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Sample records for platelet fraction establishment

  1. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  2. Fractionation of platelets according to size: functional and biochemical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Carty, D J; Gear, A R

    1986-01-01

    The functional and biochemical heterogeneity of platelets has been studied using graded differential centrifugation to fractionate human platelets according to size while maintaining their morphological and functional integrity as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and content of beta-thromboglobulin. Aggregation kinetics were studied by both optical and quenched-flow methods involving single-particle counting. Large platelets were significantly more sensitive to ADP, but aggregated less rapidly than small platelets. Thrombin exerted a similar influence. Large platelets were also enriched in surface sialic acid and sulfhydryl groups and in internal glycogen, ATP, ADP, calcium, cyclic AMP, malonaldehyde, and succinate cytochrome c reductase when compared to small platelets, even when normalized per unit volume. ADP caused a more rapid breakdown of cyclic AMP in small platelets. Potential aging relationships were tested by isotope studies in rats. 75Se-selenomethionine was incorporated in vivo at a similar rate into all fractions. Large platelets labeled with 51Cr disappeared from circulation linearly and had a longer mean lifespan than small platelets, which disappeared exponentially. This behavior supports independent aging of platelet populations of differing size. The data suggest a distinct heterogeneity in platelet function and fate, which could derive from protection of large platelets against excessive activation by Ca2+-regulated events.

  3. Volume Fraction of Graphene Platelets in Copper-Graphene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-graphene composite films were deposited on copper foil using electrochemical deposition. Four electrolyte solutions that each consist of 250 mL of graphene oxide suspension in distilled water and increasing volume of 0.2 M solution of CuSO4 in steps of 250 mL were used to deposit the composite films with and without a magnetic stirrer. Graphene oxide in the films was reduced to graphene by hydrogen treatment for 6 hours at 673 K (400 °C). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction for identification of phases, scanning electron microscopy for distribution of graphene, energy dispersive spectrometry for evaluation of elemental composition, electrical resistivity and temperature coefficient of electrical resistance and thermal conductivity. Effective mean field analysis (EMA) was used to determine the volume fraction and electrical conductivity of graphene and interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and copper. The electrical resistivity was reduced from 2.031 to 1.966 μΩ cm and the thermal conductivity was improved from 3.8 to 5.0 W/cm K upon addition of graphene platelets to electrolytic copper. The use of stirrer during deposition of the films increased the average size and the thickness of the graphene platelets and as a result the improvement in electrical conductivity was lower compared to the values obtained without the stirrer. Using the EMA, the volume fraction of graphene platelets that was responsible for the improvement in the electrical conductivity was found to be lower than that for the improvement in the thermal conductivity. The results of the analysis are used to determine the volume fraction of the thinner and the thicker graphene platelets in the composite films.

  4. Platelet rich fibrin in the management of established dry socket

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Dry socket may occur secondary to the removal of any tooth. However, most dry socket cases develop in the third molar region. Dry socket is multifactorial in nature and has been treated using various modalities with varying success rates. This study assessed the efficacy of platelet rich fibrin (PRF) in established dry socket. Materials and Methods Ten patients of either sex aged from 41 to 64 years with established dry socket according to established criteria were treated using PRF. Evaluation was performed by observing the reduction of pain using visual analogue scale, analgesic tablet use over the follow-up period, and healing parameters. Results Pain was reduced on the first day in all patients with decreased analgesic use. Pain was drastically reduced during follow-up on the first, second, third, and seventh days with a fall in pain score of 0 to 1 after the first day alone. The pain scores of all patients decreased to 1 by the first day except in one patient, and the scores decreased to 0 in all patients after 48 hours. Total analgesic intake ranged from 2 to 6 tablets (aceclofenac 100 mg per tablet) over the follow-up period of 7 days. Healing was satisfactory in all patients by the end of the seventh day. Conclusion PRF showed early pain reduction in established dry socket with minimal analgesic intake. No patients had allergic reactions to PRF as it is derived from the patient's own blood. PRF showed good wound healing. Our study suggests that PRF should be considered as a treatment modality for established dry socket. PMID:28770156

  5. Determinants of platelet count in pediatric patients with congenital cyanotic heart disease: Role of immature platelet fraction.

    PubMed

    Matter, Randa M; Ragab, Iman A; Roushdy, Alaa M; Ahmed, Ahmed G; Aly, Hanan H; Ismail, Eman A

    2017-09-07

    Congenital heart defects are common noninfectious causes of mortality in children. Bleeding and thrombosis are both limiting factors in the management of such patients. We assessed the frequency of thrombocytopenia in pediatric patients with congenital cyanotic heart disease (CCHD) and evaluated determinants of platelet count including immature platelet fraction (IPF) and their role in the pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia. Forty-six children and adolescents with CCHD during pre-catheter visits were studied; median age was 20.5 months. Complete blood count including IPF as a marker of platelet production and reticulated hemoglobin content (RET-He) as a marker of red cell production and iron status were done on Sysmex XE 2100 (Sysmex, Japan). C-reactive protein, prothrombin time (PT), Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were also assessed. Thrombocytopenia was found in 6 patients (13%). PT was prolonged (P = .016) and IPF was significantly higher in patients with thrombocytopenia compared with patients with normal platelet count (14.15 ± 5.2% vs 6.68 ± 3.39%; P = .003). Platelet count was negatively correlated with IPF while significant positive correlations were found between IPF and hemoglobin, red blood cells (RBCs) count, hematocrit (Hct), PT, reticulocytes count, and immature reticulocyte fraction. We suggest that elevated IPF in CCHD patients with thrombocytopenia may denote peripheral platelets destruction as an underlying mechanism. Hemoglobin level, RBCs count, Hct, and RET-He were not significant determinants for platelet count in CCHD. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Collagen and Fractionated Platelet-Rich Plasma Scaffold for Dermal Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Houdek, Matthew T; Wyles, Cody C; Stalboerger, Paul G; Terzic, Andre; Behfar, Atta; Moran, Steven L

    2016-05-01

    Current options for in vivo regeneration of dermal tissue remain limited. The purpose of this study was to engineer a unique scaffold capable of recruiting dermal stem cells from adjacent tissue, thus circumventing the need to seed the scaffolds with stem cells before implantation, leading to skin regeneration. A hydrogel scaffold was created through combination of type I collagen along with fractionated platelet-rich plasma. This was compared to a control hydrogel consisting of type I collagen and fetal bovine serum. Hydrogels were cultured with fresh human skin tissue and incubated with supplemental media. Gels were digested weekly for cellular content as examined by flow cytometry at the 4- and 8-week time points. The fractionated platelet-rich plasma and collagen gels were then implanted onto full-thickness skin defects on the backs of rats and compared to wounds healing by secondary intention. Wound area was evaluated for epithelialization and neovascularization. Platelet-rich plasma fractionation increased platelet-derived growth factors. In contrast to collagen scaffolds, fractionated platelet-rich plasma-supplemented scaffolds recruited more dermal-derived stem cells from fresh skin tissue compared with collagen hydrogels at the 4- and 8-week time points. Furthermore, fractionated platelet-rich plasma-supplemented hydrogels accelerated wound healing, angiogenesis, and hair and sweat gland formation, ultimately regenerating a dermis-like tissue. Generation of hydrogels with fractionated platelet-rich plasma was able to improve cellular recruitment and growth and differentiation of dermal-derived stem cells, leading to hair growth and sweat gland formation. This provides a novel approach to regenerate skin for treating large defects.

  7. Fractions of aqueous and methanolic extracts from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) present platelet antiaggregant activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduado J; Astudillo, Luis A; Gutiérrez, Margarita I; Contreras, Samuel O; Bustamante, Luis O; Rubio, Pia I; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Alarcón, Marcelo A; Fuentes, Jaime A; González, Daniel E; Palomo, Iván F

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Its prevention emphasizes three aspects: not smoking, physical activity and a healthy diet. Recently, we screened the antithrombotic activity of a selected group of fruits and vegetables. Among them, tomato showed an important effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the platelet antiaggregatory activity of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). For this, we obtained aqueous and methanolic tomato extracts and evaluated the effect of pH (2 and 10) and temperature (22, 60 and 100°C) on this activity. Furthermore, in order to isolate the antiaggregant principle, we separated tomato extracts into several fractions (A-D) by size exclusion chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the platelet antiaggregating activity ex vivo in Wistar rats. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of tomato treated at 22, 60 and 100°C and pH 2 and 10 still inhibited platelet aggregation (in vitro). Moreover, it was noted that one of the fractions (fraction C), from both aqueous and methanolic extracts, presented the highest activity (∼70% inhibition of platelet aggregation) and concentration dependently inhibited platelet aggregation significantly compared with control (P < 0.05). These fractions did not contain lycopene but presented two peaks of absorption, at 210 and 261 nm, compatible with the presence of nucleosides. In rats treated with tomato macerates, a mild platelet antiaggregating effect ex vivo was observed. Further studies are required to identify the molecules with platelet antiaggregating activity and antiplatelet mechanisms of action.

  8. Anti-platelet aggregation activities of different fractions in leaves of Apocynum venetum L.

    PubMed

    Kasimu, Rena; Fan, Zhenzhen; Wang, Xinling; Hu, Junping; Wang, Peng; Wang, Jinhui

    2015-06-20

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Apocynum venetum: is widely used in Uygur and traditional Chinese medicine. Modern pharmaceutical studies have shown that leaves of A. venetum have effects of liver protection, antidepressant and regulation of blood pressure. However, it is unclear that which components have pharmacological activities. The aim was to study chemical constituents of A. venetum and its anti-platelet aggregation activity. Nephelometery was applied to evaluate anti-platelet aggregation activity of multi-components of A. venetum. Systematic separation components were characterized by HPLC analysis method, and in vitro screening active components by anti-platelet aggregation study. Ethyl acetate fraction (L-III) and L-III-4 have better anti-platelet aggregation activity than other fractions. The results indicated that isoquercitrin, hyperoside and other flavonoids have anti-platelet aggregation activity in A. venetum. Our studies provide basis on the endeavors of screening chemicals with that anti-platelet aggregation activity in leaves of A. venetum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Beyond the platelet count: immature platelet fraction and thromboelastometry correlate with bleeding in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Lindsey A; Chen, Siqi; Seery, Caroline; Imahiyerobo, Allison M; Bussel, James B

    2014-08-01

    Platelet counts (PC) estimate bleeding risk in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP). We investigated whether measures of thromboelastometry and absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) would correlate better with acute bleeding score (ABS) than PC or mean platelet volume (MPV). Simultaneous determination of ABS, complete blood count and thromboelastometry was performed in 141 ITP patients; 112 underwent A-IPF testing. Subgroup analyses were performed for paediatric subjects, PC <60 × 10(9) /l and <30 × 10(9) /l. PC significantly inversely correlated with ABS in all subjects, PC <30 × 10(9) /l and total paediatric cohort. MPV did not correlate with ABS in any subgroup. Thromboelastometry measures of clot firmness, but not PC, significantly correlated with ABS in all subjects with PC <60 × 10(9) /l, and children with PC <60 × 10(9) /l and <30 × 10(9) /l. A-IPF demonstrated stronger correlation with ABS than did PC among all subjects, those with PC <60 × 10(9) /l, all children and children with PC <30 × 10(9) /l (r = -0·37; r = -0·34; r = -0·44; r = -0·60) versus ABS with PC (r = -0·36; ns; r = -0·32; ns). Stronger correlations of both thromboelastometry measures of clot firmness and A-IPF than PC with ABS suggest factors beyond PC, i.e. related to platelet function, contribute to ITP bleeding pathophysiology. Thromboelastometry, A-IPF and ABS can be incorporated into routine or acute visits.

  10. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... common disorder of platelet function is caused by aspirin. Aspirin blocks one of the steps required for platelets to stick together. This effect of aspirin is what makes it an effective treatment for ...

  11. Establishment of Epithelial Attachment on Titanium Surface Coated with Platelet Activating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Shiho; Maeno, Masahiko; Lee, Cliff; Nagai, Shigemi; Kim, David M.; Da Silva, John; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce epithelial attachment on a typical implant abutment surface of smooth titanium. A challenging complication that hinders the success of dental implants is peri-implantitis. A common cause of peri-implantitis may results from the lack of epithelial sealing at the peri-implant collar. Histologically, epithelial sealing is recognized as the attachment of the basement membrane (BM). BM-attachment is promoted by activated platelet aggregates at surgical wound sites. On the other hand, platelets did not aggregate on smooth titanium, the surface typical of the implant abutment. We then hypothesized that epithelial BM-attachment was produced when titanium surface was modified to allow platelet aggregation. Titanium surfaces were coated with a protease activated receptor 4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP). PAR4-AP coating yielded rapid aggregation of platelets on the titanium surface. Platelet aggregates released robust amount of epithelial chemoattractants (IGF-I, TGF-β) and growth factors (EGF, VEGF) on the titanium surface. Human gingival epithelial cells, when they were co-cultured on the platelet aggregates, successfully attached to the PAR4-AP coated titanium surface with spread laminin5 positive BM and consecutive staining of the epithelial tight junction component ZO1, indicating the formation of complete epithelial sheet. These in-vitro results indicate the establishment of epithelial BM-attachment to the titanium surface. PMID:27741287

  12. The mechanism of the effect of aspirin on human platelets. I. Acetylation of a particulate fraction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits platelet prostaglandin synthesis and the ADP- and collagen-induced platelet release reaction. The mechanism of the inhibitory effect is unknown but may involve protein acetylation, since aspirin acetylates a variety of substrates, including platelet protein. We have examined the relationship between protein acetylation and aspirin's physiologic effect on platelets. Suspensions of washed human platelets were incubated at 37 degrees C with (3H)aspirin, and incorporation of radioactivity into protein was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Exposure to (acetyl-3H)aspirin but not (aromatic ring-3H)aspirin resulted in radioactive labeling of three platelet proteins, suggesting that the drug acetylates these three proteins. The acetylation of two of the proteins (located in the supernatant fraction) was not saturable, implying that these reactions may not be physiologically significant. Acetylation of the third protein, approximate mol wt 85,000 (located in the particulate fraction), saturated at an aspirin concentration of 30 muM and was complete within 20 min. Platelets prepared from aspirin-treated donors did not incorporate any (acetyl-3H)aspirin radioactivity into the particulate protein for 2 days after drug treatment and did not show full pretreatment uptake of radioactivity for 12 days thereafter. The course of increasing incorporation of (acetyl-3H)aspirin radioactivity parralleled that of platelet turnover. Therefore, in addition to its saturability, acetylation of the particulate fraction protein by aspirin was permanent. In two respects, the inhibition of platelet function by aspirin correlates well with the aspirin-mediated acetylation of the particulate fraction protein. Both persist for the life-span of the aspirin-treated platelet, and both occur at a similar saturating aspirin concentration. The evidence suggests that the physiologic effect of aspirin on human platelets is produced

  13. Evaluation of the immature platelet fraction in the diagnosis and prognosis of childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ragab, Iman Ahmed; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Farahat, Mona Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Rapid assessment of platelet production would distinguish between thrombocytopenia due to decreased platelet production or increased peripheral platelet destruction. We evaluated the value of immature platelet fraction (IPF) in differentiating immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) from thrombocytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure and its potential use as a prognostic marker. Forty-one young patients with ITP were compared with 14 patients with hematological malignancies under chemotherapy, representing a control group with thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow suppression and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Patients were studied stressing on bleeding manifestations, organomegaly/lymphadenopathy and therapy. Complete blood count including IPF was performed using Sysmex XE-2100. ITP patients were classified into two subgroups: acute ITP with spontaneous resolution within 3 months from diagnosis and chronic ITP that lasted ≥ 1 year from diagnosis. Median IPF was 11.8% in patients with ITP, 7% in those with hematological malignancy and 3% in the control group (p < 0.001). ITP patients had significantly higher mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) and IPF compared with patients with malignancy or healthy controls, while plateletcrit (PCT) was significantly lower in ITP patients than other groups (p < 0.001). IPF was increased in patients with chronic ITP compared with acute ITP group (p < 0.001). Patients with active ITP had the highest IPF followed by those in partial remission, while ITP patients in remission had the lowest IPF. IPF was positively correlated to the number of lines of treatment used, MPV, PDW and P-LCR, while negatively correlated to platelet count and PCT among ITP patients (p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that platelet count and P-LCR were independently related to IPF. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of IPF at 9.4% could be diagnostic for ITP patients

  14. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  15. Platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy for skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyung; Lee, Jong-Ho; Lee, Sang-Jun; Kim, Nack-In

    2012-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous concentration of human platelets contained in a small volume of plasma and has recently been shown to accelerate wound healing and rejuvenate aging skin. The current study was conducted to determine whether there are additional effects of PRP combined with fractional laser therapy. Twenty-two Korean women underwent three sessions of fractional laser; 11 were treated with topical application of PRP combined with fractional laser. Evaluations were done at baseline and 1 month after the final treatment. The outcome assessments included subjective satisfaction scale; blinded clinical assessment; and the biophysical parameters of roughness, elasticity, skin hydration, and the erythema and melanin index. Biopsies were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin, Masson-trichrome, and immunohistochemistry for matrix metalloproteinase-1. PRP combined with fractional laser increased subject satisfaction and skin elasticity and decreased the erythema index. PRP increased the length of the dermoepidermal junction, the amount of collagen, and the number of fibroblasts. PRP with fractional laser treatment is a good combination therapy for skin rejuvenation. Keratinocyte and fibroblast proliferation and collagen production can explain the capacity of PRP to increase dermal elasticity. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Glycoprotein Ib in the Triton-insoluble (cytoskeletal) fraction of blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Solum, N O; Olsen, T M

    1984-06-29

    Glycoprotein Ib could be demonstrated in the Triton-insoluble (cytoskeletal) fraction of platelets prepared with EGTA by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and staining with the periodic acid Schiff's reagent. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis showed that glycoprotein Ib could be extracted from such Triton-insoluble residues when the extraction solution contained 1% Triton X-100 plus 5 mM CaCl2, but not if it also contained leupeptin. This indicates that glycoprotein Ib was associated to structures in the cytoskeletal fraction in such a way that it could be extracted only after activation of a calcium-dependent protease, and degradation of the actin-binding protein was demonstrated. After crossed immunoelectrophoresis of platelet extracts prepared in the presence of leupeptin or EDTA, a glycoprotein Ib-related, rocket-shaped immunoprecipitate was seen originating from the application well. This was interpreted as being related to glycoprotein Ib associated to actin polymers which did not sediment at low-speed centrifugation. Incubation of platelets with 32P as sodium phosphate led to incorporation of phosphatase-sensitive 32P in all of the glycoprotein Ib-related immunoprecipitates except for that of glycocalicin. This supports the idea that glycoprotein Ib traverses the plasma membrane and can be phosphorylated at the inner surface whereas glycocalicin represents the terminal part of the glycoprotein Ib alpha-chain exposed at the outer surface.

  17. Importance of immature platelet fraction as predictor of immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Arshi; Mukry, Samina Naz; Shaikh, Mahwish Rauf; Bukhari, Ali Raza; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a clinical syndrome in which a decreased number of circulating platelets (thrombocytopenia) manifests as a bleeding tendency, easy bruising (purpura) or extravasation of blood from capillaries into skin and mucous membranes (petechiae). The diagnosis of ITP can be made clinically on the basis of symptoms, we need to see if ITP can be confirmed in patients by quantification of residual RNA containing immature platelets (megakaryocytic mass) or immature platelets fraction (IPF) using automated hematology analyzers (Sysmex XE-2100). Methods: In order to check the efficacy of IPF% parameter of Sysmex XE-2100 a total of 231 patients of thrombocytopenia were included in this study. Complete blood count (CBC) was estimated. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS version 17. Results: About 62 patients were diagnosed as ITP and 169 patients were diagnosed as non ITP on the basis of clinical history. The mean IPF % value of ITP patients was 16.39% and the IPF % value of Non ITP patients was ~7.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in IPF% values with respect to time between sampling and acquisition of complete blood count. The diagnostic sensitivity of IPF% as biomarker for ITP and non-ITP was 85.71% (95%CI: 84.04% to 85.96%) and 41.76% (95% CI: 39.87% to 43.65%). Conclusion: The mean IPF % value by Sysmex XE-2100 can be used to predict ITP. PMID:27375692

  18. Automatic detection of immature platelets for decision making regarding platelet transfusion indications for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Sakota, Yasuyuki; Masuda, Yukako; Matsunaga, Kyoko; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Makoto; Yanai, Tomoko; Hayakawa, Akira; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Tsutomu; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2008-04-01

    Immature or reticulated platelets are known as a clinical marker of thrombopoiesis. Recently, an automatic method was established to detect reticulated platelets as immature platelet fraction (IPF) by means of hematology analyzer XE-2100. We assessed the effects of IPF detection after chemotherapy for various pediatric malignant disorders of 16 patients. Our results indicate that IPF should be considered a useful marker of imminent platelet recovery so that unnecessary platelet transfusion can be avoided.

  19. Protective Mechanisms of S. lycopersicum Aqueous Fraction (Nucleosides and Flavonoids) on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation: In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Valenzuela, Claudio; Pérez, Pablo; Astudillo, Luis; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms of antiplatelet action of bioactive principle from S. lycopersicum. Aqueous fraction had a high content of nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, and adenosine 5′-monophosphate) by HPLC analysis. Also aqueous fraction presented flavonoids content. Aqueous fraction inhibited platelet activation by 15 ± 6% (P < 0.05). Fully spread of human platelets on collagen in the presence of aqueous fraction was inhibited from 15 ± 1 to 9 ± 1 μm2 (P < 0.001). After incubation of whole blood with aqueous fraction, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 55 ± 12% (P < 0.001). Platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by the aqueous fraction. At the same concentrations that aqueous fraction inhibits platelet aggregation, levels of sCD40L significantly decreased and the intraplatelet cAMP levels increased. In addition, SQ22536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, attenuated the effect of aqueous fraction toward ADP-induced platelet aggregation and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Platelet aggregation ex vivo (human study) and thrombosis formation in vivo (murine model) were inhibited by aqueous fraction. Finally, aqueous fraction may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities (nucleosides and flavonoids) to processed foods. PMID:24159349

  20. Protective Mechanisms of S. lycopersicum Aqueous Fraction (Nucleosides and Flavonoids) on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation: In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Valenzuela, Claudio; Pérez, Pablo; Astudillo, Luis; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms of antiplatelet action of bioactive principle from S. lycopersicum. Aqueous fraction had a high content of nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate) by HPLC analysis. Also aqueous fraction presented flavonoids content. Aqueous fraction inhibited platelet activation by 15 ± 6% (P < 0.05). Fully spread of human platelets on collagen in the presence of aqueous fraction was inhibited from 15 ± 1 to 9 ± 1  μ m(2) (P < 0.001). After incubation of whole blood with aqueous fraction, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 55 ± 12% (P < 0.001). Platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by the aqueous fraction. At the same concentrations that aqueous fraction inhibits platelet aggregation, levels of sCD40L significantly decreased and the intraplatelet cAMP levels increased. In addition, SQ22536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, attenuated the effect of aqueous fraction toward ADP-induced platelet aggregation and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Platelet aggregation ex vivo (human study) and thrombosis formation in vivo (murine model) were inhibited by aqueous fraction. Finally, aqueous fraction may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities (nucleosides and flavonoids) to processed foods.

  1. Protective action of proanthocyanidin fraction from Medemia argun nuts against oxidative/nitrative damages of blood platelet and plasma components.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna; Głowacki, Rafał; Olas, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative/nitrative stress induced by different factors plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various disorders, including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Proanthocyanidins have antioxidative properties and may protect biomolecules (lipids, DNA, and proteins) exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The effects of proanthocyanidin fraction from Medemia argun nuts on oxidative/nitrative protein damages (determined by such parameters as level of thiol groups, carbonyl groups, and nitrotyrosine residues) and on the amount of glutathione (as an important component of redox status; using HPLC) in human blood platelets and plasma after treatment with peroxynitrite were studied in vitro. The preincubation of blood platelets and plasma with proanthocyanidin fraction from M. argun nuts (0.5-50 µg/ml) reduced the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, diminished oxidation of thiol groups, and decreased the level of carbonyl groups in proteins caused by 100 µM peroxynitrite. An action of tested plant fraction and ONOO(-) evoked a significant increase of GSH in platelets and plasma in comparison with platelets and plasma treated with ONOO(-) only. The proanthocyanidin fraction from M. argun nuts can be useful as a protecting factor against oxidative/nitrative stress associated with different diseases (cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases) and proanthocyanidins of M. argun nuts may be promising antioxidants.

  2. Evaluation of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus on biological properties of blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus in blood platelets stimulated by thrombin was studied. Thrombin as a strong physiological agonist induces the enzymatic peroxidation of endogenous arachidonic acid, the formation of different reactive oxygen species, including superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text](·)) and the platelet aggregation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the polyphenolic fraction from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus may change the biological properties of blood platelets activated by thrombin. We used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this fraction to change [Formula: see text](·) generation in platelets. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin (8-EPI) F(2). Moreover, we determined the effects of the fraction on blood platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. We observed that the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced [Formula: see text](·), 8-EPI and TBARS production in these cells. The ability of the fraction to decrease the [Formula: see text](·) generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. This study may suggest that the tested plant fraction might be a good candidate for protecting blood platelets against changes of their biological functions, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular disorders.

  3. NF-E2 p45 Is Important for Establishing Normal Function of Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Rie; Takayama-Tsujimoto, Mariko; Satoh, Hironori; Gutiérrez, Laura; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Sarai, Akinori; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2013-01-01

    NF-E2 is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of p45 and small Maf subunits. Since p45−/− mice display severe thrombocytopenia, p45 is recognized as a critical regulator of platelet production from megakaryocytes. To identify direct p45 target genes in megakaryocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing to analyze the genome-wide chromatin occupancy of p45 in primary megakaryocytes. p45 target gene candidates obtained from the analysis are implicated in the production and function of platelets. Two of these genes, Selp and Myl9, were verified as direct p45 targets through multiple approaches. Since P-selectin, encoded by Selp, plays a critical role in platelet function during thrombogenesis, we tested whether p45 determines the intrinsic reactivity and potency of platelets generated from megakaryocytes. Mice expressing a hypomorphic p45 mutant instead of wild-type p45 in megakaryocytes (p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg mice) displayed platelet hypofunction accompanied by mild thrombocytopenia. Furthermore, lung metastasis of melanoma cells, which requires platelet activation, was repressed in p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg mice compared to control mice, validating the impaired function of platelets produced from p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg megakaryocytes. By activating genes in megakaryocytes that mediate platelet production and function, p45 determines the quantity and quality of platelets. PMID:23648484

  4. NF-E2 p45 is important for establishing normal function of platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Rie; Takayama-Tsujimoto, Mariko; Satoh, Hironori; Gutiérrez, Laura; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Sarai, Akinori; Bresnick, Emery H; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2013-07-01

    NF-E2 is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of p45 and small Maf subunits. Since p45(-/-) mice display severe thrombocytopenia, p45 is recognized as a critical regulator of platelet production from megakaryocytes. To identify direct p45 target genes in megakaryocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing to analyze the genome-wide chromatin occupancy of p45 in primary megakaryocytes. p45 target gene candidates obtained from the analysis are implicated in the production and function of platelets. Two of these genes, Selp and Myl9, were verified as direct p45 targets through multiple approaches. Since P-selectin, encoded by Selp, plays a critical role in platelet function during thrombogenesis, we tested whether p45 determines the intrinsic reactivity and potency of platelets generated from megakaryocytes. Mice expressing a hypomorphic p45 mutant instead of wild-type p45 in megakaryocytes (p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg mice) displayed platelet hypofunction accompanied by mild thrombocytopenia. Furthermore, lung metastasis of melanoma cells, which requires platelet activation, was repressed in p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg mice compared to control mice, validating the impaired function of platelets produced from p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg megakaryocytes. By activating genes in megakaryocytes that mediate platelet production and function, p45 determines the quantity and quality of platelets.

  5. [HPA distribution characteristics of platelet donor population in Mudanjiang area of China and establishment of its database].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-Xian; Gao, Guang-Ping; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Xiu-Qing; Xia, Dong-Mei; Zhou, Rui-Hua; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Qiang; Liu, Jie

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the distribution characteristics of the human platelet antigen (HPA) gene of human platelet donors and its polymorphism in Mudanjiang area of Heilongjiang Province in China, to determine platelet antigen system with clinical significance by judging the rate of incompatibility of HPA, as well as to establish a database of donors' HPA. The genotyping of 154 unrelated platelet donors was performed by means of PCR-SSP. The frequencies of gene and genotype were calculated and compared with that in other areas. The results showed that the genes 1a-17a of HPA-a were all expressed in the 154 healthy and unrelated platelet donors. Only genes 1b, 2b, 3b, 5b, 6b and 15b of HPA-b were expressed while genes 4b, 7b-14b, 16b were not expressed. Among the genotypes, aa homozygosity was predominant and HPA15 had the greatest heterozygosity, while HPA3 had lower heterozygosity. There were 23 combined types of HPA, 5 of them had a rate higher than 10%, and the frequencies of the other 18 were lower than 8%. HPA genotype frequencies showed a good consistency to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. It is concluded that the distribution of the allele polymorphism of HPA1-HPA17 in Mudanjiang area has its own characteristics, compared with other areas and some countries, the local HPA genotype database of platelet donors is established in Mudanjiang area, which can provide the matching donors for clinical use with immunological significance.

  6. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy combined with autologous platelet concentrate applied in rabbit fibula fraction healing

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Paulo César Fagundes; de Campos Vieira Abib, Simone; Neves, Rogério Fagundes; Pircchio, Oronzo; Saad, Karen Ruggeri; Saad, Paulo Fernandes; Simões, Ricardo Santos; Moreira, Marcia Bento; de Souza Laurino, Cristiano Frota

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose is to study the effects of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrates in healing the fibula bone of rabbits after induced fractures. METHODS: A total of 128 male New Zealand albino rabbits, between 6–8 months old, were subjected to a total osteotomy of the proximal portion of the right fibula. After surgery, the animals were divided into four groups (n = 32 each): control group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy; autologous platelet concentrate group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site; hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions; and autologous platelet concentrate and hyperbaric oxygen group, in which animals were subjected to osteotomy, autologous platelet concentrate applied at the fracture site, and 9 consecutive daily hyperbaric oxygen therapy sessions. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups according to a pre-determined euthanasia time points: 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks postoperative. After euthanasia at a specific time point, the fibula containing the osseous callus was prepared histologically and stained with hematoxylin and eosin or picrosirius red. RESULTS: Autologous platelet concentrates and hyperbaric oxygen therapy, applied together or separately, increased the rate of bone healing compared with the control group. CONCLUSION: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and autologous platelet concentrate combined increased the rate of bone healing in this experimental model. PMID:24141841

  7. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  8. Pitfalls in establishing the diagnosis of deep venous thrombophlebitis by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Kimball, D.A.; Ponto, J.A.; Bricker, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    Forty-seven /sup 111/In-platelet scintigraphs (In-PS) were analyzed retrospectively to identify sources of diagnostic error and to optimize the diagnostic criteria for active deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT). The results of In-PS were compared with contrast venography, additional diagnostic studies, and clinical outcome. Three patterns of platelet localization emerged as the best predictors of active DVT: (a) focal or (b) linear 4-hr localization, or (c) an asymmetric blood-pool pattern on 4-hr imaging that evolved into a focal or linear pattern by 16 to 24 hr. All false-positive studies had abnormal patterns confined to the inguinal region at 24 hr. All patients with false-negative studies had received heparin between 4 and 24 hr. The potential pitfalls encountered in the evaluation of the iliac, femoral, and popliteal veins are reviewed and the importance of delayed imaging in selected cases is emphasized.

  9. Novel hematological parameters for the evaluation of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: the immature platelet and reticulocyte fractions.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Bose, Prithviraj; Lyle, Lindsey; Gaw, Katie; Zhou, Lingsha; Pierce, Sherry A; Huynh-Lu, Julie; Hirsch-Ginsberg, Cheryl F; Bueso-Mendoza, Daniel E; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2017-02-28

    New automated hematology analyzers have led to the availability of novel hematological parameters, including the immature platelet fraction (IPF) and the immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF), both of potential interest in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We performed a prospective analysis of 217 patients with MPN, including 32 (15%) with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 43 (20%) with polycythemia vera (PV), and 142 (65%) with myelofibrosis (MF); the IPF and IRF were measured by the Sysmex XN analyzer. As compared to patients with ET, both a higher IPF and IRF were observed among patients with PV and MF. Factors associated with high IPF among patients with PV/ET were male sex, thrombocytopenia, and diagnosis of PV; among patients with MF, they were elevated peripheral blasts, low platelet count, JAK2 V617F mutation, and previous therapy. Factors associated with high IRF among patients with PV/ET were low hemoglobin, high reticulocyte count, and PV diagnosis; among patients with MF, they were peripheral blasts and elevated reticulocytes. The IPF and IRF represent novel parameters in patients with MPN with potential relevant clinical implications. Comparison with healthy subjects and those with secondary polycythemia is needed to confirm our preliminary findings.

  10. The efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with erbium fractional laser therapy for facial acne scars or acne.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang-Ting; Xuan, Min; Zhang, Ya-Ni; Liu, Hong-Wei; Cai, Jin-Hui; Wu, Yan-Hong; Xiang, Xiao-Fei; Shan, Gui-Qiu; Cheng, Biao

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with erbium fractional laser therapy for facial acne or acne scars. PRP combined with erbium fractional laser therapy was used for the treatment of 22 patients, including 16 patients who suffered from facial acne scars and 6 patients who suffered from acne scars concomitant with acne. Whole blood (40 ml) was collected from each patient, and following differential centrifugation, PRP was harvested. After using an erbium fractional laser, we applied PRP to the entire face of every patient. Digital photos were taken before and after the treatment for evaluation by dermatologists and the patients rated the efficacy on a 5-point scale. The erythema was moderate or mild, while its total duration was <3 days; after receiving the treatment three times, 90.9% of the patients showed an improvement of >50%, and 91% of the patients were satisfied; no acne inflammation was observed after treatment. PRP combined with erbium fractional laser therapy is an effective and safe approach for treating acne scars or acne, with minimal side-effects, and it simultaneously enhanced the recovery of laser-damaged skin.

  11. Platelet fibrinogen

    PubMed Central

    Castaldi, P. A.; Caen, J.

    1965-01-01

    Platelet fibrinogen has been studied in normal, thrombasthenic, and hypofibrinogenaemic subjects. It has been differentiated into adsorbed (plasma) and extractable (intraplatelet) fractions. Isotopic studies suggest that exchange does not occur between intraplatelet and plasma fibrinogen and it appears possible that the intra-platelet fraction may be derived from the megakaryocyte. Six of nine thrombasthenic patients were found to have a severe deficiency of both adsorbed and extractable fibrinogen. Since the remaining three had near-normal platelet fibrinogen and all nine failed to aggregate it is improbable that the failure to adsorb fibrinogen is responsible for the defect in aggregation. Magnesium partially corrects adhesion to fibrin and clot retraction by these platelets, but has not been found to influence their fibrinogen adsorption. It is considered that the basic platelet surface defect, of varying severity, is responsible for the abnormalities of adsorption, aggregation, and adhesion in thrombasthenia. In the case of congenital hypofibrinogenaemia, fibrinogen transfusion corrects the long bleeding time, platelet-adsorbed fibrinogen, and the ability of platelets to spread on glass. It is possible that fibrinogen influences the surface properties of human platelets, although the final mechanism is not determined. Images PMID:5835438

  12. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multi-frequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Hunkeler, P. A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise and accumulate beneath nearby sea ice to form a several meter thick sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator for ice - ocean interactions. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and sub-ice platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions from platelet-layer conductivities using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drill-hole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction also yielded plausible results. Our findings imply that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties. However, we emphasize that the successful application of this technique requires a break with traditional EM sensor calibration strategies due to the need of absolute calibration with respect to a physical forward model.

  13. The Association between Platelet/Lymphocyte Ratio and Coronary Artery Disease Severity in Asymptomatic Low Ejection Fraction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Açar, Burak; Gul, Murat; Özeke, Özcan; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Coronary angiography (CAG) is generally needed in the setting of systolic heart failure (HF) with an unidentified etiology as a part of diagnostic strategy. On the other hand, the clinical value of this invasive strategy is largely unknown. Platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has recently emerged as a novel inflammatory index that may serve as an important predictor of inflammatory state and overall mortality. The present study aimed to search the predictive value of PLR in determining the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic low ejection fraction (EF) patients. Subjects and Methods 156 asymptomatic heart failure (HF) subjects (without angina or HF symptoms, mean age: 58 years; to male: 71.2%) were enrolled, and thereafter a CAG was performed. Gensini Score was used to determine the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) on CAG. According to this scoring system, the overall study group was categorized into three distinct subgroups: control group with the score 0, mild atherosclerosis group with the score 0 to 20 and severe atherosclerosis group with the score of >20. Thereafter, a comparison was made among groups with regard to mean values of PLR. Results The severe atherosclerosis group had a substantially higher level of mean PLR in comparison to other groups (p<0.001). Pre-CAG PLR levels as well as a variety of clinical variables including age, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol demonstrated an independent correlation with Gensini score through a multivariate analysis. Conclusion These findings suggest the potential association of high PLR levels with severe atherosclerosis in the setting of asymptomatic systolic HF. A simple measurement of PLR helps to identify the severity of coronary atherosclerosis prior to conducting coronary angiography. PMID:27826341

  14. [Persistent thrombocytopenia in a child: morphological examination of blood platelets established the diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome].

    PubMed

    Latger-Cannard, V; Lacroix, F; Devignes, J; Salignac, S; Bensoussan, D; Salmon, A; Mansuy, L; Bordigoni, P; Lecompte, T

    2008-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia frequently occurs in laboratory practice. The present work illustrates, through the presentation of a case report of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, the difficulties encountered to identify and characterize thrombocytopenia. The clinicobiological validation of a low platelet count involves both the biologist, who must assume the validation of numeration while mentioning the morphological characteristics of the platelets and other blood cells, as well as the physician who has to interpret these data according to the clinical context.

  15. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional ablative carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in treatment of facial atrophic acne scars: A split-face randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, Gita; Keyvan, Shima; Asilian, Ali; Nouraei, Saeid; Behfar, Shadi; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohamad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Autologous platelet-rich plasma has recently attracted significant attention throughout the medical field for its wound-healing ability. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy in the treatment of acne scarring. Sixteen patients (12 women and 4 men) who underwent split-face therapy were analyzed in this study. They received ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intradermal platelet-rich plasma treatment on one half of their face and ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser with intradermal normal saline on the other half. The injections were administered immediately after laser therapy. The treatment sessions were repeated after an interval of one month. The clinical response was assessed based on patient satisfaction and the objective evaluation of serial photographs by two blinded dermatologists at baseline, 1 month after the first treatment session and 4 months after the second. The adverse effects including erythema and edema were scored by participants on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15 and 30 after each session. Overall clinical improvement of acne scars was higher on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser treated side but the difference was not statistically significant either 1 month after the first treatment session (P = 0.15) or 4 months after the second (P = 0.23). In addition, adverse effects (erythema and edema) on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser-treated side were more severe and of longer duration. Small sample size, absence of all skin phototypes within the study group and lack of objective methods for the evaluation of response to treatment and adverse effects were the limitations. This study demonstrated that adding platelet-rich plasma to fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment did not produce any statistically significant synergistic effects and also resulted in more severe side effects and longer downtime.

  16. The Clinical Efficacy of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma Combined with Ultra-Pulsed Fractional CO2 Laser Therapy for Facial Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser is an efficient, precise, and safe therapeutic intervention for skin refreshing, although accompanied with prolonged edema and erythema. In recent years, autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been proven to promote wound and soft tissue healing and collagen regeneration. To investigate whether the combination of PRP and ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser had a synergistic effect on therapy for facial rejuvenation. Totally, 13 facial aging females were treated with ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser. One side of the face was randomly selected as experimental group and injected with PRP, the other side acted as the control group and was injected with physiological saline at the same dose. Comprehensive assessment of clinical efficacy was performed by satisfaction scores, dermatologists' double-blind evaluation and the VISIA skin analysis system. After treatment for 3 months, subjective scores of facial wrinkles, skin texture, and skin elasticity were higher than that in the control group. Similarly, improvement of skin wrinkles, texture, and tightness in the experimental group was better compared with the control group. Additionally, the total duration of erythema, edema, and crusting was decreased, in the experimental group compared with the control group. PRP combined with ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser had a synergistic effect on facial rejuvenation, shortening duration of side effects, and promoting better therapeutic effect. PMID:27222038

  17. Platelet interactions with Candida albicans.

    PubMed Central

    Skerl, K G; Calderone, R A; Sreevalsan, T

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of human platelets and Candida albicans was studied. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from freshly drawn blood or outdated platelet concentrates. From the platelet-rich plasma, a platelet extract was derived which stimulated germ tube formation by C. albicans when incubated with yeast cells at 37 degrees C. The active component(s) was heat stable, trypsin sensitive, and ribonuclease and deoxyribonuclease insensitive, and possessed cationic properties since it readily attached to carboxymethyl-Sephadex. The active component(s) seemed to bind to heparin also, since germ tube-promoting activity was eluted from a heparin-cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose 4B column. In addition, platelet-derived growth factor (Collaborative Research, Inc.) stimulated germination when incubated with low amounts (0.4% final concentration) of bovine calf serum. The aggregation of platelets, prepared as platelet-rich plasma by C. albicans cell wall or alkali-extracted cell wall fractions, was also studied. Aggregation of platelets was observed when cell wall or cell wall fractions were incubated with platelet-poor plasma at 37 degrees C for 20 min and then added to platelet-rich plasma. The component of platelet-poor plasma which promoted aggregation of platelets by C. albicans cell wall or alkali-extracted fractions was inactivated at 56 degrees C (30 min) and by cobra venom factor, indicating a role for the alternate complement pathway in the aggregation response. PMID:7037646

  18. The detection of platelet isoantibodies by membrane immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    van der Schans, G S; Veenhoven, W A; Snijder, J A; Nieweg, H O

    1977-07-01

    A membrane ummunofluorescence test for the detection of platelet isoantibodies is described. Gel filtration of the incubation mixture was incorporated in the procedure and proved effective for the removal of serum proteins from the platelet suspension. With this technique isoantibodies were found in the serum of 13 out of a group of 16 patients who had received multiple transfusions. The results were checked by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled anti-IgG fraction by gel-filtered platelets. Subsequently the membrane immunofluorescence method was also compared with established techniques described for the detection of isoantibodies such as the microtest for lymphocytotoxicity and a complement-fixation method and the procedures based on the release of labeled serotonin, the phagocytosis of chromium-tagged platelets, the increase of platelet factor 3 activity, and on platelet aggregation. We had the opportunity to investigate the serum of one patient for the presence of isoantibodies against platelets from HLA identical siblings both before and after the administration of their platelets. On the basis of this experience it is concluded that the membrane immunofluorescence test for platelet isoantibodies is a relatively simple method with a high degree of specificity and adequate sensitivity.

  19. Involvement of platelet activating factor, histamine and serotonin in acute lethal shock induced by Candida albicans water-soluble extracellular polysaccharide fraction (CAWS) in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagi-Miura, Noriko; Shingo, Yuko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohno, Naohito

    2007-07-01

    CAWS (Candida albicans water-soluble extracellular polysaccharide fraction) is a water-soluble extracellular mannoprotein-beta-glucan complex obtained from the culture supernatant following the culture of pathogenic Candida albicans in a completely synthetic medium. CAWS administered intraperitoneally induces vasculitis in mice, however, administered intravenously, it causes lethal shock. The acute lethal reaction to CAWS occurs within 1 h of intravenous administration, with the mice demonstrating anaphylactic shock-like symptoms including convulsion, diarrhea, and collapse. In this study, we analyzed the factors involved in this lethal effect. We examined physiologically active substances believed to be involved in anaphylactic shock, and found that the lethal effect of CAWS could be inhibited by blocking histamine, serotonin, and platelet activating factor (PAF) simultaneously, but by blocking only one. This finding strongly suggests that the acute lethal reaction to CAWS is a result of the simultaneous production of several physiologically active substances.

  20. Platelet interaction with polymerizing fibrin.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, S; Regoeczi, E; Stewart, G J; Senyl, A F; Mustard, J F

    1972-03-01

    Interaction of washed pig, rabbit, or human platelets with fibrinogen was studied during its transition to fibrin using photometric, isotopic, and electron microscopic techniques. Untreated fibrinogen and fully polymerized fibrin had no detectable effect on platelets. Fibrinogen, incubated with low concentrations of reptilase or thrombin, formed intermediate products which readily became associated with platelets and caused their aggregation. Neutralization of the thrombin did not prevent this interaction. In the absence of fibrinogen, reptilase did not affect platelets. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was accompanied by small losses of platelet constituents (serotonin, adenine nucleotides, platelet factor 4, and lactic dehydrogenase). This loss did not appear to be the result of the platelet release reaction. Inhibitors of the release reaction or of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation did not prevent the interaction of platelets with polymerizing fibrin. Apyrase or prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) reduced the extent of platelet aggregation by polymerizing fibrin, but the amount of protein associated with platelets was slightly increased. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) or ethylene glycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA).Fibers formed in solutions of polymerizing fibrin were larger in the presence than in the absence of washed platelets, suggesting that platelets affect fibrin polymerization. The adherence of platelets to polymerizing fibrin may be responsible for the establishment of links between platelets and fibrin in hemostatic plugs and thrombi.

  1. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  2. High-content live-cell imaging assay used to establish mechanism of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)--mediated inhibition of platelet production.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Devine, Matthew T; Jurak Begonja, Antonija; Tibbitts, Jay; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-09-06

    Proplatelet production represents a terminal stage of megakaryocyte development during which long, branching processes composed of platelet-sized swellings are extended and released into the surrounding culture. Whereas the cytoskeletal mechanics driving these transformations have been the focus of many studies, significant limitations in our ability to quantify the rate and extent of proplatelet production have restricted the field to qualitative analyses of a limited number of cells over short intervals. A novel high-content, quantitative, live-cell imaging assay using the IncuCyte system (Essen BioScience) was therefore developed to measure the rate and extent of megakaryocyte maturation and proplatelet production under live culture conditions for extended periods of time. As proof of concept, we used this system in the present study to establish a mechanism by which trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), an Ab-drug conjugate currently in clinical development for cancer, affects platelet production. High-content analysis of primary cell cultures revealed that T-DM1 is taken up by mouse megakaryocytes, inhibits megakaryocyte differentiation, and disrupts proplatelet formation by inducing abnormal tubulin organization and suppressing microtubule dynamic instability. Defining the pathways by which therapeutics such as T-DM1 affect megakaryocyte differentiation and proplatelet production may yield strategies to manage drug-induced thrombocytopenias.

  3. Establishment of a proficiency panel for an external quality assessment programme for the detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates using rapid and cultural detection methods.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, T; Schmidt, M; Hourfar, K; Schottstedt, V; Pichl, L; Gubbe, K; Knabbe, C; Dreier, J

    2016-05-01

    Platelet concentrates (PCs) are the main focus regarding the residual risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections. Rapid screening methods for bacterial detection in platelets have been optimized over the last decade, but their external evaluation represents a complicated process. We developed a new type of proficiency panel for bacterial detection in PCs using currently available screening methods (especially rapid methods) suitable for external quality assessment programmes (EQAP). PC samples were inoculated with different bacteria at two concentrations (10E+03 CFU/ml, 10E+05 CFU/ml) and stored under temperature-controlled conditions (1-5 days). Bacterial growth was further prevented by the addition of 0-20 μg/ml cotrimoxazole. Samples were analysed prior to and after storage using rapid detection methods (Bactiflow (BF), bacteria-generic NAT) and cultural methods to determine the influence of storage and antibiotic treatment on bacterial counts and the result outcome. A pilot EQAP was performed with four participants. Testing under the evaluated conditions demonstrated that bacterial counts remained constant prior to and after storage. The supplementation of 10 μg/ml cotrimoxazole did not influence bacterial detection using the two rapid detection methods BF and NAT. Furthermore, the detection of bacteria using cultural methods is still possible despite of antibiotic supplementation. The pilot EQAP confirmed these results. A storage time of up to 3 days proved practicable, showing no considerable influence on bacterial count and outcome of test results. The established proficiency panel provided PC matrix-conform samples with stabilized bacterial counts which can be analysed in parallel by rapid and cultural detection methods. © 2016 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  4. Fractionating dead reckoning: role of the compass, odometer, logbook, and home base establishment in spatial orientation.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Douglas G; Martin, Megan M; Winter, Shawn S

    2008-11-01

    Rats use multiple sources of information to maintain spatial orientation. Although previous work has focused on rats' use of environmental cues, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that rats also use self-movement cues to organize navigation. This review examines the extent that kinematic analysis of naturally occurring behavior has provided insight into processes that mediate dead-reckoning-based navigation. This work supports a role for separate systems in processing self-movement cues that converge on the hippocampus. The compass system is involved in deriving directional information from self-movement cues; whereas, the odometer system is involved in deriving distance information from self-movement cues. The hippocampus functions similar to a logbook in that outward path unique information from the compass and odometer is used to derive the direction and distance of a path to the point at which movement was initiated. Finally, home base establishment may function to reset this system after each excursion and anchor environmental cues to self-movement cues. The combination of natural behaviors and kinematic analysis has proven to be a robust paradigm to investigate the neural basis of spatial orientation.

  5. Fractionating dead reckoning: role of the compass, odometer, logbook, and home base establishment in spatial orientation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Megan M.; Winter, Shawn S.

    2008-01-01

    Rats use multiple sources of information to maintain spatial orientation. Although previous work has focused on rats' use of environmental cues, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that rats also use self-movement cues to organize navigation. This review examines the extent that kinematic analysis of naturally occurring behavior has provided insight into processes that mediate dead-reckoning-based navigation. This work supports a role for separate systems in processing self-movement cues that converge on the hippocampus. The compass system is involved in deriving directional information from self-movement cues; whereas, the odometer system is involved in deriving distance information from self-movement cues. The hippocampus functions similar to a logbook in that outward path unique information from the compass and odometer is used to derive the direction and distance of a path to the point at which movement was initiated. Finally, home base establishment may function to reset this system after each excursion and anchor environmental cues to self-movement cues. The combination of natural behaviors and kinematic analysis has proven to be a robust paradigm to investigate the neural basis of spatial orientation. PMID:18553065

  6. Fractionating dead reckoning: role of the compass, odometer, logbook, and home base establishment in spatial orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Douglas G.; Martin, Megan M.; Winter, Shawn S.

    2008-06-01

    Rats use multiple sources of information to maintain spatial orientation. Although previous work has focused on rats’ use of environmental cues, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that rats also use self-movement cues to organize navigation. This review examines the extent that kinematic analysis of naturally occurring behavior has provided insight into processes that mediate dead-reckoning-based navigation. This work supports a role for separate systems in processing self-movement cues that converge on the hippocampus. The compass system is involved in deriving directional information from self-movement cues; whereas, the odometer system is involved in deriving distance information from self-movement cues. The hippocampus functions similar to a logbook in that outward path unique information from the compass and odometer is used to derive the direction and distance of a path to the point at which movement was initiated. Finally, home base establishment may function to reset this system after each excursion and anchor environmental cues to self-movement cues. The combination of natural behaviors and kinematic analysis has proven to be a robust paradigm to investigate the neural basis of spatial orientation.

