly from aging in the circulation. This thesis was contradicted (1) by size distributions of age-homogeneous, newly-born cell populations which were lognormal with increased (instead of decreased) dispersion of volumes and (2) by the macrothrombocytosis found in some populations with normal age distribution. For these reasons, thrombocytopoiesis appeared to play the major role in determining platelet size. A model was built in which the volume variation of platelet territories due to megakaryocyte growth and membrane demarcation at each step of maturation was a random proportion of the previous value of the volume. This model explains the lognormal shape of both newborn and circulating platelet size distributions. It also implies that (1) the mean and standard deviation of platelet logvolumes depend on the rates of volume change of the individual platelet territories (growth rate minus demarcation rate) as well as on megakaryocyte maturation time; (2) platelet hyperdestruction causes an increase in the mean and dispersion of the rates of territory volume change; (3) Mediterranean macrothrombocytosis and some hereditary macrothrombocytotic thrombocytopenias or dysthrombocytopoieses reflect a diminished rate of territory demarcation, and (4) platelet size heterogeneity is caused mainly by the variations in territory growth and demarcation and not by aging in the circulation.

  17. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  18. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  19. Platelet and endothelial activation in catastrophic and quiescent antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bontadi, A; Ruffatti, A; Falcinelli, E; Giannini, S; Marturano, A; Tonello, M; Hoxha, A; Pengo, V; Punzi, L; Momi, S; Gresele, P

    2013-05-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) seem to induce a prothrombotic state by activating endothelium and platelets, but no studies have evaluated systematically the effects of aPL from patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in quiescent versus catastrophic phase. Our aims were to evaluate the in vitro effects on platelet activation of anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodiesisolated from APS patientin either quiescent or catastrophic phase and to investigate ex vivo platelet and endothelial activation in patients with quiescent or catastrophic APS. Anti-β2GPI antibodies were isolated from plasma of a pregnant woman in two different stages of APS (quiescent and catastrophic, respectively). They were co-incubated with washed platelets from healthy controls that were then challenged with TRAP-6 (thrombin receptor activating peptide 6) and the expression of P- selectin (P-sel) on platelets was assessed by flow cytometry. Moreover, plasma samples from six patients with quiescent, four with catastrophic APS and 10 controls were assessed for several markers of platelet and endothelial activation. The results showed that purified anti-β2GPI antibodies co-incubated with platelets enhanced TRAP-6- induced platelet P-sel expression. Notably, anti-β2GPI antibodies isolated during the catastrophic phase enhanced platelet P-sel expression more than antibodies isolated from the same patient in the quiescent stage of disease. Moreover, APS patients had significantly higher plasma levels of soluble (s) Psel, sCD40 ligand, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 than control subjects. In addition, sP-sel and von Willebrand factor activity were significantly higher during catastrophic than in quiescent phase. PMID:23572134

  20. Drug-Antibody-Platelet Interaction in Quinine- and Quinidine-induced Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Douglas J.; Aster, Richard H.

    1982-01-01

    Binding of quinine- and quinidine-dependent antibodies to platelets was studied using an electroimmunoassay to measure platelet-bound IgG. Antibodies from four patients with drug-induced thrombocytopenia differed significantly in their interaction with platelets: association constants for binding to platelets at high drug concentrations ranged from 0.29 to 2.6 × 107 M−1, the maximum number of antibody molecules bound ranged from 36,000 to 161,000/platelet, the amount of drug necessary to achieve half-maximum binding of antibodies to platelets ranged from 2 to 60 μM, and only one of the antibodies cross-reacted with the stereoisomer of the drug to which the patient was sensitized. Binding of the antibodies to platelets was enhanced at the highest achievable molar ratio of drug:antibody, 10,000:1, rather than being inhibited, as would be expected in a conventional, hapten-dependent reaction. The drug-antibody-platelet reaction was unaffected by Factor VIII/von Willebrand protein, nonspecifically aggregated IgG, or heat-labile complement components. After pretreatment with tritiated quinine, platelets retained several hundred thousand molecules of drug each, but failed to bind detectable amounts of antibody. However, platelets treated simultaneously with quinine-dependent antibody and tritiated quinine retained significantly more drug after repeated washes than platelets treated with drug and normal serum. These findings support the proposition that in quinine- and quinidine-induced thrombocytopenia, drug and antibody combine first in the soluble phase to form a complex, which then binds with high affinity to a receptor on the platelet surface (innocent bystander reaction), and demonstrate that these antibodies are heterogeneous in respect to the amount of drug required to promote their binding to platelets, the number of platelet receptors they recognize, and their binding affinities. PMID:6215430

  1. Platelet adhesion signalling and the regulation of thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2004-07-15

    Platelets perform a central role in haemostasis and thrombosis. They adhere to subendothelial collagens exposed at sites of blood vessel injury via the glycoprotein (GP) Ib-V-IX receptor complex, GPVI and integrin alpha(2)beta(1). These receptors perform distinct functions in the regulation of cell signalling involving non-receptor tyrosine kinases (e.g. Src, Fyn, Lyn, Syk and Btk), adaptor proteins, phospholipase C and lipid kinases such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase. They are also coupled to an increase in cytosolic calcium levels and protein kinase C activation, leading to the secretion of paracrine/autocrine platelet factors and an increase in integrin receptor affinities. Through the binding of plasma fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor to integrin alpha(IIb)beta(3), a platelet thrombus is formed. Although increasing evidence indicates that each of the adhesion receptors GPIb-V-IX and GPVI and integrins alpha(2)beta(1) and alpha(IIb)beta(3) contribute to the signalling that regulates this process, the individual roles of each are only beginning to be dissected. By contrast, adhesion receptor signalling through platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) is implicated in the inhibition of platelet function and thrombus formation in the healthy circulation. Recent studies indicate that understanding of platelet adhesion signalling mechanisms might enable the development of new strategies to treat and prevent thrombosis. PMID:15252124

  2. Platelet dysfunction-eosinophilia syndrome in parasitized Venezuelan children.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Sáez, Arlette; Sifontes, Luz Núñez; Feijoo, Rosa; Certad, Gabriela; Arenas-Pinto, Alejandro; Pocaterra, Leonor; Ferrara, Guiseppe; Giménez, Rita; Torres, Obdulita; Goldstein, Carlos; Bosch, Norma

    2005-08-01

    Platelet dysfunction was detected in six children with purpura and eosinophilia. We conducted clinical evaluations, hematologic and platelet function tests, clotting studies (bleeding time, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, factor XIII, factor VIII, and von Willebrand factor), assays for IgG and IgM antibodies to platelets, and a search for stool parasites. Mild bleeding phenomena (ecchymoses, petechiae, epistaxis, and gingival) were transient. All children showed intestinal parasites and marked eosinophilia (mean count = 2,615.2 cells/muL, 95% confidence interval = 1,259.6-5,429.8). Main abnormalities included prolonged bleeding times (50%) and defective aggregation with collagen (100%) adrenaline (66%), or ADP (66%). Antibodies to platelets were not detected. Anti-parasite therapy reversed the hemorrhagic manifestations and normalized eosinophil counts and platelet alterations. No relationship could be established between excess eosinophils, intensity of bleeding, or type and degree of platelet abnormalities. Thrombocytopathic features mimicked the intrinsic defect of storage pool disease. The possible pathogenic roles of eosinophilia and parasitism are reviewed. This is the first report of this pathologic combination in Latin American children.

  3. Platelet Function Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the clotting process in the body ( in vivo ). A person with normal platelet function test results may still experience excessive bleeding or inappropriate clotting during and after a surgery. Most samples for platelet function testing are only stable for a very short period ...

  4. Gasotransmitters and platelets.

    PubMed

    Truss, Nicola J; Warner, Timothy D

    2011-11-01

    Platelets are essential to prevent blood loss and promote wound healing. Their activation comprises of several complex steps which are regulated by a range of mediators. Over the last few decades there has been intense interest in a group of gaseous mediators known as gasotransmitters; currently comprising nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S). Here we consider the action of gasotransmitters on platelet activity. NO is a well established platelet inhibitor which mediates its effects predominantly through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase leading to a decrease in intraplatelet calcium. More recently CO has been identified as a gasotransmitter with inhibitory actions on platelets; CO acts through the same mechanism as NO but is less potent. The in vivo and platelet functions of the most recently identified gasotransmitter, H(2)S, are still the subject of investigations, but they appear generally inhibitory. Whilst there is evidence for the individual action of these mediators, it is also likely that combinations of these mediators are more relevant regulators of platelets. Furthermore, current evidence suggests that these mediators in combination alter the production of each other, and so modify the circulating levels of gasotransmitters. The use of gasotransmitters as therapeutic agents is also being explored for a range of indications. In conclusion, the importance of NO in the regulation of vascular tone and platelet activity has long been understood. Other gasotransmitters are now establishing themselves as mediators of vascular tone, and recent evidence suggests that these other gasotransmitters may also modulate platelet function.

  5. Bleeding in renal failure: is von Willebrand factor implicated?

    PubMed Central

    Remuzzi, G; Livio, M; Roncaglioni, M C; Mecca, G; Donati, M B; de Gaetano, G

    1977-01-01

    Normal or increased concentrations of factor VIII procoagulant activity (VIIIC), factor VIII-related antigen (VIIIRA), and factor VIII-von Willebrand activity (VIIIVWF) were found in the predialysis plasma of 10 out of 11 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). All patients had a bleeding time longer than 15 minutes and platelet retention to glass beads lower than 40%. The only patient who had reduced concentrations of all three factor VIII complex components was subsequently shown to have von Willebrand's disease. In four patients with CRF, very low platelet retention, and slightly prolonged bleeding time none of the three factor VIII COMPLEX COMPONENTS WERE SELECTIVely modified in predialysis samples. These findings suggest that the bleeding tendency common in CRF is not necessarily linked to defective plasma factor VIII-related activities. PMID:302134

  6. The Role of Decorative Pictures in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenzner, Alwine; Schnotz, Wolfgang; Müller, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Three experiments with students from 7th and 8th grade were performed to investigate the effects of decorative pictures in learning as compared to instructional pictures. Pictures were considered as instructional, when they were primarily informative, and as decorative, when they were primarily aesthetically appealing. The experiments…

  7. Painter and Decorator. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Mike; MacCallum, Marilyn; Maddocks, Christopher

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a painter and decorator, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as painter and painter and decorator--commercial and residential. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To…

  8. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  9. Granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading: differential sorting of α-granules expressing VAMP-7.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian G; Michelson, Alan D; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2012-07-01

    There has been recent controversy as to whether platelet α-granules represent a single granule population or are composed of different subpopulations that serve discrete functions. To address this question, we evaluated the localization of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) in spread platelets to determine whether platelets actively sort a specific subpopulation of α-granules to the periphery during spreading. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that granules expressing VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 localized to the central granulomere of spread platelets along with the granule cargos von Willebrand factor and serotonin. In contrast, α-granules expressing VAMP-7 translocated to the periphery of spread platelets along with the granule cargos TIMP2 and VEFG. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that α-granules expressing VAMP-7 actively moved from the granulomere to the periphery during spreading. Platelets from a patient with gray platelet syndrome lacked α-granules and demonstrated only minimal spreading. Similarly, spreading was impaired in platelets obtained from Unc13d(Jinx) mice, which are deficient in Munc13-4 and have an exocytosis defect. These studies identify a new α-granule subtype expressing VAMP-7 that moves to the periphery during spreading, supporting the premise that α-granules are heterogeneous and demonstrating that granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading.

  10. Granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading: differential sorting of α-granules expressing VAMP-7

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Christian G.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent controversy as to whether platelet α-granules represent a single granule population or are composed of different subpopulations that serve discrete functions. To address this question, we evaluated the localization of vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) in spread platelets to determine whether platelets actively sort a specific subpopulation of α-granules to the periphery during spreading. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that granules expressing VAMP-3 and VAMP-8 localized to the central granulomere of spread platelets along with the granule cargos von Willebrand factor and serotonin. In contrast, α-granules expressing VAMP-7 translocated to the periphery of spread platelets along with the granule cargos TIMP2 and VEFG. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that α-granules expressing VAMP-7 actively moved from the granulomere to the periphery during spreading. Platelets from a patient with gray platelet syndrome lacked α-granules and demonstrated only minimal spreading. Similarly, spreading was impaired in platelets obtained from Unc13dJinx mice, which are deficient in Munc13-4 and have an exocytosis defect. These studies identify a new α-granule subtype expressing VAMP-7 that moves to the periphery during spreading, supporting the premise that α-granules are heterogeneous and demonstrating that granule exocytosis is required for platelet spreading. PMID:22589474

  11. Decoration Increases the Conspicuousness of Raptor Nests

    PubMed Central

    Canal, David; Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita; Negro, Juan José; Sergio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Avian nests are frequently concealed or camouflaged, but a number of species builds noticeable nests or use conspicuous materials for nest decoration. In most cases, nest decoration has a role in mate choice or provides thermoregulatory or antiparasitic benefits. In territorial species however, decorations may serve additional or complementary functions, such as extended phenotypic signaling of nest-site occupancy and social status to potential intruders. The latter may benefit both signaler and receiver by minimizing the risk of aggressive interactions, especially in organisms with dangerous weaponry. Support for this hypothesis was recently found in a population of black kites (Milvus migrans), a territorial raptor that decorates its nest with white artificial materials. However, the crucial assumption that nest decorations increased nest-site visibility to conspecifics was not assessed, a key aspect given that black kite nests may be well concealed within the canopy. Here, we used an unmanned aircraft system to take pictures of black kite nests, with and without an experimentally placed decoration, from different altitudes and distances simulating the perspective of a flying and approaching, prospecting intruder. The pictures were shown to human volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rates varied according the nest decoration status and distance. Decorated nests consistently showed a higher detection frequency and a lower detection-latency, compared to undecorated versions of the same nests. Our results confirm that nest decoration in this species may act as a signaling medium that enhances nest visibility for aerial receivers, even at large distances. This finding complements previous work on this communication system, which showed that nest decoration was a threat informing trespassing conspecifics on the social dominance, territory quality and fighting capabilities of the signaler. PMID:27455066

  12. Decoration Increases the Conspicuousness of Raptor Nests.

    PubMed

    Canal, David; Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita; Negro, Juan José; Sergio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Avian nests are frequently concealed or camouflaged, but a number of species builds noticeable nests or use conspicuous materials for nest decoration. In most cases, nest decoration has a role in mate choice or provides thermoregulatory or antiparasitic benefits. In territorial species however, decorations may serve additional or complementary functions, such as extended phenotypic signaling of nest-site occupancy and social status to potential intruders. The latter may benefit both signaler and receiver by minimizing the risk of aggressive interactions, especially in organisms with dangerous weaponry. Support for this hypothesis was recently found in a population of black kites (Milvus migrans), a territorial raptor that decorates its nest with white artificial materials. However, the crucial assumption that nest decorations increased nest-site visibility to conspecifics was not assessed, a key aspect given that black kite nests may be well concealed within the canopy. Here, we used an unmanned aircraft system to take pictures of black kite nests, with and without an experimentally placed decoration, from different altitudes and distances simulating the perspective of a flying and approaching, prospecting intruder. The pictures were shown to human volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rates varied according the nest decoration status and distance. Decorated nests consistently showed a higher detection frequency and a lower detection-latency, compared to undecorated versions of the same nests. Our results confirm that nest decoration in this species may act as a signaling medium that enhances nest visibility for aerial receivers, even at large distances. This finding complements previous work on this communication system, which showed that nest decoration was a threat informing trespassing conspecifics on the social dominance, territory quality and fighting capabilities of the signaler. PMID:27455066

  13. Decoration Increases the Conspicuousness of Raptor Nests.

    PubMed

    Canal, David; Mulero-Pázmány, Margarita; Negro, Juan José; Sergio, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Avian nests are frequently concealed or camouflaged, but a number of species builds noticeable nests or use conspicuous materials for nest decoration. In most cases, nest decoration has a role in mate choice or provides thermoregulatory or antiparasitic benefits. In territorial species however, decorations may serve additional or complementary functions, such as extended phenotypic signaling of nest-site occupancy and social status to potential intruders. The latter may benefit both signaler and receiver by minimizing the risk of aggressive interactions, especially in organisms with dangerous weaponry. Support for this hypothesis was recently found in a population of black kites (Milvus migrans), a territorial raptor that decorates its nest with white artificial materials. However, the crucial assumption that nest decorations increased nest-site visibility to conspecifics was not assessed, a key aspect given that black kite nests may be well concealed within the canopy. Here, we used an unmanned aircraft system to take pictures of black kite nests, with and without an experimentally placed decoration, from different altitudes and distances simulating the perspective of a flying and approaching, prospecting intruder. The pictures were shown to human volunteers through a standardized routine to determine whether detection rates varied according the nest decoration status and distance. Decorated nests consistently showed a higher detection frequency and a lower detection-latency, compared to undecorated versions of the same nests. Our results confirm that nest decoration in this species may act as a signaling medium that enhances nest visibility for aerial receivers, even at large distances. This finding complements previous work on this communication system, which showed that nest decoration was a threat informing trespassing conspecifics on the social dominance, territory quality and fighting capabilities of the signaler.

  14. Misfolding of vWF to pathologically disordered conformations impacts the severity of von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Madde, Pranathi; Moon-Tasson, Laurie; Auton, Matthew

    2014-09-01

    The primary hemostatic von Willebrand factor (vWF) functions to sequester platelets from rheological blood flow and mediates their adhesion to damaged subendothelium at sites of vascular injury. We have surveyed the effect of 16 disease-causing mutations identified in patients diagnosed with the bleeding diathesis disorder, von Willebrand disease (vWD), on the structure and rheology of vWF A1 domain adhesiveness to the platelet GPIbα receptor. These mutations have a dynamic phenotypical range of bleeding from lack of platelet adhesion to severe thrombocytopenia. Using new rheological tools in combination with classical thermodynamic, biophysical, and spectroscopic metrics, we establish a high propensity of the A1 domain to misfold to pathological molten globule conformations that differentially alter the strength of platelet adhesion under shear flow. Rheodynamic analysis establishes a quantitative rank order between shear-rate-dependent platelet-translocation pause times that linearly correlate with clinically reported measures of patient platelet counts and the severity of thrombocytopenia. These results suggest that specific secondary structure elements remaining in these pathological conformations of the A1 domain regulate GPIbα binding and the strength of vWF-platelet interactions, which affects the vWD functional phenotype and the severity of thrombocytopenia. PMID:25185554

  15. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches.

  16. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  17. Nanotechnology: Platelet mimicry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2015-10-01

    Cloaking drug-loaded nanoparticles with platelet membranes enhances the drugs' abilities to target desired cells and tissues. This technology might improve treatments for cardiovascular and infectious diseases. See Letter p.118

  18. Platelets mediate acetaminophen hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Fong W; Rumbaut, Rolando E

    2015-10-01

    In this issue of Blood, Miyakawa et al show that platelets and protease-activated receptor (PAR)-4 contribute to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver damage. Using various strategies in a mouse model of APAP overdose, the authors demonstrate that platelets participate in the progression of liver damage, and that the direct thrombin inhibitor lepirudin and PAR-4 deficiency attenuate hepatotoxicity. These findings have the potential to help identify future therapeutic targets for APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:26450954

  19. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (left) and Fred W. Kelley examine a ST-100 Stellar Instrument Platform in the astrionics lab. Dr. Von Braun, then deputy associate administrator for planning, NASA, was visiting on the anniversary of the establishment of the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  20. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, stands in front of a Saturn IB Launch Vehicle at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Dr. Von Braun was Marshall's first Center Director (1960-1970). Under his leadership Marshall was responsible for the development of the Saturn rockets, the Skylab project and getting the United States into Space and landing on the moon with the Apollo missions.

  1. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  2. Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Dr. von Braun is looking out from a 10th floor window of building 4200 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). He was the first Center Director and served as the Director from July 1960 through February 1970. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under the Project Paperclip (American acquisition of German rocket experts) to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his German Rocket Team (also called the Peenemuende Team) were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Under Dr. von Braun's leadership, MSFC developed the Saturn V launch vehicle, which placed the first men, two American astronauts, on the Moon. Wernher von Braun's life was dedicated to expanding man's knowledge through the exploration of space.

  3. Polyoxometalate (POM) Macroion Decorated Polymersomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Benxin; Connor, Erin; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2014-03-01

    Polymersomes as one of the common self-assembled forms of amphiphilic block copolymers have been widely developed for applications from drug delivery to mirco/nanoreactors. The tunability of their materials properties, such as mechanical strength and permeability often relies on the chemistry of the selected polymer in a liquid medium. We have recently employed the emergent polyoxometalate (POM) nanoclusters as macroions to control their interaction and assembly with different polymersomes. For both neutral and cationic polymersomes decorated with highly charged anionic POM nanoclusters, the dispersion stability and mechanic strength can be significantly enhanced. AFM and TEM characterization further confirms the encapsulation of POM macroions into polymersomes to form inorganic-organic hybrid complexes, which lead to new potential applications in anticancer and antibacterial medicines and catalysts.

  4. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  5. Platelet binding sites for factor VIII in relation to fibrin and phosphatidylserine.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Gary E; Novakovic, Valerie A; Shi, Jialan; Rasmussen, Jan; Pipe, Steven W

    2015-09-01

    Thrombin-stimulated platelets expose very little phosphatidylserine (PS) but express binding sites for factor VIII (fVIII), casting doubt on the role of exposed PS as the determinant of binding sites. We previously reported that fVIII binding sites are increased three- to sixfold when soluble fibrin (SF) binds the αIIbβ3 integrin. This study focuses on the hypothesis that platelet-bound SF is the major source of fVIII binding sites. Less than 10% of fVIII was displaced from thrombin-stimulated platelets by lactadherin, a PS-binding protein, and an fVIII mutant defective in PS-dependent binding retained platelet affinity. Therefore, PS is not the determinant of most binding sites. FVIII bound immobilized SF and paralleled platelet binding in affinity, dependence on separation from von Willebrand factor, and mediation by the C2 domain. SF also enhanced activity of fVIII in the factor Xase complex by two- to fourfold. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) ESH8, against the fVIII C2 domain, inhibited binding of fVIII to SF and platelets but not to PS-containing vesicles. Similarly, mAb ESH4 against the C2 domain, inhibited >90% of platelet-dependent fVIII activity vs 35% of vesicle-supported activity. These results imply that platelet-bound SF is a component of functional fVIII binding sites. PMID:26162408

  6. Radiation processing of plastics for decorative purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knizhnik, E. I.; Onisko, A. D.; Gaydamaka, A. V.

    Methods are reviewed for the radiation processing of polymeric films, sheets, plates and panels to form patterns, drawings, images and decorative finishing which have been recently developed in various countries. Methods of beam and radiation processing of transparent plastics are described for making a decorative article with a pattern inside the volume; advantages and shortcomings of the methods are shown. The method of radiation processing of transparent dielectric plastics by electron beam of a Microton is considered in detail. It provides an economical method of fabrication of large-size highly artistic decorative articles with an original pattern inside the volume. Radiation processing operations are presented which are aimed at creation and visualization of regions of extended thermalized electron space charges stored by irradiation of dielectric. Examples are presented of large-size highly artistic decorative articles of polymethylmethacrylate which were used in interior of buildings and demonstrated at home and international exhibitions.

  7. Calpain-controlled detachment of major glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton regulates adhesive properties of activated phosphatidylserine-positive platelets.

    PubMed

    Artemenko, Elena O; Yakimenko, Alena O; Pichugin, Alexey V; Ataullakhanov, Fazly I; Panteleev, Mikhail A

    2016-02-15

    In resting platelets, adhesive membrane glycoproteins are attached to the cytoskeleton. On strong activation, phosphatidylserine(PS)-positive and -negative platelet subpopulations are formed. Platelet activation is accompanied by cytoskeletal rearrangement, although the glycoprotein attachment status in these two subpopulations is not clear. We developed a new, flow cytometry-based, single-cell approach to investigate attachment of membrane glycoproteins to the cytoskeleton in cell subpopulations. In PS-negative platelets, adhesive glycoproteins integrin αIIbβ3, glycoprotein Ib and, as shown for the first time, P-selectin were associated with the cytoskeleton. In contrast, this attachment was disrupted in PS-positive platelets; it was retained to some extent only in the small convex regions or 'caps'. It correlated with the degradation of talin and filamin observed only in PS-positive platelets. Calpain inhibitors essentially prevented the disruption of membrane glycoprotein attachment in PS-positive platelets, as well as talin and filamin degradation. With the suggestion that detachment of glycoproteins from the cytoskeleton may affect platelet adhesive properties, we investigated the ability of PS-positive platelets to resist shear-induced breakaway from the immobilized fibrinogen. Shear rates of 500/s caused PS-positive platelet breakaway, but their adhesion stability increased more than 10-fold after pretreatment of the platelets with calpain inhibitor. In contrast, the ability of PS-positive platelets to adhere to immobilized von Willebrand's factor at 100/s was low, but this was not affected by the preincubation of platelets with a calpain inhibitor. Our data suggest that calpain-controlled detachment of membrane glycoproteins is a new mechanism that is responsible for the loss of ability of the procoagulant platelets to resist detachment from thrombi by high shear stress.

  8. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  9. Platelets and platelet-like particles mediate intercellular RNA transfer

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonina; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Vitseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The role of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis is clearly established; however, the mechanisms by which platelets mediate inflammatory and immune pathways are less well understood. Platelets interact and modulate the function of blood and vascular cells by releasing bioactive molecules. Although the platelet is anucleate, it contains transcripts that may mirror disease. Platelet mRNA is only associated with low-level protein translation; however, platelets have a unique membrane structure allowing for the passage of small molecules, leading to the possibility that its cytoplasmic RNA may be passed to nucleated cells. To examine this question, platelet-like particles with labeled RNA were cocultured with vascular cells. Coculture of platelet-like particles with activated THP-1, monocytic, and endothelial cells led to visual and functional RNA transfer. Posttransfer microarray gene expression analysis of THP-1 cells showed an increase in HBG1/HBG2 and HBA1/HBA2 expression that was directly related to the transfer. Infusion of wild-type platelets into a TLR2-deficient mouse model established in vivo confirmation of select platelet RNA transfer to leukocytes. By specifically transferring green fluorescent protein, we also observed external RNA was functional in the recipient cells. The observation that platelets possess the capacity to transfer cytosolic RNA suggests a new function for platelets in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. PMID:22596260

  10. Platelet size does not correlate with platelet age

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.B.; Love, D.G.; Quinn, P.G.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-08-01

    The relationship between platelet size and in vivo aging was investigated in the baboon using size-dependent platelet subpopulations separated by counterflow centrifugation. The separation characteristics, size, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and dense-body content of the baboon platelet subpopulations were similar to those previously observed in studies of human platelets. Three independent labeling techniques were used: (1) in vivo labeling with /sup 75/Se-methionine, (2) in vitro labeling with /sup 51/Cr, and (3) in vivo labeling with 14C-serotonin. Maximal incorporation of all three labels showed a close correlation between the mean platelet volume (MPV) of each fraction and the platelet radioactivity. The onset of incorporation and rate of accumulation of /sup 75/Se-methionine were comparable in all fractions when corrected for differences in volume, suggesting that platelet size heterogeneity was present from the time of release of the platelets from the bone marrow. Survival studies using /sup 51/Cr and /sup 14/C-serotonin showed no translocation of the label from one fraction to another in the circulation over time. In vivo survival values for the three radionuclides showed a slight but significant correlation between the lifespan and the MPV of the fractions. The data suggest that large platelets were not younger platelets, but rather platelets with a longer life-span. Platelet size heterogeneity is the result of production factors in the bone marrow and not maturation in the circulation.

  11. Function of von Willebrand factor after crossed bone marrow transplantation between normal and von Willebrand disease pigs: effect on arterial thrombosis in chimeras.

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, T C; Samama, C M; Bellinger, D A; Roussi, J; Reddick, R L; Bonneau, M; Read, M S; Bailliart, O; Koch, G G; Vaiman, M

    1995-01-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is essential for the induction of occlusive thrombosis in stenosed and injured pig arteries and for normal hemostasis. To separate the relative contribution of plasma and platelet vWF to arterial thrombosis, we produced chimeric normal and von Willebrand disease pigs by crossed bone marrow transplantation; von Willebrand disease (vWD) pigs were engrafted with normal pig bone marrow and normal pigs were engrafted with vWD bone marrow. Thrombosis developed in the chimeric normal pigs that showed normal levels of plasma vWF and an absence of platelet vWF; but no thrombosis occurred in the chimeric vWD pigs that demonstrated normal platelet vWF and an absence of plasma vWF. The ear bleeding times of the chimeric pigs were partially corrected by endogenous plasma vWF but not by platelet vWF. Our animal model demonstrated that vWF in the plasma compartment is essential for the development of arterial thrombosis and that it also contributes to the maintenance of bleeding time and hemostasis. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708664

  12. Platelets and the immune continuum.

    PubMed

    Semple, John W; Italiano, Joseph E; Freedman, John

    2011-04-01

    Platelets are anucleate cells that are crucial mediators of haemostasis. Most immunologists probably don't think about platelets every day, and may even consider these cells to be 'nuisances' in certain in vitro studies. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets have inflammatory functions and can influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which platelets contribute to immunity: these small cells are more immunologically savvy than we once thought.

  13. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  14. Echicetin Coated Polystyrene Beads: A Novel Tool to Investigate GPIb-Specific Platelet Activation and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J.; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways. PMID:24705415

  15. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs.

  16. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the astronautics lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics lab.

  17. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun (right), Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, inspects the mockup of the Saturn Workshop during a visit marking the 10th anniversary of the Marshall Center. Shown with Dr. Von Braun, from left to right, are Karl Heimburg, Director of the Astronautics Lab; Herman K. Weidner, Director of Science and Engineering, and George Hardy of the Astronautics Lab.

  18. Selective surface decoration of corannulene.

    PubMed

    Zabula, Alexander V; Dubceac, Cristina; Filatov, Alexander S; Petrukhina, Marina A

    2011-12-01

    The reaction of corannulene (C(20)H(10)) with 1,2-C(2)H(4)Hal(2) (Hal = Cl or Br) in the presence of AlCl(3) affords stable nonplanar carbocations C(20)H(10)CH(2)CH(2)Hal(+) (Hal = Cl (1) and Br (2)) with an -CH(2)CH(2)Hal moiety attached to the interior carbon atom of the bowl. In the analogous reaction with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, the selective (up to 98%) abstraction of chloride is observed with the formation of cation 2. The molecular structures of bowl-shaped carbocations 1 and 2 crystallized as salts with AlCl(4)(-) counterions are revealed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The reaction of 2 with methanol or ethanol provides further decoration of the nonplanar polyarene upon the nucleophilic addition of alkoxy groups to the exterior carbon atom of the corannulene moiety. The (1)H NMR investigation of the corresponding products, C(20)H(10)(CH(2)CH(2)Br)(OCH(2)R) (R = H (3) and CH(3) (4)), shows the formation of intramolecular H···O and H···Br hydrogen bonds.

  19. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Genlik, Sevim Polat; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-10-28

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm(-2). Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs. PMID:27651222

  20. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Polat Genlik, Sevim; Emrah Unalan, Husnu

    2016-10-01

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm-2. Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs.

  1. Silver nanowire decorated heatable textiles.

    PubMed

    Doganay, Doga; Coskun, Sahin; Genlik, Sevim Polat; Unalan, Husnu Emrah

    2016-10-28

    The modification of insulating fabrics with electrically conductive nanomaterials has opened up a novel application field. With the help of Joule heating mechanism, conductive fabrics can be used as mobile heaters. In this work, heatable textiles are fabricated using silver nanowires (Ag NWs). Cotton fabrics are decorated with polyol synthesized Ag NWs via a simple dip-and-dry method. The time-dependent thermal response of the fabrics under different applied voltages is investigated. It is found that the fabrics can be heated to 50 °C under an applied power density of as low as 0.05 W cm(-2). Uniform deposition of Ag NWs resulted in the homogeneous generation of heat. In addition, the stability of the fabrics with time and under different bending and washing conditions is examined. Moreover, a simple control circuit is fabricated and integrated in order to demonstrate the high potential of the fabrics for mobile applications. This work provides a roadmap for researchers who would like to work on heatable textiles with metallic NWs.

  2. Development and evaluation of decorated aceclofenac nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Joo; Meghani, Nilesh; Choi, Jin-Seok; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at achieving enhanced solubility of aceclofenac (ACF) in nanocrystaline forms (ACF-NC) and evaluating the effects of ACF-NC on cell viability. Decorated ACF-NC were prepared by nano-precipitation with stabilizers. Three kinds of stabilizers were investigated: Tween 80, Poloxamer 407, and PEG 6000. The crystal structure and morphology of ACF-NC were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The solubility of ACF-NC and ACF (pure) was evaluated in different media (pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 buffers and distilled water [DW]). A drug release study was performed in PBS for 24h. Cell viability was evaluated for 24h using a human colon cancer cell-line (HCT-116) and a human breast cancer cell-line (MCF-7). Decorated ACF-NC with a mean size of 725nm were successfully prepared. The solubility of the decorated ACF-NC were 4-7 times higher than that of ACF in DW and pH 6.8 buffer. A peak shift from 153.1°C to 150.5-151.0°C was observed in the DSC thermogram of decorated ACF-NC versus ACF. In terms of drug release, there was an initial burst in decorated ACF-NC within 1h followed by slow release for up to 4h. Decorated ACF-NC exhibited viability approximately 63.9% of HCT-116 cells and also showed viability in 58.3% of MCF-7 cells at 15μg/mL of drug concentration. In conclusion, decorated ACF-NC proved to be a promising approach for enhancing drug solubility and cytotoxicity. PMID:27011350

  3. Nucleation of platelets with blood-borne pathogens on Kupffer cells precedes other innate immunity and contributes to bacterial clearance.

    PubMed

    Wong, Connie H Y; Jenne, Craig N; Petri, Björn; Chrobok, Navina L; Kubes, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Through the use of intravital imaging of the liver, we demonstrate a collaborative role for platelets with Kupffer cells (KCs) in eradicating blood-borne bacterial infection. Under basal conditions, platelets, via the platelet-adhesion receptor GPIb, formed transient 'touch-and-go' interactions with von Willebrand factor (vWF) constitutively expressed on KCs. Bacteria such as Bacillus cereus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were rapidly caught by KCs and triggered platelets to switch from 'touch-and-go' adhesion to sustained GPIIb-mediated adhesion on the KC surface to encase the bacterium. Infected GPIbα-deficient mice had more endothelial and KC damage than did their wild-type counterparts, which led to more fluid leakage, substantial polycythemia and rapid mortality. Our study identifies a previously unknown surveillance mechanism by which platelets survey macrophages that rapidly converts to a critical host response to blood-borne bacteria.

  4. von Willebrand factor, Jedi knight of the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Springer, Timothy A

    2014-08-28

    When blood vessels are cut, the forces in the bloodstream increase and change character. The dark side of these forces causes hemorrhage and death. However, von Willebrand factor (VWF), with help from our circulatory system and platelets, harnesses the same forces to form a hemostatic plug. Force and VWF function are so closely intertwined that, like members of the Jedi Order in the movie Star Wars who learn to use "the Force" to do good, VWF may be considered the Jedi knight of the bloodstream. The long length of VWF enables responsiveness to flow. The shape of VWF is predicted to alter from irregularly coiled to extended thread-like in the transition from shear to elongational flow at sites of hemostasis and thrombosis. Elongational force propagated through the length of VWF in its thread-like shape exposes its monomers for multimeric binding to platelets and subendothelium and likely also increases affinity of the A1 domain for platelets. Specialized domains concatenate and compact VWF during biosynthesis. A2 domain unfolding by hydrodynamic force enables postsecretion regulation of VWF length. Mutations in VWF in von Willebrand disease contribute to and are illuminated by VWF biology. I attempt to integrate classic studies on the physiology of hemostatic plug formation into modern molecular understanding, and point out what remains to be learned.

  5. Factors Associated with Early Platelet Activation in Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    García, Anel Gómez; Núñez, Guillermina García; Sandoval, Martha Eva Viveros; Castellanos, Sergio Gutierrez; Aguilar, Cleto Alvarez

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the factors associated with platelet activation in obese children. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Department of Pediatrics of Regional Hospital N∘ 1 of Mexican Institute of Social Security in Morelia, Michoacán, Mexico. Participants 79 obese and 64 non-obese children between the ages of 5 and 10 years. Main Outcomes Measures Obese children (body mass index [BMI] >85 in growth curves for Centers for Disease Control/National Center for Health Statistics), and the control group of 64 non-obese children (percentile <85), % body fat, platelet activation was assessed by sP-selectin. Other measures were leptin, uric acid (UA), von Willebrand Factor (vWF), plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), lipid profile, and glucose. Results Obese children displayed higher plasma sP-selectin, leptin, PAI-1, and vWF than non-obese children. In the univariate logistic regression analysis, leptin, vWF, UA, and high density lipoprotein (HDL), but not with PAI-1, were factors associated with platelet activation. By stepwise linear regression analysis adjusted by sex and age, the best predictor variables for platelet activation were leptin (β:0.381; t:4.665; P=0.0001), vWF (β:0.211; t:2.926; P=0.004), UA (β:0.166; t:2.146; P=0.034), and HDL (β:−0.215; t:−2.819; P=0.006). Conclusions Obese children have a higher risk of developing early platelet activation. Factors associated with platelet activation were Leptin, vWF, UA, and HDL. Further studies involving larger numbers of patients over a longer duration are needed to understand the possible molecular mechanism underlying the association between leptin, vWF, and UA and endothelial activation and/or endothelial damage/dysfunction in obese children and its influence in cardiovascular disease in adults. PMID:24415745

  6. Insomnia, platelet serotonin and platelet monoamine oxidase in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Nenadic Sviglin, Korona; Nedic, Gordana; Nikolac, Matea; Mustapic, Maja; Muck-Seler, Dorotea; Borovecki, Fran; Pivac, Nela

    2011-08-18

    Insomnia is a common sleep disorder frequently occurring in chronic alcoholic patients. Neurobiological basis of insomnia, as well as of alcoholism, is associated with disrupted functions of the main neurotransmitter systems, including the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system. Blood platelets are considered a limited peripheral model for the central 5-HT neurons, since both platelets and central 5-HT synaptosomes have similar dynamics of 5-HT. Platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) are assumed to represent biomarkers for particular symptoms and behaviors in psychiatric disorders. The hypothesis of this study was that platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity will be altered in chronic alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to comparable values in patients without insomnia. The study included 498 subjects: 395 male and 103 female medication-free patients with alcohol dependence and 502 healthy control subjects: 325 men and 177 women. The effects of early, middle and late insomnia (evaluated using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale), as well as sex, age and smoking on platelet 5-HT concentration and platelet MAO-B activity were evaluated using one-way ANOVA and multiple regression analysis by the stepwise method. Platelet 5-HT concentration, but not platelet MAO-B activity, was significantly reduced in alcoholic patients with insomnia compared to patients without insomnia. Multiple regression analysis revealed that platelet 5-HT concentration was affected by middle insomnia, smoking and sex, while platelet MAO activity was affected only by sex and age. The present and previous data suggest that platelet 5-HT concentration might be used, after controlling for sex and smoking, as a biomarker for insomnia in alcoholism, PTSD and in rotating shift workers.

  7. Simulation of the Effect of Red Blood Cell Collisions on Platelet Adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgibbon, Sean; Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2012-11-01

    The adsorption of platelets to the endothelial wall is an important first step in the clotting process, which is critical to stopping blood loss after trauma. Initial platelet arrest is controlled by very short range interaction between two proteins, von Willibrand Factor and GPIb, so the rate of platelet adsorption is expected to be strongly dependent on the rate at which the platelets sample the wall. With Peclet numbers in the range (103 - 105) , simple diffusive arguments are not sufficient to explain the high rates of platelet adsorption. Using Stokes flow simulations, we show that the platelets' wall sampling rate is significantly increased by interactions with red blood cells. Our simulation models platelets as rigid bodies suspended in a Stokesian linear shear flow. We solve for the flow using standard boundary integral techniques with the appropriate single wall bounded Green's function. Receptor-ligand interactions are represented as Hookean springs with characteristic lifetimes, sizes, and stiffness coefficients. Drag forces are calculated with the reciprocal theorem, and RBC collisions are modelled as AR processes extracted from the large scale suspension simulations of Zhao et al.

