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Sample records for platelet fraction establishment

  1. Functional fractionation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Haver, V M; Gear, A R

    1981-02-01

    Studies of platelet populations suggest that they are heterogeneous in size, age, and metabolic parameters. In an attempt to correlate these parameters with efficiency of aggregation, a new technique, functional fractionation, was developed. Platelet populations are separated by their differential reactivity to aggregating agents. For example, low doses of ADP (0.1 to 0.7 microM) are added to stirred PRP, after which gentle centrifugation is used to remove aggregates from single unreacted platelets. The loose aggregates can be readily dispersed for comparison of the physical or biochemical properties of the reacted versus unreacted platelets. It was found that reactive platelets were larger (6.5 micrometer3) than unreacted platelets (5.51 micrometer3). No significant difference in density existed between the two populations, and no release of [14C]serotonin from prelabeled platelets occurred during functional fractionation. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size difference and revealed that in both populations platelets were structurally intact with a normal discoid shape and no significant difference in organelle content. Human platelets most reactive to ADP were also enriched in glycogen (3.6-fold), ATP (1.6-fold), and ADP (twofold), compared with less reactive cells. These "reactive" cells took up more 51[Cr] and contained 1.9 times more surface sialic acid. In an in vivo aging experiment, rats were injected with 75[Se]methionine. Shortly after labeling (1 day), the most reactive platelets possessed the highest amount of 75[Se]. These results reveal that functionally active platelets, which are also larger, are more active metabolically than less reactive platelets, possess a higher negative surface charge, and may be a younger population.

  2. Volume Fraction of Graphene Platelets in Copper-Graphene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2013-01-01

    Copper-graphene composite films were deposited on copper foil using electrochemical deposition. Four electrolyte solutions that each consist of 250 mL of graphene oxide suspension in distilled water and increasing volume of 0.2 M solution of CuSO4 in steps of 250 mL were used to deposit the composite films with and without a magnetic stirrer. Graphene oxide in the films was reduced to graphene by hydrogen treatment for 6 hours at 673 K (400 °C). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction for identification of phases, scanning electron microscopy for distribution of graphene, energy dispersive spectrometry for evaluation of elemental composition, electrical resistivity and temperature coefficient of electrical resistance and thermal conductivity. Effective mean field analysis (EMA) was used to determine the volume fraction and electrical conductivity of graphene and interfacial thermal conductance between graphene and copper. The electrical resistivity was reduced from 2.031 to 1.966 μΩ cm and the thermal conductivity was improved from 3.8 to 5.0 W/cm K upon addition of graphene platelets to electrolytic copper. The use of stirrer during deposition of the films increased the average size and the thickness of the graphene platelets and as a result the improvement in electrical conductivity was lower compared to the values obtained without the stirrer. Using the EMA, the volume fraction of graphene platelets that was responsible for the improvement in the electrical conductivity was found to be lower than that for the improvement in the thermal conductivity. The results of the analysis are used to determine the volume fraction of the thinner and the thicker graphene platelets in the composite films.

  3. Fractions of aqueous and methanolic extracts from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) present platelet antiaggregant activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduado J; Astudillo, Luis A; Gutiérrez, Margarita I; Contreras, Samuel O; Bustamante, Luis O; Rubio, Pia I; Moore-Carrasco, Rodrigo; Alarcón, Marcelo A; Fuentes, Jaime A; González, Daniel E; Palomo, Iván F

    2012-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Its prevention emphasizes three aspects: not smoking, physical activity and a healthy diet. Recently, we screened the antithrombotic activity of a selected group of fruits and vegetables. Among them, tomato showed an important effect. The aim of this study was to evaluate and characterize the platelet antiaggregatory activity of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). For this, we obtained aqueous and methanolic tomato extracts and evaluated the effect of pH (2 and 10) and temperature (22, 60 and 100°C) on this activity. Furthermore, in order to isolate the antiaggregant principle, we separated tomato extracts into several fractions (A-D) by size exclusion chromatography. In addition, we evaluated the platelet antiaggregating activity ex vivo in Wistar rats. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of tomato treated at 22, 60 and 100°C and pH 2 and 10 still inhibited platelet aggregation (in vitro). Moreover, it was noted that one of the fractions (fraction C), from both aqueous and methanolic extracts, presented the highest activity (∼70% inhibition of platelet aggregation) and concentration dependently inhibited platelet aggregation significantly compared with control (P < 0.05). These fractions did not contain lycopene but presented two peaks of absorption, at 210 and 261 nm, compatible with the presence of nucleosides. In rats treated with tomato macerates, a mild platelet antiaggregating effect ex vivo was observed. Further studies are required to identify the molecules with platelet antiaggregating activity and antiplatelet mechanisms of action.

  4. Beyond the platelet count: immature platelet fraction and thromboelastometry correlate with bleeding in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Greene, Lindsey A; Chen, Siqi; Seery, Caroline; Imahiyerobo, Allison M; Bussel, James B

    2014-08-01

    Platelet counts (PC) estimate bleeding risk in Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP). We investigated whether measures of thromboelastometry and absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) would correlate better with acute bleeding score (ABS) than PC or mean platelet volume (MPV). Simultaneous determination of ABS, complete blood count and thromboelastometry was performed in 141 ITP patients; 112 underwent A-IPF testing. Subgroup analyses were performed for paediatric subjects, PC <60 × 10(9) /l and <30 × 10(9) /l. PC significantly inversely correlated with ABS in all subjects, PC <30 × 10(9) /l and total paediatric cohort. MPV did not correlate with ABS in any subgroup. Thromboelastometry measures of clot firmness, but not PC, significantly correlated with ABS in all subjects with PC <60 × 10(9) /l, and children with PC <60 × 10(9) /l and <30 × 10(9) /l. A-IPF demonstrated stronger correlation with ABS than did PC among all subjects, those with PC <60 × 10(9) /l, all children and children with PC <30 × 10(9) /l (r = -0·37; r = -0·34; r = -0·44; r = -0·60) versus ABS with PC (r = -0·36; ns; r = -0·32; ns). Stronger correlations of both thromboelastometry measures of clot firmness and A-IPF than PC with ABS suggest factors beyond PC, i.e. related to platelet function, contribute to ITP bleeding pathophysiology. Thromboelastometry, A-IPF and ABS can be incorporated into routine or acute visits.

  5. Establishment of Epithelial Attachment on Titanium Surface Coated with Platelet Activating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Shiho; Maeno, Masahiko; Lee, Cliff; Nagai, Shigemi; Kim, David M.; Da Silva, John; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce epithelial attachment on a typical implant abutment surface of smooth titanium. A challenging complication that hinders the success of dental implants is peri-implantitis. A common cause of peri-implantitis may results from the lack of epithelial sealing at the peri-implant collar. Histologically, epithelial sealing is recognized as the attachment of the basement membrane (BM). BM-attachment is promoted by activated platelet aggregates at surgical wound sites. On the other hand, platelets did not aggregate on smooth titanium, the surface typical of the implant abutment. We then hypothesized that epithelial BM-attachment was produced when titanium surface was modified to allow platelet aggregation. Titanium surfaces were coated with a protease activated receptor 4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP). PAR4-AP coating yielded rapid aggregation of platelets on the titanium surface. Platelet aggregates released robust amount of epithelial chemoattractants (IGF-I, TGF-β) and growth factors (EGF, VEGF) on the titanium surface. Human gingival epithelial cells, when they were co-cultured on the platelet aggregates, successfully attached to the PAR4-AP coated titanium surface with spread laminin5 positive BM and consecutive staining of the epithelial tight junction component ZO1, indicating the formation of complete epithelial sheet. These in-vitro results indicate the establishment of epithelial BM-attachment to the titanium surface. PMID:27741287

  6. The mechanism of the effect of aspirin on human platelets. I. Acetylation of a particulate fraction protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roth, G J; Majerus, P W

    1975-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) inhibits platelet prostaglandin synthesis and the ADP- and collagen-induced platelet release reaction. The mechanism of the inhibitory effect is unknown but may involve protein acetylation, since aspirin acetylates a variety of substrates, including platelet protein. We have examined the relationship between protein acetylation and aspirin's physiologic effect on platelets. Suspensions of washed human platelets were incubated at 37 degrees C with (3H)aspirin, and incorporation of radioactivity into protein was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Exposure to (acetyl-3H)aspirin but not (aromatic ring-3H)aspirin resulted in radioactive labeling of three platelet proteins, suggesting that the drug acetylates these three proteins. The acetylation of two of the proteins (located in the supernatant fraction) was not saturable, implying that these reactions may not be physiologically significant. Acetylation of the third protein, approximate mol wt 85,000 (located in the particulate fraction), saturated at an aspirin concentration of 30 muM and was complete within 20 min. Platelets prepared from aspirin-treated donors did not incorporate any (acetyl-3H)aspirin radioactivity into the particulate protein for 2 days after drug treatment and did not show full pretreatment uptake of radioactivity for 12 days thereafter. The course of increasing incorporation of (acetyl-3H)aspirin radioactivity parralleled that of platelet turnover. Therefore, in addition to its saturability, acetylation of the particulate fraction protein by aspirin was permanent. In two respects, the inhibition of platelet function by aspirin correlates well with the aspirin-mediated acetylation of the particulate fraction protein. Both persist for the life-span of the aspirin-treated platelet, and both occur at a similar saturating aspirin concentration. The evidence suggests that the physiologic effect of aspirin on human platelets is produced

  7. Evaluation of the immature platelet fraction in the diagnosis and prognosis of childhood immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Adly, Amira Abdel Moneam; Ragab, Iman Ahmed; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Farahat, Mona Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Rapid assessment of platelet production would distinguish between thrombocytopenia due to decreased platelet production or increased peripheral platelet destruction. We evaluated the value of immature platelet fraction (IPF) in differentiating immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) from thrombocytopenia secondary to bone marrow failure and its potential use as a prognostic marker. Forty-one young patients with ITP were compared with 14 patients with hematological malignancies under chemotherapy, representing a control group with thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow suppression and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Patients were studied stressing on bleeding manifestations, organomegaly/lymphadenopathy and therapy. Complete blood count including IPF was performed using Sysmex XE-2100. ITP patients were classified into two subgroups: acute ITP with spontaneous resolution within 3 months from diagnosis and chronic ITP that lasted ≥ 1 year from diagnosis. Median IPF was 11.8% in patients with ITP, 7% in those with hematological malignancy and 3% in the control group (p < 0.001). ITP patients had significantly higher mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), platelet large cell ratio (P-LCR) and IPF compared with patients with malignancy or healthy controls, while plateletcrit (PCT) was significantly lower in ITP patients than other groups (p < 0.001). IPF was increased in patients with chronic ITP compared with acute ITP group (p < 0.001). Patients with active ITP had the highest IPF followed by those in partial remission, while ITP patients in remission had the lowest IPF. IPF was positively correlated to the number of lines of treatment used, MPV, PDW and P-LCR, while negatively correlated to platelet count and PCT among ITP patients (p < 0.001). Multiple regression analysis showed that platelet count and P-LCR were independently related to IPF. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of IPF at 9.4% could be diagnostic for ITP patients

  8. Inhibition of platelet (/sup 3/H)- imipramine binding by human plasma protein fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Strijewski, A.; Chudzik, J.; Tang, S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of high-affinity (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding to platelet membranes by human plasma fractions and isolated plasma proteins was investigated. Several plasma proteins were found to contribute to the observed apparent inhibition and this contribution was assessed in terms of inhibitor units. Alpha/sub 1/ acid glycoprotein, high density and low density lipoprotein, IgG and ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin were identified as effective non-specific inhibitors. Alpha-1-acid glycoprotein was confirmed to be the most potent plasma protein inhibitor. Cohn fractions were evaluated for the presence of the postulated endocoid of (/sup 3/H)-imipramine binding site.

  9. Automatic detection of immature platelets for decision making regarding platelet transfusion indications for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Sakota, Yasuyuki; Masuda, Yukako; Matsunaga, Kyoko; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Takeshi; Sakurai, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Makoto; Yanai, Tomoko; Hayakawa, Akira; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Nomura, Tsutomu; Kubota, Yoshitsugu; Kumagai, Shunichi

    2008-04-01

    Immature or reticulated platelets are known as a clinical marker of thrombopoiesis. Recently, an automatic method was established to detect reticulated platelets as immature platelet fraction (IPF) by means of hematology analyzer XE-2100. We assessed the effects of IPF detection after chemotherapy for various pediatric malignant disorders of 16 patients. Our results indicate that IPF should be considered a useful marker of imminent platelet recovery so that unnecessary platelet transfusion can be avoided.

  10. Importance of immature platelet fraction as predictor of immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Arshi; Mukry, Samina Naz; Shaikh, Mahwish Rauf; Bukhari, Ali Raza; Shamsi, Tahir Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is a clinical syndrome in which a decreased number of circulating platelets (thrombocytopenia) manifests as a bleeding tendency, easy bruising (purpura) or extravasation of blood from capillaries into skin and mucous membranes (petechiae). The diagnosis of ITP can be made clinically on the basis of symptoms, we need to see if ITP can be confirmed in patients by quantification of residual RNA containing immature platelets (megakaryocytic mass) or immature platelets fraction (IPF) using automated hematology analyzers (Sysmex XE-2100). Methods: In order to check the efficacy of IPF% parameter of Sysmex XE-2100 a total of 231 patients of thrombocytopenia were included in this study. Complete blood count (CBC) was estimated. The data was statistically analyzed by SPSS version 17. Results: About 62 patients were diagnosed as ITP and 169 patients were diagnosed as non ITP on the basis of clinical history. The mean IPF % value of ITP patients was 16.39% and the IPF % value of Non ITP patients was ~7.69% respectively. There was no significant difference in IPF% values with respect to time between sampling and acquisition of complete blood count. The diagnostic sensitivity of IPF% as biomarker for ITP and non-ITP was 85.71% (95%CI: 84.04% to 85.96%) and 41.76% (95% CI: 39.87% to 43.65%). Conclusion: The mean IPF % value by Sysmex XE-2100 can be used to predict ITP. PMID:27375692

  11. Protective Mechanisms of S. lycopersicum Aqueous Fraction (Nucleosides and Flavonoids) on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation: In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Valenzuela, Claudio; Pérez, Pablo; Astudillo, Luis; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms of antiplatelet action of bioactive principle from S. lycopersicum. Aqueous fraction had a high content of nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, and adenosine 5′-monophosphate) by HPLC analysis. Also aqueous fraction presented flavonoids content. Aqueous fraction inhibited platelet activation by 15 ± 6% (P < 0.05). Fully spread of human platelets on collagen in the presence of aqueous fraction was inhibited from 15 ± 1 to 9 ± 1 μm2 (P < 0.001). After incubation of whole blood with aqueous fraction, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 55 ± 12% (P < 0.001). Platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by the aqueous fraction. At the same concentrations that aqueous fraction inhibits platelet aggregation, levels of sCD40L significantly decreased and the intraplatelet cAMP levels increased. In addition, SQ22536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, attenuated the effect of aqueous fraction toward ADP-induced platelet aggregation and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Platelet aggregation ex vivo (human study) and thrombosis formation in vivo (murine model) were inhibited by aqueous fraction. Finally, aqueous fraction may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities (nucleosides and flavonoids) to processed foods. PMID:24159349

  12. Protective Mechanisms of S. lycopersicum Aqueous Fraction (Nucleosides and Flavonoids) on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation: In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Valenzuela, Claudio; Pérez, Pablo; Astudillo, Luis; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms of antiplatelet action of bioactive principle from S. lycopersicum. Aqueous fraction had a high content of nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate) by HPLC analysis. Also aqueous fraction presented flavonoids content. Aqueous fraction inhibited platelet activation by 15 ± 6% (P < 0.05). Fully spread of human platelets on collagen in the presence of aqueous fraction was inhibited from 15 ± 1 to 9 ± 1  μ m(2) (P < 0.001). After incubation of whole blood with aqueous fraction, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 55 ± 12% (P < 0.001). Platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by the aqueous fraction. At the same concentrations that aqueous fraction inhibits platelet aggregation, levels of sCD40L significantly decreased and the intraplatelet cAMP levels increased. In addition, SQ22536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, attenuated the effect of aqueous fraction toward ADP-induced platelet aggregation and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Platelet aggregation ex vivo (human study) and thrombosis formation in vivo (murine model) were inhibited by aqueous fraction. Finally, aqueous fraction may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities (nucleosides and flavonoids) to processed foods.