  7. Ectopic osteogenic capacity of freshly isolated adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells supported with platelet-rich plasma: A simulation of intraoperative procedure.

    PubMed

    Najman, Stevo J; Cvetković, Vladimir J; Najdanović, Jelena G; Stojanović, Sanja; Vukelić-Nikolić, Marija Đ; Vučković, Ivica; Petrović, Dragan

    2016-10-01

    Bone defects represent a serious problem in cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells in combination with biological factors and bone substitutes were previously proposed as alternative to bone grafting. By simulating an intraoperative procedure we examined osteogenic capacity of the combination of two autologous components, freshly isolated adipose-derived SVF cells, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), delivered on bone mineral matrix (BMM) carrier (SPB group) in mice ectopic bone forming model. Implantation of BMM only (B group) was a control. The presence of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in SVF was detected by immunocytochemical analysis. Expression of bone- and endothelial-related genes was compared between freshly isolated SVF and ADSCs obtained from SVF after in vitro cultivation. The implants were analyzed using expression analysis of bone-related genes at one, two, four and eight weeks and histochemical, immunohistochemical and histomorphometrical analyses at two and eight weeks after implantation. Freshly isolated adipose-derived SVF contained ADSCs and exhibited promising osteogenic and vasculogenic capacity. At two and four weeks, significantly higher expression of bone-related genes was detected in SPB group compared to B group. The signs of osteogenic process were more pronounced in SPB than in B implants. By the end of experiment, percentage of infiltrated tissue and vascularization was significantly higher in SPB than in B implants. Adipose-derived SVF cells, PRP and BMM rapidly initiated osteogenesis what makes this combination promising candidate for treatment of bone defects.

  8. Platelets and platelet-like particles mediate intercellular RNA transfer

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonina; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Vitseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The role of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis is clearly established; however, the mechanisms by which platelets mediate inflammatory and immune pathways are less well understood. Platelets interact and modulate the function of blood and vascular cells by releasing bioactive molecules. Although the platelet is anucleate, it contains transcripts that may mirror disease. Platelet mRNA is only associated with low-level protein translation; however, platelets have a unique membrane structure allowing for the passage of small molecules, leading to the possibility that its cytoplasmic RNA may be passed to nucleated cells. To examine this question, platelet-like particles with labeled RNA were cocultured with vascular cells. Coculture of platelet-like particles with activated THP-1, monocytic, and endothelial cells led to visual and functional RNA transfer. Posttransfer microarray gene expression analysis of THP-1 cells showed an increase in HBG1/HBG2 and HBA1/HBA2 expression that was directly related to the transfer. Infusion of wild-type platelets into a TLR2-deficient mouse model established in vivo confirmation of select platelet RNA transfer to leukocytes. By specifically transferring green fluorescent protein, we also observed external RNA was functional in the recipient cells. The observation that platelets possess the capacity to transfer cytosolic RNA suggests a new function for platelets in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. PMID:22596260

  9. Establishment of a paediatric age-related reference interval for the measurement of urinary total fractionated metanephrines.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Alison; O'Shea, Paula; FitzGerald, Roland; O'Connor, Gerard; Tormey, William

    2011-01-01

    Normetanephrine and metanephrine are intermediate metabolites of noradrenaline and adrenaline metabolism. To assess whether normetanephrine and metanephrine analysis may aid in the diagnosis of Neuroblastoma, a reference interval for these metabolites must first be established. The overall aim of this study was to establish a paediatric age-related reference interval for the measurement of total fractionated metanephrines. A total of 267 urine samples were analysed following acid hydrolysis. This releases the metanephrines from their sulphate-bound metabolites. The samples were analysed using reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography with electro-chemical detection on a Gilson automated sequential trace enrichment of dialysate sample system. Data were analysed using Minitab Release version 14. Outliers were removed using the Dixon/Reed one-third rule. Partitioning of the age groups was achieved using Harris and Boyd's standard normal deviate test. Non-parametric analysis of the data was performed, followed by the establishment of the 2.5th and the 97.5th reference limits. The established reference intervals are described in Table 2.

  10. Human Platelets and Factor XI

    PubMed Central

    Lipscomb, Myatt S.; Walsh, Peter N.

    1979-01-01

    Because human platelets participate in the contact phase of intrinsic coagulation and contain a Factor XI-like coagulant activity, the nature of the Factor XI-like activity was examined and compared with purified plasma Factor XI. The platelet factor XI-like activity was sedimented with the particulate fraction of a platelet lysate, was inactivated by heat (t1/2 3.5 min, 56°C), was not a nonspecific phospholipid activity, and was destroyed by treatment with Triton X-100. Isolated platelet membranes were four-fold enriched in Factor XI activity and similarly enriched in plasma membrane marker enzymes. The Factor XI-like activity of platelet membranes was detected only when assayed in the presence of kaolin, which suggests that it is present in an unactivated form and can participate in contact activation. Concanavalin A inhibited the Factor XI-like activity of platelet lysates and platelet membranes but not of plasma or purified Factor XI. A platelet membrane-Factor XI complex was isolated after incubation of membranes with purified Factor XI. The Factor XI activity of the platelet membrane-plasma Factor XI complex was inhibited by concanavalin A, whereas unbound plasma Factor XI retained activity. An antibody raised against plasma Factor XI inhibited the in vitro Factor XI activity of plasma and of the platelet membrane-plasma Factor XI complex but had no effect on the endogenous Factor XI-like activity of washed lysed platelets or isolated platelet membranes. Washed platelets and isolated platelet membranes obtained from a Factor XI-deficient donor without a history of excessive bleeding had normal quantities of platelet Factor XI-like activity and normal behavior in the contact phase of coagulation (collagen-induced coagulant activity). These results indicate that platelet membranes contain an endogenous Factor XI-like activity that is functionally distinct from plasma Factor XI. PMID:447822

  11. The prognostic utility of tests of platelet function for the detection of 'aspirin resistance' in patients with established cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Dretzke, Janine; Riley, Richard D; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Jowett, Susan; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Ensor, Joie; Moloney, Eoin; Price, Malcolm; Raichand, Smriti; Hodgkinson, James; Bayliss, Susan; Fitzmaurice, David; Moore, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The use of aspirin is well established for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, a proportion of patients suffer repeat cardiovascular events despite being prescribed aspirin treatment. It is uncertain whether or not this is due to an inherent inability of aspirin to sufficiently modify platelet activity. This report aims to investigate whether or not insufficient platelet function inhibition by aspirin ('aspirin resistance'), as defined using platelet function tests (PFTs), is linked to the occurrence of adverse clinical outcomes, and further, whether or not patients at risk of future adverse clinical events can be identified through PFTs. OBJECTIVES To review systematically the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness evidence regarding the association between PFT designation of 'aspirin resistance' and the risk of adverse clinical outcome(s) in patients prescribed aspirin therapy. To undertake exploratory model-based cost-effectiveness analysis on the use of PFTs. DATA SOURCES Bibliographic databases (e.g. MEDLINE from inception and EMBASE from 1980), conference proceedings and ongoing trial registries up to April 2012. METHODS Standard systematic review methods were used for identifying clinical and cost studies. A risk-of-bias assessment tool was adapted from checklists for prognostic and diagnostic studies. (Un)adjusted odds and hazard ratios for the association between 'aspirin resistance', for different PFTs, and clinical outcomes are presented; however, heterogeneity between studies precluded pooling of results. A speculative economic model of a PFT and change of therapy strategy was developed. RESULTS One hundred and eight relevant studies using a variety of PFTs, 58 in patients on aspirin monotherapy, were analysed in detail. Results indicated that some PFTs may have some prognostic utility, i.e. a trend for more clinical events to be associated with groups classified as 'aspirin resistant'. Methodological and clinical

  12. The prognostic utility of tests of platelet function for the detection of 'aspirin resistance' in patients with established cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dretzke, Janine; Riley, Richard D; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Jowett, Susan; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Ensor, Joie; Moloney, Eoin; Price, Malcolm; Raichand, Smriti; Hodgkinson, James; Bayliss, Susan; Fitzmaurice, David; Moore, David

    2015-05-01

    The use of aspirin is well established for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. However, a proportion of patients suffer repeat cardiovascular events despite being prescribed aspirin treatment. It is uncertain whether or not this is due to an inherent inability of aspirin to sufficiently modify platelet activity. This report aims to investigate whether or not insufficient platelet function inhibition by aspirin ('aspirin resistance'), as defined using platelet function tests (PFTs), is linked to the occurrence of adverse clinical outcomes, and further, whether or not patients at risk of future adverse clinical events can be identified through PFTs. To review systematically the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness evidence regarding the association between PFT designation of 'aspirin resistance' and the risk of adverse clinical outcome(s) in patients prescribed aspirin therapy. To undertake exploratory model-based cost-effectiveness analysis on the use of PFTs. Bibliographic databases (e.g. MEDLINE from inception and EMBASE from 1980), conference proceedings and ongoing trial registries up to April 2012. Standard systematic review methods were used for identifying clinical and cost studies. A risk-of-bias assessment tool was adapted from checklists for prognostic and diagnostic studies. (Un)adjusted odds and hazard ratios for the association between 'aspirin resistance', for different PFTs, and clinical outcomes are presented; however, heterogeneity between studies precluded pooling of results. A speculative economic model of a PFT and change of therapy strategy was developed. One hundred and eight relevant studies using a variety of PFTs, 58 in patients on aspirin monotherapy, were analysed in detail. Results indicated that some PFTs may have some prognostic utility, i.e. a trend for more clinical events to be associated with groups classified as 'aspirin resistant'. Methodological and clinical heterogeneity prevented a quantitative summary of

  13. Expanded Stem Cells, Stromal-Vascular Fraction, and Platelet-Rich Plasma Enriched Fat: Comparing Results of Different Facial Rejuvenation Approaches in a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rigotti, Gino; Charles-de-Sá, Luiz; Gontijo-de-Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Amable, Paola Romina; Borojevic, Radovan; Benati, Donatella; Bernardi, Paolo; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that treatment with expanded adipose-derived stem cells or stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-enriched fat modify the pattern of the dermis in human beings, representing a skin rejuvenation effect. Considering that expanded stem cells require a cell factor, the authors wanted to assess similar results by replacing them with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which is easier to obtain and for which an empirical regenerative effect has been already described. Objectives To determine if PRP injection could replace the cutaneous regenerative effect of adipose-derived stem cells. Methods This study was performed in 13 patients who were candidates for facelift. The patients underwent sampling of fat by liposuction from the abdomen and submitted to one of three protocols: injection of SVF-enriched fat or expanded adipose-derived stem cells or fat plus PRP in the preauricular areas. Fragments of skin were removed before and 3 months after treatment and analyzed by optical and electron microscopy. Results The use of fat plus PRP led to the presence of more pronounced inflammatory infiltrates and a greater vascular reactivity, increasing in vascular permeability and a certain reactivity of the nervous component. The addition of PRP did not improve the regenerative effect. Conclusion The use of PRP did not have significant advantages in skin rejuvenation over the use of expanded adipose-derived stem cells or SVF-enriched fat. The effect of increased vascular reactivity may be useful in pathological situations in which an intense angiogenesis is desirable, such as tissular ischemia. Level of Evidence: 4 Therapeutic PMID:26879294

  14. Expanded Stem Cells, Stromal-Vascular Fraction, and Platelet-Rich Plasma Enriched Fat: Comparing Results of Different Facial Rejuvenation Approaches in a Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Rigotti, Gino; Charles-de-Sá, Luiz; Gontijo-de-Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Amable, Paola Romina; Borojevic, Radovan; Benati, Donatella; Bernardi, Paolo; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that treatment with expanded adipose-derived stem cells or stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-enriched fat modify the pattern of the dermis in human beings, representing a skin rejuvenation effect. Considering that expanded stem cells require a cell factor, the authors wanted to assess similar results by replacing them with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which is easier to obtain and for which an empirical regenerative effect has been already described. To determine if PRP injection could replace the cutaneous regenerative effect of adipose-derived stem cells. This study was performed in 13 patients who were candidates for facelift. The patients underwent sampling of fat by liposuction from the abdomen and submitted to one of three protocols: injection of SVF-enriched fat or expanded adipose-derived stem cells or fat plus PRP in the preauricular areas. Fragments of skin were removed before and 3 months after treatment and analyzed by optical and electron microscopy. The use of fat plus PRP led to the presence of more pronounced inflammatory infiltrates and a greater vascular reactivity, increasing in vascular permeability and a certain reactivity of the nervous component. The addition of PRP did not improve the regenerative effect. The use of PRP did not have significant advantages in skin rejuvenation over the use of expanded adipose-derived stem cells or SVF-enriched fat. The effect of increased vascular reactivity may be useful in pathological situations in which an intense angiogenesis is desirable, such as tissular ischemia. © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Effects of administration of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and platelet-rich plasma to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, David A; Renberg, Walter C; Roush, James K; Milliken, George A; Weiss, Mark L

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of simultaneous intra-articular and IV injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints. ANIMALS 22 client-owned dogs (12 placebo-treated [control] dogs and 10 treated dogs). PROCEDURES Dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints that caused signs of lameness or discomfort were characterized on the basis of results of orthopedic examination, goniometry, lameness score, the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI), a visual analogue scale, and results obtained by use of a pressure-sensing walkway at week 0 (baseline). Dogs received a simultaneous intraarticular and IV injection of SVF and PRP or a placebo. Dogs were examined again 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. RESULTS CBPI scores were significantly lower for the treatment group at week 24, compared with scores for the control group. Mean visual analogue scale score for the treatment group was significantly higher at week 0 than at weeks 4, 8, or 24. Dogs with baseline peak vertical force (PVF) in the lowest 25th percentile were compared, and the treatment group had a significantly higher PVF than did the control group. After the SVF-PRP injection, fewer dogs in the treated group than in the control group had lameness confirmed during examination. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints treated with SVF and PRP, improvements in CBPI and PVF were evident at some time points, compared with results for the control group.

  16. Platelet Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donating platelets, can I still donate blood? What blood types should donate platelets? Can I donate plasma at ... Community Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood ...

  17. Establishing proof of concept: Platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Niall A; Murawski, Christopher D; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Kennedy, John G

    2012-07-18

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries in the athletic patient. They present a challenging clinical problem as cartilage has a poor potential for healing. Current surgical treatments consist of reparative (microfracture) or replacement (autologous osteochondral graft) strategies and demonstrate good clinical outcomes at the short and medium term follow-up. Radiological findings and second-look arthroscopy however, indicate possible poor cartilage repair with evidence of fibrous infill and fissuring of the regenerative tissue following microfracture. Longer-term follow-up echoes these findings as it demonstrates a decline in clinical outcome. The nature of the cartilage repair that occurs for an osteochondral graft to become integrated with the native surround tissue is also of concern. Studies have shown evidence of poor cartilage integration, with chondrocyte death at the periphery of the graft, possibly causing cyst formation due to synovial fluid ingress. Biological adjuncts, in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), have been investigated with regard to their potential in improving cartilage repair in both in vitro and in vitro settings. The in vitro literature indicates that these biological adjuncts may increase chondrocyte proliferation as well as synthetic capability, while limiting the catabolic effects of an inflammatory joint environment. These findings have been extrapolated to in vitro animal models, with results showing that both PRP and BMAC improve cartilage repair. The basic science literature therefore establishes the proof of concept that biological adjuncts may improve cartilage repair when used in conjunction with reparative and replacement treatment strategies for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

  18. Typing for human platelet alloantigens.

    PubMed

    Juji, T; Saji, H; Satake, M; Tokunaga, K

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies to platelet alloantigens, and sometimes to isoantigens, induce severe clinical problems such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and refractoriness to platelet transfusions (PTR). For example, NAIT affects approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is essential, therefore, to screen pregnant women for platelet antibodies in order to save babies' lives. Almost 40 years ago, two platelet alloantigen systems were discovered using relatively simple methods, namely the platelet agglutination test and the complement fixation test. However, these methods were not sensitive enough to identify all antibodies in mothers and patients, even in those with severe clinical problems. Tremendous effort has been devoted to establish more sensitive and reliable methods. In recent years, excellent new serological and immunochemical methods have been established and several new platelet antigen systems have been discovered. Simultaneously, newly developed molecular genetic techniques have been introduced for the typing and analysis of human platelet alloantigen systems. These methods allow DNA typing for cases in which serological typing is not available. In this article, the history of studies on human platelet alloantigen systems and isoantigens, the nomenclature of platelet alloantigen systems and their alleles, the present status of antibody detection and typing techniques and, finally, ethnic variations in platelet antigen profiles are reviewed.

  19. Future innovations in anti-platelet therapies

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, N E; Holbrook, L; Jones, S; Kaiser, W J; Moraes, L A; Rana, R; Sage, T; Stanley, R G; Tucker, K L; Wright, B; Gibbins, J M

    2008-01-01

    Platelets have long been recognized to be of central importance in haemostasis, but their participation in pathological conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis and inflammation is now also well established. The platelet has therefore become a key target in therapies to combat cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet therapies are used widely, but current approaches lack efficacy in a proportion of patients, and are associated with side effects including problem bleeding. In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in understanding the regulation of platelet function, including the characterization of new ligands, platelet-specific receptors and cell signalling pathways. It is anticipated this progress will impact positively on the future innovations towards more effective and safer anti-platelet agents. In this review, the mechanisms of platelet regulation and current anti-platelet therapies are introduced, and strong, and some more speculative, potential candidate target molecules for future anti-platelet drug development are discussed. PMID:18587441

  20. Current status of additive solutions for platelets.

    PubMed

    Alhumaidan, Hiba; Sweeney, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The storage of platelets in additive solution (PAS) had lagged behind red cell concentrates, especially in North America. The partial or complete removal of anticoagulated plasma and storage of platelet concentrates in AS presents many advantages. The PAS can be formulated to optimize aerobic metabolism or decrease platelet activation, thus abrogating the platelet storage lesion and potentially improving in vivo viability. Plasma removal has been shown to reduce allergic reactions and the plasma harvested could contribute to the available plasma pool for transfusion or fractionation. PAS coupled to pathogen reduction technology results in a platelet product of equivalent hemostatic efficacy to conventionally stored platelets. Given the above, the likely future direction of platelet storage will be in new generation designer PAS with an extended shelf life and a superior safety profile to plasma stored platelets. J. Clin. Apheresis, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. First comparative analysis concerning the plasma platelet contamination during MNC collection.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Hella; Achenbach, Susanne; Strobel, Julian; Zimmermann, Robert; Eckstein, Reinhold; Strasser, Erwin F

    2017-07-13

    Monocytes can be cultured into dendritic cells with addition of autologous plasma, which is highly prone to platelet contamination due to the apheresis process. Since platelets affect the maturation process of monocytes into dendritic cells and might even lead to a diminished harvest of dendritic cells, it is very important to reduce the platelet contamination. A new collection device (Spectra Optia) was analyzed, compared to two established devices (COM.TEC, Cobe Spectra) and evaluated regarding the potential generation of source plasma. Concurrent plasma collected during leukapheresis was analyzed for residual cell contamination in a prospective study with the new Spectra Optia apheresis device (n=24) and was compared with COM.TEC and Cobe Spectra data (retrospective analysis, n=72). Donor pre-donation counts of platelets were analyzed for their predictive value of contaminating PLTs in plasma harvests. The newest apheresis device showed the lowest residual platelet count of the collected concurrent plasma (median 3.50×10(9)/l) independent of pre-donation counts. The other two devices and sets had a higher platelet contamination. The contamination of the plasma with leukocytes was very low (only 2.0% were higher than 0.5×10(9)/l). This study showed a significant reduction of platelet contamination of the concurrent plasma collected with the new Spectra Optia device. This plasma product with low residual platelets and leukocytes might also be used as plasma for fractionation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states.

  3. PLATELET FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Jonathan N.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is the underlying cause of a number of major clinical conditions and genetic disorders worldwide. While therapeutic agents that bind and stimulate the thrombopoietin receptor are currently available, the development of drugs that directly stimulate megakaryocytes to generate platelets has lagged behind. To improve the management of thrombocytopenia, we will need to define the cell biological pathways that drive the production of platelets from megakaryocytes. This review integrates the latest research of platelet biogenesis and focuses on the molecular pathways that power and regulate proplatelet production. PMID:20620432

  4. Measurement of platelet aggregation, independently of patient platelet count: a flow-cytometric approach.

    PubMed

    Vinholt, P J; Frederiksen, H; Hvas, A-M; Sprogøe, U; Nielsen, C

    2017-06-01

    Essentials Platelet function may influence bleeding risk in thrombocytopenia, but useful tests are needed. A flow cytometric platelet aggregation test independent of the patient platelet count was made. Platelet aggregation was reduced in thrombocytopenic patients with hematological cancer. High platelet aggregation ruled out bleeding tendency in thrombocytopenic patients. Background Methods for testing platelet aggregation in thrombocytopenia are lacking. Objective To establish a flow-cytometric test of in vitro platelet aggregation independently of the patient's platelet count, and examine the association of aggregation with a bleeding history in thrombocytopenic patients. Patients/methods We established a flow-cytometric assay of platelet aggregation, and measured samples from healthy individuals preincubated with antiplatelet drugs, and samples from two patients with inherited platelet disorders. Then, we included 19 healthy individuals and 20 patients with platelet counts of ≤ 50 × 10(9) L(-1) , diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. We measured platelet aggregation and platelet activation by platelet surface expression of activated glycoprotein IIb-IIIa, P-selectin and CD63 after addition of agonists: collagen-related peptide, thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP), and ADP. Results The platelet aggregation assay showed a low intraserial coefficient of variation of ≤ 3%. Similar results were obtained for platelet-rich plasma and isolated platelets at platelet counts of > 10 × 10(9) L(-1) ; otherwise, platelet isolation was required. The platelet aggregation percentage decreased with increasing antiplatelet drug concentration. Platelet aggregation in patients was reduced as compared with healthy individuals: 42% (interquartile range [IQR] 27-58) versus 66% (IQR 60-67) for TRAP; 41% (IQR 25-48) versus 70% (IQR 69-72) for collagen-related peptide; and 44% (IQR 30-53) versus 65% (IQR 46-72) for ADP. Platelet activation after

  5. [Summary of pathophysiology and diagnosis of patients with platelet abnormality].

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Asakura, Hidesaku

    2009-05-01

    In hematological disorders, thrombocytopenia is frequently observed, and it is sometimes difficult to diagnose the underlying disease. In this symposium, laboratory tests for platelet abnormality were reviewed. Tests for platelet aggregation were reported to be important for the diagnosis of platelet dysfunction. Thrombocytopenia is caused by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), etc. As DIC is classified according to the degree of fibrinolysis, it was stated that the measurement of hemostatic molecular markers was further required. TMA is caused by abnormality of ADAMTS13, verotoxin, DIC, etc. HIT is diagnosed by anti-PF4 antibody, but its specificity is not high. Further investigation of TMA and HIT is required. APS is one of the most important diseases which cause thrombosis or abortion, suggesting that a differential diagnosis of APS is important. It was reported that diagnostic criteria of ITP have been established using a new antibody assay for platelets, immature platelet fractions, thrombopoietin, etc. In myeloproliferative disorders such as polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, the mutation of JAK2 V617F was reported to be an important risk factor for thrombosis.

  6. Thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Malte; Sallmon, Hannes; Kling, Pamela J; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is widespread in preterm and term neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, with up to one-third of infants demonstrating platelet counts <150 × 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia may arise from maternal, placental or fetal/neonatal origins featuring decreased platelet production, increased consumption, or both mechanisms. Over the past years, innovations in managing neonatal thrombocytopenia were achieved from prospectively obtained clinical data on thrombocytopenia and bleeding events, animal studies on platelet life span and production rate and clinical use of fully automated measurement of reticulated platelets (immature platelet fraction). This review summarizes the pathophysiology of neonatal thrombocytopenia, current management including platelet transfusion thresholds and recent developments in megakaryopoietic agents. Furthermore, we propose a novel index score for bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic neonates to facilitate clinician's decision-making when to transfuse platelets.

  7. Platelets in infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Elizabeth; Rondina, Matthew T

    2016-12-02

    Sepsis is a dynamic, acute, infectious disease syndrome characterized by dysregulated thrombo-inflammatory responses. The high mortality associated with sepsis has been recognized since the earliest clinicians' writings. Despite this, advances in the treatment of sepsis have been more modest. This is limited, in part, by the heterogeneity in the definition, population, presentation, and causal factors of infectious syndromes. Given the persistently high morbidity and mortality associated with sepsis, a better understanding of the dysregulated cellular biology underpinning sepsis is needed. Platelets are small, anucleate cells that have hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune-mediating properties. Platelets are the second most common circulating blood cell, and emerging evidence suggests that platelets serve as sentinel and effector cells during infectious syndromes. Nevertheless, the molecular and functional changes that occur in platelets during sepsis, and their impact on the clinical course of infected patients, remain incompletely understood. In this review, we first highlight the complex and dynamic pathophysiology characteristics of acute, systemic infections and we then discuss established and emerging evidence of the roles of platelets in sepsis. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  8. Distribution of inorganic phosphorus in profiles and particle-size fractions across an established riparian buffer and adjacent cropped area at the Dian lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G. S.; Li, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Riparian buffer can trap sediment and nutrients sourced from upper cropland and minimizing eutrophication risk of water quality. This study aimed to investigate the distributions of soil inorganic phosphorus (Pi) forms among profile and particle-size fractions in an established riparian buffer and adjacent cropped area at the Dian lake, Southwestern China. The Ca-bound fraction (62 %) was the major proportion of the Pi in the riparian soils. Buffer rehabilitation from cropped area had a limited impact on total phosphorus (TP) concentrations after 3 years, but has contributed to a change in Pi forms. At 0-20 cm soil layer, levels of the Olsen-P, nonoccluded, Ca-bound and total Pi were lower in the buffer than the cropped area; however, the Pi distribution between the cropped area and the buffer did not differ significantly as depth increased. The clay fraction corresponded to 57 % of TP and seemed to be both a sink for highly recalcitrant Pi and a source for labile Pi. The lower concentration of Pi forms in the silt and sand particle fraction in the surface soil was observed in the buffer area, which indicating that the Pi distribution in coarse particle fraction has sensitively responded to land-use changes.

  9. Distribution of inorganic phosphorus in profiles and particle fractions of Anthrosols across an established riparian buffer and adjacent cropped area at the Dian lake (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guo Sheng; Cha Li, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Riparian buffers can trap sediment and nutrients sourced from upper cropland, minimizing the eutrophication risk of water quality. This study aimed to investigate the distributions of soil inorganic phosphorus (Pi) forms among profile and particle-size fractions in an established riparian buffer and adjacent cropped area at the Dian lake, southwestern China. The Ca-bound fraction (62 %) was the major proportion of the Pi in the riparian soils. After 3 years' restoration, buffer rehabilitation from cropped area had a limited impact on total phosphorus (TP) concentrations, but has contributed to a change in Pi forms. In the 0-20 cm soil layer, levels of the Olsen-P, non-occluded, Ca-bound, and total Pi were lower in the buffer than the cropped area; however, the Pi distribution between the cropped area and the buffer did not differ significantly as depth increased. The clay fraction corresponded to 57 % of TP and seemed to be both a sink for highly recalcitrant Pi and a source for labile Pi. The lower concentration of Pi forms in the silt and sand particle fraction in the surface soil was observed in the buffer area, which indicated that the Pi distribution in coarse particle fraction had sensitively responded to land use changes.

  10. Relation of platelet density to platelet age: survival of low- and high-density 111indium-labeled platelets in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B.; McFadden, P.R.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between platelet density and platelet age has been studied using continuous linear Percoll density gradients and 111In-labeling of autologous platelets in baboons. To investigate changes in platelet density during senescence in the circulation, baboons were infused with 111In-labeled autologous platelets, and blood was collected at one hour postinfusion and twice daily thereafter for six days. Platelets were isolated from these samples in high yield (greater than 95%) and separated in continuous linear Percoll density gradients following density equilibrium centrifugation. Although at one hour postinfusion the density distribution of radiolabeled platelets coincided closely with the distribution of the total platelet population, a detectable symmetrical shift toward higher densities was observed after five days. The relative specific radioactivity (RSR) of high-density platelets (1.064 to 1.067 g/mL) decreased at a slower rate than that of the total platelet population (platelets of all densities), whereas the RSR of low-density platelets (1.053 to 1.056 g/mL) showed a more immediate and rapid decrease. These results give rise to one of two interpretations: (1) low-density platelets have a shorter survival time than more dense platelets and are therefore cleared from the circulation at a faster rate, or (2) platelets of all densities increase in density upon aging in the circulation. To determine the explanation for changing RSR of different density fractions we studied the in vivo disappearance characteristics of low- and high-density 111In-labeled platelets. There were no significant differences between the mean survival times of low-density platelets (5.0 +/- 0.49 days, +/- 1 SD, n = 6), high-density platelets (4.9 +/- 0.56 days, n = 6), or control platelets representing platelets of all densities (4.9 +/- 0.38 days, n = 6).

  11. Studies on Human Platelet Gangliosides

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Aaron J.; Ullman, Harris L.; Safier, Lenore B.

    1972-01-01

    Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids which contain sialic acid, were studied in human platelets. They represented 0.5% of the platelet lipids and accounted for 6% of the total neuraminic acid content of platelets. Three major ganglioside fractions were identified and characterized. Ganglioside I was hematoside (G6) and comprised 92% of the platelet gangliosides. It contained glucose, galactose, and sialic acid in molar ratios of 1:1:1 and no hexosamine. The major fatty acid was behenate (22:0). Ganglioside I was also identified in isolated platelet granules and membranes. Ganglioside II (5%) contained glucose, galactose, sialic acid, and hexosamines (molar ratios 1:2:1:1). The hexosamines were glucosamine (72%) and galactosamine (28%). It was therefore designated as ganglioside lacto-N-neotetraose. Ganglioside III (2%) contained disialosyllactosyl ceramide (G3A) as well as two other gangliosides which could not be precisely characterized. Gangliosides I, II, and III were susceptible to the action of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase as evidenced by full recovery of sialic acid in its free form after incubation. Neutral platelet glycolipids were qualitatively examined by thin-layer chromatography. The major component was lactosyl ceramide. Interactions of gangliosides I and III and serotonin-14C were examined in an equilibrium dialysis system at 4°C. The gangliosides bound serotonin-14C in relatively small quantities, whereas control lipids were negative. The binding was essentially unchanged by reverse dialysis, ultracentrifugation and subsequent thin-layer chromatography. The results are comparable to the previously observed nonmetabolic interactions between whole platelets and serotonin in the cold. It is suggested that the orientation and specific distribution of platelet membrane glycolipids may be important determinants of the unique surface properties of platelets. Images PMID:4341436

  12. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  13. What can proteomics tell us about platelets?

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Julia M; Gambaryan, Stepan; Watson, Stephen P; Jurk, Kerstin; Walter, Ulrich; Sickmann, Albert; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Zahedi, René P

    2014-03-28

    More than 130 years ago, it was recognized that platelets are key mediators of hemostasis. Nowadays, it is established that platelets participate in additional physiological processes and contribute to the genesis and progression of cardiovascular diseases. Recent data indicate that the platelet proteome, defined as the complete set of expressed proteins, comprises >5000 proteins and is highly similar between different healthy individuals. Owing to their anucleate nature, platelets have limited protein synthesis. By implication, in patients experiencing platelet disorders, platelet (dys)function is almost completely attributable to alterations in protein expression and dynamic differences in post-translational modifications. Modern platelet proteomics approaches can reveal (1) quantitative changes in the abundance of thousands of proteins, (2) post-translational modifications, (3) protein-protein interactions, and (4) protein localization, while requiring only small blood donations in the range of a few milliliters. Consequently, platelet proteomics will represent an invaluable tool for characterizing the fundamental processes that affect platelet homeostasis and thus determine the roles of platelets in health and disease. In this article we provide a critical overview on the achievements, the current possibilities, and the future perspectives of platelet proteomics to study patients experiencing cardiovascular, inflammatory, and bleeding disorders.

  14. Single-step separation of platelets from whole blood coupled with digital quantification by interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC).

    PubMed

    Basabe-Desmonts, L; Ramstrom, S; Meade, G; O'Neill, S; Riaz, A; Lee, L P; Ricco, A J; Kenny, D

    2010-09-21

    We report the efficient single-step separation of individual platelets from unprocessed whole blood, enabling digital quantification of platelet function using interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC) on a chip. iPC is accomplished by the precision micropatterning of platelet-specific protein surfaces on solid substrates. By separating platelets from whole blood using specific binding to protein spots of a defined size, iPC implements a simple incubate-and-rinse approach, without sample preparation, that enables (1) the study of platelets in the physiological situation of interaction with a protein surface, (2) the choice of the number of platelets bound on each protein spot, from one to many, (3) control of the platelet-platelet distance, including the possibility to study noninteracting single platelets, (4) digital quantification (counting) of platelet adhesion to selected protein matrices, enabling statistical characterization of platelet subpopulations from meaningfully large numbers of single platelets, (5) the study of platelet receptor expression and spatial distribution, and (6) a detailed study of the morphology of isolated single platelets at activation levels that can be manipulated. To date, we have demonstrated 1-4 of the above list. Platelets were separated from whole blood using iPC with fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and anti-CD42b antibody printed "spots" ranging from a fraction of one to several platelet diameters (2-24 μm). The number of platelets captured per spot depends strongly on the protein matrix and the surface area of the spot, together with the platelet volume, morphology, and activation state. Blood samples from healthy donors, a May-Hegglin-anomaly patient, and a Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia patient were analyzed via iPC to confirm the specificity of the interaction between protein matrices and platelets. For example, the results indicate that platelets interact with fibrinogen spots only through the fibrinogen receptor (

  15. Headspace-solid phase microextraction-gas chromatography as a tool to define an index that establishes the retention capacity of the wine polymeric fraction towards ethyl esters.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Sílvia M; Coutinho, Paula; Delgadillo, Ivonne; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2007-05-25

    A headspace-solid phase microextraction followed by gas chromatographic analysis (HS-SPME-GC) was developed to be applied in the study of the interactions between the wine polymeric fraction and the ethyl esters: ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, and ethyl decanoate. Wine models (WM) were prepared with 10% (v/v) aqueous ethanol at pH 3.5 with distinct wine polymeric concentrations prepared from white wine of Vitis vinifera L. var. Fernão-Pires: 1.0 g L(-1) (PWM1), with a polymeric concentration approaching the real one in wine; 10.0 g L(-1) (PWM10); and 30.0 g L(-1) (PWM30), saturated with polymeric fraction. A reference wine model (RWM) was prepared without polymeric fraction. Each volatile compound (4.0 mg L(-1)) was added separately to the RWM and to the WM with the three levels of polymeric material (PWM). From the retention index (RI) calculated for each compound using the formula: [RI = 1 - (C(RWM) - C(PWM))/C(RWM)], where C(RWM) is the concentration of the compound in the RWM and C(PWM) is the concentration of the compound in the given PWM, the retention capacity of each wine polymeric fraction towards the three esters was established. The higher retention indexes were observed for ethyl decanoate, the more hydrophobic compound, and for the PWM with higher concentration. Furthermore, this study also suggested that the retained compounds are dosed to the headspace, which may promote the perception of their aroma for a longer period of time.

  16. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003552.htm Platelet-associated antibodies blood test To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a ...

  17. Transcellular activation of platelets and endothelial cells by bioactive lipids in platelet microparticles.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, O. P.; Pratico, D.; Lawson, J. A.; FitzGerald, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Microparticles are released during platelet activation in vitro and have been detected in vivo in syndromes of platelet activation. They have been reported to express both pro- and anticoagulant activities. Nevertheless, their functional significance has remained unresolved. To address the mechanism(s) of cellular activation by platelet microparticles, we examined their effects on platelets and endothelial cells. Activation of human platelets by diverse stimuli (thrombin, 0.1 U/ml; collagen, 4 microg/ml; and the calcium ionophore A23187, 1 microM) results in shedding of microparticles. Pretreatment of these particles, but not membrane fractions from resting platelets, with (s)PLA2 evokes a dose-dependent increase in platelet aggregation, intracellular [Ca2+] movement, and inositol phosphate formation. These effects localize to the arachidonic acid fraction of the microparticles and are mimicked by arachidonic acid isolated from them. However, platelet activation requires prior metabolism of microparticle arachidonic acid to thromboxane A2. Thus, pretreatment of platelets with the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin (20 microM), the thromboxane antagonist SQ29,548 (1 microM), or the protein kinase C inhibitor GF109203X (5 microM) prevents platelet activation by microparticles. However, platelet microparticles fail to evoke an inositol phosphate response directly, via either of the cloned thromboxane receptor isoforms stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Prelabeling platelets with [2H(8)] arachidonate was used to demonstrate platelet metabolism of the microparticle-derived substrate to thromboxane. Platelet microparticles can also induce expression of COX-2 and prostacyclin (PGI2) production, but not expression of COX-1, in human endothelial cells. These effects are prevented by pretreatment with actinomycin D (12 microM) or cycloheximide (5 microg/ml). Expression of COX-2 is again induced by the microparticle arachidonate fraction

  18. Platelet--arterial synthetic graft interaction and its modification

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, A.D.; Connolly, R.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Gembarowicz, R.; Keough, E.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; Valeri, C.R.

    1982-11-01

    We compared the in vivo platelet reactivity of two commonly used clinical grafts, Dacron and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), with that of a control autogenous artery graft and assessed whether platelet reactivity was modified by the platelet-antiaggregating agent prostacyclin (PGI2) (epoprostenol). Grafts were randomly placed into the carotid arteries of 21 baboons. Platelets labeled with /sup 111/In were infused within one hour after implantation graft for gamma camera scanning of platelet uptake. The accumulation of platelets on Dacron grafts began almost immediately after injection and reached a peak after one to two hours. The PTFE and control autogenous artery grafts accumulated comparable small amounts of platelets. Prostacyclin was then infused in a second series of baboons with Dacron grafts, at a rate of 150 to 200 ng/kg/min. It prevented the usual platelet uptake when administered concomitant with graft implantation and reduced previously established platelet activity.

  19. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  20. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Aster, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The “acidification” approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available. PMID:24177466

  1. Plasma protein regulation of platelet function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M S; Bang, N U

    1979-04-02

    This reviews summarizes our evidence suggesting that the plasma protein enviroment influences platelet aggregation potential and metabolic activity. Cationic proteins are capable of restoring the aggreation potential of washed human platelets. The aggregation restoring effect of gamma globulin is inhibited by more anionic proteins in subfractions of Cohn fraction IV and fractions V and VI. Artificial enhancement of the net negative charge of plasma proteins through acylation produces derivatives capable of inhibiting platelet rich plasma. The oxygen consumption of washed human platelets is lower than in platelet rich plasma while the lactate production is identical. Autologus plasma, albumin or IgG immunoglobulin restores the oxygen consumption of washed platelets to values comparable to those obtained for platelet rich plasma, while the lactate production is unaffected. Fibrinogen on IgA myeloma protein increases the lactate production, but not the oxygen consumption. Cyclic AMP levels are considerably lower in washed platelets than in platelet rich plasma. Gamma globulin and albumin causes a futher decrease, which is progressive with time. Fibrinogen causes no change in platelet cyclic AMP content. It is suggested that these observations may in part be explained by the equilibriun between anionic and cationic proteins in the platelet microenvironment. This hypothesis appears applicable in certain situations.

  2. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  3. Cancer and Thrombosis: The Platelet Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Meikle, Claire K. S.; Kelly, Clare A.; Garg, Priyanka; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ali, Ramadan A.; Worth, Randall G.

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are critical to hemostatic and immunological function, and are key players in cancer progression, metastasis, and cancer-related thrombosis. Platelets interact with immune cells to stimulate anti-tumor responses and can be activated by immune cells and tumor cells. Platelet activation can lead to complex interactions between platelets and tumor cells. Platelets facilitate cancer progression and metastasis by: (1) forming aggregates with tumor cells; (2) inducing tumor growth, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and invasion; (3) shielding circulating tumor cells from immune surveillance and killing; (4) facilitating tethering and arrest of circulating tumor cells; and (5) promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell establishment at distant sites. Tumor cell-activated platelets also predispose cancer patients to thrombotic events. Tumor cells and tumor-derived microparticles lead to thrombosis by secreting procoagulant factors, resulting in platelet activation and clotting. Platelets play a critical role in cancer progression and thrombosis, and markers of platelet-tumor cell interaction are candidates as biomarkers for cancer progression and thrombosis risk. PMID:28105409

  4. First-in-man intraglandular implantation of stromal vascular fraction and adipose-derived stem cells plus platelet-rich plasma in irradiation-induced gland damage: a case study.

    PubMed

    Comella, Kristin; Bell, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is a mixture of cells which can be isolated from a mini-lipoaspirate of fat tissue. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a mixture of growth factors and other nutrients which can be obtained from peripheral blood. Adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ADSCs) can be isolated from fat tissue and expanded in culture. The SVF includes a variety of different cells such as ADSCs, pericytes, endothelial/progenitor cells, and a mix of different growth factors. The adipocytes (fat cells) can be removed via centrifugation. Here, we describe the rationale and, to our knowledge, the first clinical implementation of SVF and PRP followed by repeat dosing of culture-expanded ADSCs into a patient with severe xerostomia postirradiation. Approximately 120 mLs of adipose tissue was removed via mini-lipoaspirate procedure under local anesthetic. The SVF was prepared from half of the fat and resuspended in PRP. The mixture was delivered via ultrasound directly into the submandibular and parotid glands on both the right and left sides. The remaining 60 mLs of fat was processed to culture-expand ADSCs. The patient received seven follow-up injections of the ADSCs plus PRP at 5, 8, 16, 18, 23, 28, and 31 months postliposuction. The subject was monitored over a period of 31 months for safety (adverse events), glandular size via ultrasound and saliva production. Throughout the 31-month monitoring period, no safety events such as infection or severe adverse events were reported. The patient demonstrated an increase in gland size as measured by ultrasound which corresponded to increased saliva production. Overall, the patient reported improved quality of life and willingness to continue treatments. The strong safety profile and preliminary efficacy results warrant larger studies to determine if this is a feasible treatment plan for patients postradiation.

  5. Human Platelet Senescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-30

    electrophoresis platelet subpopulations membranes enrichment of platelet collections with miigathrombocytes 20. A DST RAC T (Cpntinue on reverse&. "~gaU...label which enters megakaryocytes but not peripheral blood platelets. Platelets re- leased from the bone marrow however, do contain the isotope . With...their own platelet-rich plasma (anticoagulated with ACD-A) at 800 RP’M) 1200 RPM, 1600 RPM, 1800 RPM and 2000 RPM in a Sorvall RC3 Centrifugue . The

  6. [In vitro platelet production].

    PubMed

    Dunois-Lardé, C; Baruch, D

    2011-04-01

    This review aims at presenting a state of the art on platelet functions, not only in well-characterized hemostasis and thrombosis, but also in various domains such as inflammation, immunity, angiogenesis, source of growth factors, metastasis and vascular remodelling. This multivalent phenotype of platelets suggests new potential applications of platelets. The second objective is to present new advances in platelet formation from megakaryocytes and direct platelet release, as initially shown by our group and more recently by others.

  7. The Role of Platelets in Cardiovascular Disease: Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Papapanagiotou, Angeliki; Daskalakis, Georgios; Siasos, Gerasimos; Gargalionis, Antonios; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-01-01

    The role of platelets in atherosclerotic process and subsequently in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease is essential as platelets in addition to their contribution to thrombosis and hemostasis modulating inflammatory reactions and immune response. Platelets after adhesion on the injured vascular endothelium and activation release a wide range of molecules stored in platelets granules such as chemokines, proinflammatory molecules and other biological response modulators accelerating interaction among platelets, endothelial cells and leukocytes. These interactions establish a localized inflammatory response that promotes the atherosclerotic process. Moreover, activated platelets give rise to microparticles another active participant within the blood stream. The purpose of this review is to present the role of platelets in the above mechanisms giving an emphasis on the nature of the platelet derived- molecules and their contribution to the atherosclerotic process.

  8. Analyzing the platelet proteome.

    PubMed

    García, Angel; Zitzmann, Nicole; Watson, Steve P

    2004-08-01

    During the last 10 years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a key tool for protein analysis and has underpinned the emerging field of proteomics. Using high-throughput tandem MS/MS following protein separation, it is potentially possible to analyze hundreds to thousands of proteins in a sample at a time. This technology can be used to analyze the protein content (i.e., the proteome) of any cell or tissue and complements the powerful field of genomics. The technology is particularly suitable for platelets because of the absence of a nucleus. Cellular proteins can be separated by either gel-based methods such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography (LC) -MS/MS or by multidimensional LC-MS/MS. Prefractionation techniques, such as subcellular fractionations or immunoprecipitations, can be used to improve the analysis. Each method has particular advantages and disadvantages. Proteomics can be used to compare the proteome of basal and diseased platelets, helping to reveal information on the molecular basis of the disease.

  9. Covalent modification of platelet proteins by palmitate

    SciTech Connect

    Muszbek, L.; Laposata, M. )

    1989-09-01

    Covalent attachment of fatty acid to proteins plays an important role in association of certain proteins with hydrophobic membrane structures. In platelets, the structure of many membrane glycoproteins (GPs) has been examined in detail, but the question of fatty acid acylation of platelet proteins has not been addressed. In this study, we wished to determine (a) whether platelet proteins could be fatty acid acylated; and, if so, (b) whether these modified proteins were present in isolated platelet membranes and cytoskeletal fractions; and (c) if the pattern of fatty acid acylated proteins changed on stimulation of the platelets with the agonist thrombin. We observed that in platelets allowed to incorporate 3H-palmitate, a small percentage (1.37%) of radioactivity incorporated into the cells became covalently bound to protein. Selective cleavage of thioester, thioester plus O-ester, and amide-linked 3H-fatty acids from proteins, and their subsequent analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that the greatest part of 3H-fatty acid covalently bound to protein was thioester-linked 3H-palmitate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and fluorography, at least ten major radiolabeled proteins were detected. Activation of platelets by thrombin greatly increased the quantity of 3H-palmitoylated proteins associated with the cytoskeleton. Nearly all radiolabeled proteins were recovered in the membrane fraction, indicating that these proteins are either integral or peripheral membrane proteins or proteins tightly associated to membrane constituents. Components of the GPIIb-IIIa complex were not palmitoylated. Thus, platelet proteins are significantly modified posttranslationally by 3H-palmitate, and incorporation of palmitoylated proteins into the cytoskeleton is a prominent component of the platelet response to thrombin stimulation.

  10. Functional platelet defects in children with severe chronic ITP as tested with 2 novel assays applicable for low platelet counts.

    PubMed

    van Bladel, Esther R; Laarhoven, Annemieke G; van der Heijden, Laila B; Heitink-Pollé, Katja M; Porcelijn, Leendert; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Haas, Masja; Roest, Mark; Vidarsson, Gestur; de Groot, Philip G; Bruin, Marrie C A

    2014-03-06

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with a complex heterogeneous pathogenesis and a bleeding phenotype that is not necessarily correlated to platelet count. In this study, the platelet function was assessed in a well-defined cohort of 33 pediatric chronic ITP patients. Because regular platelet function test cannot be performed in patients with low platelet counts, 2 new assays were developed to determine platelet function: first, the microaggregation test, measuring in platelets isolated from 10 mL of whole blood the platelet potential to form microaggregates in response to an agonist; second, the platelet reactivity assay, measuring platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), convulxin (CVX), and thrombin receptor activator peptide in only 150 μL of unprocessed whole blood. Patients with a severe bleeding phenotype demonstrated a decreased aggregation potential upon phorbol myristate acetate stimulation, decreased platelet degranulation following ADP stimulation, and a higher concentration of ADP and CVX needed to activate the glycoprotein IIbIIIa complex compared with patients with a mild bleeding phenotype. In conclusion, here we have established 2 functional tests that allow for evaluation of platelet function in patients with extremely low platelet counts (<10(9)). These tests show that platelet function is related to bleeding phenotype in chronic ITP.

  11. Principles of establishing material cycling with a high degree of closure in the experimental model of a BTLSS intended for a rated "fraction of a human"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Velichko, Vladimir; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Shikhov, Valentin; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    A promising way to develop future biotechnical life support systems (BTLSS) is to construct experimental models and establish the cycling intended for a fraction of a human. Being of relatively low cost, such models provide an opportunity to test effectively closed process that could be further transferred to the real BTLSS with humans. Researchers of the IBP SB RAS are developing an adequate BTLSS model with the loops closed to a high degree. To attain high closure of mass exchange processes, plants in the phototrophic compartment are cultivated under intensive lighting conditions, created by using modern LED irradiators of enhanced power, equipped with lens optics. The higher plant compartment has been renewed and broadened by including soybean plants, which improve the vegetable part of the human diet and make it more diverse. It is very important that the operation of the physicochemical installation for waste mineralization fully matches the composition of the atmosphere of plant growth chambers: the purified gaseous components of this installation enter the common atmosphere of the system, without causing any deviations from the norm in the gaseous composition. This proves the eco-friendliness of the developed physicochemical method of waste mineralization and shows that the gaseous components resulting from waste mineralization can be included in the system mass exchange. A system for including human respiration into the gas exchange of the BTLSS has been developed and tested; the associated gas exchange and water exchange dynamics have been analyzed. Results of the functioning of the experimental model of the BTLSS for several months are proposed for discussion in order to get insight into the formation of dynamic characteristics of cycling processes and factors determining them. The study was supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (Project 14-14-00599) and carried out at the IBP SB RAS.

  12. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  13. Constitutive modeling of the rheological behavior of platelet suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Drew E.