  8. Thrombin stimulates tumor-platelet adhesion in vitro and metastasis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Nierodzik, M L; Plotkin, A; Kajumo, F; Karpatkin, S

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a role for platelets and the platelet-adhesive proteins, fibronectin and von Willebrand factor (vWF) in platelet-tumor cell interaction in vitro and metastasis in vivo. The present report documents the effect of thrombin treatment of platelets on this interaction in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, thrombin at 100-1,000 mU/ml maximally stimulated the adhesion of six different tumor cell lines from three different species two- to fivefold. As little as 1-10 mU/ml was effective. The effect of thrombin was specific (inhibitable by hirudin, dansyl-arginine N-(3-ethyl-1,5 pentanediyl) amide and unreactive with the inactive thrombin analogue N-P-tosyl-L-phenylchloromethylketone-thrombin and D-phenylalanyl-L-propyl-L-arginine chloromethylketone-thrombin (PPACK-thrombin), and required high-affinity thrombin receptors (competition with PPACK-thrombin but not with N-P-tosyl-L-lysine-chloromethyl-ketone-thrombin). Functionally active thrombin was required on the platelet surface. Binding of tumor cells to thrombin-activated platelets was inhibitable by agents known to interfere with the platelet GPIIb-GPIIIa integrin: monoclonal antibody 10E5, tetrapeptide RGDS and gamma chain fibrinogen decapeptide LGGAKQAGDV, as well as polyclonal antibodies against the platelet adhesive ligands, fibronectin and vWF. In vivo, thrombin at 250-500 mU per animal increased murine pulmonary metastases fourfold with CT26 colon carcinoma cells and 68-413-fold with B16 amelanotic melanoma cells. Thus, thrombin amplifies tumor-platelet adhesion in vitro two- to fivefold via occupancy of high-affinity platelet thrombin receptors, and modulation of GPIIb-GPIIIa adhesion via an RGD-dependent mechanism. In vivo, thrombin enhances tumor metastases 4-413-fold with two different tumor cell lines. PMID:1845869

  9. PECAM-1 negatively regulates GPIb/V/IX signaling in murine platelets.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Vipul; Stapleton, Michelle A; Hillery, Cheryl A; Montgomery, Robert R; Nichols, Timothy C; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Newman, Debra K; Newman, Peter J

    2003-11-15

    Platelet adhesion at sites of vascular injury is mediated, in part, by interaction of the platelet plasma membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib/V/IX complex with von Willebrand Factor (VWF) presented on collagen-exposed surfaces. Recent studies indicate that GPIb/V/IX may be functionally coupled with the Fc receptor gamma (FcR gamma)-chain, which, by virtue of its cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif, sends activation signals into the cell. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is an inhibitory receptor that has previously been shown to negatively regulate platelet responses to collagen, which transduces activation signals via the GPVI/FcR gamma-chain complex. To determine whether PECAM-1 might similarly regulate signals emanating from GPIb/FcR gamma, we compared activation and aggregation responses to VWF of PECAM-1-positive and PECAM-1-deficient murine platelets. PECAM-1 and the FcR gamma-chain became rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated in platelets following botrocetin-induced VWF binding, but FcR gamma-chain tyrosine phosphorylation was delayed in PECAM-1-positive, versus PECAM-1-deficient, platelets. PECAM-1-deficient platelets were hyperaggregable to VWF, exhibited enhanced spreading and, under conditions of arterial flow, formed markedly larger thrombi on immobilized VWF than did wild-type platelets. Taken together, these data support the notion that engagement of the GPIb complex, in addition to sending activation signals, also initiates a negative feedback loop involving PECAM-1 that controls the rate and extent of platelet activation. PMID:12893757

  10. 5. EAST ELEVATION (OFFICE BLOCK), DETAIL SHOWING DECORATIVE PILASTERS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. EAST ELEVATION (OFFICE BLOCK), DETAIL SHOWING DECORATIVE PILASTERS AND STYLIZED EGG-AND-DART DECORATION AROUND WINDOWS OF UPPER FLOORS - Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad & Ferry Terminal, Hudson Place, Hoboken, Hudson County, NJ

  11. Dietary manipulation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bachmair, E M; Ostertag, L M; Zhang, X; de Roos, B

    2014-11-01

    Activated platelets contribute to plaque formation within blood vessels in the early and late stages of atherogenesis, and therefore they have been proposed as risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet drugs, such as aspirin, are now the most prescribed pharmacological treatment in Europe. Certain dietary bioactives also beneficially affect platelet function, and with less side effects, albeit that effects are generally more subtle. Therefore, consumption of dietary bioactives could play a role in the prevention of atherothrombotic vascular disease. Here we review the efficacy of dietary treatment strategies, especially those involving certain dietary fatty acids and polyphenols, to modulate platelet function in healthy subjects or in patients with cardiovascular disease. Variation in study populations, small study sizes and lack of comparability between methods to assess platelet function currently limit robust evidence on the efficacy of dietary bioactives in healthy subjects or specific patient groups. Also, limited knowledge of the metabolism of dietary bioactives, and therefore of the bioavailability of bioactive ingredients, restricts our ability to identify the most effective dietary regimes to improve platelet function. Implementation of uniform point-of-care tests to assess platelet function, and enhanced knowledge of the efficacy by which specific dietary compounds and their metabolites affect platelet function, may enable the identification of functional anti-platelet ingredients that are eligible for a health claim, or combined treatment strategies, including both pharmacological anti-platelet treatment as well as dietary intervention, to tackle atherothrombotic vascular disease. PMID:24858060

  12. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  13. Platelet donation drives: a novel initiative to recruit platelet donors.

    PubMed

    Tendulkar, Anita; Shah, Sneha; Patil, Dipali; Tambe, Manisha

    2014-06-01

    The most important strategy to ensure a safe and an adequate supply of blood and blood products is motivation, recruitment, selection and retention of voluntary non remunerated blood donors. With a view of the increased platelet necessity in our oncology setup, the first platelet donation drive in the city and to the best of our knowledge, in India was conducted by our hospital in November 2009. The aim was to identify target groups and expand our donor database. It was also essential that the donor's contribution is acknowledged and appropriately felicitated. A campaign called "Save a Life" was initiated and publicized locally. A core team consisting of Transfusion Medicine specialists, clinicians and an NGO (nongovernment organization) was formed. The best suitable date and venue were finalized for the platelet camp. The audience was addressed and willing donors were registered as volunteer platelet donors with our institute. In a span of 40 months, 15 platelet camps were organized in colleges, social organizations, and corporate offices. A total of 1035 donors were registered out of which, 382 (37%) donated platelets in our hospital. 125/382 (33.2%) donated Single Donor Platelets (SDP) more than once. The largest number of platelet donations by a single camp donor was 24 times. Due to multiple donations from donors, the SDP number was enhanced considerably and lead to addition of 699 SDP units to our inventory. The annual indoor and camp voluntary platelet donor numbers increased from 142 in 2006 to 631 in 2012 due to platelet drives. All platelet donations were altruistic as no incentives were offered to the donors. Ready availability of platelets and planning SDP inventory as per patient blood group requirements had a positive impact on clinical services.

  14. Platelet Immobilization on Supported Phospholipid Bilayers for Single Platelet Studies.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Eva; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-08-23

    The worldwide cardiovascular disease (CVD) epidemic is of grave concern. A major role in the etiology of CVDs is played by the platelets (thrombocytes). Platelets are anuclear cell fragments circulating in the blood. Their primary function is to catalyze clot formation, limiting traumatic blood loss in the case of injury. The same process leads to thrombosis in the case of CVDs, which are commonly managed with antiplatelet therapy. Platelets also have other, nonhemostatic functions in wound healing, inflammation, and tissue regeneration. They play a role in the early stages of atherosclerosis and the spread of cancer through metastases. Much remains to be learned about the regulation of these diverse platelet functions under physiological and pathological conditions. Breakthroughs in this regard are expected to come from single platelet studies and systems approaches. The immobilization of platelets at surfaces is advantageous for developing such approaches, but platelets are activated when they come in contact with foreign surfaces. In this work, we develop and validate a protocol for immobilizing platelets on supported lipid bilayers without activation due to immobilization. Our protocol can therefore be used for studying platelets with a wide variety of surface-sensitive techniques. PMID:27438059

  15. Immunogold labelling of human von Willebrand factor adsorbed to collagen.

    PubMed

    Furlan, M; Robles, R; Lämmle, B; Zimmermann, J; Hunziker, E

    1991-06-01

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) mediates adhesion of platelets to the exposed subendothelium at sites of vascular injury. This function is expressed through binding of vWF to both collagen and receptors on the platelet membrane. We have developed a new method using immunogold staining and electron microscopy, permitting visualization of human vWF adsorbed to collagen fibrils. The electron micrographs revealed strings of gold beads reflecting the polymeric structure of vWF. Our data showed dramatic differences in the binding of vWF to collagens of different sources: high binding density was observed using a collagen preparation isolated from aortic tissue whereas colloidal gold was virtually absent from tendon collagen. Using the immunogold labelling method we demonstrated that high shear rate enhanced vWF binding to aortic collagen.

  16. Programmierung von Werkzeugmaschinen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrberg, Rainer; Barfels, Lutz; Voss, Jürgen

    In den 1950-er Jahren wurde am Bostoner MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) die Grundlage der modernen CNC-Technik gelegt. Für die spanende Herstellung von Rotorprofilen für Hubschrauber auf Basis vorab berechneter Konturverläufe wurden erstmalig Steuerungen auf Basis diskreter elektronischer Bauelemente entwickelt. Mit der Einführung integrierter elektronischer Schaltkreise (ICs) begann diese Technologie schrittweise Einzug in die Werkzeugmaschinenindustrie zu halten. Neben der Entwicklung der Hardware wurde die Programmierung und die Entwicklung von entsprechenden Programmiersprachen ein für die Akzeptanz dieser Technologie entscheidende Größe.

  17. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  18. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2015-12-04

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  19. Osmotic stability of blood platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Hypotonic solutions added to human platelet-containing plasma cause a transient decrease of absorbancy of light at 610 mμ which is followed by a gradual increase of absorbancy. 2. When platelets are stored for 7 hr at 4° C the absorbancy changes with variations of osmolarity and their aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) remain the same. However, the reversal of absorbancy declines during storage of platelet-containing plasma. 3. Platelets are not aggregated by stearate. Platelets appear to be only slightly affected by stearate concentration higher than 0·8 mM, but oleate has no effect. 4. Hypertonic solutions of NaCl and urea cause increase in absorbancy of platelet-containing human plasma. Hypertonic sucrose solutions produce no more change than isotonic solutions. Hypertonic NaCl produces permanent increases in absorbancy. In human platelet-containing plasma the increased absorbancy caused by hypertonic urea is transient and declines. 5. The osmotic platelet changes occur in isolated platelets as well as in platelet-containing plasma. 6. The absorbancy of frozen and thawed platelet-containing plasma is not significantly altered by hypotonic solutions but the absorbancy changes caused by hypertonic solutions are similar to that of unfrozen plasma. 7. The immediate absorbancy changes caused by hypo- and by hypertonic solutions are the same at 5° C and 30° C and are therefore probably of a physical nature. The reversal of absorbancy and aggregation of platelets by added adenosine diphosphate have Q10 > 1 and are therefore probably of a chemical-enzymic nature. 8. Divalent cations and contact activation are not required for the osmotic platelet changes and 10-3 M-Cu2+ and Zn2+ do not interfere. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, electron transfer, sodium, potassium activated adenosine triphosphatases and adenosine triphosphate do not inhibit reversal of absorbancy of platelets exposed to hypotonic solutions. Cyanide, 5 × 10-3 M, fluoride, 1

  20. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  1. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process. PMID:27338300

  2. Homemaking (Clothing and Interior Decorating), Course Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelso, Bessie; Anderson, Floyd L.

    Prepared by an instructor and curriculum development specialist of the Minnesota Work Opportunity Center, this course is designed to aid the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth develop skills in clothing and interior decorating. The approach focuses on the individual and the goals he desires to accomplish. During the first interview, the…

  3. 10 Ways to...Decorate Your Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prescott, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Recruit the best decorating corps you have for this year's classroom makeover--your students! Not only does involving kids save money and effort on your part, teachers agree that it increases kids' sense of involvement and respect. In this article, the author presents 10 teacher-tested ideas for a classroom that shines with color and learning: (1)…

  4. Quantum decoration transformation for spin models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braz, F. F.; Rodrigues, F. C.; de Souza, S. M.; Rojas, Onofre

    2016-09-01

    It is quite relevant the extension of decoration transformation for quantum spin models since most of the real materials could be well described by Heisenberg type models. Here we propose an exact quantum decoration transformation and also showing interesting properties such as the persistence of symmetry and the symmetry breaking during this transformation. Although the proposed transformation, in principle, cannot be used to map exactly a quantum spin lattice model into another quantum spin lattice model, since the operators are non-commutative. However, it is possible the mapping in the "classical" limit, establishing an equivalence between both quantum spin lattice models. To study the validity of this approach for quantum spin lattice model, we use the Zassenhaus formula, and we verify how the correction could influence the decoration transformation. But this correction could be useless to improve the quantum decoration transformation because it involves the second-nearest-neighbor and further nearest neighbor couplings, which leads into a cumbersome task to establish the equivalence between both lattice models. This correction also gives us valuable information about its contribution, for most of the Heisenberg type models, this correction could be irrelevant at least up to the third order term of Zassenhaus formula. This transformation is applied to a finite size Heisenberg chain, comparing with the exact numerical results, our result is consistent for weak xy-anisotropy coupling. We also apply to bond-alternating Ising-Heisenberg chain model, obtaining an accurate result in the limit of the quasi-Ising chain.

  5. Comparison between von Willebrand factor (VWF) and VWF antigen II in normal individuals and patients with von Willebrand disease.

    PubMed

    de Romeuf, C; Mazurier, C

    1998-07-01

    Von Willebrand disease is characterised by a quantitative (type 1) or qualitative (type 2) decrease in von Willebrand factor (vWF) a multimeric glycoprotein involved in primary haemostasis. The propeptide of von Willebrand, also named vWF antigen II (vWF:AgII), is released from platelets and endothelial cells and circulates in plasma as a glycoprotein of 100 kD. In the present study, we attempted to determine whether vWF:AgII level may provide information on the synthesis of vWF, specially in patients with von Willebrand disease (vWD). To elucidate that point, we developed an ELISA and quantify the vWF:AgII in normal individuals and in various vWD patients. The propeptide molar concentration was found to be 5 nM as compared to 31 nM for mature vWF. In normal individuals, the level of vWF:AgII was significantly decreased in females from O and A blood groups. In type 2 vWD patients the level of plasma vWF:AgII appears normal in the patients with normal level of platelet vWF. In type 2 B vWD characterised by increased affinity of mature vWF for platelet glycoprotein Ib, the vWF:AgII in contrast to the vWF antigen (vWF:Ag) was not decreased. In type 2A vWD patients the level of vWF:AgII was decreased in patients with absence of high molecular weight vWF in platelets and plasma but normal in patients with increased sensitivity to proteolysis. Finally, in type 1 vWD, some studied patients have a parallel decrease in vWF:AgII and vWF:Ag whereas in others, the vWF:Ag levels were much more affected than corresponding vWF:AgII levels, as observed in some type 2 vWD patients. Thus, in contrast to that already described, the plasma vWF:AgII level cannot discriminate type 1 from type 2 vWD patients. We conclude that the vWF:AgII measurement provides additional information on the mechanisms responsible for vWD and might also contribute to the classification of vWD patients. PMID:9684782

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A camerman catches Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, his son, Peter, and daughter, Martgrit, as they arrive at the employee picnic held to celebrate man's first landing on the moon 6 days earlier. In the foreground is David R. Newby, Director of Administration and Technical Services at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Shown viewing the Apollo telescope mockup are, from left to right, Charles Donlan, deputy associate administrator for manned space flight; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director; William Horton, astrionics lab; Dr. Thomas Paine, NASA deputy administrator; Warner Kuers, director of the ME lab.

  8. Analytik von Lebensmittelallergenen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demmel, Anja; Hahn, Alexandra

    Ansonsten harmlose Lebensmittel oder deren Bestandteile können bei von Lebensmittelallergien betroffenen Personen Überempfindlichkeitsreaktionen auslösen. Hierbei kann es sich um immunvermittelte Lebensmittelallergien oder um Intoleranzen gegenüber bestimmten Lebensmittelbestandteilen handeln. Ein Beispiel für Letzteres ist die Laktoseintoleranz, welche durch einen Enzymdefekt hervorgerufen wird [1]. Im Gegensatz hierzu handelt es sich bei Lebensmittelallergien um Sofortreaktionen, die durch IgE-Antikörper gegen Antigene aus den Lebensmitteln hervorgerufen werden und zu verschiedenen körperlichen Beschwerden führen können. Bei den Antigenen, welche von den von Allergikern produzierten IgE-Antikörpern erkannt werden, handelt es sich vor allem um Proteine [2]. Symptome IgE-vermittelter Reaktionen können zum Beispiel Hautausschlag, eine Schwellung der Schleimhäute oder das sogenannte orale Allergiesyndrom mit allergischen Reaktionen an der Mundschleimhaut und im Magen-Darm-Trakt sein [3]. Die hierbei auftretenden Beschwerden reichen von einem Brennen im Mund und einer Schwellung der Lippen und der Zunge bis zu Atemnot verursachenden Schwellungen im Kehlkopfbereich. In besonders schlimmen Fällen können allergische Reaktionen zu einem anaphylaktischen Schock und zum Tod durch Kreislaufversagen führen [4]. Während klassische Nahrungsallergene häufig komplexe Reaktionen zur Folge haben, ist bei Pollen-assoziierten Nahrungsmittelallergien das orale Allergiesyndrom vorherrschend.

  9. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center director Wernher Von Braun and his family were honored with a series of events prior to his relocation to Washington, D.C. where he was assigned duties at NASA headquarters as deputy associate administrator for planning. Here he is shown with General Richard Drury and Hazel Toftoy, widow of General H.N. Toftoy.

  10. Energetische Verwertung von Biomasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahoransky, Richard; Allelein, Hans-Josef; Bollin, Elmar; Oehler, Helmut; Schelling, Udo

    Etwa 0,1% der Solarenergie wandeln sich durch Photosynthese aus dem Kohlendioxid der Luft in Biomasse um. Die Biomassen sind als Festbrennstoff nutzbar oder zu gasförmigen Brennstoffen weiterverarbeitbar. Zwei Arten von Biomassen sind zu unterscheiden: Anfallende Biomasse

  11. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, explains the purpose of a thermal curtain in the mockup of a Saturn I workshop to U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon of Alabama. The Congressman visited the Marshall Center on March 2, 1968 to tour the workshop and to visit Marshall Center facilities.

  12. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    U.S. Representative Armistead Seldon (D.-Al) inspects the food preparation area of the Saturn I workshop mockup during a visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center. Explaining the operation of the food preparation area to the congressman is Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director.

  13. Effect of selective inhibition of the p38 MAP kinase pathway on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kuliopulos, Athan; Mohanlal, Ramon; Covic, Lidija

    2004-12-01

    Systemic inflammation has been shown to be a contributing factor to the instability of atherosclerotic plaques in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). VX-702, a novel p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor, is currently under investigation in ACS patients with unstable angina to evaluate its safety and efficacy during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The role of p38 MAPK in platelet aggregation of normal individuals was examined using the selective second generation p38 MAPK inhibitor VX-702. Treatment of platelets with thrombin (activates PAR1 and PAR4 thrombin receptors), SFLLRN (PAR1), AYPGKF (PAR4), collagen (alpha2beta1 and GPVI/FCgammaIIR receptors) and U46619 (TXA(2)) resulted in strong activation of p38 MAPK. Activation of the GPIb von Willebrand factor receptor with ristocetin did not stimulate p38 MAPK. Pre-treatment of platelets with 1 microM VX-702 completely inhibited activation of p38 MAPK by thrombin, SFLLRN, AYPGKF, U46619, and collagen. There was no effect of VX-702 on platelet aggregation induced by any of the agonists in the presence or absence of aspirin, heparin or apyrase. It has been postulated that a potential role of p38 MAPK is to activate phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) which catalyses formation of arachidonic acid leading to production of thromboxane. Interestingly, we show contrasting effects of p38 MAPK inhibition as compared to aspirin inhibition on platelet aggregation in response to collagen. Blockade of TXA(2) production by aspirin results in significant inhibition of collagen activation. However,VX-702 has no effect on collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, suggesting that blocking p38 MAPK does not effect thromboxane production in human platelets. Therefore, unlike aspirin blockade of thromboxane production in platelets, p38 MAPK inhibitors such as VX-702 do not significantly affect platelet function and would not be expected to contribute to an elevated risk of bleeding side-effects in treated

  14. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  15. Alpha-adrenoceptor blockade by phentolamine inhibits adrenaline-induced platelet activation in vivo without affecting resting measurements.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P T; Wallén, N H; Egberg, N; Hjemdahl, P

    1992-04-01

    1. The effects of phentolamine (500 micrograms/min) on platelet aggregability in vivo at rest and during adrenaline infusion were assessed by ex vivo filtragometry and measurements of plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels in 10 healthy male subjects. Plasma levels of von Willebrand factor antigen and free fatty acids were also measured. 2. Adrenaline induced marked and expected increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure and decreased diastolic blood pressure when venous plasma adrenaline levels were elevated from 0.12 +/- 0.02 to 2.9 +/- 0.3 nmol/l (P less than 0.01). 3. Adrenaline caused platelet activation in vivo. Ex vivo filtragometry readings were shortened by 58 +/- 9% (P less than 0.01), plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels increased by 99 +/- 44% (P less than 0.01) and platelet counts increased by 26 +/- 6% (P less than 0.01). Plasma levels of von Willebrand factor antigen and free fatty acids increased by 53 +/- 5% and 475 +/- 113% (both P less than 0.01), respectively. 4. Phentolamine enhanced the beta-adrenergic vasodilator responses to adrenaline, as both the decrease in diastolic blood pressure and the reflexogenic increase in heart rate were enhanced (both P less than 0.01). Marked elevations in plasma noradrenaline levels were found during infusions of phentolamine and adrenaline (P less than 0.001). 5. Phentolamine did not alter platelet indices at rest, but abolished adrenaline-induced platelet activation, as filtragometry readings, plasma beta-thromboglobulin levels and platelet counts remained at, or below, resting levels. Responses of plasma levels of von Willebrand factor antigen and free fatty acids to adrenaline were not influenced by phentolamine and did not seem to influence platelet responses.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Platelet-targeted gene therapy with human factor VIII establishes haemostasis in dogs with haemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lily M.; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan T.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Bellinger, Dwight A.; Jensen, Eric S.; Haberichter, Sandra L.; Merricks, Elizabeth; Raymer, Robin A.; Fang, Juan; Koukouritaki, Sevasti B.; Jacobi, Paula M.; Hawkins, Troy B.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Shi, Qizhen; Wilcox, David A.

    2013-01-01

    It is essential to improve therapies for controlling excessive bleeding in patients with haemorrhagic disorders. As activated blood platelets mediate the primary response to vascular injury, we hypothesize that storage of coagulation Factor VIII within platelets may provide a locally inducible treatment to maintain haemostasis for haemophilia A. Here we show that haematopoietic stem cell gene therapy can prevent the occurrence of severe bleeding episodes in dogs with haemophilia A for at least 2.5 years after transplantation. We employ a clinically relevant strategy based on a lentiviral vector encoding the ITGA2B gene promoter, which drives platelet-specific expression of human FVIII permitting storage and release of FVIII from activated platelets. One animal receives a hybrid molecule of FVIII fused to the von Willebrand Factor propeptide-D2 domain that traffics FVIII more effectively into α-granules. The absence of inhibitory antibodies to platelet-derived FVIII indicates that this approach may have benefit in patients who reject FVIII replacement therapies. Thus, platelet FVIII may provide effective long-term control of bleeding in patients with haemophilia A. PMID:24253479

  17. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  18. [Adrenergic receptors of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    Blood platelets possess adrenergic receptors and are stimulated by adrenaline in the circulation. This review summarizes the state of knowledge of the pharmacology of adrenergic receptors and the biochemical mechanisms of platelet activation by adrenaline in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:2837727

  19. Nutritional zinc increases platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Marx, G; Krugliak, J; Shaklai, M

    1991-11-01

    After ingestion of 220 mg zinc sulfate, platelet aggregation was evaluated at various time intervals (i.e., T = 0, 1, and 3 hr) and the autologous plasma analyzed by atomic absorption analysis. The zinc levels increased maximally some 0.4 +/- 0.2 microgram/ml within 3 hr after ingestion, which for the entire blood pool corresponds to only 5% of the ingested zinc. Aggregation responses of platelet rich plasma (PRP), instigated with suboptimal levels of thrombin (less than 0.2 U/ml), ADP (less than 2 microM), epinephrine (less than 2 microM), collagen (less than 2 micrograms/ml), or PAF (less than 50 ng/ml), show significant improvement to at least one aggregant. Mean +/- SEM values for delta % aggregation increase are as follows: thrombin, 51 +/- 10%; epinephrine, 21 +/- 6%; ADP, 31 +/- 6%; collagen 23 +/- 6%; and platelet aggregating factor (PAF), 56 +/- 6%. For controls, the platelets from one individual with Glanzmann thrombasthenia as well as four undosed volunteers exhibited no significant changes in platelet responsiveness. Increased platelet responsiveness to agonists after zinc sulfate ingestion was observed in PRP from blood collected in either citrate or heparin. We demonstrate that within a relatively short time period, single bolus of nutritional zinc intake can significantly increase platelet reactivity. These findings show that nutritional zinc availability is relevant to hemostasis and may pertain to the viability of platelet concentrates in blood banks.

  20. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  1. Dr. von Braun at 'Wernher von Braun Day' Celebration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    In 1970 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director Dr. Wernher von Braun (right) was reassigned to NASA Headquarters to serve as Deputy Associate Administrator for Plarning. Prior to his transfer, Dr. von Braun was honored for his career in Huntsville, Alabama, with the celebration of 'Wernher von Braun Day.' Among those participating were Alabama Governor Albert Brewer (left) and Alabama Senator John Sparkman (center). (Courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public library)

  2. Platelet-Rich Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Brian J.; Seroyer, Shane T.; Filardo, Giuseppe; Bajaj, Sarvottam; Fortier, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) may affect soft tissue healing via growth factors released after platelet degranulation. Because of this potential benefit, clinicians have begun to inject PRP for the treatment of tendon, ligament, muscle, and cartilage injuries and early osteoarthritis. Evidence Acquisition: A PubMed search was performed for studies relating to PRP, growth factors, and soft tissue injuries from 1990 to 2010. Relevant references from these studies were also retrieved. Results: Soft tissue injury is a major source of disability that may often be complicated by prolonged and incomplete recovery. Numerous growth factors may potentiate the healing and regeneration of tendons and ligaments. The potential benefits of biologically enhanced healing processes have led to a recent interest in the use of PRP in orthopaedic sports medicine. There has been widespread anecdotal use of PRP for muscle strains, tendinopathy, and ligament injuries and as a surgical adjuvant to rotator cuff repair, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and meniscal or labral repairs. Although the fascination with this emerging technology has led to a dramatic increase in its use, scientific data supporting this use are still in their infancy. Conclusions: The literature is replete with studies on the basic science of growth factors and their relation to the maintenance, proliferation, and regeneration of various tissues and tissue-derived cells. Despite the promising results of several animal studies, well-controlled human studies are lacking. PMID:23015939

  3. Platelet-Rich Plasma and Platelet Gel: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Everts, Peter A.M.; Knape, Johannes T.A.; Weibrich, Gernot; Schönberger, Jacques P.A.M.; Hoffmann, Johannes; Overdevest, Eddy P.; Box, Henk A.M.; van Zundert, André

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Strategies to reduce blood loss and transfusion of allogeneic blood products during surgical procedures are important in modern times. The most important and well-known autologous techniques are preoperative autologous predonation, hemodilution, perioperative red cell salvage, postoperative wound blood autotransfusion, and pharmacologic modulation of the hemostatic process. At present, new developments in the preparation of preoperative autologous blood component therapy by whole blood platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-poor plasma (PPP) sequestration have evolved. This technique has been proven to reduce the number of allogeneic blood transfusions during open heart surgery and orthopedic operations. Moreover, platelet gel and fibrin sealant derived from PRP and PPP mixed with thrombin, respectively, can be exogenously applied to tissues to promote wound healing, bone growth, and tissue sealing. However, to our disappointment, not many well-designed scientific studies are available, and many anecdotic stories exist, whereas questions remain to be answered. We therefore decided to study perioperative blood management in more detail with emphasis on the application and production of autologous platelet gel and the use of fibrin sealant. This review addresses a large variety of aspects relevant to platelets, platelet-rich plasma, and the application of platelet gel. In addition, an overview of recent animal and human studies is presented. PMID:16921694

  4. Phosphorylation of platelet actin-binding protein during platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, R.C.; Gerrard, J.M.

    1982-03-01

    In this study we have followed the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein as a function of platelet activation. Utilizing polyacrylamide-sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to resolve total platelet protein samples, we found 2 to 3-fold labeling increases in actin-binding protein 30 to 60 sec after thrombin stimulation. Somewhat larger increases were observed for 40,000 and 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptides. The actin-binding protein was identified on the gels by coelectrophoresis with purified actin-binding protein, its presence in cytoskeletal cores prepared by detergent extraction of activated 32P-labeled platelets, and by direct immunoprecipitation with antibodies against guinea pig vas deferens filamin (actin-binding protein). In addition, these cytoskeletal cores indicated that the 32P-labeled actin-binding protein was closely associated with the activated platelet's cytoskeleton. Following the 32P-labeling of actin-binding protein over an 8-min time course revealed that in aggregating platelet samples rapid dephosphorylation to almost initial levels occurred between 3 and 5 min. A similar curve was obtained for the 20,000 apparent molecular weight peptide. However, rapid dephosphorylation was not observed if platelet aggregation was prevented by chelating external calcium or by using thrombasthenic platelets lacking the aggregation response. Thus, cell-cell contact would seem to be crucial in initiating the rapid dephosphorylation response.

  5. Characterization of aberrant splicing of von Willebrand factor in von Willebrand disease: an underrecognized mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hawke, Lindsey; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Poon, Man-Chiu; Scully, Mary-Frances; Rivard, Georges-Etienne; James, Paula D

    2016-07-28

    Approximately 10% of von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene mutations are thought to alter messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing through disruption of consensus splice sites. This mechanism is likely underrecognized and affected by mutations outside consensus splice sites. During VWF synthesis, splicing abnormalities lead to qualitative defects or quantitative deficiencies in VWF. This study investigated the pathologic mechanism acting in 3 von Willebrand disease (VWD) families with putative splicing mutations using patient-derived blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) and a heterologous human embryonic kidney (HEK 293(T)) cell model. The exonic mutation c.3538G>A causes 3 in-frame splicing variants (23del, 26del, and 23/26del) which cannot bind platelets, blood coagulation factor VIII, or collagen, causing VWD through dominant-negative intracellular retention of coexpressed wild-type (WT) VWF, and increased trafficking to lysosomes. Individuals heterozygous for the c.5842+1G>C mutation produce exon 33 skipping, exons 33-34 skipping, and WT VWF transcripts. Pathogenic intracellular retention of VWF lacking exons 33-34 causes their VWD. The branch site mutation c.6599-20A>T causes type 1 VWD through mRNA degradation of exon 38 skipping transcripts. Splicing ratios of aberrant transcripts and coexpressed WT were altered in the BOECs with exposure to shear stress. This study provides evidence of mutations outside consensus splice sites disrupting splicing and introduces the concept that VWF splicing is affected by shear stress on endothelial cells. PMID:27317792

  6. Optimierung von Kommunikationsnetzen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberspächer, Jörg; Kiese, Moritz; Wessäly, Roland

    Die weltweiten Telekommunikationsnetze (Telefon-, Mobilfunknetze, Internet) bilden heute das Nervensystem von Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft. Durch den anhaltenden technologischen Fortschritt in der Elektronik, der Computer- und Kommunikationstechnik steigt nicht nur die Zahl der Teilnehmer in den Netzen ständig, sondern es entstehen auch laufend neue Anwendungen, wie Radio und Fernsehen im Internet, elektronischer Handel und interaktive Spiele im Internet. Auf den Kupfer- und Glasfaserkabeln sowie den Funkstrecken werden gigantische Informationsmengen transportiert. Das Verkehrs-wachstum ist nach wie vor exponentiell.

  7. ["Christmas tree decoration" crystals in the lens].

    PubMed

    Pau, H

    1983-01-01

    In lens crystal cataracts resembling Christmas tree decorations there are, most commonly in the nucleus, crystals in tubular cavities whose double refraction corresponds to that of cholesterol. There are considerable differences in the sizes of the crystals and they are not restricted to the borders of the lens fibers. In the cortex the cholesterol crystals minute if they are found here at all are situated in areas disposed to water-cleft formation.

  8. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  9. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  10. A monoclonal antibody directed against a granule membrane glycoprotein (GMP-140/PADGEM, P-selectin, CD62P) inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, H; Ruchaud-Sparagano, M H; Rouen, C; Brochier, J; Kaplan, C; McGregor, J L

    1996-02-01

    P-selectin (also called CD62, GMP-140, PADGEM, CD62P) is a recently described member of a family of vascular adhesion receptors expressed by activated platelets and endothelial cells that are involved in leucocyte cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to characterize a new monoclonal antibody (LYP7) directed against activated human blood platelets that inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Immunoadsorbent affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation studies showed that LYP7 (IgG1) bound a surface-labelled glycoprotein (GP) which changed its apparent molecular mass (M(r)) on reduction from 138 kD (situated below GPIIb) to 148 kD (above GPIIb alpha). LYP7 and S12, a monoclonal antibody directed against P-selectin immunoprecipitated the same band. Using ELISA assay, purified P-selectin was shown to bind LYP7 and S12 monoclonal antibodies. Binding sites of 125I-labelled LYP7, which was greatly increased on thrombin-stimulated (2 U/ml) washed platelets (10825 +/- 2886, mean +/- SD) Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.5 nM) compared to resting platelets (2801 +/- 1278, mean +/- SD) (Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.6 nM), was found to be normal on thrombin-stimulated platelets taken from a patient with grey platelet syndrome or a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. LYP7 (IgG1, F(ab')2 or Fab fragments) inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation of platelets in a dose-dependent fashion without affecting the binding of von Willebrand (vWf) factor. However, agglutination of formaldehyde-fixed platelets induced by ristocetin was not affected by monoclonal antibody LYP7. In addition, the binding of thrombin-activated platelets to neutrophils was inhibited by monoclonal antibody LYP7. These results strongly suggest that P-selectin, by promoting cell-cell contact, may play an active role in platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:8603015

  11. Rate-limiting roles of the tenase complex of factors VIII and IX in platelet procoagulant activity and formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi under flow.

    PubMed

    Swieringa, Frauke; Kuijpers, Marijke J E; Lamers, Moniek M E; van der Meijden, Paola E J; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2015-06-01

    The importance of factor Xa generation in thrombus formation has not been studied extensively so far. Here, we used mice deficient in either factor VIII or factor IX to determine the role of platelet-stimulated tenase activity in the formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi on collagen. With tissue factor present, deficiency in factor VIII or IX markedly suppressed thrombus growth, fibrin formation and platelet procoagulant activity (phosphatidylserine exposure). In either case, residual fibrin formation was eliminated in the absence of tissue factor. Effects of factor deficiencies were antagonized by supplementation of the missing coagulation factor. In wild-type thrombi generated under flow, phosphatidylserine-exposing platelets bound (activated) factor IX and factor X, whereas factor VIII preferentially co-localized at sites of von Willebrand factor binding. Furthermore, proteolytic activity of the generated activated factor X and thrombin was confined to the sites of phosphatidylserine exposure. With blood from a hemophilia A or B patient, the formation of platelet-fibrin thrombi was greatly delayed and reduced, even in the presence of high concentrations of tissue factor. A direct activated factor X inhibitor, rivaroxaban, added to human blood, suppressed both thrombin and fibrin formation. Together, these data point to a potent enforcement loop in thrombus formation due to factor X activation, subsequent thrombin and fibrin generation, causing activated factor X-mediated stimulation of platelet phosphatidylserine exposure. This implies that the factor VIII/factor IX-dependent stimulation of platelet procoagulant activity is a limiting factor for fibrin formation under flow conditions, even at high tissue factor concentrations.

  12. Cyclosporine A enhances platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Grace, A A; Barradas, M A; Mikhailidis, D P; Jeremy, J Y; Moorhead, J F; Sweny, P; Dandona, P

    1987-12-01

    In view of the reported increase in thromboembolic episodes following cyclosporine A (CyA) therapy, the effect of this drug on platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release was investigated. The addition of CyA, at therapeutic concentrations to platelet rich plasma from normal subjects in vitro was found to increase aggregation in response to adrenaline, collagen and ADP. Ingestion of CyA by healthy volunteers was also associated with enhanced platelet aggregation. The CyA-mediated enhancement of aggregation was further enhanced by the addition in vitro of therapeutic concentrations of heparin. Platelets from renal allograft recipients treated with CyA also showed hyperaggregability and increased thromboxane A2 release, which were most marked at "peak" plasma CyA concentration and less so at "trough" concentrations. Platelet hyperaggregability in renal allograft patients on long-term CyA therapy tended to revert towards normal following the replacement of CyA with azathioprine. Hypertensive patients with renal allografts on nifedipine therapy had normal platelet function and thromboxane release in spite of CyA therapy. These observations suggest that CyA-mediated platelet activation may contribute to the pathogenesis of the thromboembolic phenomena associated with the use of this drug. The increased release of thromboxane A2 (a vasoconstrictor) may also play a role in mediating CyA-related nephrotoxicity.

  13. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  14. Cytoskeletal reorganization of human platelets after stimulation revealed by the quick-freeze deep-etch technique

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We studied the cytoskeletal reorganization of saponized human platelets after stimulation by using the quick-freeze deep-etch technique, and examined the localization of myosin in thrombin-treated platelets by immunocytochemistry at the electron microscopic level. In unstimulated saponized platelets we observed cross-bridges between: adjoining microtubules, adjoining actin filaments, microtubules and actin filaments, and actin filaments and plasma membranes. After activation with 1 U/ml thrombin for 3 min, massive arrays of actin filaments with mixed polarity were found in the cytoplasm. Two types of cross-bridges between actin filaments were observed: short cross-bridges (11 +/- 2 nm), just like those observed in the resting platelets, and longer ones (22 +/- 3 nm). Actin filaments were linked with the plasma membrane via fine short filaments and sometimes ended on the membrane. Actin filaments and microtubules frequently ran close to the membrane organelles. We also found that actin filaments were associated by end- on attachments with some organelles. Decoration with subfragment 1 of myosin revealed that all the actin filaments associated end-on with the membrane pointed away in their polarity. Immunocytochemical study revealed that myosin was present in the saponin-extracted cytoskeleton after activation and that myosin was localized on the filamentous network. The results suggest that myosin forms a gel with actin filaments in activated platelets. Close associations between actin filaments and organelles in activated platelets suggests that contraction of this actomyosin gel could bring about the observed centralization of organelles. PMID:3667697

  15. Thrombus formation and platelet-vessel wall interaction in the nephrotic syndrome under flow conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Zwaginga, J J; Koomans, H A; Sixma, J J; Rabelink, T J

    1994-01-01

    Increased in vitro platelet aggregability and hypercoagulability are generally held to be main determinants in the prethrombotic state in nephrosis. In vivo, however, thrombotic events depend on the dynamic interaction of flowing blood with the vessel wall. The present study confirms that aggregability of platelets of nephrotic patients is significantly increased by mere stirring or by exogenous stimuli as adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid. Moreover, the nephrotic patients have high von Willebrand factor and decreased red blood cell deformability, which normally increase platelet-vessel wall interaction. However, perfusion studies under well-defined flow conditions, in which anticoagulated nephrotic blood was exposed to deendothelialized human umbilical artery segments and sprayed collagen, showed normal platelet adhesion and only a modest increase in the deposition of platelet aggregates. This suggests that some factor counteracts platelet-vessel wall interaction under flow conditions in the nephrotic syndrome. When tissue factor associated with endothelial extracellular matrix (ECM) was allowed to generate thrombin, perfusions with nephrotic blood over this ECM resulted in a strong increase in fibrin generation. The capacity of patient blood to form increased amounts of fibrin appeared strongly correlated with the level of hyperfibrinogenemia. Platelet adhesion as well as aggregation in these experiments was even decreased below control values. This suggests that fibrin coverage may block the direct contact between blood platelets and matrix. We therefore also studied the isolated effect of high fibrinogen on platelet-vessel wall interaction by increasing fibrinogen concentrations in normal blood. Modulation of fibrinogen concentrations in normal blood could mimic all the observations in nephrotic blood: platelet aggregation in suspension increased with increasing concentrations of fibrinogen, while platelet adhesion and aggregate formation under flow

  16. Holiday Decorating Contest - A Way to Meet Fellow Employees | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The trolls from “Frozen,” a North Pole tunnel, and a Christmas tree­–shaped periodic table of elements were just a few of the decorations on display during the second annual Holiday Decorating Contest in December. The contest, sponsored by the R&W Club Frederick, awarded prizes to three groups and two individuals whose decorations were judged based on visual impact, creativity, and craftsmanship.

  17. Synthesis of polymer latex particles decorated with organically-modified laponite clay platelets via emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Norma Negrete; Persoz, Stéphanie; Putaux, Jean-Luc; David, Laurent; Bourgeat-Lami, Elodie

    2006-02-01

    We report a new route to colloidal nanocomposites consisting of polymer latex particles covered with Laponite clay nanoplatelets. These composite particles are prepared by seeded emulsion (co)polymerization of styrene and butyl acrylate from Laponite clay suspensions previously functionalized by ion exchange using either a free radical initiator: 2,2-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) hydrochloride (AIBA) or a cationic vinyl monomer: 2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (MADQUAT). The successful intercalation of the cationic reactive molecules was confirmed by elemental analysis, FTIR, 13C solid-state NMR and WAXD. The organically-modified clays were dispersed into water with the help of tetrasodium pyrophosphate and an anionic surfactant. stable latexes, produced under different experimental conditions, were successfully obtained from the clay suspensions. Cryo-TEM images of the resulting latexes showed spherical composite particles with diameters in the 50-250 nm range with clay sheets located on their surface. This paper reports on the effect of the processing conditions on the particle morphology and latex stability, and describes the mechanism of formation of the nanocomposite particles.

  18. Mutational Constraints on Local Unfolding Inhibit the Rheological Adaptation of von Willebrand Factor.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Alexander; Campbell, James C; Machha, Venkata R; Moon-Tasson, Laurie; Benson, Linda M; Sankaran, Banumathi; Kim, Choel; Auton, Matthew

    2016-02-19

    Unusually large von Willebrand factor (VWF), the first responder to vascular injury in primary hemostasis, is designed to capture platelets under the high shear stress of rheological blood flow. In type 2M von Willebrand disease, two rare mutations (G1324A and G1324S) within the platelet GPIbα binding interface of the VWF A1 domain impair the hemostatic function of VWF. We investigate structural and conformational effects of these mutations on the A1 domain's efficacy to bind collagen and adhere platelets under shear flow. These mutations enhance the thermodynamic stability, reduce the rate of unfolding, and enhance the A1 domain's resistance to limited proteolysis. Collagen binding affinity is not significantly affected indicating that the primary stabilizing effect of these mutations is to diminish the platelet binding efficiency under shear flow. The enhanced stability stems from the steric consequences of adding a side chain (G1324A) and additionally a hydrogen bond (G1324S) to His(1322) across the β2-β3 hairpin in the GPIbα binding interface, which restrains the conformational degrees of freedom and the overall flexibility of the native state. These studies reveal a novel rheological strategy in which the incorporation of a single glycine within the GPIbα binding interface of normal VWF enhances the probability of local unfolding that enables the A1 domain to conformationally adapt to shear flow while maintaining its overall native structure. PMID:26677223

  19. 14-3-3ζ regulates the mitochondrial respiratory reserve linked to platelet phosphatidylserine exposure and procoagulant function

    PubMed Central

    Schoenwaelder, Simone M.; Darbousset, Roxane; Cranmer, Susan L.; Ramshaw, Hayley S.; Orive, Stephanie L.; Sturgeon, Sharelle; Yuan, Yuping; Yao, Yu; Krycer, James R.; Woodcock, Joanna; Maclean, Jessica; Pitson, Stuart; Zheng, Zhaohua; Henstridge, Darren C.; van der Wal, Dianne; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.; Berndt, Michael C.; Andrews, Robert K.; James, David E.; Lopez, Angel F.; Jackson, Shaun P.