  13. Protective action of proanthocyanidin fraction from Medemia argun nuts against oxidative/nitrative damages of blood platelet and plasma components.

    PubMed

    Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna; Głowacki, Rafał; Olas, Beata

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative/nitrative stress induced by different factors plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various disorders, including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Proanthocyanidins have antioxidative properties and may protect biomolecules (lipids, DNA, and proteins) exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, including peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The effects of proanthocyanidin fraction from Medemia argun nuts on oxidative/nitrative protein damages (determined by such parameters as level of thiol groups, carbonyl groups, and nitrotyrosine residues) and on the amount of glutathione (as an important component of redox status; using HPLC) in human blood platelets and plasma after treatment with peroxynitrite were studied in vitro. The preincubation of blood platelets and plasma with proanthocyanidin fraction from M. argun nuts (0.5-50 µg/ml) reduced the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine, diminished oxidation of thiol groups, and decreased the level of carbonyl groups in proteins caused by 100 µM peroxynitrite. An action of tested plant fraction and ONOO(-) evoked a significant increase of GSH in platelets and plasma in comparison with platelets and plasma treated with ONOO(-) only. The proanthocyanidin fraction from M. argun nuts can be useful as a protecting factor against oxidative/nitrative stress associated with different diseases (cancer, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases) and proanthocyanidins of M. argun nuts may be promising antioxidants.

  14. Evaluation of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus on biological properties of blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The antiplatelet and antioxidative activity of polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus in blood platelets stimulated by thrombin was studied. Thrombin as a strong physiological agonist induces the enzymatic peroxidation of endogenous arachidonic acid, the formation of different reactive oxygen species, including superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text](·)) and the platelet aggregation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the polyphenolic fraction from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus may change the biological properties of blood platelets activated by thrombin. We used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this fraction to change [Formula: see text](·) generation in platelets. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by the production of 8-epi-prostaglandin (8-EPI) F(2). Moreover, we determined the effects of the fraction on blood platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. We observed that the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced [Formula: see text](·), 8-EPI and TBARS production in these cells. The ability of the fraction to decrease the [Formula: see text](·) generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. This study may suggest that the tested plant fraction might be a good candidate for protecting blood platelets against changes of their biological functions, which may be associated with the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular disorders.

  15. NF-E2 p45 is important for establishing normal function of platelets.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Rie; Takayama-Tsujimoto, Mariko; Satoh, Hironori; Gutiérrez, Laura; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Sarai, Akinori; Bresnick, Emery H; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2013-07-01

    NF-E2 is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of p45 and small Maf subunits. Since p45(-/-) mice display severe thrombocytopenia, p45 is recognized as a critical regulator of platelet production from megakaryocytes. To identify direct p45 target genes in megakaryocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing to analyze the genome-wide chromatin occupancy of p45 in primary megakaryocytes. p45 target gene candidates obtained from the analysis are implicated in the production and function of platelets. Two of these genes, Selp and Myl9, were verified as direct p45 targets through multiple approaches. Since P-selectin, encoded by Selp, plays a critical role in platelet function during thrombogenesis, we tested whether p45 determines the intrinsic reactivity and potency of platelets generated from megakaryocytes. Mice expressing a hypomorphic p45 mutant instead of wild-type p45 in megakaryocytes (p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg mice) displayed platelet hypofunction accompanied by mild thrombocytopenia. Furthermore, lung metastasis of melanoma cells, which requires platelet activation, was repressed in p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg mice compared to control mice, validating the impaired function of platelets produced from p45(-/-):ΔNTD-Tg megakaryocytes. By activating genes in megakaryocytes that mediate platelet production and function, p45 determines the quantity and quality of platelets.

  16. NF-E2 p45 Is Important for Establishing Normal Function of Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Rie; Takayama-Tsujimoto, Mariko; Satoh, Hironori; Gutiérrez, Laura; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Satoshi; Sarai, Akinori; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2013-01-01

    NF-E2 is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting of p45 and small Maf subunits. Since p45−/− mice display severe thrombocytopenia, p45 is recognized as a critical regulator of platelet production from megakaryocytes. To identify direct p45 target genes in megakaryocytes, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing to analyze the genome-wide chromatin occupancy of p45 in primary megakaryocytes. p45 target gene candidates obtained from the analysis are implicated in the production and function of platelets. Two of these genes, Selp and Myl9, were verified as direct p45 targets through multiple approaches. Since P-selectin, encoded by Selp, plays a critical role in platelet function during thrombogenesis, we tested whether p45 determines the intrinsic reactivity and potency of platelets generated from megakaryocytes. Mice expressing a hypomorphic p45 mutant instead of wild-type p45 in megakaryocytes (p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg mice) displayed platelet hypofunction accompanied by mild thrombocytopenia. Furthermore, lung metastasis of melanoma cells, which requires platelet activation, was repressed in p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg mice compared to control mice, validating the impaired function of platelets produced from p45−/−:ΔNTD-Tg megakaryocytes. By activating genes in megakaryocytes that mediate platelet production and function, p45 determines the quantity and quality of platelets. PMID:23648484

  17. [HPA distribution characteristics of platelet donor population in Mudanjiang area of China and establishment of its database].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing-Xian; Gao, Guang-Ping; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Yan; Yu, Xiu-Qing; Xia, Dong-Mei; Zhou, Rui-Hua; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Qiang; Liu, Jie

    2012-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the distribution characteristics of the human platelet antigen (HPA) gene of human platelet donors and its polymorphism in Mudanjiang area of Heilongjiang Province in China, to determine platelet antigen system with clinical significance by judging the rate of incompatibility of HPA, as well as to establish a database of donors' HPA. The genotyping of 154 unrelated platelet donors was performed by means of PCR-SSP. The frequencies of gene and genotype were calculated and compared with that in other areas. The results showed that the genes 1a-17a of HPA-a were all expressed in the 154 healthy and unrelated platelet donors. Only genes 1b, 2b, 3b, 5b, 6b and 15b of HPA-b were expressed while genes 4b, 7b-14b, 16b were not expressed. Among the genotypes, aa homozygosity was predominant and HPA15 had the greatest heterozygosity, while HPA3 had lower heterozygosity. There were 23 combined types of HPA, 5 of them had a rate higher than 10%, and the frequencies of the other 18 were lower than 8%. HPA genotype frequencies showed a good consistency to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. It is concluded that the distribution of the allele polymorphism of HPA1-HPA17 in Mudanjiang area has its own characteristics, compared with other areas and some countries, the local HPA genotype database of platelet donors is established in Mudanjiang area, which can provide the matching donors for clinical use with immunological significance.

  18. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  19. Novel hematological parameters for the evaluation of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms: the immature platelet and reticulocyte fractions.

    PubMed

    Strati, Paolo; Bose, Prithviraj; Lyle, Lindsey; Gaw, Katie; Zhou, Lingsha; Pierce, Sherry A; Huynh-Lu, Julie; Hirsch-Ginsberg, Cheryl F; Bueso-Mendoza, Daniel E; Bueso-Ramos, Carlos E; Verstovsek, Srdan

    2017-02-28

    New automated hematology analyzers have led to the availability of novel hematological parameters, including the immature platelet fraction (IPF) and the immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF), both of potential interest in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We performed a prospective analysis of 217 patients with MPN, including 32 (15%) with essential thrombocythemia (ET), 43 (20%) with polycythemia vera (PV), and 142 (65%) with myelofibrosis (MF); the IPF and IRF were measured by the Sysmex XN analyzer. As compared to patients with ET, both a higher IPF and IRF were observed among patients with PV and MF. Factors associated with high IPF among patients with PV/ET were male sex, thrombocytopenia, and diagnosis of PV; among patients with MF, they were elevated peripheral blasts, low platelet count, JAK2 V617F mutation, and previous therapy. Factors associated with high IRF among patients with PV/ET were low hemoglobin, high reticulocyte count, and PV diagnosis; among patients with MF, they were peripheral blasts and elevated reticulocytes. The IPF and IRF represent novel parameters in patients with MPN with potential relevant clinical implications. Comparison with healthy subjects and those with secondary polycythemia is needed to confirm our preliminary findings.

  20. Pitfalls in establishing the diagnosis of deep venous thrombophlebitis by indium-111 platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Seabold, J.E.; Conrad, G.R.; Kimball, D.A.; Ponto, J.A.; Bricker, J.A.

    1988-07-01

    Forty-seven /sup 111/In-platelet scintigraphs (In-PS) were analyzed retrospectively to identify sources of diagnostic error and to optimize the diagnostic criteria for active deep venous thrombophlebitis (DVT). The results of In-PS were compared with contrast venography, additional diagnostic studies, and clinical outcome. Three patterns of platelet localization emerged as the best predictors of active DVT: (a) focal or (b) linear 4-hr localization, or (c) an asymmetric blood-pool pattern on 4-hr imaging that evolved into a focal or linear pattern by 16 to 24 hr. All false-positive studies had abnormal patterns confined to the inguinal region at 24 hr. All patients with false-negative studies had received heparin between 4 and 24 hr. The potential pitfalls encountered in the evaluation of the iliac, femoral, and popliteal veins are reviewed and the importance of delayed imaging in selected cases is emphasized.

  1. The efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with erbium fractional laser therapy for facial acne scars or acne.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jiang-Ting; Xuan, Min; Zhang, Ya-Ni; Liu, Hong-Wei; Cai, Jin-Hui; Wu, Yan-Hong; Xiang, Xiao-Fei; Shan, Gui-Qiu; Cheng, Biao

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) combined with erbium fractional laser therapy for facial acne or acne scars. PRP combined with erbium fractional laser therapy was used for the treatment of 22 patients, including 16 patients who suffered from facial acne scars and 6 patients who suffered from acne scars concomitant with acne. Whole blood (40 ml) was collected from each patient, and following differential centrifugation, PRP was harvested. After using an erbium fractional laser, we applied PRP to the entire face of every patient. Digital photos were taken before and after the treatment for evaluation by dermatologists and the patients rated the efficacy on a 5-point scale. The erythema was moderate or mild, while its total duration was <3 days; after receiving the treatment three times, 90.9% of the patients showed an improvement of >50%, and 91% of the patients were satisfied; no acne inflammation was observed after treatment. PRP combined with erbium fractional laser therapy is an effective and safe approach for treating acne scars or acne, with minimal side-effects, and it simultaneously enhanced the recovery of laser-damaged skin.

  2. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multi-frequency EM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Hunkeler, P. A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise and accumulate beneath nearby sea ice to form a several meter thick sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator for ice - ocean interactions. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and sub-ice platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions from platelet-layer conductivities using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drill-hole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction also yielded plausible results. Our findings imply that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties. However, we emphasize that the successful application of this technique requires a break with traditional EM sensor calibration strategies due to the need of absolute calibration with respect to a physical forward model.

  3. The Association between Platelet/Lymphocyte Ratio and Coronary Artery Disease Severity in Asymptomatic Low Ejection Fraction Patients

    PubMed Central

    Açar, Burak; Gul, Murat; Özeke, Özcan; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Coronary angiography (CAG) is generally needed in the setting of systolic heart failure (HF) with an unidentified etiology as a part of diagnostic strategy. On the other hand, the clinical value of this invasive strategy is largely unknown. Platelet-lymphocyte ratio (PLR) has recently emerged as a novel inflammatory index that may serve as an important predictor of inflammatory state and overall mortality. The present study aimed to search the predictive value of PLR in determining the extent of coronary atherosclerosis in asymptomatic low ejection fraction (EF) patients. Subjects and Methods 156 asymptomatic heart failure (HF) subjects (without angina or HF symptoms, mean age: 58 years; to male: 71.2%) were enrolled, and thereafter a CAG was performed. Gensini Score was used to determine the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) on CAG. According to this scoring system, the overall study group was categorized into three distinct subgroups: control group with the score 0, mild atherosclerosis group with the score 0 to 20 and severe atherosclerosis group with the score of >20. Thereafter, a comparison was made among groups with regard to mean values of PLR. Results The severe atherosclerosis group had a substantially higher level of mean PLR in comparison to other groups (p<0.001). Pre-CAG PLR levels as well as a variety of clinical variables including age, low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol demonstrated an independent correlation with Gensini score through a multivariate analysis. Conclusion These findings suggest the potential association of high PLR levels with severe atherosclerosis in the setting of asymptomatic systolic HF. A simple measurement of PLR helps to identify the severity of coronary atherosclerosis prior to conducting coronary angiography. PMID:27826341

  4. [Persistent thrombocytopenia in a child: morphological examination of blood platelets established the diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome].

    PubMed

    Latger-Cannard, V; Lacroix, F; Devignes, J; Salignac, S; Bensoussan, D; Salmon, A; Mansuy, L; Bordigoni, P; Lecompte, T

    2008-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia frequently occurs in laboratory practice. The present work illustrates, through the presentation of a case report of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, the difficulties encountered to identify and characterize thrombocytopenia. The clinicobiological validation of a low platelet count involves both the biologist, who must assume the validation of numeration while mentioning the morphological characteristics of the platelets and other blood cells, as well as the physician who has to interpret these data according to the clinical context.

  5. The Clinical Efficacy of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma Combined with Ultra-Pulsed Fractional CO2 Laser Therapy for Facial Rejuvenation

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Qiang; Chang, Peng; Guo, Bingyu; Zhang, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser is an efficient, precise, and safe therapeutic intervention for skin refreshing, although accompanied with prolonged edema and erythema. In recent years, autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been proven to promote wound and soft tissue healing and collagen regeneration. To investigate whether the combination of PRP and ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser had a synergistic effect on therapy for facial rejuvenation. Totally, 13 facial aging females were treated with ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser. One side of the face was randomly selected as experimental group and injected with PRP, the other side acted as the control group and was injected with physiological saline at the same dose. Comprehensive assessment of clinical efficacy was performed by satisfaction scores, dermatologists' double-blind evaluation and the VISIA skin analysis system. After treatment for 3 months, subjective scores of facial wrinkles, skin texture, and skin elasticity were higher than that in the control group. Similarly, improvement of skin wrinkles, texture, and tightness in the experimental group was better compared with the control group. Additionally, the total duration of erythema, edema, and crusting was decreased, in the experimental group compared with the control group. PRP combined with ultra-pulsed fractional CO2 laser had a synergistic effect on facial rejuvenation, shortening duration of side effects, and promoting better therapeutic effect. PMID:27222038

  6. The detection of platelet isoantibodies by membrane immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    van der Schans, G S; Veenhoven, W A; Snijder, J A; Nieweg, H O

    1977-07-01

    A membrane ummunofluorescence test for the detection of platelet isoantibodies is described. Gel filtration of the incubation mixture was incorporated in the procedure and proved effective for the removal of serum proteins from the platelet suspension. With this technique isoantibodies were found in the serum of 13 out of a group of 16 patients who had received multiple transfusions. The results were checked by measuring the uptake of 125I-labeled anti-IgG fraction by gel-filtered platelets. Subsequently the membrane immunofluorescence method was also compared with established techniques described for the detection of isoantibodies such as the microtest for lymphocytotoxicity and a complement-fixation method and the procedures based on the release of labeled serotonin, the phagocytosis of chromium-tagged platelets, the increase of platelet factor 3 activity, and on platelet aggregation. We had the opportunity to investigate the serum of one patient for the presence of isoantibodies against platelets from HLA identical siblings both before and after the administration of their platelets. On the basis of this experience it is concluded that the membrane immunofluorescence test for platelet isoantibodies is a relatively simple method with a high degree of specificity and adequate sensitivity.