    Compression molding of chopped fiber composites is used to manufacture complex 3D geometries with high fiber volume fractions of 50-60% and long, discontinuous fibers and thermoplastic matrices. When prepreg, chopped into platelets, is used as a charge material, the individual platelets remain intact during the molding process and flow relative to one another, as experimental observations show. Heterogeneity of the platelet/resin suspension cannot be considered at the structural scale of molding simulation. Instead, the suspension should be idealized into the homogenized anisotropic and viscous system which obeys the prescribed anisotropic stress-strain rate constitutive relation. The viscosity tensor of the aforementioned constitutive law was analytically evaluated in this work through the representative volume element (RVE) based analysis. An idealized microstructure of platelets was developed to perform such an analysis. The platelets were aligned and arranged in a planar configuration with periodic boundary conditions. Analytic expressions for the effective, anisotropic viscosities were derived by micromechanical analysis for the idealized microstructure of rigid platelets. In this analysis, the load transfer mechanisms and their contribution to the viscosity of the platelet assembly were investigated. The kinematic assumption of linear velocity distributions consistent with the mechanism of shearing rate was adopted. While the platelets were assumed to be rigid, the resin was taken as an incompressible, isotropic fluid which provided for the platelet-to-platelet load transfer. Strain rate and temperature dependence were included by modeling the polymer matrix as a Carreau fluid. Shear strain in the resin was developed due to the relative motion of adjacent platelets. The resin shear strain rate was expressed in terms of the corresponding platelet velocities. Equilibrium of the platelet was used to relate the applied far-field stress to the average strain rate

  14. Platelet glycoprotein Ibα supports experimental lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shashank; Zuka, Masahiko; Liu, Jungling; Russell, Susan; Dent, Judith; Guerrero, José A.; Forsyth, Jane; Maruszak, Brigid; Gartner, T. Kent; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Ware, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The platelet paradigm in hemostasis and thrombosis involves an initiation step that depends on platelet membrane receptors binding to ligands on a damaged or inflamed vascular surface. Once bound to the surface, platelets provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin-rich network produced by coagulation factors. The platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX, is critical in this process and initiates the formation of a platelet-rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. A role for platelets beyond the hemostasis/thrombosis paradigm is emerging with significant platelet contributions in both tumorigenesis and inflammation. We have established congenic (N10) mouse colonies (C57BL/6J) with dysfunctional GP Ib-IX receptors in our laboratory that allow us an opportunity to examine the relevance of platelet GP Ib-IX in syngeneic mouse models of experimental metastasis. Our results demonstrate platelet GP Ib-IX contributes to experimental metastasis because a functional absence of GP Ib-IX correlates with a 15-fold reduction in the number of lung metastatic foci using B16F10.1 melanoma cells. The results demonstrate that the extracellular domain of the α-subunit of GP Ib is the structurally relevant component of the GP Ib-IX complex contributing to metastasis. Our results support the hypothesis that platelet GP Ib-IX functions that support normal hemostasis or pathologic thrombosis also contribute to tumor malignancy. PMID:17494758

  15. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  16. Induction of platelet formation from megakaryocytoid cells by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, E; Willoughby, S R; Foxall, T; Valeri, C R; Loscalzo, J

    2001-12-04

    Although the growth factors that regulate megakaryocytopoiesis are well known, the molecular determinants of platelet formation from mature megakaryocytes remain poorly understood. Morphological changes in megakaryocytes associated with platelet formation and removal of senescent megakaryocytes are suggestive of an apoptotic process. Previously, we have established that nitric oxide (NO) can induce apoptosis in megakaryocytoid cell lines. To determine whether there is an association between NO-induced apoptosis and platelet production, we exposed Meg-01 cells to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) with or without thrombopoeitin (TPO) pretreatment and used flow cytometry and electron microscopy to assess platelet-sized particle formation. Meg-01 cells treated with TPO alone produced few platelet-sized particles (<3% of total counts), whereas treatment with GSNO alone produced a significant percentage of platelet-sized particles (22 +/- 4% of total counts); when combined with TPO pretreatment, however, GSNO led to a marked increase in platelet-sized particle production (48 +/- 3% of total counts). Electron microscopy confirmed that Meg-01 cells treated with TPO and GSNO yielded platelet-sized particles with morphological features specific for platelet forms. The platelet-sized particle population appears to be functional, because addition of calcium, fibrinogen, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide led to aggregation. These results demonstrate that NO facilitates platelet production, thereby establishing the essential role of NO in megakaryocyte development and thrombopoiesis.

  17. Blood platelet counts, morphology and morphometry in lions, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, L

    2009-09-01

    Due to logistical problems in obtaining sufficient blood samples from apparently healthy animals in the wild in order to establish normal haematological reference values, only limited information regarding the blood platelet count and morphology of free-living lions (Panthera leo) is available. This study provides information on platelet counts and describes their morphology with particular reference to size in two normal, healthy and free-ranging lion populations. Blood samples were collected from a total of 16 lions. Platelet counts, determined manually, ranged between 218 and 358 x 10(9)/l. Light microscopy showed mostly activated platelets of various sizes with prominent granules. At the ultrastructural level the platelets revealed typical mammalian platelet morphology. However, morphometric analysis revealed a significant difference (P < 0.001) in platelet size between the two groups of animals. Basic haematological information obtained in this study may be helpful in future comparative studies between animals of the same species as well as in other felids.

  18. The role of platelets and megakaryocytes in bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphael; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Blood platelets have been known for more than a century as important partners for successful metastatic dissemination of solid tumors. Cancer cell-induced platelet activation is a key event responsible for prometastatic activity of platelets. Blocking platelet aggregation inhibits the progression of skeletal metastases through mechanisms that are not fully understood. The establishment and progression of bone metastases are strongly influenced by the bone remodeling process. Growth factors and cytokines released upon platelet activation may contribute to both skeletal tumor growth and osteolytic lesions. Megakaryocytes are platelet precursors located in the bone marrow that control bone mass through direct stimulation of osteoblast functions and indirect inhibition of osteoclast activities. Considering growing evidence for their role in the metastatic cascade, platelets and/or megakaryocytes may provide new therapeutic opportunities to help limit bone metastases.

  19. Platelet monoamine uptake in relatives of patients with Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Ehsanullah, R. S.; Turner, P.

    1981-01-01

    Uptake of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by the platelets of 25 symptom-free relatives of patients with established Huntington's chorea (HC) was not significantly different from that of control subjects. Platelet uptake of 5-HT in 3 subjects with early signs of the disease showed increased Km and Vmax values. Increased platelet uptake of 5-HT in patients with established HC was confirmed in a further 3 patients. It seems that this phenomenon appears with the clinical evidence of the disease. Further investigation of the nature of the platelet uptake abnormality may cast light on pathogenic factors in HC. PMID:6458032

  20. The omnipotent platelet.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, L A

    1996-03-01

    This information was derived from the increase in platelets of patients following fractures and/or bone surgery and in conjunction with a vast amount of published literature. The increase in numbers of platelets reflects the extent of bone involvement, especially noted in the hip, knee, post-coronary artery bypass graft, and multiple fractures. The role of the platelet in any and all tissues, i.e. soft tissue or bone, whether beneficial or detrimental, is multifunctional. The platelet responds to all physiologic and pathologic states and, if tissue involved is sufficient, the role of the platelet becomes obvious.

  1. Tirofiban (Aggrastat) protects platelets and decreases platelet-granulocyte binding in an extracorporeal circulation model.

    PubMed

    Straub, A; Azevedo, R; Beierlein, W; Wendel, H P; Dietz, K; Ziemer, G

    2006-04-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) induces platelet activation and inflammation with potentially life-threatening organ dysfunction. Short-acting GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors like tirofiban and eptifibatide protect platelets during ECC without increasing bleeding complications and may reduce inflammation. This study investigates anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory effects of different platelet inhibitors. Control (untreated) and treated (using either 150 ng/mL tirofiban, 2.5 microg/mL eptifibatide, 0.7 microg/mL milrinone, 15 microg/mL dipyridamol, or 300 KIU/mL aprotinin) heparinized blood of healthy volunteers (n = 6) was recirculated in a well-established ECC model (Chandler loop). Percentage of platelet aggregates, P-selectin-expressing (activated) platelets, CD15-positive aggregates (indicating proinflammatory platelet-granulocyte binding), and platelet counts were determined before (baseline) and after 30 minutes recirculation in unstimulated and ADP-stimulated samples using flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was performed using multifactor ANOVA after transforming the data (logarithms for counts and log odds for percentages). Least square means were backtransformed to obtain appropriate means and their 95 % confidence intervals. Multiple post-hoc comparisons were performed by Tukey's HSD test with a global alpha of 5 %. Significant inhibition was observed for: 1) ECC-induced platelet aggregation by tirofiban (unstimulated: 2.2-fold/stimulated: 2.46-fold), eptifibatide (unstimulated: 1.96-fold/stimulated: 2.65-fold), and milrinone (unstimulated: 1.87-fold/stimulated: 1.37-fold); 2) ECC-induced P-selectin expression by tirofiban (unstimulated: 3.95-fold/stimulated: 2.54-fold), and eptifibatide (unstimulated: 5.87-fold/stimulated: 3.28-fold); 3) ECC-induced platelet loss by tirofiban (1.27-fold), and eptifibatide (1.25-fold); 4) ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte binding by tirofiban (unstimulated: 2.25-fold/stimulated: 1.59-fold), but not by eptifibatide. Amongst

  2. In vitro canine platelet aggregation caused by Dirofilaria immitis extract

    PubMed Central

    TAKASHIMA, Yasuhiro; ONODA, Isako; CHIOU, Shin-Pin; KITOH, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Platelet function hyper-activity has been reported in Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm, HW)-infected dogs. Although the mechanism of increased platelet hyper-activity has not yet been elucidated, it is suggested to be mediated by unknown factors, which may be related to adult HW components. This study aims to determine whether adult male HW whole body extract induces canine platelet aggregation in vitro. The results indicate that HW extract caused an aggregation of canine platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. This aggregation ability of the HW extract was not mediated by the adenosine diphosphate receptor. In addition, the mechanisms of aggregation did not require cyclooxygenase-dependent pathways, and the aggregating activity of substances contained in the HW extract was heat stable; therefore, the active substances may be different from collagen. Furthermore, the platelet aggregating activity remained within the molecular weight (MW)≥100,000 fraction obtained by ultrafiltrating the HW extract. In contrast, the MW <100,000 fraction also had a platelet aggregation ability, but the aggregation pattern was reversible and the maximum extent decreased, compared with the MW≥100,000 fraction response. Our experiments have been conducted using a whole body extract from adult HWs to determine with certainty the aggregating activity of HW elements on canine platelets. More studies are necessary to evaluate the effects of the metabolic products released from live adult worms in pulmonary arteries and the symbiont bacterium Wolbachia-derived antigens on canine platelet aggregation. PMID:28049921

  3. In vitro canine platelet aggregation caused by Dirofilaria immitis extract.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Onoda, Isako; Chiou, Shin-Pin; Kitoh, Katsuya

    2017-02-28

    Platelet function hyper-activity has been reported in Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm, HW)-infected dogs. Although the mechanism of increased platelet hyper-activity has not yet been elucidated, it is suggested to be mediated by unknown factors, which may be related to adult HW components. This study aims to determine whether adult male HW whole body extract induces canine platelet aggregation in vitro. The results indicate that HW extract caused an aggregation of canine platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. This aggregation ability of the HW extract was not mediated by the adenosine diphosphate receptor. In addition, the mechanisms of aggregation did not require cyclooxygenase-dependent pathways, and the aggregating activity of substances contained in the HW extract was heat stable; therefore, the active substances may be different from collagen. Furthermore, the platelet aggregating activity remained within the molecular weight (MW)≥100,000 fraction obtained by ultrafiltrating the HW extract. In contrast, the MW <100,000 fraction also had a platelet aggregation ability, but the aggregation pattern was reversible and the maximum extent decreased, compared with the MW≥100,000 fraction response. Our experiments have been conducted using a whole body extract from adult HWs to determine with certainty the aggregating activity of HW elements on canine platelets. More studies are necessary to evaluate the effects of the metabolic products released from live adult worms in pulmonary arteries and the symbiont bacterium Wolbachia-derived antigens on canine platelet aggregation.

  4. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  5. Microtubule and cortical forces determine platelet size during vascular platelet production.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Macleod, Hannah; Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Zhu, Jie; Lee, Kun-Chun; Mogilner, Alex; Hartwig, John H; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-05-22

    Megakaryocytes release large preplatelet intermediates into the sinusoidal blood vessels. Preplatelets convert into barbell-shaped proplatelets in vitro to undergo repeated abscissions that yield circulating platelets. These observations predict the presence of circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in blood, and two fundamental questions in platelet biology are what are the forces that determine barbell-proplatelet formation, and how is the final platelet size established. Here we provide insights into the terminal mechanisms of platelet production. We quantify circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in human blood in high-resolution fluorescence images, using a laser scanning cytometry assay. We demonstrate that force constraints resulting from cortical microtubule band diameter and thickness determine barbell-proplatelet formation. Finally, we provide a mathematical model for the preplatelet to barbell conversion. We conclude that platelet size is limited by microtubule bundling, elastic bending, and actin-myosin-spectrin cortex forces.

  6. Detection of dengue virus in platelets isolated from dengue patients.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Gibbons, Robert V; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Jairungsri, Aroonroong; Ajariyakhajorn, Chuanpis; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G; Malasit, Prida; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2009-03-01

    Though thrombocytopenia or dysfunction of platelets is common in dengue virus infection, the role of platelets has not been established. We enrolled 33 hospitalized children with serologically confirmed dengue virus infection. Blood specimens were collected during hospitalization. Platelets and plasma were isolated from the whole blood. Detection of dengue virus in plasma and platelets was carried out by RT-PCR with primers that can differentiate different dengue serotypes simultaneously, and by electron transmission microscopy (EM). Dengue viral RNA was detected in the platelets and plasma by conventional RT-PCR. A significantly higher percentage of dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets than in plasma (p = 0.03). Platelets isolated 5 days after onset of fever were most likely positive for viral RNA. Concurrent infection or co-circulation with multiple dengue serotypes was observed in 12% of patients. Infrequently, negative-stranded dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets and in plasma. Importantly, EM confirmed the presence of dengue viral-like particles inside platelets prepared from dengue patients. Our findings suggest the presence of dengue virus in platelets may be associated with the dysfunction of platelets observed in dengue patients.

  7. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  8. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  9. Assessing the impacts of the establishment of Miscanthus on soil organic carbon on two contrasting land-use types in Ireland using soil fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Jesko; Dondini, Marta; Jones, Michael

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the use of biomass for energy production has become an increasingly important measure for mitigating global change. However, the scientific debate has been inconclusive with regard to the risks and benefits of bioenergy use. There is particular concern that land-use change to bioenergy production can lead to increased CO2 emissions. These emissions result from the loss of vegetation and the soil disturbance. The use of perennial crops such as Miscanthus x giganteus as a feedstock for bioenergy production offers a possible solution, as it shows a large soil carbon (C) sequestration potential across Europe. The aim of the present study was to analyse the impacts of land-use change from arable farming and grasslands to Miscanthus on soil fractions and associated soil organic carbon (SOC). Four three to four year old commercial Miscanthus sites, as well as adjacent control sites representing the former land-use, in SE Ireland were analysed for changes in SOC stocks and newly sequestered Miscanthus-derived C. The soil samples were fractionated using a combination of physical and chemical methods. The fraction with which the SOC is associated significantly influenced its decomposability and turnover time. Using the 13C natural abundance method, we found that newly sequestered C was found mainly as particulate organic matter (79.7% of Miscanthus-derived C) and therefore in a labile state with short turnover times. No significant differences were found in the distribution of the different soil fractions and SOC between the Miscanthus and the control sites, and it was shown that the share of fractions on the bulk soil as well as the proportion of the SOC associated with these fractions in young Miscanthus sites depends mainly on the previous land-use. It was therefore concluded that soil disturbance linked to the introduction of Miscanthus does not lead to a significant loss of soil organic carbon or a disruption of stable aggregates.

  10. Platelets: handle with care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S

    2016-10-01

    Platelets are delicate cells that require careful handling between collection, preparation and transfusion. This review addresses practical questions relating to platelet concentration, resting time after collection, total time and number of periods without agitation and temperature. The bags in which platelets are stored are made from gas-permeable plastic to allow sufficient oxygen for the platelets to maintain aerobic respiration. Manufacturers have assigned limits for platelet content and concentration, and these must not be exceeded. There is no strong evidence for or against the resting of platelets post-collection and pre-agitation, but platelets should not be over-wrapped during this period as this compromises gas exchange; a short rest period of up to 1 h may allow the separation of minor aggregates. It is necessary to transport platelet concentrates (e.g. from manufacturing site to hospital), but these periods without gas exchange must be limited to avoid excessive damage to the platelets. Current data support a total of 24 h of transportation per component but with no individual period lasting more than 8 h. Platelets need to be stored at 20-24 °C based on evidence that colder storage leads to irreversible changes on the platelet membrane, resulting in phagocytosis of the platelets following transfusion. Storage at warmer temperatures may lead to an increase in bacterial risk. On the basis of this review, the UK Guidelines for Blood Transfusion Services have been updated to ensure that platelets are handled in the most appropriate way to ensure that efficacious components are provided for patients.

  11. Platelet factor 4: a chemokine enigma.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, Arne

    2005-06-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is a platelet alpha-granule protein sequenced over 25 years ago that is a founding member of the C-X-C chemokine family, yet its physiologic function has yet to be definitively established. Initial investigations focused on possible procoagulant roles for PF4 in platelet function and plasmatic coagulation. Subsequent in vitro studies have, however, described a puzzling array of other apparently unrelated biologic functions, including inhibition of angiogenesis and hematopoiesis, promotion of neutrophil adhesion, and activation, enhancement of oxy-LDL binding to the LDL receptor and stimulation of anti-coagulant activated protein C generation by the thrombomodulin/protein C system. Preliminary studies with a just-described PF4 knockout mouse line support a role for PF4 in platelet-dependent thrombosis in vivo.

  12. Influence of mental stress on platelet bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Koudouovoh-Tripp, Pia; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that various mental stress conditions contribute, or at least influence, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in somatic, as well as in psychiatric disorders; blood platelets are supposed to represent a possible link in this respect. The anculeated platelets are the smallest corpuscular elements circulating in the human blood. They display different serotonergic markers which seem to reflect the central nervous serotonin metabolism. They are known as main effectors in haematological processes but recent research highlights their role in the innate and adaptive immune system. Platelets are containing a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immune-modulatory bioactive compounds in their granules and are expressing immune-competent surface markers. Research gives hint that platelets activation and reactivity is increased by mental stress. This leads to enhanced cross talk with the immune system via paracrine secretion, receptor interaction and formation of platelet leucocyte-aggregates. Recently it has been demonstrated that the immune system can have a remarkable impact in the development of psychiatric disorders. Therefore platelets represent an interesting research area in psychiatry and their role as a possible biomarker has been investigated. We review the influence of mental stress on what is termed platelet bioactivity in this article, which subsumes the mainly immune-modulatory activity of platelets in healthy volunteers, elderly persons with chronic care-giving strain, patients with cardiovascular diseases who are prone to psychosocial stress, as well as in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder. Research data suggest that stress enhances platelet activity, reactivity and immune-modulatory capacities. PMID:24175179

  13. [Effect of proteasomal proteolysis on NO-synthase activity in isolated platelets].

    PubMed

    Dosenko, V E; Zagoriĭ, V Iu; Moĭbenko, A A

    2005-01-01

    In experiments with isolated platelets it was shown, that application of proteasomal fraction II (PF II) from rabbit's reticulocytes changes the activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). During incubation of sonicated platelets with PF II eNOS activity increased by 24.6% (p = 0.02). Methylated ubiquitin and clasto-lactacystin beta-lacton significantly eliminated this effect. So, it is not eNOS that is subsequent to proteasomal degradation, but a certain negative regulator of its activity. eNOS activity in platelets, treated with H2O2 (1 mM), after incubation with PF II increased to a higer extent, and was 3.4 +/- 0.36 UF/min x 10(6) cells (for 51.3% more, than in control), but H2O2 did not affect the activity of enzyme in platelets under analogous condition without addition of PF II. It was established, that eNOS activity decreases after 60 min of incubation with 10 mM of clasto-lactacystin beta-lacton by 11.6%, and with 20 mM--by 28.6% (p < 0.05). Data obtained witnesses about participation of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal proteolysis in regulation of eNOS activity and possibility of the effect upon intensity of NO production due to acceleration of degradation of intracellular regulators of this enzyme's activity.

  14. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  15. Increased platelet reactivity in patients with late-stage metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Niamh M; Egan, Karl; McFadden, Siobhan; Grogan, Liam; Breathnach, Oscar S; O'Leary, John; Hennessy, Bryan T; Kenny, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Platelet hyperreactivity is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of thrombosis, a risk that increases with disease progression. While cancer patients show evidence of platelet activation in vivo, few studies have extensively assessed whether these patients display platelet hyperreactivity. We hypothesized that patients with metastatic cancer would display platelet hyperreactivity, reflecting their associated high risk of thrombosis. In a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13), we assessed platelet function using well-established assays of platelet reactivity (agonist-induced platelet aggregation, spontaneous platelet aggregation, and agonist-induced P-selectin expression). In comparison with healthy controls (n = 10), patients with metastatic cancer displayed global platelet hyperreactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation responses to ADP (adenosine diphosphate), epinephrine, collagen, arachidonic acid, and PAR-1 (protease-activated receptor-1) activating peptide, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, were significantly increased in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, agonist-induced platelet P-selectin expression was also significantly increased within the patient cohort. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. We assessed platelet function in a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13) using well-established assays of platelet reactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation and activation in response to platelet agonists, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, was significantly increased in cancer patients compared with healthy controls. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. PMID

  16. Evaluation of the effect of calcium gluconate and bovine thrombin on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB from feline platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Silva, Raul F; Alvarez, María E; Ríos, Diana L; López, Catalina; Carmona, Jorge U; Rezende, Cleuza Mf

    2012-11-06

    There are not reported regarding the protocols for obtaining platelet concentrates (PC) in cats for medical purposes. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe a manual method for producing two kinds of PC in cats (PC-A and PC-B), 2) to describe the cellular population of the PC, 3) to measure and compare the effect of calcium gluconate (CG) and bovine thrombin (BT) on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) at 3 and 12 hours post-activation and 4) to establish correlations between the cellular population of both PCs and the concentration of growth factors (GF). Blood samples were taken from 16 cats for complete blood count, plasma collection and PC preparation. The PC were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The platelet counts were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PC and whole blood but not between the PC fractions. The TGF-β1 concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 42.86% and 46.54%, and activated with BT were 42.88% and 54.64%, respectively. The PDGF-BB concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 61.36% and 60.61%, and activated with BT were 65.64% and 72.12%, respectively. The temporal release of GFs showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the activating substances at the time or for any PC fraction. Whatever the activation means, these preparations of cat PC provide significant concentrations of platelets and GFs for possible clinical or experimental use.

  17. Evaluation of the effect of calcium gluconate and bovine thrombin on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB from feline platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are not reported regarding the protocols for obtaining platelet concentrates (PC) in cats for medical purposes. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe a manual method for producing two kinds of PC in cats (PC-A and PC-B), 2) to describe the cellular population of the PC, 3) to measure and compare the effect of calcium gluconate (CG) and bovine thrombin (BT) on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) at 3 and 12 hours post-activation and 4) to establish correlations between the cellular population of both PCs and the concentration of growth factors (GF). Blood samples were taken from 16 cats for complete blood count, plasma collection and PC preparation. The PC were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). Results The platelet counts were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PC and whole blood but not between the PC fractions. The TGF-β1 concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 42.86% and 46.54%, and activated with BT were 42.88% and 54.64%, respectively. The PDGF-BB concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 61.36% and 60.61%, and activated with BT were 65.64% and 72.12%, respectively. The temporal release of GFs showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the activating substances at the time or for any PC fraction. Conclusions Whatever the activation means, these preparations of cat PC provide significant concentrations of platelets and GFs for possible clinical or experimental use. PMID:23131192

  18. Endotoxin Interactions with Platelets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    irreversible aggregation of human platelets (Hamberg and Sainuelsson 1974; Hlamberg et al 1975). Acetylsalicylic acid , an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase aud...exposure to endotoxin (100 ttg/nil). To simulate the lipopolysac- charide of endotoxin, several different fatty acids were added individually to platelet...platelet lytic capability. Similarity, iflegaradt doses of ganima radiation 6wCo destroy fatty acid groups on lipid A (L. Bertok, personal communication

  19. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  20. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Meyer, Claudius U.; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen + ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin + UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established. PMID:24749844

  1. Platelet size in man.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J M

    1975-09-01

    The shape and parameters of platelet size distributions were studied in 50 normal persons and 97 patients in order to test the proposed thesis that platelet size heterogeneity results mainly from aging in the circulation. This thesis was contradicted (1) by size distributions of age-homogeneous, newly-born cell populations which were lognormal with increased (instead of decreased) dispersion of volumes and (2) by the macrothrombocytosis found in some populations with normal age distribution. For these reasons, thrombocytopoiesis appeared to play the major role in determining platelet size. A model was built in which the volume variation of platelet territories due to megakaryocyte growth and membrane demarcation at each step of maturation was a random proportion of the previous value of the volume. This model explains the lognormal shape of both newborn and circulating platelet size distributions. It also implies that (1) the mean and standard deviation of platelet logvolumes depend on the rates of volume change of the individual platelet territories (growth rate minus demarcation rate) as well as on megakaryocyte maturation time; (2) platelet hyperdestruction causes an increase in the mean and dispersion of the rates of territory volume change; (3) Mediterranean macrothrombocytosis and some hereditary macrothrombocytotic thrombocytopenias or dysthrombocytopoieses reflect a diminished rate of territory demarcation, and (4) platelet size heterogeneity is caused mainly by the variations in territory growth and demarcation and not by aging in the circulation.

  2. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  3. Metastasis: new functional implications of platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphael; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2016-07-07

    Platelets are essential components of hemostasis. Due to a plethora of factors released on activation, platelet functions are also connected to tumor growth, notably by acting on angiogenesis. It is now well recognized that major roles of platelets in the poor outcome of cancer patients occurs during hematogenous dissemination of cancer cells. In this review, we describe recent insights into the molecular mechanisms supporting the prometastatic activity of platelets. Platelets have been shown to promote survival of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream by conferring resistance to the shear stress and attack from natural killer cells. Recently, platelets were found to promote and/or maintain the state of epithelial to mesenchymal transition on CTCs through platelet secretion of transforming growth factor β in response to CTC activation. At a later stage in the metastatic process, platelets promote extravasation and establishment of metastatic cells in distant organs as observed in bone. This particular environment is also the site of hematopoiesis, megakaryocytopoiesis, and platelet production. Increasing the number of megakaryocytes (MKs) in the bone marrow results in a high bone mass phenotype and inhibits skeletal metastasis formation of prostate cancer cells. As a result of their specific location in vascular niches in the bone marrow, MK activity might contribute to the "seed and soil" suitability between CTCs and bone. In conclusion, recent findings have made a great advance in our knowledge on how platelets contribute to the metastatic dissemination of cancer cells and that may support the development of new antimetastasis therapies.

  4. Functional factor XIII-A is exposed on the stimulated platelet surface

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Joanne L.; Lionikiene, Ausra S.; Fraser, Steven R.; Whyte, Claire S.; Booth, Nuala A.

    2014-01-01

    Factor XIII (FXIII) stabilizes thrombi against fibrinolysis by cross-linking α2-antiplasmin (α2AP) to fibrin. Cellular FXIII (FXIII-A) is abundant in platelets, but the extracellular functions of this pool are unclear because it is not released by classical secretion mechanisms. We examined the function of platelet FXIII-A using Chandler model thrombi formed from FXIII-depleted plasma. Platelets stabilized FXIII-depleted thrombi in a transglutaminase-dependent manner. FXIII-A activity on activated platelets was unstable and was rapidly lost over 1 hour. Inhibiting platelet activation abrogated the ability of platelets to stabilize thrombi. Incorporating a neutralizing antibody to α2AP into FXIII-depleted thrombi revealed that the stabilizing effect of platelet FXIII-A on lysis was α2AP dependent. Platelet FXIII-A activity and antigen were associated with the cytoplasm and membrane fraction of unstimulated platelets, and these fractions were functional in stabilizing FXIII-depleted thrombi against lysis. Fluorescence confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed exposure of FXIII-A on activated membranes, with maximal signal detected with thrombin and collagen stimulation. FXIII-A was evident in protruding caps on the surface of phosphatidylserine-positive platelets. Our data show a functional role for platelet FXIII-A through exposure on the activated platelet membrane where it exerts antifibrinolytic function by cross-linking α2AP to fibrin. PMID:25331118

  5. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine release and aggregation promoted by cotton bracts tannin.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, M S; Rolstad, R A; Tracy, P B; Russell, J A

    1984-01-01

    The effect of aqueous extracts of cotton bract (CBE) on platelet secretion and aggregation was examined by using washed bovine and human platelets. The CBE promoted the release of 75% to 90% of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stored in both human and bovine platelets in a dose-dependent manner. This release reaction occurred without the lysis of the platelets and was not inhibited by indomethacin, 2-deoxyglucose, or KCN. Fractionation of the CBE indicated that the platelet secretagogue present in the CBE was the condensed polyphenol, tannin. In addition to promoting the secretion of 5-HT, tannin also aggregated the platelets in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the secretion of platelet 5-HT and the aggregation of platelets by tannin could potentially contribute to the pulmonary symptoms associated with byssinosis.

  6. [Dose-effect relationship of traditional Chinese medicine formula for promoting blood circulation to remove stasis on ADP-induced platelet aggregation and rabbit plasma thrombin time].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhua; Tang, Yuping; Guo, Jianming; Ding, Anwei; Duan, Jinao

    2009-11-01

    To investigate the effect of five traditional Chinese medicine formula for promoting blood circulation to remove stasis (Xuefuzhuyu Tang, Shaofuzhuyu Tang, Gexiazhuyu Tang, ShentongZhuyu Tang, Tongqiaohuoxue Tang) on platelet aggregation and clotting time in a dose-response relationship. The platelet aggregation was tested with Born's method and thrombin time (TT) method was established to determine the clotting time. The formula for promoting blood circulation to remove stasis showed significant inhibitory effects on the platelet aggregation and prolonged clotting time, the supernate of 80% alcohol solution showed the most potent inhibitory activity among the three kinds of samples from one formula (P < 0.01), especially the supernate of Shaofuzhuyu Tang and Gexiazhuyu Tang were better than other formula on platelet aggregation. About the anticoagulant, the whole formula showed the evidently prolonging the clotting time than other two fractions (P < 0.01) and the precipitation were the worst. The formula for promoting blood circulation to remove stasis showed significant effect on platelet aggregation and clotting time, and different samples of the formula had different efficacy. The study established a foundation for further bio-activity evaluation of these formulae and provided evidence for the treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  7. Role of nitric oxide synthase in collagen-platelet interaction: involvement of platelet nonintegrin collagen receptor nitrotyrosylation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, T M; Cole, F; Woo-Rasberry, V; Kang, E S

    2001-05-15

    Platelets possess the endothelial isoform of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), which plays an important role in platelet function. Other laboratories, including ours, have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is released upon exposure of platelets to collagen, but the mechanism of the interaction is not yet established. The objective of this study is to examine the possible role of nonintegrin receptor nitrotyrosylation on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Results of the study show that two platelet proteins with M(r) of 65- and 23-kDa proteins are nitrotyrosylated in a time-dependent manner after the addition of type I collagen. The M(r) 65-kDa protein is identified as the platelet receptor for type I collagen. The recombinant protein of the platelet receptor for type I collagen can also be nitrotyrosylated. The nitrotyrosylated recombinant protein loses its ability to inhibit type I collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In addition, the polyclonal anti-65 kDa immunoprecipitates eNOS suggesting that the platelet nonintegrin receptor for type I collagen is closely linked to the eNOS. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory effect of NO on collagen-induced platelet aggregation may be mediated by the nitrotyrosylation of the 65-kDa receptor.

  8. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of platelet...

  9. Multi-dimensional fractionation and characterization of crude protein mixtures: toward establishment of a database of protein purification process development parameters.

    PubMed

    Nfor, Beckley K; Ahamed, Tangir; Pinkse, Martijn W H; van der Wielen, Luuk A M; Verhaert, Peter D E M; van Dedem, Gijs W K; Eppink, Michel H M; van de Sandt, Emile J A X; Ottens, Marcel

    2012-12-01

    A multi-dimensional fractionation and characterization scheme was developed for fast acquisition of the relevant molecular properties for protein separation from crude biological feedstocks by ion-exchange chromatography (IEX), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), and size-exclusion chromatography. In this approach, the linear IEX isotherm parameters were estimated from multiple linear salt-gradient IEX data, while the nonlinear IEX parameters as well as the HIC isotherm parameters were obtained by the inverse method under column overloading conditions. Collected chromatographic fractions were analyzed by gel electrophoresis for estimation of molecular mass, followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. The usefulness of the generated molecular properties data for rational decision-making during downstream process development was equally demonstrated. Monoclonal antibody purification from crude hybridoma cell culture supernatant was used as case study. The obtained chromatographic parameters only apply to the employed stationary phases and operating conditions, hence prior high throughput screening of different chromatographic resins and mobile phase conditions is still a prerequisite. Nevertheless, it provides a quick, knowledge-based approach for rationally synthesizing purification cascades prior to more detailed process optimization and evaluation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  11. Platelet Function Tests.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally developed for diagnosis of bleeding disorders, platelet function assays have become increasingly used in basic research on platelet physiology, in phenotype-genotype associations in bleeding disorders, in drug development as surrogate endpoints of efficacy of new antiplatelet therapy, and to an extent, in the monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in clinical practice to predict thrombotic and bleeding risk. A multiplicity of platelet function assays is available to measure the level of platelet activity in various settings. These include assays that are restricted to a specialized laboratory as well as point-of-care instruments meant to investigate platelet function at patient bedside. Unlike tests that determine a defined quantity or measurement of a clinical biomarker (e.g., cholesterol or blood pressure), platelet function testing assesses the dynamics of living cells, which immediately presents a series of unique problems to any laboratory or clinic. This article presents currently used platelet function assays and discusses important variables to take into account when performing these assays, including preanalytical issues and difficulties in interpreting platelet function test results.

  12. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  13. Platelet Turnover Predicts Outcome after Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Iliev, Liana; Bruno, Veronika; Rohla, Miklos; Egger, Florian; Weiss, Thomas W.; Hübl, Wolfgang; Willheim, Martin; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Summary Elevated platelet turnover contributes to high platelet reactivity. High platelet reactivity after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). The purpose of this study was to determine the prognostic value of platelet turnover and function with regard to MACE after PCI with stent implantation. In this prospective observational study, 486 consecutive patients after PCI on aspirin and clopidogrel were included to determine platelet turnover (mean platelet volume (MPV), reticulated platelet fraction (RPF)) and platelet function (multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA), vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein-phosphorylation (VASP-P) assay). At six-months follow-up, MACE occurred in 10.7 % of patients. RPF (odds ratio [OR]=1.173 (95% confidence interval [CI 95 %] 1.040–1.324), p=0.009) and MPV (OR=1.459 (CI 95 % 1.059–2.008), p=0.021) were univariable predictors of MACE, whereas VASP-P (OR=1.016 (CI 95 % 1.000–1.032), p=0.052) and MEA (OR=0.999 (CI 95 % 0.980–1.017), p=0.895) failed to predict MACE. RPF remained the only platelet variable independently associated with MACE. The best model to predict MACE included: troponin I (OR=1.007 (CI 95 % 1.002–1.012), p=0.009), RPF (OR=1.136 (CI 95 % 1.001–1.288), p=0.048), CRP (OR=1.008 (CI 95 % 1.001–1.014), p=0.023) and history of myocardial infarction (OR=2.039 (CI 95 % 1.093–3.806), p=0.025). RPF (OR=1.211 (CI 95 % 1.042–1.406), p=0.012) was also independently associated with in-hospital bleedings. In conclusion, RPF as index of platelet turnover is an independent predictor of MACE and bleeding events in PCI patients on dual antiplatelet therapy. Since RPF can reliably be quantified along with routine haemograms, RPF might easily be applied in the setting of cardiovascular risk prediction. PMID:28229159

  14. Administration of nicotinamide does not increase platelet levels in mice

    PubMed Central

    Konieczna, Iwona M.; Panuganti, Swapna; DeLuca, Teresa A.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry; Eklund, Elizabeth A.; Miller, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating ways to enhance megakaryopoiesis in vivo would have therapeutic applications for thrombocytopenia and transfusion medicine. Nicotinamide has been shown to enhance endomitosis in megakaryocytes cultured in vitro, suggesting that it may be beneficial for the production of platelets in culture. We hypothesized that regular injections of nicotinamide in mice would also increase platelets in vivo. However, we found that platelet counts were reduced by about 25% with daily injections of nicotinamide. Altering the schedule, duration, or nicotinamide dose did not improve platelet production. Consistent with lower platelet levels, nicotinamide also tended to decrease megakaryocyte frequency in sternum and spleen sections, as well as colony formation in vitro by bone marrow progenitor cells. However, there was no effect on the fraction or ploidy of CD41+ cells harvested from bone marrow. Together, our results suggest that, although nicotinamide increases polyploidization of megakaryocytes in culture, it does not have translatable effects in vivo. PMID:23265740

  15. The sticky platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Benjamín; Ruíz-Arguelles, Guillermo J; Castillo-Martínez, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    The sticky platelets syndrome (SPS) is a procoagulant condition based on either arterial, venous, or capillary thrombi caused by hyperesponsive and hyperaggregable platelets. This is a frequent disease, which often remains clinically inapparent, until stressful events or combination with other factors increase the risk of developing SPS. The condition is due to a congenital platelet defect with autosomal dominant characteristics, leading to the increased platelet aggregability when they are challenged with epinephrine and adenosine diphosphate. Nowadays classification of this disorder is based on platelet reactivity to both ADP and epinephrine (SPS type 1), epinephrine alone (SPS type 2), and ADP alone (SPS type 3). The diagnoses of the syndrome depend on the functional aggregometer assay. This condition should be taken into account whenever a patient with thrombophilia is considered.

  16. Tocotrienols-induced inhibition of platelet thrombus formation and platelet aggregation in stenosed canine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dietary supplementation with tocotrienols has been shown to decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. Tocotrienols are plant-derived forms of vitamin E, which have potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anticancer, hypocholesterolemic, and neuroprotective properties. Our objective in this study was to determine the extent to which tocotrienols inhibit platelet aggregation and reduce coronary thrombosis, a major risk factor for stroke in humans. The present study was carried out to determine the comparative effects of α-tocopherol, α-tocotrienol, or tocotrienol rich fraction (TRF; a mixture of α- + γ- + δ-tocotrienols) on in vivo platelet thrombosis and ex vivo platelet aggregation (PA) after intravenous injection in anesthetized dogs, by using a mechanically stenosed circumflex coronary artery model (Folts' cyclic flow model). Results Collagen-induced platelet aggregation (PA) in platelet rich plasma (PRP) was decreased markedly after treatment with α-tocotrienol (59%; P < 0.001) and TRF (92%; P < 0.001). α-Tocopherol treatment was less effective, producing only a 22% (P < 0.05) decrease in PA. Adenosine diphosphate-induced (ADP) PA was also decreased after treatment with α-tocotrienol (34%; P < 0.05) and TRF (42%; P < 0.025). These results also indicate that intravenously administered tocotrienols were significantly better than tocopherols in inhibiting cyclic flow reductions (CFRs), a measure of the acute platelet-mediated thrombus formation. Tocotrienols (TRF) given intravenously (10 mg/kg), abolished CFRs after a mean of 68 min (range 22 -130 min), and this abolition of CFRs was sustained throughout the monitoring period (50 - 160 min). Next, pharmacokinetic studies were carried out and tocol levels in canine plasma and platelets were measured. As expected, α-Tocopherol treatment increased levels of total tocopherols in post- vs pre-treatment specimens (57 vs 18 μg/mL in plasma, and 42 vs 10 μg/mL in platelets). However, treatment with

  17. Blood platelets and inflammation: their relationship with liver and digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    Ripoche, J

    2011-05-01

    An expansion of knowledge from basic and clinical research has highlighted the critical role of platelets in inflammation and tissue repair in addition to their established contribution to hemostasis. Activated platelets are a rich source of mediators participating to inflammation and tissue regeneration. Platelet-derived microparticles recapitulate essential platelet functions and their contribution to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases has been emphasized. Recent findings suggest that platelets are both friends and foes for the liver. Platelets are essential to liver regeneration, platelet-derived serotonin being critical. However platelets can also exacerbate liver damage, as in immune-mediated injury. The dual role of platelets has recently been exemplified in animal models of liver fibrosis. Platelets release profibrogenic mediators, such as CXC Chemokine Ligand 4, that is instrumental in the progression of liver fibrosis. On the other hand, thrombocytopenia aggravates liver fibrosis, an outcome linked to the downregulation of hepatic stellate cell collagen production by platelet derived hepatocyte growth factor. CD154, a key molecule in inflammation, is expressed by platelets and is a pathogenic mediator in inflammatory bowel disease. Here, we summarize some of the mechanisms linking platelets with inflammation and comment few recent articles indicating why platelets may prove to be important pathogenic mediators in liver and gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Formaldehyde-fixation of platelets for flow cytometric measurement of phosphatidylserine exposure is feasible.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Sophie; Alberio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Strong platelet activation results in a redistribution of negatively charged phospholipids from the cytosolic to the outer leaflet of the cellular membrane. Annexin V has a high affinity to negatively charged phospholipids and can be used to identify procoagulant platelets. Formaldehyde fixation can cause factitious Annexin V binding. Our aim was to evaluate a method for fixing platelets avoiding additional Annexin V binding. We induced expression of negatively charged phospholipids on the surface of a fraction of platelets by combined activation with convulxin and thrombin in the presence of Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and calcium. Aliquots of resting and activated platelets were fixed with a low concentration, calcium-free formaldehyde solution. Both native platelets and fixed platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry immediately and after a 24-h storage at 4°C. We observed that the percentage of Annexin V positive resting platelets ranged from 1.5 to 9.3% for the native samples and from 0.4 to 12.8% for the fixed samples (P=0.706, paired t-test). The amount of Annexin V positive convulxin/thrombin activated platelets varied from 12.9 to 35.4% without fixation and from 15.3 to 36.3% after formalin fixation (P=0.450). After a 24-h storage at 4°C, Annexin V positive platelets significantly increased both in the resting and in the convulxin/thrombin activated samples of native platelets (both P<0.001), while results for formalin fixed platelets did not differ from baseline values (P=0.318 for resting fixed platelets; P=0.673 for activated fixed platelets). We conclude that platelet fixation with a low concentration, calcium-free formaldehyde solution does not alter the proportion of Annexin V positive platelets. This method can be used to investigate properties of procoagulant platelets by multicolor flow-cytometric analysis requiring fixation steps.

  19. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable.

  20. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  1. Effects of tomato extract on human platelet aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Roy, A K; Crosbie, L; Gordon, M J

    2001-06-01

    Among all fruits tested in vitro for their anti-platelet property, tomato had the highest activity followed by grapefruit, melon, and strawberry, whereas pear and apple had little or no activity. Tomato extract (20-50 microl of 100% juice) inhibited both ADP- and collagen-induced aggregation by up to 70% but could not inhibit arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation and concomitant thromboxane synthesis under similar experimental conditions. The anti-platelet components (MW <1000 Da) in tomatoes are water soluble, heat stable and are concentrated in the yellow fluid around the seeds. The active fractions were separated using gel filtration and HPLC. The aqueous fraction (110 000 xg supernatant) of tomatoes containing anti-platelet activity was subjected to gel filtration column chromatography (Biogel P2 column). The activity was fractionated into two peaks, peak-3 and peak-4 (major peak). Subsequently, peak-4 was further purified by HPLC using a reversed-phase column. NMR and mass spectroscopy studies indicated that peak F2 (obtained from peak 4) contained adenosine and cytidine. Deamination of peak F2 with adenosine deaminase almost completely abolished its anti-platelet activity, confirming the presence of adenosine in this fraction. In comparison, deamination of peak-4 resulted in only partial loss of inhibitory activity while the activity of peak-3 remained unaffected. These results indicate that tomatoes contain anti-platelet compounds in addition to adenosine. Unlike aspirin, the tomato-derived compounds inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. All these data indicate that tomato contains very potent anti-platelet components, and consuming tomatoes might be beneficial both as a preventive and therapeutic regime for cardiovascular disease.

  2. Platelets in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    In patients with critical illness, thrombocytopenia is a frequent laboratory abnormality. However frequent this may occur, a low platelet count is not an epiphenomenon, but a marker with further significance. It is always important to assess the proper cause for thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients because different underlying disorders may precipitate different diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. Platelets are part of the first-line defense of the body against bleeding; hence, thrombocytopenia may increase the risk of hemorrhage. In case of systemic inflammatory syndromes, such as the response to sepsis, disseminated intravascular platelet activation may occur. This will contribute to microvascular failure and thereby play a role in the development of organ dysfunction. Platelets are circulating blood cells that will normally not interact with the intact vessel wall but that may swiftly respond to endothelial disruption (which is often part of the pathogenesis of critical illness) by adhering to subendothelial structures, followed by interaction with each other, thereby forming a platelet aggregate. The activated platelet (phospholipid) membrane may form a suitable surface on which further coagulation activation may occur. A low platelet count is a strong and independent predictor of an adverse outcome in critically ill patients, thereby facilitating a simple and practically risk assessment in these patients and potentially guiding the use of complex or expensive treatment strategies.

  3. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  4. Lovastatin induces platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Li, Ming; Chen, Mengxing; Zhou, Ling; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng

    2016-03-01

    Statins are widely used in the prevention of atherosclerosis and treatment of coronary artery disease because of pleiotropic effects on thrombosis. Thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage occurred in some statin-treated patients, but the reason remains unclear. In the current study, we show that lovastatin dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, leading to up-regulation of Bak, down-regulation of Bcl-XL, and activation of caspase-3/8/9. Lovastatin treatment did not increase the surface expression of P-selectin or PAC-1 binding but led to strongly reduced collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. The integrin αIIbβ3 antagonist, RGDS, inhibited lovastatin-induced apoptosis in both human platelets and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing integrin αIIbβ3. The number of circulating platelets in mice was significantly reduced after intraperitoneal injections with lovastatin. Taken together, these data indicate that lovastatin induced caspase-dependent platelet apoptosis. Lovastatin does not incur platelet activation, whereas impairs platelet function and reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia and hemorrhage in patients treated with statins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  6. Platelets and cancer: a casual or causal relationship: revisited

    PubMed Central

    Menter, David G.; Tucker, Stephanie C.; Kopetz, Scott; Sood, Anil K.; Crissman, John D.; Honn, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets arise as subcellular fragments of megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The physiologic demand, presence of disease such as cancer, or drug effects can regulate the production circulating platelets. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. The most critical biological platelet response is serving as “First Responders” during the wounding process. The exposure of extracellular matrix proteins and intracellular components occurs after wounding. Numerous platelet receptors recognize matrix proteins that trigger platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and stabilization. Once activated, platelets change shape and degranulate to release growth factors and bioactive lipids into the blood stream. This cyclic process recruits and aggregates platelets along with thrombogenesis. This process facilitates wound closure or can recognize circulating pathologic bodies. Cancer cell entry into the blood stream triggers platelet-mediated recognition and is amplified by cell surface receptors, cellular products, extracellular factors, and immune cells. In some cases, these interactions suppress immune recognition and elimination of cancer cells or promote arrest at the endothelium, or entrapment in the microvasculature, and survival. This supports survival and spread of cancer cells and the establishment of secondary lesions to serve as important targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:24696047

  7. Platelets and cancer: a casual or causal relationship: revisited.

    PubMed

    Menter, David G; Tucker, Stephanie C; Kopetz, Scott; Sood, Anil K; Crissman, John D; Honn, Kenneth V

    2014-03-01

    Human platelets arise as subcellular fragments of megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The physiologic demand, presence of disease such as cancer, or drug effects can regulate the production circulating platelets. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. The most critical biological platelet response is serving as "First Responders" during the wounding process. The exposure of extracellular matrix proteins and intracellular components occurs after wounding. Numerous platelet receptors recognize matrix proteins that trigger platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and stabilization. Once activated, platelets change shape and degranulate to release growth factors and bioactive lipids into the blood stream. This cyclic process recruits and aggregates platelets along with thrombogenesis. This process facilitates wound closure or can recognize circulating pathologic bodies. Cancer cell entry into the blood stream triggers platelet-mediated recognition and is amplified by cell surface receptors, cellular products, extracellular factors, and immune cells. In some cases, these interactions suppress immune recognition and elimination of cancer cells or promote arrest at the endothelium, or entrapment in the microvasculature, and survival. This supports survival and spread of cancer cells and the establishment of secondary lesions to serve as important targets for prevention and therapy.

  8. Characterization of the human platelet Fc sub. gamma. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is often associated with immune complex disease and may in part be due to the interaction of circulating (IgG) immune complexes with an Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor on the platelet surface. Characterization of the immune complex-platelet interaction should provide for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytpenia. To this end, a ligand binding assay, employing {sup 125}I-IgG trimer, was established. Receptor expression was determined by measuring the saturable binding of radiolabeled trimer to platelets at equilibrium. Normal human platelets were observed to express 8559 {plus minus} 852 binding sites for IgG trimer with a Kd of 12.5 {plus minus} 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} M. Binding of IgG trimer to human platelets was blocked following preincubation of the cells with an anti-Fc{sub {gamma}}RII monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, this binding was ionic-strength dependent but was unaffected by the presence of Mg{sup ++} or cytochalasin B. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor modulation was examined by assessing the effects of various physiologic and pharmacologic on the ability of platelets to bind IgG trimer. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor expression was not affected by thrombin, ADP, or {gamma}-interferon. However, in 7/12 normal donors, treatment of platelets with dexamethasone resulted in a decrease in the number of Fc{sub {gamma}} receptors expressed.

  9. ITIM receptors: more than just inhibitors of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Coxon, Carmen H.; Geer, Mitchell J.

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-containing receptors have been shown to inhibit signaling from immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing receptors in almost all hematopoietic cells, including platelets. However, a growing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that this is an oversimplification, and that ITIM-containing receptors are versatile regulators of platelet signal transduction, with functions beyond inhibiting ITAM-mediated platelet activation. PECAM-1 was the first ITIM-containing receptor identified in platelets and appeared to conform to the established model of ITIM-mediated attenuation of ITAM-driven activation. PECAM-1 was therefore widely accepted as a major negative regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis for many years, but more recent findings suggest a more complex role for this receptor, including the facilitation of αIIbβ3-mediated platelet functions. Since the identification of PECAM-1, several other ITIM-containing platelet receptors have been discovered. These include G6b-B, a critical regulator of platelet reactivity and production, and the noncanonical ITIM-containing receptor TREM-like transcript-1, which is localized to α-granules in resting platelets, binds fibrinogen, and acts as a positive regulator of platelet activation. Despite structural similarities and shared binding partners, including the Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases Shp1 and Shp2, knockout and transgenic mouse models have revealed distinct phenotypes and nonredundant functions for each ITIM-containing receptor in the context of platelet homeostasis. These roles are likely influenced by receptor density, compartmentalization, and as-yet unknown binding partners. In this review, we discuss the diverse repertoire of ITIM-containing receptors in platelets, highlighting intriguing new functions, controversies, and future areas of investigation. PMID:28465343

  10. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  11. Modified C-reactive protein interacts with platelet glycoprotein Ibα.

    PubMed

    Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Szymański, Jacek; Potempa, Lawrence A; Rychlik, Błażej; Watała, Cezary

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the possible mechanisms by which recombinant modified CRP(m(r)CRP) modulates blood platelet function. Modified CRP could activate blood platelets and stimulate their adhesion and aggregation in the absence of any other physiological stimuli. Preincubation of isolated blood platelets with m(r)CRP at a concentration as low as 2 μg/ml resulted in significant platelet degranulation (fraction of CD62-positive platelets increased 2-fold, p < 0.0002), and at concentrations of 20 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml, increased exposure of the platelet procoagulant surface was observed (expression of annexin V-positive platelets increased to 5.7 ± 1.0% and 10.4 ± 2.2%, respectively, p < 0.03, vs. 2.9 ± 0.2% in control). Furthermore, m(r)CRP (100 μg/ml) strongly augmented spontaneous and ADP-induced fibrinogen binding to platelets (p < 0.05), platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and platelet aggregation. Using the Biacore™ surface plasmon resonance technique and glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) immobilized on the sensor surface, we demonstrated direct binding between platelet GPIbα and m(r)CRP. Binding of m(r)CRP to GPIbα and C1q was also observed by ELISA, irrespective of the immobilized ligand. These outcomes strongly support a role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the interactions of m(r)CRP with blood platelets.

  12. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches.

  13. An autoanalyzer test for the quantitation of platelet-associated IgG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Nathan; Teno, Richard A.; Szymanski, Irma O.