    2016-01-01

    The 14-3-3 family of adaptor proteins regulate diverse cellular functions including cell proliferation, metabolism, adhesion and apoptosis. Platelets express numerous 14-3-3 isoforms, including 14-3-3ζ, which has previously been implicated in regulating GPIbα function. Here we show an important role for 14-3-3ζ in regulating arterial thrombosis. Interestingly, this thrombosis defect is not related to alterations in von Willebrand factor (VWF)–GPIb adhesive function or platelet activation, but instead associated with reduced platelet phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and procoagulant function. Decreased PS exposure in 14-3-3ζ-deficient platelets is associated with more sustained levels of metabolic ATP and increased mitochondrial respiratory reserve, independent of alterations in cytosolic calcium flux. Reduced platelet PS exposure in 14-3-3ζ-deficient mice does not increase bleeding risk, but results in decreased thrombin generation and protection from pulmonary embolism, leading to prolonged survival. Our studies define an important role for 14-3-3ζ in regulating platelet bioenergetics, leading to decreased platelet PS exposure and procoagulant function. PMID:27670677

  20. Increasing platelet aggregability after venepuncture is platelet, not plasma derived.

    PubMed

    Terres, W; Becker, B F; Kratzer, M A; Gerlach, E

    1986-05-15

    The time course of ADP induced aggregation of human platelets was determined in aliquots of stored platelet rich plasma 3.5, 10, 30 and 100 minutes after venepuncture. The maximal rate of aggregation was found to increase throughout this entire period, even though pH (7.4), CO2 (7 volume per cent) and temperature (35 degrees C) of the samples were kept constant. The mean acceleration (+/- SEM) between 3.5 and 100 minutes was 41.7 +/- 6.9 per cent (n = 67) at an ADP-concentration of 1 mumol/l and 18.3 +/- 6.2 per cent (n = 23) at 2 mumol/l ADP. The effect did not result from changes of any platelet regulatory factors putatively present alone in the plasma. Acceleration of aggregability was only found when the platelets themselves underwent storage, but not when freshly prepared plasma was given to prestored platelets. The change in aggregability was not diminished after inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase by oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid. PMID:3715816

  1. Von Willebrand factor in patients on mechanical circulatory support – a double-edged sword between bleeding and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarski, Jacek; Pacholewicz, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gasior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is an umbrella term describing the various technologies used in both short- and long-term management of patients with either end-stage chronic heart failure (HF) or acute HF. Most often, MCS has emerged as a bridge to transplantation, but more recently it is also used as a destination therapy. Mechanical circulatory support includes left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or bi-ventricular assist device (Bi-VAD). Currently, 2- to 3-year survival in carefully selected patients is much better than with medical therapy. However, MCS therapy is hampered by sometimes life-threatening complications including bleeding and device thrombosis. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) has two major functions in haemostasis. First, it plays a crucial role in platelet-subendothelium adhesion and platelet-platelet interactions (aggregation). Second, it is the carrier of factor VIII (FVIII) in plasma. Von Willebrand factor prolongs FVIII half-time by protecting it from proteolytic degradation. It delivers FVIII to the site of vascular injury thus enhancing haemostatic process. On one hand, high plasma levels of vWF have been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other, defects or deficiencies of vWF underlie the inherited von Willebrand disease or acquired von Willebrand syndrome. Here we review the pathophysiology of thrombosis and bleeding associated with vWF. PMID:26702279

  2. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  3. Platelet adhesiveness after blood donation.

    PubMed

    Pegrum, G D; Harrison, K M; Shaw, S

    1971-03-13

    Platelet adhesiveness to glass was measured in healthy blood donors at the time of and eight days after donating 500 ml of blood. By a whole blood method a highly significant increase was found whereas by a method using platelet-rich plasma with added adenosine diphosphate there was only a slightly significant increase. The discrepancy suggested that changes in the red cell population might influence the results. Packed red cells from 19 blood donors obtained at the time of donation and eight days later were mixed with fresh pooled platelets from the same independent persons on each occasion. The whole blood platelet adhesiveness on this mixture showed an increase in every case after blood donation. It is postulated that the increased adhesiveness is influenced by the presence of young red cells.

  4. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a second-generation platelet concentrate. Part II: platelet-related biologic features.

    PubMed

    Dohan, David M; Choukroun, Joseph; Diss, Antoine; Dohan, Steve L; Dohan, Anthony J J; Mouhyi, Jaafar; Gogly, Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) belongs to a new generation of platelet concentrates, with simplified processing and without biochemical blood handling. In this second article, we investigate the platelet-associated features of this biomaterial. During PRF processing by centrifugation, platelets are activated and their massive degranulation implies a very significant cytokine release. Concentrated platelet-rich plasma platelet cytokines have already been quantified in many technologic configurations. To carry out a comparative study, we therefore undertook to quantify PDGF-BB, TGFbeta-1, and IGF-I within PPP (platelet-poor plasma) supernatant and PRF clot exudate serum. These initial analyses revealed that slow fibrin polymerization during PRF processing leads to the intrinsic incorporation of platelet cytokines and glycanic chains in the fibrin meshes. This result would imply that PRF, unlike the other platelet concentrates, would be able to progressively release cytokines during fibrin matrix remodeling; such a mechanism might explain the clinically observed healing properties of PRF.

  5. Theodore von Karman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1950-01-01

    Dr. Theodore von Karman, co-founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Pasadena, California was an aeronautical theoretician. His contributions in the fields of aerodynamics and aeronautical engineering are well documented and well known to every aerospace engineer. He was the first winner of the prestigious U.S. Medal of Science presented to him by President John F. Kennedy. As well as being co-founder of JPL, he also was principal founder of a major rocket propulsion firm (Aerojet-General Corp.), the top science advisor to the U.S. Air Force during its transition to jet propulsion aircraft and the top science advisor to NATO. He was, during much of this time, the fountainhead of aerodynamic thought as head of the Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology (GALCIT) in Pasadena, California. In the May 1956 issue of the Journal of Aeronautical Sciences, it was said of him that 'No other man has had so great an impact on the development of aeronautical science in this country. Hundreds of young men became his students and scientific collaborators and were inspired to greater effort.' Dr. William H. Pickering, then director of JPL said in 1960 'We wouldn't have an aeronautical science as we know it today, if it weren't for Dr. Thoedore von Karman.' Under his guidance, Caltech's 10 foot wind tunnel was designed, built and operated. Industry firms such as Douglas, Northrop, Hughes, Lockheed, North American, Vultee and Consolidated all tested new aeronautical designs and concepts in GALCIT's tunnel. Even Boeing's own high-speed wind tunnel was heavily influenced by suggestions from von Karman. The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) became so concerned about GALCIT's growing influence over West coast aviation, it erected the Ames Laboratory in Sunnyvale, California in part to deter an ever widening aeronautical gap that had formed between NACA and GALCIT. From 1936 to 1940, Caltech stood alone as the only university

  6. Platelet aggregability and in vivo platelet deposition in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease--evaluation by indium-111-platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Isaka, Y.; Kimura, K.; Uehara, A.; Hashikawa, K.; Mieno, M.; Matsumoto, M.; Handa, N.; Nakabayashi, S.; Imaizumi, M.; Kamada, T. )

    1989-12-15

    In ischemic cerebrovascular disease, it is not clear whether platelet function in vitro actually reflects the situation in vivo. Using indium-111 platelet scintigraphy as a method for detecting platelet activation in vivo, we tried to elucidate this problem. Twenty eight patients with chronic stage of ischemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and 17 control subjects were examined. Platelet scintigrams were positive in 9 of 28 patients in CVD, while all were negative in control. A comparison of the results obtained from qualitative platelet imaging and platelet aggregability was performed to evaluate whether threshold aggregation concentration (TAC) grade differed across the three groups (control, CVD patients without platelet deposition and CVD patients with platelet deposition). CVD patients with platelet deposition showed a higher TAC than those patients who did not show platelet deposition (P less than 0.05) or control subjects without platelet deposition (P less than 0.05). These results suggest that some patients in chronic stages of CVD may have active platelet deposition on carotid atheromatous lesions, and presence of platelet deposition in vivo could contribute to reduce platelet reactivity in peripheral blood.

  7. Dr. Wernher Von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Thomas Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, examines an ordinary man's shoe outfitted for use in the Saturn I workshop. Pictured from the left in the Saturn I workshop mockup are William Brooksbank, propulsion and vehicle engineering laboratory; Dr. Paine; Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Center director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, Executive Officer in the Office Of The Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, Deputy Associate Administrator for Manned Space Flight, Technical. the shoe Dr. Paine is holding has a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about on the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desires.

  8. Platelet function defects in chronic alcoholism.

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Jenkins, W J; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1986-01-01

    Platelet function in alcoholic patients was assessed on admission and during abstinence in hospital. On admission platelets from these patients were significantly less responsive (percentage aggregation and thromboxane A2 release) to conventional in vitro aggregating agents (adrenaline, adenosine diphosphate, and collagen) than platelets from healthy, moderate drinkers. Initially, platelet counts in platelet rich plasma tended to be low and the Simplate II bleeding times frequently prolonged. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release, however, were inhibited even in patients with normal platelet counts on admission. Platelet aggregation and thromboxane A2 release returned to normal or became hyper-responsive during two to three weeks of abstinence. Platelet counts rose during this period, the largest responses occurring in those patients with the lowest counts on admission. Bleeding times reverted to normal during abstinence and correlated significantly with changes in platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 release, and platelet count and with the estimated ethanol consumption during the week before admission. Chronic, heavy alcohol ingestion evidently exerts an inhibitory effect on platelet function even in the absence of alcohol in the blood, and this phenomenon is reversible on abstaining. The impaired platelet function, together with the reduced platelet count, may contribute to the bleeding diathesis associated with chronic alcoholism and to the increased incidence and recurrence of gastrointestinal haemorrhage associated with excessive alcohol intake. PMID:3094624

  9. Analysis of platelet function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Jurk, K

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets act as central players of haemostasis only their cross-talk with other blood cells, plasma factors and the vascular compartment enables the formation of a stable thrombus. Multiple activation processes and complex signalling networks are responsible for appropriate platelet function. Thus, a variety of platelet function tests are available for platelet research and diagnosis of platelet dysfunction. However, universal platelet function tests that are sensitive to all platelet function defects do not exist and therefore diagnostic algorithms for suspected platelet function disorders are still recommended in clinical practice. Based on the current knowledge of human platelet activation this review evaluates point-of-care related screening tests in comparison with specific platelet function assays and focuses on their diagnostic utility in relation to severity of platelet dysfunction. Further, systems biology-based platelet function methods that integrate global and specific analysis of platelet vessel wall interaction (advanced flow chamber devices) and post-translational modifications (platelet proteomics) are presented and their diagnostic potential is addressed.

  10. Extraordinary Absorption of Decorated Undoped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, T.; Gómez-Santos, G.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2014-02-01

    We theoretically study absorption by an undoped graphene layer decorated with arrays of small particles. We discuss periodic and random arrays within a common formalism, which predicts a maximum absorption of 50% for suspended graphene in both cases. The limits of weak and strong scatterers are investigated, and an unusual dependence on particle-graphene separation is found and explained in terms of the effective number of contributing evanescent diffraction orders of the array. Our results can be important to boost absorption by single-layer graphene due to its simple setup with potential applications to light harvesting and photodetection based on energy (Förster) rather than charge transfer.

  11. Holiday Door Decorating Contest Brings Cheer | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Other than the time of year, what do the following have in common: the leg lamp from the movie “A Christmas Story,” a compilation of silly holiday jokes, a gingerbread house, and Santa on a motorcycle? All four were among the individual door winners for the Holiday Door Decorating Contest, held at NCI at Frederick in December. Employees dressed up their office doors, hallways, and even stairwells to participate. Entries for the contest included individual office doors as well as groups. Some employees even “decked the halls” of whole office buildings to participate.

  12. Cutaneous complications related to permanent decorative tattooing.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    Decorative tattooing involves the introduction of exogenous pigments and/or dyes into the dermis to produce a permanent design. Practiced for thousands of years, it has gained tremendous popularity during the past 20 years, especially among the young. Tattoo-associated cutaneous complications have only been reported since the end of the 19th Century. With the increased prevalence of tattooed individuals, dermatologists have witnessed increasing numbers of patients presenting with complaints about their tattoos. Complications primarily include infections, hypersensitivity reaction to tattoo pigments, benign and sometimes malignant tumors arising on tattoos, and the localization of various dermatoses to tattoos. PMID:20441423

  13. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  14. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  15. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  16. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  17. 21 CFR 109.16 - Ornamental and decorative ceramicware.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.16 Ornamental and decorative ceramicware. (a) Lead is a toxic... food may result in the leaching of lead from the glaze or decoration into the food. The provisions of... Food Use. May Poison Food,” “Not for Food Use. Glaze contains lead. Food Use May Result in...

  18. Quantitation of human platelet transformation on siliconized glass: comparison of "normal' and "abnormal' platelets.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, R; Zacharski, L R; Allen, R D

    1981-08-28

    A series of typical morphological stages, representing progression of transformation, may be defined following adhesion of platelets to a siliconized glass surface. Platelets are visualized by new light microscopic techniques that allow quantitative categorization of transformation of large platelet populations by morphological stage, and thus the detection and elucidation of platelet defects which influence transformation. Living platelets form each of five subjects with bleeding disorders, due to platelet defects, exhibited a pattern of morphologic transformation which differed from normal. In addition, the pattern observed with the platelets from a subject with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia was sufficiently different from that observed with the platelets from four subjects with thrombopathy, so as to point to a qualitative difference in the activity of the platelets in the two disorders. These findings indicate that the analysis of platelet transformation in vitro through the use of light microscopy may allow for detection and further classification of platelet abnormalities. PMID:7302892

  19. The role of platelets in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark R; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-31

    There is growing recognition of the critical role of platelets in inflammation and immune responses. Recent studies have indicated that antiplatelet medications may reduce mortality from infections and sepsis, which suggests possible clinical relevance of modifying platelet responses to inflammation. Platelets release numerous inflammatory mediators that have no known role in haemostasis. Many of these mediators modify leukocyte and endothelial responses to a range of different inflammatory stimuli. Additionally, platelets form aggregates with leukocytes and form bridges between leukocytes and endothelium, largely mediated by platelet P-selectin. Through their interactions with monocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes and the endothelium, platelets are therefore important coordinators of inflammation and both innate and adaptive immune responses.

  20. Desmopressin in vitro effects on platelet function, monitored with Multiplate, ROTEM and Sonoclot.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Kevin; Jensen, Hanna; Kander, Thomas; Schött, Ulf

    2016-07-01

    Background and aims The vasopressin analogue desmopressin has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing bleeding time by increasing the circulating levels of coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor, but also by direct effects on platelets. Previous studies have demonstrated contrasting results regarding the effect of desmopressin on platelets in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate the dose-response effects of in vitro desmopressin in whole blood. Our hypothesis was that desmopressin could increase platelet function in anticoagulated whole blood being stored up to 4 hours. Methods Desmopressin was administered with up to four different concentrations to venous whole blood, sampled with standard vacutainer tubes from 10 healthy volunteers after consent. Platelet function was analyzed with three different point-of-care techniques: Multiplate platelet aggregometry with adenosine diphosphate, collagen, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6, ristocetin and arachidonic acid agonists, tissue factor-activated thromboelastometry and Sonoclot glass bead viscoelastic coagulation tests at baseline and 4 hours later using different activator reagents. Results Thromboelastometry and Sonoclot did not show any significant change between baseline and 4 h later. A significant decrease in area under curve (AUC) could be seen with the Multiplate between baseline and after 4 h. Desmopressin did not improve any of these tests at baseline or during a 4 h storage and incubation period. Conclusion In vitro administered desmopressin could not increase normal platelet function or coagulation being measured with thromboelastometry and Sonoclot. Multiplate indicated decreased platelet aggregation over time, without any effect of in vitro added desmopressin. PMID:26923171

  1. Platelets and Infection – An Emerging Role of Platelets in Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Assinger, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis) are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years, more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients. Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favors platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen–antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies. All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count but also shape immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation, and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25566260

  2. Platelets and infection - an emerging role of platelets in viral infection.

    PubMed

    Assinger, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate blood cells that play a crucial role in the maintenance of hemostasis. While platelet activation and elevated platelet counts (thrombocytosis) are associated with increased risk of thrombotic complications, low platelet counts (thrombocytopenia) and several platelet function disorders increase the risk of bleeding. Over the last years, more and more evidence has emerged that platelets and their activation state can also modulate innate and adaptive immune responses and low platelet counts have been identified as a surrogate marker for poor prognosis in septic patients. Viral infections often coincide with platelet activation. Host inflammatory responses result in the release of platelet activating mediators and a pro-oxidative and pro-coagulant environment, which favors platelet activation. However, viruses can also directly interact with platelets and megakaryocytes and modulate their function. Furthermore, platelets can be activated by viral antigen-antibody complexes and in response to some viruses B-lymphocytes also generate anti-platelet antibodies. All these processes contributing to platelet activation result in increased platelet consumption and removal and often lead to thrombocytopenia, which is frequently observed during viral infection. However, virus-induced platelet activation does not only modulate platelet count but also shape immune responses. Platelets and their released products have been reported to directly and indirectly suppress infection and to support virus persistence in response to certain viruses, making platelets a double-edged sword during viral infections. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge on platelet interaction with different types of viruses, the viral impact on platelet activation, and platelet-mediated modulations of innate and adaptive immune responses.

  3. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  4. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  5. Platelet activation and platelet-monocyte aggregate formation contribute to decreased platelet count during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection in pig-tailed macaques.

    PubMed

    Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Lyons, Claire E; Dorsey, Jamie L; Shirk, Erin N; Queen, Suzanne E; Adams, Robert J; Gama, Lucio; Morrell, Craig N; Mankowski, Joseph L

    2013-09-01

    Platelets are key participants in innate immune responses to pathogens. As a decrease in circulating platelet count is one of the initial hematologic indicators of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we sought to determine whether decline in platelet number during acute infection results from decreased production, increased antibody-mediated destruction, or increased platelet activation in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model. During acute SIV infection, circulating platelets were activated with increased surface expression of P-selection, CD40L and major histocompatibility complex class I. Platelet production was maintained and platelet autoantibodies were not detected during acute infection. Concurrent with a decrease in platelet numbers and an increase in circulating monocytes, platelets were found sequestered in platelet-monocyte aggregates, thereby contributing to the decline in platelet counts. Because the majority of circulating CD16(+) monocytes formed complexes with platelets during acute SIV infection, a decreased platelet count may represent platelet participation in the innate immune response to HIV.

  6. Wolfgang von Ohnesorge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Gareth H.; Renardy, Michael

    2011-12-01

    This manuscript got started when one of us (G.H.M.) presented a lecture at the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications at the University of Minnesota. The presentation included a photograph of Rayleigh and made frequent mention of the Ohnesorge number. When the other of us (M.R.) enquired about a picture of Ohnesorge, we found out that none were readily available on the web. Indeed, little about Ohnesorge is available from easily accessible public sources. A good part of the reason is certainly that, unlike other "numbermen" of fluid mechanics, Ohnesorge did not pursue an academic career. The purpose of this article is to fill the gap and shed some light on the life of Wolfgang von Ohnesorge. We shall discuss the highlights of his biography, his scientific contributions, their physical significance, and their impact today.

  7. A genetically-engineered von Willebrand disease type 2B mouse model displays defects in hemostasis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Frédéric; Casari, Caterina; Prévost, Nicolas; Kauskot, Alexandre; Loubière, Cécile; Legendre, Paulette; Repérant, Christelle; Baruch, Dominique; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Bryckaert, Marijke; de Groot, Philip G.; Christophe, Olivier D.; Lenting, Peter J.; Denis, Cécile V.

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD)-type 2B is characterized by gain-of-function mutations in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-domain, leading to increased affinity for its platelet-receptor, glycoprotein Ibα. We engineered the first knock-in (KI) murine model for VWD-type 2B by introducing the p.V1316M mutation in murine VWF. Homozygous KI-mice replicated human VWD-type 2B with macrothrombocytopenia (platelet counts reduced by 55%, platelet volume increased by 44%), circulating platelet-aggregates and a severe bleeding tendency. Also, vessel occlusion was deficient in the FeCl3-induced thrombosis model. Platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen was defective for KI-mice at all doses. KI-mice manifested a loss of high molecular weight multimers and increased multimer degradation. In a model of VWF-string formation, the number of platelets/string and string-lifetime were surprisingly enhanced in KI-mice, suggesting that proteolysis of VWF/p.V1316M is differentially regulated in the circulation versus the endothelial surface. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response induced by the reverse passive Arthus reaction. This points to an active role of VWF/p.V1316M in the exfiltration of leukocytes under inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, our genetically-engineered VWD-type 2B mice represent an original model to study the consequences of spontaneous VWF-platelet interactions and the physiopathology of this human disease. PMID:27212476

  8. A genetically-engineered von Willebrand disease type 2B mouse model displays defects in hemostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Adam, Frédéric; Casari, Caterina; Prévost, Nicolas; Kauskot, Alexandre; Loubière, Cécile; Legendre, Paulette; Repérant, Christelle; Baruch, Dominique; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Bryckaert, Marijke; de Groot, Philip G; Christophe, Olivier D; Lenting, Peter J; Denis, Cécile V

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD)-type 2B is characterized by gain-of-function mutations in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) A1-domain, leading to increased affinity for its platelet-receptor, glycoprotein Ibα. We engineered the first knock-in (KI) murine model for VWD-type 2B by introducing the p.V1316M mutation in murine VWF. Homozygous KI-mice replicated human VWD-type 2B with macrothrombocytopenia (platelet counts reduced by 55%, platelet volume increased by 44%), circulating platelet-aggregates and a severe bleeding tendency. Also, vessel occlusion was deficient in the FeCl3-induced thrombosis model. Platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or collagen was defective for KI-mice at all doses. KI-mice manifested a loss of high molecular weight multimers and increased multimer degradation. In a model of VWF-string formation, the number of platelets/string and string-lifetime were surprisingly enhanced in KI-mice, suggesting that proteolysis of VWF/p.V1316M is differentially regulated in the circulation versus the endothelial surface. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte recruitment during an inflammatory response induced by the reverse passive Arthus reaction. This points to an active role of VWF/p.V1316M in the exfiltration of leukocytes under inflammatory conditions. In conclusion, our genetically-engineered VWD-type 2B mice represent an original model to study the consequences of spontaneous VWF-platelet interactions and the physiopathology of this human disease.

  9. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  10. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  11. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to play a role in the formation of alpha-granules, which are sacs inside platelets that contain ... injury that causes bleeding, the proteins stored in alpha-granules help platelets stick to one another to ...

  12. Platelets in treated adrenoleukodystrophy: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Revell, P; Green, A; Green, S

    1995-01-01

    Platelet counts have been noted to be low in patients treated with high-oil diet therapy for adrenoleukodystrophy. We suggest that some of these observations are spurious but that others reflect a true thrombocytopenia. Visual platelet counts are recommended.

  13. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  14. A 'touch' of the White platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Key, Nigel S; King, Richard A; Vercellotti, Gregory M

    2005-09-01

    Investigations into structural defects in platelets from a large family with the White platelet syndrome (WPS) separated the members into three groups. The first group of 22 members was the subject of our first report (White JG, Key NS, King RA, Vercellotti GM. The white platelet syndrome: A new autosomal dominant platelet disorder. Platelets 2004;15:173-184). A third group of 13 members had no abnormalities of platelet ultrastructure. The second group of 17 members, the focus of the present study, had a 'touch' of the WPS. Platelet counts, mean platelet volumes (MPVs) and platelet responses to aggregating agents were normal in 'touch' patients in contrast to platelets of those with the full WPS in whom these parameters were abnormal. Up to 13% of the full WPS platelets contained large, fully developed Golgi complexes, up to seven in number, extruding innumerable vesicles from the trans-Golgi face and filling the cytoplasm of many platelets. Many Golgi complexes had centrioles associated with them. 'Touch' platelets had one or two Golgi complexes of intermediate size in 3-5% of their platelets. Golgi vesicles were uncommon and centrioles absent. Gray platelets and hypogranular cells were infrequent in patients with a 'touch' of the WPS, whereas up to 44% of the platelets from those with the WPS were gray or hypogranular. Elements of the dense tubular system were prominent in full WPS platelets, together with their formation into areas of cytoplasmic sequestration and autodigestion. These features were absent in 'touch' platelets. As commonly observed in full WPS platelets, mitochondria were larger and more numerous than alpha granules in some 'touch' cells. Both 'touch' and full WPS platelets frequently contained giant and rod-shaped granules. Dense bodies, however, were normal in size and number in 'touch' platelets, and half normal size in full WPS platelets. The separation of ultrastructural abnormalities in the two varieties of the WPS suggests that genetic

  15. Von Hippel-Lindau Disease.

    PubMed

    Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer J; McMahon, Kelly Q; Findeis, Sarah K

    2016-06-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an autosomal dominant syndrome which occurs secondary to germline mutations in the VHL tumor suppressor gene, located on chromosome 3. Clinically von Hippel-Lindau disease is characterized by an increased risk of developing simple visceral cysts, most commonly in the pancreas and kidneys, in addition to an increased risk of developing neoplasms, often with clear cell features, in a multitude of organ systems. The most common neoplasms are cerebellar and retinal hemangioblastomas, adrenal pheochromocytomas, clear cell renal cell carcinomas, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, pancreatic serous cystadenomas, and endolymphatic sac tumors. These lesions most commonly present during adulthood; however, screening and surveillance for the development of these lesions should begin in the pediatric years for patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease. In this review article, the genetics and most common neoplasms of von Hippel-Lindau disease are reviewed, with an eye towards implications for the pediatric patient. PMID:27617152

  16. Pregnancy and von Gierke's disease.

    PubMed

    Farber, M; Knuppel, R A; Binkiewicz, A; Kennison, R D

    1976-02-01

    A detailed description of the course of pregnancy in a patient with von Gierke's disease is presented. Careful dietary control together with proper management of the hematologic complications of the disease led to a successful outcome. PMID:1061911

  17. von Braun and German Publisher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    In this photograph, Guenter Ogger of Capitol Magazine, West Germany, greets Marshall Space Flight Center Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun. Mr. Ogger interviewed the famous rocket scientist for his magazine.

  18. Antiplatelet drugs in patients with enhanced platelet turnover: biomarkers versus platelet function testing.

    PubMed

    Freynhofer, Matthias K; Gruber, Susanne C; Grove, Erik L; Weiss, Thomas W; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2015-08-31

    Platelets are key players in atherothrombosis. Antiplatelet therapy comprising aspirin alone or with P2Y12-inhibitors are effective for prevention of atherothrombotic complications. However, there is interindividual variability in the response to antiplatelet drugs, leaving some patients at increased risk of recurrent atherothrombotic events. Several risk factors associated with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), including elevated platelet turnover, have been identified. Platelet turnover is adequately estimated from the fraction of reticulated platelets. Reticulated platelets are young platelets, characterised by residual messenger RNA. They are larger, haemostatically more active and there is evidence that platelet turnover is a causal and prognostic factor in atherothrombotic disease. Whether platelet turnover per se represents a key factor in pathogenesis, progression and prognosis of atherothrombotic diseases (with focus on acute coronary syndromes) or whether it merely facilitates insufficient platelet inhibition will be discussed in this state-of-the art review. PMID:26272640

  19. Force-Sensitive Autoinhibition of the von Willebrand Factor Is Mediated by Interdomain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aponte-Santamaría, Camilo; Huck, Volker; Posch, Sandra; Bronowska, Agnieszka K.; Grässle, Sandra; Brehm, Maria A.; Obser, Tobias; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Schneider, Stefan W.; Baldauf, Carsten; Gräter, Frauke

    2015-01-01

    Von Willebrand factor (VWF) plays a central role in hemostasis. Triggered by shear-stress, it adheres to platelets at sites of vascular injury. Inactivation of VWF has been associated to the shielding of its adhesion sites and proteolytic cleavage. However, the molecular nature of this shielding and its coupling to cleavage under shear-forces in flowing blood remain unknown. In this study, we describe, to our knowledge, a new force-sensory mechanism for VWF-platelet binding, which addresses these questions, based on a combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and microfluidic experiments. Our MD simulations demonstrate that the VWF A2 domain targets a specific region at the VWF A1 domain, corresponding to the binding site of the platelet glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) receptor, thereby causing its blockage. This implies autoinhibition of the VWF for the binding of platelets mediated by the A1-A2 protein-protein interaction. During force-probe MD simulations, a stretching force dissociated the A1A2 complex, thereby unblocking the GPIbα binding site. Dissociation was found to be coupled to the unfolding of the A2 domain, with dissociation predominantly occurring before exposure of the cleavage site in A2, an observation that is supported by our AFM experiments. This suggests that the A2 domain prevents platelet binding in a force-dependent manner, ensuring that VWF initiates hemostasis before inactivation by proteolytic cleavage. Microfluidic experiments with an A2-deletion VWF mutant resulted in increased platelet binding, corroborating the key autoinhibitory role of the A2 domain within VWF multimers. Overall, autoinhibition of VWF mediated by force-dependent interdomain interactions offers the molecular basis for the shear-sensitive growth of VWF-platelet aggregates, and might be similarly involved in shear-induced VWF self-aggregation and other force-sensing functions in hemostasis. PMID:25954888

  20. Thrombin-dependent Incorporation of von Willebrand Factor into a Fibrin Network*

    PubMed Central

    Miszta, Adam; Pelkmans, Leonie; Lindhout, Theo; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; de Groot, Philip G.; Hemker, Coenraad H.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2014-01-01

    Attachment of platelets from the circulation onto a growing thrombus is a process involving multiple platelet receptors, endothelial matrix components, and coagulation factors. It has been indicated previously that during a transglutaminase reaction activated factor XIII (FXIIIa) covalently cross-links von Willebrand factor (VWF) to polymerizing fibrin. Bound VWF further recruits and activates platelets via interactions with the platelet receptor complex glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). In the present study we found proof for binding of VWF to a fibrin monomer layer during the process of fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion in the presence of thrombin, arvin, or a snake venom from Crotalus atrox. Using a domain deletion mutant we demonstrated the involvement of the C domains of VWF in this binding. Substantial binding of VWF to fibrin monomers persisted in the presence of the FXIIIa inhibitor K9-DON, illustrating that cross-linking via factor XIII is not essential for this phenomenon and suggesting the identification of a second mechanism through which VWF multimers incorporate into a fibrin network. Under high shear conditions, platelets were shown to adhere to fibrin only if VWF had been incorporated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the C domains of VWF and the E domain of fibrin monomers are involved in the incorporation of VWF during the polymerization of fibrin and that this incorporation fosters binding and activation of platelets. Fibrin thus is not an inert end product but partakes in further thrombus growth. Our findings help to elucidate the mechanism of thrombus growth and platelet adhesion under conditions of arterial shear rate. PMID:25381443

  1. Thrombin-dependent Incorporation of von Willebrand Factor into a Fibrin Network.

    PubMed

    Miszta, Adam; Pelkmans, Leonie; Lindhout, Theo; Krishnamoorthy, Ganeshram; de Groot, Philip G; Hemker, Coenraad H; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Kelchtermans, Hilde; de Laat, Bas

    2014-12-26

    Attachment of platelets from the circulation onto a growing thrombus is a process involving multiple platelet receptors, endothelial matrix components, and coagulation factors. It has been indicated previously that during a transglutaminase reaction activated factor XIII (FXIIIa) covalently cross-links von Willebrand factor (VWF) to polymerizing fibrin. Bound VWF further recruits and activates platelets via interactions with the platelet receptor complex glycoprotein Ib (GPIb). In the present study we found proof for binding of VWF to a fibrin monomer layer during the process of fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion in the presence of thrombin, arvin, or a snake venom from Crotalus atrox. Using a domain deletion mutant we demonstrated the involvement of the C domains of VWF in this binding. Substantial binding of VWF to fibrin monomers persisted in the presence of the FXIIIa inhibitor K9-DON, illustrating that cross-linking via factor XIII is not essential for this phenomenon and suggesting the identification of a second mechanism through which VWF multimers incorporate into a fibrin network. Under high shear conditions, platelets were shown to adhere to fibrin only if VWF had been incorporated. In conclusion, our experiments show that the C domains of VWF and the E domain of fibrin monomers are involved in the incorporation of VWF during the polymerization of fibrin and that this incorporation fosters binding and activation of platelets. Fibrin thus is not an inert end product but partakes in further thrombus growth. Our findings help to elucidate the mechanism of thrombus growth and platelet adhesion under conditions of arterial shear rate. PMID:25381443

  2. Von Karman and JATO Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1940-01-01

    Dr. Theodore von Karman (black coat) sketches out a plan on the wing of an airplane as his JATO engineering team looks on. From left to right: Dr. Clark B. Millikan, Dr.Martin Summerfield, Dr. Theodore von Karman, Dr. Frank J. Malina and pilot, Capt. Homer Boushey. Captain Boushey would become the first American to pilot an airplane that used JATO (Jet Assisted Take-Off) solid propellent rockets.

  3. Image analysis of blood platelets adhesion.

    PubMed

    Krízová, P; Rysavá, J; Vanícková, M; Cieslar, P; Dyr, J E

    2003-01-01

    Adhesion of blood platelets is one of the major events in haemostatic and thrombotic processes. We studied adhesion of blood platelets on fibrinogen and fibrin dimer sorbed on solid support material (glass, polystyrene). Adhesion was carried on under static and dynamic conditions and measured as percentage of the surface covered with platelets. Within a range of platelet counts in normal and in thrombocytopenic blood we observed a very significant decrease in platelet adhesion on fibrin dimer with bounded active thrombin with decreasing platelet count. Our results show the imperative use of platelet poor blood preparations as control samples in experiments with thrombocytopenic blood. Experiments carried on adhesive surfaces sorbed on polystyrene showed lower relative inaccuracy than on glass. Markedly different behaviour of platelets adhered on the same adhesive surface, which differed only in support material (glass or polystyrene) suggest that adhesion and mainly spreading of platelets depends on physical quality of the surface. While on polystyrene there were no significant differences between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen, adhesion measured on glass support material markedly differed between fibrin dimer and fibrinogen. We compared two methods of thresholding in image analysis of adhered platelets. Results obtained by image analysis of spreaded platelets showed higher relative inaccuracy than results obtained by image analysis of platelets centres and aggregates.

  4. Dengue platelets meet Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Bray, Paul F

    2013-11-14

    In this issue of Blood, Hottz et al provide compelling evidence that dengue virus (DV) induces (1) platelet synthesis of interleukin-1b (IL-1b); (2) platelet-derived IL-1b–containing microvesicles (MVs) that increase vascular permeability; and (3) DV-triggered inflammasome activation in platelets.

  5. Human platelet antigen genotyping of platelet donors in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Merzoni, J; Fagundes, I S; Lunardi, L W; Lindenau, J D-R; Gil, B C; Jobim, M; Dias, V G; Merzoni, L; Sekine, L; Onsten, T G H; Jobim, L F

    2015-10-01

    Human platelet antigens (HPA) are immunogenic structures that result from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) leading to single amino acid substitutions. This study sought to determine the allele and genotype frequencies of HPA-1, HPA-2, HPA-3, HPA-4, HPA-5 and HPA-15 in platelet donors from the state of Rio Grande do Sul (RS), Brazil, and compare their allele frequencies to those observed in other populations. HPA genotyping was performed by PCR-SSP method. The study sample comprised 201 platelet donors (167 Caucasians and 34 non-Caucasians). Allele 'a' was that most commonly found for HPA-1 to 5 in both groups. The HPA-15ab genotype predominated over homozygous genotypes of this system. Fisher's exact test revealed statistically significant differences for the HPA-5 system, with a greater prevalence of the HPA-5b allele in non-Caucasians. The neighbour-joining method and principal components analysis revealed genetic proximity between our Caucasian group and European populations. We conclude that the allele frequencies of HPA-1 to 5 and HPA-15 found in our Caucasian sample are similar to those reported for European populations. These findings corroborate the ethnic makeup of the population of RS. The higher frequency of the HPA-5b allele found in the non-Caucasian group of our sample suggests the possibility of allosensitization in patients who receive platelet transfusions from genetically incompatible donors.

  6. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage.

  7. The platelet receptor for type III collagen (TIIICBP) is present in platelet membrane lipid microdomains (rafts).

    PubMed

    Maurice, Pascal; Waeckel, Ludovic; Pires, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Lemesle, Monique; Arbeille, Brigitte; Vassy, Jany; Rochette, Jacques; Legrand, Chantal; Fauvel-Lafève, Françoise

    2006-04-01

    Platelet interactions with collagen are orchestrated by the presence or the migration of platelet receptor(s) for collagen into lipid rafts, which are specialized lipid microdomains from the platelet plasma membrane enriched in signalling proteins. Electron microscopy shows that in resting platelets, TIIICBP, a receptor specific for type III collagen, is present on the platelet membrane and associated with the open canalicular system, and redistributes to the platelet membrane upon platelet activation. After platelet lysis by 1% Triton X-100 and the separation of lipid rafts on a discontinuous sucrose gradient, TIIICBP is recovered in lipid raft-containing fractions and Triton X-100 insoluble fractions enriched in cytoskeleton proteins. Platelet aggregation, induced by type III collagen, was inhibited after disruption of the lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion, whereas platelet adhesion under static conditions did not require lipid raft integrity. These results indicate that TIIICBP, a platelet receptor involved in platelet interaction with type III collagen, is localized within platelet lipid rafts where it could interact with other platelet receptors for collagen (GP VI and alpha2beta1 integrin) for efficient platelet activation. PMID:16205938

  8. Decorating Cutting as New Approach to Machine Tool System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcinkova, Zuzana; Vasilko, Karol

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents so called decorating cutting focused on turning. It uses self-excited vibrations that are typical for turning and other types of cutting operations. The decorating turning do not utilize setting of unstable technological conditions of cutting process but it actively use the acting of cutting force on machine tool without generation of unwanted chatter vibrations. The special tool fixture was developed to utilize self-excited vibrations invoked by periodical changeability of cutting force by cutting process itself. Thus the typical texture of surface appears. The various macro/micro-textures of surfaces can be applied either for decorating purpose or for better holding of oil film.

  9. Pooled platelet concentrates: an alternative to single donor apheresis platelets?

    PubMed

    Pietersz, R N I

    2009-10-01

    Three types of platelet concentrates (PC) are compared: PC either processed with the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or the Buffy coat (BC) method from whole blood units and PC obtained by apheresis. Leuko-reduction (LR) pre-storage is advocated to improve quality of the PC during storage and reduce adverse reactions in recipients. Standardization of methods allow preparation of PC with comparable yields of approximately 400 x 10(9) platelets in pooled non-LR-PRP, approximately 370 x 10(9) in pooled LR-BC-PC and in LR apheresis PC the number of platelets can be targeted on 350 x 10(9) or more with devices of various manufacturers. While viral transmission can be prevented by outstanding laboratory tests, the risk of bacterial contamination should be reduced by improved arm disinfection, deviation of the first 20-30 ml of blood and culture or rapid detection assays of the PC pre-issue. In a large prospective multicenter trial no significant difference was observed between cultures of apheresis PC (n = 15,198): 0.09% confirmed positive units versus 0.06% in pooled BC-PC (n = 37,045), respectively. Though platelet activation as measured by CD62 expression may differ in vitro in PC obtained with various apheresis equipment, and also between PC processed with the two whole blood methods there is scarce literature about the clinical impact of these findings. In conclusion the final products of LR-PC derived from whole blood or obtained by apheresis can be comparable, provided the critical steps of the processing method are identified and covered and the process is in control.

  10. Polymorphisms in canine platelet glycoproteins identify potential platelet antigens.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Werner, Petra; Mason, Nicola J; Meny, Geralyn M; Raducha, Michael G; Henthorn, Paula S

    2013-08-01

    Human alloimmune thrombocytopenic conditions caused by exposure to a platelet-specific alloantigen include neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. More than 30 platelet-specific alloantigens have been defined in the human platelet antigen (HPA) system; however, there is no previous information on canine platelet-specific alloantigens. Using the HPA system as a model, we evaluated the canine ITGB3, ITGA2B, and GP1BB genes encoding GPIIIa (β3), GPIIb (αIIb), and GPIbβ, respectively, which account for 21 of 27 HPA, to determine whether amino acid polymorphisms are present in the orthologous canine genes. A secondary objective was to perform a pilot study to assess possible association between specific alleles of these proteins and a diagnosis of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) in dogs. By using genomic DNA from dogs of various breeds with and without ITP, sequencing of PCR products encompassing all coding regions and exon-intron boundaries for these 3 genes revealed 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ITGA2B resulting in amino acid polymorphisms in the canine genome, 3 previously reported and 1 newly identified (Gly[GGG]/Arg[AGG] at amino acid position 576 of ITGA2B. Of 16 possible ITGA2B protein alleles resulting from unique combinations of the 4 polymorphic amino acids, 5 different protein isoforms were present in homozygous dogs and explain all of the genotype combinations in heterozygous dogs. There was no amino acid polymorphism or protein isoform that was specific for a particular breed or for the diagnosis of ITP. PMID:24209971

  11. Luminescence properties of lustre decorated majolica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibilia, E.; Padeletti, G.; Fermo, P.

    Luminescence measurements have been performed on several Italian Renaissance ceramic shards produced in central Italy, as well as on some others from Hispano-Moresque and Fatimid periods. The aim of this study was the characterisation of the raw materials used to manufacture lustre decorated majolica. At first, the thermoluminescence (TL) dating of all ceramic bodies was performed, because the shards lacked sure chronological attribution, having been provided by private collectors, or found during emergency restoration works or archaeological surveys. To characterise the defects and the recombination centers of the different components of the ceramics (ceramic body, glaze, glaze, and lustre), radioluminescence (RL) measurements have been performed on samples representative of each historical period. The dating results are reported, as well as the preliminary RL results.

  12. Acetal phosphatidic acids: novel platelet aggregating agents.

    PubMed

    Brammer, J P; Maguire, M H; Walaszek, E J; Wiley, R A

    1983-05-01

    1 Palmitaldehyde, olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids induced rapid shape change and dose-dependent biphasic aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma; aggregation was reversible at low doses and irreversible at high doses of the acetal phosphatidic acids. The palmitaldehyde congener elicited monophasic dose-dependent aggregation of sheep platelets in platelet-rich plasma.2 The threshold concentration for palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid (PGAP)-induced platelet aggregation was 2.5-5 muM for human platelets and 0.25-0.5 muM for sheep platelets. PGAP was 4-5 times as potent versus human platelets as the olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids, which were equipotent.3 PGAP-induced irreversible aggregation of [(14)C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([(14)C]-5-HT)-labelled human platelets in platelet-rich plasma was accompanied by release of 44.0+/-2.4% (s.e.) of the platelet [(14)C]-5-HT; reversible aggregation was not associated with release. In contrast, PGAP-induced release of [(14)C]-5-HT-labelled sheep platelets was dose-dependent.4 The adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonist, 2-methylthio-AMP, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin, abolished PGAP-induced second phase aggregation and release in human platelets but did not affect the first, reversible, phase of aggregation. Both the first and second phases of PGAP-induced aggregation were abolished by chlorpromazine, by the phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, mepacrine, and by nmolar concentrations of prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)); these agents abolished the second, but not the first phase of ADP-induced aggregation.5 The related phospholipids, lecithin, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid, at <100 muM, neither induced aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma, nor modified PGAP-induced aggregation; 1-palmityl lysophosphatidic acid elicited aggregation of human platelets at a threshold concentration of 100 muM.6 It is concluded that the acetal phosphatidic acids

  13. Platelets: crossroads of immunity and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N

    2014-07-31

    In this issue of Blood, Koupenova and colleagues report that platelets express functional TOLL-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and contribute to host survival during viral infection. Through a series of experiments utilizing mice deficient for TLR7 together with adoptive transfer of wild-type platelets, Koupenova et al demonstrate that platelets specifically respond to viral analogs and intact virus, leading to platelet activation and binding to various leukocyte subsets. Perhaps most importantly, this platelet activation appears absolutely essential for host survival during infection with some viral pathogens such as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV).