  7. Platelet interaction with polymerizing fibrin.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, S; Regoeczi, E; Stewart, G J; Senyl, A F; Mustard, J F

    1972-03-01

    Interaction of washed pig, rabbit, or human platelets with fibrinogen was studied during its transition to fibrin using photometric, isotopic, and electron microscopic techniques. Untreated fibrinogen and fully polymerized fibrin had no detectable effect on platelets. Fibrinogen, incubated with low concentrations of reptilase or thrombin, formed intermediate products which readily became associated with platelets and caused their aggregation. Neutralization of the thrombin did not prevent this interaction. In the absence of fibrinogen, reptilase did not affect platelets. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was accompanied by small losses of platelet constituents (serotonin, adenine nucleotides, platelet factor 4, and lactic dehydrogenase). This loss did not appear to be the result of the platelet release reaction. Inhibitors of the release reaction or of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation did not prevent the interaction of platelets with polymerizing fibrin. Apyrase or prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) reduced the extent of platelet aggregation by polymerizing fibrin, but the amount of protein associated with platelets was slightly increased. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) or ethylene glycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA).Fibers formed in solutions of polymerizing fibrin were larger in the presence than in the absence of washed platelets, suggesting that platelets affect fibrin polymerization. The adherence of platelets to polymerizing fibrin may be responsible for the establishment of links between platelets and fibrin in hemostatic plugs and thrombi.

  8. Effects of hormones on platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Farré, Antonio López; Modrego, Javier; Zamorano-León, José J

    2014-04-01

    Platelets and their activation/inhibition mechanisms play a central role in haemostasis. It is well known agonists and antagonists of platelet activation; however, during the last years novel evidences of hormone effects on platelet activation have been reported. Platelet functionality may be modulated by the interaction between different hormones and their platelet receptors, contributing to sex differences in platelet function and even in platelet-mediated vascular damage. It has suggested aspects that apparently are well established should be reviewed. Hormones effects on platelet activity are included among them. This article tries to review knowledge about the involvement of hormones in platelet biology and activity.

  9. High-content live-cell imaging assay used to establish mechanism of trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1)--mediated inhibition of platelet production.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Devine, Matthew T; Jurak Begonja, Antonija; Tibbitts, Jay; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-09-06

    Proplatelet production represents a terminal stage of megakaryocyte development during which long, branching processes composed of platelet-sized swellings are extended and released into the surrounding culture. Whereas the cytoskeletal mechanics driving these transformations have been the focus of many studies, significant limitations in our ability to quantify the rate and extent of proplatelet production have restricted the field to qualitative analyses of a limited number of cells over short intervals. A novel high-content, quantitative, live-cell imaging assay using the IncuCyte system (Essen BioScience) was therefore developed to measure the rate and extent of megakaryocyte maturation and proplatelet production under live culture conditions for extended periods of time. As proof of concept, we used this system in the present study to establish a mechanism by which trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), an Ab-drug conjugate currently in clinical development for cancer, affects platelet production. High-content analysis of primary cell cultures revealed that T-DM1 is taken up by mouse megakaryocytes, inhibits megakaryocyte differentiation, and disrupts proplatelet formation by inducing abnormal tubulin organization and suppressing microtubule dynamic instability. Defining the pathways by which therapeutics such as T-DM1 affect megakaryocyte differentiation and proplatelet production may yield strategies to manage drug-induced thrombocytopenias.

  10. Ectopic osteogenic capacity of freshly isolated adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction cells supported with platelet-rich plasma: A simulation of intraoperative procedure.

    PubMed

    Najman, Stevo J; Cvetković, Vladimir J; Najdanović, Jelena G; Stojanović, Sanja; Vukelić-Nikolić, Marija Đ; Vučković, Ivica; Petrović, Dragan

    2016-10-01

    Bone defects represent a serious problem in cranio-maxillofacial surgery. Autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells in combination with biological factors and bone substitutes were previously proposed as alternative to bone grafting. By simulating an intraoperative procedure we examined osteogenic capacity of the combination of two autologous components, freshly isolated adipose-derived SVF cells, and platelet-rich plasma (PRP), delivered on bone mineral matrix (BMM) carrier (SPB group) in mice ectopic bone forming model. Implantation of BMM only (B group) was a control. The presence of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) in SVF was detected by immunocytochemical analysis. Expression of bone- and endothelial-related genes was compared between freshly isolated SVF and ADSCs obtained from SVF after in vitro cultivation. The implants were analyzed using expression analysis of bone-related genes at one, two, four and eight weeks and histochemical, immunohistochemical and histomorphometrical analyses at two and eight weeks after implantation. Freshly isolated adipose-derived SVF contained ADSCs and exhibited promising osteogenic and vasculogenic capacity. At two and four weeks, significantly higher expression of bone-related genes was detected in SPB group compared to B group. The signs of osteogenic process were more pronounced in SPB than in B implants. By the end of experiment, percentage of infiltrated tissue and vascularization was significantly higher in SPB than in B implants. Adipose-derived SVF cells, PRP and BMM rapidly initiated osteogenesis what makes this combination promising candidate for treatment of bone defects.

  11. Platelets and platelet-like particles mediate intercellular RNA transfer

    PubMed Central

    Risitano, Antonina; Beaulieu, Lea M.; Vitseva, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The role of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis is clearly established; however, the mechanisms by which platelets mediate inflammatory and immune pathways are less well understood. Platelets interact and modulate the function of blood and vascular cells by releasing bioactive molecules. Although the platelet is anucleate, it contains transcripts that may mirror disease. Platelet mRNA is only associated with low-level protein translation; however, platelets have a unique membrane structure allowing for the passage of small molecules, leading to the possibility that its cytoplasmic RNA may be passed to nucleated cells. To examine this question, platelet-like particles with labeled RNA were cocultured with vascular cells. Coculture of platelet-like particles with activated THP-1, monocytic, and endothelial cells led to visual and functional RNA transfer. Posttransfer microarray gene expression analysis of THP-1 cells showed an increase in HBG1/HBG2 and HBA1/HBA2 expression that was directly related to the transfer. Infusion of wild-type platelets into a TLR2-deficient mouse model established in vivo confirmation of select platelet RNA transfer to leukocytes. By specifically transferring green fluorescent protein, we also observed external RNA was functional in the recipient cells. The observation that platelets possess the capacity to transfer cytosolic RNA suggests a new function for platelets in the regulation of vascular homeostasis. PMID:22596260

  12. Fractionating dead reckoning: role of the compass, odometer, logbook, and home base establishment in spatial orientation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Megan M.; Winter, Shawn S.

    2008-01-01

    Rats use multiple sources of information to maintain spatial orientation. Although previous work has focused on rats' use of environmental cues, a growing number of studies have demonstrated that rats also use self-movement cues to organize navigation. This review examines the extent that kinematic analysis of naturally occurring behavior has provided insight into processes that mediate dead-reckoning-based navigation. This work supports a role for separate systems in processing self-movement cues that converge on the hippocampus. The compass system is involved in deriving directional information from self-movement cues; whereas, the odometer system is involved in deriving distance information from self-movement cues. The hippocampus functions similar to a logbook in that outward path unique information from the compass and odometer is used to derive the direction and distance of a path to the point at which movement was initiated. Finally, home base establishment may function to reset this system after each excursion and anchor environmental cues to self-movement cues. The combination of natural behaviors and kinematic analysis has proven to be a robust paradigm to investigate the neural basis of spatial orientation. PMID:18553065

  13. Expanded Stem Cells, Stromal-Vascular Fraction, and Platelet-Rich Plasma Enriched Fat: Comparing Results of Different Facial Rejuvenation Approaches in a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Rigotti, Gino; Charles-de-Sá, Luiz; Gontijo-de-Amorim, Natale Ferreira; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Amable, Paola Romina; Borojevic, Radovan; Benati, Donatella; Bernardi, Paolo; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background In a previous study, the authors demonstrated that treatment with expanded adipose-derived stem cells or stromal vascular fraction (SVF)-enriched fat modify the pattern of the dermis in human beings, representing a skin rejuvenation effect. Considering that expanded stem cells require a cell factor, the authors wanted to assess similar results by replacing them with platelet-rich plasma (PRP), which is easier to obtain and for which an empirical regenerative effect has been already described. Objectives To determine if PRP injection could replace the cutaneous regenerative effect of adipose-derived stem cells. Methods This study was performed in 13 patients who were candidates for facelift. The patients underwent sampling of fat by liposuction from the abdomen and submitted to one of three protocols: injection of SVF-enriched fat or expanded adipose-derived stem cells or fat plus PRP in the preauricular areas. Fragments of skin were removed before and 3 months after treatment and analyzed by optical and electron microscopy. Results The use of fat plus PRP led to the presence of more pronounced inflammatory infiltrates and a greater vascular reactivity, increasing in vascular permeability and a certain reactivity of the nervous component. The addition of PRP did not improve the regenerative effect. Conclusion The use of PRP did not have significant advantages in skin rejuvenation over the use of expanded adipose-derived stem cells or SVF-enriched fat. The effect of increased vascular reactivity may be useful in pathological situations in which an intense angiogenesis is desirable, such as tissular ischemia. Level of Evidence: 4 Therapeutic PMID:26879294

  14. Effects of administration of adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction and platelet-rich plasma to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints.

    PubMed

    Upchurch, David A; Renberg, Walter C; Roush, James K; Milliken, George A; Weiss, Mark L

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate effects of simultaneous intra-articular and IV injection of autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints. ANIMALS 22 client-owned dogs (12 placebo-treated [control] dogs and 10 treated dogs). PROCEDURES Dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints that caused signs of lameness or discomfort were characterized on the basis of results of orthopedic examination, goniometry, lameness score, the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI), a visual analogue scale, and results obtained by use of a pressure-sensing walkway at week 0 (baseline). Dogs received a simultaneous intraarticular and IV injection of SVF and PRP or a placebo. Dogs were examined again 4, 8, 12, and 24 weeks after injection. RESULTS CBPI scores were significantly lower for the treatment group at week 24, compared with scores for the control group. Mean visual analogue scale score for the treatment group was significantly higher at week 0 than at weeks 4, 8, or 24. Dogs with baseline peak vertical force (PVF) in the lowest 25th percentile were compared, and the treatment group had a significantly higher PVF than did the control group. After the SVF-PRP injection, fewer dogs in the treated group than in the control group had lameness confirmed during examination. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For dogs with osteoarthritis of the hip joints treated with SVF and PRP, improvements in CBPI and PVF were evident at some time points, compared with results for the control group.

  15. Platelet Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... donating platelets, can I still donate blood? What blood types should donate platelets? Can I donate plasma at ... Community Learn About Blood Blood Facts and Statistics Blood Types Blood Components What Happens to Donated Blood Blood ...

  16. Establishing proof of concept: Platelet-rich plasma and bone marrow aspirate concentrate may improve cartilage repair following surgical treatment for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Niall A; Murawski, Christopher D; Haleem, Amgad M; Hannon, Charles P; Savage-Elliott, Ian; Kennedy, John G

    2012-07-18

    Osteochondral lesions of the talus are common injuries in the athletic patient. They present a challenging clinical problem as cartilage has a poor potential for healing. Current surgical treatments consist of reparative (microfracture) or replacement (autologous osteochondral graft) strategies and demonstrate good clinical outcomes at the short and medium term follow-up. Radiological findings and second-look arthroscopy however, indicate possible poor cartilage repair with evidence of fibrous infill and fissuring of the regenerative tissue following microfracture. Longer-term follow-up echoes these findings as it demonstrates a decline in clinical outcome. The nature of the cartilage repair that occurs for an osteochondral graft to become integrated with the native surround tissue is also of concern. Studies have shown evidence of poor cartilage integration, with chondrocyte death at the periphery of the graft, possibly causing cyst formation due to synovial fluid ingress. Biological adjuncts, in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), have been investigated with regard to their potential in improving cartilage repair in both in vitro and in vitro settings. The in vitro literature indicates that these biological adjuncts may increase chondrocyte proliferation as well as synthetic capability, while limiting the catabolic effects of an inflammatory joint environment. These findings have been extrapolated to in vitro animal models, with results showing that both PRP and BMAC improve cartilage repair. The basic science literature therefore establishes the proof of concept that biological adjuncts may improve cartilage repair when used in conjunction with reparative and replacement treatment strategies for osteochondral lesions of the talus.

  17. Typing for human platelet alloantigens.

    PubMed

    Juji, T; Saji, H; Satake, M; Tokunaga, K

    1999-01-01

    Antibodies to platelet alloantigens, and sometimes to isoantigens, induce severe clinical problems such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT), post-transfusion purpura (PTP) and refractoriness to platelet transfusions (PTR). For example, NAIT affects approximately 1 in 5,000 live births. It is essential, therefore, to screen pregnant women for platelet antibodies in order to save babies' lives. Almost 40 years ago, two platelet alloantigen systems were discovered using relatively simple methods, namely the platelet agglutination test and the complement fixation test. However, these methods were not sensitive enough to identify all antibodies in mothers and patients, even in those with severe clinical problems. Tremendous effort has been devoted to establish more sensitive and reliable methods. In recent years, excellent new serological and immunochemical methods have been established and several new platelet antigen systems have been discovered. Simultaneously, newly developed molecular genetic techniques have been introduced for the typing and analysis of human platelet alloantigen systems. These methods allow DNA typing for cases in which serological typing is not available. In this article, the history of studies on human platelet alloantigen systems and isoantigens, the nomenclature of platelet alloantigen systems and their alleles, the present status of antibody detection and typing techniques and, finally, ethnic variations in platelet antigen profiles are reviewed.

  18. Future innovations in anti-platelet therapies

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, N E; Holbrook, L; Jones, S; Kaiser, W J; Moraes, L A; Rana, R; Sage, T; Stanley, R G; Tucker, K L; Wright, B; Gibbins, J M

    2008-01-01

    Platelets have long been recognized to be of central importance in haemostasis, but their participation in pathological conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis and inflammation is now also well established. The platelet has therefore become a key target in therapies to combat cardiovascular disease. Anti-platelet therapies are used widely, but current approaches lack efficacy in a proportion of patients, and are associated with side effects including problem bleeding. In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in understanding the regulation of platelet function, including the characterization of new ligands, platelet-specific receptors and cell signalling pathways. It is anticipated this progress will impact positively on the future innovations towards more effective and safer anti-platelet agents. In this review, the mechanisms of platelet regulation and current anti-platelet therapies are introduced, and strong, and some more speculative, potential candidate target molecules for future anti-platelet drug development are discussed. PMID:18587441

  19. Current status of additive solutions for platelets.

    PubMed

    Alhumaidan, Hiba; Sweeney, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The storage of platelets in additive solution (PAS) had lagged behind red cell concentrates, especially in North America. The partial or complete removal of anticoagulated plasma and storage of platelet concentrates in AS presents many advantages. The PAS can be formulated to optimize aerobic metabolism or decrease platelet activation, thus abrogating the platelet storage lesion and potentially improving in vivo viability. Plasma removal has been shown to reduce allergic reactions and the plasma harvested could contribute to the available plasma pool for transfusion or fractionation. PAS coupled to pathogen reduction technology results in a platelet product of equivalent hemostatic efficacy to conventionally stored platelets. Given the above, the likely future direction of platelet storage will be in new generation designer PAS with an extended shelf life and a superior safety profile to plasma stored platelets. J. Clin. Apheresis, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states.