    1986-01-01

    A new quantitative antiglobulin consumption (QAC) test for the measurement of platelet-associated IgG is described. In this test washed platelets are incubated with anti-IgG at a final dilution of 1:2 million. The unneutralized fraction of anti-IgG remaining in solution is then measured with an Autoanalyzer and soluble IgG is used for calibration. The dose-response curves depicting the percent neutralization of anti-IgG by platelets and by soluble IgG were compared in detail and found to be nearly identical, indicating that platelet-associated IgG can be accurately quantitated by this method. The mean IgG values were 2287 molecules/platelet for normal adults and 38,112 molecules/platelet for ITP patients. The Autoanalyzer QAC test is a sensitive and reproducible assay for the quantitation of platelet-associated IgG.

  14. Platelet proteome in healthy volunteers who smoke.

    PubMed

    Della Corte, Anna; Tamburrelli, Chiara; Crescente, Marilena; Giordano, Lucia; D'Imperio, Marco; Di Michele, Michela; Donati, Maria Benedetta; De Gaetano, Giovanni; Rotilio, Domenico; Cerletti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Smoking accelerates atherosclerosis and is a well-known risk factor for acute cardiovascular complications; however, the mechanisms of these effects have not been completely clarified. Recently developed proteomic approaches may offer new clues when combined with well-established functional tests. Platelet proteome of healthy smokers and non-smokers was resolved by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, compared by Decyder software and identified by mass spectrometry analysis (nano-LC-MS/MS). In smokers, three proteins (Factor XIII-A subunit, platelet glycoprotein IIb and beta-actin) were significantly up-regulated, whereas WDR1 protein and chaperonine HSP60 were down-regulated. Furthermore, the highest scored network derived by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis using the modulated proteins as input showed the involvement of several proteins to be related to inflammation and apoptosis. Platelet function tests and the levels of markers of platelet and leukocyte activation were not different in smokers vs. non-smoker subjects. The platelet proteomic approach confirms that cigarette smoking triggers several inflammatory reactions and may help clarify some of the molecular mechanisms of smoke effect on cellular systems relevant for vascular integrity and human health.

  15. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects.

  16. Identification of a membrane skeleton in platelets

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Platelets have previously been shown to contain actin filaments that are linked, through actin-binding protein, to the glycoprotein (GP) Ib- IX complex, GP Ia, GP IIa, and an unidentified GP of Mr 250,000 on the plasma membrane. The objective of the present study was to use a morphological approach to examine the distribution of these membrane- bound filaments within platelets. Preliminary experiments showed that the Triton X-100 lysis buffers used previously to solubilize platelets completely disrupt the three-dimensional organization of the cytoskeletons. Conditions were established that minimized these postlysis changes. The cytoskeletons remained as platelet-shaped structures. These structures consisted of a network of long actin filaments and a more amorphous layer that outlined the periphery. When Ca2+ was present, the long actin filaments were lost but the amorphous layer at the periphery remained; conditions were established in which this amorphous layer retained the outline of the platelet from which it originated. Immunocytochemical experiments showed that the GP Ib-IX complex and actin-binding protein were associated with the amorphous layer. Analysis of the amorphous material on SDS-polyacrylamide gels showed that it contained actin, actin-binding protein, and all actin- bound GP Ib-IX. Although actin filaments could not be visualized in thin section, the actin presumably was in a filamentous form because it was solubilized by DNase I and bound phalloidin. These studies show that platelets contain a membrane skeleton and suggest that it is distinct from the network of cytoplasmic actin filaments. This membrane skeleton exists as a submembranous lining that, by analogy to the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, may stabilize the plasma membrane and contribute to determining its shape. PMID:3372587

  17. Nitric oxide released from activated platelets inhibits platelet recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, J E; Loscalzo, J; Barnard, M R; Alpert, C; Keaney, J F; Michelson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Vessel injury and thrombus formation are the cause of most ischemic coronary syndromes and, in this setting, activated platelets stimulate platelet recruitment to the growing thrombus. Recently, a constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been identified in human platelets. To further define the capacity of platelets to produce nitric oxide (NO), as well as to study the role of this NO in platelet recruitment, we adapted a NO-selective microelectrode for use in a standard platelet aggregometer, thereby permitting simultaneous measurement of platelet aggregation and NO production. Treatment of platelets with the NO synthase inhibitor -NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), reduced NO production by 92+/-8% in response to 5 microM ADP compared to control but increased aggregation by only 15+/-2%. In contrast, L-NAME had a more pronounced effect on platelet recruitment as evidenced by a 35+/-5% increase in the extent of aggregation, a 33+/-3% decrease in cyclic GMP content, and a 31+/-5% increase in serotonin release from a second recruitable population of platelets added to stimulated platelets at the peak of NO production. To study platelet recruitment accurately, we developed an assay that monitors two platelet populations simultaneously. Nonbiotinylated platelets were incubated with L-NAME or vehicle and activated with ADP. At peak NO production, biotinylated platelets were added. As measured by three-color flow cytometry, there was a 56+/-11% increase in the number of P selectin- positive platelets in the nonbiotinylated population treated with L-NAME as compared to control. When biotinylated platelets were added to the L-NAME-treated nonbiotinylated population, the number of P selectin positive biotinylated plate-lets increased by 180+/-32% as compared to biotinylated platelets added to the control. In summary, stimulated platelets produce NO that modestly inhibits platelet activation but markedly inhibits additional platelet recruitment. These data suggest

  18. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  19. cDNA cloning and expression of the human A-type platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor establishes structural similarity to the B-type PDGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Claesson-Welsh, L.; Eriksson, A.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H. )

    1989-07-01

    The primary structure of the human A-type receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has been determined. A 6.5-kilobase (kb) transcript was identified through low-stringency hybridization with a probe derived from the B-type PDGF receptor cDNA. The sequence of a cDNA clone corresponding to the 6.5-kb transcript contains an open reading frame that predicts a 1,089-amino acid growth factor receptor-like molecule, which displays 44% overall amino acid similarity with the PDGF B-type receptor. The two receptors have a similar domain organization, with five immunoglobulin-like domains extracellularly and an intracellular split protein tyrosine kinase domain. Transfection of the new cDNA into COS cells led to the expression of a protein specifically recognized by an antiserum previously shown to react with the PDGF A-type receptor. The expressed protein was shown to display high-affinity binding of all three {sup 125}I-labeled dimeric forms of PdGF A and B chains in a manner that is characteristic for the PDGF A-type receptor.

  20. Giant Platelets in Platelet Donors – A Blessing in Disguise?

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nabajyoti; Ray, Deepanjan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) are relatively rare, but their prevalence is probably underestimated. Harris platelet syndrome, the most common IGPD reported from Indian subcontinent, mostly from eastern part, is characterised by a low platelet count, high mean platelet volume (MPV) and absence of bleeding. Aim A short study was conducted to assess the prevalence of giant platelets in voluntary donors of single donor platelets (SDP) and analyse the effect of transfusion of such SDPs in patients. Materials and Methods Voluntary donors of SDPs were screened as per standard guidelines prior to the procedure. A complete blood count (including MPV) along with a peripheral smear was done. A total of 45 donors were screened for plateletpheresis. Following plateletpheresis from these donors, a platelet count from the collection bag was done after one hour. The SDP was transfused as a single unit or divided into two and transfused to the same patient at two different occasions, as per clinical need. Platelet counts on pateints were done after one hour and the platelet recovery was noted. Results Out of the 45 donors who were screened, 30 (66.67%) were found to have giant platelets. It was observed that the pre procedure platelet counts in donors having giant platelets were relatively low (1.5 -1.7 lacs) and so also the platelet yield (2.7-3x1011) compared to donors who did not, but the post transfusion platelet recovery was greater. Conclusion Since presence of giant platelets has been seen to be common in the Eastern part of India, a peripheral smear examination should always be considered during screening of plateletpheresis donors to avoid rejecting donors with giant platelets whose platelet counts are given falsely low by autoanalysers. PMID:26266124

  1. Platelet activation and apoptosis modulate monocyte inflammatory responses in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Hottz, Eugenio D.; Medeiros-de-Moraes, Isabel M.; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; de Assis, Edson F.; Vals-de-Souza, Rogério; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Bozza, Fernando A.; Bozza, Patrícia T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease in the world. Dengue infection has a large spectrum of clinical manifestations from self-limited febrile illness to severe syndromes accompanied by bleeding and shock. Thrombocytopenia and vascular leak with altered cytokine profiles in plasma are features of severe dengue. Although monocytes have been recognized as important sources of cytokines in dengue, the contributions of platelet-monocyte interactions to inflammatory responses in dengue have not been addressed. Patients/Methods Patients with dengue were investigated for platelet-monocyte aggregate formation and markers of monocyte activation. Platelet-induced cytokine responses by monocytes and underlying mechanisms were also investigated in vitro. Results We observed increased levels of platelet-monocyte aggregates in blood samples from patients with dengue, especially patients with thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permeability. Moreover, the exposure of monocytes from healthy volunteers to platelets from patients with dengue induced the secretion of the cytokines IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10 and MCP-1, while the exposure to platelets from healthy volunteers only induced the secretion of MCP-1. In addition to the well-established modulation of monocyte cytokine responses by activated platelets through P-selectin binding, we found that interaction of monocytes with apoptotic platelets mediate IL-10 secretion through phosphatidylserine recognition in platelet-monocyte aggregates. Moreover, IL-10 secretion required platelet-monocyte contact but not phagocytosis. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that activated and apoptotic platelets aggregate with monocytes during dengue infection and signal specific cytokine responses that may contribute to the pathogenesis of dengue. PMID:25015827

  2. ACE and platelet aggregation inhibitors from Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge (host plant of Herba Cistanches) growing in Xinjiang

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yachao; Liao, Jing; Tang, Yingzhan; Zhang, Peng; Tan, Chengyu; Ni, Hui; Wu, Xueqin; Li, Ning; Jia, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge is a salt cedar that grows widespread in the desert mountains in Xinjiang. T. hohenackeri has not been investigated earlier, although there are many reports of phytochemical work on other Tamarix species. Materials and Methods: To find out natural angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitors, the bioactive extract (ethyl acetate [EtOAc] fraction) from the dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri were investigated. The active fraction was purified by repeated column chromatography, including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 column, medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) (polyamide column) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The isolated major constituents were tested for their anti-platelet aggregation activity. Results: Bioassay-directed separation of the EtOAc fraction of the 70% ethanol extract from the air-dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri led to the isolation of a new triterpenoid lactone (1), together with 13 known compounds (2-14). It was the first time to focus on screening bioactive constituents for this plant. The chemical structures were established on the basis of spectral data (ESI-MS and NMR). The results showed that the flavonoid compounds (7 and 8) and phenolic compounds (9, 10, 11, and 14) were potential ACE inhibitors. And the flavonoid compounds (5 and 7) showed significant anti-platelet aggregation activities. Conclusion: On the basis of the chemical and biological data, the material basis of ACE inhibitory activity for the active part was the phenolic constituents. However, the flavonoid compounds were responsible for the anti-platelet aggregation. The primary structure and activity relationship were also discussed respectively. PMID:24914275

  3. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  4. Localization of platelet prostaglandin production in the platelet dense tubular system.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; White, J. G.; Rao, G. H.; Townsend, D.

    1976-01-01

    Platelet production of 12L-hydroxy-5,8,10-heptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) and 8-(1-hydroxy-3-oxopropyl)-9, 12L-dihydroxy-5,10-heptadecadienoic acid (PHD), two metabolites of the prostaglandin cyclic endoperoxides PGG2 and PGH2, was found in this investigation to occur primarily in a platelet microsomal fraction consisting almost exclusively of membranes. To further localize the membrane site of platelet prostaglandin biosynthesis, the present study has used a cytochemical technique employing 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as an oxidizable substrate. The reaction product was found to localize in the platelet dense tubular system. Formation of the reaction product was inhibited by aminotriazole. In similar concentrations, aminotriazole inhibited collagen and arachidonic acid aggregation, the second wave of ADP and epinephrine aggregation, but failed to inhibit aggregation by PGG2 and A23187. A study of the mechanism of action of aminotriazole revealed inhibition of formation of HHT and PHD. The results localize platelet prostaglandin biosynthesis to the membranes of the dense tubular system. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figures 1-2 Figure 3 and 4 PMID:1266944

  5. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  6. Equid Herpesvirus Type 1 Activates Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  7. Sports medicine applications of platelet rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Allan; Harmon, Kimberly; Woodall, James; Vieira, Amy

    2012-06-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a powerful new biologic tool in sports medicine. PRP is a fraction of autologous whole blood containing and increased number of platelets and a wide variety of cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-B1), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) among many others. Worldwide interest in this biologic technology has recently risen sharply. Basic science and preclinical data support the use of PRP for a variety of sports related injuries and disorders. The published, peer reviewed, human data on PRP is limited. Although the scientific evaluation of clinical efficacy is in the early stages, elite and recreational athletes already use PRP in the treatment of sports related injuries. Many questions remain to be answered regarding the use of PRP including optimal formulation, including of leukocytes, dosage and rehabilitation protocols. In this review, a classification for platelet rich plasma is proposed and the in-vitro, preclinical and human investigations of PRP applications in sports medicine will be reviewed as well as a discussion of rehabilitation after a PRP procedure. The regulation of PRP by the World Anti-Doping Agency will also be discussed. PRP is a promising technology in sports medicine; however, it will require more vigorous study in order to better understand how to apply it most effectively.

  8. Src family kinases: at the forefront of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Mazharian, Alexandra; Mori, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in mediating the rapid response of platelets to vascular injury. They transmit activation signals from a diverse repertoire of platelet surface receptors, including the integrin αIIbβ3, the immunoreceptor tyrosine–based activation motif–containing collagen receptor complex GPVI-FcR γ-chain, and the von Willebrand factor receptor complex GPIb-IX-V, which are essential for thrombus growth and stability. Ligand-mediated clustering of these receptors triggers an increase in SFK activity and downstream tyrosine phosphorylation of enzymes, adaptors, and cytoskeletal proteins that collectively propagate the signal and coordinate platelet activation. A growing body of evidence has established that SFKs also contribute to Gq- and Gi-coupled receptor signaling that synergizes with primary activation signals to maximally activate platelets and render them prothrombotic. Interestingly, SFKs concomitantly activate inhibitory pathways that limit platelet activation and thrombus size. In this review, we discuss past discoveries that laid the foundation for this fundamental area of platelet signal transduction, recent progress in our understanding of the distinct and overlapping functions of SFKs in platelets, and new avenues of research into mechanisms of SFK regulation. We also highlight the thrombotic and hemostatic consequences of targeting platelet SFKs. PMID:25115887

  9. Analysis of the proteins associated with platelet detergent resistant membranes.

    PubMed

    Szklanna, Paulina B; Foy, Martina; Wynne, Kieran; Byrne, Dwayne; Maguire, Patricia B

    2016-09-01

    Proteomic studies have facilitated the identification of proteins associated with the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction in a variety of cell types. Here, we have undertaken label-free quantitative (LFQ) proteomic profiling of the proteins associated with detergent-resistant plasma and internal membranes from resting and activated platelets. One hundred forty-one proteins were identified and raw data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002554. The proteins identified include a myriad of important platelet signaling and trafficking proteins including Rap1b, Src, SNAP-23, syntaxin-11, and members of the previously unattributed Ragulator complex. Mean LFQ intensities calculated across three technical replicates for the three biological donors revealed that several important platelet signaling proteins altered their detergent solubility upon activation, including GPIbα, GPIbβ, Src, and 14-3-3ζ. Altered detergent solubility for GPIbα, following activation using a variety of platelet agonists, was confirmed by immunoblotting and further coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that GPIbα forms a complex with 14-3-3ζ that shifts into DRMs following activation. Taken together, proteomic profiling of platelet DRMs allowed greater insight in the complex biology of both DRMs and platelets and will be a useful subproteome to study platelet-related disease. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002554 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002554). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Red Blood Cell Hematocrit Influences Platelet Adhesion Rate in a Microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, Andrew; Campbell, James; Fitzgibbon, Sean; Rodriguez, Armando; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The creation of a blood clot to stop bleeding involves platelets forming a plug at the site of injury. Red blood cells indirectly play a role in ensuring that the distribution of platelets across the height of the channel is not uniform - the contrast in deformability and size between platelets and red blood cells allows the platelets to preferentially marginate close to the walls. We perform 3D boundary integral simulations of a suspension of platelets and red blood cells in a periodic channel with a model that allows for platelet binding at the walls. The relative rate of platelet activity with varying hematocrit (volume fraction of red blood cells) is compared to experiments in which red blood cells and platelets flow through a channel coated with von Willebrand factor. In the simulations as well as the experiments, a decrease in hematocrit of red blood cells is found to reduce the rate at which platelets adhere to the channel wall in a manner that is both qualitatively and quantitatively similar. We conclude with a discussion of the tumbling and wobbling motions of platelets in 3D leading up to the time at which the platelets bind to the wall. Funded by Stanford Army High Performance Computing Research Center, experiments by US Army Institute of Surgical Research.

  11. Platelet interaction with bacteria. V. Ultrastructure of congenital afibrinogenemic platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Clawson, C. C.; White, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    Platelets from a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia (CA) were tested in their native plasma for reactivity in vitro to Staphylococcus aureus 502A. Previous studies of the interactions between normal human platelets and this organism have shown rapid irreversible aggregation responses in which the bacteria were regularly trapped between aggregating platelets. Engulfment of microbes by single normal platelets in a process akin to phagocytosis was a very rare occurrence. In contrast, CA platelets showed a delayed aggregation response to contact with this microorganism. The CA platelets were also much more sensitive to the concentration of bacteria than were normal platelets. Electron microscopy showed that individual CA platelets often engulfed the stimulatory organism rather than participating in aggregation. Postfixation staining with a colloidal tracer, lanthanum nitrate, indicated that the bacteria were sequestered in the open canalicular system of the CA platelets in a manner analogous to that previously observed with latex particles. Restoration of normal levels of human fibrinogen to the CA platelet-rich plasma corrected the delay in aggregation but did not eliminate the frequent engulfment of bacteria by the CA platelets. These findings indicate that fibrinogen is an important, although not essential, cofactor in the response of human platelets to contact with this common bacterial pathogen. Images p[209]-a Figures 6 and 7 Figures 8 and 9 Figures 10 and 11 Figures 12 and 13 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7350814

  12. Normal platelets and megakaryocytes are produced in vivo in the absence of thrombopoietin.

    PubMed

    Bunting, S; Widmer, R; Lipari, T; Rangell, L; Steinmetz, H; Carver-Moore, K; Moore, M W; Keller, G A; de Sauvage, F J

    1997-11-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been established as the major regulator of megakaryocyte and platelet production. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that TPO affects both megakaryocyte proliferation and maturation. In vitro, TPO has been reported to be essential for full development of megakaryocytes and platelets. These studies are in contrast to results observed in vivo in mice deficient in the TPO or c-mpl gene (TPO-/- and c-mpl-/-). Both TPO-/- and c-mpl-/- mice exhibit a 90% reduction in megakaryocyte and platelet levels. But even with this small number of circulating platelets, these mice do not have any excessive bleeding. Ultrastructural analysis indicates that platelets and megakaryocytes present in the knockout mice are morphologically normal. Characterization of platelet function shows that platelets from knockout mice are functionally identical to the wild-type platelets as measured by upregulation of 125I-fibrinogen binding to platelets in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation and by platelet attachment to the immobilized extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and von Willebrand factor (vWF). These results demonstrate that in vivo, TPO is required for the control of megakaryocyte and platelet number but not for their maturation. Other factors with megakaryocytopoietic activity may be able to compensate for the maturational role of TPO and lead to the formation of normal megakaryocytes and platelets in TPO-/- and c-mpl-/- mice.

  13. Platelet-mediated adhesion facilitates leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Senfeng; Cao, Yanting; Zhang, Wenjian; Liu, Honglin; You, Jia; Yin, Yiqing; Lou, Jinning; Li, Chenghui

    2016-03-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration and sequestration are two distinct outcomes following leukocyte adhesion to endothelium during ischemia-reperfusion injury, in which platelets may play a pivotal role. In the present study, we established an in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation model to mimic ischemia-reperfusion injury and found platelet pre-incubation significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells after hyoxia-reoxygenation (over 67%). Blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules inhibited leukocyte direct adhesion to endothelial cells, while platelet-mediated leukocyte adhesion was suppressed by blockade of platelet-expressed adhesion molecules. Further experiments revealed platelets acted as a bridge to mediate leukocyte adhesion, and platelet-mediated adhesion was the predominant pattern in the presence of platelets. However, platelet pre-incubation significantly suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration after hypoxia-reoxygenation (over 31%), which could be aggravated by blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules, but alleviated by blockade of platelet- expressed adhesion molecules. This would indicate that platelet-mediated adhesion disrupted leukocyte transendothelial migration. An in vivo mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion model demonstrated leukocyte transfusion alone caused mild leukocyte adhesion to reperfused vessels and subsequent leukocyte infiltration, while simultaneous leukocyte and platelet transfusion led to massive leukocyte adhesion and sequestration within reperfused microvessels. Our studies revealed platelets enhanced leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, but suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration. Overall, this leads to leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

  14. Spleen function and platelet kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Klonizakis, I; Peters, A M; Fitzpatrick, M L; Kensett, M J; Lewis, S M; Lavender, J P

    1981-01-01

    In patients suffering from various platelet abnormalities, quantitative scanning after injection of indium-111 (111In) labelled platelets showed three different patterns of platelet destruction and distribution. In patients with a normal platelet life span but with evidence of increased splenic pooling, the spleen tended to be the main site of destruction. In patients with a moderately reduced platelet life span, the distribution of destruction in the system and variable destruction in the marrow. However, because of its rapidity this destruction was difficult to quantify, and it was difficult in these cases to distinguish reliably between spleen pool, sequestration, and destruction. Destruction of platelets on the liver appeared to be unimportant in all three groups. 111In, because of its physical characteristics, is preferable to chromium-51 as a platelet label in the assessment of abnormal platelet kinetics. Images PMID:7240424

  15. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  16. Recovery of Platelet Count among Apheresis Platelet Donors

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Anandan, Ashwin; Panicker, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increase in awareness regarding use of single donor platelets and the availability of technology has resulted in increased platelet pheresis procedures. The interval between two succesive plateletpheresis donations is much less compared to whole blood donations. Plateletpheresis procedures are associated with short term and long term adverse events. The effect of plateletpheresis on haematopoietic system remains significant. Aim To study the recovery of platelet count to baseline in plateletpheresis donors. Materials and Methods Fifty, first time apheresis donors were followed for platelet count recovery. Platelet count was measured before donation and at 30 minutes, 48 hours, 7th day and 14th day post-donation. Donor platelet count recovery to baseline was observed during the two week period. Results were analysed statistically, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Platelet count recovered to baseline by 7th day post-donation in 50% of donors in groups I (Pre-donation platelet count 1.5 lacs/μl to 2.2 lacs/μl) and II (Donors with platelet count >2.2 lacs/μl to 2.75 lacs/μl), 30% of donors in group III (Donors with platelet count >2.75 lacs/μl to 3.5 lacs/μl) of the donors. Donor’s platelet count recovered to baseline in 85% of donors by day 14 in across the three groups. Recruitment of platelets from spleen was observed in donors with pre-donation platelet count on the lower limit of normal. Conclusion By day 7, donor’s platelet count recovered to baseline in majority of the donors. Allowing enough recovery periods for donor platelet count, the minimum interval between two apheresis donations can be 7 days till more prospective studies conclude on the frequency and minimum interval between plateletpheresis donations. PMID:28208861

  17. [Platelets and arterial thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Gachet, Christian; Lanza, François; Wiesel, Marie-Louise

    2003-01-01

    The pathological mechanisms involved in arterial thrombus formation are similar to the mechanisms involved in physiological hemostasis. Arterial thrombosis is initiated following lesion of the vessel wall, either through rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque containing lipids, adhesive proteins and tissue factor or after angioplasty exposing the thrombogenic subendothelial matrix. Platelets play a major role in arterial thrombus formation through ADP secretion and thrombin generation on their activated surface. Arterial thrombosis is a frequent complication of atherosclerotic lesions and leads to acute ischemic events. These events are therapeutic emergencies which require administration of antithrombotic drugs inhibiting platelet functions and thrombin.

  18. Lyophilized Platelets: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    and protozoan infections; alloimmunization resulting in refracto- riness to future platelet transfusions; and graft-versus-host disease . The...for preparation of lyophilized platelets has recently been described.7 Freeze-dried platelets retain native von Willebrand factor-mediated adhesion

  19. Thrombocytopenia: A Destruction of Platelets.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Edythe M

    Platelets, or megakaryocytes, are irregular, disk-shaped cell fragments circulating in the blood. They are a primary component in maintaining hemostasis. Low platelet counts, or thrombocytopenia, leave patients at an increased risk of hemorrhage. This article discusses various etiologies of disorders of low platelets and current therapies for management.

  20. Myosin light chain phosphorylation is correlated with cold-induced changes in platelet shape.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, H; Higashihara, M; Ohsaka, M; Miyazaki, K; Ikebe, M; Hirano, H

    2001-12-01

    Chilling induces shape changes in platelets from disks to spheres with abundant filopodia. Such changes were time-dependent and correlated well with the phosphorylation of 20-kDa myosin light chain (LC20). Both the shape changes and the phosphorylation were reversible. After the platelets had been chilled, myosin became incorporated into the Triton X-insoluble fraction. When the chilled platelets were immunocytochemically stained, anti-myosin antibody was localized with filamentous structures inside the filopodia. These results suggest that LC20 phosphorylation and subsequent interactions with actin filaments play a crucial role in the cold-induced changes in platelet shape and in the formation of filopodia.

  1. Characterization of human platelet glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Moroff, G; Kosow, D P

    1978-12-08

    Glutathione reductase (NAD(P)h:oxidized glutathione oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.4.2) has been purified 1000-fold from the cytoplasmic fraction of human platelets. Salts, including the heretofore unreported effect of sodium citrate, activate the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione. Sodium citrate and monovalent salt activation appears to involve multiple sites having different binding affinities. At sub-saturating sodium phosphate, non-linear double reciprocal plots indicative of substrate activation by oxidized glutathione were observed. Initial velocity double reciprocal plots at sub-saturating and saturating concentrations of phosphate generate a family of converging lines. NADP+ is a partial inhibitor, indicating that the reduction of oxidized glutathione can proceed by more than one pathway. FMN, FAD, and riboflavin inhibit platelet glutathione reductase by influencing only the V while nitrofurantoin inhibition is associated with an increase Koxidized glutathione and a decreased V.

  2. A Computerized Prediction Model of Hazardous Inflammatory Platelet Transfusion Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Sebban, Marc; Fromont, Elisa; Chavarin, Patricia; Absi, Lena; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet component (PC) transfusion leads occasionally to inflammatory hazards. Certain BRMs that are secreted by the platelets themselves during storage may have some responsibility. Methodology/Principal Findings First, we identified non-stochastic arrangements of platelet-secreted BRMs in platelet components that led to acute transfusion reactions (ATRs). These data provide formal clinical evidence that platelets generate secretion profiles under both sterile activation and pathological conditions. We next aimed to predict the risk of hazardous outcomes by establishing statistical models based on the associations of BRMs within the incriminated platelet components and using decision trees. We investigated a large (n = 65) series of ATRs after platelet component transfusions reported through a very homogenous system at one university hospital. Herein, we used a combination of clinical observations, ex vivo and in vitro investigations, and mathematical modeling systems. We calculated the statistical association of a large variety (n = 17) of cytokines, chemokines, and physiologically likely factors with acute inflammatory potential in patients presenting with severe hazards. We then generated an accident prediction model that proved to be dependent on the level (amount) of a given cytokine-like platelet product within the indicated component, e.g., soluble CD40-ligand (>289.5 pg/109 platelets), or the presence of another secreted factor (IL-13, >0). We further modeled the risk of the patient presenting either a febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction or an atypical allergic transfusion reaction, depending on the amount of the chemokine MIP-1α (<20.4 or >20.4 pg/109 platelets, respectively). Conclusions/Significance This allows the modeling of a policy of risk prevention for severe inflammatory outcomes in PC transfusion. PMID:24830754

  3. Platelets participate in synovitis via Cox-1-dependent synthesis of prostacyclin independently of microparticle generation.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Larabee, Katherine; Shnayder, Ruslan; Jacobs, Kathleen; Farndale, Richard W; Ware, Jerry; Lee, David M

    2011-04-01

    In addition to the well-described role of platelets in thrombosis, a growing body of evidence implicates platelets in diverse inflammatory responses. We recently showed platelets can contribute to the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthritis via IL-1- containing microparticles. In this study, we demonstrate that platelets, and not platelet microparticles, actively contribute to synovitis via production of proinflammatory prostacyclin in an autoimmune arthritis model. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we establish that paracrine production of prostacyclin proceeds in the absence of cyclooxygenase-2. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that prostacyclin generation can arise via transcellular collaboration between platelets and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In addition to shedding light on an unappreciated pathway of lipid synthesis in arthritis, we further delineate a novel effector activity by which platelets can contribute to inflammatory disease.

  4. Platelet Dynamics during Natural and Pharmacologically Induced Torpor and Forced Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    de Vrij, Edwin L.; Vogelaar, Pieter C.; Goris, Maaike; Houwertjes, Martin C.; Herwig, Annika; Dugbartey, George J.; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Henning, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Hibernation is an energy-conserving behavior in winter characterized by two phases: torpor and arousal. During torpor, markedly reduced metabolic activity results in inactivity and decreased body temperature. Arousal periods intersperse the torpor bouts and feature increased metabolism and euthermic body temperature. Alterations in physiological parameters, such as suppression of hemostasis, are thought to allow hibernators to survive periods of torpor and arousal without organ injury. While the state of torpor is potentially procoagulant, due to low blood flow, increased viscosity, immobility, hypoxia, and low body temperature, organ injury due to thromboembolism is absent. To investigate platelet dynamics during hibernation, we measured platelet count and function during and after natural torpor, pharmacologically induced torpor and forced hypothermia. Splenectomies were performed to unravel potential storage sites of platelets during torpor. Here we show that decreasing body temperature drives thrombocytopenia during torpor in hamster with maintained functionality of circulating platelets. Interestingly, hamster platelets during torpor do not express P-selectin, but expression is induced by treatment with ADP. Platelet count rapidly restores during arousal and rewarming. Platelet dynamics in hibernation are not affected by splenectomy before or during torpor. Reversible thrombocytopenia was also induced by forced hypothermia in both hibernating (hamster) and non-hibernating (rat and mouse) species without changing platelet function. Pharmacological torpor induced by injection of 5′-AMP in mice did not induce thrombocytopenia, possibly because 5′-AMP inhibits platelet function. The rapidness of changes in the numbers of circulating platelets, as well as marginal changes in immature platelet fractions upon arousal, strongly suggest that storage-and-release underlies the reversible thrombocytopenia during natural torpor. Possibly, margination of platelets

  5. Reactions Induced by Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Kiefel, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Summary Platelet transfusions play a central role in therapeutic regimens for patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases who develop severe thrombocytopenia either in the course of their disease or following cytostatic therapy. Like other blood components, platelet transfusions have achieved a high degree of safety as far as transmission of viral diseases is concerned. However, transfusion of platelet concentrates is accompanied by a high frequency of febrile and anaphylactoid reactions. In rare cases, recipients of platelet concentrates are threatened by severe reactions as septic complications due to bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, transfusion-related acute lung injury and severe anaphylactic episodes. PMID:21512624

  6. Cbl proteins in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Tsygankov, Alexander; Sanjay, Archana; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Their functional responses have to be tightly controlled as any disturbance may lead to bleeding disorders or thrombosis. It is thus important to clearly identify and understand the signaling mechanisms involved in platelet function. An important role of c-Cbl and Cbl-b ubiquitin ligases in platelet functional responses and in hematological malignancies has been recently described. Cbl proteins perform negative and positive regulation of several signaling pathways in platelets. In this review, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in platelet functional responses.

  7. Human Platelet Senescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-30

    s by thP Spleen. We have recently made the interest inro o!bservat ion that the spleen preferentially sequesters mega- thrombocytes (o,7) (se...follow:ini th,’ inj,.cti(,n ,f anti-platelet antihody. Electron microscopy of blood from pati. with micrnthr’bteocyte, peaks reveal very small intact

  8. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  9. Rho GTPases in platelet function.

    PubMed

    Aslan, J E; McCarty, O J T

    2013-01-01

    The Rho family of GTP binding proteins, also commonly referred to as the Rho GTPases, are master regulators of the platelet cytoskeleton and platelet function. These low-molecular-weight or 'small' GTPases act as signaling switches in the spatial and temporal transduction, and amplification of signals from platelet cell surface receptors to the intracellular signaling pathways that drive platelet function. The Rho GTPase family members RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 have emerged as key regulators in the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in platelets and play key roles in platelet aggregation, secretion, spreading and thrombus formation. Rho GTPase regulators, including GEFs and GAPs and downstream effectors, such as the WASPs, formins and PAKs, may also regulate platelet activation and function. In this review, we provide an overview of Rho GTPase signaling in platelet physiology. Previous studies of Rho GTPases and platelets have had a shared history, as platelets have served as an ideal, non-transformed cellular model to characterize Rho function. Likewise, recent studies of the cell biology of Rho GTPase family members have helped to build an understanding of the molecular regulation of platelet function and will continue to do so through the further characterization of Rho GTPases as well as Rho GAPs, GEFs, RhoGDIs and Rho effectors in actin reorganization and other Rho-driven cellular processes. © 2012 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  10. Both TMEM16F-dependent and TMEM16F-independent pathways contribute to phosphatidylserine exposure in platelet apoptosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    van Kruchten, Roger; Mattheij, Nadine J A; Saunders, Christine; Feijge, Marion A H; Swieringa, Frauke; Wolfs, Jef L N; Collins, Peter W; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Bevers, Edouard M

    2013-03-07

    Scott syndrome, a bleeding disorder caused by defective phospholipid scrambling, has been associated with mutations in the TMEM16F gene. The role of TMEM16F in apoptosis- or agonist-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure was studied in platelets from a Scott syndrome patient and control subjects. Whereas stimulation of control platelets with the BH3-mimetic ABT737 resulted in 2 distinct fractions with moderate and high PS exposure, the high PS-exposing fraction was markedly delayed in Scott platelets. High, but not moderate, PS exposure in platelets was suppressed by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+), whereas caspase inhibition completely abolished ABT737-induced PS exposure in both Scott and control platelets. On the other hand, high PS exposure induced by the Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists convulxin/thrombin fully relied on mitochondrial depolarization and was virtually absent in Scott platelets. Finally, PS exposure induced by collagen/thrombin was partly affected in Scott platelets, and the residual PS positive fraction was insensitive to inhibition of caspases or mitochondrial depolarization. In conclusion, TMEM16F is not required for, but enhances, caspase-dependent PS exposure; convulxin-/thrombin-induced PS exposure is entirely dependent on TMEM16F, whereas collagen/thrombin-induced PS exposure results from 2 distinct pathways, one of which involves mitochondrial depolarization and is mediated by TMEM16F.

  11. Potent anti-platelet constituents from Centaurea iberica.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amna Nisar; Fatima, Itrat; Khaliq, Urooj Abdul; Malik, Abdul; Miana, Ghulam Abbas; Qureshi, Zia-Ur-Rehman; Rasheed, Huma

    2011-02-28

    New naturally occurring nitrogenous compounds 1 and 2, along with a new dimeric lignan glucoside 3, have been isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Centaurea iberica. Their structures have been elucidated through spectroscopic techniques. All the isolated compounds showed significant platelet aggregation inhibition.

  12. Measurement of immature platelets with Abbott CD-Sapphire and Sysmex XE-5000 in haematology and oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Meintker, Lisa; Haimerl, Maria; Ringwald, Jürgen; Krause, Stefan W

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of immature platelets was introduced into routine diagnostics by Sysmex as immature platelet fraction (IPF) some years ago and recently by Abbott as reticulated platelet fraction (rPT). Here, we compare both methods. We evaluated the precision and agreement of these parameters between Sysmex XE-5000 and Abbott CD-Sapphire in three distinct thrombocytopaenic cohorts: 30 patients with beginning thrombocytopaenia and 64 patients with recovering platelets (PLT) after chemotherapy, 16 patients with immune thrombocytopaenia (ITP) or heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia type 2 (HIT) and 110 additional normal controls. Furthermore, we analysed, how IPF/rPT differed between these thrombocytopaenic cohorts and controls. Both analysers demonstrated acceptable overall precision (repeatability) of IPF/rPT with lower precision at low PLT counts. IPF/rPT artificially increased during storage of blood samples overnight. Inter-instrument comparison showed a moderate correlation (Pearson r²=0.38) and a systematic bias of 1.04 towards higher IPF-values with the XE-5000. IPF/rPT was highest in recovering thrombopoesis after chemotherapy and moderately increased in ITP/HIT. The normal range deduced from control samples was much narrower with CD-Sapphire (1.0%-3.8%, established here for the first time) in comparison to XE-5000 (0.8%-7.9%) leading to a smaller overlap of samples with increased PLT turnover and normal controls. IPF and rPT both give useful information on PLT turnover, although the two analysers only show a moderate inter-instrument correlation and have different reference ranges. A better separation of patient groups with high PLT turnover like ITP/HIT from normal controls is obtained by CD-Sapphire.

  13. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  14. Does platelet count in platelet-rich plasma influence slope, maximal amplitude and lag phase in healthy individuals? Results of light transmission aggregometry.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2015-01-01

    Light transmission aggregometry lacks in standardisation and normal reference values are not widely available. The aims of our study were to establish reference ranges for aggregation, slope and lag phase in healthy controls with platelet counts between 150 and 450 × 10(9)/l in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as well as evaluate the influence of platelet count. Ninety-nine subjects were evaluated with four agonists and divided into two groups based on platelet count and the groups were compared by Student's t-test. There was no difference between the means of the two groups for amplitude and slope barring the lag phase for collagen. Platelet counts between 150 and 450 × 10(9)/l have no effects on light transmission aggregometry and hence adjustment of platelet count is not necessary.

  15. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL. PMID:26829393

  16. Platelet growth factors from allogeneic platelet-rich plasma for clinical improvement in split-thickness skin graft

    PubMed Central

    Sonker, Atul; Dubey, Anju; Bhatnagar, Ankur; Chaudhary, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Platelets are a source of numerous growth factors which facilitate repair and healing. Thus platelet rich plasma has been increasingly used as a treatment modality in the field of reconstructive surgeries for wound healing. This preliminary study was carried out to explore whether platelet growth factors from platelet rich plasma could be used for enhancement of split thickness skin graft survival. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (13 males and 7 females) requiring split thickness skin graft for various clinical reasons were enrolled in the study. Platelet rich plasma was collected by apheresis and frozen at −80° C. It was thawed at room temperature immediately before its intended application. PRP was applied only on one half of the wound, while another half served as control. Patient was followed for 6 weeks. The effect was assessed at first dressing in terms of graft uptake and subsequently as time taken for complete healing. Results: There was 100% uptake of the graft in the area where platelet rich plasma was applied. In the control area, there was complete graft loss in 4 cases, partial loss in 7 cases and complete uptake in 9 cases. Conclusion: This study demonstrated promising results on application of PRP to split thickness skin grafts. Further randomized studies with greater sample size may be undertaken to establish platelet rich plasma as a validated treatment modality. PMID:26420935

  17. Inherited Platelet Function Disorders: Algorithms for Phenotypic and Genetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Bury, Loredana; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) manifest with mucocutaneous bleeding and are frequently difficult to diagnose due to their heterogeneity, the complexity of the platelet activation pathways and a lack of standardization of the platelet function laboratory assays and of their use for this purpose. A rational diagnostic approach to IPFDs should follow an algorithm where clinical examination and a stepwise laboratory evaluation play a crucial role. A streamlined panel of laboratory tests, with consecutive steps of increasing level of complexity, allows the phenotypic characterization of most IPFDs. A first-line diagnosis of a significant fraction of the IPFD may be made also at nonspecialized centers by using relatively simple tests, including platelet count, peripheral blood smear, light transmission aggregometry, measurement of platelet granule content and release, and the expression of glycoproteins by flow cytometry. Some of the most complex, second- and third-step tests may be performed only in highly specialized laboratories. Genotyping, including the widespread application of next-generation sequencing, has enabled discovery in the last few years of several novel genes associated with platelet disorders and this method may eventually become a first-line diagnostic approach; however, a preliminary clinical and laboratory phenotypic characterization nowadays still remains crucial for diagnosis of IPFDs. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Salazar, Gustavo Adolfo; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Perales, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P) translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet proteome in dengue

  19. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue.

    PubMed

    Trugilho, Monique Ramos de Oliveira; Hottz, Eugenio Damaceno; Brunoro, Giselle Villa Flor; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Salazar, Gustavo Adolfo; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Fernando A; Bozza, Patrícia T; Perales, Jonas

    2017-05-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P) translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet proteome in dengue

  20. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  1. Extracts from Tribulus species may modulate platelet adhesion by interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to study the effects of crude extracts from Tribulus pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on selected biological functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus, at the final concentrations of 0.5, 5 and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin, was used. The effects of crude extracts from T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on adhesion of blood platelets to collagen were determined by method according to Tuszynski and Murphy. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In these studies we also compared the action of tested crude plant extracts with the effects of the polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, which has antiplatelet and antioxidative properties. The performed assays demonstrated that the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus and the phenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of this tested extract and its phenolic fraction on adhesion of resting platelets and thrombin - stimulated platelets to collagen was found. We also observed that the crude extract from T. pterocarpus, like the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced TBARS production in blood platelets. In the comparative studies, the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus was not found to be more effective antiplatelet factor, than the polyphenolic fraction from this plant. The results obtained suggest that T. pterocarpus may be a promising source of natural compounds, valuable in the prevention of the enhanced activity of blood platelets in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  2. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  3. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5ppm for 6h) or sub-chronic (1ppm, 6h/day for 4days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  4. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  5. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes.

  6. Hypothermia and Platelet Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery, other major surgery, multiple trauma, cold exposure, and neonatal cold injury.1Ŗ The hemorrhagic diathesis...associated with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery is considered to be primarily a platelet function defect.I6,17,23 We have...cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery.,8,24 Consistent with this data, other investigators have recently reported that normothermic cardiopulmonary

  7. Human Platelet Senescence Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    ability to measure certain enzymes to their oxidation-reduc other enzymes which can be measured by o phosphatase , acid phosphatase , chymotryp...alkaline sin, trypsin, esterases (17)); M use of n A or wheat germ agglutinin in the second etect specific carbohydrate constituents. We have...Von Willebrand factor. Nurden and Caen also demonstrated that GPI was rich in sialic acid (5) and probably responsible for the platelets’ surface

  8. Estrogen, inflammation, and platelet phenotype.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Hashimoto, Kazumori; Heit, John A; Owen, Whyte G

    2008-01-01

    Although exogenous estrogenic therapies increase the risk of thrombosis, the effects of estrogen on formed elements of blood are uncertain. This article examines the genomic and nongenomic actions of estrogen on platelet phenotype that may contribute to increased thrombotic risk. To determine aggregation, secretion, protein expression, and thrombin generation, platelets were collected from experimental animals of varying hormonal status and from women enrolled in the Kronos Early Estrogen Prevention Study. Estrogen receptor beta predominates in circulating platelets. Estrogenic treatment in ovariectomized animals decreased platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion. However, acute exposure to 17beta-estradiol did not reverse decreases in platelet ATP secretion invoked by lipopolysaccharide. Thrombin generation was positively correlated to the number of circulating microvesicles expressing phosphatidylserine. Assessing the effect of estrogen treatments on blood platelets may lead to new ways of identifying women at risk for adverse thrombotic events with such therapies.

  9. [Platelet count in the cat].

    PubMed

    Moritz, A; Hoffmann, C

    1997-11-01

    The technique of collecting blood samples is primarily responsible for the appearance of platelet-agglomeration in cats. Blood obtained by the conventional way ("one syringe technology", drips of blood) caused in 52% of the cases an activation of the large and therefore active thrombocytes however. Rejection of the first 2-5 ml blood for the platelet count ("two syringe technology") reduced the rate of platelet-agglomeration significantly. No big differences in platelet-agglomeration were found with regard to the place used for collecting blood (V. cephalica antebrachii/V. jugularis). Platelet-agglutination was observed with Li-Heparin, K-EDTA, Na-Citrat or ACD anticoagulated blood samples. Citrat (Na-Citrat, ACD) seemed to have a stabilizing effect on feline thrombocytes as has been described for human thrombocytes. The platelet count in cats should be performed within 30 minutes.

  10. Effects of the venom of the rhinoceros horned viper (Bitis nasicornis) on blood coagulation, platelet aggregation, and fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    MacKay, N.; Ferguson, J. C.; McNicol, G. P.

    1970-01-01

    The venom of the rhinoceros horned viper (Bitis nasicornis) has been studied in vitro and has been shown to be anticoagulant. This action appeared to be due to an effect on both the extrinsic and intrinsic blood thromboplastin mechanisms. The venom was also proteolytic and in purified caseinolytic systems activated plasminogen, enhanced the activation of plasminogen by streptokinase, and potentiated the action of plasmin. In the euglobulin clot lysis system high concentrations of venom produced inhibition. The crude venom increased platelet adhesiveness but in high concentrations delayed the snowstorm effect in the Chandler's tube system and inhibited platelet adenosine diphosphate reactivity. Passage through carboxymethylcellulose yielded six fractions. One possessed anticoagulant activity, inhibited plasmin, and increased the optical density of platelet-rich plasma. The other five fractions shortened the plasma recalcification time but had no effect on plasmin activity. Four fractions aggregated platelets and enhanced platelet adenosine diphosphate reactivity. PMID:4251326

  11. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  12. Osmotic stability of blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Fantl, P

    1968-09-01

    1. Hypotonic solutions added to human platelet-containing plasma cause a transient decrease of absorbancy of light at 610 mmu which is followed by a gradual increase of absorbancy.2. When platelets are stored for 7 hr at 4 degrees C the absorbancy changes with variations of osmolarity and their aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) remain the same. However, the reversal of absorbancy declines during storage of platelet-containing plasma.3. Platelets are not aggregated by stearate. Platelets appear to be only slightly affected by stearate concentration higher than 0.8 mM, but oleate has no effect.4. Hypertonic solutions of NaCl and urea cause increase in absorbancy of platelet-containing human plasma. Hypertonic sucrose solutions produce no more change than isotonic solutions. Hypertonic NaCl produces permanent increases in absorbancy. In human platelet-containing plasma the increased absorbancy caused by hypertonic urea is transient and declines.5. The osmotic platelet changes occur in isolated platelets as well as in platelet-containing plasma.6. The absorbancy of frozen and thawed platelet-containing plasma is not significantly altered by hypotonic solutions but the absorbancy changes caused by hypertonic solutions are similar to that of unfrozen plasma.7. The immediate absorbancy changes caused by hypo- and by hypertonic solutions are the same at 5 degrees C and 30 degrees C and are therefore probably of a physical nature. The reversal of absorbancy and aggregation of platelets by added adenosine diphosphate have Q(10) > 1 and are therefore probably of a chemical-enzymic nature.8. Divalent cations and contact activation are not required for the osmotic platelet changes and 10(-3)M-Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) do not interfere. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, electron transfer, sodium, potassium activated adenosine triphosphatases and adenosine triphosphate do not inhibit reversal of absorbancy of platelets exposed to hypotonic solutions. Cyanide, 5 x 10

  13. Platelets can enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Paré, Alexandre; Farndale, Richard W; Schumacher, H Ralph; Nigrovic, Peter A; Lacroix, Steve; Boilard, Eric

    2012-08-09

    Platelets survey blood vessels, searching for endothelial damage and preventing loss of vascular integrity. However, there are circumstances where vascular permeability increases, suggesting that platelets sometimes fail to fulfill their expected function. Human inflammatory arthritis is associated with tissue edema attributed to enhanced permeability of the synovial microvasculature. Murine studies have suggested that such vascular leak facilitates entry of autoantibodies and may thereby promote joint inflammation. Whereas platelets typically help to promote microvascular integrity, we examined the role of platelets in synovial vascular permeability in murine experimental arthritis. Using an in vivo model of autoimmune arthritis, we confirmed the presence of endothelial gaps in inflamed synovium. Surprisingly, permeability in the inflamed joints was abrogated if the platelets were absent. This effect was mediated by platelet serotonin accumulated via the serotonin transporter and could be antagonized using serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. As opposed to the conventional role of platelets to microvascular leakage, this demonstration that platelets are capable of amplifying and maintaining permeability adds to the rapidly growing list of unexpected functions for platelets.

  14. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  15. Platelet effects on ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ashley N; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    Growing understanding of the role of thrombocytosis, high platelet turnover, and the presence of activated platelets in the circulation in cancer progression and metastasis has brought megakaryocytes into focus. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. However, before megakaryocyte/platelet-directed therapies can be considered for clinical use, understanding of the mechanism and biology of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in malignancy is required. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical implications, biological significance, and mechanisms of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in the context of ovarian cancer.

  16. Osmotic stability of blood platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fantl, P.

    1968-01-01

    1. Hypotonic solutions added to human platelet-containing plasma cause a transient decrease of absorbancy of light at 610 mμ which is followed by a gradual increase of absorbancy. 2. When platelets are stored for 7 hr at 4° C the absorbancy changes with variations of osmolarity and their aggregation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) remain the same. However, the reversal of absorbancy declines during storage of platelet-containing plasma. 3. Platelets are not aggregated by stearate. Platelets appear to be only slightly affected by stearate concentration higher than 0·8 mM, but oleate has no effect. 4. Hypertonic solutions of NaCl and urea cause increase in absorbancy of platelet-containing human plasma. Hypertonic sucrose solutions produce no more change than isotonic solutions. Hypertonic NaCl produces permanent increases in absorbancy. In human platelet-containing plasma the increased absorbancy caused by hypertonic urea is transient and declines. 5. The osmotic platelet changes occur in isolated platelets as well as in platelet-containing plasma. 6. The absorbancy of frozen and thawed platelet-containing plasma is not significantly altered by hypotonic solutions but the absorbancy changes caused by hypertonic solutions are similar to that of unfrozen plasma. 7. The immediate absorbancy changes caused by hypo- and by hypertonic solutions are the same at 5° C and 30° C and are therefore probably of a physical nature. The reversal of absorbancy and aggregation of platelets by added adenosine diphosphate have Q10 > 1 and are therefore probably of a chemical-enzymic nature. 8. Divalent cations and contact activation are not required for the osmotic platelet changes and 10-3 M-Cu2+ and Zn2+ do not interfere. Inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, electron transfer, sodium, potassium activated adenosine triphosphatases and adenosine triphosphate do not inhibit reversal of absorbancy of platelets exposed to hypotonic solutions. Cyanide, 5 × 10-3 M, fluoride, 1

  17. Comparison of platelet counting technologies in equine platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Caitlin M; Werre, Stephen R; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2015-04-01

    (1) To compare the performance of 4 platelet counting technologies in equine platelet concentrates and (2) to evaluate the ability of the Magellan platelet rich plasma (PRP) system to concentrate equine platelets. Experimental study to assess method agreement. Adult mixed breed horses (n = 32). Acid citrate dextrose-A anti-coagulated whole blood was collected and PRP produced using the Magellan system according to the manufacturer's instructions. Platelets were quantified using 4 counting methods: optical scatter (Advia 2120), impedance (CellDyn 3700), hand counting, and fluorescent antibody flow cytometry. Platelet concentrations were compared using Passing and Bablok regression analyses and mixed model ANOVA. Significance was set at P < .05. Platelet concentrations measured in identical PRP samples were consistently higher for the Advia 2120 than the CellDyn 3700. Systematic and proportional biases were observed between these 2 automated methods when analyzed by regression analysis of the larger sample size. No bias (systematic or proportional) was observed among any of the other counting methods. Despite the bias detected between the 2 automated systems, there were no significant differences on average among the 4 counting methods evaluated, based on the ANOVA. The Magellan system consistently generated high platelet concentrations as well as higher than expected WBC concentrations. The Magellan system delivered desirably high platelet concentrations; however, WBC concentrations may be unacceptably high for some orthopedic applications. All 4 platelet counting methods tested were equivalent on average and therefore suitable for quantifying platelets in equine PRP used for clinical applications. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  18. Influence of preparative procedures on assay of platelet function and apparent effects of antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Nathaniel J; Holmes, Chris E; Serrano, Feliciano A; Sobel, Burton E; Schneider, David J

    2007-08-15

    Previous studies have shown that anticoagulants alter platelet reactivity and the apparent effects of antiplatelet agents. This study was conducted to identify the impact of methods of preparation of blood samples on an assay of platelet function and the effects of antiplatelet agents. The activation of platelets was identified with the use of flow cytometry in response to thrombin (1 and 10 nmol/L), adenosine diphosphate (0.2 and 1 micromol/L), platelet activating factor (1 nmol/L), and convulxin (1 and 10 ng/ml). Antiplatelet effects were assessed after the addition in vitro of tirofiban (50 ng/ml) and cangrelor (10 nmol/L). Results were compared in whole blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) anticoagulated with corn trypsin inhibitor (32 microg/ml, a specific inhibitor of factor XIIa). The fraction of young platelets was quantified with thiazole orange, which identifies ribonucleic acid. The activation of platelets was consistently less in PRP compared with whole blood. Activation in PRP was 23 +/- 15% that in whole blood for thrombin, 65 +/- 26% for adenosine diphosphate, 40 +/- 20% for platelet activating factor, and 49 +/- 25% for convulxin (p <0.01 for each comparison). The fraction of young platelets in PRP was 39 +/- 11% that in whole blood (p <0.001). The effects of antiplatelet agents varied with agonist and antiplatelet agent but were generally greater in PRP compared with whole blood (p <0.05). In conclusion, platelet reactivity is lower and the effects of antiplatelet agents are greater and potentially misleading in PRP compared with whole blood. The accuracy of platelet function testing may be improved by performance in whole blood.