  14. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation. PMID:27129192

  15. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  16. Mechanism and functional impact of CD40 ligand-induced von Willebrand factor release from endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Möller, Kerstin; Adolph, Oliver; Grünow, Jennifer; Elrod, Julia; Popa, Miruna; Ghosh, Subhajit; Schwarz, Manuel; Schwale, Chrysovalandis; Grässle, Sandra; Huck, Volker; Bruehl, Claus; Wieland, Thomas; Schneider, Stefan W; Nobiling, Rainer; Wagner, Andreas H; Hecker, Markus

    2015-05-01

    Co-stimulation via CD154 binding to CD40, pivotal for both innate and adaptive immunity, may also link haemostasis to vascular remodelling. Here we demonstrate that human platelet-bound or recombinant soluble CD154 (sCD154) elicit the release from and tethering of ultra-large (UL) von Willebrand factor (vWF) multimers to the surface of human cultured endothelial cells (ECs) exposed to shear stress. This CD40-mediated ULVWF multimer release from the Weibel-Palade bodies was triggered by consecutive activation of TRAF6, the tyrosine kinase c-Src and phospholipase Cγ1 followed by inositol-1,4,5 trisphosphate-mediated calcium mobilisation. Subsequent exposure to human washed platelets caused ULVWF multimer-platelet string formation on the EC surface in a shear stress-dependent manner. Platelets tethered to these ULVWF multimers exhibited P-selectin on their surface and captured labelled monocytes from the superfusate. When exposed to shear stress and sCD154, native ECs from wild-type but not CD40 or vWF-deficient mice revealed a comparable release of ULVWF multimers to which murine washed platelets rapidly adhered, turning P-selectin-positive and subsequently capturing monocytes from the perfusate. This novel CD154-provoked ULVWF multimer-platelet string formation at normal to fast flow may contribute to vascular remodelling processes requiring the perivascular or intravascular accumulation of pro-inflammatory macrophages such as arteriogenesis or atherosclerosis.

  17. State of the Art in Platelet Function Testing

    PubMed Central

    E. Kehrel, Beate; F. Brodde, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Summary Platelets perform many functions in hemostasis but also in other areas of physiology and pathology. Therefore, it is obvious that many different function tests have been developed, each one conceived and standardized for a special purpose. This review will summarize the different fields in which platelet function testing is currently in use; diagnostics of patients with bleeding disorders, monitoring patients’ response to anti-platelet therapy, monitoring in transfusion medicine (blood donors, platelet concentrates, and after transfusion), and monitoring in perioperative medicine to predict bleeding tendency. The second part of the review outlines different methods for platelet function testing, spanning bleeding time, and platelet counting as well as determining platelet adhesion, platelet secretion, platelet aggregation, platelet morphology, platelet signal transduction, platelet procoagulant activity, platelet apoptosis, platelet proteomics, and molecular biology. PMID:23653569

  18. A method for the automated processing and analysis of images of ULVWF-platelet strings.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Scott R; Abbitt, Katherine B; Cruise, Thomas D; Hose, D Rodney; Lawford, Patricia V

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for identifying and analysing unusually large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF)-platelet strings in noisy low-quality images. The method requires relatively inexpensive, non-specialist equipment and allows multiple users to be employed in the capture of images. Images are subsequently enhanced and analysed, using custom-written software to perform the processing tasks. The formation and properties of ULVWF-platelet strings released in in vitro flow-based assays have recently become a popular research area. Endothelial cells are incorporated into a flow chamber, chemically stimulated to induce ULVWF release and perfused with isolated platelets which are able to bind to the ULVWF to form strings. The numbers and lengths of the strings released are related to characteristics of the flow. ULVWF-platelet strings are routinely identified by eye from video recordings captured during experiments and analysed manually using basic NIH image software to determine the number of strings and their lengths. This is a laborious, time-consuming task and a single experiment, often consisting of data from four to six dishes of endothelial cells, can take 2 or more days to analyse. The method described here allows analysis of the strings to provide data such as the number and length of strings, number of platelets per string and the distance between each platelet to be found. The software reduces analysis time, and more importantly removes user subjectivity, producing highly reproducible results with an error of less than 2% when compared with detailed manual analysis.

  19. Platelets: bridging hemostasis, inflammation, and immunity.

    PubMed

    Jenne, C N; Urrutia, R; Kubes, P

    2013-06-01

    Although the function of platelets in the maintenance of hemostasis has been studied in great detail, more recent evidence has highlighted a central role for platelets in the host inflammatory and immune responses. Platelets by virtue of their large numbers and their ability to rapidly release a broad spectrum of immunomodulatory cytokines, chemokines, and other mediators act as circulating sentinels. Upon detection of a pathogen, platelets quickly activate and begin to drive the ensuing inflammatory response. Platelets have the ability to directly modulate the activity of neutrophils (phagocytosis, oxidative burst), endothelium (adhesion molecule and chemokine expression), and lymphocytes. Due to their diverse array of adhesion molecules and preformed chemokines, platelets are able to adhere to leukocytes and facilitate their recruitment to sites of tissue damage or infection. Furthermore, platelets directly participate in the capture and sequestration of pathogens within the vasculature. Platelet-neutrophil interactions are known to induce the release of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in response to either bacterial or viral infection, and platelets have been shown to internalize pathogens, sequestering them in engulfment vacuoles. Finally, emerging data indicate that platelets also participate in the host immune response by directly killing infected cells. This review will highlight the central role platelets play in the initiation and modulation of the host inflammatory and immune responses.

  20. Influence of training on markers of platelet activation in response to a bout of heavy resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Creighton, Brent C; Kupchak, Brian R; Aristizabal, Juan C; Flanagan, Shawn D; Dunn-Lewis, Courtenay; Volk, Brittanie M; Comstock, Brett A; Volek, Jeff S; Hooper, David R; Szivak, Tunde K; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J

    2013-09-01

    Recent connections between platelet activity and cardiovascular disease have raised questions of whether platelet function varies in exercising individuals. Resistance training has been linked to a possible reduction in hyper-aggregability of platelets, especially following acute strenuous exercise. The present investigation was designed to explore the effects of an acute resistance exercise test on the primary hemostatic system in both resistance-trained (RT) and untrained (UT) individuals. Ten RT (five men and five women; age, 26.0 ± 4.5 years; height, 175.12 ± 8.54 cm; weight, 79.56 ± 13.56 kg) and ten UT (five men and five women; age, 26.4 ± 6.2 years; height, 170.31 ± 7.45 cm; weight 67.88 ± 16.90 kg) individuals performed an Acute Exhaustive Resistance Exercise Test (AERET; six sets of ten repetitions of squats at 80 % of the 1-Repetition Maximum (RM)). Blood samples were obtained before, immediately after, and at 15, 60, and 120 min following the AERET. Blood samples were analyzed for platelet count, von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag), beta-thromboglobulin (β-TG), and platelet factor 4 (PF4). B-TG showed significant differences (p < 0.05) between RT and UT at +15 and +60 min. Both groups showed a main effect for time in platelet count, vWF, and β-TG following the AERET, whereas PF4 remained unchanged. All blood variables returned to baseline 120 min after exercise. Compared with UT, RT demonstrated reduced platelet activation in response to an acute bout of heavy resistance exercise. Reduced platelet activation may be attributed to training status, as shown by a reduction in plasma concentrations of B-TG in the RT group.

  1. Mathematical analysis of mural thrombogenesis. Concentration profiles of platelet-activating agents and effects of viscous shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Folie, B J; McIntire, L V

    1989-01-01

    The concentration profiles of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thromboxane A2 (TxA2), thrombin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) released extracellularly from the platelet granules or produced metabolically on the platelet membrane during thrombus growth, were estimated using finite element simulation of blood flow over model thrombi of various shapes and dimensions. The wall fluxes of these platelet-activating agents were estimated for each model thrombus at three different wall shear rates (100 s-1, 800 s-1, and 1,500 s-1), employing experimental data on thrombus growth rates and sizes. For that purpose, whole human blood was perfused in a parallel-plate flow chamber coated with type l fibrillar human collagen, and the kinetic data collected and analyzed by an EPl-fluorescence video microscopy system and a digital image processor. It was found that thrombin concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation. Although heparin significantly accelerated thrombin inhibition by antithrombin lll, the remaining thrombin levels were still significantly above the minimum threshold required for irreversible platelet aggregation. While ADP concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation at low shear rates and for small aggregate sizes, TxA2 concentrations were only sufficient to induce platelet shape change over the entire range of wall shear rates and thrombi dimensions studied. Our results also indicated that the local concentration of vWF multimers released from the platelet alpha-granules could be sufficient to modulate platelet aggregation at low and intermediate wall shear rates (less than 1,000 s-1). The sizes of standing vortices formed adjacent to a growing aggregate and the embolizing stresses and the torque, acting at the aggregate surface, were also estimated in this simulation. It was found that standing vortices developed on both sides of the thrombus even at low wall shear rates. Their sizes increased with

  2. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  3. Cancer procoagulant and blood platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Olas, B; Wachowicz, B; Mielicki, W P

    2001-08-28

    The effects of cancer procoagulant (CP), cysteine protease (EC 3.4.22.26), on the pig blood platelet secretory process and platelet aggregation have been studied. The response of platelets to CP was compared with the response of these cells to thrombin. The obtained results show that blood platelets treated with CP (0.5, 1, 2.5, and 5 microg/ml, 2-30 min, 37 degrees C) released adenine nucleotides (P < 0.05) and proteins (P < 0.05). The secretion of compounds from blood platelets after incubation with CP does not correlate with the release of platelet lactic dehydrogenase activity (marker of cell lysis) into the extracellular medium. In comparison with thrombin action, CP stimulates secretory process to a smaller extent than thrombin alone. In the presence of CP, the thrombin action is suppressed (P < 0.05). We noticed that CP does not induce platelet aggregation.

  4. Richard von Volkmann

    PubMed Central

    Willy, Christian; Schneider, Peter; Engelhardt, Michael; Hargens, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Richard von Volkmann (1830–1889), one of the most important surgeons of the 19th century, is regarded as one of the fathers of orthopaedic surgery. He was a contemporary of Langenbeck, Esmarch, Lister, Billroth, Kocher, and Trendelenburg. He was head of the Department of Surgery at the University of Halle, Germany (1867–1889). His popularity attracted doctors and patients from all over the world. He was the lead physician for the German military during two wars. From this experience, he compared the mortality of civilian and war injuries and investigated the general poor hygienic conditions in civilian hospitals. This led him to introduce the “antiseptic technique” to Germany that was developed by Lister. His powers of observation and creativity led him to findings and achievements that to this day bear his name: Volkmann’s contracture and the Hueter-Volkmann law. Additionally, he was a gifted writer; he published not only scientific literature but also books of children’s fairy tales and poems under the pen name of Richard Leander, assuring him a permanent place in the world of literature as well as orthopaedics. PMID:18196438

  5. Effect of ajoene, the major antiplatelet compound from garlic, on platelet thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Apitz-Castro, R; Badimon, J J; Badimon, L

    1992-10-15

    Ajoene, (E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide, is a potent antiplatelet compound isolated from alcoholic extracts of garlic (Allium sativum). Ajoene reversibly inhibits in vitro platelet aggregation as well as release reaction induced by all known agonists. We used a well characterized cylindrical perfusion chamber to study the effect of ajoene on platelet deposition onto physiological substrates such as pig aortic subendothelium and tunica media as a model of mildly and severely damaged vessel wall respectively. Experiments were performed under flow conditions of high and low shear rate that mimic laminar blood flow in small and medium size arteries (1690 sec-1 and 212 sec-1). Our results indicate that ajoene prevents thrombus formation both at low and high shear rate in citrated whole blood. The inhibitory effect of ajoene on platelet-thrombus formation seems to be dependent on its inhibition of fibrinogen binding, since significantly higher concentrations of ajoene are needed to affect von Willebrand factor binding to GPIIb/IIIa receptors. Further, ajoene does not impair Ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, mediated by GPIb. Our results suggest that ajoene may be useful for the acute prevention of thrombus formation induced by vascular damage.

  6. 13. INTERIOR, SHOWING DECORATION AT THE ALTAR FOR THE REPOSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. INTERIOR, SHOWING DECORATION AT THE ALTAR FOR THE REPOSE OF THE SOUL OF DON ALFONSO XII, KING OF SPAIN (photograph, Jan. 20, 1886) - Our Lady of Peace Cathedral, 1183 Fort Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  7. 35. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW OF TILE DECORATION ON WALL OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. DETAIL INTERIOR VIEW OF TILE DECORATION ON WALL OF POWERHOUSE #1 ON LEVEL +55; THE WINDOWS LOOK OUT ON DISCHARGE CHANNEL DOWNSTREAM FROM POWERHOUSE. - Bonneville Project, Powerhouse No.1, Spanning Bradford Slough, from Bradford Island, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  8. Calcium decorated and doped phosphorene for gas adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalitha, Murugan; Nataraj, Yuvarani; Lakshmipathi, Senthilkumar

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present the results from first-principles study based on the electronic structure and adsorption characteristics of CH4, CO2, H2 and NH3 adsorbed on Ca decorated/doped phosphorene. Our study finds that phosphorene exhibits n-type behaviour on decorating calcium, and p-type on doping calcium. Gas molecules are physisorbed on both pristine and calcium-mediated phosphorene, visible through their lower binding energy and charge transfer values. Ca decorated phosphorene is suitable for hydrogen storage due to its higher binding energy for H2. Ca doped structures shows increased binding affinity towards CH4 and NH3 in zigzag1 direction and armchair directions respectively. The extracts of our study implies that Ca doped phosphorene possess increased binding affinity towards gas molecules, and the results are highly helpful for gas adsorption and to design gas sensors based on calcium doped or decorated phosphorene.

  9. ZnO nanorods decorated with ZnS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Joicy, S.; Sivakumar, P.; Thangadurai, P.; Ponpandian, N.

    2015-06-24

    In this study, ZnO nanorods (NRs) and ZnS nanoparticles decorated ZnO-NRs were prepared by a combination of hydrothermal and hydrolysis method. Structural and optical properties of the samples were studied by XRD, FE-SEM, UV-Vis DRS and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Microscopy analysis revealed that the diameter of ZnO-NRs was ∼500 nm and the length was ranging from a few hundred nm to several micrometers and their surface was decorated with ZnS nanoparticles. UV-Vis DRS showed the absorption of ZnS decorated ZnO-NRs was blue shifted with respect to pure ZnO-NRs which enhanced the separation of electron-hole pairs. PL spectrum of ZnS decorated ZnO-NRs showed a decrease in intensity of UV and green emissions with the appearance of blue emission at 436 nm.

  10. 16. DETAIL, CLOSEUP OF DECORATIVE PANEL, TOP FLOOR (4 x ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL, CLOSE-UP OF DECORATIVE PANEL, TOP FLOOR (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. 15. DETAIL, DECORATIVE PANEL, ABOVE TOP FLOOR, WEST ELEVATION (4 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL, DECORATIVE PANEL, ABOVE TOP FLOOR, WEST ELEVATION (4 x 5 NEGATIVE) - U.S. General Services Administration, Central Heating Plant, C & D Streets between Twelfth & Thirteenth Streets Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  12. 11. DETAIL OF TERRACOTTA DECORATION, SHOWING SCROLL CONSOLE, WAVE ORNAMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL OF TERRACOTTA DECORATION, SHOWING SCROLL CONSOLE, WAVE ORNAMENT, EGG-AND-DART, NYMPH HEADS AND FOLIATE PATTERN AROUND WINDOWS - City Hall, Atlantic & Tennessee Avenues, Atlantic City, Atlantic County, NJ

  13. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H.

    2014-09-01

    Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

  14. 72. 451 MADISON AVENUE, GRAND STAIR, ZODIAC CLOCK WITH DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. 451 MADISON AVENUE, GRAND STAIR, ZODIAC CLOCK WITH DECORATIVE CARVING BY STANFORD WHITE AND AUGUSTUS SAINT-GAUDENS - Villard Houses, 451-457 Madison Avenue & 24 East Fifty-first Street, New York County, NY

  15. 11. BASRELIEF DECORATION, 'REGENERATION,' MURAL COMMEMORATING THE REBUILDING OF CHICAGO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. BAS-RELIEF DECORATION, 'REGENERATION,' MURAL COMMEMORATING THE REBUILDING OF CHICAGO AFTER THE GREAT FIRE - Chicago River Bascule Bridge, Michigan Avenue, Spanning Chicago River at North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  16. 'Colored' and Decorative Contact Lenses: A Prescription Is a Must

    MedlinePlus

    ... labeling. (See additional information about cleaning solutions with hydrogen peroxide on the FDA website.) See your eye ... For More Information Decorative Contact Lenses Contact Lenses Hydrogen Peroxide Solution Related Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact ...

  17. 4. Photocopy of photograph, date unknown DETAIL, DECORATIVE SWAG OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Photocopy of photograph, date unknown DETAIL, DECORATIVE SWAG OF EARS OF CORN - Thomas Asylum for Orphan & Destitute Indians, Dining Hall, Route 438, Cattaraugas Reservation, Irving, Chautauqua County, NY

  18. Transport properties of zigzag graphene nanoribbon decorated with copper clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Berahman, M.; Sheikhi, M. H.

    2014-09-07

    Using non-equilibrium green function with density functional theory, the present study investigates the transport properties of decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon with a copper cluster. We have represented the decoration of zigzag graphene nanoribbon with single copper atom and cluster containing two and three copper atoms. In all the cases, copper atoms tend to occupy the edge state. In addition, we have shown that copper can alter the current-voltage characteristic of zigzag graphene nanoribbon and create new fluctuations and negative differential resistance. These alternations are made due to discontinuity in the combination of orbitals along the graphene nanoribbon. Decoration alters these discontinuities and creates more visible fluctuations. However, in low bias voltages, the changes are similar in all the cases. The study demonstrates that in the decorated zigzag graphene nanoribbon, the edge states are the main states for transporting electron from one electrode to another.

  19. Detail view of the Ten Mile Creek Bridge decorative concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the Ten Mile Creek Bridge decorative concrete arched balustrade at southeast corner of bridge, view looking east. - Ten Mile Creek Bridge, Spanning Ten Mile Creek on Oregon Coast Highway, Yachats, Lincoln County, OR

  20. 14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit JTL: Detail, oblique view of Egyptian Revival decorative motifs used typically at midpoints of diagonals - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  1. 13. Credit JTL: Detail, orthogonal view of Egyptian Revivial decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Credit JTL: Detail, orthogonal view of Egyptian Revivial decorative motifs used typically at midpoints of diagonals - Reading-Halls Station Bridge, U.S. Route 220, spanning railroad near Halls Station, Muncy, Lycoming County, PA

  2. Detail view of the terracotta antefixes that decorate the roof ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the terra-cotta antefixes that decorate the roof of the Justice Department Building - United States Department of Justice, Constitution Avenue between Ninth & Tenth Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Detail of decorative panel featuring a monkey at Ten Mile ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of decorative panel featuring a monkey at Ten Mile River Playground comfort station, looking northwest. - Henry Hudson Parkway, Extending 11.2 miles from West 72nd Street to Bronx-Westchester border, New York County, NY

  4. Stable parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotically stable decorated swamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    Parabolic Higgs bundles can be described in terms of decorated swamps, which we studied in a recent paper. This description induces a notion of stability of parabolic Higgs bundles depending on a parameter, and we construct their moduli space inside the moduli space of decorated swamps. We then introduce asymptotic stability of decorated swamps in order to study the behaviour of the stability condition as one parameter approaches infinity. The main result is the existence of a constant, such that stability with respect to parameters greater than this constant is equivalent to asymptotic stability. This implies boundedness of all decorated swamps which are semistable with respect to some parameter. Finally, we recover the usual stability condition of parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotic stability.

  5. 3. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION ON LOWER END OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION ON LOWER END OF EXPRESSED COLUMN, JUST BELOW SECOND FLOOR ON SOUTH FRONT FACADE - John D. Van Allen & Son Store, South Fifth Avenue & Second Street, Clinton, Clinton County, IA

  6. 4. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION AT TOP OF EXPRESSED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL OF TERRA COTTA DECORATION AT TOP OF EXPRESSED COLUMN, JUST ABOVE FOURTH FLOOR WINDOWS ON SOUTH FRONT FACADE - John D. Van Allen & Son Store, South Fifth Avenue & Second Street, Clinton, Clinton County, IA

  7. 11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail, southeast corner, showing decorative elements of main structure, and window at the second story of the hose tower. - Independent Hose Company No. 3, Nineteenth & Belmont Streets, Bellaire, Belmont County, OH

  8. 2. Fieldstone wall along Towne Avenue. Decorative fieldstone landscape border ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Fieldstone wall along Towne Avenue. Decorative fieldstone landscape border is shown. Pitzer-Peairs House is in the background. - Pitzer Ranch, Rock Wall, 4353 Towne Avenue, Claremont, Los Angeles County, CA

  9. Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the front elevation (note: decorative details such as the brackets underpinning the deep cornice on the porch and house) - Philip T. Berry House, 1402 Thirty-first Street, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  10. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE DINING AREA, FACING EAST. THE DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE DINING AREA, FACING EAST. THE DECORATIVE DESIGN OF THE OVERHEAD BEAMS AND COLUMNS ARE FROM THE ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bachelor Officer Quarters, Dealy Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. Detail of front west entry showing telescoping pilasters and decorative ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of front west entry showing telescoping pilasters and decorative crawl space vents, facing east. - Albrook Air Force Station, Dispensary, East side of Canfield Avenue, Balboa, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  12. DETAIL VIEW OF END OF TRUSS SHOWING CONNECTION OF DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF END OF TRUSS SHOWING CONNECTION OF DECORATIVE "KNEE", RAILING ENDPOST AND UPPER AND LOWER CHORDS - Scarlets Mill Bridge, Spanning former Reading Railroad, Scarlets Mill, Berks County, PA

  13. DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE CUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE CUT RAFTERS. PILASTERS, AND LAVA ROCK CHEEK CHEEK WALLS. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Y, 27 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  14. DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING THE KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY. SHOWING THE KNEE BRACES AND DECORATIVE CUT RAFTER TAILS. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Fort Kamehameha Officers' Housing Type Z, 19 Worchester Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  16. Anti-platelet activity of water dispersible curcuminoids in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Maheswaraiah, Anikisetty; Rao, Lingamallu Jaganmohan; Naidu, Kamatham Akhilender

    2015-03-01

    Curcuminoids are active principle of turmeric with plethora of health beneficial properties. In this study, we have evaluated for the first time the effect of water dispersible curcuminoids on rat platelet aggregation. Curcuminoids (10-30 µg/mL) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by agonists viz., collagen, ADP and arachidonic acid. Curcuminoids were found to be two-fold more potent than curcumin in inhibiting platelet aggregation. Intracellular curcuminoid concentration was relatively higher than curcumin in rat platelets. Curcuminoids significantly attenuated thromboxane A2 , serotonin levels in rat platelets which play an important role in platelet aggregation. Curcuminoid treatment increased nitric oxide (NO) levels in platelets treated with agonists. Curcuminoids inhibited free radicals such as superoxide anion released from activated platelets, which ultimately inhibits platelet aggregation. Further, curcuminoids inhibited 12-lipoxygenase activity and formation of 12-hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HPETE) in activated rat platelets which regulates platelet aggregation. The results suggest that curcuminoids have remarkable anti-platelet activity by modulating multiple mechanisms involved in platelet aggregation. Thus curcuminoids may have a therapeutic potential to prevent platelet activation related disorders.

  17. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  18. Activity concentrations and dose rates from decorative granite countertops.

    PubMed

    Llope, W J

    2011-06-01

    The gamma radiation emitted from a variety of commercial decorative granites available for use in U.S. homes has been measured with portable survey meters as well as an NaI(Th) gamma spectrometer. The (40)K, U-nat, and (232)Th activity concentrations were determined using a full-spectrum analysis. The dose rates that would result from two different arrangements of decorative granite slabs as countertops were explored in simulations involving an adult anthropomorphic phantom.

  19. Acquired von Willebrand syndrome associated with left ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Nascimbene, Angelo; Neelamegham, Sriram; Frazier, O H; Moake, Joel L; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2016-06-23

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) provide cardiac support for patients with end-stage heart disease as either bridge or destination therapy, and have significantly improved the survival of these patients. Whereas earlier models were designed to mimic the human heart by producing a pulsatile flow in parallel with the patient's heart, newer devices, which are smaller and more durable, provide continuous blood flow along an axial path using an internal rotor in the blood. However, device-related hemostatic complications remain common and have negatively affected patients' recovery and quality of life. In most patients, the von Willebrand factor (VWF) rapidly loses large multimers and binds poorly to platelets and subendothelial collagen upon LVAD implantation, leading to the term acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS). These changes in VWF structure and adhesive activity recover quickly upon LVAD explantation and are not observed in patients with heart transplant. The VWF defects are believed to be caused by excessive cleavage of large VWF multimers by the metalloprotease ADAMTS-13 in an LVAD-driven circulation. However, evidence that this mechanism could be the primary cause for the loss of large VWF multimers and LVAD-associated bleeding remains circumstantial. This review discusses changes in VWF reactivity found in patients on LVAD support. It specifically focuses on impacts of LVAD-related mechanical stress on VWF structural stability and adhesive reactivity in exploring multiple causes of AVWS and LVAD-associated hemostatic complications. PMID:27143258

  20. Platelet receptors and patient responses: The contributions of Professor Stan Heptinstall to platelet research.

    PubMed

    Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2015-01-01

    Stan Heptinstall's contributions to platelet research covered organising meetings at the national and European level as well as starting and maintaining the journal "Platelets". The major part of his research addressed problems of inhibition of platelet receptors and the effects of this on patient health. In particular, the effects of P2Y12 inhibitors on patients with acute cardiovascular problems were a major focus. Other studies included the effects of feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) extracts on platelets, of direct anti-IIb/IIIa receptor (αIIbβ3) inhibitors and of prostanoids on platelet function. Recently, methods for assessing the effectiveness of platelet inhibition were investigated.

  1. Von Willebrand factor regulates complement on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Noone, Damien G; Riedl, Magdalena; Pluthero, Fred G; Bowman, Mackenzie L; Liszewski, M Kathryn; Lu, Lily; Quan, Yi; Balgobin, Steve; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Schneppenheim, Sonja; Budde, Ulrich; James, Paula; Atkinson, John P; Palaniyar, Nades; Kahr, Walter H A; Licht, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura have traditionally been considered separate entities. Defects in the regulation of the complement alternative pathway occur in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, and defects in the cleavage of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-multimers arise in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. However, recent studies suggest that both entities are related as defects in the disease-causing pathways overlap or show functional interactions. Here we investigate the possible functional link of VWF-multimers and the complement system on endothelial cells. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) were obtained from 3 healthy individuals and 2 patients with Type 3 von Willebrand disease lacking VWF. Cells were exposed to a standardized complement challenge via the combination of classical and alternative pathway activation and 50% normal human serum resulting in complement fixation to the endothelial surface. Under these conditions we found the expected release of VWF-multimers causing platelet adhesion onto BOECs from healthy individuals. Importantly, in BOECs derived from patients with von Willebrand disease complement C3c deposition and cytotoxicity were more pronounced than on BOECs derived from normal individuals. This is of particular importance as primary glomerular endothelial cells display a heterogeneous expression pattern of VWF with overall reduced VWF abundance. Thus, our results support a mechanistic link between VWF-multimers and the complement system. However, our findings also identify VWF as a new complement regulator on vascular endothelial cells and suggest that VWF has a protective effect on endothelial cells and complement-mediated injury. PMID:27236750

  2. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  3. Platelet MicroRNAs: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Neetu; Sarachana, Tewarit; Vu, Long; Becker, Kevin G; Wood, William H; Zhang, Yongqing; Atreya, Chintamani D

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNA that have been found to influence the expression of many genes and cellular processes by either repressing translation or degrading messenger RNA transcripts. Platelet miRNA expression has been shown to be perturbed during ex vivo storage of platelets and in platelet-associated disorders. Although bioinformatics-based miRNA target predictions have been established, direct experimental validation of the role of miRNAs in platelet biology has been rather slow. Target prediction studies are, nonetheless, valuable in directing the design of appropriate experiments to test specific miRNA:messenger RNA interactions relevant to the underlying mechanisms of platelet function in general and in disease as well as in ex vivo storage-associated "storage lesions," a collective term used to include physiologic, biochemical, and morphologic changes that occur in stored platelets. This brief review will focus on emerging human platelet miRNA studies to emphasize their potential role relevant to transfusion medicine field in terms of regulating platelet signaling pathways, markers of platelet associated disorders, and remote impactors of gene expression (intercellular biomodulators) as well as potential platelet quality markers of storage and pathogen reduction treatments.

  4. Platelet destruction in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura: kinetics and clearance of indium-111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ballem, P.J.; Gernsheimer, T.; Cerqueira, M.; Slichter, S.J.

    1989-05-01

    Using autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets, platelet kinetics and the sites of platelet destruction were assessed in 16 normal subjects (13 with and three without spleens), in 17 studies of patients with primary autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP), in six studies of patients with secondary AITP, in ten studies of patients with AITP following splenectomy, and in five thrombocytopenic patients with myelodysplastic syndromes. In normal subjects, the spleen accounted for 24 +/- 4% of platelet destruction and the liver for 15 +/- 2%. Untreated patients with primary AITP had increased splenic destruction (40 +/- 14%, p less than 0.001) but not hepatic destruction (13 +/- 5%). Compared with untreated patients, prednisone treated patients did not have significantly different spleen and liver platelet sequestration. Patients with secondary AITP had similar platelet counts, platelet survivals, and increases in splenic destruction of platelets as did patients with primary AITP. In contrast, patients with myelodysplastic syndromes had a normal pattern of platelet destruction. In AITP patients following splenectomy, the five nonresponders all had a marked increase (greater than 45%) in liver destruction compared to five responders (all less than 40%). Among all patients with primary or secondary AITP, there was an inverse relationship between the percent of platelets destroyed in the liver plus spleen and both the platelet count (r = 0.75, p less than 0.001) and the platelet survival (r = 0.86, p less than 0.001). In a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, total liver plus spleen platelet destruction, the platelet survival and the platelet turnover were all significant independent predictors of the platelet count. Thus platelet destruction is shifted to the spleen in primary and secondary AITP. Failure of splenectomy is associated with a marked elevation in liver destruction.

  5. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  6. Indium-111 platelet imaging for detection of platelet deposition in abdominal aneurysms and prosthetic arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Stratton, J.R.; Thiele, B.; Haminton, G.W.; Warrick, L.N.; Huang, T.W.; Harker, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Thirty-four platelet imaging studies were performed in 23 patients to determine whether platelet deposition could be detected in patients with vascular aneurysms (18 patients) or in patients in whom Dacron prosthetic grafts had been placed (5 patients). In patients in whom abnormal platelet deposition was detected, the effect of administration of platelet-active drugs on platelet deposition was examined. Of the 18 patients with an aneurysm, 12 had equivocally positive studies on initial imaging and 2 had equivocally positive images. Of five patients with Dacron arterial grafts in place, four had diffuse platelet deposition in the grafts; the fifth patient had a platelet deposition only in a pseudoaneurysm. Eight patients with an abdominal aneurysm and positive or equivocally positive baseline images were restudied during platelet-active drug therapy either with aspirin plus dipyridamole (seven patients) or with sulfinpyrazone (four patients). No patient studied during treatment with aspirin plus dipyridamole had detectably decreased platelet deposition compared with baseline determinations. In contrast, two of four patients studied while receiving sulfinpyrazone showed decreased platelet deposition. Thus, platelet imaging may be of value for studying platelet physiology in vivo and for assessing platelet-active drugs and the thrombogenicity of prosthetic graft materials in human beings.

  7. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section... platelet counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for platelet counting is a device that resembles platelets in plasma or whole blood and that is used to set a platelet counting instrument. It is...

  8. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section... platelet counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for platelet counting is a device that resembles platelets in plasma or whole blood and that is used to set a platelet counting instrument. It is...

  9. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section... platelet counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for platelet counting is a device that resembles platelets in plasma or whole blood and that is used to set a platelet counting instrument. It is...

  10. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section... platelet counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for platelet counting is a device that resembles platelets in plasma or whole blood and that is used to set a platelet counting instrument. It is...

  11. 21 CFR 864.8175 - Calibrator for platelet counting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for platelet counting. 864.8175 Section... platelet counting. (a) Identification. A calibrator for platelet counting is a device that resembles platelets in plasma or whole blood and that is used to set a platelet counting instrument. It is...

  12. Orthobiologics and platelet rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Mandeep S; Behera, Prateek; Patel, Sandeep; Shetty, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Orthobiologics have evolved to the extent that they significantly influence modern orthopedic surgical practice. A better understanding of the role of various growth factors and cells in the process of tendon healing, ligament repair, cartilage regeneration and bone formation has stimulated focused research in many chronic musculoskeletal ailments. Investigators have published results of laboratory as well as clinical studies, using orthobiologics like platelet rich plasma, stem cells, autologous conditioned serum etc., with variable results. However, a clear consensus over the best orthobiologic substance and the method of preparation and usage of these substances is lacking. Much of the confusion is due to the fact that studies ranging from RCTs to case reports present variable results, and the interpretations are wide-ranging. We have reviewed the available orthobiologics related data with a focus on platelet rich plasma in orthopedic conditions. PMID:24600055

  13. Detection of heterozygotes in both parents of homozygous patients with Von Willebrand's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Y; Simeon, J; Caen, J P

    1975-01-01

    Three patients with severe Von Willebrand's disease are shown to be homozygotes. They were born from unaffected parents. New techniques using a factor-VIII-related antigen assay by the Laurell method and a ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation assay demonstrated abnormalities in these two tests in both parents of the probands. Factor-VIII-related of heterogotes could not be differentiated from normal factor-VIII-related antigen by the immunodiffusion technique, crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and filtration on a sepharose 4b column. Images PMID:805164

  14. A rapid flow cytometric technique for the detection of platelet-monocyte complexes, activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Laura; Thom, Jim; Adams, Murray; Oostryck, Robert; Krueger, Rom; Yong, Gerald; Baker, Ross

    2009-08-01

    Platelet activation occurs in a variety of clinical situations in which it directly contributes to the pathology. This study reports a simple flow cytometric assay for platelet activation which measures platelet-derived microparticles, activated platelets and platelet-monocyte complexes. Pre- and post analytical conditions were investigated and optimized and a normal range established on 20 healthy controls. Twenty patients pre- and post percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) were tested with the technique. Soluble activation markers sCD40 ligand and sP-selectin and plasma phospholipid levels were measured in both groups. There was a significant increase in activated platelets and platelet-monocyte complexes between normal and pre-PCI (P = 0.005 and 0.0275, respectively) suggesting an activated state. There was a significant fall in activated platelets post-PCI (P = 0.0027) which was mirrored by a fall in soluble CD40 ligand, soluble P-selectin and plasma phospholipid levels (P = 0.0066, <0.0001 and 0.0032, respectively) consistent with antiplatelet therapy administered during the process. This is a reliable and rapid method for the assessment of ex vivo platelet activation which may be an aid in diagnosis and help guide therapy for patients with thrombotic disease.

  15. Interaction between canine platelets and adult heartworms: platelet recognition of heartworm surfaces.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, R M; Yamaguchi, R A; Schaub, R G; Fleming, J; Dorsey-Lee, M R; McDonald, T L

    1986-02-01

    An interaction between blood platelets and adult heartworms was examined in vitro. Surfaces of glutaraldehyde-fixed heartworms, which were taken from infected dogs washed, and incubated in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. Adherence of platelets to heartworms occurred only with PRP from infected dogs. Aggregation to epinephrine and adenosine diphosphate of PRP incubated with heartworms was monitored. Seemingly, platelet activation to heartworm membranes occurs in dogs with heartworm disease. The increased platelet reactivity was also observed in dogs with occult heartworm disease, indicating that the presence of circulating microfilaria was not important for this process. The ability to transfer the reactivity to heartworm-negative platelets by suspending them in heartworm-positive plasma indicated that this reactivity resided in the plasma. The processes leading to platelet activation may be responsible for the platelet-associated vascular disorders of canine heartworm disease.

  16. LIM kinase/cofilin dysregulation promotes macrothrombocytopenia in severe von Willebrand disease-type 2B

    PubMed Central

    Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Adam, Frédéric; Muczynski, Vincent; Aymé, Gabriel; Casari, Caterina; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Soukaseum, Christelle; Rothschild, Chantal; Proulle, Valérie; Pietrzyk-Nivau, Audrey; Berrou, Eliane; Christophe, Olivier D.; Rosa, Jean-Philippe; Lenting, Peter J.; Bryckaert, Marijke; Baruch, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease type 2B (VWD-type 2B) is characterized by gain-of-function mutations of von Willebrand factor (vWF) that enhance its binding to platelet glycoprotein Ibα and alter the protein’s multimeric structure. Patients with VWD-type 2B display variable extents of bleeding associated with macrothrombocytopenia and sometimes with thrombopathy. Here, we addressed the molecular mechanism underlying the severe macrothrombocytopenia both in a knockin murine model for VWD-type 2B by introducing the p.V1316M mutation in the murine Vwf gene and in a patient bearing this mutation. We provide evidence of a profound defect in megakaryocyte (MK) function since: (a) the extent of proplatelet formation was drastically decreased in 2B MKs, with thick proplatelet extensions and large swellings; and (b) 2B MKs presented actin disorganization that was controlled by upregulation of the RhoA/LIM kinase (LIMK)/cofilin pathway. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of the LIMK/cofilin signaling pathway rescued actin turnover and restored normal proplatelet formation, platelet count, and platelet size. These data indicate, to our knowledge for the first time, that the severe macrothrombocytopenia in VWD-type 2B p.V1316M is due to an MK dysfunction that originates from a constitutive activation of the RhoA/LIMK/cofilin pathway and actin disorganization. This suggests a potentially new function of vWF during platelet formation that involves regulation of actin dynamics. PMID:27734030

  17. Nouvelle cuisine: platelets served with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Zufferey, Anne; Boilard, Eric; Semple, John W

    2015-06-15

    Platelets are small cellular fragments with the primary physiological role of maintaining hemostasis. In addition to this well-described classical function, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets have an intimate connection with infection and inflammation. This stems from several platelet characteristics, including their ability to bind infectious agents and secrete many immunomodulatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as their expression of receptors for various immune effector and regulatory functions, such as TLRs, which allow them to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Furthermore, platelets contain RNA that can be nascently translated under different environmental stresses, and they are able to release membrane microparticles that can transport inflammatory cargo to inflammatory cells. Interestingly, acute infections can also result in platelet breakdown and thrombocytopenia. This report highlights these relatively new aspects of platelets and, thus, their nonhemostatic nature in an inflammatory setting.

  18. Evaluation of platelet cross-matching in the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Osama S.; Aladl, Doaa A.; El Ghannam, Doaa M.; Elderiny, Wesam E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cross-match-compatible platelets are used to support thrombocytopenic patients who are refractory to randomly selected platelets. However, few studies have addressed the efficacy of using this strategy for patients requiring intensive platelet transfusion therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of cross-match-compatible platelets in an unselected group of patients refractory to platelets from random donors. Materials and methods A total of 406 cross-match-compatible platelet components were administered to 40 evaluable patients who were refractory to random-donor platelets. A solid-phase red cell adherence method was used for platelet cross-matching. The corrected count increment was used to monitor the effectiveness of each platelet transfusion. Multivariate analysis was performed to detect whether any variables could predict the response to transfusion. Results Statistically significant improvements were found in the mean corrected count increment when comparing cross-match-compatible platelets with randomly selected and incompatible platelets (p<0.001 for each). Compatible platelet transfusions were associated with a good response in 72.9% of cases while incompatible platelets were associated with a poor response in 66.7% of transfusion events (p<0.001). In the presence of clinical factors or alloimmunisation, compatible platelets were associated with good responses in 67.9% and 28.0% respectively vs 100% and 93.3% in their absence (p=0.009, p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that cross-matching and alloimmunisation were the strongest predictors of transfusion response at 1 hour, while ABO compatibility, type of units received, followed by alloimmunisation then clinical factors were predictors at 24 hours. Discussion Platelet cross-matching using the solid-phase red cell adherence technique is an effective and rapid first-line approach for the management of patients refractory to platelet transfusions. PMID:24931840

  19. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  20. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  1. The effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on platelet function in whole blood and platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Reikvam, Anne-Grete; Hustad, Steinar; Reikvam, Håkon; Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Nepstad, Ina; Hervig, Tor Audun

    2012-01-01

    Several studies report that patients who are treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for depression may have increased risk of bleeding, particularly from the gastrointestinal tract. This may be related to low intraplatelet serotonin concentrations. Several blood banks do not store platelets from donors using SSRIs for transfusion, although the possible effects of SSRIs on platelet storage are not documented. We conducted a case-control pilot study of apheresis platelet concentrates prepared from donors using SSRIs (n=8) and from donors without medication (n=10). The platelet concentrates were stored for 5 days. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA), thrombelastography (TEG), and flow cytometric analyses were preformed for in vitro measurements of platelet function. Platelet function and platelet serotonin content were investigated in whole blood and in platelet concentrates stored for up to 5 days. LTA, TEG, and flow cytometric analysis of glycoprotein expression did not reveal any significant differences between the two groups. All 18 platelet concentrates performed well according to the standards set for platelet quality in relation to transfusion. Blood donors using SSRIs had significantly lower platelet serotonin compared to blood donors without medication. The results from our pilot study indicate that platelets from donors using SSRIs may be suitable for transfusion after storage for 5 days, but further laboratory and clinical studies are necessary to confirm this.

  2. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Rachael F.; Gerrits, Anja J.; Berny-Lang, Michelle A.; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L.; Neufeld, Ellis J.; Michelson, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa–positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP. PMID:26138687

  3. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline Aparecida; Zulli, Roberto; Soares, Sheila; de Castro, Vagner; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment) is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA). RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years), nine (56%) were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%). Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%), who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50%) by the PIFT and in three (19%) by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64%) had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%). Of the former, two were refractory (29%). No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management. PMID:21437433

  4. Uptake of Latex Particles by Blood Platelets

    PubMed Central

    White, James G.