  1. [Summary of pathophysiology and diagnosis of patients with platelet abnormality].

    PubMed

    Wada, Hideo; Asakura, Hidesaku

    2009-05-01

    In hematological disorders, thrombocytopenia is frequently observed, and it is sometimes difficult to diagnose the underlying disease. In this symposium, laboratory tests for platelet abnormality were reviewed. Tests for platelet aggregation were reported to be important for the diagnosis of platelet dysfunction. Thrombocytopenia is caused by disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), etc. As DIC is classified according to the degree of fibrinolysis, it was stated that the measurement of hemostatic molecular markers was further required. TMA is caused by abnormality of ADAMTS13, verotoxin, DIC, etc. HIT is diagnosed by anti-PF4 antibody, but its specificity is not high. Further investigation of TMA and HIT is required. APS is one of the most important diseases which cause thrombosis or abortion, suggesting that a differential diagnosis of APS is important. It was reported that diagnostic criteria of ITP have been established using a new antibody assay for platelets, immature platelet fractions, thrombopoietin, etc. In myeloproliferative disorders such as polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia, the mutation of JAK2 V617F was reported to be an important risk factor for thrombosis.

  2. Thrombocytopenia and platelet transfusion in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Cremer, Malte; Sallmon, Hannes; Kling, Pamela J; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-02-01

    Neonatal thrombocytopenia is widespread in preterm and term neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units, with up to one-third of infants demonstrating platelet counts <150 × 10(9)/L. Thrombocytopenia may arise from maternal, placental or fetal/neonatal origins featuring decreased platelet production, increased consumption, or both mechanisms. Over the past years, innovations in managing neonatal thrombocytopenia were achieved from prospectively obtained clinical data on thrombocytopenia and bleeding events, animal studies on platelet life span and production rate and clinical use of fully automated measurement of reticulated platelets (immature platelet fraction). This review summarizes the pathophysiology of neonatal thrombocytopenia, current management including platelet transfusion thresholds and recent developments in megakaryopoietic agents. Furthermore, we propose a novel index score for bleeding risk in thrombocytopenic neonates to facilitate clinician's decision-making when to transfuse platelets.

  3. Relation of platelet density to platelet age: survival of low- and high-density 111indium-labeled platelets in baboons

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, B.; McFadden, P.R.; Hanson, S.R.; Harker, L.A.

    1986-08-01

    The relationship between platelet density and platelet age has been studied using continuous linear Percoll density gradients and 111In-labeling of autologous platelets in baboons. To investigate changes in platelet density during senescence in the circulation, baboons were infused with 111In-labeled autologous platelets, and blood was collected at one hour postinfusion and twice daily thereafter for six days. Platelets were isolated from these samples in high yield (greater than 95%) and separated in continuous linear Percoll density gradients following density equilibrium centrifugation. Although at one hour postinfusion the density distribution of radiolabeled platelets coincided closely with the distribution of the total platelet population, a detectable symmetrical shift toward higher densities was observed after five days. The relative specific radioactivity (RSR) of high-density platelets (1.064 to 1.067 g/mL) decreased at a slower rate than that of the total platelet population (platelets of all densities), whereas the RSR of low-density platelets (1.053 to 1.056 g/mL) showed a more immediate and rapid decrease. These results give rise to one of two interpretations: (1) low-density platelets have a shorter survival time than more dense platelets and are therefore cleared from the circulation at a faster rate, or (2) platelets of all densities increase in density upon aging in the circulation. To determine the explanation for changing RSR of different density fractions we studied the in vivo disappearance characteristics of low- and high-density 111In-labeled platelets. There were no significant differences between the mean survival times of low-density platelets (5.0 +/- 0.49 days, +/- 1 SD, n = 6), high-density platelets (4.9 +/- 0.56 days, n = 6), or control platelets representing platelets of all densities (4.9 +/- 0.38 days, n = 6).

  4. Platelet function tests, independent of platelet count, are associated with bleeding severity in ITP.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Grace, Rachael F; Gerrits, Anja J; Berny-Lang, Michelle A; Brown, Travis; Carmichael, Sabrina L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Michelson, Alan D

    2015-08-13

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients with similarly low platelet counts differ in their tendency to bleed. To determine if differences in platelet function in ITP patients account for this variation in bleeding tendency, we conducted a single-center, cross-sectional study of pediatric patients with ITP. Bleeding severity (assessed by standardized bleeding score) and platelet function (assessed by whole blood flow cytometry) with and without agonist stimulation was evaluated in 57 ITP patients (median age, 9.9 years). After adjustment for platelet count, higher levels of thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP)-stimulated percent P-selectin- and activated glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa-positive platelets were significantly associated with a lower bleeding score, whereas higher levels of immature platelet fraction (IPF), TRAP-stimulated platelet surface CD42b, unstimulated platelet surface P-selectin, and platelet forward light scatter (FSC) were associated with a higher bleeding score. Thus, platelet function tests related to platelet age (IPF, FSC) and activation through the protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) thrombin receptor (TRAP-stimulated P-selectin, activated GPIIb-IIIa, and CD42b), independent of platelet count, are associated with concurrent bleeding severity in ITP. These tests may be useful markers of future bleeding risk in ITP.

  5. Studies on Human Platelet Gangliosides

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Aaron J.; Ullman, Harris L.; Safier, Lenore B.

    1972-01-01

    Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids which contain sialic acid, were studied in human platelets. They represented 0.5% of the platelet lipids and accounted for 6% of the total neuraminic acid content of platelets. Three major ganglioside fractions were identified and characterized. Ganglioside I was hematoside (G6) and comprised 92% of the platelet gangliosides. It contained glucose, galactose, and sialic acid in molar ratios of 1:1:1 and no hexosamine. The major fatty acid was behenate (22:0). Ganglioside I was also identified in isolated platelet granules and membranes. Ganglioside II (5%) contained glucose, galactose, sialic acid, and hexosamines (molar ratios 1:2:1:1). The hexosamines were glucosamine (72%) and galactosamine (28%). It was therefore designated as ganglioside lacto-N-neotetraose. Ganglioside III (2%) contained disialosyllactosyl ceramide (G3A) as well as two other gangliosides which could not be precisely characterized. Gangliosides I, II, and III were susceptible to the action of Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase as evidenced by full recovery of sialic acid in its free form after incubation. Neutral platelet glycolipids were qualitatively examined by thin-layer chromatography. The major component was lactosyl ceramide. Interactions of gangliosides I and III and serotonin-14C were examined in an equilibrium dialysis system at 4°C. The gangliosides bound serotonin-14C in relatively small quantities, whereas control lipids were negative. The binding was essentially unchanged by reverse dialysis, ultracentrifugation and subsequent thin-layer chromatography. The results are comparable to the previously observed nonmetabolic interactions between whole platelets and serotonin in the cold. It is suggested that the orientation and specific distribution of platelet membrane glycolipids may be important determinants of the unique surface properties of platelets. Images PMID:4341436

  6. Single-step separation of platelets from whole blood coupled with digital quantification by interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC).

    PubMed

    Basabe-Desmonts, L; Ramstrom, S; Meade, G; O'Neill, S; Riaz, A; Lee, L P; Ricco, A J; Kenny, D

    2010-09-21

    We report the efficient single-step separation of individual platelets from unprocessed whole blood, enabling digital quantification of platelet function using interfacial platelet cytometry (iPC) on a chip. iPC is accomplished by the precision micropatterning of platelet-specific protein surfaces on solid substrates. By separating platelets from whole blood using specific binding to protein spots of a defined size, iPC implements a simple incubate-and-rinse approach, without sample preparation, that enables (1) the study of platelets in the physiological situation of interaction with a protein surface, (2) the choice of the number of platelets bound on each protein spot, from one to many, (3) control of the platelet-platelet distance, including the possibility to study noninteracting single platelets, (4) digital quantification (counting) of platelet adhesion to selected protein matrices, enabling statistical characterization of platelet subpopulations from meaningfully large numbers of single platelets, (5) the study of platelet receptor expression and spatial distribution, and (6) a detailed study of the morphology of isolated single platelets at activation levels that can be manipulated. To date, we have demonstrated 1-4 of the above list. Platelets were separated from whole blood using iPC with fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor (VWF), and anti-CD42b antibody printed "spots" ranging from a fraction of one to several platelet diameters (2-24 μm). The number of platelets captured per spot depends strongly on the protein matrix and the surface area of the spot, together with the platelet volume, morphology, and activation state. Blood samples from healthy donors, a May-Hegglin-anomaly patient, and a Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia patient were analyzed via iPC to confirm the specificity of the interaction between protein matrices and platelets. For example, the results indicate that platelets interact with fibrinogen spots only through the fibrinogen receptor (

  7. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003552.htm Platelet-associated antibodies blood test To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a ...

  8. Transcellular activation of platelets and endothelial cells by bioactive lipids in platelet microparticles.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, O. P.; Pratico, D.; Lawson, J. A.; FitzGerald, G. A.

    1997-01-01

    Microparticles are released during platelet activation in vitro and have been detected in vivo in syndromes of platelet activation. They have been reported to express both pro- and anticoagulant activities. Nevertheless, their functional significance has remained unresolved. To address the mechanism(s) of cellular activation by platelet microparticles, we examined their effects on platelets and endothelial cells. Activation of human platelets by diverse stimuli (thrombin, 0.1 U/ml; collagen, 4 microg/ml; and the calcium ionophore A23187, 1 microM) results in shedding of microparticles. Pretreatment of these particles, but not membrane fractions from resting platelets, with (s)PLA2 evokes a dose-dependent increase in platelet aggregation, intracellular [Ca2+] movement, and inositol phosphate formation. These effects localize to the arachidonic acid fraction of the microparticles and are mimicked by arachidonic acid isolated from them. However, platelet activation requires prior metabolism of microparticle arachidonic acid to thromboxane A2. Thus, pretreatment of platelets with the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, indomethacin (20 microM), the thromboxane antagonist SQ29,548 (1 microM), or the protein kinase C inhibitor GF109203X (5 microM) prevents platelet activation by microparticles. However, platelet microparticles fail to evoke an inositol phosphate response directly, via either of the cloned thromboxane receptor isoforms stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Prelabeling platelets with [2H(8)] arachidonate was used to demonstrate platelet metabolism of the microparticle-derived substrate to thromboxane. Platelet microparticles can also induce expression of COX-2 and prostacyclin (PGI2) production, but not expression of COX-1, in human endothelial cells. These effects are prevented by pretreatment with actinomycin D (12 microM) or cycloheximide (5 microg/ml). Expression of COX-2 is again induced by the microparticle arachidonate fraction

  9. Platelet--arterial synthetic graft interaction and its modification

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, A.D.; Connolly, R.; O'Donnell, T.F. Jr.; Gembarowicz, R.; Keough, E.; Ramberg-Laskaris, K.; Valeri, C.R.

    1982-11-01

    We compared the in vivo platelet reactivity of two commonly used clinical grafts, Dacron and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), with that of a control autogenous artery graft and assessed whether platelet reactivity was modified by the platelet-antiaggregating agent prostacyclin (PGI2) (epoprostenol). Grafts were randomly placed into the carotid arteries of 21 baboons. Platelets labeled with /sup 111/In were infused within one hour after implantation graft for gamma camera scanning of platelet uptake. The accumulation of platelets on Dacron grafts began almost immediately after injection and reached a peak after one to two hours. The PTFE and control autogenous artery grafts accumulated comparable small amounts of platelets. Prostacyclin was then infused in a second series of baboons with Dacron grafts, at a rate of 150 to 200 ng/kg/min. It prevented the usual platelet uptake when administered concomitant with graft implantation and reduced previously established platelet activity.

  10. Blood platelet kinetics and platelet transfusion.

    PubMed

    Aster, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    The discovery of citrate anticoagulant in the 1920s and the development of plastic packs for blood collection in the 1960s laid the groundwork for platelet transfusion therapy on a scale not previously possible. A major limitation, however, was the finding that platelet concentrates prepared from blood anticoagulated with citrate were unsuitable for transfusion because of platelet clumping. We found that this could be prevented by simply reducing the pH of platelet-rich plasma to about 6.5 prior to centrifugation. We used this approach to characterize platelet kinetics and sites of platelet sequestration in normal and pathologic states and to define the influence of variables such as anticoagulant and ABO incompatibility on post-transfusion platelet recovery. The "acidification" approach enabled much wider use of platelet transfusion therapy until alternative means of producing concentrates suitable for transfusion became available.

  11. Plasma protein regulation of platelet function and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hansen, M S; Bang, N U

    1979-04-02

    This reviews summarizes our evidence suggesting that the plasma protein enviroment influences platelet aggregation potential and metabolic activity. Cationic proteins are capable of restoring the aggreation potential of washed human platelets. The aggregation restoring effect of gamma globulin is inhibited by more anionic proteins in subfractions of Cohn fraction IV and fractions V and VI. Artificial enhancement of the net negative charge of plasma proteins through acylation produces derivatives capable of inhibiting platelet rich plasma. The oxygen consumption of washed human platelets is lower than in platelet rich plasma while the lactate production is identical. Autologus plasma, albumin or IgG immunoglobulin restores the oxygen consumption of washed platelets to values comparable to those obtained for platelet rich plasma, while the lactate production is unaffected. Fibrinogen on IgA myeloma protein increases the lactate production, but not the oxygen consumption. Cyclic AMP levels are considerably lower in washed platelets than in platelet rich plasma. Gamma globulin and albumin causes a futher decrease, which is progressive with time. Fibrinogen causes no change in platelet cyclic AMP content. It is suggested that these observations may in part be explained by the equilibriun between anionic and cationic proteins in the platelet microenvironment. This hypothesis appears applicable in certain situations.

  12. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  13. Cancer and Thrombosis: The Platelet Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Meikle, Claire K. S.; Kelly, Clare A.; Garg, Priyanka; Wuescher, Leah M.; Ali, Ramadan A.; Worth, Randall G.

    2017-01-01

    Platelets are critical to hemostatic and immunological function, and are key players in cancer progression, metastasis, and cancer-related thrombosis. Platelets interact with immune cells to stimulate anti-tumor responses and can be activated by immune cells and tumor cells. Platelet activation can lead to complex interactions between platelets and tumor cells. Platelets facilitate cancer progression and metastasis by: (1) forming aggregates with tumor cells; (2) inducing tumor growth, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and invasion; (3) shielding circulating tumor cells from immune surveillance and killing; (4) facilitating tethering and arrest of circulating tumor cells; and (5) promoting angiogenesis and tumor cell establishment at distant sites. Tumor cell-activated platelets also predispose cancer patients to thrombotic events. Tumor cells and tumor-derived microparticles lead to thrombosis by secreting procoagulant factors, resulting in platelet activation and clotting. Platelets play a critical role in cancer progression and thrombosis, and markers of platelet-tumor cell interaction are candidates as biomarkers for cancer progression and thrombosis risk. PMID:28105409

  14. [In vitro platelet production].

    PubMed

    Dunois-Lardé, C; Baruch, D

    2011-04-01

    This review aims at presenting a state of the art on platelet functions, not only in well-characterized hemostasis and thrombosis, but also in various domains such as inflammation, immunity, angiogenesis, source of growth factors, metastasis and vascular remodelling. This multivalent phenotype of platelets suggests new potential applications of platelets. The second objective is to present new advances in platelet formation from megakaryocytes and direct platelet release, as initially shown by our group and more recently by others.