  19. Subpopulations in purified platelets adhering on glass.

    PubMed

    Donati, Alessia; Gupta, Swati; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-22

    Understanding how platelet activation is regulated is important in the context of cardiovascular disorders and their management with antiplatelet therapy. Recent evidence points to different platelet subpopulations performing different functions. In particular, procoagulant and aggregating subpopulations have been reported in the literature in platelets treated with the GPVI agonists. How the formation of platelet subpopulations upon activation is regulated remains unclear. Here, it is shown that procoagulant and aggregating platelet subpopulations arise spontaneously upon adhesion of purified platelets on clean glass surfaces. Calcium ionophore treatment of the adhering platelets resulted in one platelet population expressing both the procoagulant and the adherent population markers phosphatidylserine and the activated form of GPIIb/IIIa, while all of the platelets expressed CD62P independently of the ionophore treatment. Therefore, all platelets have the capacity to express all three activation markers. It is concluded that platelet subpopulations observed in various studies reflect the dynamics of the platelet activation process.

  20. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  1. Relationship between structure of phenothiazine analogues and their activity on platelet calcium fluxes.

    PubMed Central

    Enouf, J.; Lévy-Toledano, S.

    1984-01-01

    Phenothiazine analogues have been tested for their effect on calcium uptake into platelet membrane vesicles and on ionophore-induced platelet activation, both phenomena being Ca2+-dependent. Both calcium uptake into membrane vesicles and ionophore-induced platelet activation were inhibited by the drugs. Evidence for two inhibitors as potent as chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine was found. These drugs are apparently competitive inhibitors of calcium uptake. A structure-activity relationship has been established. The data suggest that the phenothiazines are able to inhibit calmodulin-insensitive calcium uptake of platelet membrane vesicles and that therefore they cannot be assumed to be selective inhibitors of calmodulin interactions under all circumstances. PMID:6697061

  2. Unravelling the different functions of protein kinase C isoforms in platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Poole, Alastair W

    2011-06-23

    Platelets tightly regulate haemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in most platelet responses implicated in thrombus formation. Recent pharmacological and mouse gene knockout approaches show that the conventional PKC isoforms and the novel PKC isoforms contribute in distinct ways to these platelet responses. We hypothesize that, in platelets and other cells, the characteristic functions of PKC isoforms are established through unique activation mechanisms and unique interacting protein partners, which result in isoform-specific patterns of substrate phosphorylation. For identifying the substrate proteins in a living cell, new methodology is available and discussed.

  3. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  4. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  5. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  6. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  7. Platelets as delivery systems for disease treatments

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qizhen; Montgomery, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are small, anucleate, discoid shaped blood cells that play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Platelets contain a large number of biologically active molecules within cytoplasmic granules that are critical to normal platelet function. Because platelets circulate in blood through out the body, release biological molecules and mediators on demand, and participate in hemostasis as well as many other pathophysiologic processes, targeting expression of proteins of interest to platelets and utilizing platelets as delivery systems for disease treatment would be a logical approach. This paper reviews the genetic therapy for inherited bleeding disorders utilizing platelets as delivery system, with a particular focus on platelet-derived FVIII for hemophilia A treatment. PMID:20619307

  8. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data.

  9. Terminal platelet production is regulated by von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Nguyen, Kim Anh; Pietrzyk, Audrey; Casari, Caterina; Veyradier, Agnes; Denis, Cecile V; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    It is established that proplatelets are formed from mature megakaryocytes (MK) as intermediates before platelet production. Recently, the presence of proplatelets was described in blood incubated in static conditions. We have previously demonstrated that platelet and proplatelet formation is upregulated by MK exposure to high shear rates (1800 s(-1)) on immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether VWF is involved in the regulation of terminal platelet production in blood. To this end, Vwf (-/-) mice, a model of severe von Willebrand disease, were used to create a situation in which blood cells circulate in a vascular tree that is completely devoid of VWF. Murine platelets were isolated from Vwf (-/-) and Vwf (+/+) blood, exposed to VWF at 1800 s(-1) in a microfluidic platform, and examined by means of videomicroscopy, as well as fluorescence and activation studies. Proplatelets became visible within 5 minutes, representing 38% of all platelets after 12 minutes and 46% after 28 min. The proportion of proplatelets was 1.8-fold higher in blood from Vwf(-/-) mice than from Vwf(+/+) mice, suggesting a role of VWF in vivo. Fragmentation of these proplatelets into smaller discoid platelets was also observed in real-time. Platelets remained fully activatable by thrombin. Compensation of plasmatic VWF following hydrodynamic gene transfer in Vwf(-/-) mice reduced the percentage of proplatelets to wild-type levels. A thrombocytopenic mouse model was studied in the flow system, 7 days after a single 5-FU injection. Compared to untreated mouse blood, a 2-fold increase in the percentage of proplatelets was detected following exposure to 1800 s(-1) on VWF of samples from mice treated with 5-FU. In conclusion, VWF and shear stress together appear to upregulate proplatelet reorganization and platelet formation. This suggests a new function for VWF in vivo as regulator of bloodstream thrombopoiesis.

  10. Platelets actively sequester angiogenesis regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Tai-Tung; Cassiola, Flavia; Kikuchi, Lena; Cervi, David; Podust, Vladimir; Italiano, Joseph E.; Wheatley, Erin; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Bender, Elise; Almog, Nava; Kieran, Mark W.; Folkman, Judah

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials with antiangiogenic agents have not been able to validate plasma or serum levels of angiogenesis regulators as reliable markers of cancer presence or therapeutic response. We recently reported that platelets contain numerous proteins that regulate angiogenesis. We now show that accumulation of angiogenesis regulators in platelets of animals bearing malignant tumors exceeds significantly their concentration in plasma or serum, as well as their levels in platelets from non–tumor-bearing animals. This process is selective, as platelets do not take up a proportional amount of other plasma proteins (eg, albumin), even though these may be present at higher concentrations. We also find that VEGF-enriched Matrigel pellets implanted subcutaneously into mice or the minute quantities of VEGF secreted by microscopic subcutaneous tumors (0.5-1 mm3) result in an elevation of VEGF levels in platelets, without any changes in its plasma levels. The profile of other angiogenesis regulatory proteins (eg, platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor) sequestered by platelets also reflects the presence of tumors in vivo before they can be macroscopically evident. The ability of platelets to selectively take up angiogenesis regulators in cancer-bearing hosts may have implications for the diagnosis and management of many angiogenesis-related diseases and provide a guide for antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:19036702

  11. Platelet compatibility of magnesium alloys.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Chie; Mochizuki, Akira

    2017-09-01

    Lately, Mg alloys have been investigated as a new class of biomaterials owing to their excellent biodegradability and biocompatibility. It has previously been reported that the in vitro compatibility of a Mg alloy containing aluminum and zinc (AZ) alloy with the blood coagulation system is excellent due to Mg(2+) ions eluting from the alloy. In this study, the compatibility of the AZ alloy with platelets was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and flow cytometry. In the flow cytometry analysis, the platelets were stained using PAC-1 and P-selectin antibodies. SEM images and PAC-1 analyses showed no negative effects on the platelets, whereas P-selectin analysis showed marked platelet activation. To understand these contradictory results, the amount of β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) released from the platelets was investigated. From that investigation, it was concluded that platelets are markedly activated by the alloys. In addition to clarifying divergent results depending on the analysis method used, the effects of Mg(2+) ions and pH on platelet activation were studied. These results show that platelet activation is caused by an increase in pH at the alloy surface owing to the erosion of the alloy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biologic nanoparticles and platelet reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M; Hunter, Larry W; Chu, Kevin; Kaul, Vivasvat; Squillace, Phillip D; Lieske, John C; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2009-01-01

    Aim Nanosized particles (NPs) enriched in hydroxyapatite and protein isolated from calcified human tissue accelerate occlusion of endothelium-denuded arteries when injected intravenously into rabbits. Since platelet aggregation and secretory processes participate in normal hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular remodeling, experiments were designed to determine if these biologic NPs alter specific platelet functions in vitro. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrate anticoagulated human blood. Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion were monitored in response to thrombin receptor agonists peptide (10 μM) or convulxin (50 μg/ml) prior to and following 15 min incubation with either control solution, human-derived NPs, bovine-derived NPs or crystals of hydroxyapatite at concentrations of 50 and 150 nephelometric turbidity units. Results Incubation of platelets for 15 min with either human- or bovine-derived NPs reduced aggregation induced by thrombin receptor activator peptide and convulxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite caused a greater inhibition than either of the biologically derived NPs. Human-derived NPs increased ATP secretion by unstimulated platelets during the 15 min incubation period. Conclusion Effects of bovine-derived and hydroxyapatite NPs on basal release of ATP were both time and concentration dependent. These results suggest that biologic NPs modulate both platelet aggregation and secretion. Biologically derived NPs could modify platelet responses within the vasculature, thereby reducing blood coagulability and the vascular response to injury. PMID:19839809

  13. Platelets: production, morphology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate, discoid cells, roughly 2-3 μm in diameter that function primarily as regulators of hemostasis, but also play secondary roles in angiogensis and innate immunity. Although human adults contain nearly one trillion platelets in circulation that are turned over every 8-10 days, our understanding of the mechanisms involved in platelet production is still incomplete. Platelets stem from large (30-100 μm) nucleated cells called megakaryocytes that reside primarily in the bone marrow. During maturation megakaryocytes extend long proplatelet elongations into sinusoidal blood vessels from which platelets ultimately release. During this process, platelets develop a number of distinguishable structural elements including: a delimited plasma membrane; invaginations of the surface membrane that form the open canalicular system (OCS); a closed-channel network of residual endoplasmic reticulum that form the dense tubular system (DTS); a spectrin-based membrane skeleton; an actin-based cytoskeletal network; a peripheral band of microtubules; and numerous organelles including α-granules, dense-granules, peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria. Proplatelet elongation and platelet production is an elaborate and complex process that defines the morphology and ultrastructure of circulating platelets, and is critical in understanding their increasingly numerous and varied biological functions.

  14. Platelets induce apoptosis via membrane-bound FasL

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Rebecca I.; Reichenbach, Frank; Kraft, Peter; Kumar, Anil; Lescan, Mario; Todt, Franziska; Göbel, Kerstin; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Geisler, Tobias; Bauer, Axel; Olbrich, Marcus; Schaller, Martin; Wesselborg, Sebastian; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Meuth, Sven G.; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Gawaz, Meinrad; Li, Xuri; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Edlich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    After tissue injury, both wound sealing and apoptosis contribute to restoration of tissue integrity and functionality. Although the role of platelets (PLTs) for wound closure and induction of regenerative processes is well established, the knowledge about their contribution to apoptosis is incomplete. Here, we show that PLTs present the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) on their surface after activation. Activated PLTs as well as the isolated membrane fraction of activated PLTs but not of resting PLTs induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in primary murine neuronal cells, human neuroblastoma cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Membrane protein from PLTs lacking membrane-bound FasL (FasL△m/△m) failed to induce apoptosis. Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis signaling in target cells was not required for PLT-induced cell death, but increased the apoptotic response to PLT-induced Fas signaling. In vivo, PLT depletion significantly reduced apoptosis in a stroke model and an inflammation-independent model of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal apoptosis. Furthermore, experiments using PLT-specific PF4Cre+ FasLfl/fl mice demonstrated a role of PLT-derived FasL for tissue apoptosis. Because apoptosis secondary to injury prevents inflammation, our findings describe a novel mechanism on how PLTs contribute to tissue homeostasis. PMID:26232171

  15. [Importance of the interaction of surface receptors with the cytoskeleton for platelet function].

    PubMed

    Meyer, M

    1990-01-01

    Two Triton-X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions were prepared from washed human blood platelets by centrifugation: a low speed sediment (TP) and a fraction recovered as ultracentrifugation pellet (UP). Glycoproteins associated with both fractions prior to and after different times of thrombin activation were analyzed by electrophoretic techniques. In the TP fraction of unstimulated platelet the major membrane glycoproteins (GP) Ib and Ia were detected. After thrombin stimulation there is a rapid increase of GPs Ia, Ib, IIIb and a Mr 250,000-GP and a slower appearance of GPs IIb and IIIa in this fraction. The UP fraction contains mainly GPs Ib, Ia, IIb, IIIa and a Mr 250,000-GP. Thrombin activation does not cause any significant changes in the glycopeptide pattern of this fraction.

  16. Platelet coagulation-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N

    2004-08-01

    The biochemical mechanisms by which activated platelets participate in exposing receptors for the assembly of enzyme-cofactor-substrate complexes at all stages of the blood coagulation cascade are reviewed. Information derived from studies conducted during the last 30 years supports the concept that the initiation of blood coagulation is triggered by exposure of tissue factor at injury sites, leading to the generation of minute quantities of thrombin (limited by tissue factor pathway inhibitor), sufficient to activate platelets, factors XI, VIII, and V, and trigger the consolidation pathway (i.e., the sequential activation of factors XI, IX, X, and prothrombin on the activated platelet surface), leading to the generation of sufficient thrombin to convert fibrinogen to fibrin and effect hemostasis. Platelets localize coagulation to the hemostatic thrombus and protect coagulation enzymes from inhibition by both plasma and platelet inhibitors (e.g., protease nexin 2), thus preventing disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  17. Platelet and leptin in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Foschini, Denis; Santos, Ronaldo V T dos; Prado, Wagner L; de Piano, Aline; Lofrano, Mara C; Martins, Aniela C; Carnier, June; Caranti, Danielle A; Sanches, Priscila de L; Tock, Lian; Mello, Marco T de; Tufik, Sérgio; Dâmaso, Ana R

    2008-01-01

    To analyze the influence of obesity status on immune cell count and concentration of the hormones cortisol and leptin, in order to establish a relationship among the variables analyzed. We recruited 27 obese [body mass index (BMI) > or = 95th percentile] and 21 non-obese (BMI < or = 75th percentile) adolescent boys and girls, aged 15-19 years at the post-pubertal stage. BMI was calculated as body weight divided by height squared, and body composition was estimated by plethysmography in the Bod Pod system. Blood samples were collected to analyze leukocytes, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, platelets, cortisol, and leptin. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was performed, followed by the independent Student t test in case of normal distribution. Significance values were set at p < 0.05 and expressed as means +/- standard deviation. The statistical package SPSS for Windows version 12.0 was used. There was no difference between obese and non-obese adolescents in terms of leukocyte, neutrophil, lymphocyte, monocyte and cortisol serum concentrations. The group of obese adolescents presented higher platelet and leptin concentrations (p < 0.01). The prevalence of hyperleptinemia was 25.92% in the obese adolescents (15.38% in boys and 35.7% in girls). Obese adolescents have higher platelet and leptin concentrations in comparison with non-obese adolescents. It was also found that obese girls presented a higher prevalence of hyperleptinemia than obese boys.

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of platelet cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 and surface glycoproteins in patients with immune thrombocytopenia and healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Rubak, Peter; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-06-01

    Immature platelets may contain more platelet enzymes such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 than mature platelets. Patients with immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) have a higher fraction of immature platelets and can therefore be utilized as a biological model for investigating COX-1 and COX-2 platelet expression. The aims were to develop flow cytometric assays for platelet COX-1 and COX-2 and to investigate the COX-1 and COX-2 platelet expression, platelet turnover, and platelet glycoproteins in ITP patients (n = 10) compared with healthy individuals (n = 30). Platelet count and platelet turnover parameters (mean platelet volume (MPV), immature platelet fraction (IPF), and immature platelet count (IPC)) were measured by flow cytometry (Sysmex XE-5000). Platelet COX-1, COX-2, and the glycoproteins (GP)IIb, IX, Ib, Ia, and IIIa were all analyzed by flow cytometry (Navios) and expressed as median fluorescence intensity. COX analyses were performed in both whole blood and platelet rich plasma (PRP), whereas platelet glycoproteins were analyzed in whole blood only. ITP patients had significantly lower platelet count (55 × 10(9)/L) than healthy individuals (240 × 10(9)/L, p < 0.01), but a higher MPV (p = 0.03) and IPF (p < 0.01). IPC was similar for the two groups (p = 0.74). PRP had significantly lower MPV (p < 0.01) and significantly higher platelet count and IPC (both p-values <0.03) when compared with whole blood. IPF was similar for PRP and whole blood (p = 0.18). COX-1 expression was 10 times higher and COX-2 expression was 50% higher in PRP than in whole blood (pCOX-1 < 0.01, pCOX-2 < 0.01). Platelet COX-1 expression was higher in ITP patients than healthy individuals using whole blood (pCOX-1 < 0.01) and PRP, though this was nonsignificant in PRP (pCOX-1 = 0.17). In ITP patients, positive correlations were found between platelet turnover and COX-1 expression (all p-values <0.01, rho = 0.80-0.94), whereas healthy individuals showed significant though weaker

  19. Platelets and angiogenesis in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sierko, Ewa; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z

    2004-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that platelets play an important role in the process of tumor angiogenesis. Thrombocytosis is a frequent finding in cancer patients (10-57%). Although the mechanisms underlying thrombocytosis are not yet fully elucidated, tumor-derived factors with thrombopoietin-like activity and growth factors, platelet-derived microparticles, and factors secreted from bone marrow endothelial cells, as well as growth factors released by megakaryocytes (acting via an autocrine loop), are postulated to influence this process. The progression of cancer is associated with hypercoagulability, which results from direct influences of tumor cells and diverse indirect mechanisms. Activated platelets serve as procoagulant surfaces amplifying the coagulation reactions. It is well known that hemostatic proteins are involved in different steps of the angiogenic process. Furthermore, platelets adhering to endothelium facilitate adhesion of mononuclear cells (which exert various proangiogenic activities) to endothelial cells and their transmigration to the extravascular space. It was also documented that platelets induce angiogenesis in vivo. Platelets are a rich source of proangiogenic factors. They also store and release angiogenesis inhibitors. In addition, platelets express surface growth factor receptors, which may regulate the process of angiogenesis. Platelets also contribute directly to the process of basement membrane and extracellular matrix proteolysis by releasing proteinases, or indirectly via inducing endothelial cells and tumor cells to release proteolytic enzymes, as well as through the proteolytic activities of platelet-derived growth factors. The multidirectional activities of platelets in the process of new blood vessel formation during tumor development and metastasis formation may create the possibility of introducing antiplatelet agents for antiangiogenic therapy in cancer patients. Thus far experimental studies employing inhibitors of

  20. Platelet function and constituents of platelet rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, M H; Malhotra, A; Brighton, T; Walsh, W R; Lindeman, R

    2013-01-01

    Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapies require blood to be processed prior to application, however, the full assessment of the output of platelet sequestration devices is lacking. In this study the products of the Autologous Fluid Concentrator (Circle BiologicsTM, Minneapolis, MN) and the Gravitational Platelet Separation System (GPS, Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) were evaluated in terms of platelet viability and PRP constituents. The AFC and GPS produced 6.4 (±1.0) ml and 6.3 (±0.4) ml of PRP, with platelet recovery of 46.4% (±14.7%) and 59.8% (±24.2%) producing fold increases of platelets of 4.19 (±1.62) and 5.19 (±1.62), respectively. Fibrinogen concentration was increased above baseline PPP produced with the AFC. pH was lower for both of the processed samples than for whole blood. White Blood Cell count was increased around 5 fold. Functional tests showed preserved viability with both devices. This represents essential knowledge that every treating physician should have before they can confidently administer PRP therapy produced by any method. These are the first published results of platelet function for the GPS system and the first performance results of the AFC system. The PRP produced is classified according to broad classifications as Leukocyte-PRP (L-PRP) for both devices.

  1. Platelets Participate in Synovitis via Cox-1–Dependent Synthesis of Prostacyclin Independently of Microparticle Generation

    PubMed Central

    Boilard, Eric; Larabee, Katherine; Shnayder, Ruslan; Jacobs, Kathleen; Farndale, Richard W.; Ware, Jerry; Lee, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the well-described role of platelets in thrombosis, a growing body of evidence implicates platelets in diverse inflammatory responses. We recently showed platelets can contribute to the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthritis via IL-1–containing microparticles. In this study, we demonstrate that platelets, and not platelet microparticles, actively contribute to synovitis via production of proinflammatory prostacyclin in an autoimmune arthritis model. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we establish that paracrine production of prostacyclin proceeds in the absence of cyclooxygenase-2. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that prostacyclin generation can arise via transcellular collaboration between platelets and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In addition to shedding light on an unappreciated pathway of lipid synthesis in arthritis, we further delineate a novel effector activity by which platelets can contribute to inflammatory disease. PMID:21357261

  2. Delayed-onset of procoagulant signalling revealed by kinetic analysis of COAT platelet formation.

    PubMed

    Alberio, Lorenzo; Ravanat, Catherine; Hechler, Béatrice; Mangin, Pierre H; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian

    2017-06-02

    The combined action of collagen and thrombin induces the formation of COAT platelets, which are characterised by a coat of procoagulant and adhesive molecules on their surface. Although recent work has started to highlight their clinical relevance, the exact mechanisms regulating the formation of procoagulant COAT platelets remain unclear. Therefore, we employed flow cytometry in order to visualise in real time surface and intracellular events following simultaneous platelet activation with convulxin and thrombin. After a rapid initial response pattern characterised by the homogenous activation of the fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in all platelets, starting with a delay of about 2 minutes an increasing fraction transforms to procoagulant COAT platelets. Their surface is characterised by progressive loss of PAC-1 binding, expression of negative phospholipids and retention of α-granule von Willebrand factor. Intracellular events in procoagulant COAT platelets are a marked increase of free calcium into the low micromolar range, concomitantly with early depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane and activation of caspase-3, while non-COAT platelets keep the intracellular free calcium in the nanomolar range and maintain an intact mitochondrial membrane. We show for the first time that the flow-cytometrically distinct fractions of COAT and non-COAT platelets differentially phosphorylate two signalling proteins, PKCα and p38MAPK, which may be involved in the regulation of the different calcium fluxes observed in COAT versus non-COAT platelets. This study demonstrates the utility of concomitant cellular and signalling evaluation using flow cytometry in order to further dissect the mechanisms underlying the dichotomous platelet response observed after collagen/thrombin stimulation.

  3. Measurements of immature platelets with haematology analysers are of limited value to separate immune thrombocytopenia from bone marrow failure.

    PubMed

    Cybulska, Annalina; Meintker, Lisa; Ringwald, Jürgen; Krause, Stefan W

    2017-05-01

    Detection of immature platelets in the circulation may help to dissect thrombocytopenia due to platelet destruction from bone marrow failure (BMF). We prospectively tested the predictive value of immature platelets, measured as immature platelet fraction (IPF) on the XE-5000 (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan) or percentage of reticulated platelets (rPT) on the CD Sapphire (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA, USA) to separate immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) from BMF (leukaemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, aplastic anaemia). We analysed 58 samples of patients with BMF, 47 samples of patients with ITP and 97 controls. Median rPT (CD Sapphire) was increased to 9·0% in ITP and to 10·9% in BMF, compared to 1·9% in controls. Median IPF (XE-5000) was 16·2% in ITP, 10·2% in BMF and 2·5% in controls. We found an inverse correlation between high fractions of immature platelets and low platelet counts in thrombocytopenic samples regardless of the diagnosis. In conclusion, we observed a broad overlap of immature platelets between ITP and BMF, which may be caused by an accelerated release of immature platelets in any thrombocytopenic state and decreased production in many patients with ITP. Despite this, IPF (XE-5000) had some power to discriminate ITP from BMF, whereas rPT (CD Sapphire) was of no predictive value. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Platelet factor XIIIa release during platelet aggregation and plasma clot strength measured by thrombelastography in patients with coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A

    2015-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as reference, and ADP 5 µM as agonist. Kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5 µM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24%, p < 0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r = 0.48, p < 0.0001), but not in PPP (r = 0.15, p = 0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet-derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p = 0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p = 0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet-derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus, in part, provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets.

  5. The origins of major platelet receptor nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2017-01-01

    The nomenclature of the major platelet receptors may appear complex, but in fact there are logical reasons why it developed in the way it did. In this short review, I describe the origins of this nomenclature, how it developed as more information became available and as relationships were established with receptors on other types of cells. Difficulties have also arisen with alternative nomenclature systems and the various equivalences with these are described and listed. There remain areas such as immunology and transfusion where the accepted nomenclature leaves something to be desired, but it is unlikely that major changes will occur.

  6. Inhibition of bovine platelets aggregation in response to Hyalomma anatolicum salivary gland proteins/peptides

    PubMed Central

    Surbhi; Sangwan, Nirmal; Sangwan, Arun K.; Singh, Vijender; Kumar, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ticks are obligate ectoparasites that have an impact on wide range of vertebrates and also act as a potential vector for the transmission of tropical theileriosis, babesiosis, etc., causing significant loss to livestock production worldwide. While feeding, they introduce their saliva containing different bioactive molecules into the host. These molecules have the capability to counteract the host hemostatic mechanism to suck host blood successfully. Therefore, the study was aimed to isolate anti-platelet aggregating peptides from salivary gland extract (SGE) of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks, a commonly available tick in India. Materials and Methods: Female H. anatolicum salivary glands were dissected out and SGE was prepared by homogenizing it in a suitable buffer under ice. Extract so obtained was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography using Sephacryl S-200 column. Total protein concentration in fractions was estimated and bovine platelets were isolated, stimulated with thrombin (positive control), treated with Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide (negative control) and with salivary gland fractions for identification of proteins/peptides having anti-platelet aggregating activities. Results: Proteins/peptides present in various salivary gland fractions inhibited the bovine platelet aggregation and the percent inhibition ranged between 33% and 35.8%. Conclusion: The results suggests that the fractions of H. anatolicum salivary glands possess thrombin-induced anti-platelet aggregating activity and which could be further exploited for raising anti-tick vaccine and also for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27956779

  7. Platelet-aggregating activity of released factor(s) from Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Nwagwu, M; Inyang, A L; Molokwu, R I; Essien, E M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of factors derived from Trypanosoma brucei brucei on rat platelets was studied. T. brucei at a concentration of 4 X 10(9) trypanosomes/ml phosphate saline glucose (PSG) was stored at -20 degrees C for 18 h, thawed, and a supernatant fraction, trypanosome-derived supernatant (TDS) was obtained by spinning the sample at 3000 g for 10 min at 20 degrees C. Normal rat platelets, prepared as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), were then incubated with TDS in the absence or presence of ADP (0.05-0.1 microM). The results showed that approximately 83% platelet aggregation was induced by addition of TDS (50 microliters; 113 micrograms protein) to 100 microliters PRP with a platelet count of 10(6). simultaneous addition of ADP and TDS to PRP produced a synergistic effect. It was also shown that a supernatant fraction, obtained by incubating live T. brucei (4 X 10(9)/microliters PSG) at 0 degrees C 1 h and spinning down the trypanosomes (3000 g for 10 min), also induced platelet aggregation. The nature of the factor(s) derived from, or released by, T. brucei inducing platelet aggregation is being investigated but it has been shown not to be ADP.

  8. Platelet high-density lipoprotein activates transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators, MAPPs, following thrombin digestion.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Wu, Bin; Nagai, Yumiko; Tanaka, Sumiko; Onodera, Masayuki; Ogawa, Takafumi; Ueno, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular activators of phagocytosis from platelets (MAPPs), transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators released from platelets, activate leukocytic phagocytosis via Fcγ receptors. It has been found that MAPPs can be prepared using stored platelets or their lysate. Using this artificial MAPP production system, it has been found that they can be produced from precursors (tetrameric and dimeric transferrins) following reaction with a low-molecular-weight (LMW) activator of MAPPs, which is liberated from a high-molecular-weight activator of MAPP (HMW activator) by reaction with thrombin. In this study, the HMW activator in platelet lysate was characterized by assaying phagocytosis of washed neutrophils. In an ultracentrifugation study of the platelet lysate, HMW activator activity was observed in the fraction corresponding to the density of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The activity was observed in the apolipoproteins obtained from the HDL fraction. Among the apolipoproteins tested only apolipoprotein CIII showed the activity to produce MAPP in vitro. Affinity chromatography of the apolipoproteins from the HDL fraction of the platelet lysate using an anti-apolipoprotein CIII column revealed that the substance that binds with the antibody showed MAPP-forming activity. In a gel filtration study of thrombin-treated apolipoprotein CIII, a peak of LMW activator activity was observed for fractions with a molecular size smaller than that of apolipoprotein CIII. Finally, MAPP-forming activity of HDL obtained from the plasma was examined. MAPP was formed only when delipidized HDL was used. In conclusion, it is suggested that platelet HDL is the HMW activator and that this activation is achieved via apolipoprotein CIII after thrombin reaction in platelets.

  9. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  10. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS.

  11. Mechanisms of hemolysis-associated platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Helms, C. C.; Marvel, M.; Zhao, W.; Stahle, M.; Vest, R.; Kato, G. J.; Lee, J. S.; Christ, G.; Gladwin, M. T.; Hantgan, R. R.; Kim-Shapiro, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Intravascular hemolysis occurs after blood transfusion, in hemolytic anemias and other conditions, and is associated with hypercoagulable states. Hemolysis has been shown to potently activate platelets in vitro and in vivo and several mechanisms have been suggested to account for this including (1) direct activation by hemoglobin, (2) increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), (3) scavenging of nitric oxide by released hemoglobin, and (4) release of intraerythrocytic ADP. Objective The aim of the current study is to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis-mediated platelet activation. Methods We used flow cytometry to detect PAC-1 binding to activated platelets for in vitro experiments and a Siemens’ Advia 120 hematology system to assess platelet aggregation using platelet counts from in vivo experiments in a rodent model. Results We show that Hb does not directly activate platelets. However, ADP bound to Hb can cause platelet activation. Furthermore, platelet activation due to shearing of RBCs is reduced in the presence of apyrase which metabolizes ADP to AMP. Use of ROS scavengers did not affect platelet activation. We also show that cell free Hb does enhance platelet activation by abrogating the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet activation. In vivo infusions of ADP and purified (ADP-free) Hb as well as hemolysate result in platelet aggregation as evidenced by decreased platelet counts. Conclusion Two primary mechanisms account for red blood cell hemolysis-associated platelet activation: ADP release which activates platelets and cell-free hemoglobin release which enhances platelet activation by lowering NO bioavailability. PMID:24119131

  12. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  13. The use of regression analysis in determining reference intervals for low hematocrit and thrombocyte count in multiple electrode aggregometry and platelet function analyzer 100 testing of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Gerhardus J A J M; Houben, Rik; Wetzels, Rick J H; Verhezen, Paul W M; van Oerle, Rene; Ten Cate, Hugo; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Lancé, Marcus D

    2017-01-09

    Low platelet counts and hematocrit levels hinder whole blood point-of-care testing of platelet function. Thus far, no reference ranges for MEA (multiple electrode aggregometry) and PFA-100 (platelet function analyzer 100) devices exist for low ranges. Through dilution methods of volunteer whole blood, platelet function at low ranges of platelet count and hematocrit levels was assessed on MEA for four agonists and for PFA-100 in two cartridges. Using (multiple) regression analysis, 95% reference intervals were computed for these low ranges. Low platelet counts affected MEA in a positive correlation (all agonists showed r(2) ≥ 0.75) and PFA-100 in an inverse correlation (closure times were prolonged with lower platelet counts). Lowered hematocrit did not affect MEA testing, except for arachidonic acid activation (ASPI), which showed a weak positive correlation (r(2) = 0.14). Closure time on PFA-100 testing was inversely correlated with hematocrit for both cartridges. Regression analysis revealed different 95% reference intervals in comparison with originally established intervals for both MEA and PFA-100 in low platelet or hematocrit conditions. Multiple regression analysis of ASPI and both tests on the PFA-100 for combined low platelet and hematocrit conditions revealed that only PFA-100 testing should be adjusted for both thrombocytopenia and anemia. 95% reference intervals were calculated using multiple regression analysis. However, coefficients of determination of PFA-100 were poor, and some variance remained unexplained. Thus, in this pilot study using (multiple) regression analysis, we could establish reference intervals of platelet function in anemia and thrombocytopenia conditions on PFA-100 and in thrombocytopenia conditions on MEA.

  14. An aqueous extract of guaraná (Paullinia cupana) decreases platelet thromboxane synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bydlowski, S P; D'Amico, E A; Chamone, D A

    1991-01-01

    The effects of an aqueous extract of guaraná (Paullinia cupana) on rabbit platelet aggregation and thromboxane synthesis were examined. The guaraná extract (100 mg/ml) and fractions separated by TLC (origin and xanthines) decreased platelet aggregation (37, 27 and 31% of control values, respectively) and platelet thromboxane formation from [14C]-arachidonic acid (78, 70 and 50% of control values, respectively). The decreased thromboxane synthesis could be responsible, at least in part, for the antiaggregatory action of guaraná.

  15. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J.; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions. PMID:25530818

  16. Multiscale Particle-Based Modeling of Flowing Platelets in Blood Plasma Using Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Coarse Grained Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Chao; Zhang, Na; Slepian, Marvin J; Deng, Yuefan; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-12-01

    We developed a multiscale particle-based model of platelets, to study the transport dynamics of shear stresses between the surrounding fluid and the platelet membrane. This model facilitates a more accurate prediction of the activation potential of platelets by viscous shear stresses - one of the major mechanisms leading to thrombus formation in cardiovascular diseases and in prosthetic cardiovascular devices. The interface of the model couples coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD). The CGMD handles individual platelets while the DPD models the macroscopic transport of blood plasma in vessels. A hybrid force field is formulated for establishing a functional interface between the platelet membrane and the surrounding fluid, in which the microstructural changes of platelets may respond to the extracellular viscous shear stresses transferred to them. The interaction between the two systems preserves dynamic properties of the flowing platelets, such as the flipping motion. Using this multiscale particle-based approach, we have further studied the effects of the platelet elastic modulus by comparing the action of the flow-induced shear stresses on rigid and deformable platelet models. The results indicate that neglecting the platelet deformability may overestimate the stress on the platelet membrane, which in turn may lead to erroneous predictions of the platelet activation under viscous shear flow conditions. This particle-based fluid-structure interaction multiscale model offers for the first time a computationally feasible approach for simulating deformable platelets interacting with viscous blood flow, aimed at predicting flow induced platelet activation by using a highly resolved mapping of the stress distribution on the platelet membrane under dynamic flow conditions.

  17. Platelets effects on tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Goubran, Hadi A; Stakiw, Julie; Radosevic, Mirjana; Burnouf, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Unlike other blood cells, platelets are small anucleate structures derived from marrow megakaryocytes. Thought for almost a century to possess solely hemostatic potentials, platelets, however, play a much wider role in tissue regeneration and repair and interact intimately with tumor cells. On one hand, tumor cells induce platelet aggregation (TCIPA), known to act as the trigger of cancer-associated thrombosis. On the other hand, platelets recruited to the tumor microenvironment interact, directly, with tumor cells, favoring their proliferation, and, indirectly, through the release of a wide palette of growth factors, including angiogenic and mitogenic proteins. In addition, the role of platelets is not solely confined to the primary tumor site. Indeed, they escort tumor cells, helping their intravasation, vascular migration, arrest, and extravasation to the tissues to form distant metastasis. As expected, nonspecific or specific inhibition of platelets and their content represents an attractive novel approach in the fight against cancer. This review illustrates the role played by platelets at primary tumor sites and in the various stages of the metastatic process.

  18. Headpiece Domain of Dematin Regulates Calcium Mobilization and Signaling in Platelets*

    PubMed Central

    Wieschhaus, Adam J.; Le Breton, Guy C.; Chishti, Athar H.

    2012-01-01

    Dematin is a broadly expressed membrane cytoskeletal protein that has been well characterized in erythrocytes and to a lesser extent in non-erythroid cells. However, dematin's function in platelets is not known. Here, we show that dematin is abundantly expressed in both human and mouse platelets. Platelets harvested from the dematin headpiece knock-out (HPKO) mouse model exhibit a striking defect in the mobilization of calcium in response to multiple agonists of platelet activation. The reduced calcium mobilization in HPKO platelets is associated with concomitant inhibition of platelet aggregation and granule secretion. Integrin αIIbβ3 activation in response to agonists is attenuated in the HPKO platelets. The mutant platelets show nearly normal spreading on fibrinogen and an unaltered basal cAMP level; however, the clot retraction was compromised in the mutant mice. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that dematin is present both at the dense tubular system and plasma membrane fractions of platelets. Proteomic analysis of dematin-associated proteins in human platelets identified inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase isoform B (IP3KB) as a binding partner, which was confirmed by immunoprecipitation analysis. IP3KB, a dense tubular system protein, is a major regulator of calcium homeostasis. Loss of the dematin headpiece resulted in a decrease of IP3KB at the membrane and increased levels of IP3KB in the cytosol. Collectively, these findings unveil dematin as a novel regulator of internal calcium mobilization in platelets affecting multiple signaling and cytoskeletal functions. Implications of a conserved role of dematin in the regulation of calcium homeostasis in other cell types will be discussed. PMID:23060452

  19. Platelet function in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Bernardo, Esther; Feltes, Gisela; Escaned, Javier; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; De Agustín, José Alberto; Vivas, David; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TK) includes a transient left ventricular dysfunction without obstructive coronary disease, sometimes after stressful situations with elevated cathecolamines. Since catecholamines activate platelets we aimed to study the platelet influence in a TK setting. We included 32 patients with a TK diagnosis, 13 with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 18 healthy volunteers. Once consent informed was obtained, blood samples were extracted and processed (at admission and after 3 months follow-up). Clinical, ecg, echocardiographic and angiographic features were thoroughly recorded.Previous treatment before admission was similar between groups. No differences were observed in clinical features or any of the acute markers studied regarding platelet reactivity between TK compared to ACS. After follow-up, aggregation levels and platelet reactivity showed differences, mainly due to the antithrombotic therapy prescribed at discharge, but similar to volunteers. Circulating epinephrine during the acute phase was significantly higher in TK (p < 0.001). Patients with higher levels of epinephrine had elevated platelet activation and aggregation after 3 months. No differences were observed in Takotsubo acute platelet aggregation compared to patients with ACS, in spite of higher blood levels of adrenaline. Takotsubo patients had elevated platelet aggregation and activation compared with ACS patients at 3 months follow-up because they were less frequently on chronic clopidogrel and ASA. However, they had similar platelet aggregation and activation levels to healthy volunteers despite treatment with low-dose ASA. Takotsubo patients who had higher levels of adrenaline in the acute phase displayed increased platelet reactivity during follow-up.

  20. Clearance of circulating activated platelets in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Norma; Malato, Simona; Femia, Eti A; Pugliano, Mariateresa; Campana, Lara; Lunghi, Francesca; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Lussana, Federico; Podda, Gianmarco; Cattaneo, Marco; Ciceri, Fabio; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2011-09-22

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV) are characterized by persistent platelet activation. The mechanisms involved in their clearance are poorly characterized. In the present study, we report that leukocytes were actively involved in platelet disposal in 51 patients with ET and 30 with PV, but not in 70 age- and sex-matched controls. The fraction of circulating neutrophils and monocytes that had phagocytosed platelets, as assessed by flow cytometry, was significantly higher in patients with PV or ET, independently of hydroxyurea treatment, than in controls. Platelet phagocytosis by circulating leukocytes was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The lack of effect of hydroxyurea, which disrupts the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) interaction, suggests a P-selectin-independent mechanism. This hypothesis was confirmed in an ad hoc animal model based on the in vivo injection of activated platelets from P-selectin(+/+) and P-selectin(-/-) mice. P-selectin expression was associated with an earlier and effective clearance of platelets by neutrophils. A second delayed, P-selectin-independent phase actively involved monocytes. Our results suggest that phagocytic clearance of platelets by leukocytes occurs in PV and ET, possibly involving P-selectin-dependent and -independent pathways, thus representing a novel mechanism to remove activated platelets from the circulation.

  1. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  2. Cerebral microbleeds in nonlacunar brain infarction are associated with lower coated-platelet levels.

    PubMed

    Prodan, Calin I; Stoner, Julie A; Gordon, David L; Dale, George L

    2014-01-01

    Coated-platelets are a subset of platelets with high procoagulant potential observed on dual-agonist stimulation with collagen and thrombin. Coated-platelet levels are elevated in patients with nonlacunar ischemic stroke compared with controls, although the presence of early hemorrhagic transformation is associated with lower coated-platelet levels. In contrast to infarction, patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage have lower coated-platelet levels, and these levels inversely correlate with bleed size. Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) represent previous small hemorrhagic occurrences. We undertook a pilot study to investigate coated-platelet production and the presence of CMBs in patients with nonlacunar ischemic stroke. Coated-platelet levels were determined in 110 consecutive patients with a diagnosis of nonlacunar stroke. Microbleeds were identified using the published criteria by an experienced stroke neurologist. Coated-platelet levels were compared statistically between patients with and without CMBs using the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum test. Coated-platelet levels (median [interquartile range]) for all patients were 44.1% [34%-51.2%]. CMBs were detected in 22 patients (20%); these patients had significantly lower coated-platelet levels compared with those without CMBs (35.6% [22.6%-47.2%] versus 45.1% [36.1%-51.5%]; P = .025), whereas other demographic and clinical factors did not differ significantly. The presence of CMBs in patients with nonlacunar ischemic stroke is associated with lower levels of coated-platelets. Larger prospective studies are needed to better establish the potential connection between altered coated-platelet synthesis, microbleeds, cerebral infarction, and possible hemorrhage-prone vascular changes. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Dynamic platelet adhesion in patients with an acute coronary syndrome: The effect of antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsoumani, Maria E; Tatsidou, Prokopia T; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Goudevenos, John A; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2016-12-01

    Platelet adhesion and aggregation are key functions leading to thrombus formation. The effect of aspirin, clopidogrel, and ticagrelor on platelet aggregation has been well established, however, there is limited data on the effect of these drugs on platelet adhesion. We therefore evaluated the effect of these drugs on platelet adhesion in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. Citrated blood was collected from 50 ACS patients loaded with 325 mg of aspirin (baseline) and at 5 days after the administration of aspirin 100 mg/day and clopidogrel (600 mg loading dose, 75 mg/day) (n = 26) or ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose, 90 mg × 2/day) (n = 24). High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) to clopidogrel was estimated by vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation assay. Platelet adhesion to collagen was studied for 6 min under high shear stress and was evaluated using the time to platelet recruitment (TPR), the perimeter and average area of each adherent object, number of adherent objects, and the total percent of surface coverage (SC%). Six ACS patients exhibited HTPR to clopidogrel and excluded from the platelet adhesion assays. TPR and SC% values were similar among patient groups at baseline and controls. However, all other adhesion parameters were different in ACS patients, indicating the formation of more aggregates in regard to controls. At 5 days post-treatment with either clopidogrel or ticagrelor, the TPR values were increased and the SC% values were reduced to a similar extent compared with baseline. However, significant differences were observed in the ticagrelor group in the perimeter, number of adherent objects, and the average area of each adherent object indicating a more potent inhibition of adherence-induced platelet aggregation than clopidogrel. In conclusion, aspirin does not affect platelet adherence to collagen, whereas clopidogrel and ticagrelor inhibit to a similar extent dynamic platelet adhesion at 5 days post-treatment in

  4. Platelets in the immune response: Revisiting platelet-activating factor in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Parwinder; Jindal, Nina Lakhani; Jagdis, Amanda; Vadas, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening multisystem allergic reaction resulting from the sudden systemic release of biochemical mediators and chemotactic substances. Release of both preformed granule-associated mediators and newly generated lipid-derived mediators contributes to the amplification and prolongation of anaphylaxis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid-derived mediator the central role of which has been well established in experimental models of both immune-mediated and non-immune mediated anaphylaxis. It is produced and secreted by several types of cells, including mast cells, monocytes, tissue macrophages, platelets, eosinophils, endothelial cells, and neutrophils. PAF is implicated in platelet aggregation and activation through release of vasoactive amines in the inflammatory response, resulting in increased vascular permeability, circulatory collapse, decreased cardiac output, and various other biological effects. PAF is rapidly hydrolyzed and degraded to an inactive metabolite, lysoPAF, by the enzyme PAF acetylhydrolase, the activity of which has shown to correlate inversely with PAF levels and predispose to severe anaphylaxis. In addition to its role in anaphylaxis, PAF has also been implicated as a mediator in both allergic and nonallergic inflammatory diseases, including allergic rhinitis, sepsis, atherosclerotic disease, and malignancy, in which PAF signaling has an established role. The therapeutic role of PAF antagonism has been investigated for several diseases, with variable results thus far. Further investigation of its role in pathology and therapeutic modulation is highly anticipated because of the pressing need for more selective and targeted therapy for the management of severe anaphylaxis.

  5. Confounding effects of platelets on flow cytometric analysis and cell-sorting experiments using blood-derived cells.

    PubMed

    McFarland, David C; Zhang, Cindy; Thomas, Heath C; T L, Ratliff

    2006-02-01

    Flow cytometric analysis and cell-sorting of peripheral blood leukocytes is commonplace; however, platelet contamination is typically ignored during immunophenotypic analysis and sorting of blood-derived cells. Red blood cells, platelets, T & B lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes were sorted from rat blood preparations. Presort enrichment was performed by differential centrifugation for all cell types. Additionally, leukocyte samples were prepared by ammonium chloride lysis of red blood cells. Unless proper precautions were taken, significant numbers of platelets were sorted along with (nonplatelet) cells of interest. The amount of platelet contamination varied greatly from experiment to experiment with the highest level of leukocyte-platelet association observed in the neutrophil/granulocyte population in samples prepared using ammonium chloride-based red blood cell-lysing solution. Addition of an immunophenotypic marker for platelet identification is a simple, yet prudent, measure to help evaluate the impact of platelets on immunophenotypic staining when performing flow cytometric analysis or sorting of blood-derived cells and should become a routine practice. Platelet presence in postsort fractions can be due to free platelets as well as target cell-associated platelets and both sources of contamination must be addressed. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  7. Platelet and red blood cell indices in Harris platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naina, Harris V K; Harris, Samar

    2010-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) or macro thrombocytopenias are relatively rare, but their prevalence is likely underestimated from complexities of diagnosis and a spectrum of subclinical phenotypes. Harris platelet syndrome (HPS) is the most common IGPD reported from the Indian subcontinent. Of note there are an increased number of hemoglobinopathies reported from the geographic location. We analysed red blood cell and platelet indices of blood donors with HPS from the north eastern part of India and compared them with blood indices of blood donors of south India. We found a statistically significant lower platelet count in blood donors with HPS (median, range) 132 (71-267) vs. 252 (160-478) as compared to donors from south India (P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in donors with HPS 13.1, (range 12-21.9 fl) as compared to donors from south India 7.35 (range 6-9.2 fl) (P < 0.001). This study showed that blood donors with HPS had a low median platelet bio-mass 0.17 (0.10-0.38%) vs. 0.19 (0.13-0.28%) in donors from south India. The platelet distribution width (PDW) was 17.4 (14.9-19.6) in donors with HPS vs. 16.38 (15.2-18.5) in south Indian blood donors (P < 0.001). Thirty-three donors with HPS had a normal platelet count with MPV more than 12 fL. Only donors with HPS had giant platelets and thrombocytopenia on peripheral blood smear examination. None of these donors had Dohle body inclusion in their leukocytes. Compared to donors from south India, donors with HPS had a significantly lower hemoglobin 13.8 (12-16.3 gm/dL) vs. 14.8 (12-18) respectively (P < 0.001) while red distribution width (RDW) was higher in HPS 13.6 (11.5-16.7) vs. 12.8 (11.4-15.1). However we did not find any statistically significant difference in MCV, MCH, MCHC between the two groups. Peripheral blood smear did not show any obvious abnormal red blood cell morphology. In the blood donors with HPS we found a statistically higher MPV

  8. The Platelet Function Defect of Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    fibrinolytic and coagulation systems occur during CPB,1 a platelet function defect is generally considered to be the primary CPB-induced hemostatic...platelets.39 OKM5 (provided by Dr. Patricia Rao, Ortho Diagnostic Systems , Raritan, NJ) is directed against platelet membrane GPIV.40 Flow Cytometric...22 after degranulation.7-14-16-18 Utilizing washed platelet systems , Nieuwenhuis et al.14 found a modest increase during CPB of the platelet

  9. Characterization of the Human Platelet α-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. Wayne; Cooper, Barry; Handin, Robert I.