    1972-01-01

    The incorporation of large particulates by blood platelets is considered identical to the ingestion of bacteria by neutrophils, and is referred to as platelet phagocytosis. However, bacteria enter neutrophils in sealed vacuoles derived from the cell wall, and products deposited in the vacuoles during neutrophil degranulation are confined almost exclusively to the phagolysosomes. Products released from platelet storage organelles after uptake of foreign particles, on the other hand, are extruded to the cell exterior. The basis for this unusual difference in the phagocytic response of platelets and neutrophils has been sought in the present investigation. Combined electron microscopic and cytechemical study of platelet-latexspherule interaction revealed that platelets do not phagocytize in the usual sense. Most of the latex particles observed in platelets were lodged in channels of the open canalicular system. Channels which contained latex did not pinch off to form sealed phagocytic vacuoles, but remained open. An electron-dense tracer, lanthanum nitrate, was able to penetrate into the channels and outline the ingested latex particles. Therefore, platelets do not phagocytize latex, but sequester the spherules in preformed membranous invaginations. The persistence of open channel communication with the exterior after latex uptake may explain why platelets extrude secretory products, rather than confine them to phagolysosomes. ImagesFig 4Fig 1Fig 5Fig 2Fig 6Fig 3 PMID:5086899

  5. Platelets: Covert Regulators of Lymphatic Development

    PubMed Central

    Bertozzi, Cara C.; Hess, Paul R.; Kahn, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The field of platelet biology has rapidly expanded beyond the classical role of platelets in preventing blood loss and orchestrating clot formation. Despite the lack of transcriptional ability of these anuclear cell fragments, platelet function is now thought to encompass such diverse contexts as tissue repair, immune activation, primary tumor formation, and metastasis. Recent studies from multiple groups have turned the spotlight on an exciting new role for platelets in the formation of lymphatic vessels during embryonic development. Genetic experiments demonstrate that Podoplanin, a transmembrane protein expressed on lymphatic endothelial cells, engages the platelet CLEC-2 receptor when exposed to blood, leading to SYK-SLP-76-dependent platelet activation. When components of this pathway are disrupted, aberrant vascular connections form, resulting in blood-lymphatic mixing. Furthermore, platelet-null embryos manifest identical blood-lymphatic mixing. The identification of platelets as the critical cell type mediating blood-lymphatic vascular separation raises new questions in our understanding of lymphatic development and platelet biology. PMID:21071706

  6. Platelet depletion and severity of streptococcal endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Dall, Lawrence; Miller, Todd; Herndon, Betty; Diez, Ireneo; Dew, Michelle

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of thrombocytopenia in streptococcal endocarditis using an animal model. DESIGN: A model of human septic endocarditis was established in rats (polyethylene catheters across the aortic valve and administration of Streptococcus sanguis, 5×107 colony forming units [cfu] intravenous). Thrombocytopenia at four levels was produced by antiplatelet serum. Secondary methods of producing thrombocytopenia were also evaluated. At sacrifice (96 h after platelet depletion and 72 h after infection), vegetations were removed, weighed, diluted, plated and counted. Potential mechanisms of the dose-response relationship between vegetation density and platelet count were evaluated. SETTING: Controlled research laboratory experiments. POPULATION STUDIED: Animal models of streptococcal endocarditis. MAIN RESULTS: The bacterial density of the aortic valve vegetations significantly increased as the platelet count decreased (P=0.0007). In severely thrombocytopenic animals (two-dose antiplatelet serum), data suggest increased vegetation embolism. Platelet depletion, which was minimal with chemical methods, was produced most effectively by antithrombocyte serum. Platelet surfaces in endocarditis were found to express elevated CD62p proteins (72.7% endocarditis, 34.7% control). Platelet protein fractions were evaluated in vitro by both streptocidal (P=0.19) and phagocytosis-stimulating assays. Platelet presence in mature aortic valve vegetations averaged only about 2%. CONCLUSIONS: In platelet depletion experiments using a rat model, a dose-response relationship of peripheral circulating platelet depletion to aortic valve vegetation density was found. The mechanism relating thrombocytopenia to endocarditis severity remains unresolved. PMID:22346555

  7. Platelet interactions with viruses and parasites.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Ana Lopez; Cox, Dermot

    2015-01-01

    While the interactions between Gram-positive bacteria and platelets have been well characterized, there is a paucity of data on the interaction between other pathogens and platelets. However, thrombocytopenia is a common feature with many infections especially viral hemorrhagic fever. The little available data on these interactions indicate a similarity with bacteria-platelet interactions with receptors such as FcγRIIa and Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) playing key roles with many pathogens. This review summarizes the known interactions between platelets and pathogens such as viruses, fungi and parasites.

  8. Migraine: the platelet hypothesis after 10 years.

    PubMed

    Hanington, E

    1989-01-01

    The proposal that migraine is a blood disorder and caused by a primary abnormality of platelet behaviour was first put forward in 1978. This paper outlines the basis on which the proposal was made and the way in which the platelet hypothesis can account for the many facets of the disorder. It also reports further studies of platelet composition and function which have been undertaken by a large number of independent workers during the past ten years. The results of their investigations provide strong additional support for the platelet hypothesis in migraine.

  9. Platelet cytoskeleton and its hemostatic role.

    PubMed

    Cerecedo, Doris

    2013-12-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets adhere to the exposed extracellular matrix, which triggers the platelet activation and aggregation to form a hemostatic plug to seal the wound. All of these events involve dramatic changes in shape because of the cytoskeleton reorganization. The versatility of the cytoskeleton's main elements depends on the biochemical nature of the elements, as well as on the associated proteins that confer multiple functions within the cell. The list of these associated proteins grows actively, increasing our knowledge concerning the complexity of platelet cytoskeleton machinery. The present review evidences the recently described platelet proteins that promote characteristic modifications in their cytoskeleton organization, with special focus on the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex.

  10. von Willebrand Disease (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Type 2A or Type 2B. People with Type 3 (and some with Type 2A and 2B) will need treatment with Humate-P, an intravenous medication derived from human plasma that contains factor VIII and von Willebrand factor. ...

  11. Decoration of silk fibroin by click chemistry for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongshi; Heusler, Eva; Jones, Gabriel; Li, Linhao; Werner, Vera; Germershaus, Oliver; Ritzer, Jennifer; Luehmann, Tessa; Meinel, Lorenz

    2014-06-01

    Silkfibroin (SF) has an excellent biocompatibility and its remarkable structure translates into exciting mechanical properties rendering this biomaterial particularly fascinating for biomedical application. To further boost the material's biological/preclinical impact, SF is decorated with biologics, typically by carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling (EDC/NHS). For biomedical application, this chemistry challenges the product risk profile due to the formation of covalent aggregates, particularly when decoration is with biologics occurring naturally in humans as these aggregates may prime for autoimmunity. Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click chemistry) provides the necessary specificity to avoid such intermolecular, covalent aggregates. We present a blueprint outlining the necessary chemistry rendering SF compatible with CuAAC and with a particular focus on structural consequences. For that, the number of SF carboxyl groups (carboxyl-SF; required for EDC/NHS chemistry) or azido groups (azido-SF; required for click chemistry) was tailored by means of diazonium coupling of the SF tyrosine residues. Structural impact on SF and decorated SF was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The click chemistry yielded a better controlled product as compared to the EDC/NHS chemistry with no formation of inter- and intramolecular crosslinks as demonstrated for SF decorated with fluorescent model compounds or a biologic, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), respectively. In conclusion, SF can readily be translated into a scaffold compatible with click chemistry yielding decorated products with a better risk profile for biomedical application.

  12. Factor VIII alters tubular organization and functional properties of von Willebrand factor stored in Weibel-Palade bodies.

    PubMed

    Bouwens, Eveline A M; Mourik, Marjon J; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Eikenboom, Jeroen C J; Voorberg, Jan; Valentijn, Karine M; Mertens, Koen

    2011-11-24

    In endothelial cells, von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers are packaged into tubules that direct biogenesis of elongated Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs). WPB release results in unfurling of VWF tubules and assembly into strings that serve to recruit platelets. By confocal microscopy, we have previously observed a rounded morphology of WPBs in blood outgrowth endothelial cells transduced to express factor VIII (FVIII). Using correlative light-electron microscopy and tomography, we now demonstrate that FVIII-containing WPBs have disorganized, short VWF tubules. Whereas normal FVIII and FVIII Y1680F interfered with formation of ultra-large VWF multimers, release of the WPBs resulted in VWF strings of equal length as those from nontransduced blood outgrowth endothelial cells. After release, both WPB-derived FVIII and FVIII Y1680F remained bound to VWF strings, which however had largely lost their ability to recruit platelets. Strings from nontransduced cells, however, were capable of simultaneously recruiting exogenous FVIII and platelets. These findings suggest that the interaction of FVIII with VWF during WPB formation is independent of Y1680, is maintained after WPB release in FVIII-covered VWF strings, and impairs recruitment of platelets. Apparently, intra-cellular and extracellular assembly of FVIII-VWF complex involves distinct mechanisms, which differ with regard to their implications for platelet binding to released VWF strings. PMID:21940821

  13. Platelet function in the postprandial period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia have been related to cardiovascular events. Among different underlying mechanisms platelet activation seems to be responsible too. No comparable data between various tests in normo- vs. hyperlipidemics before and at different time intervals are available after a fat meal. We aimed to compare 9 of them within the same patients at several time points in postprandial hyperlipidemia. Results For some tests baseline values between the groups were significantly different (TXB2, platelet sensitivity, sedimentation and WU-test). However, hyperlipidemia revealed a variable influence on the tests examined. Some of the available tests apparently sensitive to show platelet activation reflect the increase in triglycerides (TG), such as the sedimentation index. ADP-induced platelet aggregatory activity in count adjusted washed isolated platelet samples during postprandial hyperlipidemia indicates mildly enhanced platelet activity, but does not seem to induce significant changes in aggregation. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 400 mg/dl fasting) changes in platelet function are more pronounced due to delayed decay and may last up to 16 hours paralleling TG reaching the prevalue. The overwhelming majority of platelet function tests do not significantly respond to postprandial hyperlipidemia. The correlation between the tests applied is poor. For standardization purpose, platelet aggregation tests, aimed to examine proaggregatory capacity in atherosclerosis, should only be performed at the same time of the day after a fasting period > 6 hours. The great variation in preanalytical work-up on comparison of various tests, large number of platelet tests available and their respective potential value are discussed. Conclusions At present, the suspicion that platelet function is significantly activated in the postprandial period cannot be supported by any of the tests used. The information provided is valuable to

  14. Metalloproteolytic receptor shedding…platelets "acting their age".

    PubMed

    Andrews, Robert K; Gardiner, Elizabeth E

    2016-09-01

    Whilst significant effort has been focused on development of tools and approaches to clinically modulate activation processes that consume platelets, the platelet receptors that initiate activation processes remain untargeted. The modulation of receptor levels is also linked to underlying platelet aging processes which influence normal platelet lifespan and also the functionality and survival of stored platelets that are used in transfusion. In this review, we will focus on platelet adhesion receptors initiating thrombus formation, and discuss how regulation of levels of these receptors impact platelet function and platelet survival. PMID:27459696

  15. Enhanced hydrogen storage by using lithium decoration on phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiyuan; Wan, Neng; Lei, Shuangying; Yu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen storage characteristics of Li decorated phosphorene were systematically investigated based on first-principle density functional theory. It is revealed that the adsorption of H2 on pristine phosphorene is relatively weak with an adsorption energy of 0.06 eV. While this value can be dramatically enhanced to ˜0.2 eV after the phosphorene was decorated by Li, and each Li atom can adsorb up to three H2 molecules. The detailed mechanism of the enhanced hydrogen storage was discussed based on our density functional theory calculations. Our studies give a conservative prediction of hydrogen storage capacity to be 4.4 wt. % through Li decoration on pristine phosphorene. By comparing our calculations to the present molecular dynamic simulation results, we expect our adsorption system is stable under room temperature and hydrogen can be released after moderate heating.

  16. H2 adsorption in Li-decorated porous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seenithurai, S.; Pandyan, R. Kodi; Kumar, S. Vinodh; Munieswaran, P.; Saranya, C.; Mahendran, M.

    2015-06-01

    Porous graphene (PG) has been decorated with Li atoms and subsequently studied the hydrogen (H2) adsorption characteristics, by using Density Functional Theory (DFT)-based calculations. A 2×2 PG has been decorated with eight Li atoms. Upto four H2 molecules get adsorbed on each Li atom. The maximum H2 storage capacity that could be achieved in 2×2PG-8Li is 8.95 wt% which is higher than the U.S. DOE's revised target for the on-board vehicles. The average H2 adsorption binding energy is 0.535 eV/H2, which lies between 0.2-0.6 eV/H2 that is required for achieving adsorption and desorption at near ambient conditions. Thus, Li-decorated PG could be a viable option for on-board automobile applications.

  17. Some aspects of the characterization of decorations on ceramic glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Arantegui, J.; Larrea, A.; Molera, J.; Pradell, T.; Vendrell-Saz, M.

    From antiquity, glazes have been one of the techniques used for decorating ceramics. Potters took advantage of the optical properties of these glazes to improve the quality of the object, especially to obtain an appearance or some characteristics that had commercial success. This is why it is important to know the reasons of the visual appearance of glazes. In this paper we present some aspects of the characterization of lustre, one of the on-glaze decorations that results in a more spectacular visual effect, as a microstructure, its composition, its raw materials and some technological aspects of its production. Lustre is a three-dimensional heterogeneous structure, where copper and silver nanoparticles play the most important role, but also alkali elements in the glaze and other components of raw lustre pigments. Lustre properties are determined by copper and silver composition and by distribution and dimension of these metallic nanocrystals in the decoration layer.

  18. Bulk fluid phase behaviour of colloidal platelet-sphere and platelet-polymer mixtures.

    PubMed

    de las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2013-04-13

    Using a geometry-based fundamental measure density functional theory, we calculate bulk fluid phase diagrams of colloidal mixtures of vanishingly thin hard circular platelets and hard spheres. We find isotropic-nematic phase separation, with strong broadening of the biphasic region, upon increasing the pressure. In mixtures with large size ratio of platelet and sphere diameters, there is also demixing between two nematic phases with differing platelet concentrations. We formulate a fundamental measure density functional for mixtures of colloidal platelets and freely overlapping spheres, which represent ideal polymers, and use it to obtain phase diagrams. We find that, for low platelet-polymer size ratio, in addition to isotropic-nematic and nematic-nematic phase coexistence, platelet-polymer mixtures also display isotropic-isotropic demixing. By contrast, we do not find isotropic-isotropic demixing in hard-core platelet-sphere mixtures for the size ratios considered.

  19. Relation of platelet density to platelet age: survival of low- and high-density 111indium-labeled platelets in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B.; McFadden, P.R.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between platelet density and platelet age has been studied using continuous linear Percoll density gradients and 111In-labeling of autologous platelets in baboons. To investigate changes in platelet density during senescence in the circulation, baboons were infused with 111In-labeled autologous platelets, and blood was collected at one hour postinfusion and twice daily thereafter for six days. Platelets were isolated from these samples in high yield (greater than 95%) and separated in continuous linear Percoll density gradients following density equilibrium centrifugation. Although at one hour postinfusion the density distribution of radiolabeled platelets coincided closely with the distribution of the total platelet population, a detectable symmetrical shift toward higher densities was observed after five days. The relative specific radioactivity (RSR) of high-density platelets (1.064 to 1.067 g/mL) decreased at a slower rate than that of the total platelet population (platelets of all densities), whereas the RSR of low-density platelets (1.053 to 1.056 g/mL) showed a more immediate and rapid decrease. These results give rise to one of two interpretations: (1) low-density platelets have a shorter survival time than more dense platelets and are therefore cleared from the circulation at a faster rate, or (2) platelets of all densities increase in density upon aging in the circulation. To determine the explanation for changing RSR of different density fractions we studied the in vivo disappearance characteristics of low- and high-density 111In-labeled platelets. There were no significant differences between the mean survival times of low-density platelets (5.0 +/- 0.49 days, +/- 1 SD, n = 6), high-density platelets (4.9 +/- 0.56 days, n = 6), or control platelets representing platelets of all densities (4.9 +/- 0.38 days, n = 6).

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of haemostatic function in von Willebrand disease patients using a microchip-based flow chamber system.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, K; Nogami, K; Hosokawa, K; Ohnishi, T; Matsumoto, T; Shima, M

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of von Willebrand disease (VWD) is difficult due to the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with this disorder. We have analysed and characterized haemostatic function in VWD patients using a microchip-based flow chamber system. Microchips coated with either collagen [platelet (PL)-chip] or collagen/thromboplastin [atherome (AR)-chip] were used to evaluate platelet thrombus formation at 1000 s(-1) and fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation at 240 s(-1) respectively. Blood samples from an asymptomatic patient with VWD type 1 [von Willebrand factor (VWF): RCo 3.2%; bleeding score (BS 2] displayed normal thrombus formation in both PL- and AR-chips, whereas blood from a symptomatic type 1 patient (VWF: RCo 14%, BS 9) had significantly delayed capillary occlusion. Nearly complete suppression of the flow pressure increase was observed in symptomatic patients with VWD type 2A (BS 13) and 2N (BS 27), whereas no flow pressure was found for the type 3 patient (BS 6). Fibrin-rich platelet thrombus formation was only weakly increased by the in vitro addition of factor VIII (FVIII) to blood samples from the type 3 patient, but was normalized by the addition of VWF/FVIII. The in vivo effects of treatment with desmopressin or VWF/FVIII for the symptomatic patients were analysed using two types of microchips. The PL-chip was highly sensitive for patients' VWF-mediated platelet functions, whereas the AR-chip allowed assessment of overall haemostatic ability, including sensitivity to both VWF and FVIII. The combined analysis with PL- and AR-chips may be potentially useful for the diagnosis of VWD based on clinical phenotypes, and for monitoring drug effects.

  1. Effect of propranolol on platelet signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Dash, D; Rao, K

    1995-01-01

    Propranolol inhibits platelet secondary aggregation and secretion by mechanisms unrelated to its beta-adrenergic-blocking activity. We previously reported that a major effect of the drug is perturbation of the physical microenvironment of the human platelet membrane. To explore further the molecular mechanisms underlying propranolol-mediated platelet inhibition, we studied protein kinase C activity, estimated from the phosphorylation of the substrate protein pleckstrin, in propranolol-treated human platelets. The drug inhibited activation of the enzyme in thrombin-stimulated platelets but not in platelets stimulated with phorbol esters, indicating that its site of action might be upstream of protein kinase C. It also inhibited the activity of phospholipase C, determined from the extent of generation of inositol phosphates and phosphatidic acid, in platelets stimulated with thrombin as well as the non-hydrolysable GTP analogue guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate in a dose-dependent manner. These data suggest that propranolol inhibits signal transduction in thrombin-stimulated platelets by interacting at the level of phospholipase C and exclude interaction of the drug with the downstream effector enzyme protein kinase C. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7619088

  2. Platelet generation in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Biao; Zheng, Jiansheng

    2016-01-01

    Platelet (PLT) transfusion, which is the primary cell therapy for thrombocytopenia, has been a source of concern in recent years due to its limitations of donor-dependent supply and soaring costs. In vitro platelet generation on an industrial scale is a possible solution requiring exploration. The technology of platelet generation ex vivo has been widely studied across the world, though the mechanisms of physiological thrombopoiesis and platelet biology function in vivo still remain elusive today. Various culture systems have been studied, most of which proved quite inefficient in generating functional platelets ex vivo, so there is still a long way to reach our ultimate goal of generating a fully functional platelet in vitro on an industrial scale. This review integrates the latest research into physiological platelet biogenesis and ex vivo-platelet/megakaryocyte (MK) generation protocols with a focus on the ability to generate PLT/MK in large quantities, summarizes current culture systems based on induced human pluripotent stem cells and adipose-derived stem cells, and discusses significant challenges that must be overcome for these approaches to be perfected. PMID:27390629

  3. Titanium surface hydrophilicity enhances platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Titanium implant surface modification is a key strategy used to enhance osseointegration. Platelets are the first cells that interact with the implant surface whereupon they release a wide array of proteins that influence the subsequent healing process. This study therefore investigated the effect of titanium surface modification on the attachment and activation of human platelets. The surface characteristics of three titanium surfaces: smooth (SMO), micro-rough (SLA) and hydrophilic micro-rough (SLActive) and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets following exposure to these surfaces were determined. The SLActive surface showed the presence of significant nanoscale topographical features. While attached platelets appeared to be morphologically similar, significantly fewer platelets attached to the SLActive surface compared to both the SMO and SLA surfaces. The SLActive surface however induced the release of the higher levels of chemokines β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 from platelets. This study shows that titanium surface topography and chemistry have a significant effect on platelet activation and chemokine release.

  4. Fractal and Euclidean descriptors of platelet shape.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Max-Joseph; Neeb, Heiko; Strasser, Erwin F

    2014-01-01

    Platelet shape change is a dynamic membrane surface process that exhibits remarkable morphological heterogeneity. Once the outline of an irregular shape is identified and segmented from a digital image, several mathematical descriptors can be applied to numerical characterize the irregularity of the shapes surface. 13072 platelet outlines (PLO) were segmented automatically from 1928 microscopic images using a newly developed algorithm for the software product Matlab R2012b. The fractal dimension (FD), circularity, eccentricity, area and perimeter of each PLO were determined. 972 PLO were randomly assigned for computer-assisted manual measurement of platelet diameter as well as number, width and length of filopodia per platelet. FD can be used as a surrogate parameter for determining the roughness of the PLO and circularity can be used as a surrogate to estimate the number and length of filopodia. The relationship between FD and perimeter of the PLO reveals the existence of distinct groups of platelets with significant structural differences which may be caused by platelet activation. This new method allows for the standardized continuous numerical classification of platelet shape and its dynamic change, which is useful for the analysis of altered platelet activity (e.g. inflammatory diseases, contact activation, drug testing).

  5. Metal-decorated graphene oxide for ammonia adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunguo; Pathak, Biswarup; Nisar, Jawad; Qian, Zhao; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2013-07-01

    Based on the first-principles density functional theory, we have studied the stability, electronic structure and ammonia storage capacity of metal-decorated graphene oxide (GO). Metal atoms (Mg and Li) are bonded strongly to the epoxy oxygen atoms on the surface of the GO sheet, which can act as high-surface-area adsorbent for the ammonia uptake and release. Each metal atom can bind several ammonia molecules around itself with a reasonable binding energy. We find metal-decorated GO can store up to tens of moles of ammonia per kilogram, which is far better than the recently reported excellent ammonia adsorption by GO.

  6. Unusual electronic and magnetic responses from sulfur-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Choongyu; Cybart, S. A.; Wu, S. M.; Dynes, R. C.; Shin, S. J.; Haller, E. E.; Kim, S.; Kim, K.; Min, B. I.; Rappoport, T. G.; Jozwiak, C.; Fedorov, A. V.; Mo, S.-K.; Castro Neto, A. H.; Lee, D.-H.; Lanzara, A.

    Interactions between two different materials can produce strong electronic correlations that do not exist when each material stands alone. We search for such correlations from graphene, a non-magnetic semi-metal, decorated by sulfur, a diamagnetic insulator, using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and magneto-transport measurements. Sulfur-decorated graphene exhibits unusual electronic and magnetic responses that are clearly distinguished from clean graphene. Our findings provide intriguing insights on the search for novel quantum phases in graphene-based compounds.

  7. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  8. 41 CFR 102-42.125 - How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How is donation of gifts... 42-UTILIZATION, DONATION, AND DISPOSAL OF FOREIGN GIFTS AND DECORATIONS Donation of Foreign Gifts and Decorations § 102-42.125 How is donation of gifts or decorations accomplished? The State Agencies for...

  9. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  10. [Platelet antigens: immunology and immuno-allergology].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, J C; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1996-02-01

    Platelet immunology allows the understanding of clinical findings in a genetic and serologic basis. Blood platelets bear common antigens and same specific antigens, classified in five groups (HPA 1 to 5), that are localized on membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib alpha, IIb and IIIa. Antiplatelet autoimmunization is generally due to IgG antibodies against membrane complexes IIb/IIIa or Ib/lX. Antiplatelet alloimmunization, clinically resulting in Posttransfusion Purpura and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia is more frequently associated with anti-IIb/IIIa antibodies, either anti-HPA-1a or HPA-1b. Finally, platelet participation in immunoallergic reactions is discussed, focusing both platelet activation by allergen itself and platelet recruitment by other inflammatory cells.

  11. Platelets as immune cells in infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Speth, Cornelia; Löffler, Jürgen; Krappmann, Sven; Lass-Flörl, Cornelia; Rambach, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Platelets have been shown to cover a broad range of functions. Besides their role in hemostasis, they have immunological functions and thus participate in the interaction between pathogens and host defense. Platelets have a broad repertoire of receptor molecules that enable them to sense invading pathogens and infection-induced inflammation. Consequently, platelets exert antimicrobial effector mechanisms, but also initiate an intense crosstalk with other arms of the innate and adaptive immunity, including neutrophils, monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, B cells and T cells. There is a fragile balance between beneficial antimicrobial effects and detrimental reactions that contribute to the pathogenesis, and many pathogens have developed mechanisms to influence these two outcomes. This review aims to highlight aspects of the interaction strategies between platelets and pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, in addition to the subsequent networking between platelets and other immune cells, and the relevance of these processes for the pathogenesis of infections.

  12. Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Schippinger, Gert; Prüller, Florian; Divjak, Manuela; Mahla, Elisabeth; Fankhauser, Florian; Rackemann, Steve; Raggam, Reinhard Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used for the treatment of sports injuries. It has been associated with improved healing and regeneration of soft tissues in elite athletes. Athletes are commonly receiving nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). As yet, the effect of these drugs on platelet function in PRP formulations has not been taken into consideration. Hypothesis The function of platelets in PRP produced under the influence of NSAIDs is inhibited and may lessen a possible healing effect on the site of injury. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods PRP was collected from patients receiving NSAIDs after elective orthopaedic surgery, and platelet function was evaluated using light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Results were compared with those obtained from healthy volunteers without a history of NSAID intake during the previous 2 weeks. Two different systems for blood collection and PRP production (Arthrex ACP double-syringe system and standard 4.5-mL sodium citrate blood collection tubes) were used and compared regarding the quality of PRP that was produced. Results For both groups, the baseline platelet counts of whole blood and the platelet counts of PRP formulations were found to be in the normal range. Both collection systems for PRP produced comparable results without significant differences between the groups. Platelet function testing with LTA revealed significantly impaired platelet aggregation in both PRP preparations, obtained from patients taking NSAIDs, irrespective of the type of NSAID (P < .001). All subjects from the control group showed normal platelet aggregation patterns when tested with LTA. Conclusion Autologous PRP produced from subjects after NSAID medication shows significantly impaired platelet function and may result in lower quality regarding the content of bioactive compounds. Clinical Relevance If required, the administration of NSAIDs should be performed after blood collection for

  13. Platelets and coagulation in infection

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rachelle P; Miller-Dorey, Sarah; Jenne, Craig N

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a frequent complication in sepsis that is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality in patients. In addition to the uncontrolled generation of thrombi throughout the patient's vasculature, DIC often consumes large quantities of clotting factors leaving the patient susceptible to hemorrhaging. Owing to these complications, patients often receive anticoagulants to treat the uncontrolled clotting, often with mixed outcomes. This lack of success with the current array of anticoagulants can be partly explained by the fact that during sepsis clotting is often initiated by the immune system. Systemic inflammation has the capacity to activate and amplify coagulation and, as such, potential therapies for the treatment of sepsis-associated DIC need to address the interaction between inflammation and coagulation. Recent studies have suggested that platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are the key mediators of infection-induced coagulation. This review explores current anticoagulant therapies and discusses the development of future therapies to target platelet and NET-mediated coagulation. PMID:27525062

  14. Histamine reduces GPIbα-mediated adhesion of platelets to TNF-α-activated vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Brown, T P; Forouzan, O; Shevkoplyas, S S; Khismatullin, D B

    2013-02-01

    Histamine and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are critical mediators of acute and chronic inflammation that are generated by mast cells and macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions or systemically during allergic attacks. Both of them induce activation of vascular endothelium and thus may play a role in thrombosis. Here we studied the interplay between histamine and TNF-α in glycoprotein (GP) Ibα-mediated platelet adhesion to cultured human vascular endothelial cells under static and shear flow conditions. The stimulation of endothelial cells with histamine or TNF-α increased the number of adherent or slow rolling GP Ibα-coated microbeads or washed human platelets. However, the application of histamine to endothelium pre-activated by TNF-α inhibited GP Ibα-mediated platelet adhesion. These effects were found to be associated with changes in the concentration of ultra large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF) strings anchored to endothelium. The results of this study indicate that histamine released during mast cell degranulation may cause or inhibit thrombosis, depending on whether it acts on resting endothelial cells or on cells pre-activated by other inflammatory stimuli.

  15. In vivo efficacy of platelet-delivered, high specific activity factor VIII variants

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Teshell K.; Wang, Cheng; Hirsch, Jessica D.; Zhai, Li; Gewirtz, Jamie; Thornton, Michael A.; Miao, Hongzhi Z.; Pipe, Steven W.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Camire, Rodney M.; Arruda, Valder R.; Kowalska, M. Anna

    2010-01-01

    Ectopically expressed, human B-domainless (hB) factor 8 (F8) in platelets improves hemostasis in hemophilia A mice in several injury models. However, in both a cuticular bleeding model and a cremaster laser arteriole/venule injury model, there were limitations to platelet-derived (p) hBF8 efficacy, including increased clot embolization. We now address whether variants of F8 with enhanced activity, inactivation resistant F8 (IR8) and canine (c) BF8, would improve clotting efficacy. In both transgenic and lentiviral murine model approaches, pIR8 expressed at comparable levels to phBF8, but pcBF8 expressed at only approximately 30%. Both variants were more effective than hBF8 in cuticular bleeding and FeCl3 carotid artery models. However, in the cremaster injury model, only pcBF8 was more effective, markedly decreasing clot embolization. Because inhibitors of F8 are stored in platelet granules and IR8 is not protected by binding to von Willebrand factor, we also tested whether pIR8 was effective in the face of inhibitors and found that pIR8 is protected from the inhibitors. In summary, pF8 variants with high specific activity are more effective in controlling bleeding, but this improved efficacy was inconsistent between bleeding models, perhaps reflecting the underlying mechanism(s) for the increased specific activity of the studied F8 variants. PMID:20852129

  16. Towards personalised therapy for von Willebrand disease: a future role for recombinant products

    PubMed Central

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J.

    2016-01-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is reportedly the most common bleeding disorder and is caused by deficiencies and/or defects in the adhesive plasma protein von Willebrand factor (VWF). Functionally, normal VWF prevents bleeding by promoting both primary and secondary haemostasis. In respect to primary haemostasis, VWF binds to both platelets and sub-endothelial matrix components, especially collagen, to anchor platelets to damaged vascular tissue and promote thrombus formation. VWF also stabilises and protects factor VIII in the circulation, delivering FVIII to the site of injury, which then facilitates secondary haemostasis and fibrin formation/thrombus stabilisation. As a result of this, patients with VWD suffer a bleeding diathesis reflective of a primary defect caused by defective/deficient VWF, which in some patients is compounded by a reduction in FVIII. Management of VWD, therefore, chiefly entails replacement of VWF, and sometimes also FVIII, to protect against bleeding. The current report principally focuses on the future potential for “personalised” management of VWD, given the emerging options in recombinant therapies. Recombinant VWF has been developed and is undergoing clinical trials, and this promising therapy may soon change the way in which VWD is managed. In particular, we can envisage a personalised treatment approach using recombinant VWF, with or without recombinant FVIII, depending on the type of VWD, the extent of deficiencies, and the period and duration of treatment. PMID:27136426

  17. Dr. von Braun Briefing Walt Disney

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Dr. von Braun began his association with Walt Disney in the 1950s when the rocket scientist appeared in three Disney television productions related to the exploration of space. Years later, Dr. von Braun invited Disney and his associates to tour the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This photograph is dated April 13, 1965. From left are R.J. Schwinghamer from the MSFC, Disney, B.J. Bernight, and Dr. von Braun.

  18. Mean platelet size related to glycoprotein-specific autoantibodies and platelet-associated IgG.

    PubMed

    Javela, K; Kekomäki, R

    2007-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that platelet-associated glycoprotein-specific (GP) antibodies represent true positive autoantibodies and can therefore be taken as the gold standard. Earlier tests, which aimed at detecting platelet-associated IgG (PA-IgG), might have been hampered, e.g. by the variation of platelet size in thrombocytopenic patients. In this study, 206 samples with increased PA-IgG from consecutive thrombocytopenic patients were tested further for GP-specific antibodies with a monoclonal antibody immobilized platelet antigen test (MAIPA) using a combination of a GP IIbIIIa-specific and a GP IbIX-specific antibody for immobilization or, in a separate assay, GP V-specific antibody. Mean platelet size was recorded as forward scatter (FSC) of platelets in flow cytometric analysis of PA-IgG. GP-specific antibodies were detected in 49 (24%) of the 206 patient samples. Their presence correlated well with increased PA-IgG (R = 0.769). The mean platelet size and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of PA-IgG were both significantly increased in patients compared with healthy controls (n = 112; P < 0.0001). Notably, PA-IgG was associated with platelet size within the platelet population of both healthy controls and patients (R = 0.999). Further, the probability of GP IIbIIIa and/or IbIX and GP V-specific PA-IgG tended to increase with the mean platelet size of the patients (P = 0.045). In conclusion, large platelets bound more IgG than platelets of normal size, which may explain at least in part the reported low specificity of total PA-IgG measurement. As the PA-IgG displays low specificity compared with the gold standard, its use as such may be abandoned and replaced by tests for platelet-associated GP-specific autoantibodies. PMID:17988298

  19. Mean platelet size related to glycoprotein-specific autoantibodies and platelet-associated IgG

    PubMed Central

    JAVELA, K; KEKOMÄKI, R

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that platelet-associated glycoprotein-specific (GP) antibodies represent true positive autoantibodies and can therefore be taken as the gold standard. Earlier tests, which aimed at detecting platelet-associated IgG (PA-IgG), might have been hampered, e.g. by the variation of platelet size in thrombocytopenic patients. In this study, 206 samples with increased PA-IgG from consecutive thrombocytopenic patients were tested further for GP-specific antibodies with a monoclonal antibody immobilized platelet antigen test (MAIPA) using a combination of a GP IIbIIIa-specific and a GP IbIX-specific antibody for immobilization or, in a separate assay, GP V-specific antibody. Mean platelet size was recorded as forward scatter (FSC) of platelets in flow cytometric analysis of PA-IgG. GP-specific antibodies were detected in 49 (24%) of the 206 patient samples. Their presence correlated well with increased PA-IgG (R = 0.769). The mean platelet size and mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of PA-IgG were both significantly increased in patients compared with healthy controls (n = 112; P < 0.0001). Notably, PA-IgG was associated with platelet size within the platelet population of both healthy controls and patients (R = 0.999). Further, the probability of GP IIbIIIa and/or IbIX and GP V-specific PA-IgG tended to increase with the mean platelet size of the patients (P = 0.045). In conclusion, large platelets bound more IgG than platelets of normal size, which may explain at least in part the reported low specificity of total PA-IgG measurement. As the PA-IgG displays low specificity compared with the gold standard, its use as such may be abandoned and replaced by tests for platelet-associated GP-specific autoantibodies. PMID:17988298

  20. 17. Interior, molded plaster cornice and overdoor decoration found in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Interior, molded plaster cornice and overdoor decoration found in a closet on the first floor. May have been part of a dining room at the turn of the century. - Trenton House Hotel, 20-24 North Warren Street & 1-19 East Hanover Street, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  1. Reaction rates of graphite with ozone measured by etch decoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennig, G. R.; Montet, G. L.

    1968-01-01

    Etch-decoration technique of detecting vacancies in graphite has been used to determine the reaction rates of graphite with ozone in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the layer planes. It consists essentially of peeling single atom layers off graphite crystals without affecting the remainder of the crystal.

  2. The mechanism by which arabinoxylanases can recognize highly decorated xylans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The enzymatic degradation of plant cell walls is an important biological process of increasing environmental and industrial significance. Xylan, a major component of the plant cell wall, consists of a backbone of beta 1,4-xylose (Xylp) units that are often decorated with arabinofuranose (Araf) side ...

  3. Breaking Monotony: A Reflective Study of Teaching Decorative Pot Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nortey, Samuel; Okai, Frederick E.; Bodjawah, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    In art, the idea of pots being circular and cylindrical is an intuitive proposition that defines why potters have, up to the present, made wonderful decorations in the round. It is believed that potters do not want to subvert or break away from their tradition, perhaps because the art started as family craft. In this study, the authors describe…

  4. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF BUILDING 1'S MAIN ENTRY TOWER (INCLUDING THE ENGAGED COLUMN CAPITALS, PILASTERS & CAPITALS, CORNICES, AND TERRA COTTA EAGLES); LOOKING SW FROM THE E WING ROOF. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  5. LANAI OF UNIT B. NOTE THE DECORATIVE PROTRUDING CONCRETE MASONRY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LANAI OF UNIT B. NOTE THE DECORATIVE PROTRUDING CONCRETE MASONRY. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  6. 25. LOBBY FIREPLACE. NOTE THE GEYSER DECORATING THE FIREPLACE SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. LOBBY FIREPLACE. NOTE THE GEYSER DECORATING THE FIREPLACE SCREEN AND THE WEIGHTS AND PENDULUM HANGING FROM THE CLOCK DESIGNED BY ARCHITECT ROBERT C. REAMER. - Old Faithful Inn, 900' northeast of Snowlodge & 1050' west of Old Faithful Lodge, Lake, Teton County, WY

  7. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  8. 5. VIEW OF THE LAMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. DECORATIVE BRICK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF THE LAMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. DECORATIVE BRICK CORBELING AND PILASTERS DIVIDE THE BAYS. BRICK CORBELING ACCENTS THE EAVES. CONCRETE LINTELS ABOVE THE WINDOW OPENINGS PROVIDE ADDITIONAL DETAILING. - Tower Hill No. 2 Mine, Approximately 0.47 mile Southwest of intersection of Stone Church Road & Township Route 561, Hibbs, Fayette County, PA

  9. 5. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF BUILDING 220, DECORATIVE FLOOR AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW OF INTERIOR OF BUILDING 220, DECORATIVE FLOOR AT ENTRANCE. VINYL TILE INLAID FLOOR WITH A RED BACKGROUND, GREEN EMBLEM, BROWN AND WHITE EAGLE, RED AND WHITE SHIELD, BLACK ANCHOR, RED ARROWS AND LETTERING. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Brig, Neville Way near Ninth Street at Marine Barracks, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  10. CLOSEUP OF THE DECORATIVE FEATURES OF THE WINDOW AND DOOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CLOSE-UP OF THE DECORATIVE FEATURES OF THE WINDOW AND DOOR AREA ON THE NORTH SIDE OF BLDG 662. NOTE THE CAST CONCRETE ORNAMENTAL FEATURES FROM THE ORIGINAL CONSTRUCTION. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Bachelor Officer Quarters, Dealy Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  11. The Decorated School: Past Potency and Present Patronage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The Decorated School is an interdisciplinary research network funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council. The article situates current academic and wider community engagement concerning the purpose and significance of art as part of the school building and grounds in an historical context. It goes on to discuss emerging patterns of…

  12. Platelet-TLR7 mediates host survival and platelet count during viral infection in the absence of platelet-dependent thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Koupenova, Milka; Vitseva, Olga; MacKay, Christopher R; Beaulieu, Lea M; Benjamin, Emelia J; Mick, Eric; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Ravid, Katya; Freedman, Jane E

    2014-07-31

    Viral infections have been associated with reduced platelet counts, the biological significance of which has remained elusive. Here, we show that infection with encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) rapidly reduces platelet count, and this response is attributed to platelet Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7). Platelet-TLR7 stimulation mediates formation of large platelet-neutrophil aggregates, both in mouse and human blood. Intriguingly, this process results in internalization of platelet CD41-fragments by neutrophils, as assessed biochemically and visualized by microscopy, with no influence on platelet prothrombotic properties. The mechanism includes TLR7-mediated platelet granule release, translocation of P-selectin to the cell surface, and a consequent increase in platelet-neutrophil adhesion. Viral infection of platelet-depleted mice also led to increased mortality. Transfusion of wild-type, TLR7-expressing platelets into TLR7-deficient mice caused a drop in platelet count and increased survival post EMCV infection. Thus, this study identifies a new link between platelets and their response to single-stranded RNA viruses that involves activation of TLR7. Finally, platelet-TLR7 stimulation is independent of thrombosis and has implications to the host immune response and survival.

  13. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  14. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies. PMID:24966015

  15. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  16. The role of platelets in sepsis.

    PubMed

    de Stoppelaar, Sacha F; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-10-01

    Platelets are small circulating anucleate cells that are of crucial importance in haemostasis. Over the last decade, it has become increasingly clear that platelets play an important role in inflammation and can influence both innate and adaptive immunity. Sepsis is a potentially lethal condition caused by detrimental host response to an invading pathogen. Dysbalanced immune response and activation of the coagulation system during sepsis are fundamental events leading to sepsis complications and organ failure. Platelets, being major effector cells in both haemostasis and inflammation, are involved in sepsis pathogenesis and contribute to sepsis complications. Platelets catalyse the development of hyperinflammation, disseminated intravascular coagulation and microthrombosis, and subsequently contribute to multiple organ failure. Inappropriate accumulation and activity of platelets are key events in the development of sepsis-related complications such as acute lung injury and acute kidney injury. Platelet activation readouts could serve as biomarkers for early sepsis recognition; inhibition of platelets in septic patients seems like an important target for immune-modulating therapy and appears promising based on animal models and retrospective human studies.

  17. Nanoparticle biointerfacing by platelet membrane cloaking.

    PubMed

    Hu, Che-Ming J; Fang, Ronnie H; Wang, Kuei-Chun; Luk, Brian T; Thamphiwatana, Soracha; Dehaini, Diana; Nguyen, Phu; Angsantikul, Pavimol; Wen, Cindy H; Kroll, Ashley V; Carpenter, Cody; Ramesh, Manikantan; Qu, Vivian; Patel, Sherrina H; Zhu, Jie; Shi, William; Hofman, Florence M; Chen, Thomas C; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Chien, Shu; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-10-01

    Development of functional nanoparticles can be encumbered by unanticipated material properties and biological events, which can affect nanoparticle effectiveness in complex, physiologically relevant systems. Despite the advances in bottom-up nanoengineering and surface chemistry, reductionist functionalization approaches remain inadequate in replicating the complex interfaces present in nature and cannot avoid exposure of foreign materials. Here we report on the preparation of polymeric nanoparticles enclosed in the plasma membrane of human platelets, which are a unique population of cellular fragments that adhere to a variety of disease-relevant substrates. The resulting nanoparticles possess a right-side-out unilamellar membrane coating functionalized with immunomodulatory and adhesion antigens associated with platelets. Compared to uncoated particles, the platelet membrane-cloaked nanoparticles have reduced cellular uptake by macrophage-like cells and lack particle-induced complement activation in autologous human plasma. The cloaked nanoparticles also display platelet-mimicking properties such as selective adhesion to damaged human and rodent vasculatures as well as enhanced binding to platelet-adhering pathogens. In an experimental rat model of coronary restenosis and a mouse model of systemic bacterial infection, docetaxel and vancomycin, respectively, show enhanced therapeutic efficacy when delivered by the platelet-mimetic nanoparticles. The multifaceted biointerfacing enabled by the platelet membrane cloaking method provides a new approach in developing functional nanoparticles for disease-targeted delivery.