  15. The Role of Platelets in Cardiovascular Disease: Molecular Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Papapanagiotou, Angeliki; Daskalakis, Georgios; Siasos, Gerasimos; Gargalionis, Antonios; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G

    2016-01-01

    The role of platelets in atherosclerotic process and subsequently in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease is essential as platelets in addition to their contribution to thrombosis and hemostasis modulating inflammatory reactions and immune response. Platelets after adhesion on the injured vascular endothelium and activation release a wide range of molecules stored in platelets granules such as chemokines, proinflammatory molecules and other biological response modulators accelerating interaction among platelets, endothelial cells and leukocytes. These interactions establish a localized inflammatory response that promotes the atherosclerotic process. Moreover, activated platelets give rise to microparticles another active participant within the blood stream. The purpose of this review is to present the role of platelets in the above mechanisms giving an emphasis on the nature of the platelet derived- molecules and their contribution to the atherosclerotic process.

  16. Analyzing the platelet proteome.

    PubMed

    García, Angel; Zitzmann, Nicole; Watson, Steve P

    2004-08-01

    During the last 10 years, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a key tool for protein analysis and has underpinned the emerging field of proteomics. Using high-throughput tandem MS/MS following protein separation, it is potentially possible to analyze hundreds to thousands of proteins in a sample at a time. This technology can be used to analyze the protein content (i.e., the proteome) of any cell or tissue and complements the powerful field of genomics. The technology is particularly suitable for platelets because of the absence of a nucleus. Cellular proteins can be separated by either gel-based methods such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by liquid chromatography (LC) -MS/MS or by multidimensional LC-MS/MS. Prefractionation techniques, such as subcellular fractionations or immunoprecipitations, can be used to improve the analysis. Each method has particular advantages and disadvantages. Proteomics can be used to compare the proteome of basal and diseased platelets, helping to reveal information on the molecular basis of the disease.

  17. Functional platelet defects in children with severe chronic ITP as tested with 2 novel assays applicable for low platelet counts.

    PubMed

    van Bladel, Esther R; Laarhoven, Annemieke G; van der Heijden, Laila B; Heitink-Pollé, Katja M; Porcelijn, Leendert; van der Schoot, C Ellen; de Haas, Masja; Roest, Mark; Vidarsson, Gestur; de Groot, Philip G; Bruin, Marrie C A

    2014-03-06

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease with a complex heterogeneous pathogenesis and a bleeding phenotype that is not necessarily correlated to platelet count. In this study, the platelet function was assessed in a well-defined cohort of 33 pediatric chronic ITP patients. Because regular platelet function test cannot be performed in patients with low platelet counts, 2 new assays were developed to determine platelet function: first, the microaggregation test, measuring in platelets isolated from 10 mL of whole blood the platelet potential to form microaggregates in response to an agonist; second, the platelet reactivity assay, measuring platelet reactivity to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), convulxin (CVX), and thrombin receptor activator peptide in only 150 μL of unprocessed whole blood. Patients with a severe bleeding phenotype demonstrated a decreased aggregation potential upon phorbol myristate acetate stimulation, decreased platelet degranulation following ADP stimulation, and a higher concentration of ADP and CVX needed to activate the glycoprotein IIbIIIa complex compared with patients with a mild bleeding phenotype. In conclusion, here we have established 2 functional tests that allow for evaluation of platelet function in patients with extremely low platelet counts (<10(9)). These tests show that platelet function is related to bleeding phenotype in chronic ITP.

  18. Labile aggregation stimulating substance, free fatty acids, and platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, J M; White, J G; Krivit, W

    1976-01-01

    Labile aggregation stimulating substance (LASS), an intermediate produced during platelet biosynthesis of PGE2 and PGF2alpha, acts as a physiologic intercellular messenger to promote platelet aggregation and the release reaction. The activity is formed by intact cells after physiologic stimulation or can be generated from platelet membrane fractions after combination with arachidonate. In the present investigation, small amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids added to an incubation mixture of platelet microsomes and arachidonate were found to significantly inhibit subsequent platelet aggregation. Saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the same concentrations were without effect. However, in higher concentrations mono-unsaturated fatty acids were found to be inhibitory and stearic acid was found to enhance subsequent platelet aggregation. The inhibition caused by the polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleate, was shown to be the result of an effect on the production of LASS through an interaction with the platelet enzyme responsible for conversion of arachidonate to LASS. In contrast, stearic acid was found to enhance platelet aggregation by acting on the platelets and not directly on LASS production. The results suggest that small changes in the fatty acid composition of platelet phospholipids could significantly influence platelet reactivity.

  19. Constitutive modeling of the rheological behavior of platelet suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, Drew E.

    Compression molding of chopped fiber composites is used to manufacture complex 3D geometries with high fiber volume fractions of 50-60% and long, discontinuous fibers and thermoplastic matrices. When prepreg, chopped into platelets, is used as a charge material, the individual platelets remain intact during the molding process and flow relative to one another, as experimental observations show. Heterogeneity of the platelet/resin suspension cannot be considered at the structural scale of molding simulation. Instead, the suspension should be idealized into the homogenized anisotropic and viscous system which obeys the prescribed anisotropic stress-strain rate constitutive relation. The viscosity tensor of the aforementioned constitutive law was analytically evaluated in this work through the representative volume element (RVE) based analysis. An idealized microstructure of platelets was developed to perform such an analysis. The platelets were aligned and arranged in a planar configuration with periodic boundary conditions. Analytic expressions for the effective, anisotropic viscosities were derived by micromechanical analysis for the idealized microstructure of rigid platelets. In this analysis, the load transfer mechanisms and their contribution to the viscosity of the platelet assembly were investigated. The kinematic assumption of linear velocity distributions consistent with the mechanism of shearing rate was adopted. While the platelets were assumed to be rigid, the resin was taken as an incompressible, isotropic fluid which provided for the platelet-to-platelet load transfer. Strain rate and temperature dependence were included by modeling the polymer matrix as a Carreau fluid. Shear strain in the resin was developed due to the relative motion of adjacent platelets. The resin shear strain rate was expressed in terms of the corresponding platelet velocities. Equilibrium of the platelet was used to relate the applied far-field stress to the average strain rate

  20. Platelet glycoprotein Ibα supports experimental lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Shashank; Zuka, Masahiko; Liu, Jungling; Russell, Susan; Dent, Judith; Guerrero, José A.; Forsyth, Jane; Maruszak, Brigid; Gartner, T. Kent; Felding-Habermann, Brunhilde; Ware, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    The platelet paradigm in hemostasis and thrombosis involves an initiation step that depends on platelet membrane receptors binding to ligands on a damaged or inflamed vascular surface. Once bound to the surface, platelets provide a unique microenvironment supporting the accumulation of more platelets and the elaboration of a fibrin-rich network produced by coagulation factors. The platelet-specific receptor glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX, is critical in this process and initiates the formation of a platelet-rich thrombus by tethering the platelet to a thrombogenic surface. A role for platelets beyond the hemostasis/thrombosis paradigm is emerging with significant platelet contributions in both tumorigenesis and inflammation. We have established congenic (N10) mouse colonies (C57BL/6J) with dysfunctional GP Ib-IX receptors in our laboratory that allow us an opportunity to examine the relevance of platelet GP Ib-IX in syngeneic mouse models of experimental metastasis. Our results demonstrate platelet GP Ib-IX contributes to experimental metastasis because a functional absence of GP Ib-IX correlates with a 15-fold reduction in the number of lung metastatic foci using B16F10.1 melanoma cells. The results demonstrate that the extracellular domain of the α-subunit of GP Ib is the structurally relevant component of the GP Ib-IX complex contributing to metastasis. Our results support the hypothesis that platelet GP Ib-IX functions that support normal hemostasis or pathologic thrombosis also contribute to tumor malignancy. PMID:17494758

  1. Clinical application of radiolabelled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Kessler, C. )

    1990-01-01

    This book presents papers on the clinical applications of radiolabelled platelets. The papers are grouped into six sections on platelet labelling techniques, radiolabelled platelets in cardiology, monitoring of antiplatelet therapy, platelet scintigraphy in stroke patients, platelet scintigraphy in angiology, and platelet scintigraphy in hematology and other clinical applications, including renal transplant rejection.

  2. Induction of platelet formation from megakaryocytoid cells by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, E; Willoughby, S R; Foxall, T; Valeri, C R; Loscalzo, J

    2001-12-04

    Although the growth factors that regulate megakaryocytopoiesis are well known, the molecular determinants of platelet formation from mature megakaryocytes remain poorly understood. Morphological changes in megakaryocytes associated with platelet formation and removal of senescent megakaryocytes are suggestive of an apoptotic process. Previously, we have established that nitric oxide (NO) can induce apoptosis in megakaryocytoid cell lines. To determine whether there is an association between NO-induced apoptosis and platelet production, we exposed Meg-01 cells to S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) with or without thrombopoeitin (TPO) pretreatment and used flow cytometry and electron microscopy to assess platelet-sized particle formation. Meg-01 cells treated with TPO alone produced few platelet-sized particles (<3% of total counts), whereas treatment with GSNO alone produced a significant percentage of platelet-sized particles (22 +/- 4% of total counts); when combined with TPO pretreatment, however, GSNO led to a marked increase in platelet-sized particle production (48 +/- 3% of total counts). Electron microscopy confirmed that Meg-01 cells treated with TPO and GSNO yielded platelet-sized particles with morphological features specific for platelet forms. The platelet-sized particle population appears to be functional, because addition of calcium, fibrinogen, and thrombin receptor-activating peptide led to aggregation. These results demonstrate that NO facilitates platelet production, thereby establishing the essential role of NO in megakaryocyte development and thrombopoiesis.

  3. Principles of establishing material cycling with a high degree of closure in the experimental model of a BTLSS intended for a rated "fraction of a human"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikhomirov, Alexander A.; Ushakova, Sofya; Velichko, Vladimir; Tikhomirova, Natalia; Shikhov, Valentin; Trifonov, Sergey V.

    2016-07-01

    A promising way to develop future biotechnical life support systems (BTLSS) is to construct experimental models and establish the cycling intended for a fraction of a human. Being of relatively low cost, such models provide an opportunity to test effectively closed process that could be further transferred to the real BTLSS with humans. Researchers of the IBP SB RAS are developing an adequate BTLSS model with the loops closed to a high degree. To attain high closure of mass exchange processes, plants in the phototrophic compartment are cultivated under intensive lighting conditions, created by using modern LED irradiators of enhanced power, equipped with lens optics. The higher plant compartment has been renewed and broadened by including soybean plants, which improve the vegetable part of the human diet and make it more diverse. It is very important that the operation of the physicochemical installation for waste mineralization fully matches the composition of the atmosphere of plant growth chambers: the purified gaseous components of this installation enter the common atmosphere of the system, without causing any deviations from the norm in the gaseous composition. This proves the eco-friendliness of the developed physicochemical method of waste mineralization and shows that the gaseous components resulting from waste mineralization can be included in the system mass exchange. A system for including human respiration into the gas exchange of the BTLSS has been developed and tested; the associated gas exchange and water exchange dynamics have been analyzed. Results of the functioning of the experimental model of the BTLSS for several months are proposed for discussion in order to get insight into the formation of dynamic characteristics of cycling processes and factors determining them. The study was supported by the grant of the Russian Science Foundation (Project 14-14-00599) and carried out at the IBP SB RAS.

  4. The role of platelets and megakaryocytes in bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphael; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    Blood platelets have been known for more than a century as important partners for successful metastatic dissemination of solid tumors. Cancer cell-induced platelet activation is a key event responsible for prometastatic activity of platelets. Blocking platelet aggregation inhibits the progression of skeletal metastases through mechanisms that are not fully understood. The establishment and progression of bone metastases are strongly influenced by the bone remodeling process. Growth factors and cytokines released upon platelet activation may contribute to both skeletal tumor growth and osteolytic lesions. Megakaryocytes are platelet precursors located in the bone marrow that control bone mass through direct stimulation of osteoblast functions and indirect inhibition of osteoclast activities. Considering growing evidence for their role in the metastatic cascade, platelets and/or megakaryocytes may provide new therapeutic opportunities to help limit bone metastases.

  5. Blood platelet counts, morphology and morphometry in lions, Panthera leo.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, L

    2009-09-01

    Due to logistical problems in obtaining sufficient blood samples from apparently healthy animals in the wild in order to establish normal haematological reference values, only limited information regarding the blood platelet count and morphology of free-living lions (Panthera leo) is available. This study provides information on platelet counts and describes their morphology with particular reference to size in two normal, healthy and free-ranging lion populations. Blood samples were collected from a total of 16 lions. Platelet counts, determined manually, ranged between 218 and 358 x 10(9)/l. Light microscopy showed mostly activated platelets of various sizes with prominent granules. At the ultrastructural level the platelets revealed typical mammalian platelet morphology. However, morphometric analysis revealed a significant difference (P < 0.001) in platelet size between the two groups of animals. Basic haematological information obtained in this study may be helpful in future comparative studies between animals of the same species as well as in other felids.

  6. Platelet monoamine uptake in relatives of patients with Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed Central

    Ehsanullah, R. S.; Turner, P.

    1981-01-01

    Uptake of dopamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) by the platelets of 25 symptom-free relatives of patients with established Huntington's chorea (HC) was not significantly different from that of control subjects. Platelet uptake of 5-HT in 3 subjects with early signs of the disease showed increased Km and Vmax values. Increased platelet uptake of 5-HT in patients with established HC was confirmed in a further 3 patients. It seems that this phenomenon appears with the clinical evidence of the disease. Further investigation of the nature of the platelet uptake abnormality may cast light on pathogenic factors in HC. PMID:6458032

  7. The omnipotent platelet.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, L A

    1996-03-01

    This information was derived from the increase in platelets of patients following fractures and/or bone surgery and in conjunction with a vast amount of published literature. The increase in numbers of platelets reflects the extent of bone involvement, especially noted in the hip, knee, post-coronary artery bypass graft, and multiple fractures. The role of the platelet in any and all tissues, i.e. soft tissue or bone, whether beneficial or detrimental, is multifunctional. The platelet responds to all physiologic and pathologic states and, if tissue involved is sufficient, the role of the platelet becomes obvious.

  8. In vitro canine platelet aggregation caused by Dirofilaria immitis extract

    PubMed Central

    TAKASHIMA, Yasuhiro; ONODA, Isako; CHIOU, Shin-Pin; KITOH, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Platelet function hyper-activity has been reported in Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm, HW)-infected dogs. Although the mechanism of increased platelet hyper-activity has not yet been elucidated, it is suggested to be mediated by unknown factors, which may be related to adult HW components. This study aims to determine whether adult male HW whole body extract induces canine platelet aggregation in vitro. The results indicate that HW extract caused an aggregation of canine platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. This aggregation ability of the HW extract was not mediated by the adenosine diphosphate receptor. In addition, the mechanisms of aggregation did not require cyclooxygenase-dependent pathways, and the aggregating activity of substances contained in the HW extract was heat stable; therefore, the active substances may be different from collagen. Furthermore, the platelet aggregating activity remained within the molecular weight (MW)≥100,000 fraction obtained by ultrafiltrating the HW extract. In contrast, the MW <100,000 fraction also had a platelet aggregation ability, but the aggregation pattern was reversible and the maximum extent decreased, compared with the MW≥100,000 fraction response. Our experiments have been conducted using a whole body extract from adult HWs to determine with certainty the aggregating activity of HW elements on canine platelets. More studies are necessary to evaluate the effects of the metabolic products released from live adult worms in pulmonary arteries and the symbiont bacterium Wolbachia-derived antigens on canine platelet aggregation. PMID:28049921

  9. In vitro canine platelet aggregation caused by Dirofilaria immitis extract.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yasuhiro; Onoda, Isako; Chiou, Shin-Pin; Kitoh, Katsuya

    2017-02-28

    Platelet function hyper-activity has been reported in Dirofilaria immitis (heartworm, HW)-infected dogs. Although the mechanism of increased platelet hyper-activity has not yet been elucidated, it is suggested to be mediated by unknown factors, which may be related to adult HW components. This study aims to determine whether adult male HW whole body extract induces canine platelet aggregation in vitro. The results indicate that HW extract caused an aggregation of canine platelets in a concentration-dependent manner. This aggregation ability of the HW extract was not mediated by the adenosine diphosphate receptor. In addition, the mechanisms of aggregation did not require cyclooxygenase-dependent pathways, and the aggregating activity of substances contained in the HW extract was heat stable; therefore, the active substances may be different from collagen. Furthermore, the platelet aggregating activity remained within the molecular weight (MW)≥100,000 fraction obtained by ultrafiltrating the HW extract. In contrast, the MW <100,000 fraction also had a platelet aggregation ability, but the aggregation pattern was reversible and the maximum extent decreased, compared with the MW≥100,000 fraction response. Our experiments have been conducted using a whole body extract from adult HWs to determine with certainty the aggregating activity of HW elements on canine platelets. More studies are necessary to evaluate the effects of the metabolic products released from live adult worms in pulmonary arteries and the symbiont bacterium Wolbachia-derived antigens on canine platelet aggregation.