    1978-01-01

    Human platelets aggregate and undergo a release reaction when incubated with catecholamines. Indirect evidence indicates that these events are mediated through α-adrenergic receptors. We used [3H]dihydroergocryptine, an α-adrenergic antagonist, to identify binding sites on platelets that have the characteristics of α-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamines compete for the binding sites in a stereo-specific manner with the potency series of (−) epinephrine > (−) norepinephrine > (±) phenylephrine > (−) isoproterenol. The dissociation constant (Kd) of (−) epinephrine is 0.34 μM. Binding is saturable using a platelet particulate fraction but not with intact platelets. There are 0.130 pmol binding sites per milligram protein in fresh platelet membranes. This number represents approximately 100 binding sites per platelet. The Kd for [3H]-dihydroergocryptine was 0.003−0.01 μM. The α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine (Kd = 0.0069 μM) was much more potent than the β-adrenergic antagonist (±) propranolol (Kd = 27 μM) in competing for the binding sites. The binding data were correlated with catecholamine-induced platelet aggregation and inhibition of basal and prostaglandin E1-stimulated adenylate cyclase. (−) Epinephrine was more potent than (−) norepinephrine in producing aggregation whereas (−) isoproterenol was ineffective. The threshold dose for inducing aggregation by (−) epinephrine was 0.46 μM. Phentolamine and dihydroergocyrptine blocked this response, whereas (±) propranolol had no effect. (−) Epinephrine and (−) norepinephrine inhibited basal and prostaglandin E1-stimulated adenylate cyclase in a dose-related manner. The concentration of (−) epinephrine inhibiting adenylate cyclase 50% was 0.7 μM. This inhibition was also blocked by phentolamine and dihydroergocryptine but not by (±) propranolol. The specificity of binding and the close correlation with α-adrenergic receptor-mediated biochemical and physiological responses

  10. Inherited platelet disorders and oral health.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marie-Cécile; Kemoun, Philippe; Cousty, Sarah; Sie, Pierre; Payrastre, Bernard

    2013-02-01

    Platelets play a key role in thrombosis and hemostasis. Accumulation of platelets at the site of vascular injury is the first step in the formation of hemostatic plugs, which play a pivotal role in preventing blood loss after injury. Platelet adhesion at sites of injury results in spreading, secretion, recruitment of additional platelets, and formation of platelet aggregates. Inherited platelet disorders are rare causes of bleeding syndromes, ranging from mild bruising to severe hemorrhage. The defects can reflect deficiency or dysfunction of platelet surface glycoproteins, granule contents, cytoskeletal proteins, platelet pro-coagulant function, and signaling pathways. For instance, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and Glanzmann thrombasthenia are attributed to deficiencies of glycoprotein Ib/IX/V and GPIIb/IIIa, respectively, and are rare but severe platelet disorders. Inherited defects that impair platelet secretion and/or signal transduction are among the most common forms of mild platelet disorders and include gray platelet syndrome, Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, and Chediak-Higashi syndrome. When necessary, desmopressin, antifibrinolytic agents, and transfusion of platelets remain the most common treatment of inherited platelet disorders. Alternative therapies such as recombinant activated factor VII are also available for a limited number of situations. In this review, we will discuss the management of patients with inherited platelet disorders in various clinical situations related to dental cares, including surgical intervention. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  11. Autologous platelet-labeling in thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Vinazzer, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies performed with peripheral platelets obtained from 6 male volunteers aged 23 to 29 years revealed an extraordinary dependence of labeling efficiency on incubation time and platelet concentration after {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling. Since the monitoring of in vivo-platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia may cause problems due to insufficient labeling results and homologous platelets may show a different in vivo behaviour to autologous ones, we have searched for the minimal amount of platelets necessary to allow appropriate labeling and imaging in patients with thrombocytopenia. In 15 patients with untreated thrombocytopenia aged 14 to 79 years demonstrating a mean peripheral platelet count of 2.509 +/- 1.45 x 10(4) cells/microliters autologous {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling was performed. The results indicate that approximately 1 x 10(8) (concentrated) platelets/ml are necessary to obtain an adequate labeling efficiency and recovery. This platelet concentration can be easily achieved by drawing one more Monovette of whole blood per each 5 x 10(4) platelets/microliter peripheral platelet count less than 2 x 10(5)/microliter. It is concluded, that calculation of the required number of platelets in advance, variation of the blood volume drawn and the volume of incubation buffer allow informative, qualitative and quantitative results using autologous platelets. The method presented effectively circumvents the requirement of homologous platelets for radiolabeling in thrombocytopenia.

  12. Timing of Platelet Rich Plasma Injections During Antithrombotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ramsook, Ryan Ravi; Danesh, Houman

    2016-01-01

    The use of platelet rich plasma (PRP) spans across many fields owing to its role in healing and as a natural alternative to surgery. PRP continues to grow however much of the literature is anecdotal or case report based and there is a lack of controlled trials to evaluate standards for PRP. The International Cellular Medical Society (ICMS) has developed guidelines to help with the safe advancement of PRP; however there remains a gap in literature concerning the timing of PRP injections in patients who are on antithrombotic therapy. The importance of an intact platelet surface membrane allows for the appropriate release of the healing bioproteins and growth factors granting PRP therapy its efficacy. This along with the proliferation of differentiated cells, enhancement of collagen synthesis, early angiogenesis and revascularization help promote the benefits of regeneration. The intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade are valuable in that disruption of this mechanism or prematurely activated platelets may result in limited efficacy. Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs are commonly used in patients who are candidates for PRP. As antithrombotic agents affect platelet stability, they will have an effect on PRP efficacy and must be discontinued at an appropriate time frame prior to injection therapy. Understanding the pharmacokinetics and platelet effects can help guide discussion on the proper timing of discontinuation and resumption of a particular antithrombotic agent. With future research, the establishment of clinical practice guidelines concerning PRP and antithrombotic therapy can help structure safe and efficacious means in which to promote healing and regeneration in a growing patient population. Platelet rich plasma, antithrombotic therapy, coagulation, platelet activation, regenerative medicine, growth factors.

  13. Implications of anticoagulants and gender on cell counts and growth factor concentration in platelet-rich plasma and platelet-rich gel supernatants from rabbits.

    PubMed

    González, Juan C; López, Catalina; Carmona, Jorge U

    2016-01-01

    Our objectives were as follows: 1) to validate a protocol for producing rabbit platelet-rich plasma (PRP); 2) to determine the influence of two anticoagulants, sodium citrate and acid-citrate-dextrose solution A, and gender on cell count in PRP and growth factor concentration in pure platelet-rich gel supernatants; 3) to correlate the variables evaluated. Whole blood from 18 New Zealand rabbits (9 males and 9 females) was obtained with sodium citrate and acid-citrate-dextrose solution A for processing PRP fractions (A and B), which were evaluated for haematology. The PRP fractions were either activated with calcium gluconate or lysated with a detergent. The concentrations of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor BB were assayed by ELISA. The sodium citrate PRP-B had significantly higher counts of platelets in comparison to PRP-A and whole blood obtained with the same anticoagulant and the homologous acid-citrate-dextrose solution A PRP fraction. The sodium citrate PRP-A had a significantly higher count of leukocytes compared to the homologous acid-citrate-dextrose solution A fraction. All the PRP fractions had a significant leuko-reduction when compared to whole blood. The sodium citrate PRP-A fraction from female rabbits had significantly lower platelet counts and significantly higher leukocyte counts than the same acid-citrate-dextrose solution A fraction. Growth factor concentration was not affected by the type of anticoagulant or gender. The type of anticoagulant and gender affected the cell counts in PRP, but they did not influence the growth factor concentration. More complete rabbit PRP studies should be performed before evaluating this type of substance in models of disease.

  14. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  15. Fractional distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, M. J.; Callejas, R. J.

    1985-10-08

    Process and apparatus are provided for the recovery of low, medium and high boiling components from feed streams containing same wherein reboiler fouling, gumming and the like are minimized, via the control of fractionator reboiler temperatures.

  16. Fractionalize this

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Philip

    2010-12-01

    Precisely what are the electrons in a high-temperature superconductor doing before they superconduct? Strong electronic correlations may give rise to composite rather than fractionalized excitations, as is typical in other strongly coupled systems such as quark matter.

  17. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF): a second-generation platelet concentrate. Part II: platelet-related biologic features.

    PubMed

    Dohan, David M; Choukroun, Joseph; Diss, Antoine; Dohan, Steve L; Dohan, Anthony J J; Mouhyi, Jaafar; Gogly, Bruno

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) belongs to a new generation of platelet concentrates, with simplified processing and without biochemical blood handling. In this second article, we investigate the platelet-associated features of this biomaterial. During PRF processing by centrifugation, platelets are activated and their massive degranulation implies a very significant cytokine release. Concentrated platelet-rich plasma platelet cytokines have already been quantified in many technologic configurations. To carry out a comparative study, we therefore undertook to quantify PDGF-BB, TGFbeta-1, and IGF-I within PPP (platelet-poor plasma) supernatant and PRF clot exudate serum. These initial analyses revealed that slow fibrin polymerization during PRF processing leads to the intrinsic incorporation of platelet cytokines and glycanic chains in the fibrin meshes. This result would imply that PRF, unlike the other platelet concentrates, would be able to progressively release cytokines during fibrin matrix remodeling; such a mechanism might explain the clinically observed healing properties of PRF.

  18. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Negative T cells than B6.lpr mice. This suggests that the absence of PF4 alleviates some tissue damage in the lupus prone mice. 6...mice with PF4-/- mice may alleviate multi organ dysfunction in Lupus prone mice. Reportable Outcomes Nothing to report Conclusions We have...dysfunction in lupus models. We have evaluated the relationship between Syk and platelets and have thus far identified a role for Syk in platelet lodging in

  19. Lysophosphatidic acids. Influence on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; Kindom, S. E.; Peterson, D. A.; Peller, J.; Krantz, K. E.; White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Decanoyl-, palmitoyl-, and oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were studied for their effects on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux. Palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA both caused a concentration-dependent aggregation of human blood platelets at concentrations of 12--300 microM. Aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was enhanced at slightly lower concentrations. First-wave aggregation induced by these LPAs was not blocked by aspirin, indomethacin, or heparin, suggesting similarities to ADP aggregation. However, in washed platelets with a high calcium concentration, no serotonin secretion was observed, even though full aggregation occurred, suggesting that aggregation was not due to released ADP. This concept was supported by studies of platelets deficient in the storage pool of ADP and serotonin, which had a normal first-wave aggregation response to palmitoyl-LPA. Aggregation induced by palmitoyl LPA was inhibited by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), theophylline, and ethylenediaminotetraacetate (EDTA), though in the presence of EDTA shape change occurred. Aggregation stimulated by palmitoyl-LPA or oleoyl-LPA was characterized by changes in the shape of the platelets with development of pseudopods and centralization of granules closely surrounded by contractile microfilaments and supporting microtubules. The addition of palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA, but not decanoyl-LPA, caused the release of calcium from a platelet membrane fraction that contains elements of the intracellular calcium storage system and actively concentrates this cation in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and magnesium. It is suggested that LPAs cause aggregation by stimulating the release of calcium intracellularly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Text-Figure 6 PMID:112871

  20. Isolation and characterization of platelet-derived extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aatonen, Maria T.; Öhman, Tiina; Nyman, Tuula A.; Laitinen, Saara; Grönholm, Mikaela; Siljander, Pia R.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) participate, for example, in haemostasis, immunity and development. Most studies of platelet EVs have targeted microparticles, whereas exosomes and EV characterization under various conditions have been less analyzed. Studies have been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining EVs free from contaminating cells and platelet remnants. Therefore, we optimized an EV isolation protocol and compared the quantity and protein content of EVs induced by different agonists. Methods Platelets isolated with iodixanol gradient were activated by thrombin and collagen, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or Ca2+ ionophore. Microparticles and exosomes were isolated by differential centrifugations. EVs were quantitated by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and total protein. Size distributions were determined by NTA and electron microscopy. Proteomics was used to characterize the differentially induced EVs. Results The main EV populations were 100–250 nm and over 90% were <500 nm irrespective of the activation. However, activation pathways differentially regulated the quantity and the quality of EVs, which also formed constitutively. Thrombogenic activation was the most potent physiological EV-generator. LPS was a weak inducer of EVs, which had a selective protein content from the thrombogenic EVs. Ca2+ ionophore generated a large population of protein-poor and unselectively packed EVs. By proteomic analysis, EVs were highly heterogeneous after the different activations and between the vesicle subpopulations. Conclusions Although platelets constitutively release EVs, vesiculation can be increased, and the activation pathway determines the number and the cargo of the formed EVs. These activation-dependent variations render the use of protein content in sample normalization invalid. Since most platelet EVs are 100–250 nm, only a fraction has been analyzed by previously used methods, for example, flow cytometry. As the EV subpopulations

  1. Ristocetin-Induced Platelet Aggregation (RIPA) and RIPA Mixing Studies.

    PubMed

    Frontroth, Juan Pablo; Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2017-01-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) is used as an in vitro test to determine the presence and integrity of the platelet glycoprotein (GP) Ibα-V-IX complex and von Willebrand factor (VWF) interaction and is usually performed using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Impairment in the response of VWF/GPIbα-V-IX is measured with reference to several established concentrations of ristocetin and may indicate defects in VWF or in GPIbα-V-IX function. RIPA-based mixing studies comprise an additional approach to testing this interaction to help define whether defects identified by RIPA lie in VWF or in GPIbα-V-IX. For example, the correction of an abnormal RIPA trace after mixing PRP with normal plasma and rechallenging with ristocetin at 1.0 mg/mL suggests VWF function/quantity defect. RIPA mixing studies at lower doses of ristocetin (0.5 mg/mL) are recommended for discrimination of von Willebrand disease type 2B (VWD2B) from the rarer platelet-type (PT) VWD and for the phenotypic laboratory diagnosis of VWD2B. The demonstration of a plasma factor capable of inducing platelet aggregation at such low doses of ristocetin represents the hallmark for the phenotypic laboratory diagnosis of VWD2B. Moreover, since both VWD2B and PT-VWD may present with thrombocytopenia, RIPA-based mixing studies are also useful in thrombocytopenic patients in whom RIPA testing is difficult to assess.

  2. Hydrodynamic effects and receptor interactions of platelets and their aggregates in linear shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, P; Diamond, S L

    1997-01-01

    We have modeled platelet aggregation in a linear shear flow by accounting for two body collision hydrodynamics, platelet activation and receptor biology. Considering platelets and their aggregates as unequal-sized spheres with DLVO interactions (psi(platelet) = -15 mV, Hamaker constant = 10(-19) J), detailed hydrodynamics provided the flow field around the colliding platelets. Trajectory calculations were performed to obtain the far upstream cross-sectional area and the particle flux through this area provided the collision frequency. Only a fraction of platelets brought together by a shearing fluid flow were held together if successfully bound by fibrinogen cross-bridging GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the platelet surfaces. This fraction was calculated by modeling receptor-mediated aggregation using the formalism of Bell (Bell, G. I. 1979. A theoretical model for adhesion between cells mediated by multivalent ligands. Cell Biophys. 1:133-147) where the forward rate of bond formation dictated aggregation during collision and was estimated from the diffusional limited rate of lateral association of receptors multiplied by an effectiveness factor, eta, to give an apparent rate. For a value of eta = 0.0178, we calculated the overall efficiency (including both receptor binding and hydrodynamics effects) for equal-sized platelets with 50,000 receptors/platelet to be 0.206 for G = 41.9 s(-1), 0.05 for G = 335 s(-1), and 0.0086 for G = 1920 s(-1), values which are in agreement with efficiencies determined from initial platelet singlet consumption rates in flow through a tube. From our analysis, we predict that bond formation proceeds at a rate of approximately 0.1925 bonds/microm2 per ms, which is approximately 50-fold slower than the diffusion limited rate of association. This value of eta is also consistent with a colloidal stability of unactivated platelets at low shear rates. Fibrinogen was calculated to mediate aggregation quite efficiently at low shear rates but not at

  3. [Platelet-washing solution optimization].

    PubMed

    Grossin, E; Chamfly, V

    2005-10-01

    Different washing and homogénéisation solutions are hereby analysed by comparing the evolution of functional indicators during the preservation of washed aphaeresis platelet concentrates: physiological pH 4.5 and 6 solutions, buffered physiological pH 6.8 glucose solution, and two physiological pH 7 citrate solutions with acetate. Prior acidification of platelet concentrates proved to be essential. Two washings with manual or automated technique, guarantee residual proteins at a level of less than 0.5 g. Solutions T-Sol Baxter or SSP Macopharma allow us to obtain a product that meet the PSL specifications. Routine since June 2004, washings are done with a physiological pH 6 solution, then homogeneised with T-Sol solution. Platelet recovery, swirling phenomenon, lack of agrgegates, pH maintenance, low increase in the platelet average volume and maintenance of intra-cell potassium level, suggest that platelet entirety is preserved beyond the product's expiration date. The platelet transfusion yield of these products is satisfactory.

  4. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  5. Transgenic, inducible RNAi in megakaryocytes and platelets in mice

    PubMed Central

    TAKIGUCHI, M.; JAMES, C.; JOSEFSSON, E. C.; CARMICHAEL, C. L.; PREMSRIRUT, P. K.; LOWE, S. W.; HAMILTON, J. R.; HUANG, D. C. S.; KILE, B. T.; DICKINS, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene function. The tetracycline (tet)-regulated expression system has recently been adapted to allow inducible RNAi in mice, however its efficiency in a particular cell type in vivo depends on a transgenic tet transactivator expression pattern and is often highly variable. Objective We aimed to establish a transgenic strategy that allows efficient and inducible gene knockdown in particular hematopoietic lineages in mice. Methods and results Using a tet-regulated reporter gene strategy, we found that transgenic mice expressing the rtTA (tet-on) transactivator under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (CMV-rtTA mice) display inducible reporter gene expression with unusual and near-complete efficiency in megakaryocytes and platelets. To test whether the CMV-rtTA transgene can drive inducible and efficient gene knockdown within this lineage, we generated a novel mouse strain harboring a tet-regulated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Bcl-xL, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member known to be essential for maintaining platelet survival. Doxycycline treatment of adult mice carrying both transgenes induces shRNA expression, depletes Bcl-xL in megakaryocytes and triggers severe thrombocytopenia, whereas doxycycline withdrawal shuts off shRNA expression, normalizes Bcl-xL levels and restores platelet numbers. These effects are akin to those observed with drugs that target Bcl-xL, clearly demonstrating that this transgenic system allows efficient and inducible inhibition of genes in megakaryocytes and platelets. Conclusions We have established a novel transgenic strategy for inducible gene knockdown inmegakaryocytes and platelets that will be useful for characterizing genes involved in platelet production and function in adult mice. PMID:21138522

  6. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  7. Optimized gating and reference ranges of reticulated platelets in dogs for the Sysmex XT-2000iV.

    PubMed

    Oellers, Dana E; Bauer, Natali; Ginder, Melanie; Johannes, Sigrid; Pernecker, Iris; Moritz, Andreas

    2016-07-22

    Canine reticulated platelets (r-PLTs) i.e., juvenile PLTs reflecting thrombopoiesis can be measured automatically with the hematology analyzer Sysmex XT-2000iV using manual gating options. However, the impact of interferences on r-PLT measurements performed with the gates published previously (Pankraz et al., Vet Clin Path 38:30-38, 2009; Gelain et al., High fluorescent platelets fraction in macrothrombocytopenic Norfolk terrier, 2010) is largely unknown. The aim was to compare different published gates for measurement of r-PLTs with the Sysmex XT-2000iV with an own, optimized gate ("Oellers-gate") and to establish reference intervals (RIs) in > 120 dogs. Data of 362 measurements of diseased and healthy dogs were analyzed retrospectively. Several gates were applied and RIs for r-PLTs and platelet indices were established for pet dogs and a group of 153 healthy Beagles kept under defined housing conditions. Intra-assay precision (CV) was also assessed. In 30/362 samples, interferences consistent with small erythrocytes/reticulocytes were seen in the previously published gates but not in the "Oellers-gate". Good correlation was found between the different gates (rs: 0.88-1.00). RIs for the "Pankraz-gate", the "Gelain-gate", and the "Oellers-gate" were 0.0-1.2, 0.2-3.7 and 0.2-3.9 % respectively. CVs were ranging between 22 and 41 %. Optimization of previously published gates minimized interferences of small erythrocytes with r-PLT measurements.

  8. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Ion Channelome of Human Platelets and Megakaryocytic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Joy R.; Amisten, Stefan; Goodall, Alison H.; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ion channels have crucial roles in all cell types and represent important therapeutic targets. Approximately 20 ion channels have been reported in human platelets; however, no systematic study has been undertaken to define the platelet channelome. These membrane proteins need only be expressed at low copy number to influence function and may not be detected using proteomic or transcriptomic microarray approaches. In our recent work, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) provided key evidence that Kv1.3 is responsible for the voltage-dependent K+ conductance of platelets and megakaryocytes. The present study has expanded this approach to assess relative expression of 402 ion channels and channel regulatory genes in human platelets and three megakaryoblastic/erythroleukaemic cell lines. mRNA levels in platelets are low compared to other blood cells, therefore an improved method of isolating platelets was developed. This used a cocktail of inhibitors to prevent formation of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, and a combination of positive and negative immunomagnetic cell separation, followed by rapid extraction of mRNA. Expression of 34 channel-related transcripts was quantified in platelets, including 24 with unknown roles in platelet function, but that were detected at levels comparable to ion channels with established roles in haemostasis or thrombosis. Trace expression of a further 50 ion channel genes was also detected. More extensive channelomes were detected in MEG-01, CHRF-288–11 and HEL cells (195, 185 and 197 transcripts, respectively), but lacked several channels observed in the platelet. These “channelome” datasets provide an important resource for further studies of ion channel function in the platelet and megakaryocyte. PMID:27277069

  9. Unraveling mechanisms that control platelet production.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Joseph E

    2013-02-01

    Platelets are formed by giant precursor cells called megakaryocytes that reside within the bone marrow. The generation of platelets, and their release into the bloodstream by megakaryocytes, requires a complex series of remodeling events powered by the cytoskeleton to result in the release of many platelets from a single megakaryocyte. Abnormalities in this process can result in thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) and can lead to increased risk of bleeding. This review describes the process of platelet production in detail and discusses new insights into novel platelet biology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Platelets: essential components of the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ramadan A.; Wuescher, Leah M.; Worth, Randall G.

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate cell fragments known for their central role in coagulation and vascular integrity. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets contribute to diverse immunological processes extending beyond the traditional view of platelets as fragmentary mediators of hemostasis and thrombosis. There is recent evidence that platelets participate in: 1) intervention against microbial threats; 2) recruitment and promotion of innate effector cell functions; 3) modulating antigen presentation; and 4) enhancement of adaptive immune responses. In this way, platelets should be viewed as the underappreciated orchestrator of the immune system. This review will discuss recent and historical evidence regarding how platelets influence both innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:27818580

  11. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  12. 12 CFR 5.67 - Fractional shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... fair price upon the fraction not being issued through its sale, or the purchase of the additional fraction required for a full share, if there is an established and active market in the national bank's stock; (c) Remit the cash equivalent of the fraction not being issued to those to whom fractional shares...

  13. Impact of reticulated platelets on antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is independent of platelet turnover.

    PubMed

    Stratz, Christian; Nührenberg, Thomas; Amann, Michael; Cederqvist, Marco; Kleiner, Pascal; Valina, Christian M; Trenk, Dietmar; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Hochholzer, Willibald

    2016-10-28

    Reticulated platelets are associated with impaired antiplatelet response to thienopyridines. It is uncertain whether this interaction is caused by a decreased drug exposure due to high platelet turnover reflected by elevated levels of reticulated platelets or by intrinsic properties of reticulated platelets. This study sought to investigate if the impact of reticulated platelets on early antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is mainly caused by platelet turnover as previously suggested. Elective patients undergoing coronary intervention were randomised to loading with clopidogrel 600 mg or prasugrel 60 mg (n=200). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet reactivity was determined by impedance aggregometry before, at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes and at day 1 after loading. Immature platelet count was assessed as marker of reticulated platelets by flow cytometry. Platelet reactivity increased with rising levels of immature platelet count in both groups. This effect was more distinctive in patients on clopidogrel as compared to patients on prasugrel. Overall, immature platelet count correlated well with on-treatment platelet reactivity at all time-points (p < 0.001). These correlations did not change over time in the entire cohort as well as in patients treated with clopidogrel or prasugrel indicating an effect independent of platelet turnover (comparison of correlations 120 minutes/day 1: p = 0.64). In conclusion, the association of immature platelet count with impaired antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is similar early and late after loading. This finding suggests as main underlying mechanism another effect of reticulated platelets on thienopyridines than platelet turnover.

  14. Detection of platelet alloimmunity with a platelet-associated IgG assay

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Bishop, J.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-06-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence PA-IgG assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets. The assay identified serum alloantibodies in 10 out of 14 multitransfused patients and for two of three infants with neonatal thrombocytopenia. The correct separation of all multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups by the PA-IgG assay was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. The allogeneic nature of the serum antibodies was demonstrated by progressive absorption of the antibody with increasing numbers of allogeneic platelets but not with autologous platelets. The sensitivity of the PA-IgG assay for detection of serum alloantibodies was superior to that of platelet aggregation, platelet serotonin release, and lymphocytotoxicity testing. In dilution experiments with alloimmune serum, elevated levels of serum PA-IgG could still be detected on donor platelets when platelet aggregation and serotonin release tests became negative. Platelet survival studies with selected platelets performed in the 10 alloimmunized, multitransfused patients confirmed the results of the PA-IgG assays, predicting alloimmunity to the donor platelets. In contrast, platelet aggregation, platelet serotonin release, and lymphocytotoxicity testing indicated alloimmunity for 50% or less of the patients. Reduced platelet survival times were also seen with HLA A- and HLA B-matched donor platelets when donor-recipient incompatibility was demonstrated by the PA-IgG assay. Thus the PA-IgG assay provides a sensitive method to detect serum platelet alloantibodies and may offer a technique in platelet crossmatching.

  15. Inherited platelet disorders: toward DNA-based diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lentaigne, Claire; Freson, Kathleen; Laffan, Michael A.; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Variations in platelet number, volume, and function are largely genetically controlled, and many loci associated with platelet traits have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs).1 The genome also contains a large number of rare variants, of which a tiny fraction underlies the inherited diseases of humans. Research over the last 3 decades has led to the discovery of 51 genes harboring variants responsible for inherited platelet disorders (IPDs). However, the majority of patients with an IPD still do not receive a molecular diagnosis. Alongside the scientific interest, molecular or genetic diagnosis is important for patients. There is increasing recognition that a number of IPDs are associated with severe pathologies, including an increased risk of malignancy, and a definitive diagnosis can inform prognosis and care. In this review, we give an overview of these disorders grouped according to their effect on platelet biology and their clinical characteristics. We also discuss the challenge of identifying candidate genes and causal variants therein, how IPDs have been historically diagnosed, and how this is changing with the introduction of high-throughput sequencing. Finally, we describe how integration of large genomic, epigenomic, and phenotypic datasets, including whole genome sequencing data, GWASs, epigenomic profiling, protein–protein interaction networks, and standardized clinical phenotype coding, will drive the discovery of novel mechanisms of disease in the near future to improve patient diagnosis and management. PMID:27095789

  16. Role of red cells in preventing the growth of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Machi, J; Sigel, B; Ramos, J R; Justin, J R; Feinberg, H; LeBreton, G C; Robertson, A L

    1984-10-01

    Using high-resolution real-time two-dimensional ultrasound, we have investigated the role of red cells in the growth of already established platelet aggregates under controlled flow conditions. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was circulated in vitro in horizontally and vertically arranged tubing at mean shear rate ranging from 60 to 0 sec-1, and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was used to induce platelet aggregation. ADP-induced platelet aggregates grew in size and tended to sediment as shear rate decreased, in particular, below 10 sec-1. At 0 sec-1 (stasis), large clusters of platelet aggregates formed. The addition of washed red cells to produce a hematocrit of only 2% significantly interfered with the growth and sedimentation of platelet aggregates as shear rate was reduced. Formaldehyde-hardened erythrocytes had a similar effect in preventing the growth of platelet aggregates, suggesting that mechanical collision of red cells with platelet aggregates may be the cause of growth inhibition. Therefore, the thrombotic process may be enhanced in red cell poor zones in circulation resulting from flow disturbances associated with vascular stenosis or within artificial organs and extracorporeal systems. The present study also suggested that red cell free PRP should be carefully administered therapeutically.

  17. The contribution of platelets to the pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pauling, J D; O'Donnell, V B; Mchugh, N J

    2013-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) describes the excessive vascular response of the digital vessels in response to cold exposure and emotional stress. It is typically the earliest manifestation of systemic sclerosis (SSc), a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology characterised by vasculopathy, inflammation and fibrosis. The biological actions of platelets are known to extend beyond primary haemostasis with a growing appreciation of their contribution to vascular function, inflammation and wound repair. This has led to a considerable body of work evaluating associations between platelet function analysis and RP/SSc. This review provides a conceptual framework upon which the potential contribution of platelets to vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity and tissue remodelling in RP and SSc is considered. We describe the existing evidence to support excessive platelet activation in RP and SSc, ranging from the early studies of platelet aggregability and circulating platelet-derived mediators, to the important findings of the recent work that has begun to explore the potential direct pathogenic role of platelets in established murine models of SSc. We shall describe and critically appraise the findings of previous therapeutic studies evaluating the use of anti-platelet agents in RP and SSc, along with their implications for future therapeutic intervention in these conditions.

  18. Human platelet lysate: Replacing fetal bovine serum as a gold standard for human cell propagation?

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Strunk, Dirk; Koh, Mickey B C; Schallmoser, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The essential physiological role of platelets in wound healing and tissue repair builds the rationale for the use of human platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine. Abundant growth factors and cytokines stored in platelet granules can be naturally released by thrombin activation and clotting or artificially by freeze/thaw-mediated platelet lysis, sonication or chemical treatment. Human platelet lysate prepared by the various release strategies has been established as a suitable alternative to fetal bovine serum as culture medium supplement, enabling efficient propagation of human cells under animal serum-free conditions for a multiplicity of applications in advanced somatic cell therapy and tissue engineering. The rapidly increasing number of studies using platelet derived products for inducing human cell proliferation and differentiation has also uncovered a considerable variability of human platelet lysate preparations which limits comparability of results. The main variations discussed herein encompass aspects of donor selection, preparation of the starting material, the possibility for pooling in plasma or additive solution, the implementation of pathogen inactivation and consideration of ABO blood groups, all of which can influence applicability. This review outlines the current knowledge about human platelet lysate as a powerful additive for human cell propagation and highlights its role as a prevailing supplement for human cell culture capable to replace animal serum in a growing spectrum of applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Methods of preparation of the platelet-rich plasma used in medicine as an accelerator of tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Kesy, Lena; Kopczyński, Przemysław; Baszczuk, Aleksandra; Kopczyński, Zygmunt

    2014-04-01

    Platelet rich plasma is being increasingly used in the modem medicine as a material, stimulating regeneration and accelerating tissue healing. Platelet rich plasma is an autologous platelet concentrate, which is obtained from the peripheral blood of the patient. The method of extraction is based on the isolation of platelets during centrifugation of the whole blood, drew on anticoagulant. With the difference in density between the various cellular components of blood, such as red blood cells, buffy coat and platelet poor plasma, the separation into individual fractions is possible. At the present moment no optimal method of preparation of the platelet rich plasma has been found. On the market there are a number of commercial collection systems available, differing from each other in centrifugation parameters, type of container to which blood is collected and anticogulant used. Unfortunately, this can lead to obtaining platelet rich plasma with a varying number of platelets, leukocytes and resulting in a different concentration of growth factors. This is important, because the studies show, that a positive clinical effect depends on the quality of the used platelet-rich plasma.

  20. Mice Lacking the ITIM-Containing Receptor G6b-B Exhibit Macrothrombocytopenia and Aberrant Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Jun; Bem, Danai; Finney, Brenda; Heising, Silke; Gissen, Paul; White, James G.; Berndt, Michael C.; Gardiner, Elizabeth E.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Douglas, Michael R.; Campbell, Robert D.; Watson, Steve P.; Senis, Yotis A.

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are highly reactive cell fragments that adhere to exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) and prevent excessive blood loss by forming clots. Paradoxically, megakaryocytes, which produce platelets in the bone marrow, remain relatively refractory to the ECM-rich environment of the bone marrow despite having the same repertoire of receptors as platelets. These include the ITAM (immunoreceptor tyrosine–based activation motif)–containing collagen receptor complex, which consists of glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and the Fc receptor γ-chain, and the ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine–based inhibition motif)–containing receptor G6b-B. We showed that mice lacking G6b-B exhibited macrothrombocytopenia (reduced platelet numbers and the presence of enlarged platelets) and a susceptibility to bleeding as a result of aberrant platelet production and function. Platelet numbers were markedly reduced in G6b-B–deficient mice compared to those in wild-type mice because of increased platelet turnover. Furthermore, megakaryocytes in G6b-B–deficient mice showed enhanced metalloproteinase production, which led to increased shedding of cell-surface receptors, including GPVI and GPIba. In addition, G6b-B–deficient megakaryocytes exhibited reduced integrin-mediated functions and defective formation of proplatelets, the long filamentous projections from which platelets bud off. Together, these findings establish G6b-B as a major inhibitory receptor regulating megakaryocyte activation, function, and platelet production. PMID:23112346

  1. Active Lyn protein tyrosine kinase is selectively enriched within membrane microdomains of resting platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Dorahy, D J; Burns, G F

    1998-01-01

    Circulating platelets are primed to respond very rapidly to thrombogenic stimuli, but most platelets complete their lifespan without ever becoming activated. Platelet activation is accompanied by waves of sequential tyrosine phosphorylation thought to involve members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs). We show here that resting platelets contain highly active pp53/56(Lyn) PTK within membrane microdomains (rafts) isolated biochemically with or without the use of detergent. This fraction is also greatly enriched in the transmembrane glycoprotein CD36, known to associate with Lyn PTK, but in transfection studies we could find no evidence to suggest that CD36 affects the distribution or function of Lyn. Upon platelet activation Lyn activity remains constant or diminishes and pp60(c-src) PTK within this fraction becomes highly activated, indicating the dynamic nature of the membrane microdomains. It is suggested that the function of active Lyn PTK in the resting platelet is to allow prolonged survival of this anucleate cell. PMID:9657978

  2. Platelet function tests: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Liotta, Agatina Alessandrello; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation - adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation - have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered.

  3. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  4. Relationships between platelet counts, platelet volumes and reticulated platelets in patients with ITP: evidence for significant platelet count inaccuracies with conventional instrument methods.

    PubMed

    Diquattro, M; Gagliano, F; Calabrò, G M; Tommasi, M; Scott, C S; Mancuso, G; Palma, B; Menozzi, I

    2009-04-01

    The platelet count has a primary role in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). This study analysed the accuracy of ITP patient platelet counts determined by Abbott CD-Sapphire (impedance/optical) and Bayer Advia 120 (optical) analyses, compared with a reference immunoplatelet method. Instrument platelet estimates showed broad equivalence in the higher range of observed values, but significant discrepancies against the immunoplatelet count were seen when platelet counts were <10 x 10(9)/l. CD-Sapphire mean platelet volume (MPV) results revealed increased (>12 fl) platelet volumes in eight of eight ITP patients with counts of <20 x 10(9)/l compared with 6/6 and 5/13 patients with platelet counts of 20-50 and >50 x 10(9)/l. In contrast, Bayer Advia MPV values showed no relationship with the platelet count. Increased reticulated platelets were associated with an increasing CD-Sapphire MPV (R(2) = 0.61) and a decreasing platelet count. High (>40%) reticulated platelet values were seen in 9/9 patients with immunoplatelet counts of <20 x 10(9)/l compared with 0/19 patients with platelet counts above 20 x 10(9)/l. There may be a need for caution in the interpretation of platelet counts in ITP patients obtained with conventional instrument methods, and therapeutic decisions should ideally be validated by reference immunoplatelet procedures.

  5. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer-Based Composites with Magnetic Aligned Hexagonal Boron Nitride Platelets.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Duan, Bin; Li, Lan; Xie, Bin; Huang, Mengyu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2015-06-17

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) platelets are widely used as the reinforcing fillers for enhancing the thermal conductivity of polymer-based composites. Since hBN platelets have high aspect ratio and show a highly anisotropic thermal property, the thermal conductivity of the hBNs-filled composites should be strongly associated with the platelets' orientation. However, the orientation effect has been explored less frequently due to the technical difficulties in precontrol of the platelets' orientation in the polymer matrix. In this paper, we report the use of magnetic fields to assemble the platelets into various microstructures and to study the thermal conductivities of the designed composites. The experimental results showed that thermal conductivities are dramatically different among these composites. For instance, the thermal conductivities of the composites with platelets oriented parallel and perpendicular to the heat flux direction are respectively 44.5% higher and 37.9% lower than that of unaligned composites at the volume fraction of 9.14%. The results were also analyzed by a theoretical model. The model suggests that the orientation of the hBN platelets is the main reason for the variance in the thermal conductivity.

  7. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  8. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  9. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  10. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  11. Fractional Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-11-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schrödinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schrödinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional "Bohr atom") and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schrödinger equations.

  12. Platelet function alterations and their relation to P-selectin (CD62P) expression in children with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Zuhal K; Orhan, Mehmet F; Büyükavcı, Mustafa

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) may cause platelet aggregation dysfunction and this can be reversed by iron therapy. On the other hand, it has been reported that the platelet fractions carrying the platelet activation markers, CD62P and CD63, are increased in thalassemic patients and there is a significant correlation between the increased levels of soluble P-selectin and free iron in sickle cell disease. This study was performed to investigate the alterations of platelet functions and whether iron deficiency results in diminished expression of activation marker (P-selectin; CD62P) leading to platelet aggregation dysfunction in children with IDA. Hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices (mean erythrocyte volume and red blood cell distribution width), serum levels of iron, transferrin and ferritin, platelet aggregation tests (with ADP, collagen, and ristocetin), PFA-100 closure time, and CD62P expression were evaluated in fasting blood samples of 22 children with IDA and 20 children without anemia. CD62P expression was detected by flow cytometry in normal and 5 μmol/l ADP-activated platelets. Mean closure times were longer in the patient group than control. In platelet aggregation tests, mean values of maximum aggregation times by ristocetin, ADP, and collagen were also more prolonged in patient group. Ristocetin-induced maximum aggregation rates (amplitude) were significantly higher in patients. However, ADP and collagen induction did not produce the same effect. CD62P expressions were significantly higher on activated platelets of the patient group, although they were similar in both groups before activation by ADP. These findings suggest that platelet aggregation and adhesion have been delayed in children with IDA; however, platelet function abnormalities are not associated with CD62P expression on platelet surface.

  13. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. Methods PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Results Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation

  14. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors.

    PubMed

    Amable, Paola Romina; Carias, Rosana Bizon Vieira; Teixeira, Marcus Vinicius Telles; da Cruz Pacheco, Italo; Corrêa do Amaral, Ronaldo José Farias; Granjeiro, José Mauro; Borojevic, Radovan

    2013-06-07

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 10(6) to 1.9 × 10(6) platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation retained a high concentration

  15. Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma for the Treatment of Pattern Hair Loss.

    PubMed

    Singh, Babu; Goldberg, Lynne J

    2016-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a solution derived from whole blood that is enriched in the platelet fraction. Platelets serve as a reservoir of growth factors and cytokines. When platelets are activated in vivo, signaling molecules are released into the immediate microenvironment and activate receptors for various pathways. Historically, PRP has been applied to wound beds to promote healing of complex wounds. Over the last decade, it has served as a valuable therapeutic tool in various specialties such as maxillofacial surgery, plastic surgery, orthopedics and sports medicine. Only recently has PRP been utilized for dermatologic purposes, more specifically, for the treatment of male and female pattern hair loss. In this review, we discuss molecular and cellular pathways upregulated by PRP important in hair folliculogenesis, and examine clinical evidence from all previously published studies involving the use of PRP for pattern hair loss.

  16. EXTENDED STORAGE OF PLATELET-RICH PLASMA PREPARED PLATELET CONCENTRATES IN PLASMA OR PLASMALYTE

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Bolgiano, Doug; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Background Using bacterial detection or pathogen reduction, extended platelet storage may be licensed if platelet viability is maintained. FDA's post-storage platelet acceptance guidelines are that autologous stored platelet recoveries and survivals should be ≥66% and ≥58%, respectively, of each donor's fresh platelet data. Study Design And Methods Non-leukoreduced platelet concentrates were prepared from whole blood donations. Autologous platelet concentrates from 62 subjects were stored in 100% plasma (n=44) or 20% plasma/80% Plasmalyte (n=18), an acetate based, non-glucose containing crystalloid solution previously used for platelet storage.(1-3) Fresh platelets were obtained on the day the donor's stored platelets were to be transfused. The fresh and stored platelets were alternately radiolabeled with either 51Chromium or 111Indium, and in vitro measurements were performed on the stored platelets. Results FDA's platelet recovery criterion was met for 7 days of plasma storage, but platelet survivals maintained viability for only 6 days. Plasmalyte stored platelets did not meet either acceptance criteria after 6 days of storage. After 7 days of storage, platelet recoveries averaged 43 ± 4% and 30 ± 4% and survivals 4.1 ± 0.4 days and 2.0 ± 0.2 days for plasma and Plasmalyte-stored platelets, respectively (p=0.03 for recoveries and p<0.001 for survivals). Post-storage platelet recoveries correlated with the commonly-used in vitro platelet quality measurements of HSR and Annexin V binding, while survivals correlated with ESC, morphology score, and pH. Conclusion There is a progressive decrease in recoveries and survivals of plasma stored platelets over time. Platelet viability is better maintained in plasma than Plasmalyte. PMID:20456703

  17. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2 (-∙)) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5- 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2 (-∙) in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  18. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2−∙) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5– 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2−∙ in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:26933473

  19. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  20. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-06-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) i.v. prior to red light irradiation and the platelet-rich plasma was prepared and irradiated by red light. The platelets were processed for EM examination and stereological analysis. It was shown the 16 hrs after irradiation almost all platelets were necrotized; 8 hours after irradiation about one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged. Immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformated, showing significantly increased mean area, perimeter and short axis, and mean cell volume and cell surface area. The findings indicate that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly damaged by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. The early platelet photoactivation may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... play a role in the formation of alpha-granules, which are sacs inside platelets that contain growth ... that causes bleeding, the proteins stored in alpha-granules help platelets stick to one another to form ...

  2. Comparative lipidomics and proteomics analysis of platelet lipid rafts using different detergents.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Davani, Siamak; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Meneveau, Nicolas; Montange, Damien

    2016-11-01

    Lipid rafts play a pivotal role in physiological functions of platelets. Their isolation using nonionic mild detergents is considered as the gold standard method, but there is no consensual detergent for lipid raft studies. We aimed to investigate which detergent is the most suitable for lipid raft isolation from platelet membrane, based on lipidomics and proteomics analysis. Platelets were obtained from healthy donors. Twelve sucrose fractions were extracted by three different detergents, namely Brij 35, Lubrol WX, and Triton X100, at 0.05% and 1%. After lipidomics analysis and determination of fractions enriched in cholesterol (Ch) and sphingomyelin (SM), proteomics analysis was performed. Lipid rafts were mainly observed in 1-4 fractions, and non-rafts were distributed on 5-12 fractions. Considering the concentration of Ch and SM, Lubrol WX 1% and Triton X100 1% were more suitable detergents as they were able to isolate lipid raft fractions that were more enriched than non-raft fractions. By proteomics analysis, overall, 822 proteins were identified in platelet membrane. Lipid raft fractions isolated with Lubrol WX 0.05% and Triton X100 1% contained mainly plasma membrane proteins. However, only Lubrol WX 0.05 and 1% and Triton X100 1% were able to extract non-denaturing proteins with more than 10 transmembrane domains. Our results suggest that Triton X100 1% is the most suitable detergent for global lipid and protein studies on platelet plasma membrane. However, the detergent should be adapted if investigation of an association between specific proteins and lipid rafts is planned.

  3. Anti-platelet effect of cumanastatin 1, a disintegrin isolated from venom of South American Crotalus rattlesnake.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Manuel; Lucena, Sara; Aguilar, Irma; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Salazar, Ana M; Sánchez, Elda E; Girón, Maria E; Carvajal, Zoila; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L; Guerrero, Belsy

    2009-03-01

    Disintegrins have been previously described in the venom of several snake families inhibiting signal transduction, cell-cell interactions, and cell-matrix interactions and may have therapeutic potential in heart attacks, thrombotic diseases, and cancers. This investigation describes the first disintegrin isolated from South American Crotalus venom (Venezuelan rattlesnake Crotalus durissus cumanensis), which inhibits platelet adhesion to matrix proteins. C. d. cumanensis crude venom was first separated on a Sephadex G-100 column into 4 fractions (SI to SIV). Crude venom and SIII fraction significantly diminished platelet adhesion to fibrinogen (Fg) and to fibronectin (Fn). Anti-adhesive SIII fraction was further separated by DEAE-Sephacel followed by C-18 reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The platelet anti-adhesive fraction obtained was designated as cumanastatin-1. This disintegrin has a mass of 7.442 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and pI of 8.5. Cumanastatin-1 also inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation with an IC(50) of 158 nM. However, it did not significantly inhibit collagen and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Cumanastatin-1 considerably inhibited anti-alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin binding to platelets in a dose-dependent manner; however, it did not present any effect on the alpha(5)beta(1) integrin or on P-selectin.

  4. Patterning surfaces for controlled platelet adhesion and detection of dysfunctional platelets.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Shi, Qiang; Wong, Shing-Chung; Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Hengchong; Yin, Jinghua

    2013-06-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in thrombus formation and in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis. Patterning surfaces for controlled platelet adhesion paves the way for adhesion and activation mechanisms in platelets and detection of platelet functional defects. Here, a new and simple method based on controlled polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) on the surface of styrene-block-(ethylene-co-butylene)-block-styrene (SEBS) is shown. The competition between polymerization and degradation enables platelet adhesion on SEBS to be switched on and off. The adhesive sites of the platelets can be down to single cell level, and the dysfunctional platelets can be quantitatively detected.

  5. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  6. All-Aluminum Transverse Platelet Injector

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-25

    to the low density material. The 1xx$nafter described lightweight platelet injector includes an aluminum transverse platelet faceplate joined to an... aluminum body 15 with the electron beam 20 welds 21. This allows the fabrication of an all aluminum transverse platelet iinjector capable of replacing the...1 87 1-93 Serial No _ 872,?193 Filing 1)’ 25Jan 78( * Inventg/ Samuel E./Adair --: i - ------ NOC E . . . / All- Aluminum Transverse Platelet

  7. Selection of donor platelets for alloimmunized patients using a platelet-associated IgG assay

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence platelet-associated immunoglobulin-G (PA-IgG) assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets in 8/12 multitransfused patients and to perform platelet crossmatching in the 8 alloimmunized patients. The correct separation of multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. For 5 alloimmunized patients, compatible and incompatible donor platelets were demonstrated by PA-IgG crossmatching and were confirmed by platelet survival studies. With the other 3 alloimmunized patients, only Pa-IgG incompatible donor platelets were found. Survival studies with 5 of these incompatible donor platelets showed markedly reduced survival times on 4 occasions. Pa-IgG compatible donor platelets survived 3.5 to 8.7 days, while Pa-IgG incompatible platelets showed survival times of 0.1 to 2.4 days.

  8. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  9. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  10. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining of immature platelets in donors.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, Valery M; Beskorovainova, Victoria Ju; Chanieva, Marem I; Dyagileva, Olga A; Naumova, Iren N; Skedina, Marina A

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen in platelets (PLTs) on smears of peripheral blood of 40 donors was investigated by the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) method. Three groups were formed. Group 1 was consisted of 21 men undergoing the donor selection procedure. Additionally, 9 first-time donors undergoing plateletpheresis (Group 2) and 10 donors who frequently underwent platelet apheresis (Group 3) were studied as a model of relative thrombocytopenia. Cell sizes were measured with the use of a Image Analyzer "ASPBC" (Russia). The training procedure and classification of PAS-blood PLTs were made on the basis of expert evaluation. In this article, we have established three facts. First, the PAS-positive PLT area was larger than that of the PAS-negative cells (9.5 ± 3.6 sq.mkm vs. 3.9 ± 1.3 sq.mkm, p < 0.001, n = 21). The PAS-positivity of PLTs was 23.1 ± 9.2%. Second, the PAS-positivity correlated (r(S) = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the immature platelets fraction (IPF %), determined using Sysmex XE-2100. The mean IPF was 2.1 ± 1.0% (range 0.3-4.6%). Third, using the IPF% values obtained in Group 1, we found a significantly higher level of IPF in the samples both in Group 2 [mean value 4.2 ± 2.0% (range 1.9-7.0), p < 0.01] and in Group 3 [mean value 5.1 ± 2.5% (range 1.2-8.6), p < 0.004] with relative thrombocytopenia [Group 2: median 198 (95% confidence interval, CI 166-227) vs. median 229 (95% CI 206-267), p < 0.05; Group 3: median 142.5 (95% CI 132-173) vs. median 214.5 (95% CI 196-267), p < 0.01] after plateletpheresis. There was also a significant difference between the pre- and post-plateletpheresis for IPF% in Group 2 and Group 3: median 1.7 (95% CI 1.4-4.0) vs. median 4.0 (95% CI 2.7-5.8), p < 0.05 and median 4.0 (95% CI 2.7-6.0) vs. median 5.1 (95% CI 3.3-6.9), p < 0.01. The increased IPF shows a correlation with the PAS positivity [r(S) = 0.5 (p = 0.14) and r(S) = 0.6 (p = 0.05)] which has a tendency to

  11. Dengue platelets meet Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Bray, Paul F

    2013-11-14

    In this issue of Blood, Hottz et al provide compelling evidence that dengue virus (DV) induces (1) platelet synthesis of interleukin-1b (IL-1b); (2) platelet-derived IL-1b–containing microvesicles (MVs) that increase vascular permeability; and (3) DV-triggered inflammasome activation in platelets.

  12. EFFECTS OF BACTERIAL ENDOTOXIN ON RABBIT PLATELETS

    PubMed Central

    Des Prez, Roger M.; Bryant, Richard E.

    1966-01-01

    The divalent ion requirements of rabbit platelet injury by endotoxin have been defined by the use of various anticoagulant solutions and have been compared to the divalent ion requirements of platelet injury produced by addition of antigen to immune platelet-rich plasma. The endotoxin-platelet interaction takes place in citrated blood. Platelet damage by antigen is inhibited by citrate, but preincubation of antigen and immune platelet-poor plasma in the absence of citrate results in a substance, presumably antigen-antibody complement complex, which then does injure platelets in the presence of citrate. Neither endotoxin nor preincubated antigen injures platelets in the presence of sodium EDTA in concentrations sufficient to interact with all divalent cations present in plasma. These observations have been interpreted by viewing the platelet-endotoxin interaction as a consequence of platelet phagocytosis of endotoxin, a reaction not requiring complement but requiring definite small concentrations of divalent cations. The interaction of antigen and platelets is regarded as a two phase reaction, the first requiring the participation of complement and concentrations of divalent cation larger than those provided in citrated plasma, the second requiring smaller concentrations of divalent cation, no further participation of complement, and active in citrated plasma. This second phase is regarded as representing platelet phagocytosis of immune complexes. PMID:5951281

  13. Platelets Inhibit Migration of Canine Osteosarcoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Bulla, S C; Badial, P R; Silva, R C; Lunsford, K; Bulla, C

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumour cells is important for tumour growth and metastasis. Thrombocytopenia or antiplatelet treatment negatively impact on cancer metastasis, demonstrating potentially important roles for platelets in tumour progression. To our knowledge, there is no information regarding the role of platelets in cancer progression in dogs. This study was designed to test whether canine platelets affected the migratory behaviour of three canine osteosarcoma cell lines and to give insights of molecular mechanisms. Intact platelets, platelet lysate and platelet releasate inhibited the migration of canine osteosarcoma cell lines. Addition of blood leucocytes to the platelet samples did not alter the inhibitory effect on migration. Platelet treatment also significantly downregulated the transcriptional levels of SNAI2 and TWIST1 genes. The interaction between canine platelets or molecules released during platelet activation and these tumour cell lines inhibits their migration, which suggests that canine platelets might antagonize metastasis of canine osteosarcoma. This effect is probably due to, at least in part, downregulation of genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  15. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  16. Iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Davide; Buccini, Alessandro; Donatelli, Marco; Serra-Capizzano, Stefano

    2015-05-01

    Fractional Tikhonov regularization methods have been recently proposed to reduce the oversmoothing property of the Tikhonov regularization in standard form, in order to preserve the details of the approximated solution. Their regularization and convergence properties have been previously investigated showing that they are of optimal order. This paper provides saturation and converse results on their convergence rates. Using the same iterative refinement strategy of iterated Tikhonov regularization, new iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization methods are introduced. We show that these iterated methods are of optimal order and overcome the previous saturation results. Furthermore, nonstationary iterated fractional Tikhonov regularization methods are investigated, establishing their convergence rate under general conditions on the iteration parameters. Numerical results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed regularization iterations.