  18. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Decreased mean platelet volume in panic disorder

    PubMed Central

    Göğçegöz Gül, Işıl; Eryılmaz, Gül; Özten, Eylem; Hızlı Sayar, Gökben

    2014-01-01

    Aim The relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied. It is well known that platelets may reflect certain biochemical changes that occur in the brain when different mental conditions occur. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) is also extensively studied in psychiatry. The mean platelet volume (MPV), the accurate measure of platelet size, has been considered a marker and determinant of platelet function. The aim of the present study was to search for any probable difference in the MPV of subjects with panic disorder (PD). Methods A total of 37 drug-free subjects, aged 18 to 65 years, diagnosed with PD, with or without agoraphobia, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition (DSM-IV) criteria and 45 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Platelet count and MPV were measured and recorded for each subject. Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of female/male ratio, age, or body mass index between the PD group and control group (P=0.91, P=0.82, and P=0.93, respectively). The MPV was found to be significantly lower in the PD group compared with the control group (8.8±0.9 fL vs 9.2±0.8 fL; P=0.02). All the participants had MPV values in the standard range of 6.9–10.8 fL. Conclusion We concluded that abnormalities of the 5-HT1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD are also mirrored in as an alteration in platelet activity. Measurements of platelet activity may be used as a tool for neuropsychiatric and psychopharmacological research and for studying how certain mental diseases and medications affect the central nervous system. PMID:25214790

  20. What Is Vinculin Needed for in Platelets?

    PubMed Central

    Mitsios, John V.; Prévost, Nicolas; Kasirer-Friede, Ana; Gutierrez, Edgar; Groisman, Alex; Abrams, Charles S.; Wang, Yanfeng; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Zemljic-Harpf, Alice; Ross, Robert S.; Shattil, Sanford J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background Vinculin links integrins to the cell cytoskeleton by virtue of its binding to proteins such as talin and F-actin. It has been implicated in the transmission of mechanical forces from the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton of migrating cells. Vinculin’s function in platelets is unknown. Objective To determine whether vinculin is required for the functions of platelets and their major integrin, αIIbβ3. Methods The murine vinculin gene (Vcl) was deleted in the megakaryocyte/platelet lineage by breeding Vcl fl/fl mice with Pf4-Cre mice. Platelet and integrin functions were studied in vivo and ex vivo. Results Vinculin was undetectable in platelets from Vcl fl/fl Cre+ mice, as determined by immunoblotting and fluorescence microscopy. Vinculin-deficient megakaryocytes exhibited increased membrane tethers in response to mechanical pulling on αIIbβ3 with laser tweezers, suggesting that vinculin helps to maintain membrane cytoskeleton integrity. Surprisingly, vinculin-deficient platelets displayed normal agonist-induced fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3, aggregation, spreading, actin polymerization/organization, clot retraction and the ability to form a procoagulant surface. Furthermore, vinculin-deficient platelets adhered to immobilized fibrinogen or collagen normally, both under static and flow conditions. Tail bleeding times were prolonged in 59% of vinculin-deficient mice. However, these mice exhibited no spontaneous bleeding and they formed occlusive platelet thrombi comparable to wild-type littermates in response to carotid artery injury with FeCl3. Conclusion Despite promoting membrane cytoskeleton integrity when mechanical force is applied to αIIbβ3, vinculin is not required for the traditional functions of αIIbβ3 or the platelet actin cytoskeleton. PMID:20670372

  1. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  2. Imipramine binding in subpopulations of normal human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1984-02-01

    Imipramine binding was studied in platelet membranes isolated with different proportions of heavy (young) and light (old) platelets. The B/sub max/, a measure of the number of binding sites, was greater in the heavier platelets than in the light platelets. However, the dissociation constant K/sub d/ (a reflection of the affinity of imipramine binding) was greater in the lighter platelets compared to the heavy platelets. These results indicate that differences in K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ in particular membrane preparation, could be due to the differences in the relative proportion of heavy and light platelets.

  3. RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes for brain targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Sonali; Singh, Rahul Pratap; Sharma, Gunjan; Kumari, Lakshmi; Koch, Biplob; Singh, Sanjay; Bharti, Shreekant; Rajinikanth, Paruvathanahalli Siddalingam; Pandey, Bajarangprasad L; Muthu, Madaswamy S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to formulate RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes, which contain both docetaxel (DTX) and quantum dots (QDs) for brain cancer imaging and therapy. RGD conjugated TPGS (RGD-TPGS) was synthesized and conjugation was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrospray ionisation (ESI) mass spectroscopy (ESI-MS). The theranostic liposomes were prepared by the solvent injection method and characterized for their particle size, polydispersity, zeta-potential, surface morphology, drug encapsulation efficiency, and in-vitro release study. Biocompatibility and safety of theranostic liposomes were studied by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation study and histopathology of brain. In-vivo study was performed for determination of brain theranostic effects in comparison with marketed formulation (Docel™) and free QDs. The particle sizes of the non-targeted and targeted theranostic liposomes were found in between 100 and 200nm. About 70% of drug encapsulation efficiency was achieved with liposomes. The drug release from RGD-TPGS decorated liposomes was sustained for more than 72h with 80% of drug release. The in-vivo results demonstrated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes were 6.47- and 6.98-fold more effective than Docel™ after 2h and 4h treatments, respectively. Further, RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes has reduced ROS generation effectively, and did not show any signs of brain damage or edema in brain histopathology. The results of this study have indicated that RGD-TPGS decorated theranostic liposomes are promising carrier for brain theranostics.

  4. Platelet-cytokine Complex Suppresses Tumour Growth by Exploiting Intratumoural Thrombin-dependent Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tung; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Tumours constitute unique microenvironments where various blood cells and factors are exposed as a result of leaky vasculature. In the present study, we report that thrombin enrichment in B16F10 melanoma led to platelet aggregation, and this property was exploited to administer an anticancer cytokine, interferon-gamma induced protein 10 (IP10), through the formation of a platelet-IP10 complex. When intravenously infused, the complex reached platelet microaggregates in the tumour. The responses induced by the complex were solely immune-mediated, and tumour cytotoxicity was not observed. The complex suppressed the growth of mouse melanoma in vivo, while both platelets and the complex suppressed the accumulation of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the tumour. These results demonstrated that thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation in B16F10 tumours defines platelets as a vector to deliver anticancer cytokines and provide specific treatment benefits. PMID:27117228

  5. Platelets: at the nexus of antimicrobial defence.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Michael R

    2014-06-01

    Platelets have traditionally been viewed as fragmentary mediators of coagulation. However, recent molecular and cellular evidence suggests that they have multiple roles in host defence against infection. From first-responders that detect pathogens and rapidly deploy host-defence peptides, to beacons that recruit and enhance leukocyte functions in the context of infection, to liaisons that facilitate the T cell-B cell crosstalk that is required in adaptive immunity, platelets represent a nexus at the intersection of haemostasis and antimicrobial host defence. In this Review, I consider recent insights into the antimicrobial roles of platelets, which are mediated both directly and indirectly to integrate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens.

  6. Reflexionseigenschaften von Windenergieanlagen im Funkfeld von Funknavigations- und Radarsystemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandmann, S.; Divanbeigi, S.; Garbe, H.

    2015-11-01

    Die hier behandelte Untersuchung befasst sich mit den Störungen des elektrischen Feldes einer Doppler Very High Frequency Omnidirectional Radio Range Navigationsanlage (DVOR) in der Gegenwart von Windenergieanlagen (WEA). Hierfür wird die Feldstärke auf 25 konzentrischen Kreisbahnen, sog. Orbit Flights verschiedener Höhen und mit verschiedenen Radien rund um die DVOR-Anlage numerisch simuliert. Insbesondere werden die Einflüsse diverser Parameter der WEA wie deren Anzahl, Position, Rotorwinkel, Turmhöhe und Rotordurchmesser auf die Feldverteilung herausgestellt, sowie die Anwendbarkeit der Simulationsmethode Physical Optics (PO) durch Vergleich der Simulationsergebnisse mit denen der Multi Level Fast Multipol Method (MLFMM) untersucht.

  7. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion. PMID:24078269

  8. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion.

  9. Factor VIII is a positive regulator of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Obergfell, A; Sturm, A; Speer, C P; Walter, U; Grossmann, R

    2006-11-01

    FVIII is an important cofactor in the tenase coagulation factor complex, lack of FVIII causes severe bleeding, whereas high FVIII levels seem to be associated with venous and arterial thromboembolism. Resting platelets do not bind FVIII, but activated platelets bind unactivated FVIII if vWF is not present. We investigated a possible influence of platelet bound FVIII on platelet function itself as it is unclear if there is a direct effect of FVIII on platelet function. The influence of FVIII on platelet function was investigated by flow cytometric analysis of P-selectin expression (CD62P) and PAC-1 binding before and after submaximal stimulation with TRAP-6 (5 microM final concentration), by confocal microscopy and by platelet aggregometry. For flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, washed platelets were incubated with human recombinant FVIII for 5 min at 37 degrees C. Analysis of platelet surface area was measured by computerized image analysis. Treatment with FVIII only caused no changes in P-selectin expression or PAC-1 binding, respectively. Stimulation of platelets with TRAP-6 increased the expression of P-selectin (445%) and PAC-1 binding (934%) as expected. These effects were further increased when platelets were stimulated with TRAP-6 and FVIII (P-selectin 499%, difference not significant; PAC-1 1626%, P < 0.05. Values were expressed in%, related to unstimulated, buffer treated platelets). Platelet spreading on fibrinogen was significantly increased when platelets were treated with FVIII and TRAP-6 compared to TRAP-6 alone (368 vs. 307 average pixel/platelet, P<0.05). In addition platelet aggregation was enhanced when platelets were stimulated with FVIII and TRAP-6 compared to TRAP-6 alone. FVIII can act as a positive regulator of platelet function in TRAP-co-stimulated platelets. We hypothesize that FVIII induced increase in platelet activation might contribute to venous and even arterial thrombus formation in patients with high FVIII levels. PMID:17074720

  10. Platelet-rich fibrin matrix for facial plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Sclafani, Anthony P; Saman, Masoud

    2012-05-01

    Platelets are known primarily for their role in hemostasis, but there is increasing interest in the effect of platelets on wound healing. Platelet isolates such as platelet-rich plasma have been advocated to enhance and accelerate wound healing. This article describes the use of a novel preparation, platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), for facial plastic surgery applications such as volume augmentation, fat transfer supplementation, and as an adjunct to open surgical procedures.

  11. Platelets: the few, the young, and the active.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Carol; Briggs, Carol; Machin, Samuel J

    2015-03-01

    Many modern automated cell counters in high-volume clinical hematology laboratories use new, improved technologies for routine platelet analysis. The latest progress includes the use of state-of-the art information technology, specific fluorescent dyes, and monoclonal antibodies to obtain more reliable platelet counts. This information allows the accurate and precise enumeration of platelets even in thrombocytopenic patients and the reporting of novel platelet parameters. In the near future, digital image analysis may permit even better platelet analysis. PMID:25676376

  12. Flow and delta-P dictate where thrombin, fibrin, and von Willebrand Factor will be found.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Hemostasis occurs in two different topological scenarios: complete severing of a vessel or disruption of the vessel wall. Either to meet the daily rigors of active life or during an acute trauma, hemostasis involves the regulated and self-limiting production of thrombin to stop bleeding. In contrast, arterial and venous thrombosis typically involves the unregulated, intraluminal growth of a clot, in the absence of bleeding. For either hemostasis or thrombosis, the presence of flow and pressure gradients (delta-P, ΔP) dictates when and where thrombin and fibrin are located and in what quantity. For hemostatic clots, fibrin formation helped limit clot growth. We found that γ'-fibrinogen had a role in limiting clot growth via anti-thrombin activity at venous, but not arterial conditions. For hemophilic blood, severe factor deficiency (<1% healthy) led to a defect in both platelet and fibrin deposition under flow. However, moderate deficiency, which is associated with a less severe bleeding phenotype, had normalized platelet function but still lacked fibrin production. We conclude signaling levels of thrombin can be generated during moderate hemophilia to sufficiently activate platelets to achieve primary hemostasis, even if fibrin formation remains defective. Finally, as a clot grows, shear stresses can become sufficiently extreme in diseased arteries to drive von Willebrand Factor self-association into massive fibers, potentially the final burst of clot growth towards full thrombotic occlusion. PMID:27207416

  13. Flow and delta-P dictate where thrombin, fibrin, and von Willebrand Factor will be found.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Scott L

    2016-05-01

    Hemostasis occurs in two different topological scenarios: complete severing of a vessel or disruption of the vessel wall. Either to meet the daily rigors of active life or during an acute trauma, hemostasis involves the regulated and self-limiting production of thrombin to stop bleeding. In contrast, arterial and venous thrombosis typically involves the unregulated, intraluminal growth of a clot, in the absence of bleeding. For either hemostasis or thrombosis, the presence of flow and pressure gradients (delta-P, ΔP) dictates when and where thrombin and fibrin are located and in what quantity. For hemostatic clots, fibrin formation helped limit clot growth. We found that γ'-fibrinogen had a role in limiting clot growth via anti-thrombin activity at venous, but not arterial conditions. For hemophilic blood, severe factor deficiency (<1% healthy) led to a defect in both platelet and fibrin deposition under flow. However, moderate deficiency, which is associated with a less severe bleeding phenotype, had normalized platelet function but still lacked fibrin production. We conclude signaling levels of thrombin can be generated during moderate hemophilia to sufficiently activate platelets to achieve primary hemostasis, even if fibrin formation remains defective. Finally, as a clot grows, shear stresses can become sufficiently extreme in diseased arteries to drive von Willebrand Factor self-association into massive fibers, potentially the final burst of clot growth towards full thrombotic occlusion.

  14. Evaluation of platelet thromboxane radioimmunoassay method to measure platelet life-span: Comparison with /sup 111/indium-platelet method

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Machac, J.; Badimon, L.; Lipszyc, H.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.

    1985-05-01

    The platelet activation during radiolabeling in vitro with Cr-51 and In-111 may affect the platelet life-span (PLS) in vivo. A new RIA method to measure PLS is being evaluated. Aspirin inhibits platelet thromboxane (TxA/sub 2/) by acetylating cyclooxygenase. The time required for the TxA/sub 2/ levels to return towards control values depends on the rate of new platelets entering circulation and is a measure of PLS. A single dose of aspirin (150mg) was given to 5 normal human subjects. Blood samples were collected for 2 days before aspirin and daily for 10 days. TxA/sub 2/ production in response to endogenous thrombin was studied by allowing 1 ml blood sample to clot at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min. Serum TxB/sub 2/ (stable breakdown product of Tx-A/sub 2/) levels determined by RIA technique. The plot of TxB/sub 2/ levels (% control) against time showed a gradual increase. The PLS calculated by linear regression analysis assuming a 2-day lag period before cyclooxygenase recovery is 9.7 +- 2.37. In the same 5 subjects, platelets from a 50ml blood sample were labeled with /sup 111/In-tropolone in 2 ml autologous plasma. Starting at 1 hr after injection of labeled platelets, 10 blood samples were obtained over a 8 day period. The PLS calculated based on a linear regression analysis is 10.2 +. 1.4. The PLS measured from the rate of platelet disappearance from circulation and the rate of platelet regeneration into circulation are quite comparable in normal subjects. TxA/sub 2/ regeneration RIA may provide a method to measure PLS without administering radioactivity to patient.

  15. Platelet vacuoles in a dog with severe nonregenerative anemia: evidence of platelet autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pieczarka, Emily M; Yamaguchi, Mamoru; Wellman, Maxey L; Judith Radin, M

    2014-09-01

    A 13-year-old neutered male English Springer Spaniel was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for evaluation of severe anemia. Upon blood smear review, approximately 50% of the platelets contained single to multiple variably sized clear vacuoles. Transmission electron microscopy of the platelets revealed hallmark features of autophagy, including membrane-lined vesicles and vacuoles containing membrane whorls and degrading organelles. While autophagy has been demonstrated in a wide range of eukaryotic cells for decades, reports of platelet autophagy are lacking. This case report illustrates atypical platelet vacuolation with electron microscopic features characteristic of autophagy.

  16. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro-derived platelets.

    PubMed

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul; French, Deborah L

    2016-03-10

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro-based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro-based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro-derived platelets for clinical application.

  17. Platelet lipidomics: a modern day perspective on lipid discovery and characterization in platelets

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Valerie B; Murphy, Robert C.; Watson, Steve P

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are diverse families of biomolecules that perform essential structural and signaling roles in platelets. Their formation and metabolism is tightly controlled by enzymes and signal transduction pathways, and their dysregulation leads to significant defects in platelet function and disease. Platelet activation is associated with significant changes to membrane lipids, and formation of diverse bioactive lipids that play essential roles in hemostasis. In recent years, new generation mass spectrometry analysis of lipids (termed “lipidomics”) has begun to alter our understanding of how these molecules participate in key cellular processes. While, the application of lipidomics to platelet biology is still in its infancy, seminal earlier studies have shaped our knowledge of how lipids regulate key aspects of platelet biology, including aggregation, shape change, coagulation and degranulation, as well as how lipids generated by platelets influence other cells, such as leukocytes and the vascular wall, and thus how they regulate hemostasis, vascular integrity and inflammation, as well as contribute to pathologies including arterial/deep vein thrombosis and atherosclerosis. This review will provide a brief historical perspective on the characterization of lipids in platelets, then an overview of the new generation lipidomic approaches, their recent application to platelet biology, and future perspectives for research in this area. The major platelet-regulatory lipid families, their formation, metabolism, and their role in health and disease, will be summarized. PMID:24677238

  18. Regulation of platelet biology by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1.

    PubMed

    Jones, Chris I; Moraes, Leonardo A; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2012-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif containing receptor, plays diverse and apparently contradictory roles in regulating the response of platelets to stimuli; inhibiting platelet response to immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif and G protein-coupled receptor signalling following stimulation with collagen, adenosine diphosphate, and thrombin, as well as enhancing integrin outside-in signalling. These dual, and opposing, roles suggest an important and complex role for PECAM-1 in orchestrating platelet response to vascular damage. Indeed, during thrombus formation, the influence of PECAM-1 on the multiple signalling pathways combines leading to a relatively large inhibitory effect on thrombus formation. PMID:22035359

  19. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro–derived platelets

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro–based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro–based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro–derived platelets for clinical application. PMID:26787738

  20. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  1. Platelet lipidomics: modern day perspective on lipid discovery and characterization in platelets.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Valerie B; Murphy, Robert C; Watson, Steve P

    2014-03-28

    Lipids are diverse families of biomolecules that perform essential structural and signaling roles in platelets. Their formation and metabolism are tightly controlled by enzymes and signal transduction pathways, and their dysregulation leads to significant defects in platelet function and disease. Platelet activation is associated with significant changes to membrane lipids, and formation of diverse bioactive lipids plays essential roles in hemostasis. In recent years, new generation mass spectrometry analysis of lipids (termed lipidomics) has begun to alter our understanding of how these molecules participate in key cellular processes. Although the application of lipidomics to platelet biology is still in its infancy, seminal earlier studies have shaped our knowledge of how lipids regulate key aspects of platelet biology, including aggregation, shape change, coagulation, and degranulation, as well as how lipids generated by platelets influence other cells, such as leukocytes and the vascular wall, and thus how they regulate hemostasis, vascular integrity, and inflammation, as well as contribute to pathologies, including arterial/deep vein thrombosis and atherosclerosis. This review will provide a brief historical perspective on the characterization of lipids in platelets, then an overview of the new generation lipidomic approaches, their recent application to platelet biology, and future perspectives for research in this area. The major platelet-regulatory lipid families, their formation, metabolism, and their role in health and disease, will be summarized.

  2. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  3. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches. PMID:24629305

  4. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches.

  5. Dr. Wernher Von Braun greeting dignitaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, left, greets vice president Spiro T. Agnew in the Launch Control Center for the Apollo 14 mission. Between Dr. Von Braun and Mr. Agnew are their Royal Highnesses, The Prince and Princess of Spain. The royal visitors greeted the launch control team in th enter after the launch of Apollo 14.

  6. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at a picnic.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, director of the Marshall Space Flight Center, stakes claim to a table for the picnic celebrating man's first lunar landing. With Dr. Von Braun are his wife, Maria (seated, right), and son, Peter (back to camera). His daughter, Margrit, was also present, but is hidden from view by friends in this view.

  7. Walt Disney and Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1954-01-01

    Dr. Werhner von Braun, then Chief, Guided Missile Development Operation Division at Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) in Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, was visited by Walt Disney in 1954. In the 1950's, von Braun worked with Disney Studio as a technical director, making three films about space exploration for television. A model of the V-2 rocket is in background.

  8. Ludwig von Mises: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, David

    A 117-item annotated bibliography of books, articles, essays, lectures, and reviews by economist Ludwig von Mises is presented. The bibliography is arranged chronologicaly, and is followed by an alphabetical listing of the citations, excluding books. An index and information on the Ludwig von Mises Institute at Auburn University (Alabama) are…

  9. Anger expression correlates with platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Wenneberg, S R; Schneider, R H; Walton, K G; MacLean, C R; Levitsky, D K; Mandarino, J V; Waziri, R; Wallace, R K

    1997-01-01

    Potential relationships between increased platelet aggregability and such psychological characteristics as hostility and anger were investigated as part of a larger intervention study investigating the potential efficacy of stress-reduction treatments. Participants performed 6-minute mental arithmetic tests under time pressure. Blood was sampled during the first minute of the task and whole blood platelet aggregation was measured in an aggregometer, using collagen and ADP. To assess anger and hostility, the authors used Spielberger's State-Trait Anger and Anger Expression scales together with the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. The authors found positive correlations between collagen-induced platelet aggregation and outwardly expressed anger, as measured by the Anger Expression Scale. The findings suggested that modes of anger expression may be associated with increased platelet aggregation. If confirmed by future studies, this finding could provide a mechanism for the putative connection between anger/hostility and coronary heart disease.

  10. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  11. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  12. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  13. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  14. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  15. Acid soluble, pepsin resistant platelet aggregating material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.

    1982-08-31

    Disclosed is an acid soluble, pepsin resistant, platelet aggregating material isolated from equine arterial tissue by extraction with dilute aqueous acid. The method of isolation and use to control bleeding are described. 4 figs.

  16. Platelet transfusion therapy: from 1973 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke; Novotny, Vera; Tomson, Bert

    2006-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indispensable for supportive care of patients with hematological diseases. We describe the developments in platelet products for transfusion since the 1970s, when, in particular, support for patients with allo-antibodies against human leukocyte antigens was a laborious exercise with a high failure rate. Currently, due to many stepwise innovations, platelet transfusions are of low immunogenicity and sufficiently available, they have a shelf life up to 7 days, and even matched platelets can often be routinely delivered, provided that there is good communication between all partners in the chain. Future improvements can be expected from uniform type and screen approaches for immunized patients and cross-matching by computer. For efficient use of health care resources, blood banks and stem cell donor banks could share their typed donor files. PMID:16728262

  17. Hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated Shiga toxins promote endothelial-cell secretion and impair ADAMTS13 cleavage of unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers.

    PubMed

    Nolasco, Leticia H; Turner, Nancy A; Bernardo, Aubrey; Tao, Zhenyin; Cleary, Thomas G; Dong, Jing-Fei; Moake, Joel L

    2005-12-15

    Shiga toxin 1 (Stx-1) and Stx-2 produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli cause the diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This type of HUS is characterized by obstruction of the glomeruli and renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, microvascular hemolytic anemia, and plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) activity that are within a broad normal range. We investigated the mechanism of initial platelet accumulation on Stx-stimulated endothelial cells. Stx-1 or Stx-2 (1-10 nM) stimulated the rapid secretion of unusually large (UL) VWF multimeric strings from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs). Perfused normal human platelets immediately adhered to the secreted ULVWF multimeric strings. Nanomolar concentrations (1-10 nM) of the Shiga toxins were as effective in inducing the formation of ULVWF-platelet strings as millimolar concentrations (0.1-20 mM) of histamine. The rate of ULVWF-platelet string cleavage by plasma or recombinant ADAMTS13 was delayed by 3 to 10 minutes (or longer) in the presence of 10 nM Stx-1 or Stx-2 compared with 20 mM histamine. Stx-induced formation of ULVWF strings, and impairment of ULVWF-platelet string cleavage by ADAMTS13, may promote initial platelet adhesion above glomerular endothelial cells. These processes may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion by platelet and fibrin thrombi in diarrhea-associated HUS.

  18. Dr. Wernher von Braun Laid to Rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paper Clip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. Dr. von Braun died in Alexandria, Va., on June 16, 1977, seven years after his NASA appointment. This photo was taken at the site where he was laid to rest.

  19. Dr. Wernher von Braun In His Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun served as Marshall Space Flight Center's first director from July 1, 1960 until January 27, 1970, when he was appointed NASA Deputy Associate Administrator for Planning. Following World War II, Dr. von Braun and his German colleagues arrived in the United States under Project Paperclip to continue their rocket development work. In 1950, von Braun and his rocket team were transferred from Ft. Bliss, Texas to Huntsville, Alabama to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal and later, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Under von Braun's leadership, Marshall developed the Saturn V launch vehicle which took Apollo astronauts to the moon. This photo depicts von Braun in his office at MSFC.

  20. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow. PMID:27339024

  1. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow.

  2. Stimulus-response coupling in platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of stimulus-response coupling in platelets, the potentiating effect of succinate and lithium on platelet activation was examined. The action of succinate was immediate; preincubation with succinate did not lead to desensitization. Succinate was comparable to ADP in lowering cAMP levels previously elevated by PGl/sub 2/. Since inhibition of cAMP is not a prerequisite for platelet activation, the mechanism of potentiation of succinate remains undefined. Lithium has also been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase in PGl/sub 2/-pretreated platelets. Lithium, however, can also inhibit inositol phosphate (InsP) phosphatase and lead to an accumulation of InsP. In human platelets, lithium also enhanced the thrombin-induced accumulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labelled inositol trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/), and inositol bisphosphate (InsP/sub 2/). One hour after thrombin addition, all 3 inositol phosphates returned to near basal levels. In the presence of lithium, while labelled InsP/sub 2/ and InsP/sub 3/ returned to their respective basal levels, the InsP level remained elevated, consistent with the known inhibitory effect of lithium on InsP phosphatase. In thrombin-stimulated platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)phosphate, lithium led to a decrease in labelled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) as well as an enhanced production of labelled lysophosphatidylinositol, suggesting multiple effects of lithium on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. These observed effects, however, occurred too slowly to be the mechanism by which lithium potentiated agonist-induced platelet activation. To study the agonist-receptor interaction, the effect of the specific, high affinity thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, on thrombin-induced accumulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labelled inositol phosphates was studied.

  3. Platelet concentrates: Balancing between efficacy and safety?

    PubMed

    Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet transfusions continue to be the mainstay to treat patients with quantitative and qualitative platelet disorders. Each year, about 10 millions of platelet transfusions are administered to patients worldwide with marked differences in usage between regions depending on socioeconomic development of the countries. Unfortunately, its use is associated to immune and non-immune side effects. Among the non-immune, bacterial contamination is still the major infectious risk. When bacterial culture methods are introduced for preventing bacterial septic reactions it has been found that this strategy reduce to one half the septic reactions, but do not eliminate completely that risk. To remove completely the risk, a new bacteria detection test at the time of issuance in the case of platelets stored for four or five days would be needed. Pathogen inactivation (PI) methods already in the market (based in the addition of amotosalen (A-L) or riboflavin (R-L) and the illumination with ultraviolet light) or under development (ultraviolet light C and agitation) have shown to be efficacious in the inactivation of bacteria and no cases of septic reactions associated to a pathogen-reduced product has been identified. However, it has been shown that PI technologies have measurable effects on platelet in vitro parameters and reduce the recovery and survival of treated platelets in vivo. Although these effects do not hamper the hemostatic capacity of treated platelets, an increased usage associated with PI technologies has been reported. This increase in utilization seems to be the toll to be paid if we want to completely eliminate the risk of bacterial sepsis in the recipients of platelet transfusion. PMID:27476010

  4. Dengue virus binding and replication by platelets.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ayo Y; Sutherland, Michael R; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2015-07-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes ∼200 million cases of severe flulike illness annually, escalating to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome in ∼500,000. Although thrombocytopenia is typical of both mild and severe diseases, the mechanism triggering platelet reduction is incompletely understood. As a probable initiating event, direct purified DENV-platelet binding was followed in the current study by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and confirmed antigenically. Approximately 800 viruses specifically bound per platelet at 37°C. Fewer sites were observed at 25°C, the blood bank storage temperature (∼350 sites), or 4°C, known to attenuate virus cell entry (∼200 sites). Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were implicated as coreceptors because only the combination of anti-DC-SIGN and low-molecular-weight heparin prevented binding. Interestingly, at 37°C and 25°C, platelets replicated the positive sense single-stranded RNA genome of DENV by up to ∼4-fold over 7 days. Further time course experiments demonstrated production of viral NS1 protein, which is known to be highly antigenic in patient serum. The infectivity of DENV intrinsically decayed in vitro, which was moderated by platelet-mediated generation of viable progeny. This was shown using a transcription inhibitor and confirmed by freeze-denatured platelets being incapable of replicating the DENV genome. For the first time, these data demonstrate that platelets directly bind DENV saturably and produce infectious virus. Thus, expression of antigen encoded by DENV is a novel consideration in the pathogen-induced thrombocytopenia mechanism. These results furthermore draw attention to the possibility that platelets may produce permissive RNA viruses in addition to DENV.

  5. Detritus decorations of an orb-weaving spider, Cyclosa mulmeinensis (Thorell): for food or camouflage?

    PubMed

    Tan, Eunice J; Li, Daiqin

    2009-06-01

    Many species of the orb-web spider genus Cyclosa often adorn their webs with decorations of prey remains, egg sacs and/or plant detritus, termed ;detritus decorations'. These detritus decorations have been hypothesised to camouflage the spider from predators or prey and thus reduce predation risk or increase foraging success. In the present study, we tested these two alternative hypotheses simultaneously using two types of detritus decorations (prey remain and egg sac) built by Cyclosa mulmeinensis (Thorell). By monitoring the possible responses of predators to spiders on their webs with and without decorations in the field, we tested whether web decorations would reduce the mortality of spiders. Wasp predators were observed to fly in the vicinity of webs with decorations slightly more often than in the vicinity of webs without decorations but there were very few attacks on spiders by wasps. By comparing the insect interception rates of webs with and without decorations in the field, we tested whether web decorations would increase the foraging success. Webs decorated with prey remains or egg sacs intercepted more insects than those without in the field. By calculating colour contrasts of both prey-remain and egg-sac decorations against spiders viewed by bird (blue tits) and hymenopteran (e.g. wasps) predators as well as hymenopteran (bees) prey, we showed that C. mulmeinensis spiders on webs with egg-sac decorations were invisible to both hymenopteran prey and predators and bird predators over short and long distances. While spiders on webs with prey-remain decorations were invisible to both hymenopterans and birds over short distances, spiders on webs with prey-remain decorations were visible to both predators and prey over long distances. Our results thus suggest that decorating webs with prey remains and egg sacs in C. mulmeinensis may primarily function as camouflage to conceal the spider from insects rather than as prey attractants, possibly contributing to

  6. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  7. The platelet serotonin-release assay.

    PubMed

    Warkentin, Theodore E; Arnold, Donald M; Nazi, Ishac; Kelton, John G

    2015-06-01

    Few laboratory tests are as clinically useful as The platelet serotonin-release assay (SRA): a positive SRA in the appropriate clinical context is virtually diagnostic of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), a life- and limb-threatening prothrombotic disorder caused by anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin antibodies that activate platelets, thereby triggering serotonin-release. The SRA's performance characteristics include high sensitivity and specificity, although caveats include indeterminate reaction profiles (observed in ∼4% of test sera) and potential for false-positive reactions. As only a subset of anti-PF4/heparin antibodies detectable by enzyme-immunoassay (EIA) are additionally platelet-activating, the SRA has far greater diagnostic specificity than the EIA. However, requiring a positive EIA, either as an initial screening test or as an SRA adjunct, will reduce risk of a false-positive SRA (since a negative EIA in a patient with a "positive" SRA should prompt critical evaluation of the SRA reaction profile). The SRA also provides useful information on whether a HIT serum produces strong platelet activation even in the absence of heparin: such heparin-"independent" platelet activation is a marker of unusually severe HIT, including delayed-onset HIT and severe HIT complicated by consumptive coagulopathy with risk for microvascular thrombosis. PMID:25775976

  8. The genetics of normal platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Kunicki, Thomas J; Nugent, Diane J

    2010-10-14

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to a substantial variation in platelet function seen among normal persons. Candidate gene association studies represent a valiant effort to define the genetic component in an era where genetic tools were limited, but the single nucleotide polymorphisms identified in those studies need to be validated by more objective, comprehensive approaches, such as genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of quantitative functional traits in much larger cohorts of more carefully selected normal subjects. During the past year, platelet count and mean platelet volume, which indirectly affect platelet function, were the subjects of GWAS. The majority of the GWAS signals were located to noncoding regions, a consistent outcome of all GWAS to date, suggesting a major role for mechanisms that alter phenotype at the level of transcription or posttranscriptional modifications. Of 15 quantitative trait loci associated with mean platelet volume and platelet count, one located at 12q24 is also a risk locus for coronary artery disease. In most cases, the effect sizes of individual quantitative trait loci are admittedly small, but the results of these studies have led to new insight into regulators of hematopoiesis and megakaryopoiesis that would otherwise be unapparent and difficult to define. PMID:20610812

  9. Radiolabelling of platelets with technetium-99m

    SciTech Connect

    Sundrehagen, E.; Urdal, P.; Heggli, D.E.; Lindegaard, M.W.; Jacobsen, E. )

    1990-03-01

    A method for labelling of platelets with technetium-99m (Tc-99m) is presented. In principle, aminobenzoic acid and tartaric acid are used as reagents, allowing Tc-99m complexes of intermediate chemical stability to be formed. These complexes react rapidly with proteins, such as platelet proteins, when added. We have examined the isolation procedure for the platelets and the labelling procedure using residual aggregational ability and residual content of beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) as indicators of damage to the platelets. In its final version the method allowed a 32.6 +/- 2.7% (mean +/- SD) incorporation of Tc-99m into platelets which again showed a 66 +/- 15% residual aggregational ability, tested by 50 mumol/l of ADP, and a 79 +/- 17% residual content of beta-TG releasable by 10 IU/ml of thrombin. In a pilot clinical study involving 28 patients we found labelled autologous platelets useful in detecting lung embolism and deep vein thrombosis.

  10. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  11. Quasicrystalline tilings with nematic colloidal platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dontabhaktuni, Jayasri; Ravnik, Miha; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Complex nematic fluids have the remarkable capability for self-assembling regular colloidal structures of various symmetries and dimensionality according to their micromolecular orientational order. Colloidal chains, clusters, and crystals were demonstrated recently, exhibiting soft-matter functionalities of robust binding, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, entanglement, shape-driven and topological driven assembly, and even memory imprinting. However, no quasicrystalline structures were found. Here, we show with numerical modeling that quasicrystalline colloidal lattices can be achieved in the form of original Penrose P1 tiling by using pentagonal colloidal platelets in layers of nematic liquid crystals. The tilings are energetically stabilized with binding energies up to 2500 kBT for micrometer-sized platelets and further allow for hierarchical substitution tiling, i.e., hierarchical pentagulation. Quasicrystalline structures are constructed bottom-up by assembling the boat, rhombus, and star maximum density clusters, thus avoiding other (nonquasicrystalline) stable or metastable configurations of platelets. Central to our design of the quasicrystalline tilings is the symmetry breaking imposed by the platelet shape and the surface anchoring conditions at the colloidal platelets, which are misaligning and asymmetric over two perpendicular mirror planes. Finally, the design of the quasicrystalline tilings as platelets in nematic liquid crystals is inherently capable of a continuous variety of length scales of the tiling, ranging over three orders of magnitude in the typical length (from to ), which could allow for the design of quasicrystalline photonics at multiple frequency ranges. PMID:24550269

  12. Treatment of osteochondral injuries with platelet gel

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, Marcus Vinicius; da Rosa Pereira, Hamilton; de Sá Carneiro, Carlos Augusto; Felisbino, Sérgio Luiz; Deffune, Elenice

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Treatments for injured articular cartilage have not advanced to the point that efficient regeneration is possible. However, there has been an increase in the use of platelet-rich plasma for the treatment of several orthopedic disorders, including chondral injuries. Our hypothesis is that the treatment of chondral injuries with platelet gel results in higher-quality repair tissue after 180 days compared with chondral injuries not treated with gel. METHODS: A controlled experimental laboratory study was performed on 30 male rabbits to evaluate osteochondral injury repair after treatment with or without platelet gel. Osteochondral injuries were surgically induced in both knees of each rabbit at the medial femoral condyle. The left knee injury was filled with the platelet gel, and the right knee was not treated. Microscopic analysis of both knee samples was performed after 180 days using a histological grading scale. RESULTS: The only histological evaluation criterion that was not significantly different between treatments was metachromasia. The group that was treated with platelet gel exhibited superior results in all other criteria (cell morphology, surface regularity, chondral thickness and repair tissue integration) and in the total score. CONCLUSION: The repair tissue was histologically superior after 180 days in the study group treated with platelet gel compared with the group of untreated injuries. PMID:25518022

  13. [The role of blood platelets in infections].

    PubMed

    Micota, Bartłomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Różalska, Barbara

    2015-05-17

    Platelets are primarily associated with their main function, hemostasis, although it is known that these cells also exhibit biological activity in cancer progression, inflammation and infectious processes. During infection platelets, due to the expression of specific receptors - Toll-like receptors (TLRs) - which recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens - pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) - are activated by the presence of microorganism components and/or substances released from damaged cells/tissue. Further antimicrobial activity of platelets is based on their capacity for phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the synthesis, storage and release of proteins/peptides with antimicrobial activity. Another mechanism of platelet action is their immunomodulatory activity. It is based mainly on the ability to secrete chemotactic factors allowing the accumulation of professional immunocompetent cells at the site of infection, thus enhancing the effective eradication of an infectious agent. In chronic infections, platelets, due to release of numerous growth factors and various cytokines, support mechanisms of acquired immunity. They accelerate the maturation of dendritic cells, stimulate B cells to be immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells and potentiate the activity of T cells. Unfortunately, in certain situations (the existence of specific risk factors) the interaction of microorganisms with activated platelets may also be the cause of pathology within the cardiovascular system.

  14. Cocaine and specific cocaine metabolites induce von Willebrand Factor release from endothelial cells in a tissue-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, William E.; Moore, Emily E.; Penkala, Rebecca A.; Bolgiano, D.; López, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cocaine use is associated with arterial thrombosis, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Cocaine use results in increased plasma von Willebrand Factor (VWF), accelerated atherosclerosis, and platelet-rich arterial thrombi, suggesting that cocaine activates the endothelium, promoting platelet-VWF interactions. Approach and Results Human umbilical vein (HUVEC), brain microvasculature (BMVEC), or coronary artery (CAEC) endothelial cells were treated with cocaine or metabolites benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, norcocaine, or ecgonine methylester. Supernatant VWF concentration and multimer structure were measured, and platelet–VWF strings formed on the endothelial surface under flow were quantified. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF release, with the two metabolites being more potent than the parent molecule. BMVEC were more sensitive to cocaine and metabolites than were HUVEC or CAEC. CAEC released VWF into the supernatant but did not form VWF–platelet strings. Intracellular cAMP concentration was not increased after treatment with cocaine or its metabolites. Conclusions Both cocaine and metabolites benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF secretion, possibly explaining thrombotic risk after cocaine ingestion. VWF secretion is likely to vary between vascular beds, with brain endothelial cells being particularly sensitive. These results suggest that clinical management of cocaine-induced ischemia may benefit from therapies aimed at disrupting the VWF–platelet interaction. PMID:23539221

  15. Platelet--arterial synthetic graft interaction and its modification

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, A.D.; Connolly, R.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Gembarowicz, R.; Keough, E.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; Valeri, C.R.

    1982-11-01

    We compared the in vivo platelet reactivity of two commonly used clinical grafts, Dacron and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), with that of a control autogenous artery graft and assessed whether platelet reactivity was modified by the platelet-antiaggregating agent prostacyclin (PGI2) (epoprostenol). Grafts were randomly placed into the carotid arteries of 21 baboons. Platelets labeled with /sup 111/In were infused within one hour after implantation graft for gamma camera scanning of platelet uptake. The accumulation of platelets on Dacron grafts began almost immediately after injection and reached a peak after one to two hours. The PTFE and control autogenous artery grafts accumulated comparable small amounts of platelets. Prostacyclin was then infused in a second series of baboons with Dacron grafts, at a rate of 150 to 200 ng/kg/min. It prevented the usual platelet uptake when administered concomitant with graft implantation and reduced previously established platelet activity.

  16. Platelets kill intraerythrocytic malarial parasites and mediate survival to infection.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Brendan J; Marshall, Vikki M; de Graaf, Carolyn; Drysdale, Karen E; Shabbar, Meriam; Smyth, Gordon K; Corbin, Jason E; Alexander, Warren S; Foote, Simon J

    2009-02-01

    Platelets play a critical role in the pathogenesis of malarial infections by encouraging the sequestration of infected red blood cells within the cerebral vasculature. But platelets also have well-established roles in innate protection against microbial infections. We found that purified human platelets killed Plasmodium falciparum parasites cultured in red blood cells. Inhibition of platelet function by aspirin and other platelet inhibitors abrogated the lethal effect human platelets exert on P. falciparum parasites. Likewise, platelet-deficient and aspirin-treated mice were more susceptible to death during erythrocytic infection with Plasmodium chabaudi. Both mouse and human platelets bind malarial-infected red cells and kill the parasite within. These results indicate a protective function for platelets in the early stages of erythrocytic infection distinct from their role in cerebral malaria.