  10. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  11. The Platelet Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Senzel, Lisa; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Bahou, Wadie F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review The proteome is the pool of proteins expressed at a given time and circumstance. The word “proteomics” summarizes several technologies for visualization, quantitation and identification of these proteins. Recent advances in these techniques are helping to elucidate platelet processes which are relevant to bleeding and clotting disorders, transfusion medicine and regulation of angiogenesis. Recent findings Over 1100 platelet proteins have been identified using proteomic techniques. Various subproteomes have been characterized, including platelet releasates (the “secretome”), alpha and dense granules, membrane and cytoskeletal proteins, platelet-derived microparticles, and the platelet “phosphoproteome”. Proteomic data about platelets have become increasingly available in integrated databases. Summary Proteomic experiments in resting and activated platelets have identified novel signaling pathways and secreted proteins which may represent therapeutic targets, as well as potential cancer biomarkers. PMID:19550320

  12. Microtubule and cortical forces determine platelet size during vascular platelet production.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Macleod, Hannah; Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Zhu, Jie; Lee, Kun-Chun; Mogilner, Alex; Hartwig, John H; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-05-22

    Megakaryocytes release large preplatelet intermediates into the sinusoidal blood vessels. Preplatelets convert into barbell-shaped proplatelets in vitro to undergo repeated abscissions that yield circulating platelets. These observations predict the presence of circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in blood, and two fundamental questions in platelet biology are what are the forces that determine barbell-proplatelet formation, and how is the final platelet size established. Here we provide insights into the terminal mechanisms of platelet production. We quantify circular-preplatelets and barbell-proplatelets in human blood in high-resolution fluorescence images, using a laser scanning cytometry assay. We demonstrate that force constraints resulting from cortical microtubule band diameter and thickness determine barbell-proplatelet formation. Finally, we provide a mathematical model for the preplatelet to barbell conversion. We conclude that platelet size is limited by microtubule bundling, elastic bending, and actin-myosin-spectrin cortex forces.

  13. Detection of dengue virus in platelets isolated from dengue patients.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, Sansanee; Gibbons, Robert V; Songprakhon, Pucharee; Jairungsri, Aroonroong; Ajariyakhajorn, Chuanpis; Nisalak, Ananda; Jarman, Richard G; Malasit, Prida; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Perng, Guey Chuen

    2009-03-01

    Though thrombocytopenia or dysfunction of platelets is common in dengue virus infection, the role of platelets has not been established. We enrolled 33 hospitalized children with serologically confirmed dengue virus infection. Blood specimens were collected during hospitalization. Platelets and plasma were isolated from the whole blood. Detection of dengue virus in plasma and platelets was carried out by RT-PCR with primers that can differentiate different dengue serotypes simultaneously, and by electron transmission microscopy (EM). Dengue viral RNA was detected in the platelets and plasma by conventional RT-PCR. A significantly higher percentage of dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets than in plasma (p = 0.03). Platelets isolated 5 days after onset of fever were most likely positive for viral RNA. Concurrent infection or co-circulation with multiple dengue serotypes was observed in 12% of patients. Infrequently, negative-stranded dengue viral RNA was detected in platelets and in plasma. Importantly, EM confirmed the presence of dengue viral-like particles inside platelets prepared from dengue patients. Our findings suggest the presence of dengue virus in platelets may be associated with the dysfunction of platelets observed in dengue patients.

  14. Role of platelet function and platelet membrane glycoproteins in children with primary immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen-Jun; Bai, Jing; Guo, Qu-Lian; Huang, Zhe; Yang, Hong; Bai, Yong-Qi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine and understand changes in platelet functions prior to and after the treatment of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) in children. An automatic hematology analyzer and whole blood flow cytometry were used to detect immature platelet fraction (IPF), IPC and membrane glycoproteins (CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b) in ITP children (ITP group), children with complete response after ITP treatment (ITP-CR group) and children with elective surgery (normal control group). The results showed that, levels of platelet count (PLT) and plateletcrit in the ITP group were lower alhtough the levels of mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width and platelet-large cell ratio (P-LCR) were higher than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PLT in the ITP-CR group was lower than that in the normal controls. Additionally, IPF% was higher in the normal control and ITP-CR groups, IPC was lower in the ITP group compared to the normal control and ITP-CR groups. Furthermore, prior to ADP activation, the expression levels of CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b in the ITP group were lower in ITP group than those in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. The expression level of PAC-1 was lower in the ITP-CR and normal control groups. No differences were identified in CD62p and CD42b expression levels. Following ATP activation, CD62p, PAC-1 and CD42b expression in the ITP group was lower than that in the normal control and ITP-CR groups. PAC-1 expression was lower while CD62p expression was higher in the ITP-CR group compared to the normal control group. In conclusion, the activation of platelets in ITP children was low. Decreased platelet function, platelet parameters and platelet glycoproteins may be used as markers for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ITP children. PMID:27431926

  15. Function of platelet 47K protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Imaoka, T.

    1987-05-01

    To provide insight into the biochemical pathway of platelet activation, they purified both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated P47 to homogeneity from human platelets. This study represents the first demonstration of a change of physiological action of P47 in response to phosphorylation in platelet activation. SVI labelled unphosphorylated P47 had an ability to bind with platelet membrane fraction in the presence of phosphatidylserine. Effect of diacylglycerol was inhibitory in this PS dependent P47 binding with membrane. Unphosphorylated P47 had an inhibitory activity in platelet actin polymerization. Molar ratio to inhibit actin polymerization was 1:8 (P47:actin). These activities were Ca independent. Purified TSP-labelled P47 lost the binding ability with membrane, also the inhibitory activity in actin polymerization. Therefore, they propose the hypothesis that unphosphorylated P47 may loosely bind with the inside of plasma membrane of platelet and inhibit actin polymerization as a modulator, when stimulated, protein Kinase C rapidly phosphorylate P47 and induce the activation of cytoskeletal network and subsequently release reaction.

  16. Platelets: handle with care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, S

    2016-10-01

    Platelets are delicate cells that require careful handling between collection, preparation and transfusion. This review addresses practical questions relating to platelet concentration, resting time after collection, total time and number of periods without agitation and temperature. The bags in which platelets are stored are made from gas-permeable plastic to allow sufficient oxygen for the platelets to maintain aerobic respiration. Manufacturers have assigned limits for platelet content and concentration, and these must not be exceeded. There is no strong evidence for or against the resting of platelets post-collection and pre-agitation, but platelets should not be over-wrapped during this period as this compromises gas exchange; a short rest period of up to 1 h may allow the separation of minor aggregates. It is necessary to transport platelet concentrates (e.g. from manufacturing site to hospital), but these periods without gas exchange must be limited to avoid excessive damage to the platelets. Current data support a total of 24 h of transportation per component but with no individual period lasting more than 8 h. Platelets need to be stored at 20-24 °C based on evidence that colder storage leads to irreversible changes on the platelet membrane, resulting in phagocytosis of the platelets following transfusion. Storage at warmer temperatures may lead to an increase in bacterial risk. On the basis of this review, the UK Guidelines for Blood Transfusion Services have been updated to ensure that platelets are handled in the most appropriate way to ensure that efficacious components are provided for patients.

  17. Platelet factor 4: a chemokine enigma.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, Arne

    2005-06-01

    Platelet factor 4 (PF4) is a platelet alpha-granule protein sequenced over 25 years ago that is a founding member of the C-X-C chemokine family, yet its physiologic function has yet to be definitively established. Initial investigations focused on possible procoagulant roles for PF4 in platelet function and plasmatic coagulation. Subsequent in vitro studies have, however, described a puzzling array of other apparently unrelated biologic functions, including inhibition of angiogenesis and hematopoiesis, promotion of neutrophil adhesion, and activation, enhancement of oxy-LDL binding to the LDL receptor and stimulation of anti-coagulant activated protein C generation by the thrombomodulin/protein C system. Preliminary studies with a just-described PF4 knockout mouse line support a role for PF4 in platelet-dependent thrombosis in vivo.

  18. Increased platelet reactivity in patients with late-stage metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Niamh M; Egan, Karl; McFadden, Siobhan; Grogan, Liam; Breathnach, Oscar S; O'Leary, John; Hennessy, Bryan T; Kenny, Dermot

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Platelet hyperreactivity is associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Cancer patients are at an increased risk of thrombosis, a risk that increases with disease progression. While cancer patients show evidence of platelet activation in vivo, few studies have extensively assessed whether these patients display platelet hyperreactivity. We hypothesized that patients with metastatic cancer would display platelet hyperreactivity, reflecting their associated high risk of thrombosis. In a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13), we assessed platelet function using well-established assays of platelet reactivity (agonist-induced platelet aggregation, spontaneous platelet aggregation, and agonist-induced P-selectin expression). In comparison with healthy controls (n = 10), patients with metastatic cancer displayed global platelet hyperreactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation responses to ADP (adenosine diphosphate), epinephrine, collagen, arachidonic acid, and PAR-1 (protease-activated receptor-1) activating peptide, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, were significantly increased in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, agonist-induced platelet P-selectin expression was also significantly increased within the patient cohort. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. We assessed platelet function in a cohort of patients with metastatic cancer (n = 13) using well-established assays of platelet reactivity. Agonist-induced platelet aggregation and activation in response to platelet agonists, as well as spontaneous platelet aggregation, was significantly increased in cancer patients compared with healthy controls. We demonstrate that patients with metastatic cancer are characterized by global platelet hyperreactivity, a factor that may contribute to their increased risk of thrombosis. PMID

  19. Assessing the impacts of the establishment of Miscanthus on soil organic carbon on two contrasting land-use types in Ireland using soil fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Jesko; Dondini, Marta; Jones, Michael

    2014-05-01

    In recent years the use of biomass for energy production has become an increasingly important measure for mitigating global change. However, the scientific debate has been inconclusive with regard to the risks and benefits of bioenergy use. There is particular concern that land-use change to bioenergy production can lead to increased CO2 emissions. These emissions result from the loss of vegetation and the soil disturbance. The use of perennial crops such as Miscanthus x giganteus as a feedstock for bioenergy production offers a possible solution, as it shows a large soil carbon (C) sequestration potential across Europe. The aim of the present study was to analyse the impacts of land-use change from arable farming and grasslands to Miscanthus on soil fractions and associated soil organic carbon (SOC). Four three to four year old commercial Miscanthus sites, as well as adjacent control sites representing the former land-use, in SE Ireland were analysed for changes in SOC stocks and newly sequestered Miscanthus-derived C. The soil samples were fractionated using a combination of physical and chemical methods. The fraction with which the SOC is associated significantly influenced its decomposability and turnover time. Using the 13C natural abundance method, we found that newly sequestered C was found mainly as particulate organic matter (79.7% of Miscanthus-derived C) and therefore in a labile state with short turnover times. No significant differences were found in the distribution of the different soil fractions and SOC between the Miscanthus and the control sites, and it was shown that the share of fractions on the bulk soil as well as the proportion of the SOC associated with these fractions in young Miscanthus sites depends mainly on the previous land-use. It was therefore concluded that soil disturbance linked to the introduction of Miscanthus does not lead to a significant loss of soil organic carbon or a disruption of stable aggregates.

  20. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    PubMed

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  1. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function

    PubMed Central

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E.; Meyer, Claudius U.; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen + ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin + UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established. PMID:24749844

  2. Evaluation of the effect of calcium gluconate and bovine thrombin on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 and platelet-derived growth factor isoform BB from feline platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are not reported regarding the protocols for obtaining platelet concentrates (PC) in cats for medical purposes. The objectives of this study were: 1) to describe a manual method for producing two kinds of PC in cats (PC-A and PC-B), 2) to describe the cellular population of the PC, 3) to measure and compare the effect of calcium gluconate (CG) and bovine thrombin (BT) on the temporal release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor type BB (PDGF-BB) at 3 and 12 hours post-activation and 4) to establish correlations between the cellular population of both PCs and the concentration of growth factors (GF). Blood samples were taken from 16 cats for complete blood count, plasma collection and PC preparation. The PC were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). Results The platelet counts were significantly different (P<0.05) between the PC and whole blood but not between the PC fractions. The TGF-β1 concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 42.86% and 46.54%, and activated with BT were 42.88% and 54.64%, respectively. The PDGF-BB concentration efficiencies for PC-A and PC-B activated with CG were 61.36% and 60.61%, and activated with BT were 65.64% and 72.12%, respectively. The temporal release of GFs showed no statistically significant difference (P>0.05) between the activating substances at the time or for any PC fraction. Conclusions Whatever the activation means, these preparations of cat PC provide significant concentrations of platelets and GFs for possible clinical or experimental use. PMID:23131192

  3. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  4. Endotoxin Interactions with Platelets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    irreversible aggregation of human platelets (Hamberg and Sainuelsson 1974; Hlamberg et al 1975). Acetylsalicylic acid , an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase aud...exposure to endotoxin (100 ttg/nil). To simulate the lipopolysac- charide of endotoxin, several different fatty acids were added individually to platelet...platelet lytic capability. Similarity, iflegaradt doses of ganima radiation 6wCo destroy fatty acid groups on lipid A (L. Bertok, personal communication

  5. Platelet size in man.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J M

    1975-09-01

    The shape and parameters of platelet size distributions were studied in 50 normal persons and 97 patients in order to test the proposed thesis that platelet size heterogeneity results mainly from aging in the circulation. This thesis was contradicted (1) by size distributions of age-homogeneous, newly-born cell populations which were lognormal with increased (instead of decreased) dispersion of volumes and (2) by the macrothrombocytosis found in some populations with normal age distribution. For these reasons, thrombocytopoiesis appeared to play the major role in determining platelet size. A model was built in which the volume variation of platelet territories due to megakaryocyte growth and membrane demarcation at each step of maturation was a random proportion of the previous value of the volume. This model explains the lognormal shape of both newborn and circulating platelet size distributions. It also implies that (1) the mean and standard deviation of platelet logvolumes depend on the rates of volume change of the individual platelet territories (growth rate minus demarcation rate) as well as on megakaryocyte maturation time; (2) platelet hyperdestruction causes an increase in the mean and dispersion of the rates of territory volume change; (3) Mediterranean macrothrombocytosis and some hereditary macrothrombocytotic thrombocytopenias or dysthrombocytopoieses reflect a diminished rate of territory demarcation, and (4) platelet size heterogeneity is caused mainly by the variations in territory growth and demarcation and not by aging in the circulation.

  6. Platelets enhance neutrophil transendothelial migration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Platelets are increasingly recognized as important mediators of inflammation in addition to thrombosis. While platelets have been shown to promote neutrophil (PMN) adhesion to endothelium in various inflammatory models, it is unclear whether platelets enhance neutrophil transmigration across inflame...