  17. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  18. Differential effects of grape ( Vitis vinifera ) skin polyphenolics on human platelet aggregation and low-density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Beahm, Mark R; Kuhns, Melissa A; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D; Folts, John D

    2012-06-13

    Antioxidant and antiplatelet properties of grape products are thought to be responsible for observed antiatherosclerotic effects. Diverse classes of phenolics are derived from the seed and skin (GSK) of grapes. The relative contributions of the classes of phenolics to observed properties of grape products are unknown. In this paper, GSK fractions were used to examine effects on platelet aggregation, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation in vitro, and relative binding of phenolics to LDL. GSK was separated into six fractions (fractions 1-6), and primary phenolics were characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Fractions 4, 5, and 6, enriched in polygalloyl polyflavan-3-ols (PGPFs) with 3-6, 4-8, and 6-15 degrees of polymerization, respectively, inhibited platelet aggregation. Fractions 1-3, containing various amounts of oligosaccharides, hydroxycinnamic acids, anthocyanins, flavanols, and low molecular weight PGPFs, significantly increased platelet aggregation. Fractions 4-6 were most effective in binding LDL and inhibiting LDL oxidation. Fractions 5 and 6 exhibited the greatest inhibition of platelet aggregation and LDL oxidation, suggesting that polymeric PGPFs are responsible for the beneficial effects of grape products. Conversely, phenolics in fractions 1-3 may reduce the net biological potency of the grape products and have undesirable effects on cardiovascular disease risk factors.

  19. A Model for Studying the Hemostatic Consumption or Destruction of Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Josefsson, Emma C.; Henley, Katya J.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in understanding homeostasis of the hematopoietic system is to what extent intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate cell fate. We recently revisited this issue for the case of blood platelets and concluded that platelet life span is largely regulated by internal factors, in contrast to the long-held view that accumulated damage from the environment triggers clearance. However, it is known that in humans there is an ongoing fixed requirement for platelets to maintain hemostasis and prevent bleeding; hence a proportion of platelets may be consumed in such processes before the end of their natural life span. Whether it is possible to detect this random loss of platelets in normal individuals at steady-state is unknown. To address this question, we have developed a mathematical model that independently incorporates age-independent random loss and age-dependent natural senescent clearance. By fitting to population survival curves, we illustrate the application of the model in quantifying the fixed requirement for platelets to maintain hemostasis in mice, and discuss the relationship with previous work in humans. Our results suggest a higher requirement for platelets in mice than in humans, however experimental uncertainty in the data limits our ability to constrain this quantity. We then explored the relationship between experimental uncertainty and parameter constraint using simulated data. We conclude that in order to provide useful constraint on the random loss fraction the standard error in the mean of the data must be reduced substantially, either through improving experimental uncertainty or increasing the number of experimental replicates to impractical levels. Finally we find that parameter constraint is improved at higher values of the random loss fraction; thus the model find utility in situations where the random loss fraction is expected to be high, for example during active bleeding or some types of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23505441

  20. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  1. Platelet-rich plasma therapy - future or trend?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic complex musculoskeletal injuries that are slow to heal pose challenges to physicians and researchers alike. Orthobiologics is a relatively newer science that involves application of naturally found materials from biological sources (for example, cell-based therapies), and offers exciting new possibilities to promote and accelerate bone and soft tissue healing. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an orthobiologic that has recently gained popularity as an adjuvant treatment for musculoskeletal injuries. It is a volume of fractionated plasma from the patient's own blood that contains platelet concentrate. The platelets contain alpha granules that are rich in several growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, insulin-like growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor, which play key roles in tissue repair mechanisms. PRP has found application in diverse surgical fields to enhance bone and soft-tissue healing by placing supra-physiological concentrations of autologous platelets at the site of tissue damage. The relative ease of preparation, applicability in the clinical setting, favorable safety profile and possible beneficial outcome make PRP a promising therapeutic approach for future regenerative treatments. However, there is a large knowledge gap in our understanding of PRPs mechanism of action, which has raised skepticism regarding its potential efficacy and use. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the various factors proposed to contribute to the biological activity of PRP, and the published pre-clinical and clinical evidence to support it. Additionally, we describe the current techniques and technology for PRP preparation, and review the present shortcomings of this therapy that will need to be overcome if it is to gain broad acceptance. PMID:22894643

  2. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-09

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage.

  3. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS)

    PubMed Central

    Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S. Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either 51chromium or 111indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics’ bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage. PMID:24258816

  4. Factors governing the subcellular distribution of indium-111 in human platelets. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, J.L.; Rushin, C.; Vecchione, J.J.; Valeri, C.R.

    1982-07-21

    The subcellular distribution of indium-111 (In-111), and the effect of the metabolic inhibitors rotenone and 2-deoxyglucose on its uptake, retention, and subcellular distribution, have been investigated in human platelets using techniques which permit the maintenance of dense body integrity during fractionation. As with chromium-51 (Cr-51), the In-111 label appears to be located principally in the cytosolic (soluble) fraction. Equilibrium dialysis studies suggest that only 10-20% of the In-111 is associated noncovalently with non-microsomal proteins. There appears to be a relationship between the metabolic pool of nucleotides and the uptake and retention of In-111, since incubation of platelets at 37 C with metabolic inhibitors prior to labeling with In-111 reduces the amount of label taken up when compared to platelets incubated at 22 C.

  5. Biochemical properties of platelet microparticle membranes formed during exocytosis resemble organelles more than plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Lundell, Kerstin; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2002-08-14

    Studies of [3H]glycerol turnover in phosphatidylcholine (PC) in platelets revealed two metabolic pools, a 'low turnover PC' in collagen-induced microparticles with specific radioactivity only 10% of that found in the 'high turnover PC' of bulk platelet PC. Isolated organelle fractions of [3H]glycerol-labelled platelets contained [3H]PC with specific radioactivities about 20% of that in membrane fractions. These results together with studies on distribution of concanavalin A-FITC and GPlb, a plasma membrane receptor, indicate that microparticles formed during exocytosis are not simple vesiculations of plasma membrane, but they seem rather to originate from a relatively metabolically static membrane pool not accessible to extracellular reagents.

  6. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    AlSheeha, Muneera A; Alaboudi, Rafi S; Alghasham, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Javed; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia. To compare platelet indices, namely platelet count (PC), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and PC to MPV ratio in women with preeclampsia compared with healthy controls. Qassim Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A case-control study. Sixty preeclamptic women were the cases and an equal number of healthy pregnant women were the controls. There was no significant difference in age, parity, and body mass index between the study groups. Sixteen and 44 of the cases were severe and mild preeclampsia, respectively. There was no significant difference in PDW and MPV between the preeclamptic and control women. Both PC and PC to MPV ratios were significantly lower in the women with preeclampsia compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the PC, PDW, MPV, and PC to MPV ratio when women with mild and severe preeclampsia were compared. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the PC cutoff was 248.0×10(3)/µL for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia (P=0.019; the area under the ROC curve was 62.4%). Binary regression suggests that women with PC <248.010×10(3)/µL were at higher risk of preeclampsia (odds ratio =2.2, 95% confidence interval =1.08-4.6, P=0.03). The PC/MPV cutoff was 31.2 for diagnosis of preeclampsia (P=0.035, the area under the ROC curve was 62.2%). PC <248.010×10(3)/µL and PC to MPV ratio 31.2 are valid predictors of preeclampsia.

  7. Pooled platelet concentrates: an alternative to single donor apheresis platelets?

    PubMed

    Pietersz, R N I

    2009-10-01

    Three types of platelet concentrates (PC) are compared: PC either processed with the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or the Buffy coat (BC) method from whole blood units and PC obtained by apheresis. Leuko-reduction (LR) pre-storage is advocated to improve quality of the PC during storage and reduce adverse reactions in recipients. Standardization of methods allow preparation of PC with comparable yields of approximately 400 x 10(9) platelets in pooled non-LR-PRP, approximately 370 x 10(9) in pooled LR-BC-PC and in LR apheresis PC the number of platelets can be targeted on 350 x 10(9) or more with devices of various manufacturers. While viral transmission can be prevented by outstanding laboratory tests, the risk of bacterial contamination should be reduced by improved arm disinfection, deviation of the first 20-30 ml of blood and culture or rapid detection assays of the PC pre-issue. In a large prospective multicenter trial no significant difference was observed between cultures of apheresis PC (n = 15,198): 0.09% confirmed positive units versus 0.06% in pooled BC-PC (n = 37,045), respectively. Though platelet activation as measured by CD62 expression may differ in vitro in PC obtained with various apheresis equipment, and also between PC processed with the two whole blood methods there is scarce literature about the clinical impact of these findings. In conclusion the final products of LR-PC derived from whole blood or obtained by apheresis can be comparable, provided the critical steps of the processing method are identified and covered and the process is in control.

  8. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    AlSheeha, Muneera A; Alaboudi, Rafi S; Alghasham, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Javed; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia. Objective To compare platelet indices, namely platelet count (PC), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and PC to MPV ratio in women with preeclampsia compared with healthy controls. Setting Qassim Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Design A case–control study. Sixty preeclamptic women were the cases and an equal number of healthy pregnant women were the controls. Results There was no significant difference in age, parity, and body mass index between the study groups. Sixteen and 44 of the cases were severe and mild preeclampsia, respectively. There was no significant difference in PDW and MPV between the preeclamptic and control women. Both PC and PC to MPV ratios were significantly lower in the women with preeclampsia compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the PC, PDW, MPV, and PC to MPV ratio when women with mild and severe preeclampsia were compared. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the PC cutoff was 248.0×103/µL for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia (P=0.019; the area under the ROC curve was 62.4%). Binary regression suggests that women with PC <248.010×103/µL were at higher risk of preeclampsia (odds ratio =2.2, 95% confidence interval =1.08–4.6, P=0.03). The PC/MPV cutoff was 31.2 for diagnosis of preeclampsia (P=0.035, the area under the ROC curve was 62.2%). Conclusion PC <248.010×103/µL and PC to MPV ratio 31.2 are valid predictors of preeclampsia. PMID:27920548

  9. Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Immunofluorescence as Indicators of Platelet Compatibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-23

    Studies were performed to determine if the increase in MPV was due to the presence of alloantibodies or if it was due to ABO isoagglutinins anti-A and...blood group types (Tables IA and 1B). Sera from donors with blood group type 0 containing anti-A and anti-B isoagglutinins always caused type A...platelets to swell (range 7-24%) (Table 1A). Mixtures of B and 0 platelets with sera containing anti-A and anti-B isoagglutinins demonstrated no change or

  10. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  11. Platelet actively cooled thermal management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueggenburg, H. H.; Hidahl, J. W.; Kessler, E. L.; Rousar, D. C.

    1992-07-01

    An overview of 28 years of actively-cooled platelet thermal management devices design and development history is presented. Platelet devices are created by bonding together thin metal sheets (platelets) which contain chemically-etched coolant pasages. The bonding process produces an intricate and precise matrix of coolant passages and structural walls contained within a monolithic structure. Thirteen specific applications for platelet thermal management devices are described. These devices are cooled using convective, film, and transpiration cooling techniques. Platelet thermal management devices have been fabricated from a variety of metals, cooled with a variety of fluids, and operated at heat fluxes up to 200 Btu/sq in.-sec.

  12. Hemolysis after ABO-incompatible platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Chow, M P; Yung, C H; Hu, H Y; Tzeng, C H

    1991-08-01

    An 18 year old girl, with acute myeloid leukemia, developed progressive hemolysis after receiving multiple transfusions with ABO-incompatible platelets. It was caused by passive transfusion of anti-A and -B isoagglutinin from the donor plasma. Her hemoglobin level returned to normal after giving group compatible or pooled and reduced volume platelet concentrates. Transfusing group-incompatible platelets is not contraindicated, but donor plasma reduction should be considered for those patients who need prolonged platelet support. Testing for isoagglutinin titer in group O donors is an alternate method to reduce the incidence of plasma-induced hemolysis in group-incompatible platelet transfusions.

  13. Variations of the Platelet Count in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marchasin, Sidney; Wallerstein, Ralph O.; Aggeler, Paul M.

    1964-01-01

    Platelet counts were obtained in 675 patients with different hematological and other medical disorders. An indirect venous blood dry slide method which gave a normal range of 200 to 400 × 103 per cu mm was used. Platelet counts varied considerably in disease: In 20 patients, exclusive of myeloproliferative disorders, platelet counts in excess of 1,000 × 103 per cu mm were observed; in 20 patients, exclusive of leukemia and megaloblastic anemia, platelet counts were below 100 × 103 per cu mm. In general, platelet counts varied with the leukocyte count, but not with the degree of anemia. PMID:14180504

  14. Acetal phosphatidic acids: novel platelet aggregating agents.

    PubMed

    Brammer, J P; Maguire, M H; Walaszek, E J; Wiley, R A

    1983-05-01

    1 Palmitaldehyde, olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids induced rapid shape change and dose-dependent biphasic aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma; aggregation was reversible at low doses and irreversible at high doses of the acetal phosphatidic acids. The palmitaldehyde congener elicited monophasic dose-dependent aggregation of sheep platelets in platelet-rich plasma.2 The threshold concentration for palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid (PGAP)-induced platelet aggregation was 2.5-5 muM for human platelets and 0.25-0.5 muM for sheep platelets. PGAP was 4-5 times as potent versus human platelets as the olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids, which were equipotent.3 PGAP-induced irreversible aggregation of [(14)C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([(14)C]-5-HT)-labelled human platelets in platelet-rich plasma was accompanied by release of 44.0+/-2.4% (s.e.) of the platelet [(14)C]-5-HT; reversible aggregation was not associated with release. In contrast, PGAP-induced release of [(14)C]-5-HT-labelled sheep platelets was dose-dependent.4 The adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonist, 2-methylthio-AMP, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin, abolished PGAP-induced second phase aggregation and release in human platelets but did not affect the first, reversible, phase of aggregation. Both the first and second phases of PGAP-induced aggregation were abolished by chlorpromazine, by the phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, mepacrine, and by nmolar concentrations of prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)); these agents abolished the second, but not the first phase of ADP-induced aggregation.5 The related phospholipids, lecithin, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid, at <100 muM, neither induced aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma, nor modified PGAP-induced aggregation; 1-palmityl lysophosphatidic acid elicited aggregation of human platelets at a threshold concentration of 100 muM.6 It is concluded that the acetal phosphatidic acids

  15. Platelet activity and outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Naidech, Andrew M; Bernstein, Richard A; Levasseur, Kimberly; Bassin, Sarice L; Bendok, Bernard R; Batjer, H Hunt; Bleck, Thomas P; Alberts, Mark J

    2009-03-01

    There are few data on platelet function in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We prospectively enrolled 69 patients with ICH and measured platelet function on admission. Aspirin use before ICH was associated with reduced platelet activity. Less platelet activity was associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (516.5 [interquartile range (IQR), 454-629.25] vs 637 [IQR, 493-654] aspirin reaction units; p = 0.04) and death at 14 days (480.5 [IQR, 444.5-632.5] vs 626 [IQR, 494-652] aspirin reaction units; p = 0.04). Objective measures of platelet function on admission are associated with intraventricular hemorrhage and death after ICH.

  16. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  17. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation.

  18. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man.

    PubMed

    Mezzano, D; Hwang, K; Catalano, P; Aster, R H

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 = 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets = 7.57 mu3, LD platelets = 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  19. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    5. Klinger, M.H., and W. Jelkmann. 2002. Role of blood platelets in infection and inflammation. Journal of interferon & cytokine research : the...official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research 22:913-922. 6. Kulkarni, S., K.J. Woollard, S. Thomas, D. Oxley, and

  20. Platelet Cryopreservation Using Dimethyl Sulfoxide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    plateletpheresis methods or cell separators. In recent studies, the corrected count increment following 66 transfusions of frozen platelets collected using the...Haemonetics Model 30 processor (Haemonetics Corp., Natick, Mass.) was 12,3000 (range 0-36,800) compared to a mean CCI of 11,7000 (0-34,900) using manual plateletpheresis technique (N = 211).

  1. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of anti-platelet-active compounds from the root of Ashitaba (Angelica keiskei Koidz.).

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ju; Park, Ye Oak; Yu, Chengguang; Lee, Sung Eun; Park, Young Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is fundamental to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including the induction of thrombosis and arteriosclerosis. Anti-platelet activity of a crude methanol extract and solvent fractions of Ashitaba roots (Angelica keiskei Koidz.) was evaluated using a turbidimetric method using washed rabbit platelets. We identified the anti-platelet activities of two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of Ashitaba roots by using a bioassay-guided isolation method. 4-Hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol effectively inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (IC50 of 41.9 and 35.9 μM, respectively), platelet-activating factor (IC50 of 46.1 and 42.3 μM, respectively) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (IC50 of 16.5 and 45.9 μM, respectively). These compounds did not inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (IC50 of>80 μM). The results suggest that the chalcones 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol may be potent anti-thrombotic components of A. keiskei Koidz.

  2. Diagnosis of inherited platelet disorders on a blood smear: a tool to facilitate worldwide diagnosis of platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Greinacher, A; Pecci, A; Kunishima, S; Althaus, K; Nurden, P; Balduini, C L; Bakchoul, T

    2017-07-01

    Essentials There are many hereditary platelet disorders (HPD) but diagnosing these is challenging. We provide a method to diagnose several HPDs using standard blood smears requiring < 100 µL blood. By this approach, the underlying cause of HPD was characterized in ~25-30% of referred individuals. The method facilitates diagnosis of HPD for patients of all ages around the world. Background Many hereditary thrombocytopenias and/or platelet function disorders have been identified, but diagnosis of these conditions remains challenging. Diagnostic laboratory techniques are available only in a few specialized centers and, using fresh blood, often require the patient to travel long distances. For the same reasons, patients living in developing countries usually have limited access to diagnosis. Further, the required amount of blood is often prohibitive for pediatric patients. Objectives By a collaborative international approach of four centers, we aimed to overcome these limitations by developing a method using blood smears prepared from less than 100 μL blood, for a systematic diagnostic approach to characterize the platelet phenotype. Methods We applied immunofluorescence labelling (performed centrally) to standard air-dried peripheral blood smears (prepared locally, shipped by regular mail), using antibodies specific for proteins known to be affected in specific hereditary platelet disorders. Results By immunofluorescence labelling of blood smears we characterized the underlying cause in 877/3217 (27%) patients with suspected hereditary platelet disorders (HPD). Currently about 50 genetic causes for HPD are identified. Among those, the blood smear method was especially helpful to identify MYH9 disorders/MYH9-related disease, biallelic Bernard-Soulier syndrome, Glanzmann thrombasthenia and gray platelet syndrome. Diagnosis could be established for GATA1 macrothrombocytopenia, GFI1B macrothrombocytopenia, ß1-tubulin macrothrombocytopenia, filamin A

  3. New gene functions in megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation

    PubMed Central

    Gieger, Christian; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Cvejic, Ana; Tang, Weihong; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Serbanovic-Canic, Jovana; Elling, Ulrich; Goodall, Alison H.; Labrune, Yann; Lopez, Lorna M.; Mägi, Reedik; Meacham, Stuart; Okada, Yukinori; Pirastu, Nicola; Sorice, Rossella; Teumer, Alexander; Voss, Katrin; Zhang, Weihua; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bis, Joshua C.; Ellinghaus, David; Gögele, Martin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langenberg, Claudia; Kovacs, Peter; O’Reilly, Paul F.; Shin, So-Youn; Esko, Tõnu; Hartiala, Jaana; Kanoni, Stavroula; Murgia, Federico; Parsa, Afshin; Stephens, Jonathan; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Allayee, Hooman; Attwood, Antony; Balkau, Beverley; Bastardot, François; Basu, Saonli; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bomba, Lorenzo; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cambien, François; Chambers, John C.; Cucca, Francesco; D’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Boer, Rudolf A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Döring, Angela; Elliott, Paul; Erdmann, Jeanette; Evans, David M.; Falchi, Mario; Feng, Wei; Folsom, Aaron R.; Frazer, Ian H.; Gibson, Quince D.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hammond, Chris; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hersch, Micha; Illig, Thomas; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Jolley, Jennifer; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lloyd-Jones, Heather; Lumley, Thomas; Mangino, Massimo; Maschio, Andrea; Leach, Irene Mateo; McKnight, Barbara; Memari, Yasin; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nauck, Matthias; Navis, Gerjan; Nöthlings, Ute; Nolte, Ilja M.; Porteous, David J.; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Pullat, Janne; Ring, Susan M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Ruokonen, Aimo; Sala, Cinzia; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Schlessinger, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Scott, James; Smith, Nicholas L.; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M.; Stumvoll, Michael; Takahashi, Atsushi; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Taylor, Kent; Tenesa, Albert; Thein, Swee Lay; Tönjes, Anke; Uda, Manuela; Ulivi, Sheila; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Visscher, Peter M.; Völker, Uwe; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Tsun-Po; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zitting, Paavo; Bradley, John R.; Dedoussis, George V.; Gasparini, Paolo; Hazen, Stanley L.; Metspalu, Andres; Pirastu, Mario; Shuldiner, Alan R.; van Pelt, L. Joost; Zwaginga, Jaap-Jan; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Deary, Ian J.; Franke, Andre; Froguel, Philippe; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meisinger, Christa; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N.; Ciullo, Marina; Deloukas, Panos; Greinacher, Andreas; Jupe, Steve; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Khadake, Jyoti; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Penninger, Josef; Prokopenko, Inga; Stemple, Derek; Toniolo, Daniela; Wernisch, Lorenz; Sanna, Serena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Rendon, Augusto; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Soranzo, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are the second most abundant cell type in blood and are essential for maintaining haemostasis. Their count and volume are tightly controlled within narrow physiological ranges, but there is only limited understanding of the molecular processes controlling both traits. Here we carried out a high-powered meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in up to 66,867 individuals of European ancestry, followed by extensive biological and functional assessment. We identified 68 genomic loci reliably associated with platelet count and volume mapping to established and putative novel regulators of megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation. These genes show megakaryocyte-specific gene expression patterns and extensive network connectivity. Using gene silencing in Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster, we identified 11 of the genes as novel regulators of blood cell formation. Taken together, our findings advance understanding of novel gene functions controlling fate-determining events during megakaryopoiesis and platelet formation, providing a new example of successful translation of GWAS to function. PMID:22139419

  4. Mean platelet volume in young children with urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I Re; Shin, Jae Il; Park, Se Jin; Oh, Ji Young; Kim, Ji Hong

    2015-01-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) has not yet been well-established in urinary tract infection (UTI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of MPV as an acute phase reactant in children with UTI. Data from 118 young children (<2 years) with UTI between 2012 and 2013 were grouped as acute pyelonephritis (APN) and lower UTI according to the dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan abnormalities. MPV, platelet distribution width (PDW) platelet count, and other infection markers (white blood cell [WBC] count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], and C-reactive protein [CRP]) were measured. WBC (P = 0.001), ESR (P = 0.005), CRP (P < 0.001) and MPV levels (P = 0.011) were significantly higher in the APN group than those in the lower UTI group. MPV positively correlated with PDW, CRP and negatively with platelet count. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that CRP and MPV were independent predictive factors for APN patients. However, the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for MPV was lower than CRP. Our results suggest that MPV can be an inflammatory marker in UTI, but the predictive value of MPV was not superior to CRP in the diagnosis of APN. PMID:26666588

  5. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheremata, William A; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Yeon S; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS) patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP), P-selectin expression (CD62p), circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg)], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p < 0.001) and CD62p expression was also markedly elevated (p < 0.001). Both are markers of platelet activation. Platelet-associated IgM, but not IgG, was marginally elevated in MS (p = 0.01). Protein S in MS patients did not differ significantly from normal values. Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted. PMID:18588683

  6. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  7. Inhibition of activated protein C by platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Jane, S M; Mitchell, C A; Hau, L; Salem, H H

    1989-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC), an anticoagulant that acts by inactivating Factors Va and VIIIa, is dependent on a suitable surface for its action. In this study we examined the ability of human platelets to provide this surface and support APC-mediated anticoagulant effects. The activity of APC was examined in three systems: the Factor Xa recalcification time of Al(OH)3 adsorbed plasma, studies of thrombin generation in recalcified plasma, and assessment of the rate of inactivation of purified Factor Va. In comparison with phospholipid, intact platelets required significantly greater concentrations of APC to achieve a similar degree of anticoagulation. When washed platelet membranes were substituted for intact platelets, adequate support of APC was observed and the anticoagulant effect was similar to that obtained with phospholipid. Platelet releasate obtained by stimulation of platelets with thrombin and epinephrine contained an inhibitor that interfered with the ability of phospholipid and washed platelet membranes to catalyze the anticoagulant effects of APC. A noncompetitive inhibition was suggested by Dixon plot analysis of the interaction between platelet releasate and APC. The activity of the platelet APC inhibitor was immediate and was not enhanced by heparin, distinguishing it from the circulating protein C inhibitor. The presence of this inhibitor in the platelet and its release with platelet stimulation emphasizes the procoagulant role of this cell. PMID:2910909

  8. Platelets and viruses: an ambivalent relationship.

    PubMed

    Flaujac, Claire; Boukour, Siham; Cramer-Bordé, Elisabeth

    2010-02-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of viral infections providing evidence that interaction of platelets with viruses is an important pathophysiological phenomenon. Multiple mechanisms are involved depending on the nature of the viruses involved. These include immunological platelet destruction, inappropriate platelet activation and consumption, and impaired megakaryopoiesis. Viruses bind platelets through specific receptors and identified ligands, which lead to mutual alterations of both the platelet host and the viral aggressor. We have shown that HIV-1 viruses are internalized specifically in platelets and megakaryocytes, where they can be either sheltered, unaltered (with potential transfer of the viruses into target organs), or come in contact with platelet secretory products leading to virus destruction and facilitated platelet clearance. In this issue, we have reviewed the various pathways that platelets use in order to interact with viruses, HIV and others. This review also shows that more work is still needed to precisely identify platelet roles in viral infections, and to answer the challenge of viral safety in platelet transfusion.

  9. Early increase in DcR2 expression and late activation of caspases in the platelet storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Plenchette, S; Moutet, M; Benguella, M; N'Gondara, J P; Guigner, F; Coffe, C; Corcos, L; Bettaieb, A; Solary, E

    2001-10-01

    Platelet transfusion is widely used to prevent bleeding in patients with severe thrombocytopenia. The maximal storage duration of platelet concentrates is usually 5 days, due to the platelet storage lesion that impairs their functions when stored for longer times. Some of the morphological and biochemical changes that characterize this storage lesion are reminiscent of cell death by apoptosis. The present study analyzed whether proteins involved in nucleated cell apoptosis could play a role in the platelet storage lesion. Storage of leukocyte-depleted platelets obtained by apheresis is associated with a late and limited activation of caspases, mainly caspase-3. This event correlates with an increased expression of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim in the particulate fraction and a slight and late release of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein Diablo/Smac in the cytosol. Platelets do not express the death receptors Fas, DR4 and DR5 on their plasma membrane, while the expression of the decoy receptor DcR2 increases progressively during platelet storage. Addition of low concentrations of the cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide accelerates platelet caspase activation during storage, an effect that is partially prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Altogether, DcR2 expression on the plasma membrane is an early event while caspase activation is a late event during platelet storage. These observations suggest that caspases are unlikely to account for the platelet storage lesion. As a consequence, addition of caspase inhibitors may not improve the quality of platelet concentrates stored in standard conditions.

  10. The biogenesis of platelets from megakaryocyte proplatelets

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sunita R.; Hartwig, John H.; Italiano, Joseph E.

    2005-01-01

    Platelets are formed and released into the bloodstream by precursor cells called megakaryocytes that reside within the bone marrow. The production of platelets by megakaryocytes requires an intricate series of remodeling events that result in the release of thousands of platelets from a single megakaryocyte. Abnormalities in this process can result in clinically significant disorders. Thrombocytopenia (platelet counts less than 150,000/μl) can lead to inadequate clot formation and increased risk of bleeding, while thrombocythemia (platelet counts greater than 600,000/μl) can heighten the risk for thrombotic events, including stroke, peripheral ischemia, and myocardial infarction. This Review will describe the process of platelet assembly in detail and discuss several disorders that affect platelet production. PMID:16322779

  11. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  12. Overcoming the bottleneck of platelet lysate supply in large-scale clinical expansion of adipose-derived stem cells: A comparison of fresh versus three types of platelet lysates from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Glovinski, Peter V; Herly, Mikkel; Mathiasen, Anders B; Svalgaard, Jesper D; Borup, Rehannah; Talman, Maj-Lis M; Elberg, Jens J; Kølle, Stig-Frederik T; Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Platelet lysates (PL) represent a promising replacement for xenogenic growth supplement for adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) expansions. However, fresh platelets from human blood donors are not clinically feasible for large-scale cell expansion based on their limited supply. Therefore, we tested PLs prepared via three methods from outdated buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates (PCs) to establish an efficient and feasible expansion of ASCs for clinical use. PLs were prepared by the freeze-thaw method from freshly drawn platelets or from outdated buffy coat-derived PCs stored in the platelet additive solution, InterSol. Three types of PLs were prepared from outdated PCs with platelets suspended in either (1) InterSol (not manipulated), (2) InterSol + supplemented with plasma or (3) plasma alone (InterSol removed). Using these PLs, we compared ASC population doubling time, cell yield, differentiation potential and cell surface markers. Gene expression profiles were analyzed using microarray assays, and growth factor concentrations in the cell culture medium were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Of the three PL compositions produced from outdated PCs, removal of Intersol and resuspension in plasma prior to the first freezing process was overall the best. This specific outdated PL induced ASC growth kinetics, surface markers, plastic adherence and differentiation potentials comparable with PL from fresh platelets. ASCs expanded in PL from fresh versus outdated PCs exhibited different expressions of 17 overlapping genes, of which 10 were involved in cellular proliferation, although not significantly reflected by cell growth. Only minor differences in growth factor turnover were observed. PLs from outdated platelets may be an efficient and reliable source of human growth supplement allowing for large-scale ASC expansion for clinical use. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Platelet activation patterns in platelet size sub-populations: differential responses to aspirin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mangalpally, Kiran Kumar R; Siqueiros-Garcia, Alan; Vaduganathan, Muthiah; Dong, Jing-Fei; Kleiman, Neal S; Guthikonda, Sasidhar

    2010-10-01

    Circulating platelets are heterogeneous in size and structure. Whether this translates into differences in platelet function and efficacy of antiplatelet therapy is unclear. Hence, we decided to investigate the activation patterns among different platelet populations differentiated by size, and to compare the inhibitory effects of aspirin in these populations. Circulating platelets from 9 healthy volunteers were separated by size and stratified into the largest and smallest quintiles. Platelets were stimulated with 75 μM arachidonic acid (AA), 10 μM ADP or 25 μM TRAP. Alpha-granule protein secretion and expression (P-selectin, VWF, fibrinogen), surface-protein activation (activated integrin αIIbβ3) were assessed. Platelet thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) synthesis following AA stimulation was measured in vitro before and after incubation with 265 μM aspirin. Reticulated (juvenile) platelets were assessed using thiazole orange staining. A greater number of large platelets in the largest quintile were reticulated compared with the smallest quintile (6.1 ± 2.8% vs. 1.2 ± 1.5% respectively, p < 0.001). Larger platelets also synthesized more TxB(2) than small platelets both before (1348 ± 276 pg/mL vs. 1023 ± 214 pg/mL, respectively, p = 0.01) and after aspirin (1029 ± 190 pg/mL vs. 851 ± 159 pg/mL, respectively, p = 0.03). After stimulation with each agonist, a greater proportion of large platelets bound fibrinogen, VWF, P-selectin and activated integrin αIIbβ3 than small platelets both in the presence and in the absence of in vitro aspirin. In an in vitro setting, large platelets appear to be more active than small platelets and continue to be more active even after in vitro aspirin. Platelets exhibit heterogeneity in size and structure. Whether this translates into platelet function and efficacy of antiplatelet therapy is unclear. We evaluated platelet functional properties and the effects of aspirin on separated platelet subpopulations in an in vitro setting

  14. Supramolecular Chitosan Micro-Platelets Synergistically Enhance Anti-Candida albicans Activity of Amphotericin B Using an Immunocompetent Murine Model.

    PubMed

    Grisin, Tiphany; Bories, Christian; Bombardi, Martina; Loiseau, Philippe M; Rouffiac, Valérie; Solgadi, Audrey; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Ponchel, Gilles; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this work is to design new chitosan conjugates able to self-organize in aqueous solution in the form of micrometer-size platelets. When mixed with amphotericin B deoxycholate (AmB-DOC), micro-platelets act as a drug booster allowing further improvement in AmB-DOC anti-Candida albicans activity. Micro-platelets were obtained by mixing oleoyl chitosan and α-cyclodextrin in water. The formulation is specifically-engineered for mucosal application by dispersing chitosan micro-platelets into thermosensitive pluronic(®) F127 20 wt% hydrogel. The formulation completely cured C. albicans vaginal infection in mice and had a superior activity in comparison with AmB-DOC without addition of chitosan micro-platelets. In vitro studies showed that the platelets significantly enhance AmB-DOC antifungal activity since the IC50 and the MIC90 decrease 4.5 and 4.8-times. Calculation of fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI = 0.198) showed that chitosan micro-platelets act in a synergistic way with AmB-DOC against C. albicans. No synergy is found between spherical nanoparticles composed poly(isobutylcyanoacrylate)/chitosan and AmB-DOC. These results demonstrate for the first time the ability of flattened chitosan micro-platelets to have synergistic activity with AmB-DOC against C. albicans candidiasis and highlight the importance of rheological and mucoadhesive behaviors of hydrogels in the efficacy of the treatment.

  15. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  16. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  17. Insulin enhances platelet activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yngen, M; Li, N; Hjemdahl, P; Wallén, N H

    2001-10-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of atherothrombotic complications. There is accumulating evidence of platelet hyperreactivity in diabetes, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Platelets possess insulin receptors, but their physiological relevance is not clear, and data on insulin effects on platelet function in the literature are less than consistent. We therefore investigated the influence of insulin on platelet activation in vitro. Fasting blood samples were collected in 20 healthy males, using citrate or hirudin as anticoagulants. Platelet activation was measured as platelet P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding using whole blood flow cytometry in unstimulated and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulated samples, incubated with 0-10000 microU/ml insulin for 20 min. The effect of insulin (30 or 300 microU/ml, incubated for 3 min) on platelet aggregation was studied using Born aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Insulin enhanced platelet fibrinogen binding more than P-selectin expression in unstimulated and ADP stimulated samples (P<.001 by analysis of variance [ANOVA]; n=20). Insulin (30 or 300 microU/ml) also enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in PRP (P<.01 or P<.001; n=14). The platelet activating effect of insulin was verified in hirudinized samples (n=12), indicating that it was not dependent on unphysiologically low extracellular calcium concentrations. Thus, insulin enhances platelet activation in vitro, independently of extracellular calcium concentrations. Beneficial effects of insulin treatment on platelet function in vivo are probably related to improved metabolic control, rather than to direct platelet stabilizing effects.

  18. Evidence for direct transfer of tissue factor from monocytes to platelets in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Sovershaev, Mikhail A; Egorina, Elena M; Osterud, Bjarne; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-06-01

    Varying specificity of anti-tissue factor (anti-TF) antibodies gives rise to erroneous conclusions on TF positivity of platelets. Although monocytes are a well established source of TF in whole blood, there is no consensus whether platelets express or acquire TF from external sources. To test whether platelets can acquire TF expressed in monocytes, we studied a transfer of TF-yellow fluorescent protein (TF-YFP) from monocytes nucleofected with TF-YFP to platelets in a whole blood model. Platelets isolated from whole blood were found positive for TF when immunostained with anti-TF antibody from one supplier, whereas no platelet TF antigen was found in whole blood immunostained with anti-TF antibody from another supplier. Both antibodies recognized TF in monocytes. Platelets isolated from whole blood reconstituted with monocytes expressing TF-YFP fusion protein were found positive for TF-YFP only after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, TF protein could be transferred from monocytes upon stimulation with LPS.

  19. Lung vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease mediated by arteriolar neutrophil-platelet microemboli

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Jimenez, Maritza A.; Vats, Ravi; Tutuncuoglu, Egemen; Jonassaint, Jude; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the polymerization of intraerythrocytic hemoglobin S promotes downstream vaso-occlusive events in the microvasculature. While vaso-occlusion is known to occur in the lung, often in the context of systemic vaso-occlusive crisis and the acute chest syndrome, the pathophysiological mechanisms that incite lung injury are unknown. We used intravital microscopy of the lung in transgenic humanized SCD mice to monitor acute vaso-occlusive events following an acute dose of systemic lipopolysaccharide sufficient to trigger events in SCD but not control mice. We observed cellular microembolism of precapillary pulmonary arteriolar bottlenecks by neutrophil-platelet aggregates. Blood from SCD patients was next studied under flow in an in vitro microfluidic system. Similar to the pulmonary circulation, circulating platelets nucleated around arrested neutrophils, translating to a greater number and duration of neutrophil-platelet interactions compared with normal human blood. Inhibition of platelet P-selectin with function-blocking antibody attenuated the neutrophil-platelet interactions in SCD patient blood in vitro and resolved pulmonary arteriole microembolism in SCD mice in vivo. These results establish the relevance of neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation in lung arterioles in promoting lung vaso-occlusion in SCD and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting platelet adhesion molecules to prevent acute chest syndrome. PMID:28097236

  20. Targeting a novel domain in podoplanin for inhibiting platelet-mediated tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Takaya; Takemoto, Ai; Takagi, Satoshi; Takatori, Kazuki; Sato, Shigeo; Takami, Miho; Fujita, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin/Aggrus is a sialoglycoprotein expressed in various cancers. We previously identified podoplanin as a key factor in tumor-induced platelet aggregation. Podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation enhances tumor growth and metastasis by secreting growth factors and by forming tumor emboli in the microvasculature. Thus, precise analysis of the mechanisms of podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation is critical for developing anti-tumor therapies. Here we report the discovery of a novel platelet aggregation-inducing domain, PLAG4 (81-EDLPT-85). PLAG4 has high homology to the previously reported PLAG3 and contributes to the binding of its platelet receptor CLEC-2. Mutant analyses indicated that PLAG4 exhibits a predominant platelet-aggregating function relative to PLAG3 and that conserved Glu81/Asp82/Thr85 residues in PLAG4 are indispensable for CLEC-2 binding. By establishing anti-PLAG4-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, we confirmed its role in CLEC-2 binding, platelet aggregation, and tumor emboli formation. Our results suggest the requirement of simultaneous inhibition of PLAG3/4 for complete suppression of podoplanin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26684030

  1. Glycoprotein Ib activation by thrombin stimulates the energy metabolism in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Corona de la Peña, Norma; Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Manuel; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Marín-Hernández, Álvaro

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet activation requires substantial amounts of ATP. However, the specific contribution of each ATP-generating pathway i.e., oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) versus glycolysis and the biochemical mechanisms involved in the thrombin-induced activation of energy metabolism remain unclear. Here we report an integral analysis on the role of both energy pathways in human platelets activated by several agonists, and the signal transducing mechanisms associated with such activation. We found that thrombin, Trap-6, arachidonic acid, collagen, A23187, epinephrine and ADP significantly increased glycolytic flux (3–38 times vs. non-activated platelets) whereas ristocetin was ineffective. OxPhos (33 times) and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (88%) were increased only by thrombin. OxPhos was the main source of ATP in thrombin-activated platelets, whereas in platelets activated by any of the other agonists, glycolysis was the principal ATP supplier. In order to establish the biochemical mechanisms involved in the thrombin-induced OxPhos activation in platelets, several signaling pathways associated with mitochondrial activation were analyzed. Wortmannin and LY294002 (PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors), ristocetin and heparin (GPIb inhibitors) as well as resveratrol, ATP (calcium-release inhibitors) and PP1 (Tyr-phosphorylation inhibitor) prevented the thrombin-induced platelet activation. These results suggest that thrombin activates OxPhos and glycolysis through GPIb-dependent signaling involving PI3K and Akt activation, calcium mobilization and protein phosphorylation. PMID:28817667

  2. Glycoprotein Ib activation by thrombin stimulates the energy metabolism in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Corona de la Peña, Norma; Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Manuel; Hernández-Reséndiz, Ileana; Marín-Hernández, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Thrombin-induced platelet activation requires substantial amounts of ATP. However, the specific contribution of each ATP-generating pathway i.e., oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) versus glycolysis and the biochemical mechanisms involved in the thrombin-induced activation of energy metabolism remain unclear. Here we report an integral analysis on the role of both energy pathways in human platelets activated by several agonists, and the signal transducing mechanisms associated with such activation. We found that thrombin, Trap-6, arachidonic acid, collagen, A23187, epinephrine and ADP significantly increased glycolytic flux (3-38 times vs. non-activated platelets) whereas ristocetin was ineffective. OxPhos (33 times) and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (88%) were increased only by thrombin. OxPhos was the main source of ATP in thrombin-activated platelets, whereas in platelets activated by any of the other agonists, glycolysis was the principal ATP supplier. In order to establish the biochemical mechanisms involved in the thrombin-induced OxPhos activation in platelets, several signaling pathways associated with mitochondrial activation were analyzed. Wortmannin and LY294002 (PI3K/Akt pathway inhibitors), ristocetin and heparin (GPIb inhibitors) as well as resveratrol, ATP (calcium-release inhibitors) and PP1 (Tyr-phosphorylation inhibitor) prevented the thrombin-induced platelet activation. These results suggest that thrombin activates OxPhos and glycolysis through GPIb-dependent signaling involving PI3K and Akt activation, calcium mobilization and protein phosphorylation.

  3. Role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability to protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, S.K.; Burhop, K.E.; Kaplan, J.E.; Malik, A.B. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors examined the role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular integrity by inducing thrombocytopenia in sheep using antiplatelet serum (APS). A causal relationship between thrombocytopenia and increase in pulmonary vascular permeability was established by platelet repletion using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sheep were chronically instrumented and lung lymph fistulas prepared to monitor pulmonary lymph flow (Q{sub lym}). A balloon catheter was positioned in the left atrium to assess pulmonary vascular permeability to protein after raising the left atrial pressure (P{sub la}). Thrombocytopenia was maintained for 3 days by daily intramuscular APS injections. In studies using cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers, transendothelia permeability of {sup 125}I-labeled albumin was reduced 50 and 95%, respectively, when 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} platelets were added onto endothelial monolayers. However, addition of 5 {times} 10{sup 6} platelets or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} red blood cells did not reduce endothelial monolayer albumin permeability. Results indicate that platelets are required for the maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduction in permeability appears to involve an interaction of platelets with the endothelium.

  4. Syncytiotrophoblast Extracellular Vesicles from Pre-Eclampsia Placentas Differentially Affect Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Tannetta, Dionne S.; Hunt, Kathryn; Jones, Chris I.; Davidson, Naomi; Coxon, Carmen H.; Ferguson, David; Redman, Christopher W.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Sargent, Ian L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates around 3% of all pregnancies and is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of PE remains unclear however its underlying cause originates from the placenta and manifests as raised blood pressure, proteinuria, vascular or systemic inflammation and hypercoagulation in the mother. Women who develop PE are also at significantly higher risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. In PE, the failing endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative and inflammatory stressed syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta sheds increased numbers of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV) into the maternal circulation. Platelet reactivity, size and concentration are also known to be altered in some women who develop PE, although the underlying reasons for this have not been determined. In this study we show that STBEV from disease free placenta isolated ex vivo by dual placental perfusion associate rapidly with platelets. We provide evidence that STBEV isolated from normal placentas cause platelet activation and that this is increased with STBEV from PE pregnancies. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with aspirin, currently prescribed for women at high risk of PE to reduce platelet aggregation, also inhibits STBEV-induced reversible aggregation of washed platelets. Increased platelet reactivity as a result of exposure to PE placenta derived STBEVs correlates with increased thrombotic risk associated with PE. These observations establish a possible direct link between the clotting disturbances of PE and dysfunction of the placenta, as well as the known increased risk of thromboembolism associated with this condition. PMID:26551971

  5. From Students' Problem-Solving Strategies to Connections in Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Alfinio; Klein, Erika

    2005-01-01

    Strategies that children used to solve a fraction problem are presented, and an insight into how students think about divisions and fractions is described. Teachers can use these strategies to help students establish connections related to fractions.

  6. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  7. Survey of current practice for monitoring and management of platelet refractoriness in Italy.

    PubMed

    Quaglietta, Anna; Nicolucci, Antonio; Accorsi, Patrizia; Pompa, Alessandra; Pierelli, Luca; Iacone, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Platelet transfusion failure is a common phenomenon affecting from 7% to 34% of haematology-oncology patients. Monitoring the efficacy of platelet transfusion through the evaluation of a post-transfusion platelet count and clinical response represent an important guide for subsequent transfusions and for the detection of refractoriness. The aim of this survey was to investigate physicians' attitudes and practices regarding the monitoring of platelet response and the management of platelet refractoriness. An e-mail based survey was conducted among the heads of blood banks with a hemapheresis ward in Italy. Heads of 64 centers out of the 122 initially identified (52%) completed the entire survey. Apheresis, buffy-coat pool, and platelet rich plasma represented an average of 46%, 38% and 17% of the total number of transfusions, respectively. In the prophylaxis of hemorrhagic episodes, most of the centers utilized as standard dose one unit of apheresis platelets (55.7%) and/or one unit of buffy-coat pool platelets (42.6%), while 11.4% of respondents used an average of 6 units of platelet rich plasma. In only 27.9% of the centers was the platelet dose established based on the body weight of the recipient. Only one-third of the centers evaluated the response to platelet transfusion in all patients, while the rate increased to 60% in onco-hematological patients. Among patients transfused on an outpatient basis, the rate dropped to 20%, and a platelet sample taken 10 min after transfusion was generally used. The survey documented a substantial lack of interaction between the clinician requesting the transfusion and the one responsible for the preparation and delivery of the product, with both figures involved in the diagnosis of refractoriness in only one-third of the centers. In conclusion, despite being a frequent condition, platelet refractoriness is still managed with a high degree of heterogeneity and often overlooked. Better adherence to existing guidelines and

  8. The role of mean platelet volume in patients with Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Peng, You-Fan; Guo, Jing; Deng, Yi-Bin

    2017-03-01

    Background Takayasu arteritis is a chronic non-specific inflammatory disease and mean platelet volume can either be decreased or increased during inflammation. However, there are no published data to confirm an association between mean platelet volume and Takayasu arteritis. Our aim was to evaluate the role of mean platelet volume in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Methods A total of 119 consecutive patients with Takayasu arteritis and 217 healthy individuals were included in this study. Forty-five Takayasu arteritis patients with active disease were followed with prednisone therapy. Results Mean platelet volume of patients was low compared with control groups (10.1 ± 1.47 fL vs. 11.2 ± 0.91 fL; P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume was lower in active Takayasu arteritis than in inactive Takayasu arteritis patients (9.3 ± 1.39 fL vs. 10.6 ± 1.28 fL; P< 0.001). Mean platelet volume values were significantly increased after prednisone treatment (9.3 ± 1.45 fL vs. 10.5 ± 1.29 fL; P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume negatively correlated with C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, neutrophil count and platelet count (r = - 0.219, P = 0.018; r = - 0.296, P < 0.001; r = - 0.273, P = 0.003; r =-0.486, P< 0.001), and positively correlated with platelet distribution width (r=0.304, P ≤ 0.001) in patients with Takayasu arteritis. An inverse correlation between mean platelet volume and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was observed in active Takayasu arteritis patients (r = -0.406, P = 0.010). In multiple linear regression analysis, mean platelet volume was independently correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Conclusions Our results suggest that mean platelet volume may identify active disease in patients with Takayasu arteritis, and the values of mean platelet volume may help to establish remission of active disease after treatment in

  9. [Pathogen inactivation of platelets: organization consequences for platelet transfusion].

    PubMed

    Chavarin, P; DePutter, C; Boussoulade, F; Acquart, S; Vidal, M; Argaud, C; Fabrigli, P; Garraud, O

    2011-08-01

    In the past few years, pathogen reduction technologies for labile blood products have been part of the enhancement of global transfusion safety regarding residual risks of transmitting infectious pathogens. Having carried out a feasibility study for the implementation of pathogen inactivation of platelet concentrates by means of the amotosalen/HCl/UVA (Intercept™) technology, and participated to a reinforced haemovigilance study, we took the opportunity to analyze the organization consequences for platelet concentrates inventory and distribution. This impact study first indicated that those novel needs forced the blood donation service, as well as the labile blood product preparation laboratory, to review and improve practices; secondly, it showed that the routine implementation has little (no major) consequence in the overall organization, independently of the economic consequences (not covered here).

  10. 111In platelet imaging of left ventricular thrombi. Predictive value for systemic emboli

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L. )

    1990-04-01

    To determine whether a positive indium 111 platelet image for a left ventricular thrombus, which indicates ongoing thrombogenic activity, predicts an increased risk of systemic embolization, we compared the embolic rate in 34 patients with positive {sup 111}In platelet images with that in 69 patients with negative images during a mean follow-up of 38 +/- 31 (+/- SD) months after platelet imaging. The positive and negative image groups were similar with respect to age (59 +/- 11 vs. 62 +/- 10 years), prevalence of previous infarction (94% vs. 78%, p less than 0.05), time from last infarction (28 +/- 51 vs. 33 +/- 47 months), ejection fraction (29 +/- 14 vs. 33 +/- 14), long-term or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (15% vs. 26%), warfarin therapy during follow-up (26% vs. 20%), platelet-inhibitory therapy during follow-up (50% vs. 33%), injected {sup 111}In dose (330 +/- 92 vs. 344 +/- 118 microCi), and latest imaging time (greater than or equal to 48 hours in all patients). During follow-up, embolic events occurred in 21% (seven of 34) of patients with positive platelet images for left ventricular thrombi as compared with 3% (two of 69) of patients with negative images (p = 0.002). By actuarial methods, at 42 months after platelet imaging, only 86% of patients with positive images were embolus free as compared with 98% of patients with negative images (p less than 0.01).

  11. Pathogen-Reduced, Platelet Additive Solution, Extended Stored Platelets (PREPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Society of Hematology Annual Meeting; Orlando, FL December 5-8, 2015:184 INVENTIONS, PATENTS AND LICENSES: None REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: None OTHER...Approximately 80% of the platelets given in the U.S. are transfused into hematology /oncology patients where prolonged post-transfusion survivals of the stored...of Hematology Annual Meeting; Orlando, FL December 5-8, 2015:184 5. Harker LA, Slichter SJ: Arterial thromboembolism -- quantitation and prevention

  12. Evidence that the platelet plasma membrane does not contain a (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase.