  17. Enhanced P-selectin expression on platelet-a marker of platelet activation, in young patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    George, Reema; Bhatt, Anugya; Narayani, Jayakumari; Thulaseedharan, Jissa Vinoda; Sivadasanpillai, Harikrishnan; Tharakan, Jaganmohan A

    2016-08-01

    P-selectin (CD62p) exposure is an established marker for platelet activation. P-selectin exposure can trigger variety of thrombotic and inflammatory reactions. In patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), platelets are activated, and hence, there is increased P-selectin exposure. The role of P-selectin exposure in patients on treatment with statins and anti-platelets is conflicting. A case-control study was performed to determine P-selectin exposure in consecutively recruited 142 patients (age ≤ 55 years) with angiographically proven CAD on treatment and 92 asymptomatic controls. P-selectin exposure was determined by flow cytometry. Data on conventional risk factors were obtained along with estimation of levels of thrombotic [fibrinogen, lipoprotein (a), tissue plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, homocysteine and von Willebrand factor] and anti-thrombotic factors (antithrombin III). The P-selectin exposure was compared among patient groups who had different modes of presentation of CAD and categories of CAD disease severity. The patients were followed up for a period of 26 months. The results indicate that P-selectin exposure was significantly elevated in patients (mean ± SD 9.24 ± 11.81) compared to controls (mean ± SD 1.48 ± 2.85) with p < 0.0001. Similarly, conventional risk factors were significantly elevated in patients. P-selectin exposure showed significant negative correlation with antithrombin III levels. P-selectin exposure was higher in patients who presented with acute coronary syndromes than those who presented with effort angina. Cardiovascular event rate was 6 % on follow-up. The study establishes that thrombotic-inflammatory pathways enhancing P-selectin exposure unrelated to treatment might be activated in patients, while the event rate remained lowered, and hence, treatment strategies should be inclusive to control these factors.

  18. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function.

  19. Stability of lyophilized human platelets loaded with small molecule carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wang, J X; Yang, C; Wan, W; Liu, M X; Ren, S P; Quan, G B; Han, Y

    2011-01-01

    Long-term preservation of platelets is a great challenge for blood transfusion centers, due to the required narrow storage temperature arange (22 ± 2 degree C). Short shelf life and potential bacterial growth often lead to the shortage of high-quality platelets. Freeze-dried preservation is thus believed to be a potential solution for long-term platelet storage without losing the hemostasis function. Here we report a new platelet preservation method, which uses small molecule carbohydrates to extend storage time and to maintain platelet function. The activities of lyophilized platelets that were stabilized with small molecule carbohydrate (e.g., cell viability, mean platelet volume, activation characteristics, and aggregation kinetics) were maintained after storage of 30, 60, and 90 days at room temperature, 4 degree C, and -20 degree C. The recovery of freeze-dried platelets was 87 percent in comparison to fresh platelets. The mean platelet volume of rehydrated platelets increased (from 6.8 fl to 8.0 fl). About 40 percent of rehydrated platelets was in the early-activated stage (PCA-1 positive) and 30 percent was in the terminal-activated stage (CD62P positive). The cell viability was about 60 percent as measured with CMFDA vital probes. The aggregation rate of rehydrated platelets after 90-day storage was similar to fresh platelets stored at 22 degree C ± 2 degree C.

  20. Platelet function alterations in dengue are associated with plasma leakage.

    PubMed

    Michels, M; Alisjahbana, B; De Groot, P G; Indrati, A R; Fijnheer, R; Puspita, M; Dewi, I M W; van de Wijer, L; de Boer, E M S; Roest, M; van der Ven, A J A M; de Mast, Q

    2014-08-01

    Severe dengue is characterised by thrombocytopenia, plasma leakage and bleeding. Platelets are important for preservation of endothelial integrity. We hypothesised that platelet activation with secondary platelet dysfunction contribute to plasma leakage. In adult Indonesian patients with acute dengue, we measured platelet activation status and the response to the platelet agonist TRAP using flow cytometer-based assays. Patients were monitored daily for plasma leakage by ultrasonography. Acute dengue was associated with platelet activation with an increased expression of the activated fibrinogen receptor (αIIbβ3), the lysosomal marker CD63 and the alpha-granule marker CD62P (P-selectin). Upon maximal platelet activation by TRAP, platelet function defects were observed with a significantly reduced maximal activated αIIbβ3 and CD63 expression and reduced platelet-monocyte and platelet-neutrophil complexes. Patients in the lowest tertile of activated αIIbβ3 and CD63 expression had an odds ratio for plasma leakage of 5.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.3-22.7) and 3.9 (95% CI 1.1-13.7), respectively, compared to the highest tertile. Platelet-derived serotonin has previously been related to plasma leakage and we found increased intra-platelet serotonin concentrations in our patients. In conclusion, platelet activation with platelet function alterations can be found in patients with acute dengue and this may contribute to dengue-associated plasma leakage.

  1. Intracellular delivery of functional proteins via decoration with transporter peptides.

    PubMed

    Siprashvili, Zurab; Reuter, Jason A; Khavari, Paul A

    2004-05-01

    Despite numerous attractive intracellular targets, protein therapeutics have been principally confined to the extracellular space due to the lack of a straightforward way to deliver functional polypeptides to the cell interior. Peptide sequences facilitating intracellular protein delivery have been identified; however, current strategies to apply them require problematic steps, such as generation of new in-frame fusion proteins, covalent chemical conjugation, and denaturation. We have developed a new approach to protein transfer into cells and tissues that relies on single-step decoration by cysteine-flanked, arginine-rich transporter peptides. This approach facilitated cell and tissue delivery of a variety of functional proteins, including antibodies and enzymes. Decoration with transporter peptides thus provides an attractive general means of intracellular delivery of functional proteins in vitro and in tissue.

  2. Decoration of vertical graphene with aerosol nanoparticles for gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; Ren, Ren; Zhou, Guihua; Chen, Junhong

    2015-08-01

    A facile method was demonstrated to decorate aerosol Ag nanoparticles onto vertical graphene surfaces using a mini-arc plasma reactor. The vertical graphene was directly grown on a sensor electrode using a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The aerosol Ag nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple vapor condensation process using a mini-arc plasma source. Then, the nanoparticles were assembled on the surface of vertical graphene through the assistance of an electric field. Based on our observation, nonagglomerated Ag nanoparticles formed in the gas phase and were assembled onto vertical graphene sheets. Nanohybrids of Ag nanoparticle-decorated vertical graphene were characterized for ammonia gas detection at room temperature. The vertical graphene served as the conductance channel, and the conductance change upon exposure to ammonia was used as the sensing signal. The sensing results show that Ag nanoparticles significantly improve the sensitivity, response time, and recovery time of the sensor.

  3. Assessment and treatment of pica and destruction of holiday decorations.

    PubMed

    Mitteer, Daniel R; Romani, Patrick W; Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W

    2015-12-01

    Problem behavior exhibited by individuals with autism can be disruptive to family traditions, such as decorating for the holidays. We present data for a 6-year-old girl who engaged in automatically reinforced pica and destruction of holiday decorations. Treatment was evaluated within an ABCDCD reversal design. During baseline (Phases A and B), we observed elevated rates of problem behavior. We implemented differential reinforcement of alternative behavior in Phase C to teach a response to compete with problem behavior. Little change in toy play or problem behavior occurred. In Phase D, we added a facial screen to the differential reinforcement procedures, which resulted in increases in toy play and decreases in problem behavior. Findings are discussed in terms of how interventions for problem behavior can promote alternative behavior while they facilitate household activities and traditions. PMID:26380947

  4. Assessment and treatment of pica and destruction of holiday decorations.

    PubMed

    Mitteer, Daniel R; Romani, Patrick W; Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W

    2015-12-01

    Problem behavior exhibited by individuals with autism can be disruptive to family traditions, such as decorating for the holidays. We present data for a 6-year-old girl who engaged in automatically reinforced pica and destruction of holiday decorations. Treatment was evaluated within an ABCDCD reversal design. During baseline (Phases A and B), we observed elevated rates of problem behavior. We implemented differential reinforcement of alternative behavior in Phase C to teach a response to compete with problem behavior. Little change in toy play or problem behavior occurred. In Phase D, we added a facial screen to the differential reinforcement procedures, which resulted in increases in toy play and decreases in problem behavior. Findings are discussed in terms of how interventions for problem behavior can promote alternative behavior while they facilitate household activities and traditions.

  5. Electronic transport properties of Ir-decorated graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilin; Xiao, Shudong; Cai, Xinghan; Bao, Wenzhong; Reutt-Robey, Janice; Fuhrer, Michael S

    2015-10-28

    Graphene decorated with 5d transitional metal atoms is predicted to exhibit many intriguing properties; for example iridium adatoms are proposed to induce a substantial topological gap in graphene. We extensively investigated the conductivity of single-layer graphene decorated with iridium deposited in ultra-high vacuum at low temperature (7 K) as a function of Ir concentration, carrier density, temperature, and annealing conditions. Our results are consistent with the formation of Ir clusters of ~100 atoms at low temperature, with each cluster donating a single electronic charge to graphene. Annealing graphene increases the cluster size, reducing the doping and increasing the mobility. We do not observe any sign of an energy gap induced by spin-orbit coupling, possibly due to the clustering of Ir.

  6. Platelet Consumption by Arterial Prostheses: The Effects of Endothelialization and Pharmacologic Inhibition of Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Harker, Laurence A.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; Sauvage, Lester R.

    1977-01-01

    The thrombogenic mechanism of arterial grafts has been studied by determining the relative utilization of platelets, fibrinogen and plasminogen by human arterial prostheses, and by direct examination of arterial grafts in a baboon model. Forty-one survival and turnover measurements of 51Crplatelets, 131I-fibrinogen and 125I-plasminogen in ten patients with aortofemoral knitted Dacron prostheses demonstrated platelet consumption after graft placement (platelet survival 4.2 days ± 0.5 and turnover 68,000 plat/ul/day ±10,000 compared with 8.2 days ± 0.3 and 35,000 plat/ul/day ± 5,000 respectively for control subjects with stable vascular disease, p < 0.01). In vitro platelet function test results were normal. Platelet consumption was interrupted by dipyridamole or a combination of dipyridamole and acetylsalicylic acid, and platelet survival normalized spontaneously during nine months postoperatively. No significantly increased consumption of fibrinogen or plasminogen was found in these patients with arterial grafts. Placement of impervious knitted Dacron velour aortic grafts in baboons reproduced platelet consumption that progressively normalized over six weeks postoperatively. Platelet survival measurements correlated directly with endothelial cell coverage of the graft luminal surface in these animals implying that endothelialization of the graft surface was also occurring postoperatively in patients. ImagesFig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:411428

  7. Platelets and atherogenesis: Platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection from tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.)

    PubMed Central

    PALOMO, IVÁN; FUENTES, EDUARDO; PADRÓ, TERESA; BADIMON, LINA

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been shown that platelets are not only involved in the arterial thrombotic process, but also that they play an active role in the inflammatory process of atherogenesis from the beginning. The interaction between platelets and endothelial cells occurs in two manners: activated platelets unite with intact endothelial cells, or platelets in resting adhere to activated endothelium. In this context, inhibition of the platelet function (adhesion/aggregation) could contribute to the prevention of atherothrombosis, the leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity. This can be achieved with antiplatelet agents. However, at the public health level, the level of primary prevention, a healthy diet has also been shown to exert beneficial effects. Among those elements of a healthy diet, the consumption of tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) stands out for its effect on platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection, which may be beneficial for cardiovascular health. This article briefly discusses the involvement of platelets in atherogenesis and the possible mechanisms of action provided by tomatoes for platelet anti-aggregation activity and endothelial protection. PMID:22969932

  8. CLEC-2 expression is maintained on activated platelets and on platelet microparticles.

    PubMed

    Gitz, Eelo; Pollitt, Alice Y; Gitz-Francois, Jerney J; Alshehri, Osama; Mori, Jun; Montague, Samantha; Nash, Gerard B; Douglas, Michael R; Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K; Buckley, Christopher D; Harrison, Paul; Watson, Steve P

    2014-10-01

    The C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 mediates platelet activation through a hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). CLEC-2 initiates a Src- and Syk-dependent signaling cascade that is closely related to that of the 2 platelet ITAM receptors: glycoprotein (GP)VI and FcγRIIa. Activation of either of the ITAM receptors induces shedding of GPVI and proteolysis of the ITAM domain in FcγRIIa. In the present study, we generated monoclonal antibodies against human CLEC-2 and used these to measure CLEC-2 expression on resting and stimulated platelets and on other hematopoietic cells. We show that CLEC-2 is restricted to platelets with an average copy number of ∼2000 per cell and that activation of CLEC-2 induces proteolytic cleavage of GPVI and FcγRIIa but not of itself. We further show that CLEC-2 and GPVI are expressed on CD41+ microparticles in megakaryocyte cultures and in platelet-rich plasma, which are predominantly derived from megakaryocytes in healthy donors, whereas microparticles derived from activated platelets only express CLEC-2. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, an inflammatory disease associated with increased microparticle production, had raised plasma levels of microparticles that expressed CLEC-2 but not GPVI. Thus, CLEC-2, unlike platelet ITAM receptors, is not regulated by proteolysis and can be used to monitor platelet-derived microparticles.

  9. Metallogel formation in aqueous DMSO by perfluoroalkyl decorated terpyridine ligands.

    PubMed

    Tatikonda, Rajendhraprasad; Bhowmik, Sandip; Rissanen, Kari; Haukka, Matti; Cametti, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Terpyridine based ligands 1 and 2, decorated with a C8F17 perfluorinated tag, are able to form stable thermoreversible gels in the presence of several d-block metal chloride salts. The gel systems obtained have been characterized by NMR, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies and Tgel experiments in order to gain insights into the observed different behaviour of the two similar ligands, also in terms of the effect of additional common anionic species. PMID:27460754

  10. Immunolocalization of beta 1 integrins in platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles.

    PubMed

    Wencel-Drake, J D; Dieter, M G; Lam, S C

    1993-08-15

    Human platelets contain several adhesion receptors belonging to the integrin superfamily. At least three beta 1 integrins are present on platelets and have been shown to mediate platelet adhesion to collagen, fibronectin, and laminin. To study the cellular localization of the beta 1 integrins in platelets, we produced a polyclonal antibody by immunization of goat 172 with purified beta 1 subunit from HPB-ALL cells. Antibody 172 (Ab172) specifically immunoblotted a 135-Kd protein in a lysate of whole platelets. The reactivity of Ab172 with platelet membrane proteins was further determined by immunoprecipitation of lysates of surface-radioiodinated platelets. Ab172 immunoprecipitates, resolved by nonreducing/reducing two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis consisted of three labeled proteins with migrational properties of platelet glycoprotein (GP)Ia, GPIc and GPIIa. Neither GPIIb/IIIa nor the vitronectin receptor were immunoprecipitated by Ab172, confirming a lack of cross-reactivity with the beta 3 integrins in platelets. Immunofluorescence studies using Ab172 were performed to investigate the cellular distribution of beta 1 integrins in platelets. Fluorescent labeling of intact cells demonstrated the presence of beta 1 antigen on the surface of resting cells. Permeabilization of platelets with Triton X-100 showed the presence of an intracellular pool of beta 1 antigen. Double-label experiments using Ab172 and AP-2 (anti-GPIIb/IIIa) showed identical labeling patterns, suggesting a similar subcellular distribution for these integrins. Following thrombin stimulation, permeabilized cells showed a centralized clearing of both beta 1 antigen and GPIIb/IIIa as well as an intensification of surface labeling for beta 1 antigen. These findings suggest the translocation of intracellular beta 1 antigen to the platelet surface as a result of thrombin stimulation. Because platelet-derived microvesicles have been reported to contain GPIIb

  11. Radon exhalation from building materials for decorative use.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Rahman, Naureen M; Abu Atiya, Ibrahim

    2010-04-01

    Long-term exposure to radon increases the risk of developing lung cancer. There is considerable public concern about radon exhalation from building materials and the contribution to indoor radon levels. To address this concern, radon exhalation rates were determined for 53 different samples of drywall, tile and granite available on the Canadian market for interior home decoration. The radon exhalation rates ranged from non-detectable to 312 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Slate tiles and granite slabs had relatively higher radon exhalation rates than other decorative materials, such as ceramic or porcelain tiles. The average radon exhalation rates were 30 Bq m(-2) d(-1) for slate tiles and 42 Bq m(-2) d(-1) for granite slabs of various types and origins. Analysis showed that even if an entire floor was covered with a material having a radon exhalation rate of 300 Bq m(-2) d(-1), it would contribute only 18 Bq m(-3) to a tightly sealed house with an air exchange rate of 0.3 per hour. Generally speaking, building materials used in home decoration make no significant contribution to indoor radon for a house with adequate air exchange.

  12. Dirac cones in the spectrum of bond-decorated graphenes

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, Willem Soncini, Alessandro

    2014-06-21

    We present a two-band model based on periodic Hückel theory, which is capable of predicting the existence and position of Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone of an infinite class of two-dimensional periodic carbon networks, obtained by systematic perturbation of the graphene connectivity by bond decoration, that is by inclusion of arbitrary π-electron Hückel networks into each of the three carbon–carbon π-bonds within the graphene unit cell. The bond decoration process can fundamentally modify the graphene unit cell and honeycomb connectivity, representing a simple and general way to describe many cases of graphene chemical functionalization of experimental interest, such as graphyne, janusgraphenes, and chlorographenes. Exact mathematical conditions for the presence of Dirac cones in the spectrum of the resulting two-dimensional π-networks are formulated in terms of the spectral properties of the decorating graphs. Our method predicts the existence of Dirac cones in experimentally characterized janusgraphenes and chlorographenes, recently speculated on the basis of density functional theory calculations. For these cases, our approach provides a proof of the existence of Dirac cones, and can be carried out at the cost of a back of the envelope calculation, bypassing any diagonalization step, even within Hückel theory.

  13. Nanodiamond-Decorated Silica Spheres as a Chromatographic Material.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zuqin; Vinci, John C; Colón, Luis A

    2016-02-17

    Nanodiamond (ND) particles (∼5 nm), obtained from detonation soot, were oxidized and/or thermally hydrogenated. Both, the non-hydrogenated and hydrogenated ND particles were successfully coupled to the surface of micrometer-size organo-silica particles. A thin layer of nanodiamonds (NDs) decorating the surface of the organo-silica particles was visible on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) were used to characterize the NDs prior to coupling and to confirm attachment onto the organo-silica particles. Both, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a chemical initiator were proved to be effective radical initiators for the ND-silica coupling reaction, although for scale-up purposes the chemical initiation was more advantageous to produce the ND-silica composite. Commercially available nanodiamond primary particles were also coupled to the surface of silica particles. The ND-containing silica particles were packed into chromatographic columns to study their initial feasibility as adsorbent material for liquid chromatography. The organo-silica particles decorated with hydrogenated NDs were shown to possess reversed phase type (i.e., hydrophobic) behavior toward the probe compounds, whereas silica particles decorated with the non-hydrogenated NDs showed polar (i.e., hydrophilic) interactions, both under liquid chromatographic conditions. PMID:26790050

  14. Comparative analysis of human ex vivo–generated platelets vs megakaryocyte-generated platelets in mice: a cautionary tale

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhuan; Hayes, Vincent; Jarocha, Danuta; Sim, Xiuli; Harper, Dawn C.; Fuentes, Rudy; Sullivan, Spencer K.; Gadue, Paul; Chou, Stella T.; Torok-Storb, Beverly J.; Marks, Michael S.; French, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Thrombopoiesis is the process by which megakaryocytes release platelets that circulate as uniform small, disc-shaped anucleate cytoplasmic fragments with critical roles in hemostasis and related biology. The exact mechanism of thrombopoiesis and the maturation pathways of platelets released into the circulation remain incompletely understood. We showed that ex vivo–generated murine megakaryocytes infused into mice release platelets within the pulmonary vasculature. Here we now show that infused human megakaryocytes also release platelets within the lungs of recipient mice. In addition, we observed a population of platelet-like particles (PLPs) in the infusate, which include platelets released during ex vivo growth conditions. By comparing these 2 platelet populations to human donor platelets, we found marked differences: platelets derived from infused megakaryocytes closely resembled infused donor platelets in morphology, size, and function. On the other hand, the PLP was a mixture of nonplatelet cellular fragments and nonuniform-sized, preactivated platelets mostly lacking surface CD42b that were rapidly cleared by macrophages. These data raise a cautionary note for the clinical use of human platelets released under standard ex vivo conditions. In contrast, human platelets released by intrapulmonary-entrapped megakaryocytes appear more physiologic in nature and nearly comparable to donor platelets for clinical application. PMID:25852052

  15. Anfibatide, a novel GPIb complex antagonist, inhibits platelet adhesion and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo in murine models of thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xi; Reheman, Adili; Hou, Yan; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Yiming; Marshall, Alexandra H; Liang, Chaofan; Dai, Xiangrong; Li, Benjamin Xiaoyi; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen; Ni, Heyu

    2014-02-01

    Platelet adhesion and aggregation at the sites of vascular injury are key events for thrombosis and haemostasis. It has been well demonstrated that interaction between glycoprotein (GP) Ibα and von Willebrand factor (VWF) initiates platelet adhesion and contributes to platelet aggregation, particularly at high shear. GPIb has long been suggested as a desirable antithrombotic target, but anti-GPIb therapy has never been successfully developed. Here, we evaluated the antithrombotic potential of Anfibatide, a novel snake venom-derived GPIb antagonist.We found Anfibatide inhibited washed murine platelet aggregation induced by ristocetin and recombinant murine VWF. It also blocked botrocetin-induced binding of murine plasma VWF to recombinant human GPIbα. Interestingly, Anfibatide did not inhibit botrocetin-induced aggregation of platelet-rich plasma, indicating that its binding site may differ from other snake venom-derived GPIb antagonists. Anfibatide strongly inhibited platelet adhesion, aggregation, and thrombus formation in perfusion chambers at high shear conditions and efficiently dissolved preformed thrombi. Anfibatide also inhibited thrombus growth at low shear conditions, though less than at high shear. Using intravital microscopy, we found that Anfibatide markedly inhibited thrombosis in laser-injured cremaster vessels and prevented vessel occlusion in FeCl3-injured mesenteric vessels. Importantly, Anfibatide further inhibited residual thrombosis in VWF-deficient mice, suggesting that Anfibatide has additional antithrombotic effect beyond its inhibitory role in GPIb-VWF interaction. Anfibatide did not significantly cause platelet activation, prolong tail bleeding time, or cause bleeding diathesis in mice. Thus, consistent with the data from an ongoing clinical trial, the data from this study suggests that Anfibatide is a potent and safe antithrombotic agent. PMID:24172860

  16. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  17. Optimized Preparation Method of Platelet-Concentrated Plasma and Noncoagulating Platelet-Derived Factor Concentrates: Maximization of Platelet Concentration and Removal of Fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Jun; Jona, Masahiro; Eto, Hitomi; Aoi, Noriyuki; Kato, Harunosuke; Suga, Hirotaka; Doi, Kentaro; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been clinically used as an easily prepared growth factor cocktail that can promote wound healing, angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling. However, the therapeutic effects of PRP are still controversial, due partly to the lack of optimized and standardized preparation protocols. We used whole blood (WB) samples to optimize the preparation protocols for PRP, white blood cell-containing (W-PRP), platelet-concentrated plasma (PCP), and noncoagulating platelet-derived factor concentrate (PFC). PRP and W-PRP were most efficiently collected by 10 min centrifugation in a 15-mL conical tube at 230–270 g and 70 g, respectively. To prepare PCP, platelets were precipitated by centrifugation of PRP at >2300 g, 90% of supernatant plasma was removed, and the platelets were resuspended. For preparation of noncoagulating PFC, the supernatant was replaced with one-tenth volume of saline, followed by platelet activation with thrombin. Platelet (before activation) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB (after activation) concentrations in PCP were approximately 20 times greater than those in WB, whereas PFC contained a 20-times greater concentration of platelets before platelet activation and a 50-times greater concentration of PDGF-BB without formation of a fibrin gel after platelet activation than WB. Surprisingly, total PDGF-BB content in the PFC was twice that of activated WB, which suggested that a substantial portion of the PDGF-BB became trapped in the fibrin glue, and replacement of plasma with saline is crucial for maximization of platelet-derived factors. As an anticoagulant, ethylene di-amine tetra-acetic acid disodium inhibited platelet aggregation more efficiently than acid citrate dextrose solution, resulting in higher nonaggregated platelet yield and final PDGF-BB content. These results increase our understanding of how to optimize and standardize preparation of platelet-derived factors at maximum concentrations. PMID

  18. Deletion of the Platelet-Specific Alloantigen PlA1 from Platelets in Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia

    PubMed Central

    Kunicki, Thomas J.; Aster, Richard H.

    1978-01-01

    Expression of a Platelet-specific alloantigen (PlA1) was studied in five unrelated patients with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia using immunologic techniques based on release of 51Cr from tagged platelets by PlA1-specific antibody. Less than 1% of the normal quantity of PlA1 could be detected on platelets of patients 1, 2, and 3; platelets from patients 4 and 5 contained 22 and 12% of normal levels, respectively. After treatment with bromelain, platelets from patients 4 and 5, but not those from patients 1, 2, and 3, released 51Cr as well as normal PlA1-positive platelets when exposed to anti-PlA1. Platelets from each of the five patients reacted normally with drug-dependent antibodies and with autoantibodies specific for platelets. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of thrombasthenic platelets showed marked deficiencies of glycoproteins IIbα and III (P < 0.0005), confirming recent reports of others. Deficiency of the two proteins as determined by gel scanning was more pronounced in patients 1, 2, and 3 than in patients 4 and 5. Normal levels of glycoproteins IIbα and III were found in platelets from normal subjects negative for PlA1. These observations are consistent with the possibility that the PlA1 antigen is located on one or both of the glycoproteins lacking in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, although other explanations are possible. They further suggest that patients with thrombasthenia may be heterogeneous in respect to the degree to which these glycoproteins are deleted. The PlA1 antigen can be measured with considerable precision and may provide a marker useful for the diagnosis and study of Glanzmann's disease. PMID:566280

  19. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  20. The influence of bromelain on platelet count and platelet activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gläser, Doreen; Hilberg, Thomas

    2006-02-01

    Bromelain is a general name for a family of sulfhydryl-containing, proteolytic enzymes from the pineapple plant. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of bromelain on platelet count, platelet aggregation and platelet activity in vitro. Blood samples were taken from the antecubital vein of 10 healthy male non-smokers. Platelet count decreased after incubation with 2.5 and 5 mg bromelain/ml from 277 +/- 17 platelets/nl before to 256 +/- 21 and 247 +/- 19 platelets/nl after the treatment. The ADP and TRAP-6 induced platelet aggregation led to a significant decrease after the incubation with 2.5 mg (ADP: 48.6 +/- 25.7%; TRAP-6: 49.6 +/- 28.9%) or 5 mg (ADP: 5.0 +/- 4.6%; TRAP-6: 9.0 +/- 4.9%) bromelain/ml in comparison to control (ADP: 81.4 +/- 5.0%; TRAP-6: 77.4 +/- 10.4%). The percentage of unstimulated CD62P positive platelets which were investigated by flow cytometry was minimally higher after incubation with 5 mg bromelain/ml (0.57 +/- 0.48% PC) in comparison to control (0.22 +/- 0.11% PC), but after TRAP-6 stimulation the incubation with 5 mg bromelain/ml led to a remarkable decrease in comparison to the untreated control (50.4 +/- 20.2 to 0.9 +/- 0.8% PC). The changes of CD62P (TRAP-stimulated) and the results of platelet aggregation after incubation with bromelain in vitro may demonstrate the potential of bromelain as a substance for platelet inhibition. PMID:16308185

  1. Platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence Staphylococcus aureus-platelet interactions or infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Daga, Shruti; Shepherd, James G; Callaghan, J Garreth S; Hung, Rachel K Y; Dawson, Dana K; Padfield, Gareth J; Hey, Shi Y; Cartwright, Robyn A; Newby, David E; Fitzgerald, J Ross

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac vegetations result from bacterium-platelet adherence, activation and aggregation, and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in infective endocarditis. The GPIIb/IIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptors play a central role in platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation induced by endocarditis pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus, but the influence of known polymorphisms of these receptors on the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is unknown. We determined the GPIIIa platelet antigen Pl(A1/A2) and FcγRIIa H131R genotype of healthy volunteers (n = 160) and patients with infective endocarditis (n = 40), and investigated the influence of these polymorphisms on clinical outcome in infective endocarditis and S. aureus-platelet interactions in vitro. Platelet receptor genotype did not correlate with development of infective endocarditis, vegetation characteristics on echocardiogram or the composite clinical end-point of embolism, heart failure, need for surgery or mortality (P > 0.05 for all), even though patients with the GPIIIa Pl(A1/A1) genotype had increased in vivo platelet activation (P = 0.001). Furthermore, neither GPIIIa Pl(A1/A2) nor FcγRIIa H131R genotype influenced S. aureus-induced platelet adhesion, activation or aggregation in vitro (P > 0.05). Taken together, our data suggest that the GPIIIa and FcγRIIa platelet receptor polymorphisms do not influence S. aureus-platelet interactions in vitro or the clinical course of infective endocarditis.

  2. Hypersensitivity to thrombin of platelets from hypercholesterolemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Rand, M.L.; Kinlough-Rathbone, R.L.; Mustard, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Hypersensitivity of platelets to thrombin has been associated with hypercholesterolemia. The authors have examined the mechanisms involved in this hypersensitivity. Rats were given diets rich in milk fat and containing added cholesterol and taurocholate to produce hypercholesterolemia (HC) (262 +/- 25 mg%) or added sitosterol as a normocholesterolemic control (NC) (89 +/- 6 mg%). Washed platelets were prelabelled with /sup 14/C-serotonin. In the presence of acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) (to inhibit thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/) formation) and creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase (CP/CPK) (to remove released ADP), HC platelets aggregated more (26 +/- 1%) and released more /sup 14/C (9.1 +/- 2.0%) than NC platelets (aggregation: 0%, p < 0.001; /sup 14/C release: 1.5 +/- 0.5%, p < 0.002) in response to thrombin (0.075 U/ml). Thus, a pathway independent of released ADP or TXA/sub 2/ formation is involved in the hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin. Total binding of /sup 125/I-thrombin to HC platelets was less than that to NC platelets but HC platelets were smaller and had less protein than NC platelets; the thrombin binding per mg platelet protein was the same for HC and NC platelets, indicating that hypersensitivity to thrombin of HC platelets does not result from increased thrombin binding. Thus, hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin is not due to TXA/sub 2/ formation, the action of released ADP or increased thrombin binding.

  3. Interaction of polypeptide antibiotic gramicidin S with platelets.

    PubMed

    Hackl, Ellen V; Berest, Vladimir P; Gatash, Sergey V

    2012-12-01

    Gramicidin S (GS) is a cyclic decapeptide antibiotic active against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as against several pathogenic fungi. However, clinical application of GS is limited because of GS hemolytic activity. The large number of GS analogues with potentially attenuated hemolytic activity has been developed over the last two decades. For all new GS derivatives, the antimicrobial test is accompanied with the hemolytic activity assay. At the same time, neither GS nor its analogues were tested against other blood cells. In the present work, the effects of GS on platelets and platelet aggregates have been studied. GS interaction with platelets is concentration dependent and leads either to platelet swelling or platelet shape change. Effect of GS on platelets is independent of platelet aggregation mechanism. GS induces disaggregation of platelet aggregates formed in the presence of aggregation agonists. The rate of the GS interaction with platelet membranes depends on membrane lipid mobility and significantly increases with temperature. The interaction of GS with the platelet membranes depends strongly on the state of the membrane lipids. Factors affecting the membrane lipids (temperature, lipid peroxidation and ionising irradiation) modify GS interaction with platelets. Our results show that GS is active not only against erythrocytes but also against other blood cells (platelets). The estimated numbers of GS molecules per 1 µm2 of a blood cell required to induce erythrocyte hemolysis and disaggregation of platelet aggregates are comparable. This must be considered when developing new antimicrobial GS analogues with improved hemolytic properties.

  4. [Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome].

    PubMed

    Reich, H; Hollwich, F

    1984-06-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition that comprises, apart from angiomas of the retina, the cerebellum, the spinal cord, and the cerebrum, also cystic and blastomatous dysplasias resulting from maldevelopment, namely cystic kidney and pancreas, hypernephroma, and pheochromocytoma. Early observers of the syndrome were the English neurologist John Hughlings Jackson (1872) and the German ophthalmologist Hugo Magnus (1874). The typical association of angiomas of the retina with the cerebellum was first described in 1905 by the Prague ophthalmologist Wilhelm Czermak, long before Lindau (1926). The fact that hypernephromas and pheochromocytomas may form parts of it characterizes the syndrome as a polyneoplastic hereditary disease and the sufferers as members of families at risk. Since the ophthalmologist is often the first to recognize this disease by direct inspection of the fundi, he is responsible for ensuring proper medical care for the affected person and his or her entire family.

  5. Renaturierung und Management von Heiden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härdtle, Werner; Assmann, Thorsten; van Diggelen, Rudy; von Oheimb, Goddert

    Heiden zählen zu den ältesten und besonders reizvollen Kulturlandschaften Nordwesteuropas. Sie sind bezeichnend für nährstoffarme Böden in wintermilden Gebieten mit hohen Sommerniederschlägen. Während Heiden vor wenigen Jahrhunderten noch weit verbreitet und für manche Landschaften sogar prägend waren, hat sich ihr Areal heute auf wenige, meist in Naturschutzgebieten gelegene Restbestände verkleinert. Zu diesem Rückgang haben maßgeblich Änderungen der Landnutzung, aber auch Nährstoffeinträge aus umgebenden Agrarflächen und atmogene Depositionen beigetragen. In den meisten Ländern der Europäischen Union sind Heiden heute gesetzlich geschützte Ökosysteme, da diese, neben ihrem Erholungswert für den Menschen, Pflanzen- und Tierarten beherbergen, die außerhalb von Heiden nicht oder kaum überlebensfähig sind.

  6. Equid Herpesvirus Type 1 Activates Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  7. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  8. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Incandescent A Type and Decorative Lamps and LED Replacements

    SciTech Connect

    Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses common omnidirectional incandescent lamps - A-type and small decorative, candelabra-type lamps - and their commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  9. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Shadden, Shawn C.; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport. PMID:22782543

  10. Effects of methaqualone on blood platelet function.

    PubMed

    Mills, D G

    1978-06-01

    To study the mechanism whereby toxic doses of methaqualone cause a bleeding tendency in humans, the effects of methaqualone, diphenhydramine, and the combination of methaqualone plus diphenhydramine on blood platelet function were investigated. Exposure of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma in vitro to final concentrations of methaqualone ranging from 1.1 to 4.5 X 10(-4)) M resulted in nearly complete inhibition of the secondary phase and significant inhibition of the primary phase of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)--induced aggregation. Both the slope and height of collagen-induced aggregation responses were reduced significantly in vitro by the drug. When methaqualone final concentrations of 1.1, 2.3, and 4.5 X 10(-4) M were studied in the presence of diphenhydramine (1.1, 2.3, and 4.5 X 10(-5) M, respectively), the degree of inhibition of ADP-induced aggregation was only slightly greater (not significant) than that observed with methaqualone. The platelets of rabbits injected intravenously with methaqualone, 10 mg/kg, demonstrated a significantly decreased ability to aggregate with ADP and collagen 30 and 60 min after administration of the drug. These results suggest that a drug-induced defect of blood platelet function may play a role in the bleeding associated with methaqualone toxicity.

  11. Platelet function in pre-eclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kazmi, Rashid S; Cooper, Alan J; Lwaleed, Bashir A

    2011-03-01

    Pronounced hemostatic changes occur during pregnancy, and the balance shifts markedly in favor of hypercoagulability. Although primarily a result of a marked rise in the levels of several procoagulants and a fall in some natural anticoagulants, platelet activation also contributes to this prothrombotic tendency. Several studies have confirmed the accentuation of platelet activation in pre-eclampsia (P-EC), which remains an important obstetric complication affecting ~2 to 4% of pregnancies. Although there is still a long way to go, significant inroads have been made in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Whereas the pathogenesis of P-EC is protean and involves a complex interplay of placental and maternal tissues, platelet activation is likely to contribute to several clinical features. Several techniques have been used to assess platelet activation in P-EC. Detection of aberrations of platelet function and activation appear to have predictive value for its diagnosis. The findings also lend support to the use of antiplatelet agents as prophylaxis in those women with a high risk of developing the condition.

  12. Platelet transfusion practice during dengue fever epidemic.

    PubMed

    Kumar, N D; Tomar, V; Singh, B; Kela, K

    2000-01-01

    Blood components especially platelet concentrates due to their short shelf life are frequently in limited supply. Appropriate use of blood components is required to ensure their availability for needy patients as well as to avoid the unnecessary risk of transfusion-transmitted diseases. Medical audit of blood transfusion practice, which forms an important part of quality assurance programme in a transfusion centre, can provide grounds for improvement in transfusion medicine practice. During the epidemic of dengue fever in Oct., 1996, 1837 patients were admitted as dengue haemorrhagic fever in a teaching hospital in Delhi. Two hundred and eight patients (11.3%) were given platelet transfusions. Retrospective analysis of these platelet transfusions was done. It was observed that in only 52 (25%) out of 208 patients the information on platelet counts was provided. History of active bleeding was obtained only in 65 (31.2%) patients. About 35% patients received unnecessary prophylactic transfusions and during 89% of the transfusion episodes inappropriate dose of platelet concentrate was given. Information regarding post-transfusion recovery could be obtained in only 16.5% of transfusion episodes. The study emphasises the need for development of specific guidelines for transfusion of blood components, constant interaction and co-ordination amongst clinicians and transfusion centre for implementation of these guidelines, and a regular medical audit to review the optimal utilisation of blood components.

  13. Rapid platelet turnover in WASP(−) mice correlates with increased ex vivo phagocytosis of opsonized WASP(−) platelets

    PubMed Central

    Prislovsky, Amanda; Marathe, Bindumadhav; Hosni, Amira; Bolen, Alyssa L.; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Jackson, Carl W.; Weiman, Darryl; Strom, Ted S.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to determine a mechanism for the thrombocytopenia of murine Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS). Materials and Methods Consumption rates of WAS protein (WASP)( −) and wild-type (WT) platelets were measured by injection of 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA)-labeled platelets into WT or WASP(−) recipients, and by in vivo biotinylation. Platelet and reticulated platelet counts were performed using quantitative flow cytometry. Bone marrow megakaryocyte number and ploidy was assessed by flow cytometry. Phagocytosis of CMFDA-labeled, opsonized platelets was assessed using bone marrow–derived macrophages. Serum antiplatelet antibodies were assayed via their binding to WT platelets. Results CMFDA-labeled WASP(−) platelets are consumed more rapidly than WT platelets in either WT or WASP(−) recipients. In vivo biotinylation studies corroborate these findings and show a normal consumption rate for WASP(−) reticulated platelets. The number of reticulated platelets is reduced in WASP(−) mice, but a significant number of the mice show an increased proportion of reticulated platelets and more severe thrombocytopenia. Sera from some of the latter group contain antiplatelet antibodies. Compared to WT platelets, WASP(−) platelets opsonized with anti-CD61 or 6A6 antibody are taken up more rapidly by bone marrow–derived macrophages. In vivo consumption rates of WASP(−) platelets are more accelerated by opsonization than are those of WT platelets. Conclusion Both rapid clearance and impaired production contribute to the thrombocytopenia of murine WAS. Increased susceptibility of opsonized WASP(−) platelets to phagocytosis leads to increased in vivo clearance. This correlates with a higher incidence of individuals with an elevated fraction of reticulated platelets, a more severe thrombocytopenia, and antiplatelet antibodies. PMID:18346836

  14. Wally Schirra Greets Dr. Wernher von Braun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Apollo 7 Commander Walter M. Schirra, Jr., left, greets Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Director, Marshall Space Flight Center and Dr. Kurt Debus, Right, KSC Director, during a prelaunch mission briefing held at the Florida Spaceport.

  15. Von Hippel-Lindau Disease (VHL)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Von Hippel-Lindau ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  16. Platelet-leukocyte interaction in adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Shinoda, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 10 nM) did not induce platelet adhesion to endothelial cells cultured in monolayer but it induced their adhesion to protein-coated plastic. However, PAF induced a marked platelet adhesion to endothelial cells when polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were present. Lyso-PAF had no effect. 2. Phase-contrast microscopic examination showed that single platelets rather than their aggregates adhered to the endothelial cell surface around aggregating and adhering PMNs. 3. Significant platelet adhesion was induced by PAF at concentrations higher that 0.01 nM with the maximal response at 10 nM. Platelet adhesion occurred within minutes after PAF addition, reaching a maximum approximately after 30 min. Platelet adhesion also occurred significantly at a PMN:platelet ratio of 1:800, and linearly up to 1:50. 4. The PAF-induced platelet adhesion was suppressed by three structurally unrelated PAF antagonists, WEB 2086, ONO 6240 and BN 52021, in a concentration-dependent manner. 5. PAF also increased PMN adhesion to endothelial cell monolayers, which was further augmented by the presence of platelets. 6. The present study demonstrates that PAF induces platelet adhesion to endothelial cells in vitro when PMNs are present and that there is a close interaction between platelets and PMNs in their adhesion to endothelial cells. The present study further suggests that PMNs could play a central role in platelet adhesion to vascular endothlium in certain pathological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:1884095

  17. A manual method to obtain platelet rich plasma

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Fabiana Paulino; Ingham, Sheila Jean McNeill; Forgas, Andrea; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Sasaki, Pedro Henrique; Abdalla, Rene Jorge

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study is to report a manual method to obtain platelet rich plasma (PRP). METHODS: For this study 61 ml of peripheral blood was obtained and submitted to centrifugation at 541g for 5 min. The centrifugation separates the blood into three components: red blood cells, buffy coat and platelet rich plasma. Blood and platelet rich plasma samples were sent to the Hospital's Laboratory and platelets and leukocytes were measured. RESULTS: A sample of 637 blood donors was evaluated. The platelet yield efficiency was 86.77% and the increase in platelet concentration factor was 2.89 times. The increase in leukocyte concentration factor was 1.97 times. CONCLUSION: The method described here produces leukocyte-rich and platelet-rich plasma with a high platelet and leukocyte increased factor. Level of Evidence IV, Controlled Laboratory Study. PMID:24868183

  18. Platelet concentrates, from whole blood or collected by apheresis?

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F

    2013-04-01

    Platelet concentrates can be isolated from donated whole blood with the platelet-rich plasma-method or the buffy coat-method. Alternatively, platelets can be obtained by apheresis, harvesting the platelets but returning all other cells to the donor. The quality and characteristics of platelets during storage are affected by a number of factors, such as anticoagulant, centrifugation and processing after collection, and pre- or post storage pooling, but when comparing literature on the various methods, most differences balance out. To have sufficient platelets to treat an adult patient, whole-blood-derived platelet concentrates need pooling of multiple donations, thereby increasing the risk of infectious agent transmission at least two-fold as compared with apheresis units. Allo immunization rates, acute reaction rates, and transfusion related acute lung injury rates are not different. Apheresis donation procedures have fewer adverse events. All these factors need to be considered and weighed when selecting a method of platelet collection for a blood center.