  7. Metastasis: new functional implications of platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Leblanc, Raphael; Peyruchaud, Olivier

    2016-07-07

    Platelets are essential components of hemostasis. Due to a plethora of factors released on activation, platelet functions are also connected to tumor growth, notably by acting on angiogenesis. It is now well recognized that major roles of platelets in the poor outcome of cancer patients occurs during hematogenous dissemination of cancer cells. In this review, we describe recent insights into the molecular mechanisms supporting the prometastatic activity of platelets. Platelets have been shown to promote survival of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the bloodstream by conferring resistance to the shear stress and attack from natural killer cells. Recently, platelets were found to promote and/or maintain the state of epithelial to mesenchymal transition on CTCs through platelet secretion of transforming growth factor β in response to CTC activation. At a later stage in the metastatic process, platelets promote extravasation and establishment of metastatic cells in distant organs as observed in bone. This particular environment is also the site of hematopoiesis, megakaryocytopoiesis, and platelet production. Increasing the number of megakaryocytes (MKs) in the bone marrow results in a high bone mass phenotype and inhibits skeletal metastasis formation of prostate cancer cells. As a result of their specific location in vascular niches in the bone marrow, MK activity might contribute to the "seed and soil" suitability between CTCs and bone. In conclusion, recent findings have made a great advance in our knowledge on how platelets contribute to the metastatic dissemination of cancer cells and that may support the development of new antimetastasis therapies.

  8. The functional role of platelets in the regulation of angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tony G; Metharom, Pat; Berndt, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Functionally, platelets are primarily recognized as key regulators of thrombosis and hemostasis. Upon vessel injury, the typically quiescent platelet interacts with subendothelial matrix to regulate platelet adhesion, activation and aggregation, with subsequent induction of the coagulation cascade forming a thrombus. Recently, however, newly described roles for platelets in the regulation of angiogenesis have emerged. Platelets possess an armory of pro- and anti-angiogenic proteins, which are actively sequestered and highly organized in α-granule populations. Platelet activation facilitates their release, eliciting potent angiogenic responses through mechanisms that appear to be tightly regulated. In conjunction, the release of platelet-derived phospholipids and microparticles has also earned merit as synergistic regulators of angiogenesis. Consequently, platelets have been functionally implicated in a range of angiogenesis-dependent processes, including physiological roles in wound healing, vascular development and blood/lymphatic vessel separation, whilst facilitating aberrant angiogenesis in a range of diseases including cancer, atherosclerosis and diabetic retinopathy. Whilst the underlying mechanisms are only starting to be elucidated, significant insights have been established, suggesting that platelets represent a promising therapeutic strategy in diseases requiring angiogenic modulation. Moreover, anti-platelet therapies targeting thrombotic complications also exert protective effects in disorders characterized by persistent angiogenesis.

  9. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine release and aggregation promoted by cotton bracts tannin.

    PubMed

    Rohrbach, M S; Rolstad, R A; Tracy, P B; Russell, J A

    1984-01-01

    The effect of aqueous extracts of cotton bract (CBE) on platelet secretion and aggregation was examined by using washed bovine and human platelets. The CBE promoted the release of 75% to 90% of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) stored in both human and bovine platelets in a dose-dependent manner. This release reaction occurred without the lysis of the platelets and was not inhibited by indomethacin, 2-deoxyglucose, or KCN. Fractionation of the CBE indicated that the platelet secretagogue present in the CBE was the condensed polyphenol, tannin. In addition to promoting the secretion of 5-HT, tannin also aggregated the platelets in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that the secretion of platelet 5-HT and the aggregation of platelets by tannin could potentially contribute to the pulmonary symptoms associated with byssinosis.

  10. Platelet additive solution - electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Hiroshi; Hirayama, Junichi; Akino, Mitsuaki; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-06-01

    Recent attention to solutions that replace most or all plasma in platelet concentrates, while maintaining satisfactory platelet function, is motivated by the potential of plasma reduction or depletion to mitigate various transfusion-related adverse events. This report considers the electrolytic composition of previously described platelet additive solutions, in order to draw general conclusions about what is required for platelet function and longevity. The optimal concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) are 69-115 mM. The presence of both K(+) and Mg(2+) in platelet suspension at nearly physiological concentrations (3-5mM and 1.5-3mM, respectively) is indispensable for good preservation capacity because both electrolytes are required to prevent platelet activation. In contrast to K(+) and Mg(2+), Ca(2+) may not be important because no free Ca(2+) is available in M-sol, which showed excellent platelet preservation capacity at less than 5% plasma concentration. The importance of bicarbonate (approximately 40 mM) can be recognized when the platelets are suspended in additive solution under less than 5% residual plasma concentration.

  11. Platelet Function Tests.

    PubMed

    Lordkipanidzé, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally developed for diagnosis of bleeding disorders, platelet function assays have become increasingly used in basic research on platelet physiology, in phenotype-genotype associations in bleeding disorders, in drug development as surrogate endpoints of efficacy of new antiplatelet therapy, and to an extent, in the monitoring of antiplatelet therapy in clinical practice to predict thrombotic and bleeding risk. A multiplicity of platelet function assays is available to measure the level of platelet activity in various settings. These include assays that are restricted to a specialized laboratory as well as point-of-care instruments meant to investigate platelet function at patient bedside. Unlike tests that determine a defined quantity or measurement of a clinical biomarker (e.g., cholesterol or blood pressure), platelet function testing assesses the dynamics of living cells, which immediately presents a series of unique problems to any laboratory or clinic. This article presents currently used platelet function assays and discusses important variables to take into account when performing these assays, including preanalytical issues and difficulties in interpreting platelet function test results.

  12. Alloimmune refractoriness to platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G

    1997-11-01

    Patients who are transfused on multiple occasions with red cells or platelets may develop platelet-reactive alloantibodies and experience decreased clinical responsiveness to platelet transfusion. This situation, conventionally described as "refractoriness to platelet transfusions," is defined by an unsatisfactory low post-transfusion platelet count increment. If antibodies to HLAs are detected, improved clinical outcomes may result from transfusions of HLA-matched or donor-recipient cross-matched platelets. Because refractoriness is an expected, frequently occurring phenomenon, prevention of HLA alloimmunization is an important management strategy. Prevention strategies include efforts to decrease the number of transfusions, filtration of cellular components to reduce the number of HLA-bearing leukocytes, or pretransfusion ultraviolet B irradiation of cellular components to decrease their immunogenicity. Other investigational approaches include reducing the expression of HLAs on transfused platelets, inducing a transient reticuloendothelial system blockade by infusions of specialized immunoglobulin products, or transfusing semisynthetic platelet substitutes (thromboerythrocytes, thrombospheres) or modified platelets (infusible platelet membranes, lyophilized platelets).

  13. The sticky platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moncada, Benjamín; Ruíz-Arguelles, Guillermo J; Castillo-Martínez, Claudio

    2013-07-01

    The sticky platelets syndrome (SPS) is a procoagulant condition based on either arterial, venous, or capillary thrombi caused by hyperesponsive and hyperaggregable platelets. This is a frequent disease, which often remains clinically inapparent, until stressful events or combination with other factors increase the risk of developing SPS. The condition is due to a congenital platelet defect with autosomal dominant characteristics, leading to the increased platelet aggregability when they are challenged with epinephrine and adenosine diphosphate. Nowadays classification of this disorder is based on platelet reactivity to both ADP and epinephrine (SPS type 1), epinephrine alone (SPS type 2), and ADP alone (SPS type 3). The diagnoses of the syndrome depend on the functional aggregometer assay. This condition should be taken into account whenever a patient with thrombophilia is considered.

  14. Cisplatin triggers platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Franconi, M; Caprino, L

    2000-09-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anticancer drugs could contribute to the thrombotic complications of malignancy in treated patients. Thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular thrombotic events have been reported for cisplatin, a drug widely used in the treatment of many solid tumours. The aim of this study is to explore in vitro cisplatin effect on human platelet reactivity in order to define the potentially active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced thrombotic complications. Our results demonstrate that cisplatin increases human platelet reactivity (onset of platelet aggregation wave and thromboxane production) to non-aggregating concentrations of the agonists involving arachidonic acid metabolism. Direct or indirect activation of platelet phospholipase A(2) appears to be implicated. This finding contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombotic complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  15. Formaldehyde-fixation of platelets for flow cytometric measurement of phosphatidylserine exposure is feasible.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Sophie; Alberio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Strong platelet activation results in a redistribution of negatively charged phospholipids from the cytosolic to the outer leaflet of the cellular membrane. Annexin V has a high affinity to negatively charged phospholipids and can be used to identify procoagulant platelets. Formaldehyde fixation can cause factitious Annexin V binding. Our aim was to evaluate a method for fixing platelets avoiding additional Annexin V binding. We induced expression of negatively charged phospholipids on the surface of a fraction of platelets by combined activation with convulxin and thrombin in the presence of Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate and calcium. Aliquots of resting and activated platelets were fixed with a low concentration, calcium-free formaldehyde solution. Both native platelets and fixed platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry immediately and after a 24-h storage at 4°C. We observed that the percentage of Annexin V positive resting platelets ranged from 1.5 to 9.3% for the native samples and from 0.4 to 12.8% for the fixed samples (P=0.706, paired t-test). The amount of Annexin V positive convulxin/thrombin activated platelets varied from 12.9 to 35.4% without fixation and from 15.3 to 36.3% after formalin fixation (P=0.450). After a 24-h storage at 4°C, Annexin V positive platelets significantly increased both in the resting and in the convulxin/thrombin activated samples of native platelets (both P<0.001), while results for formalin fixed platelets did not differ from baseline values (P=0.318 for resting fixed platelets; P=0.673 for activated fixed platelets). We conclude that platelet fixation with a low concentration, calcium-free formaldehyde solution does not alter the proportion of Annexin V positive platelets. This method can be used to investigate properties of procoagulant platelets by multicolor flow-cytometric analysis requiring fixation steps.

  16. Assessment of platelet function in healthy sedated cats using three whole blood platelet function tests.

    PubMed

    Ho, Kimberly K; Abrams-Ogg, Anthony C G; Wood, R Darren; O'Sullivan, M Lynne; Kirby, Gordon M; Blois, Shauna L

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish feline references intervals for 3 commercial whole blood platelet function test analyzer systems: Multiplate analyzer (MP; Roche Diagnostics International Ltd., Rotkreuz, Switzerland), Platelet Function Analyzer-100 (PF: Siemens Canada, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada), and Plateletworks Combo-25 kit (PW; Helena Laboratories, Beaumont, TX). Venipuncture was performed on 55 healthy sedated cats, and platelet aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen (COL), and arachidonic acid (AA; MP only) was assessed using citrated blood. For the MP analyzer, median (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) area under curve (Units) for ADP, COL, and AA agonists were 87 (11-176), 81 (32-129), and 91 (59-129), respectively. For the PF analyzer, median (95% CIs) closure time, using COL-ADP cartridges, was 69 (46-89) sec. For the PW assay, median (95% CIs) percent aggregations for ADP and COL agonists were 71 (18-92) and 49 (9-96), respectively, using impedance hematology analyzer platelet counts, and 94 (25-98) and 68 (14-119), respectively, using flow cytometry hematology analyzer platelet counts. There were low correlations between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and MP analyzer (COL agonist; ρ = 0.11), and between the PF analyzer (COL-ADP cartridge) and PW assay (COL agonist using impedance platelet counts; ρ = 0.14). The PW assay percent aggregations using impedance and flow cytometric platelet counts were correlated for both ADP (ρ = 0.64) and COL (ρ = 0.64) agonists. Platelet function testing using these tests are feasible in cats, but 95% CIs are wide, so single results may be difficult to interpret. Platelet counting by impedance or flow cytometry may be used for the PW assay but are not interchangeable.

  17. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  18. Pathogen-Reduced, Platelet Additive Solution, Extended Stored Platelets (PREPS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    trauma patients. References: 1. Slichter SJ, Harker LA. Preparation and storage of platelet concentrates . II. Storage variables influencing ...Storage variables influencing platelet viability and function. Br J Haematol 1976;34(3):403-419. 2. Becker GA, Tuccelli M, Kunicki T, et al. Studies of...platelet additive solution (PAS) to extend the life of stored platelets. Our project also aims to determine how long acceptable platelet viability can be

  19. Effects of tomato extract on human platelet aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dutta-Roy, A K; Crosbie, L; Gordon, M J

    2001-06-01

    Among all fruits tested in vitro for their anti-platelet property, tomato had the highest activity followed by grapefruit, melon, and strawberry, whereas pear and apple had little or no activity. Tomato extract (20-50 microl of 100% juice) inhibited both ADP- and collagen-induced aggregation by up to 70% but could not inhibit arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation and concomitant thromboxane synthesis under similar experimental conditions. The anti-platelet components (MW <1000 Da) in tomatoes are water soluble, heat stable and are concentrated in the yellow fluid around the seeds. The active fractions were separated using gel filtration and HPLC. The aqueous fraction (110 000 xg supernatant) of tomatoes containing anti-platelet activity was subjected to gel filtration column chromatography (Biogel P2 column). The activity was fractionated into two peaks, peak-3 and peak-4 (major peak). Subsequently, peak-4 was further purified by HPLC using a reversed-phase column. NMR and mass spectroscopy studies indicated that peak F2 (obtained from peak 4) contained adenosine and cytidine. Deamination of peak F2 with adenosine deaminase almost completely abolished its anti-platelet activity, confirming the presence of adenosine in this fraction. In comparison, deamination of peak-4 resulted in only partial loss of inhibitory activity while the activity of peak-3 remained unaffected. These results indicate that tomatoes contain anti-platelet compounds in addition to adenosine. Unlike aspirin, the tomato-derived compounds inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. All these data indicate that tomato contains very potent anti-platelet components, and consuming tomatoes might be beneficial both as a preventive and therapeutic regime for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Platelet Adhesion under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Zaverio M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet adhesive mechanisms play a well-defined role in hemostasis and thrombosis, but evidence continues to emerge for a relevant contribution to other pathophysiological processes including inflammation, immune-mediated responses to microbial and viral pathogens, and cancer metastasis. Hemostasis and thrombosis are related aspects of the response to vascular injury, but the former protects from bleeding after trauma while the latter is a disease mechanism. In either situation, adhesive interactions mediated by specific membrane receptors support the initial attachment of single platelets to cellular and extracellular matrix constituents of the vessel wall and tissues. In the subsequent steps of thrombus growth and stabilization, adhesive interactions mediate platelet to platelet cohesion (aggregation) and anchoring to the fibrin clot. A key functional aspect of platelets is their ability to circulate in a quiescent state surveying the integrity of the inner vascular surface, coupled to a prompt reaction wherever alterations are detected. In many respects, therefore, platelet adhesion to vascular wall structures, to one another or to other blood cells are facets of the same fundamental biological process. The adaptation of platelet adhesive functions to the effects of blood flow is the main focus of this review. PMID:19191170

  1. Platelets in Critical Illness.

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2016-04-01

    In patients with critical illness, thrombocytopenia is a frequent laboratory abnormality. However frequent this may occur, a low platelet count is not an epiphenomenon, but a marker with further significance. It is always important to assess the proper cause for thrombocytopenia in critically ill patients because different underlying disorders may precipitate different diagnostic and therapeutic management strategies. Platelets are part of the first-line defense of the body against bleeding; hence, thrombocytopenia may increase the risk of hemorrhage. In case of systemic inflammatory syndromes, such as the response to sepsis, disseminated intravascular platelet activation may occur. This will contribute to microvascular failure and thereby play a role in the development of organ dysfunction. Platelets are circulating blood cells that will normally not interact with the intact vessel wall but that may swiftly respond to endothelial disruption (which is often part of the pathogenesis of critical illness) by adhering to subendothelial structures, followed by interaction with each other, thereby forming a platelet aggregate. The activated platelet (phospholipid) membrane may form a suitable surface on which further coagulation activation may occur. A low platelet count is a strong and independent predictor of an adverse outcome in critically ill patients, thereby facilitating a simple and practically risk assessment in these patients and potentially guiding the use of complex or expensive treatment strategies.