    PubMed

    Steiner, B; Lüscher, E F

    1985-09-10

    The present study was designed to determine the subcellular distribution of the platelet (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase. Human platelets were surface labeled by the periodate-boro[3H]hydride method. Plasma membrane vesicles were then isolated to a purity of approx. 90% by a procedure utilizing wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography. These membranes were found to be 2.6-fold enriched in surface glycoproteins compared to an unfractionated vesicle fraction and almost 7-fold enriched compared to intact platelets. In contrast, the isolated plasma membranes showed a decreased specific activity of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase compared to the unfractionated vesicle fraction. This decrease in specific activity was found to be similar to that of an endoplasmic reticulum marker, glucose-6-phosphatase, and to that of a platelet inner membrane marker, phospholipase A2. We conclude, therefore, that the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase is not located in the platelet plasma membrane but is restricted to membranes of intracellular origin.

  13. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  14. The origin and function of platelet glycosyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Rumjantseva, Viktoria; Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll; Patel-Hett, Sunita; Josefsson, Emma C.; Bennett, Eric P.; Italiano, Joseph E.; Clausen, Henrik; Hartwig, John H.; Hoffmeister, Karin M.

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are megakaryocyte subfragments that participate in hemostatic and host defense reactions and deliver pro- and antiangiogenic factors throughout the vascular system. Although they are anucleated cells that lack a complex secretory apparatus with distinct Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum compartments, past studies have shown that platelets have glycosyltransferase activities. In the present study, we show that members of 3 distinct glycosyltransferase families are found within and on the surface of platelets. Immunocytology and flow cytometry results indicated that megakaryocytes package these Golgi-derived glycosyltransferases into vesicles that are sent via proplatelets to nascent platelets, where they accumulate. These glycosyltransferases are active, and intact platelets glycosylate large exogenous substrates. Furthermore, we show that activation of platelets results in the release of soluble glycosyltransferase activities and that platelets contain sufficient levels of sugar nucleotides for detection of glycosylation of exogenously added substrates. Therefore, the results of the present study show that blood platelets are a rich source of both glycosyltransferases and donor sugar substrates that can be released to function in the extracellular space. This platelet-glycosylation machinery offers a pathway to a simple glycoengineering strategy improving storage of platelets and may serve hitherto unknown biologic functions. PMID:22613794

  15. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  16. Understanding platelet function through signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Alan H; Song, Seng; Crow, Andrew R

    2003-01-01

    Platelets are activated by a number of stimuli resulting in the expression and/or activation of surface receptors, secretion of vasoactive substances, adhesion, aggregation, and finally thrombus formation. These events are propagated by a process known as transmembrane signaling, which relays the activating signal from the platelet membrane (eg, von Willebrand Factor binding to glycoprotein Ib) to the inside of the platelet which then serves to activate the platelet via a cascade of biochemical interactions. Inhibition of these transmembrane signaling molecules with a variety of available inhibitors or antagonists can in many cases prevent the platelet from becoming activated. An awareness of the mechanisms involved in platelet transmembrane signaling and the recent availability of new reagents to inhibit signaling may provide us with additional means to prevent platelet activation and perhaps even ameliorate the platelet storage lesion. This review will provide an introduction to the field of platelet transmembrane signaling and give an overview of some of the platelet signaling mechanisms that are relevant to transfusion medicine. Copyright 2003, Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  17. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  18. Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Distribution Width as Markers in the Diagnosis of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhe; Pan, Jiyong; Zhang, Yingyi; Wang, Ziyi; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Baoshun; Shi, Lei; Jing, Huirong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Acute gangrenous appendicitis (AGA) is a common medical condition; however, the grade of appendicitis usually cannot be established preoperatively. We have attempted to identify some indicators, such as the mean platelet volume (MPV) and the platelet distribution width (PDW), to diagnose AGA. Aims. To evaluate whether or not the MPV and PDW are suitable markers to diagnose AGA. Methods. A retrospective study of 160 patients with AGA and 160 healthy patients was undertaken. Disease diagnosis was confirmed based on the pathologic examination of surgical specimens. Patient white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil ratio (NR), platelet (PLT) count, MPV, PDW, and hematocrit (HCT) were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of these indices in AGA. Results. There were no significant differences between the AGA and control groups in age and gender. Compared to the control group, the WBC count, NR, and PDW were significantly higher (P < 0.001, resp.) and the MPV and HCT were significantly lower (P < 0.001, resp.) in the AGA group. The diagnostic specificities of the WBC count, NR, PLT count, MPV, PDW, and HCT were 86.3%, 92.5%, 58.1%, 81.7%, 83.9%, and 66.3%, respectively. Therefore, the NR had the highest diagnostic specificity for the diagnosis of AGA. Conclusions. This is the first study to assess the MPV and PDW in patients with AGA. Our present study showed that the MPV is reduced and the PDW is increased in patients with AGA; the sensitivity of PDW was superior to the MPV. A decreased MPV value and an increased PDW could serve as two markers to diagnose AGA. The NR had the highest specificity for the diagnosis of AGA. PMID:26688600

  19. Mouse prenatal platelet-forming lineages share a core transcriptional program but divergent dependence on MPL.

    PubMed

    Potts, Kathryn S; Sargeant, Tobias J; Dawson, Caleb A; Josefsson, Emma C; Hilton, Douglas J; Alexander, Warren S; Taoudi, Samir

    2015-08-06

    The thrombopoietic environment of the neonate is established during prenatal life; therefore, a comprehensive understanding of platelet-forming cell development during embryogenesis is critical to understanding the etiology of early-onset thrombocytopenia. The recent discovery that the first platelet-forming cells of the conceptus are not megakaryocytes (MKs) but diploid platelet-forming cells (DPFCs) revealed a previously unappreciated complexity in thrombopoiesis. This raises important questions, including the following. When do conventional MKs appear? Do pathogenic genetic lesions of adult MKs affect DPFCs? What role does myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL), a key regulator of adult megakaryopoiesis, play in prenatal platelet-forming lineages? We performed a comprehensive study to determine the spatial and temporal appearance of prenatal platelet-forming lineages. We demonstrate that DPFCs originate in the yolk sac and then rapidly migrate to other extra- and intraembryonic tissues. Using gene disruption models of Gata1 and Nfe2, we demonstrate that perturbing essential adult MK genes causes an analogous phenotype in the early embryo before the onset of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell-driven (definitive) hematopoiesis. Finally, we present the surprising finding that DPFC and MK commitment from their respective precursors is MPL independent in vivo but that completion of MK differentiation and establishment of the prenatal platelet mass is dependent on MPL expression.

  20. Platelet function tests in clinical cardiology: unfulfilled expectations.

    PubMed

    Gorog, Diana A; Fuster, Valentin

    2013-05-28

    This review is a critical evaluation of publications in the past decade on the usefulness of platelet function tests (PFTs) in clinical cardiology, in aiding diagnosis, predicting risk, and monitoring therapy. The ideal PFT should: 1) detect baseline platelet hyperreactivity; 2) allow individualization of antiplatelet medication; 3) predict thrombotic risk; and 4) predict bleeding risk. The practicalities of clinical cardiology demand rapid, accurate, and reliable tests that are simple to operate at the bedside and available 24 h a day, 7 days a week. Point-of-care PFTs most widely evaluated clinically include PFA-100 and VerifyNow. None of these tests can reliably detect platelet hyperreactivity and thus identify a prothrombotic state. Identification of antiplatelet nonresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness is highly test specific, and does not allow individualization of therapy. The power of PFTs in predicting thrombotic events for a given individual is variable and often modest, and alteration of antithrombotic treatment on the basis of the results of PFTs has not been shown to alter clinical outcome. PFTs in current mainstream use cannot reliably assess bleeding risk. These tests have been in use for over a decade, but the hopes raised by PFTs in clinical practice remain unfulfilled. Although physiologically relevant measurement of platelet function now is more important than ever, a critical reappraisal of available techniques in light of clinical requirements is needed. The use of native blood, global stimulus instead of individual agonists, contribution of thrombin generation by activated platelets to the test results, and establishment of a PFT therapeutic range for each antiplatelet drug should be considered and is discussed.

  1. Platelets are not critical effector cells for the time course of murine passive crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Bernd; Daniel, Christoph; Johnson, Richard J; Amann, Kerstin U; Hugo, Christian P M

    2013-01-01

    Although platelets are well-known effector cells of inflammatory renal disease, clinical studies were not able to establish platelet inhibition as an effective therapy. Our previous studies using Vasodilator stimulated Phosphoprotein- and P2Y1-deficient mice suggested some early, but no long-term effects of platelets in passive crescentic glomerulonephritis. To define the role of platelets for this disease model, passive crescentic glomerulonephritis was induced in 72 C57Bl/6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of sheep anti-rabbit glomerular basement membrane antibody on 2 consecutive days. Platelets were depleted using anti-glycoprotein Ibα antibodies (p0p3/p0p4) every 4th day. Mice treated with equal amounts of sterile Phosphate buffered solution or rat-IgG served as controls. Blood, urine, and tissues were harvested on days 3 and 28. Renal tissue sections were evaluated after immunostaining using (semi)quantitative and computer-assisted image analysis. Compared to controls, efficient depletion was achieved as indicated by a markedly prolonged bleeding time and a more than 90% reduction in platelet counts (800/nl vs. 42/nl; P < 0.001). Functional (creatinine-clearance and proteinuria) parameters demonstrated no significant differences between the groups. Neither parameters of renal injury (glomerulosclerosis and fibrosis) nor glomerular/tubulointerstitial matrix expansion (by collagen IV staining), glomerular capillary rarefaction (lectin staining), and the glomerular/tubulointerstitial proliferative response (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) demonstrated any differences between platelet-depleted mice and PBS- or rat-IgG-treated nephritic mice at any time point. Despite effective platelet inhibition/depletion, neither the short- nor long-term course of passive crescentic nephrotoxic nephritis was affected. These data indicate that platelets play a minor role during the time course of this disease model in the mouse.

  2. Indium-111 platelet imaging for detection of platelet deposition in abdominal aneurysms and prosthetic arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Stratton, J.R.; Thiele, B.; Haminton, G.W.; Warrick, L.N.; Huang, T.W.; Harker, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Thirty-four platelet imaging studies were performed in 23 patients to determine whether platelet deposition could be detected in patients with vascular aneurysms (18 patients) or in patients in whom Dacron prosthetic grafts had been placed (5 patients). In patients in whom abnormal platelet deposition was detected, the effect of administration of platelet-active drugs on platelet deposition was examined. Of the 18 patients with an aneurysm, 12 had equivocally positive studies on initial imaging and 2 had equivocally positive images. Of five patients with Dacron arterial grafts in place, four had diffuse platelet deposition in the grafts; the fifth patient had a platelet deposition only in a pseudoaneurysm. Eight patients with an abdominal aneurysm and positive or equivocally positive baseline images were restudied during platelet-active drug therapy either with aspirin plus dipyridamole (seven patients) or with sulfinpyrazone (four patients). No patient studied during treatment with aspirin plus dipyridamole had detectably decreased platelet deposition compared with baseline determinations. In contrast, two of four patients studied while receiving sulfinpyrazone showed decreased platelet deposition. Thus, platelet imaging may be of value for studying platelet physiology in vivo and for assessing platelet-active drugs and the thrombogenicity of prosthetic graft materials in human beings.

  3. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  4. The platelet defect in leukemia. Platelet ultrastructure, adenine nucleotide metabolism, and the release reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, D H; Graham, R C; Baunach, D

    1975-01-01

    The ultrastructure and adenine nucleotide metabolism of platelets from patients with acute leukemia were studied to elucidate possible mechanisms for the platelet dysfunction observed in this clinical setting. Nonstimulated (resting) platelets from leukemic patients varied greatly in size; exhibited marked variation in the number of alpha granules present per cell; had poorly delineated circumferential bands of microtubules; and often grossly dilated open channel systems or cytoplasmic vacuolization. The intracellular concentrations of ATP and ADP were significantly below normal, and the specific radioactivity of ATP and ADP of nonstimulated platelets in leukemia was equivalent to or exceeded that seen in stimulated normal platelets. Addition of ADP or collagen to platelets from leukemic patients was followed by retarded and incomplete shape change, delayed and incomplete centripetal migration of subcellular organelles, impaired degranulation, and the formation of loose aggregates composed of relatively few platelets. Stimulation of "leukemic" platelets with collagen led to the release of significantly subnormal amounts of ATP and ADP and no significant change in the specific radioactivity of the intracellular nucleotides. In contrast to the results in normal platelets, the conversion of ATP to inosine monophosphate and hypoxanthine in platelets in leukemia failed to increase significantly with collagen stimulation. The results indicate that abnormalities exist in the storage pool of adenine nucleotides and the release mechanism of platelets in acute leukemia. These defects appear to contribute to an impairment in the release reaction in these platelets. Many of the ultrastructural and metabolic defects seen in acute leukemia occur in platelets in preleukemia. Images PMID:45818

  5. Platelet Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Potential Mediator of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, James P; Ambruso, Daniel R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Silliman, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The occurrence of non-hemolytic transfusion reactions is highest with platelet and plasma administration. Some of these reactions are characterized by endothelial leak, especially transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Elevated concentrations of inflammatory mediators secreted by contaminating leukocytes during blood product storage may contribute to such reactions, but platelet-secreted mediators may also contribute. We hypothesized that platelet storage leads to accumulation of the endothelial permeability mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that intravascular administration of exogenous VEGF leads to extensive binding to its lung receptors. Methods Single donor, leukocyte-reduced apheresis platelet units were sampled over 5 days of storage. VEGF protein content of the centrifuged supernatant was determined by ELISA, and the potential contribution of VEGF from contaminating leukocytes was quantified. Isolated-perfused rat lungs were used to study the uptake of radiolabeled VEGF administered intravascularly, and the effect of unlabeled VEGF on lung leak. Results There was a time-dependent release of VEGF into the plasma fraction of the platelet concentrates (62 ± 9 pg/ml on day one, 149 ± 23 pg/ml on day 5; mean ± SEM, p<0.01, n=8) and a contribution by contaminating leukocytes was excluded. Exogenous 125I-VEGF bound avidly and specifically to the lung vasculature, and unlabeled VEGF in the lung perfusate caused vascular leak. Conclusion Rising concentrations of VEGF occur during storage of single donor platelet concentrates due to platelet secretion or disintegration, but not due to leukocyte contamination. Exogenous VEGF at these concentrations rapidly binds to its receptors in the lung vessels. At higher VEGF concentrations, VEGF causes vascular leak in uninjured lungs. These data provide further evidence that VEGF may contribute to the increased lung permeability seen in TRALI associated with platelet products. PMID

  6. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  7. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; ...

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  8. Extracts from Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum aerial parts as modulators of blood platelet adhesion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Malinowska, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of reports indicate that some species of clover (Trifolium) may have remarkable medical importance; however, the effects of these plants on blood platelets and hemostasis are inadequately recognized. This work was designed to study the effects of Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum extracts on the functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were preincubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pallidum (phenolic fraction and clovamide fraction) and T. scabrum (phenolic fraction) at the final concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin (0.1 U/ml), thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 20 µM), or adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 1 µM) were used. The effects of Trifolium extracts on adhesion of blood platelets to fibrinogen and collagen were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Platelet aggregation was monitored on a dual-channel Chronolog aggregometer. In these studies, we also compared the action of tested plant extracts with the effects of another antiplatelet plant-derived compound - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The performed assays demonstrated that the tested extracts might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of all tested extracts on adhesion of thrombin-stimulated platelets to collagen was found. Both extracts from T. pallidum and from T. scabrum reduced the thrombin-induced platelet adhesion to fibrinogen. Furthermore, in the presence of all three extracts, the platelet aggregation induced by thrombin was slightly inhibited. Our results also indicate that the tested plant extracts (at the highest concentrations used of 50 µg/ml), similar to purified resveratrol, inhibit selected steps of platelet activation stimulated by both proteolytic (thrombin) and nonproteolytic agonists (TRAP or ADP). In the comparative studies, T. pallidum and T. scabrum extracts was not found

  9. Functional Effect of the Mutations Similar to the Cleavage during Platelet Activation at Integrin β3 Cytoplasmic Tail when Expressed in Mouse Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiansong; Long, Zhangbiao; Zhou, Yulan; Liu, Ping; Tao, Lanlan; Ruan, Zheng; Xiao, Bing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dongya; Dai, Kesheng; Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that truncational mutations of β3 at sites of F754 and Y759 mimicking calpain cleavage regulate integrin signaling. The roles of the sequence from F754 to C-terminus and the conservative N756ITY759 motif in platelet function have yet to be elaborated. Mice expressing β3 with F754 and Y759 truncations, or NITY deletion (β3-ΔTNITYRGT, β3-ΔRGT, or β3-ΔNITY) were established through transplanting the homozygous β3-deficient mouse bone marrow cells infected by the GFP tagged MSCV MigR1 retroviral vector encoding different β3 mutants into lethally radiated wild-type mice. The platelets were harvested for soluble fibrinogen binding and platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. Platelet adhesion on fibrinogen- and collagen-coated surface under flow was also tested to assess the ability of the platelets to resist hydrodynamic drag forces. Data showed a drastic inhibition of the β3-ΔTNITYRGT platelets to bind soluble fibrinogen and spread on immobilized fibrinogen in contrast to a partially impaired fibrinogen binding and an almost unaffected spreading exhibited in the β3-ΔNITY platelets. Behaviors of the β3-ΔRGT platelets were consistent with the previous observations in the β3-ΔRGT knock-in platelets. The adhesion impairment of platelets with the β3 mutants under flow was in different orders of magnitude shown as: β3-ΔTNITYRGT>β3-ΔRGT>β3-ΔNITY to fibrinogen-coated surface, and β3-ΔTNITYRGT>β3-ΔNITY>β3-ΔRGT to collagen-coated surface. To evaluate the interaction of the β3 mutants with signaling molecules, GST pull-down and immunofluorescent assays were performed. Results showed that β3-ΔRGT interacted with kindlin but not c-Src, β3-ΔNITY interacted with c-Src but not kindlin, while β3-ΔTNITYRGT did not interact with both proteins. This study provided evidence in platelets at both static and flow conditions that the calpain cleavage-related sequences of integrin β3, i.e. T755

  10. Role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in driving nitric oxide-cGMP-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Apostoli, G L; Solomon, A; Smallwood, M J; Winyard, P G; Emerson, M

    2014-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a critical negative regulator of platelets that is implicated in the pathology of thrombotic diseases. Platelets generate NO, but the presence and functional significance of NO synthase (NOS) in platelets is unclear. Inorganic nitrate/nitrite is increasingly being recognized as a source of bioactive NO, although its role in modulating platelets during health and vascular dysfunction is incompletely understood. We investigated the functional significance and upstream sources of NO-cGMP signaling events in platelets by using established methods for assessing in vitro and in vivo platelet aggregation, and assessed the bioconversion of inorganic nitrate to nitrite during deficiency of endothelial NOS (eNOS). The phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitor sildenafil inhibited human platelet aggregation in vitro. This inhibitory effect was abolished by a guanylyl cyclase inhibitor and NO scavengers, but unaffected by NOS inhibition. Inorganic nitrite drove cGMP-mediated inhibition of human platelet aggregation in vitro and nitrate inhibited platelet function in eNOS(-/-) mice in vivo in a model of thromboembolic radiolabeled platelet aggregation associated with an enhanced plasma nitrite concentration as compared with wild-type mice. Platelets generate transient, endogenous cGMP signals downstream of NO that are primarily independent of NOS and may be enhanced by inhibition of PDE5. Furthermore, nitrite can generate transient NO-cGMP signals in platelets. The absence of eNOS leads to enhanced plasma nitrite levels following nitrate administration in vivo, which negatively impacts on platelet function. Our data suggest that inorganic nitrate exerts an antiplatelet effect during eNOS deficiency, and, potentially, that dietary nitrate may reduce platelet hyperactivity during endothelial dysfunction. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Haplotype of platelet receptor P2RY12 gene is associated with residual clopidogrel on-treatment platelet reactivity*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xiao-yan; Li, Jun-lei; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Yang; Yang, Xue-li; Fu, Yu; Liang, Guang-kai; Lu, Yun; Liu, Jian; Shi, Lu-wen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a possible association between common variations of the P2RY12 and the residual clopidogrel on-treatment platelet reactivity after adjusting for the influence of CYP2C19 tested by thromboelastography (TEG). Methods: One hundred and eighty patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) treated with clopidogrel and aspirin were included and platelet function was assessed by TEG. Five selected P2RY12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs6798347, rs6787801, rs6801273, rs6785930, and rs2046934), which cover the common variations in the P2RY12 gene and its regulatory regions, and three CYP2C19 SNPs (*2,*3,*17) were genotyped and possible haplotypes were analyzed. Results: The high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) prevalence defined by a platelet inhibition rate <30% by TEG in adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-channel was 69 (38.33%). Six common haplotypes were inferred from four of the selected P2RY12 SNPs (denoted H0 to H5) according to the linkage disequilibrium R square (except for rs2046934). Haplotype H1 showed a significantly lower incidence of HTPR than the reference haplotype (H0) in the total study population while haplotypes H1 and H2 showed significantly lower incidences of HTPR than H0 in the nonsmoker subgroup after adjusting for CYP2C19 effects and demographic characteristics. rs2046934 (T744C) did not show any significant association with HTPR. Conclusions: The combination of common P2RY12 variations including regulatory regions rather than rs2046934 (T744C) that related to pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in patients with ACS was independently associated with residual on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity. This is apart from the established association of the CYP2C19. This association seemed more important in the subgroup defined by smoking. PMID:28070995

  12. Platelets: cell proliferation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, R

    1979-04-01

    Intimal smooth muscle proliferation is the hallmark of the lesions of atherosclerosis. Endothelial injury is postulated to precede this intimal smooth muscle proliferative response, which is mediated by a potent mitogenic factor derived from adherence, aggregation, and release by platelets at sites of endothelial injury. Smooth muscle proliferation is accompanied by varying amounts of connective tissue formation and intracellular and extracellular lipid deposition, dependent upon the risk factors encountered in each patient. The platelet-derived mitogen (PF) is a stable, cationic, relatively low molecular weight (10,000-30,000) protein that has been partially purified by ion exchange chromotography and gel filtration. Less than 100 ng of PF/ml culture medium can stimulate sparse 3T3 cells or smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, to undergo multiple cell divisions in the presence of 5% cell-free, plasma-derived serum. The latter contains no mitogenic activity. The interaction of the platelet mitogen and plasma-derived components, including lipoproteins, plays a critical role in smooth muscle proliferation in vitro and in vivo in the induction of the lesions of atherosclerosis.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark extract on platelet aggregation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through suppressions of arachidonic acid liberation and ERK1/2 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong-Ju; Lim, Yong; Park, Young-Hyun; Chang, Sung-Keun; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Takeoka, Gary R; Lee, Kwang-Geun; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Jeong-Han; Park, Byeoung-Soo

    2006-11-03

    The antiplatelet and antiproliferative activities of extract of Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark (taheebo) were investigated using washed rabbit platelets and cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. n-Hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions showed marked and selective inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by collagen and arachidonic acid (AA) in a dose-dependent manner. These fractions, especially the chloroform fraction, also significantly suppressed AA liberation induced by collagen in [(3)H]AA-labeled rabbit platelets. The fractions, especially the chloroform fraction, potently inhibited cell proliferation and DNA synthesis induced by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, and inhibited the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) stimulated by PDGF-BB, in the same concentration range that inhibits VSMC proliferation and DNA synthesis.

  14. Mean Platelet Volume as an Indicator of Platelet Rejuvenation Following Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    diameter N I Estes, 1968 Mucopolysaccharidosis diameter N I Estes, 1968 Osteogenesis imperfecta diameter N N Estes, 1968 Montreal Platelet Syndrome...6. Inherited Disorders of Connective Tissue: Platelet size was evaluated in 31 families with the following disorders: Osteogenesis imperfecta

  15. Imaging the elastic modulus of human platelets during thrombin-induced activation using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Vogel, Sebastian; Seifert, Jan; Schächtele, Marc; Borst, Oliver; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-02-01

    Platelet activation plays a critical role in haemostasis and thrombosis. It is well-known that platelets generate contractile forces during activation. However, their mechanical material properties have rarely been investigated. Here, we use scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to visualise morphological and mechanical properties of live human platelets at high spatial resolution. We found that their mean elastic modulus decreases during thrombin-induced activation by about a factor of two. We observed a similar softening of platelets during cytochalasin D-induced cytoskeleton depolymerisation. However, thrombin-induced temporal and spatial modulations of the elastic modulus were substantially different from cytochalasin D-mediated changes. We thereby provide new insights into the mechanics of haemostasis and establish SICM as a novel imaging platform for the ex vivo investigation of the mechanical properties of live platelets.

  16. Mean platelet volume in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ahmet; Aypar, Ebru; Odabas, Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is still an endemic disease, especially among school-aged children in developing countries. Mean platelet volume (MPV), which is commonly used as a measure of platelet size, indicates the rate of platelet production and platelet activation. We aimed to investigate MPV in children with ARF. The study population consisted of 40 children with ARF (32 patients with carditis and 8 patients without carditis) and 40 healthy control subjects. White blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts were significantly higher and MPV values were significantly lower in patients with ARF during the acute stage when compared to controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein values significantly decreased in patients with ARF after the treatment when compared to baseline, whereas MPV values increased. MPV values were negatively correlated with ESR and WBC, and platelet counts. In conclusion, during the acute stage of ARF, MPV values were lower when compared to controls.

  17. Blood platelet aggregation and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C D; Thomas, G; Olewine, D; Zyzanski, S J; Simpson, M T; Hames, C G

    1975-12-01

    Changes in blood platelet aggregation may precipitate episodes of arterial occlusive diseases. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of psychological traits, emotional states and other behavioral stressors on platelet aggregation phenomena. This study examined 46 healthy college men at rest and after submaximal treadmill exercise. Associations were found between the duration of platelet aggregation and a number of scores from the California Psychological Inventory and self-administered anxiety scales. The more socially adequate, poised and dominant persons--those with more mature ego development and less overt anxiety--had platelets with more prolonged aggregation reactions to the in vitro introduction of noradrenalin. Irreversible aggregation of platelets occurred more regularly to lower in vitro concentrations of noradrenalin in platelet samples drawn from subjects who were less anxious and tended to be more rigidly defensive. It is premature to attempt to derive clinical implications from this exploratory work, but some implications for the design of future research are discussed.

  18. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research.

  19. Anti-platelets in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Grantham, N M; Magliano, D J; Tai, G; Cohen, N; Shaw, J E

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anti-platelet use, and the extent to which contraindications to anti-platelet therapy prevent its use, in 726 diabetic patients attending a private clinic. Among those who reported a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), 87.1% were on anti-platelet therapy. Of those without prior CVD but with at least one CVD risk factor, 59.8% were not on anti-platelet therapy, but only 7.1% of these had a contraindication to anti-platelet therapy. This study showed that high usage of anti-platelet therapy in diabetic patients with prior CVD is achievable, and that contraindications did not explain low use in those without prior CVD.

  20. Therapeutic platelet reduction: Use in postsplenectomy thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Gita; Talekar, Manjubala S.; Verma, Sanjiv Kumar; Rehmani, Babar; Gupta, Vibha; Agarwal, Amit; Harsh, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic platelet reduction is an effective modality for the reduction of platelet count in patients with treatment of extreme thrombocytosis resulting from a variety of primary and secondary causes of thrombocytosis, which may be associated with thrombotic or hemorrhagic complications of varying degrees. These cases when symptomatic fall into the ASFA Category II indication for therapeutic platelet apheresis procedure. Here, we report a case of postsplenectomy secondary thrombocytosis presenting with extremely high platelet counts and subsequent thrombosis in the shunt and successful treatment after therapeutic platelet reduction. The case is being presented to bring forth the fact that therapeutic platelet reduction is an easy procedure that gives quick and good results and also to bring to the attention of transfusion specialists an associated but as yet unreported procedural finding. PMID:25722581

  1. Nouvelle cuisine: platelets served with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Zufferey, Anne; Boilard, Eric; Semple, John W

    2015-06-15

    Platelets are small cellular fragments with the primary physiological role of maintaining hemostasis. In addition to this well-described classical function, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets have an intimate connection with infection and inflammation. This stems from several platelet characteristics, including their ability to bind infectious agents and secrete many immunomodulatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as their expression of receptors for various immune effector and regulatory functions, such as TLRs, which allow them to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Furthermore, platelets contain RNA that can be nascently translated under different environmental stresses, and they are able to release membrane microparticles that can transport inflammatory cargo to inflammatory cells. Interestingly, acute infections can also result in platelet breakdown and thrombocytopenia. This report highlights these relatively new aspects of platelets and, thus, their nonhemostatic nature in an inflammatory setting.

  2. In vitro platelet adhesion to dialysis membranes.

    PubMed

    Remuzzi, A; Boccardo, P; Benigni, A

    1991-01-01

    This work describes an in vitro system developed to quantitate platelet deposition on different dialysis membranes. The system is based on the use of small dialysis filters and reproduces the haemodynamic pattern of blood flowing through hollow fibres during in vivo dialysis. We have determined the in vitro platelet adhesion to cuprophan and to a non-cellulosic membrane, polymethylmethacrylate. When albumin concentration in the platelet suspension was low (0.35%) platelet deposition to cuprophan and to polymethylmethacrylate was comparable. When albumin concentration was increased to a physiological value (3.5%) platelet adhesion to both cuprophan and to polymethylmethacrylate membranes significantly decreased. This effect of albumin was greatest for the high-permeable polymethylmethacrylate membrane (BK). These data suggest that platelet membrane interaction is significantly influenced by circulating albumin.

  3. The impact of platelet transfusion characteristics on posttransfusion platelet increments and clinical bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Triulzi, Darrell J; Assmann, Susan F; Strauss, Ronald G; Ness, P M; Hess, John R; Kaufman, Richard M; Granger, Suzanne; Slichter, Sherrill J

    2012-06-07

    Platelet characteristics, such as platelet dose, platelet source (apheresis vs pooled), platelet donor-recipient ABO compatibility, and duration of platelet storage, can affect posttransfusion platelet increments, but it is unclear whether these factors impact platelet transfusion efficacy on clinical bleeding. We performed secondary analyses of platelet transfusions given in the prospective randomized Platelet Dose Study, which included 1272 platelet-transfused hematology-oncology patients who received 6031 prophylactic platelet transfusions. The primary outcome of these analyses was time from first transfusion to first World Health Organization ≥ grade 2 bleeding. Platelet transfusion increments were assessed at 0.25 to 4 hours and 16 to 32 hours after platelet transfusion. There were 778 patients evaluable for analysis of time to bleeding. Adjusted models showed that randomized dose strategy, platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage did not predict this outcome. Platelet increments were generally higher for transfusions of apheresis platelets, ABO-identical platelets, and platelets stored 3 days versus 4 to 5 days. Thus, although platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage exert a modest impact on both absolute and corrected posttransfusion platelet increments, they have no measurable impact on prevention of clinical bleeding. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00128713.

  4. The impact of platelet transfusion characteristics on posttransfusion platelet increments and clinical bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Susan F.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Ness, P. M.; Hess, John R.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Granger, Suzanne; Slichter, Sherrill J.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet characteristics, such as platelet dose, platelet source (apheresis vs pooled), platelet donor-recipient ABO compatibility, and duration of platelet storage, can affect posttransfusion platelet increments, but it is unclear whether these factors impact platelet transfusion efficacy on clinical bleeding. We performed secondary analyses of platelet transfusions given in the prospective randomized Platelet Dose Study, which included 1272 platelet-transfused hematology-oncology patients who received 6031 prophylactic platelet transfusions. The primary outcome of these analyses was time from first transfusion to first World Health Organization ≥ grade 2 bleeding. Platelet transfusion increments were assessed at 0.25 to 4 hours and 16 to 32 hours after platelet transfusion. There were 778 patients evaluable for analysis of time to bleeding. Adjusted models showed that randomized dose strategy, platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage did not predict this outcome. Platelet increments were generally higher for transfusions of apheresis platelets, ABO-identical platelets, and platelets stored 3 days versus 4 to 5 days. Thus, although platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage exert a modest impact on both absolute and corrected posttransfusion platelet increments, they have no measurable impact on prevention of clinical bleeding. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00128713. PMID:22496156

  5. Size Dependent Platelet Subpopulations: Relationship of Platelet Volume to Ultrastructure Enzymatic Activity, and Function.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-10

    of the present apheresis instruments to separate the larger more functional platelets from the smaller ones. The selective isolation of large... PLATELET VOLUME T. -(U) BOSTON UNIV MA SCHOOL OF I MEDICINE C B THOMPSON ET RL 10 MAR 83 BUSM-93-89 UNIIDN919CA89 /68 6ilfflfllflflflflll l...N00014-79-C-0168 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 83-08 SIZE DEPENDENT PLATELET SUBPOPULATIONS: RELATIONSHIP OF PLATELET VOLUME TO ULTRASTRUCTURE. ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY

  6. Comparison of point-of-care methods for preparation of platelet concentrate (platelet-rich plasma).

    PubMed

    Weibrich, Gernot; Kleis, Wilfried K G; Streckbein, Philipp; Moergel, Maximilian; Hitzler, Walter E; Hafner, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the concentrations of platelets and growth factors in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which are likely to depend on the method used for its production. The cellular composition and growth factor content of platelet concentrates (platelet-rich plasma) produced by six different procedures were quantitatively analyzed and compared. Platelet and leukocyte counts were determined on an automatic cell counter, and analysis of growth factors was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The principal differences between the analyzed PRP production methods (blood bank method of intermittent flow centrifuge system/platelet apheresis and by the five point-of-care methods) and the resulting platelet concentrates were evaluated with regard to resulting platelet, leukocyte, and growth factor levels. The platelet counts in both whole blood and PRP were generally higher in women than in men; no differences were observed with regard to age. Statistical analysis of platelet-derived growth factor AB (PDGF-AB) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) showed no differences with regard to age or gender. Platelet counts and TGF-β1 concentration correlated closely, as did platelet counts and PDGF-AB levels. There were only rare correlations between leukocyte counts and PDGF-AB levels, but comparison of leukocyte counts and PDGF-AB levels demonstrated certain parallel tendencies. TGF-β1 levels derive in substantial part from platelets and emphasize the role of leukocytes, in addition to that of platelets, as a source of growth factors in PRP. All methods of producing PRP showed high variability in platelet counts and growth factor levels. The highest growth factor levels were found in the PRP prepared using the Platelet Concentrate Collection System manufactured by Biomet 3i.

  7. LDL oxidation by platelets propagates platelet activation via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Roberto; Bartimoccia, Simona; Nocella, Cristina; Di Santo, Serena; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Illuminati, Giulio; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Boz, Valentina; Del Ben, Maria; De Marco, Luigi; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Platelets generate oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) via NOX2-derived oxidative stress. We investigated if once generated by activated platelets ox-LDL can propagate platelet activation. Experiments were performed in platelets from healthy subjects (HS), hyper-cholesterolemic patients and patients with NOX2 hereditary deficiency. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with LDL were associated with a dose-dependent increase of reactive oxidant species and ox-LDL. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with a fixed dose of LDL (57.14 μmol/L) or added with homogenized human atherosclerotic plaque showed enhanced ox-LDL formation (approximately +50% and +30% respectively), which was lowered by a NOX2 inhibitor (approximately -35% and -25% respectively). Compared to HS, ox-LDL production was more pronounced in agonist-stimulated platelet rich plasma (PRP) from hyper-cholesterolemic patients but was almost absent in PRP from NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet aggregation and 8-iso-PGF2α-ΙΙΙ formation increased in LDL-treated washed platelets (+42% and +53% respectively) and PRP (+31% and +53% respectively). Also, LDL enhanced platelet-dependent thrombosis at arterial shear rate (+33%) but did not affect platelet activation in NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet activation by LDL was significantly inhibited by CD36 or LOX1 blocking peptides, two ox-LDL receptor antagonists, or by a NOX2 inhibitor. LDL-added platelets showed increased p38MAPK (+59%) and PKC (+51%) phosphorylation, p47(phox) translocation to platelet membrane (+34%) and NOX2 activation (+30%), which were inhibited by ox-LDL receptor antagonists. Platelets oxidize LDL, which in turn amplify platelet activation via specific ox-LDL receptors; both effects are mediated by NOX2 activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Platelet Function in Basset Hound Hereditary Thrombopathy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    Chrono -Lume. Thromb Res 32(5):509, 1983. Mills DCB. Platelet aggregation and the adenylate cyclase system. In Platelets and Thromosis, DCB Mills and FI ...44 Figure ATP release to varying ADP concentrations ............. 9 Chrono -Lume potentiation of aggregation...............l0 Platelet ATP release...hours of blood collection. Storage pool adenine nucleotide release was monitored using the Lumi- Aggregometer ( Chrono -Log Corp., Havertown, Pa

  9. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  10. Platelet monoamine oxidase in early childhood autism.

    PubMed

    Cohen, D J; Young, J G; Roth, J A

    1977-05-01

    Platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was studied in 31 individuals suffering from early childhood autism and was not significantly different from that found in normal children or adults. In the autistic children, MAO activity decreased with age, and there was a trend toward greater platelet MAO activity in prepubertal and pubertal male autistic children relative to normal male children. Total platelet counts were not elevated in autistic children.

  11. Platelet mimicry: The emperor's new clothes?

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities to include in vivo targeting of damaged blood vessels and binding to platelet-adhering opportunistic pathogens. We present views for improved, and pharmaceutically viable nanoparticle design strategies.

  12. Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    of mouse models of platelet dysfunction in the progression of cancer to metastatic disease . During the next year we propose to examine the relevance...spread of metastatic disease represents a fundamental change in significantly shortening the life span of patients with breast cancer. Thus...von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombin, illustrating platelet GP Ib-IX as a major initiator of platelet thrombus formation in the arterial

  13. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    cancer to metastatic disease . During the next year we propose to examine the relevance of platelet receptors in models of spontaneous metastasis. A...the prognosis for recovery from breast cancer cannot be under emphasized. Indeed, the spread of metastatic disease represents a fundamental change in...IX have been identified, including von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombin, illustrating platelet GP Ib-IX as a major initiator of platelet thrombus

  14. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM signaling and vascular integrity in inflammation and development.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Bergmeier, W

    2016-04-01

    Platelets are essential for maintaining hemostasis following mechanical injury to the vasculature. Besides this established function, novel roles of platelets are becoming increasingly recognized, which are critical in non-injury settings to maintain vascular barrier integrity. For example, during embryogenesis platelets act to support the proper separation of blood and lymphatic vessels. This role continues beyond birth, where platelets prevent leakage of blood into the lymphatic vessel network. During the course of inflammation, platelets are necessary to prevent local hemorrhage due to neutrophil diapedesis and disruption of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, platelets also work to secure tumor-associated blood vessels, inhibiting excessive vessel permeability and intra-tumor hemorrhaging. Interestingly, many of these novel platelet functions depend on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling but not on signaling via G protein-coupled receptors, which plays a crucial role in platelet plug formation at sites of mechanical injury. Murine platelets express two ITAM-containing receptors: the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which functionally associates with the collagen receptor GPVI, and the C-type lectin-like 2 (CLEC-2) receptor, a hemITAM receptor for the mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin. Human platelets express an additional ITAM receptor, FcγRIIA. These receptors share common downstream effectors, including Syk, SLP-76 and PLCγ2. Here we will review the recent literature that highlights a critical role for platelet GPVI/FcRγ and CLEC-2 in vascular integrity during development and inflammation in mice and discuss the relevance to human disease.

  15. The role of RNA uptake in platelet heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Lauren; Beaulieu, Lea M; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Freedman, Jane E

    2017-03-09

    The role of platelets in regulating vascular homeostasis has expanded beyond mediation of haemostasis and thrombosis. The discovery of platelet RNA and the presence of subpopulations of platelets containing varying amounts of RNA suggest a role for platelet transcripts in vascular function. As the RNA in anucleated platelets is biologically functional and may transfer to other vascular cells, we hypothesised that platelet RNA diminishes over the lifespan of the platelet with diminishing platelet size due to horizontal cellular transfer. The purpose of this study is to determine if platelet RNA variance is the result of horizontal cellular transfer between platelets and other vascular cells. Utilising platelet sorting and RNA sequencing, we found that smaller platelets contained a more diverse set of transcripts than larger platelets. Further investigation using fluorescence imaging, gene expression analyses and in vitro and in vivo modelling revealed that platelets take up RNA from other vascular cells in a complex manner, revealing a dynamic role for platelets in modulating vascular homeostasis through bidirectional RNA transfer. The resultant RNA profile heterogeneity suggests unique functional roles for platelets dependent on size and complexity. This study expands our basic understanding of platelet function and heterogeneity and is the first to evaluate endogenous vascular RNA uptake and its relation to platelet processes. Our findings describe a novel endogenous phenomenon that can help elucidate the platelet's role in these non-thrombotic and haemostatic fields, as well as present potential for diagnostic and therapeutic development.

  16. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  17. Platelet-rich plasma stimulates osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMPs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoyasu, Akihiro; Higashio, Kanji; Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Goto, Masaaki; Kodaira, Kunihiko; Serizawa, Hiroko; Suda, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu . E-mail: katagiri@saitama-med.ac.jp

    2007-09-14

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is clinically used as an autologous blood product to stimulate bone formation in vivo. In the present study, we examined the effects of PRP on proliferation and osteoblast differentiation in vitro in the presence of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). PRP and its soluble fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts and osteoblastic cells in the presence of BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-6 or BMP-7. The soluble PRP fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in 3D cultures using scaffolds made of collagen or hydroxyapatite. Moreover, heparin-binding fractions obtained from serum also stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMP-4. These results suggested that platelets contain not only growth factors for proliferation but also novel potentiator(s) for BMP-dependent osteoblastic differentiation.

  18. Platelet activation of platelet concentrates derived from buffy coat and apheresis methods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Soleimany Ferizhandy

    2011-02-01

    Preparation for storage may cause platelet activation. The quality of platelet concentrates plays an important role in transfusion therapy. Platelet concentrates are produced by different centrifugation methods; buffy coat (buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates-BC) and plateletpheresis (apheresis-derived platelet concentrates-APC). Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: platelet, WBC and RBC counts pH, volume, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and Annexin V. The present paper compares the quality of both platelet preparations in vitro. In this experimental study, 30 platelet concentrates were harvested with the Haemonetics MCS plus and 30 units via the buffy coat (BC) method. The percentages of Annexin V expression, PF4 levels, platelet, WBC and RBC counts, pH and volume were measure immediately after collection and after 3 days of storage. During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed, no significant pH or RBC, difference in comparison with apheresis preparations (p>0.05). During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed a significant increase in the PF4 and Annexin V expression, compared to the apheresis preparations on day three (p<0.05). The kinetics of PF4 and Annexin V levels are influenced by the method used to prepare platelets for storage. The different levels of PF4 and Annexin V in BCs and APCs clearly demonstrates a progressive activation of BC platelets exceeding that of APC. However, in vivo studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  19. Serotonin enhances platelet procoagulant properties and their activation induced during platelet tissue factor uptake.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; White, James G; Escolar, Gines; Galan, Ana M

    2009-11-01

    Circulating tissue factor (TF) has been linked to thrombus propagation. Our group demonstrated that platelets possess mechanisms to capture TF-rich microvesicles (TF-MVs). Serotonin facilitates the development of platelets with increased procoagulant activity. An enhanced platelet serotonin uptake has been identified with increased cardiovascular risk. We have investigated the involvement of serotonergic mechanisms facilitating the interaction of human platelets with TF-MVs. Inhibitory strategies aimed at blocking serotonin and coagulation mechanisms were also studied. Standard aggregometry, flow cytometry, electron microscopy, and thrombin generation assays were performed. TF-MVs induced platelet aggregation in heparinized platelet-rich plasma (PRP) samples; this aggregation was further accelerated by serotonin. In washed platelets, serotonin enhanced platelet aggregation to TF-MVs with a maximum peak of 55.9 +/- 1.8 vs. 48.7 +/- 2.1% (P < 0.05). Inhibitory strategies with a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor and with lepirudin decreased these aggregations. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that serotonin induced platelet pseudopodia formation, thus facilitating the engulfment of TF-MVs. In general, serotonin significantly enhanced (P < 0.05) thrombin generation and the expression of activation markers and procoagulant activity in platelets measured for TF-MVs alone. Serotonin enhances the interaction of platelets with TF-MVs, increases platelet activation, and potentiates their overall procoagulant activity. The present results could have significant implications in thrombus formation and in the thrombogenic profile of pathological situations with increased cardiovascular risk.

  20. Response of Northern Elephant Seal platelets to pressure and temperature changes: a comparison with human platelets.

    PubMed

    Field, Cara L; Tablin, Fern

    2012-08-01

    Mammalian blood platelets are activated by physiological agonists such as collagen or thrombin, or by physical stimuli such as cold temperatures and rapid decompression. Marine mammals regularly experience cold temperatures, high pressures and rapid decompression while diving, yet do not appear to suffer from thrombotic events during routine dive activity. We evaluated the effects of cold temperature and high pressure excursions on Northern Elephant Seal (NES) platelets and compared NES platelet response to that of human platelets subjected to identical stimuli. NES platelets undergo cold-induced activation when chilled to 4 °C, and 3 distinct phase transitions can be measured using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. NES platelet membrane lipid composition was determined using thin layer chromatography and NES platelets were found to have three times the amount of cholesterol (21% by weight) as human platelets. When exposed to high pressure-rapid decompression excursion, NES platelets did not undergo morphological shape change nor bind increased amounts of fibrinogen, while human platelets were significantly activated by the same excursion. These results demonstrate that while NES platelets are activated by the physical stimulus of cold temperatures, they are resistant to decompression-induced activation. We suggest that the composition of NES platelet membranes may play an important role in preventing pressure-related activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Cardiology. Platelet function testing for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Pellaton, Cyril; Eeckhout, Eric; Silvain, Johanne; Montalescot, Gilles; Collet, Jean-Phillipe

    2014-01-15

    Platelet P2YI2 receptor inhibition with clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor plays a key role to prevent recurrent ischaemic events after percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes or elective settings. The degree of platelet inhibition depends on the antiplatelet medication used and is influenced by clinical and genetic factors. A concept of therapeutic window exists. On one side, efficient anti-aggregation is required in order to reduce cardio-vascular events. On the other side, an excessive platelet inhibition represents a risk of bleeding complications. This article describes the current knowledge about some platelet function tests and genetic tests and summarises their role in the clinical practice.

  2. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-03-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (10 mg/kg iv) immediately, 24 or 48 hrs prior to red light irradiation. The blood was collected and the platelet-rich plasma was irradiated by red light (100 J/cm2). The platelets were fixed immediately, 8 or 16 hrs after irradiation, and processed for EM examination. In comparison with those of control mice, the platelets of all experimental mice showed structural changes: 16 hrs after irradiation all platelets were necrotized; 8 hrs after irradiation almost one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged; immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformed, often with many cytoplasmic projections and considerable dilatation of the canalicular membrane system. Our findings provided a clear evidence that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly injured by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. Our results give firm support to the hypothesis that both endothelial cells and platelets may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  3. Aging of platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smethurst, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    A goal of platelet storage is to maintain the quality of platelets from the point of donation to the point of transfusion - to suspend the aging process. This effort is judged by clinical and laboratory measures with varying degrees of success. Recent work gives encouragement that platelets can be maintained ex vivo beyond the current 5 -7 day shelf life whilst maintaining their quality, as measured by posttransfusion recovery and survival. However, additional measures are needed to validate the development of technologies that may further reduce the aging of stored platelets, or enhance their hemostatic properties.

  4. Platelet antibodies in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Veenhoven, W A; Van der Schans, G S; Nieweg, H O

    1980-01-01

    An immunofluorescence (IF) technique for the detection of antibodies was applied to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Serum platelet antibodies were found in thirteen out of twenty-two patients (59 percent) with active disease, but in only four out of fifteen patients (27 percent) who had attained remission. Direct tests for platelet-associated IgG were positive in 36 and 44 percent of these patients respectively. In two cases IgM was observed on the patients' platelet membranes. C3 was not detedted on patients' platelets. Platelet-associated IgG was also found in several other disorders and its occurrence is not therefore diagnostic of ITP. In addition, serum platelet antibodies do not indicate specifically ITP as they may also be due to previous isoimmunization. Antibodies in the sera of patients with ITP generally did not fix Clq and in most cases bound to platelets only in the presence of EDTA. In contrast, isoantibodies often fixed Clq and they had equal affinity for platelets suspended in ACD or EDTA plasma. This was confirmed by quantitative data on IgG binding by platelets obtained by measuring 125-I-labelled protein A uptake. The simplicity of the IF technique permits its routine application and the technique may give useful information with respect to the nature of the antibodies. It must, however, be considered of limited value in the diagnosis of ITP. PMID:6991171

  5. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline Aparecida; Zulli, Roberto; Soares, Sheila; de Castro, Vagner; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment) is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA). RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years), nine (56%) were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%). Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%), who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50%) by the PIFT and in three (19%) by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64%) had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%). Of the former, two were refractory (29%). No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management. PMID:21437433

  6. Status Report on Cryopreservation of Human Platelets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-27

    anticoagulated with 63 mlPost-Thaw Platelet Count X Volume of Thawed Platelets of CPD. The blood was centrifuged+ * at 4500 g for 2.5 minutes at 22 ± 2...C to isolate PRP , the PRP was centrifuged51-Chromium Platelet Survival In Vivo and then resuspended in 0.5 ml at 4500 g to concentrate the platelets...the fol- anticoagulated with 2.5 ml of 1.2% manually. The esuspended plateletminor modifications: EDTA in saline, were obtained I manate w suseled

  7. Mean platelet volume in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, S; Carlioglu, A; Sahiner, E; Karaaslan, Y; Kosar, A

    2014-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterised by chronic widespread pain at multiple tender points, as well as joint stiffness and systemic symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia still remain unclear, although many contributory factors have been suggested. The presence of some common features between fibromyalgia and cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. depression and sleep disturbance) led to question of whether there is there a relationship between fibromyalgia and cardiovascular disease and/or atherosclerosis. Mean platelet volume, which is a determinant of platelet activation, is a newly emerging independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.The present study was designed to evaluate levels of mean platelet volume in patients with fibromyalgia; the study population consisted of 283 individuals with this syndrome, who were compared with 72 healthy controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, platelet count and mean platelet volume levels were retrospectively recorded via the computerised patient database. The levels of mean platelet volume were significantly higher in the fibromyalgia group than in the control group (8.09 ± 0.84 fl and 7.73 ± 0.65 fl, respectively, p < 0.001). There were no statistical differences between groups with regard to platelet count and other parameters. These results suggest that an early atherosclerosis marker, mean platelet volume, is elevated in patients with fibromyalgia. This indicates increased platelet activation and therefore a higher risk of future cardiovascular disease.

  8. Differential Dynamics of Platelet Contact and Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dooyoung; Fong, Karen P.; King, Michael R.; Brass, Lawrence F.; Hammer, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Platelet spreading is critical for hemostatic plug formation and thrombosis. However, the detailed dynamics of platelet spreading as a function of receptor-ligand adhesive interactions has not been thoroughly investigated. Using reflection interference contrast microscopy, we found that both adhesive interactions and PAR4 activation affect the dynamics of platelet membrane contact formation during spreading. The initial growth of close contact area during spreading was controlled by the combination of different immobilized ligands or PAR4 activation on fibrinogen, whereas the growth of the total area of spreading was independent of adhesion type and PAR4 signaling. We found that filopodia extend to their maximal length