  19. Roll, adhere, spread and contract: structural mechanics of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Simona; Studt, Jan-Dirk; Medalia, Ohad; Tanuj Sapra, K

    2015-01-01

    Platelets are involved in life-sustaining processes such as hemostasis, wound healing, atherothrombosis and angiogenesis. Mechanical trauma to blood vessels causes platelet activation resulting in their adherence and clot formation at the damaged site, culminating in clot retraction and tissue repair. Two of the major players underlying this process are the cytoskeleton, i.e., actin and microtubules, and the membrane integrin receptors. Rare congenital bleeding disorders such as Glanzmann thrombasthenia and Bernard-Soulier syndrome are associated with genetic alterations of platelet surface receptors, also affecting the platelet cytoskeletal structure. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about platelet structure and adhesion, and delve into the mechanical aspects of platelet function. Platelets lack a nucleus, and can thus provide a minimal model of a biological cell. New biophysical tools may help to scrutinize platelets anew and to extend the existing knowledge on cell biology. PMID:25655000

  20. The prowess of platelets in immunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Koenen, Rory R

    2016-09-27

    Platelets not only serve as essential haemostatic cells, they also have important roles in immune defence and inflammation. Despite not having a nucleus, platelets contain physiologically relevant amounts of RNA, which can be spliced and translated into functional proteins. In addition, platelets have the ability to bind to numerous other cells, such as leukocytes and vascular cells. During those interactions, platelets can modulate cellular responses, resulting in e. g. inflammatory activation or apoptosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that platelets can influence the outcomes of bacterial and viral infection, as well as the extent of tissue injury after ischaemia. Platelets also carry considerable amounts of cytokines and growth factors in their secretory granules, preformed for rapid secretion. Those properties in combination with the sheer amount of platelets circulating in the blood stream make them an important force in the immune response during health and disease. In this overview, recent findings concerning those interesting properties of platelets beyond haemostasis are discussed.

  1. (Dicer)phering roles of microRNA in platelets.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Belleannée, Clémence

    2016-04-01

    In this issue of Blood, Rowley et al report that noncoding RNAs precisely regulate the messenger RNA (mRNA) profile in platelets. Interfering in this process using genetically engineered mice affects hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets. PMID:27056990

  2. Platelet morphologic changes and fibrinogen receptor localization. Initial responses in ADP-activated human platelets.

    PubMed

    Hensler, M E; Frojmovic, M; Taylor, R G; Hantgan, R R; Lewis, J C

    1992-09-01

    Platelet exposure to agonists results in rapid morphologic changes paralleled by fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. The current study used standardized stereology in conjunction with immunogold electron microscopy to correlate the initial morphologic changes with fibrinogen receptor localization on the surfaces of ADP-activated human platelets. A 45% increase in platelet circumference was observed after 3 seconds of activation (P = 0.001). Virtually all of this increase was due to a 13-fold increase in projection membrane, and the projections observed by stereo microscopy at this time were mostly blunt. Both blunt and long projections also accounted for the increase in platelet-platelet contacts at 10 seconds of activation. Immunogold electron microscopy using the monoclonal antibodies P2 and AP-2 against the fibrinogen receptor, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GP IIb/IIIa), showed relatively equivalent immunogold densities on projections compared with cell body during 30 seconds of activation. The activation-dependent anti-GP IIb/IIIa monoclonal antibody, 7E3, showed an immunogold density 37% greater on projections compared with cell body (P = 0.0001). Colocalization studies using 7E3 with a polyclonal antifibrinogen antibody showed bound fibrinogen in close proximity to the GP IIb/IIIa localized by 7E3 on projections. These studies support an important role for platelet projections during the earliest stages of fibrinogen binding and ADP-induced aggregation.

  3. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  4. Platelet interactions with titanium: modulation of platelet activity by surface topography.

    PubMed

    Park, J Y; Gemmell, C H; Davies, J E

    2001-10-01

    Endosseous implants initially come into contact with blood. Thus, the nature of the interactions between blood and implanted endosseous implants may influence subsequent bone healing events in the peri-implant healing compartment. We conducted studies to address the following question: Does implant surface microtexture modulate platelet activity? We used commercially pure Ti (cpTi) disks with four different surface finishes: dual acid-etched (DAE), 320 grit (320G) abraded, machined, and p1200 polished cpTi. Surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical profilometry. The DAE and 320G surfaces presented more complex microtextures than the machined or polished surfaces. Platelet activities were measured by quantifying platelet adherence, platelet-derived microparticle (MP) formation, and P-selectin expression as function of surface type. Platelet adhesion, measured using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. was increased on DAE and 320G surfaces compared to machined and polished surfaces (p < 0.05). M P formation and P-selectin expression, assayed by flow cytometry, also showed increased activation of platelets on DAE and 320G surfaces. Because increased activation of platelets may lead to up-regulation of osteogenic responses during bone healing, these results may explain the enhanced osteoconductivity known to occur with DAE cpTi surfaces in comparison with machined cpTi surfaces. PMID:11519787

  5. The content of bone morphogenetic proteins in platelets varies greatly between different platelet donors

    SciTech Connect

    Kalen, Anders; Wahlstroem, Ola; Linder, Cecilia Halling; Magnusson, Per

    2008-10-17

    Platelet derivates and platelet rich plasma have been used to stimulate bone formation and wound healing because of the rich content of potent growth factors. However, not all reports have been conclusive since some have not been able to demonstrate a positive effect. We investigated the interindividual variation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) in platelets from healthy donors, and the pH-dependent effect on the release of BMPs in preparations of lysed platelets in buffer (LPB). Platelet concentrates from 31 healthy donors were prepared in pH 4.3 and pH 7.4 buffers and investigated with respect to BMP-2, -4, -6, and -7. BMP-2 and BMP-4 were significantly more common in acidic LPBs in comparison with neutral preparations. We also observed a considerable variation among platelet donors with respect to the release of BMPs at pH 4.3 and 7.4. In conclusion, a considerable variation was found among platelet donors, which may be of importance considering the ambiguous results previously reported on osteoblast proliferation and differentiation.

  6. Dr. von Braun With German Rocket Experimenters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1930-01-01

    Dr. von Braun was among a famous group of rocket experimenters in Germany in the 1930s. This photograph is believed to be made on the occasion of Herman Oberth's Kegelduese liquid rocket engine being certified as to performance during firing. From left to right are R. Nebel, Dr. Ritter, Mr. Baermueller, Kurt Heinish, Herman Oberth, Klaus Riedel, Wernher von Braun, and an unidentified person.

  7. Platelet rich plasma in ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Riestra, A C; Alonso-Herreros, J M; Merayo-Lloves, J

    2016-10-01

    The use of platelet-rich preparations has experienced a significant increase in recent years due to its role in tissue-repair and regeneration. The aim of this study is to examine the available evidence regarding the application of plasma rich in growth factors, and its variations, on the ocular surface. A review is also presented on the effects of platelet-derived growth factors, the implications of the preparation methods, and the existing literature on the safety and efficacy of these therapies in ocular surface diseases. Despite the widespread use of platelet preparations there is no consensus on the most appropriate preparation method, and growth factors concentration vary with different systems. These preparations have been used in the treatment of ocular surface diseases, such as dry eye or persistent epithelial defects, among others, with good safety and efficacy profiles, but further studies are needed to compare to the currently available alternatives.

  8. Determination of critical parameters in platelet margination.

    PubMed

    Reasor, Daniel A; Mehrabadi, Marmar; Ku, David N; Aidun, Cyrus K

    2013-02-01

    An investigation of margination dependence on hematocrit, platelet shape, and viscosity ratio of plasma to cytoplasm is presented. Whole blood is modeled as a suspension of deformable red blood cells (RBCs) and rigid platelets in a viscous liquid. The fluid phase is simulated using the lattice-Boltzmann method, the RBC membranes are modeled with a coarse-grained spectrin-link method, and the dynamics of rigid particles are updated using Newton's equations of motion for axisymmetric shapes. The results emphasize that an increase in hematocrit increases the rate of margination. The viscosity ratio between the interior cytoplasm and suspending fluid can considerably alter the rate of margination. The aspect ratio of surrogate platelet particles influences the rate of margination as well. Spherical particles tend to migrate more quickly than disks. Highly viscous or rigid RBCs slow down margination.

  9. Platelet concentration in platelet concentrates and periodontal regeneration-unscrambling the ambiguity

    PubMed Central

    Suchetha, A.; Lakshmi, P.; Bhat, Divya; Mundinamane, Darshan B.; Soorya, K. V.; Bharwani, G. Ashit

    2015-01-01

    Context: Platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) and Platelet-rich-fibrin (PRF) are extensively used autologous platelet concentrates in periodontal regeneration, and PRF has a better efficacy as compared to PRP. The rationale for this difference has often been attributed to the difference in the structure of the fibrin matrix. However, the effect of concentration of platelets on the regenerative potential of these concentrates is obscure. Aims: The study was conducted to evaluate and compare, clinically and radiographically, the efficacy of PRF and PRP in the treatment of periodontal endosseous defects and to assess the effect of platelet concentration on periodontal regeneration. Materials and Methods: Twenty intrabony defects were selected and divided into two groups randomly by the coin toss method. Group I received PRP and Group II subjects were treated with PRF. The platelet counts in PRP and PRF were analyzed. Clinical and radiological parameters were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 9 months postoperatively. Statistical Analysis: Kruskal–Wallis Chi-square test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, t-test, and Spearman's rank correlation were used for statistical analysis of data. Results: There was statistically significant improvement in all the parameters in the two groups except in relation to gingival recession. There was a statistically significant difference between the platelet count in Group I and Group II (P = 0.002). Conclusion: PRP and PRF appear to have nearly comparable effects in terms of periodontal regeneration. The concentration of platelets appears to play a paradoxical role in regeneration. The regenerative potential of platelets appears to be optimal within a limited range. PMID:26681857

  10. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable.

  11. Assessing the Methodology for Calculating Platelet Contribution to Clot Strength (Platelet Component) in Thromboelastometry and Thrombelastography

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Hochleitner, Gerald; Schöchl, Herbert; Schlimp, Christoph J.

    2015-01-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood clot have been studied most commonly using thrombelastography (TEG®) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM®). ROTEM®-based bleeding treatment algorithms recommend administering platelets to patients with low EXTEM clot strength (e.g., clot amplitude at 10 minutes [A10] <40 mm) once clot strength of the ROTEM® fibrin-based test (FIBTEM) is corrected. Algorithms based on TEG® typically use a low value of maximum amplitude (e.g., <50 mm) as a trigger for administering platelets. However, this parameter reflects the contributions of various blood components to the clot, including platelets and fibrin/fibrinogen. The platelet component of clot strength may provide a more sensitive indication of platelet deficiency than clot amplitude from a whole blood TEG® or ROTEM® assay. The platelet component of the formed clot is derived from the results of TEG®/ROTEM® tests performed with and without platelet inhibition. In this article, we review the basis for why this calculation should be based on clot elasticity (e.g., the E parameter with TEG® and the CE parameter with ROTEM®) as opposed to clot amplitude (e.g., the A parameter with TEG® or ROTEM®). This is because clot elasticity, unlike clot amplitude, reflects the force with which the blood clot resists rotation within the device, and the relationship between clot amplitude (variable X) and clot elasticity (variable Y) is nonlinear. A specific increment of X (ΔX) will be associated with different increments of Y (ΔY), depending on the initial value of X. When calculated correctly, using clot elasticity data, the platelet component of the clot can provide a valuable insight into platelet deficiency in emergency bleeding. PMID:26378699

  12. Assessing the Methodology for Calculating Platelet Contribution to Clot Strength (Platelet Component) in Thromboelastometry and Thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Cristina; Ranucci, Marco; Hochleitner, Gerald; Schöchl, Herbert; Schlimp, Christoph J

    2015-10-01

    The viscoelastic properties of blood clot have been studied most commonly using thrombelastography (TEG) and thromboelastometry (ROTEM). ROTEM-based bleeding treatment algorithms recommend administering platelets to patients with low EXTEM clot strength (e.g., clot amplitude at 10 minutes [A10] <40 mm) once clot strength of the ROTEM® fibrin-based test (FIBTEM) is corrected. Algorithms based on TEG typically use a low value of maximum amplitude (e.g., <50 mm) as a trigger for administering platelets. However, this parameter reflects the contributions of various blood components to the clot, including platelets and fibrin/fibrinogen. The platelet component of clot strength may provide a more sensitive indication of platelet deficiency than clot amplitude from a whole blood TEG or ROTEM® assay. The platelet component of the formed clot is derived from the results of TEG/ROTEM® tests performed with and without platelet inhibition. In this article, we review the basis for why this calculation should be based on clot elasticity (e.g., the E parameter with TEG and the CE parameter with ROTEM®) as opposed to clot amplitude (e.g., the A parameter with TEG or ROTEM®). This is because clot elasticity, unlike clot amplitude, reflects the force with which the blood clot resists rotation within the device, and the relationship between clot amplitude (variable X) and clot elasticity (variable Y) is nonlinear. A specific increment of X (ΔX) will be associated with different increments of Y (ΔY), depending on the initial value of X. When calculated correctly, using clot elasticity data, the platelet component of the clot can provide a valuable insight into platelet deficiency in emergency bleeding.

  13. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects.

  14. Rupture Forces among Human Blood Platelets at different Degrees of Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Palankar, Raghavendra; Bui, Van-Chien; Medvedev, Nikolay; Greinacher, Andreas; Delcea, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about mechanics underlying the interaction among platelets during activation and aggregation. Although the strength of a blood thrombus has likely major biological importance, no previous study has measured directly the adhesion forces of single platelet-platelet interaction at different activation states. Here, we filled this void first, by minimizing surface mediated platelet-activation and second, by generating a strong adhesion force between a single platelet and an AFM cantilever, preventing early platelet detachment. We applied our setup to measure rupture forces between two platelets using different platelet activation states, and blockade of platelet receptors. The rupture force was found to increase proportionally to the degree of platelet activation, but reduced with blockade of specific platelet receptors. Quantification of single platelet-platelet interaction provides major perspectives for testing and improving biocompatibility of new materials; quantifying the effect of drugs on platelet function; and assessing the mechanical characteristics of acquired/inherited platelet defects. PMID:27146004

  15. Renaturierung von Tagebaufolgeflächen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tischew, Sabine

    Der Abbau von Rohstoffen im Tagebauverfahren bedingt einen tief greifenden Landschafts- und Strukturwandel in den betroffenen Regionen. In der Abbauphase hat vor allem der Braunkohleabbau mit den tagebauübergreifenden Grundwasserabsenkungstrichtern, der Zerstörung oder Beeinträchtigung von ausgedehnten naturnahen Auenökosystemen sowie Wäldern und Elementen der Kulturlandschaft aus der Sicht des Naturschutzes überwiegend negative landschaftsökologische Folgen. Vor allem der Eingriff in Ökosysteme mit langen Entwicklungszeiten (alte Wälder, Moore) oder in die Dynamik von Auensystemen ist nicht oder nur in sehr langen Zeiträumen wieder ausgleichbar. Für letztere ist auch langfristig die Durchgängigkeit für viele Tierarten (Arten der Fließgewässer) nicht wieder vollständig herstellbar. Oft ist es zudem schwierig, traditionelle Landnutzungen (z. B. Wanderschäferei, Nutzung von Streuobstwiesen) nach der langen Abbauphase wieder aufzugreifen. Es ist deshalb eine wichtige Aufgabe, nach dem Abbauprozess auf der Grundlage der vorhandenen Potenziale eine nachhaltige Entwicklung der Bergbaufolgelandschaft zu unterstützen und von den Betreibern des Abbaus und von den Sanierungsgesellschaften auch einzufordern (z. B. Bauer 1998).

  16. Biochemical and functional abnormalities in hypercholesterolemic rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Dalal, K.B.; Ebbe, S.; Mazoyer, E.; Carpenter, D.; Yee, T. )

    1990-02-01

    This study was designed to elucidate changes in rabbit platelet lipids induced by a cholesterol rich diet and to explore the possible correlation of these lipid changes with platelet abnormalities. Pronounced biochemical alterations were observed when serum cholesterol levels of 700-1000 mg% were reached. Hypercholesterolemic (HC) platelets contained 37% more neutral lipids and 16% less phospholipids than the controls. Lysolecithin, cholesterol esters and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels were increased in HC platelets, and the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC) were decreased. The cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio of lipidemic platelets increased from 0.55 +/- 0.011 to 0.89 +/- 0.016 (P less than 0.01) in eight weeks. HC platelets had 90% more arachidonic acid (AA) in the PI than normal platelets. No significant changes in AA of PC were observed. Platelet function was monitored by the uptake and release of (14C)serotonin in platelet rich plasma (PRP), using varying concentrations of collagen as an aggregating agent. The uptake of (14C)serotonin in HC and normal platelets ranged from 78-94%. The percent of (14C)serotonin released from normal and HC platelets was proportional to the concentration of collagen. However, lipidemic platelets were hyperreactive to low concentrations of collagen. Incorporation of 50 microM acetylsalicylic acid into the aggregating medium suppressed the release of (14C)serotonin in normal PRP by more than 90%, but had only a partial effect on lipidemic PRP.

  17. Necrotic platelets provide a procoagulant surface during thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Vu Minh; Abeynaike, Latasha; Glaros, Elias; Campbell, Heather; Pasalic, Leonardo; Chen, Vivien M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    A subpopulation of platelets fulfills a procoagulant role in hemostasis and thrombosis by enabling the thrombin burst required for fibrin formation and clot stability at the site of vascular injury. Excess procoagulant activity is linked with pathological thrombosis. The identity of the procoagulant platelet has been elusive. The cell death marker 4-[N-(S-glutathionylacetyl)amino]phenylarsonous acid (GSAO) rapidly enters a subpopulation of agonist-stimulated platelets via an organic anion-transporting polypeptide and is retained in the cytosol through covalent reaction with protein dithiols. Labeling with GSAO, together with exposure of P-selectin, distinguishes necrotic from apoptotic platelets and correlates with procoagulant potential. GSAO+ platelets form in occluding murine thrombi after ferric chloride injury and are attenuated with megakaryocyte-directed deletion of the cyclophilin D gene. These platelets form a procoagulant surface, supporting fibrin formation, and reduction in GSAO+ platelets is associated with reduction in platelet thrombus size and fibrin formation. Analysis of platelets from human subjects receiving aspirin therapy indicates that these procoagulant platelets form despite aspirin therapy, but are attenuated by inhibition of the necrosis pathway. These findings indicate that the major subpopulation of platelets involved in fibrin formation are formed via regulated necrosis involving cyclophilin D, and that they may be targeted independent of platelet activation. PMID:26474813

  18. Insights into Platelet Storage and the Need for Multiple Approaches.

    PubMed

    Handigund, Mallikarjun; Cho, Yong Gon

    2015-01-01

    Upon accidental injury and the treatment of many diseases, patients may need a transfusion of blood components in order to achieve hemostasis. Platelets are small enucleated cells derived from bone marrow megakaryocytes that undergo change upon activation at sites of vascular injury and play a vital role in vascular repair and antimicrobial host defense, collectively contributing to hemostasis. They are the common blood components transfused whenever there is need, but supplies do not equal the demand as platelets are required in many medical and surgical procedures. In addition, surplus supplies of platelet concentrate are often discarded as they have a short shelf life. Currently, platelet concentrates are stored at room temperature for a maximum of 5 days from the date of collection; the temporal aspect is an added hurdle in the growing demand for platelet concentrates. Many investigations have been carried out in attempt to improve the quality and lengthen the shelf life of platelets, but the few that have succeeded are not commercially viable. Moreover, currently there is a declining trend in platelet research, quelling the hope of platelet storage improvement. Successful strategies would be a boon for medicine in particular and humanity in general. This review deals with past and current efforts toward improving the quality of platelet concentrates by reducing platelet storage lesions and increasing the viable storage period for platelets. Also presented are new perspectives based on past and current efforts, which should be investigated for platelet research in this decade.

  19. Fractionation of platelets according to size: functional and biochemical characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Carty, D.J.; Gear, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    The functional and biochemical heterogeneity of platelets has been studied using graded differential centrifugation to fractionate human platelets according to size while maintaining their morphological and functional integrity as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and content of beta-thromboglobulin. Aggregation kinetics were studied by both optical and quenched-flow methods involving single-particle counting. Large platelets were significantly more sensitive to ADP, but aggregated less rapidly than small platelets. Thrombin exerted a similar influence. Large platelets were also enriched in surface sialic acid and sulfhydryl groups and in internal glycogen, ATP, ADP, calcium, cyclic AMP, malonaldehyde, and succinate cytochrome c reductase when compared to small platelets, even when normalized per unit volume. ADP caused a more rapid breakdown of cyclic AMP in small platelets. Potential aging relationships were tested by isotope studies in rats. /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine was incorporated in vivo at a similar rate into all fractions. Large platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr disappeared from circulation linearly and had a longer mean lifespan than small platelets, which disappeared exponentially. This behavior supports independent aging of platelet populations of differing size. The data suggest a distinct heterogeneity in platelet function and fate, which could derive from protection of large platelets against excessive activation by Ca2+-regulated events.

  20. Thiazole orange positive platelets in a dog with Evans' syndrome.

    PubMed

    Michimoto, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomotaka; Suzuki, Kumiko; Watari, Toshihiro; Kano, Rui; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2004-10-01

    We examined transition for the percentage of reticulated platelets (RP%) and platelet count in a canine case of Evans' syndrome. The result demonstrated that measurement of the RP% can be useful in evaluating platelet production in the bone marrow and response to treatment.

  1. Force-induced on-rate switching and modulation by mutations in gain-of-function von Willebrand diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jongseong; Hudson, Nathan E.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the ultralong vascular protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) cause the common human bleeding disorder, von Willebrand disease (VWD). The A1 domain in VWF binds to glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) on platelets, in a reaction triggered, in part, by alterations in flow during bleeding. Gain-of-function mutations in A1 and GPIbα in VWD suggest conformational regulation. We report that force application switches A1 and/or GPIbα to a second state with faster on-rate, providing a mechanism for activating VWF binding to platelets. Switching occurs near 10 pN, a force that also induces a state of the receptor−ligand complex with slower off-rate. Force greatly increases the effects of VWD mutations, explaining pathophysiology. Conversion of single molecule kon (s−1) to bulk phase kon (s−1M−1) and the kon and koff values extrapolated to zero force for the low-force pathways show remarkably good agreement with bulk-phase measurements. PMID:25810255

  2. Force-induced on-rate switching and modulation by mutations in gain-of-function von Willebrand diseases.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseong; Hudson, Nathan E; Springer, Timothy A

    2015-04-14

    Mutations in the ultralong vascular protein von Willebrand factor (VWF) cause the common human bleeding disorder, von Willebrand disease (VWD). The A1 domain in VWF binds to glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) on platelets, in a reaction triggered, in part, by alterations in flow during bleeding. Gain-of-function mutations in A1 and GPIbα in VWD suggest conformational regulation. We report that force application switches A1 and/or GPIbα to a second state with faster on-rate, providing a mechanism for activating VWF binding to platelets. Switching occurs near 10 pN, a force that also induces a state of the receptor-ligand complex with slower off-rate. Force greatly increases the effects of VWD mutations, explaining pathophysiology. Conversion of single molecule kon (s(-1)) to bulk phase kon (s(-1)M(-1)) and the kon and koff values extrapolated to zero force for the low-force pathways show remarkably good agreement with bulk-phase measurements.

  3. Increased mean platelet volume and mean platelet volume/platelet count ratio in Korean patients with deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Soo; Park, Tae Sung; Cho, Sun Young; Joh, Jin Hyun; Ahn, Hyung Joon

    2013-01-01

    The mean platelet volume (MPV) is a laboratory marker associated with platelet function and activity. Increased MPV in thromboembolic disease is considered an important risk factor. The aim of this study was to compare the MPV and MPV/platelet count (MPV/P) ratio between deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and control subjects. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients (n = 91) admitted due to newly diagnosed DVT from December 2010 to March 2012. The control group (n = 311) underwent health screening at our Hospital. Median MPV was higher in DVT patients compared to controls (8.6 fl vs. 7.9 fl, p < 0.0001). The DVT patients also had a higher MPV/P ratio compared to the control group (0.0388 fl/(10(9)/l) vs. 0.0308 fl/(10(9)/l), p < 0.0001). MPV was inversely correlated with platelet count in DVT patients (correlation coefficient = -0.33, p = 0.001). Receiver operator characteristic analysis revealed that an MPV cutoff value of 8.2 fl provided 70.3% sensitivity and 72.7% specificity. An MPV/P cutoff value of 0.0363 fl/(10(9)/l) showed 60% sensitivity and 73% specificity. MPV and MPV/P ratio could be considered meaningful laboratory markers for the risk of DVT.

  4. Platelet turnover and kinetics in immune thrombocytopenic purpura: results with autologous 111In-labeled platelets and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets differ

    SciTech Connect

    Heyns A du, P.; Badenhorst, P.N.; Loetter, M.G.P.; Pieters, H.; Wessels, P.; Kotze, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Mean platelet survival and turnover were simultaneously determined with autologous 111In-labeled platelets (111In-AP) and homologous 51Cr-labeled platelets (51Cr-HP) in ten patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). In vivo redistribution of the 111In-AP was quantitated with a scintillation camera and computer-assisted image analysis. The patients were divided into two groups: those with splenic platelet sequestration (spleen-liver 111In activity ratio greater than 1.4), and those with diffuse sequestration in the reticuloendothelial system. The latter patients had more severe ITP reflected by pronounced thrombocytopenia, decreased platelet turnover, and prominent early hepatic platelet sequestration. Mean platelet life span estimated with 51Cr-HP was consistently shorter than that of 111In-AP. Platelet turnover determined with 51Cr-HP was thus over-estimated. The difference in results with the two isotope labels was apparently due to greater in vivo elution of 51Cr. Although the limitations of the techniques should be taken into account, these findings indicate that platelet turnover is not always normal or increased in ITP, but is low in severe disease. We suggest that this may be ascribed to damage to megakaryocytes by antiplatelet antibody. The physical characteristics in 111In clearly make this radionuclide superior to 51Cr for the study of platelet kinetics in ITP.

  5. Platelet ligands and ADAMTS13 during Puumala hantavirus infection and associated thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Laine, Outi; Mäkelä, Satu; Mustonen, Jukka; Helminen, Mika; Vaheri, Antti; Lassila, Riitta; Joutsi-Korhonen, Lotta

    2011-09-01

    We aimed here to elucidate the role of adhesive platelet ligands and endothelial involvement during the acute phase of Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection. Nineteen hospital-treated patients with serologically confirmed diagnosis of acute PUUV infection were included. Patient charts were reviewed for clinical and basic laboratory data. Plasma levels of von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag), ristocetin cofactor (VWF:RCo), factor VIII (FVIII:C) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with a thrombospondin type 1 domain 13 (ADAMTS13) activities as well as fibrinogen and fibronectin were measured three times acutely and once during the recovery phase. VWF:Ag and VWF:RCo were nearly three-fold higher acutely compared with recovery (median 252 vs. 88%, and mean 267 vs. 98%, respectively; P<0.001 for both), whereas FVIII:C was only slightly elevated (median 118 vs. 88%, P=0.002) and remarkably failed to show association with VWF in the acute phase. ADAMTS13 activity and fibronectin concentration were lower in the acute compared with the recovery phase (median 56 vs. 63%, P=0.003, and median 221 vs. 330 μmol/l, P=0.001, respectively). Fibrinogen raised acutely (mean 5.0 vs. 3.3 g/l, P<0.001), negatively correlating with the platelet count (r=-0.468, P=0.043). Markedly upregulated fibrinogen and VWF together with decreased levels of ADAMTS13 activity and fibronectin were observed during acute PUUV infection. VWF and FVIII:C did not associate during the acute phase, whereas thrombocytopenia correlated negatively with fibrinogen. These findings imply several rearranged interactions between platelets and their ligands.

  6. The Mechanism by Which Arabinoxylanases Can Recognize Highly Decorated Xylans*

    PubMed Central

    Labourel, Aurore; Crouch, Lucy I.; Brás, Joana L. A.; Jackson, Adam; Rogowski, Artur; Gray, Joseph; Yadav, Madhav P.; Henrissat, Bernard; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Najmudin, Shabir; Baslé, Arnaud; Cuskin, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of plant cell walls is an important biological process of increasing environmental and industrial significance. Xylan, a major component of the plant cell wall, consists of a backbone of β-1,4-xylose (Xylp) units that are often decorated with arabinofuranose (Araf) side chains. A large penta-modular enzyme, CtXyl5A, was shown previously to specifically target arabinoxylans. The mechanism of substrate recognition displayed by the enzyme, however, remains unclear. Here we report the crystal structure of the arabinoxylanase and the enzyme in complex with ligands. The data showed that four of the protein modules adopt a rigid structure, which stabilizes the catalytic domain. The C-terminal non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module could not be observed in the crystal structure, suggesting positional flexibility. The structure of the enzyme in complex with Xylp-β-1,4-Xylp-β-1,4-Xylp-[α-1,3-Araf]-β-1,4-Xylp showed that the Araf decoration linked O3 to the xylose in the active site is located in the pocket (−2* subsite) that abuts onto the catalytic center. The −2* subsite can also bind to Xylp and Arap, explaining why the enzyme can utilize xylose and arabinose as specificity determinants. Alanine substitution of Glu68, Tyr92, or Asn139, which interact with arabinose and xylose side chains at the −2* subsite, abrogates catalytic activity. Distal to the active site, the xylan backbone makes limited apolar contacts with the enzyme, and the hydroxyls are solvent-exposed. This explains why CtXyl5A is capable of hydrolyzing xylans that are extensively decorated and that are recalcitrant to classic endo-xylanase attack. PMID:27531750

  7. Effects of Cl adatom on Na-Decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xinxiang; Sun, Yu; Dong, Meifeng; Li, Chun; Wang, Jiesheng; Mimura, Hidenori; Yuan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    The effects of the Cl adatom on Na-decorated graphene are studied using first principles density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation to calculate the adsorption energy, geometric structure, charge density difference, and density of states. When Na and Cl adatoms are simultaneously absorbed on opposite sides of graphene, the adsorption energy of Na increases by about 1 eV and the adsorption system becomes more stable because graphene can effectively transfer the 3s valence of the Na adatom to the Cl adatom.

  8. Casein mediated green synthesis and decoration of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Vankayala, Raviraj; Kalluru, Poliraju; Tammina, Sai Kumar; Kiran Kumar, H. A.

    This research is mainly focusing on one-step biosynthesis of graphene from graphene oxide and its stabilization using naturally occurring milk protein, casein. The synthesis of casein reduced graphene oxide (CRGO) was completed within 7 h under reflux at 90 °C with the formation of few layered fine graphene nanosheets. UV-Vis, XRD, XPS analysis data revealed the reduction process of the graphene oxide. Results of FT-IR, HPLC and TEM analysis have shown that the ensuing material consists of graphene decorated with casein molecules. Aspartic acid and glutamic acid residue present in casein molecules are responsible for the reduction of graphene oxide.

  9. Ozone sensing based on palladium decorated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Colindres, Selene Capula; Aguir, Khalifa; Cervantes Sodi, Felipe; Vargas, Luis Villa; Salazar, José Moncayo; Febles, Vicente Garibay

    2014-04-14

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were easily and efficiently decorated with Pd nanoparticles through a vapor-phase impregnation-decomposition method starting from palladium acetylacetonates. The sensor device consisted on a film of sensitive material (MWCNTs-Pd) deposited by drop coating on platinum interdigitated electrodes on a SiO₂ substrate. The sensor exhibited a resistance change to ozone (O₃) with a response time of 60 s at different temperatures and the capability of detecting concentrations up to 20 ppb. The sensor shows the best response when exposed to O3 at 120 °C. The device shows a very reproducible sensor performance, with high repeatability, full recovery and efficient response.

  10. Reduction of CTRP9, a novel anti-platelet adipokine, contributes to abnormal platelet activity in diabetic animals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenqing; Lau, Wayne Bond; Wang, Yajing; Ma, Xinliang; Li, Rong

    2016-01-11

    Platelet hyper-reactivity is a crucial cause of accelerated atherosclerosis increasing risk of thrombotic vascular events in diabetic patients. The mechanisms leading to abnormal platelet activity during diabetes are complex and not fully defined. The current study attempted to clarify the role of CTRP9, a novel adiponectin paralog, in enhanced platelet activity and determined whether CTRP9 may inhibit platelet activity. Adult male C57BL/6 J mice were randomized to receive high-fat diet (HFD) or normal diet (ND). 8 weeks after HFD, animals were sacrificed, and both plasma CTRP9 and platelet aggregation were determined. HFD-fed animals increased weight gain significantly, and became hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic 8 weeks post-HFD. Compared to ND animals, HFD animals exhibited significantly decreased plasma CTRP9 concentration and increased platelet response to ADP, evidenced by augmented aggregation amplitude, steeper aggregation slope, larger area under the curve, and shorter lag time (P < 0.01). A significant negative correlation between plasma CTRP9 concentration and platelet aggregation amplitude was observed. More importantly, in vitro pre-treatment with CTRP9 significantly inhibited ADP-stimulated platelet activation in platelet samples from both ND and HFD animals. Taken together, our results suggest reduced plasma CTRP9 concentration during diabetes plays a causative role in platelet hyper-activity, contributing to platelet-induced cardiovascular damage during this pathologic condition. Enhancing CTRP9 production and/or exogenous supplementation of CTRP9 may protect against diabetic cardiovascular injury via inhibition of abnormal platelet activity.

  11. Platelets contribute to growth and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Shasthry, Saggere Muralikrishna; Bajpai, Meenu; Bhadoria, Ajeet Singh; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Kumar, Anupam; Sarin, Shiv K

    2016-09-01

    To determine the association of platelets with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) growth and its metastasis. We examined platelets, laboratory, and radiological data of consecutive 420 HCC and 1008 cirrhosis cases. Follow-up information of platelet count in cirrhosis to HCC, pre- to post-therapy, and post-therapy to HCC outcome was analyzed. Cytokine profiling was performed in HCC and cirrhosis (n = 10 each). On the basis of imaging, HCC was divided into six subgroups. Cytosmears of HCC were assessed for platelet clustering around tumor cells. An in vitro Matrigel invasion assay was performed on human HCC cell lines using graded concentration of platelets. Baseline platelet numbers and platelet/lymphocyte ratios (PLRs) were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in HCC than cirrhosis. IL-1, IL-6, FGF, G-CSF, thrombopoietin, and VEGF were higher in HCC than cirrhosis. Platelet counts were increased after HCC conversion of cirrhosis (p < 0.001) and decreased (p < 0.001) after therapy. Platelets and PLR in recurrence cases were higher than in responders at baseline. AFP, PIVKAII, platelets, and PLR increase (p < 0.001 each) with advancement in HCC growth. Multivariate analysis showed platelets (p = 0.002), PLR (p = 0.004), and AFP (p < 0.001) associated with distant metastasis. Platelet clustering seen in 75.7% of HCC group 3, 45% in group 2, and 12.5% in group 1 cases (p < 0.001). Invaded cells in Matrigel assay positively correlated with platelet concentration. Platelets can contribute to the development, growth, invasion, and metastasis of HCC. Rising platelet count after HCC therapy is indicative of incomplete response or recurrence. PMID:27457354

  12. Interactions of human blood-platelets with vaccinia

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, C.E.B.

    1989-01-01

    These investigations were conducted to determine whether vaccinia (strain WR) adsorbs to the human platelet and alters specific platelet activities, namely, the uptake of {sup 14}C-serotonin, the release of {sup 14}C-serotonin and also the release of {sup 14}C-serotonin stimulated by thrombin. Vaccinia did not alter the platelet uptake of {sup 14}C-serotonin. To determine if vaccinia induces a release of {sup 14}C-serotonin from platelets, vaccinia was added to washed or unwashed {sup 14}C-serotonin labeled platelets, and the release of {sup 14}C-Serotonin into the supernatant was measured. Less than 8% of the {sup 14}C-Serotonin was released. The action of vaccinia to alter the platelet release of {sup 14}C-serotonin induced by thrombin was monitored by measuring the radioactivity released from thrombin stimulated {sup 14}C-serotonin labeled platelets incubated with or without vaccinia. Vaccinia inhibited the thrombin induced release of {sup 14}C-serotonin from platelets at a virus to platelet ratios of 5 through 80 plaque forming units (p.f.u.)/platelet. The inhibition was dose dependent. The binding of virus to platelets was determined by a plaque assay of a washed mixture of vaccinia virus and platelets. After inoculation of mixture onto a monolayer of BSC40 cells at a virus to platelet ratio of 0.1 p.f.u./platelet, 50 cell-bound-virus per 130,000-150,000 platelets were enumerated. Vaccinia was observed to inhibit the thrombin induced clot formation of plasma by a thrombin clotting time test. Scanning electron micrographs of the clot formed in the presence of vaccinia revealed a close packed fibrous structure lacking the cross-linked mesh-like pattern seen in a normal clot. Transmission electron micrographs showed an increase in the length and a close packing of the fibrin threads.

  13. Technological advances in diagnostic testing for von Willebrand disease: new approaches and challenges.

    PubMed

    Hayward, C P M; Moffat, K A; Graf, L

    2014-06-01

    Diagnostic tests for von Willebrand disease (VWD) are important for the assessment of VWD, which is a commonly encountered bleeding disorder worldwide. Technical innovations have been applied to improve the precision and lower limit of detection of von Willebrand factor (VWF) assays, including the ristocetin cofactor activity assay (VWF:RCo) that uses the antibiotic ristocetin to induce plasma VWF binding to glycoprotein (GP) IbIXV on target platelets. VWF-collagen-binding assays, depending on the type of collagen used, can improve the detection of forms of VWD with high molecular weight VWF multimer loss, although the best method is debatable. A number of innovations have been applied to VWF:RCo (which is commonly performed on an aggregometer), including replacing the target platelets with immobilized GPIbα, and quantification by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoturbidimetric, or chemiluminescent end-point. Some common polymorphisms in the VWF gene that do not cause bleeding are associated with falsely low VWF activity by ristocetin-dependent methods. To overcome the need for ristocetin, some new VWF activity assays use gain-of-function GPIbα mutants that bind VWF without the need for ristocetin, with an improved precision and lower limit of detection than measuring VWF:RCo by aggregometry. ELISA of VWF binding to mutated GPIbα shows promise as a method to identify gain-of-function defects from type 2B VWD. The performance characteristics of many new VWF activity assays suggest that the detection of VWD, and monitoring of VWD therapy, by clinical laboratories could be improved through adopting newer generation VWF assays.

  14. Distinct mechanisms account for acquired von Willebrand syndrome in plasma cell dyscrasias.

    PubMed

    Dicke, Christina; Schneppenheim, Sonja; Holstein, Katharina; Spath, Brigitte; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Dittmer, Rita; Budde, Ulrich; Langer, Florian

    2016-05-01

    Acquired von Willebrand syndrome (AVWS) is a rare bleeding disorder that may cause life-threatening hemorrhages in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias (PCDs). Early diagnosis and treatment require a thorough understanding of its underlying pathophysiology. Two patients with IgG MGUS presented with dramatically decreased plasma von Willebrand factor (VWF) and a severe type-1 pattern on multimer analysis. A prompt response to intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), but not to VWF/FVIII, was consistent with accelerated immunologic clearance of plasma VWF. Another IgG MGUS patient showed a type-2 pattern and a less pronounced response to IVIG, suggesting that additional mechanism(s) contributed to AVWS evolution. In a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and severe depletion of plasma VWF, multimer analysis indicated association of the IgM paraprotein with VWF before, but not after plasmapheresis, resulting in destruction of the agarose gel and a characteristically distorted band structure of VWF multimers. A type-2 pattern with highly abnormal VWF triplets and laboratory evidence of excessive fibrinolytic activity suggested that plasmin-mediated VWF degradation contributed to AVWS in a patient with multiple myeloma (MM) and AL amyloidosis. Finally, in a patient with IgG MM, maximally prolonged PFA-100® closure times and a specific defect in ristocetin-induced platelet agglutination, both of which resolved after remission induction, indicated interference of the paraprotein with VWF binding to platelet GPIb. Importantly, in none of the six patients, circulating autoantibodies to VWF were detected by a specific in-house ELISA. In summary, when evaluating PCD patients with severe bleeding symptoms, AVWS due to various pathogenic mechanisms should be considered. PMID:27040683

  15. Onion (Allium cepa L.) peel extract has anti-platelet effects in rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Ro, Ju-Ye; Ryu, Jin-Hyeob; Park, Hwa-Jin; Cho, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    The effects of onion peel extract (OPE) in collagen (5 μg/mL)-stimulated washed rat platelet aggregation were investigated. OPE inhibited platelet aggregation via inhibition of aggregation-inducing molecules, intracellular Ca(2+) and thromboxane A2 (TXA2) by blocking cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and TXA2 synthase (TXAS) activities in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, OPE elevated the formation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), aggregation-inhibiting molecule, but not cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of OPE revealed that OPE contains quercetin, one of the major flavonoids, which has anti-platelet effect. In conclusion, we suggest that OPE is an effective inhibitor of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation in vitro. Therefore, it can be a promising and safe strategy for anti-cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25628983

  16. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations. (a) Ceilings, linings, and any furring incidental to their installation in...

  17. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations. (a) Ceilings, linings, and any furring incidental to their installation in...

  18. 46 CFR 116.422 - Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations... PASSENGERS CONSTRUCTION AND ARRANGEMENT Fire Protection § 116.422 Ceilings, linings, trim, interior finish and decorations. (a) Ceilings, linings, and any furring incidental to their installation in...

  19. Beyond the "Decorated Landscapes" of Educational Reform: Toward Landscapes of Pluralism in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Michael P.; Bentley, Michael L.

    2007-01-01

    Perhaps, we are at the fork in the road when it is imperative that we consider whether the pursuit of pluralism in science education is a worthwhile endeavor in light of recent educational reforms that seem to decorate the true aim of education. The "decorated landscapes" of educational reform concentrate on economic growth and do little to…

  20. Enhanced sensing of NH3 gas by decorated multiwalled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnahena, S. T.; Satpati, Biswarup; Roy, Madhusudan

    2016-05-01

    The present study describes synthesis of Barium Oxide Nanoparticles decorated Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and its gas sensing behavior towards NH3 and CO gases. The decorated MWCNT sensor has an enhanced sensing towards NH3 gas compare to pure MWCNT sensor and also has much reduced response and recovery time. The prepared sensing material is characterized by TEM, XRD and Thermal Gravimetric analysis.