  2. Platelets and cancer: a casual or causal relationship: revisited.

    PubMed

    Menter, David G; Tucker, Stephanie C; Kopetz, Scott; Sood, Anil K; Crissman, John D; Honn, Kenneth V

    2014-03-01

    Human platelets arise as subcellular fragments of megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The physiologic demand, presence of disease such as cancer, or drug effects can regulate the production circulating platelets. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. The most critical biological platelet response is serving as "First Responders" during the wounding process. The exposure of extracellular matrix proteins and intracellular components occurs after wounding. Numerous platelet receptors recognize matrix proteins that trigger platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and stabilization. Once activated, platelets change shape and degranulate to release growth factors and bioactive lipids into the blood stream. This cyclic process recruits and aggregates platelets along with thrombogenesis. This process facilitates wound closure or can recognize circulating pathologic bodies. Cancer cell entry into the blood stream triggers platelet-mediated recognition and is amplified by cell surface receptors, cellular products, extracellular factors, and immune cells. In some cases, these interactions suppress immune recognition and elimination of cancer cells or promote arrest at the endothelium, or entrapment in the microvasculature, and survival. This supports survival and spread of cancer cells and the establishment of secondary lesions to serve as important targets for prevention and therapy.

  3. Platelets and cancer: a casual or causal relationship: revisited

    PubMed Central

    Menter, David G.; Tucker, Stephanie C.; Kopetz, Scott; Sood, Anil K.; Crissman, John D.; Honn, Kenneth V.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets arise as subcellular fragments of megakaryocytes in bone marrow. The physiologic demand, presence of disease such as cancer, or drug effects can regulate the production circulating platelets. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. The most critical biological platelet response is serving as “First Responders” during the wounding process. The exposure of extracellular matrix proteins and intracellular components occurs after wounding. Numerous platelet receptors recognize matrix proteins that trigger platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and stabilization. Once activated, platelets change shape and degranulate to release growth factors and bioactive lipids into the blood stream. This cyclic process recruits and aggregates platelets along with thrombogenesis. This process facilitates wound closure or can recognize circulating pathologic bodies. Cancer cell entry into the blood stream triggers platelet-mediated recognition and is amplified by cell surface receptors, cellular products, extracellular factors, and immune cells. In some cases, these interactions suppress immune recognition and elimination of cancer cells or promote arrest at the endothelium, or entrapment in the microvasculature, and survival. This supports survival and spread of cancer cells and the establishment of secondary lesions to serve as important targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:24696047

  4. Characterization of the human platelet Fc sub. gamma. receptor

    SciTech Connect

    King, M.

    1988-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is often associated with immune complex disease and may in part be due to the interaction of circulating (IgG) immune complexes with an Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor on the platelet surface. Characterization of the immune complex-platelet interaction should provide for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of immune thrombocytpenia. To this end, a ligand binding assay, employing {sup 125}I-IgG trimer, was established. Receptor expression was determined by measuring the saturable binding of radiolabeled trimer to platelets at equilibrium. Normal human platelets were observed to express 8559 {plus minus} 852 binding sites for IgG trimer with a Kd of 12.5 {plus minus} 1.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} M. Binding of IgG trimer to human platelets was blocked following preincubation of the cells with an anti-Fc{sub {gamma}}RII monoclonal antibody. Furthermore, this binding was ionic-strength dependent but was unaffected by the presence of Mg{sup ++} or cytochalasin B. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor modulation was examined by assessing the effects of various physiologic and pharmacologic on the ability of platelets to bind IgG trimer. Platelet Fc{sub {gamma}} receptor expression was not affected by thrombin, ADP, or {gamma}-interferon. However, in 7/12 normal donors, treatment of platelets with dexamethasone resulted in a decrease in the number of Fc{sub {gamma}} receptors expressed.

  5. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  6. Modified C-reactive protein interacts with platelet glycoprotein Ibα.

    PubMed

    Boncler, Magdalena; Rywaniak, Joanna; Szymański, Jacek; Potempa, Lawrence A; Rychlik, Błażej; Watała, Cezary

    2011-01-01

    Herein, we investigated the possible mechanisms by which recombinant modified CRP(m(r)CRP) modulates blood platelet function. Modified CRP could activate blood platelets and stimulate their adhesion and aggregation in the absence of any other physiological stimuli. Preincubation of isolated blood platelets with m(r)CRP at a concentration as low as 2 μg/ml resulted in significant platelet degranulation (fraction of CD62-positive platelets increased 2-fold, p < 0.0002), and at concentrations of 20 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml, increased exposure of the platelet procoagulant surface was observed (expression of annexin V-positive platelets increased to 5.7 ± 1.0% and 10.4 ± 2.2%, respectively, p < 0.03, vs. 2.9 ± 0.2% in control). Furthermore, m(r)CRP (100 μg/ml) strongly augmented spontaneous and ADP-induced fibrinogen binding to platelets (p < 0.05), platelet adhesion to fibrinogen and platelet aggregation. Using the Biacore™ surface plasmon resonance technique and glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) immobilized on the sensor surface, we demonstrated direct binding between platelet GPIbα and m(r)CRP. Binding of m(r)CRP to GPIbα and C1q was also observed by ELISA, irrespective of the immobilized ligand. These outcomes strongly support a role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the interactions of m(r)CRP with blood platelets.

  7. Platelet-delivered therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lyde, R; Sabatino, D; Sullivan, S K; Poncz, M

    2015-06-01

    We have proposed that modified platelets could potentially be used to correct intrinsic platelet defects as well as for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to sights of vascular injury. Ectopic expression of proteins within α-granules prior to platelet activation has been achieved for several proteins, including urokinase, factor (F) VIII, and partially for FIX. Potential uses of platelet-directed therapeutics will be discussed, focusing on targeted delivery of urokinase as a thromboprophylactic agent and FVIII for the treatment of hemophilia A patients with intractable inhibitors. This presentation will discuss new strategies that may be useful in the care of patients with vascular injury as well as remaining challenges and limitations of these approaches.

  8. Platelet aggregation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders Uremia (a result of kidney failure ) Von Willebrand disease (a bleeding disorder) Risks There is very little ... vasculitis Platelet count Polycythemia vera Prerenal azotemia Von Willebrand disease Review Date 1/27/2015 Updated by: Yi- ...

  9. An autoanalyzer test for the quantitation of platelet-associated IgG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levitan, Nathan; Teno, Richard A.; Szymanski, Irma O.

    1986-01-01

    A new quantitative antiglobulin consumption (QAC) test for the measurement of platelet-associated IgG is described. In this test washed platelets are incubated with anti-IgG at a final dilution of 1:2 million. The unneutralized fraction of anti-IgG remaining in solution is then measured with an Autoanalyzer and soluble IgG is used for calibration. The dose-response curves depicting the percent neutralization of anti-IgG by platelets and by soluble IgG were compared in detail and found to be nearly identical, indicating that platelet-associated IgG can be accurately quantitated by this method. The mean IgG values were 2287 molecules/platelet for normal adults and 38,112 molecules/platelet for ITP patients. The Autoanalyzer QAC test is a sensitive and reproducible assay for the quantitation of platelet-associated IgG.

  10. Platelet proteome in healthy volunteers who smoke.

    PubMed

    Della Corte, Anna; Tamburrelli, Chiara; Crescente, Marilena; Giordano, Lucia; D'Imperio, Marco; Di Michele, Michela; Donati, Maria Benedetta; De Gaetano, Giovanni; Rotilio, Domenico; Cerletti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Smoking accelerates atherosclerosis and is a well-known risk factor for acute cardiovascular complications; however, the mechanisms of these effects have not been completely clarified. Recently developed proteomic approaches may offer new clues when combined with well-established functional tests. Platelet proteome of healthy smokers and non-smokers was resolved by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, compared by Decyder software and identified by mass spectrometry analysis (nano-LC-MS/MS). In smokers, three proteins (Factor XIII-A subunit, platelet glycoprotein IIb and beta-actin) were significantly up-regulated, whereas WDR1 protein and chaperonine HSP60 were down-regulated. Furthermore, the highest scored network derived by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis using the modulated proteins as input showed the involvement of several proteins to be related to inflammation and apoptosis. Platelet function tests and the levels of markers of platelet and leukocyte activation were not different in smokers vs. non-smoker subjects. The platelet proteomic approach confirms that cigarette smoking triggers several inflammatory reactions and may help clarify some of the molecular mechanisms of smoke effect on cellular systems relevant for vascular integrity and human health.

  11. Platelets and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Simeone, Paola; Liani, Rossella; Davì, Giovanni

    2015-07-01

    Platelet activation plays a key role in atherothrombosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and increased in vivo platelet activation with enhanced thromboxane (TX) biosynthesis has been reported in patients with impairment of glucose metabolism even in the earlier stages of disease and in the preclinical phases. In this regards, platelets appear as addresses and players carrying and transducing metabolic derangement into vascular injury. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and insulin resistance as determinants and predictors of platelet activation, (ii) inflammatory mediators derived from platelets, such as soluble CD40 ligand, soluble CD36, Dickkopf-1 and probably soluble receptor for advanced glycation-end-products (sRAGE), which expand the functional repertoire of platelets from players of hemostasis and thrombosis to powerful amplifiers of inflammation by promoting the release of cytokines and chemokines, cell activation, and cell-cell interactions; (iii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the less-than-expected antithrombotic protection by aspirin (ASA), despite regular antiplatelet prophylaxis at the standard dosing regimen, and (iv) stratification of patients deserving different antiplatelet strategies, based on the metabolic phenotype. Taken together, these pathophysiological aspects may contribute to the development of promising mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce the progression of atherothrombosis in diabetic subjects.

  12. Platelets and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita; Sanchez, Mikel; Andia, Isabel; Anitua, Eduardo

    2008-05-01

    Platelets help prevent blood loss at sites of vascular injury. To do this, they adhere, aggregate and form a procoagulant surface favoring thrombin generation and fibrin formation. In addition, platelets express and release substances that promote tissue repair and influence processes such as angiogenesis, inflammation and the immune response. They contain large secretable pools of biologically active proteins, while newly synthesized active metabolites are also released. Although anucleate, activated platelets possess a spliceosome and can synthesize tissue factor and interleukin-1beta. The binding of secreted proteins within a developing fibrin mesh or to the extracellular matrix can create chemotactic gradients favoring the recruitment of stem cells, stimulating cell migration and differentiation, and promoting repair. The therapeutic use of platelets in a fibrin clot has a positive influence in clinical situations requiring rapid healing. Dental implant surgery, orthopaedic surgery, muscle and tendon repair, skin ulcers, hole repair in eye surgery and cardiac surgery are situations where the use of autologous platelets accelerates healing. We now review the ways in which platelets participate in these processes.

  13. Identification of a membrane skeleton in platelets

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Platelets have previously been shown to contain actin filaments that are linked, through actin-binding protein, to the glycoprotein (GP) Ib- IX complex, GP Ia, GP IIa, and an unidentified GP of Mr 250,000 on the plasma membrane. The objective of the present study was to use a morphological approach to examine the distribution of these membrane- bound filaments within platelets. Preliminary experiments showed that the Triton X-100 lysis buffers used previously to solubilize platelets completely disrupt the three-dimensional organization of the cytoskeletons. Conditions were established that minimized these postlysis changes. The cytoskeletons remained as platelet-shaped structures. These structures consisted of a network of long actin filaments and a more amorphous layer that outlined the periphery. When Ca2+ was present, the long actin filaments were lost but the amorphous layer at the periphery remained; conditions were established in which this amorphous layer retained the outline of the platelet from which it originated. Immunocytochemical experiments showed that the GP Ib-IX complex and actin-binding protein were associated with the amorphous layer. Analysis of the amorphous material on SDS-polyacrylamide gels showed that it contained actin, actin-binding protein, and all actin- bound GP Ib-IX. Although actin filaments could not be visualized in thin section, the actin presumably was in a filamentous form because it was solubilized by DNase I and bound phalloidin. These studies show that platelets contain a membrane skeleton and suggest that it is distinct from the network of cytoplasmic actin filaments. This membrane skeleton exists as a submembranous lining that, by analogy to the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, may stabilize the plasma membrane and contribute to determining its shape. PMID:3372587

  14. Nitric oxide released from activated platelets inhibits platelet recruitment.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, J E; Loscalzo, J; Barnard, M R; Alpert, C; Keaney, J F; Michelson, A D

    1997-01-01

    Vessel injury and thrombus formation are the cause of most ischemic coronary syndromes and, in this setting, activated platelets stimulate platelet recruitment to the growing thrombus. Recently, a constitutive nitric oxide synthase (NOS) has been identified in human platelets. To further define the capacity of platelets to produce nitric oxide (NO), as well as to study the role of this NO in platelet recruitment, we adapted a NO-selective microelectrode for use in a standard platelet aggregometer, thereby permitting simultaneous measurement of platelet aggregation and NO production. Treatment of platelets with the NO synthase inhibitor -NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), reduced NO production by 92+/-8% in response to 5 microM ADP compared to control but increased aggregation by only 15+/-2%. In contrast, L-NAME had a more pronounced effect on platelet recruitment as evidenced by a 35+/-5% increase in the extent of aggregation, a 33+/-3% decrease in cyclic GMP content, and a 31+/-5% increase in serotonin release from a second recruitable population of platelets added to stimulated platelets at the peak of NO production. To study platelet recruitment accurately, we developed an assay that monitors two platelet populations simultaneously. Nonbiotinylated platelets were incubated with L-NAME or vehicle and activated with ADP. At peak NO production, biotinylated platelets were added. As measured by three-color flow cytometry, there was a 56+/-11% increase in the number of P selectin- positive platelets in the nonbiotinylated population treated with L-NAME as compared to control. When biotinylated platelets were added to the L-NAME-treated nonbiotinylated population, the number of P selectin positive biotinylated plate-lets increased by 180+/-32% as compared to biotinylated platelets added to the control. In summary, stimulated platelets produce NO that modestly inhibits platelet activation but markedly inhibits additional platelet recruitment. These data suggest

  15. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted.

  16. Giant Platelets in Platelet Donors – A Blessing in Disguise?

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nabajyoti; Ray, Deepanjan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) are relatively rare, but their prevalence is probably underestimated. Harris platelet syndrome, the most common IGPD reported from Indian subcontinent, mostly from eastern part, is characterised by a low platelet count, high mean platelet volume (MPV) and absence of bleeding. Aim A short study was conducted to assess the prevalence of giant platelets in voluntary donors of single donor platelets (SDP) and analyse the effect of transfusion of such SDPs in patients. Materials and Methods Voluntary donors of SDPs were screened as per standard guidelines prior to the procedure. A complete blood count (including MPV) along with a peripheral smear was done. A total of 45 donors were screened for plateletpheresis. Following plateletpheresis from these donors, a platelet count from the collection bag was done after one hour. The SDP was transfused as a single unit or divided into two and transfused to the same patient at two different occasions, as per clinical need. Platelet counts on pateints were done after one hour and the platelet recovery was noted. Results Out of the 45 donors who were screened, 30 (66.67%) were found to have giant platelets. It was observed that the pre procedure platelet counts in donors having giant platelets were relatively low (1.5 -1.7 lacs) and so also the platelet yield (2.7-3x1011) compared to donors who did not, but the post transfusion platelet recovery was greater. Conclusion Since presence of giant platelets has been seen to be common in the Eastern part of India, a peripheral smear examination should always be considered during screening of plateletpheresis donors to avoid rejecting donors with giant platelets whose platelet counts are given falsely low by autoanalysers. PMID:26266124

  17. ACE and platelet aggregation inhibitors from Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge (host plant of Herba Cistanches) growing in Xinjiang

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yachao; Liao, Jing; Tang, Yingzhan; Zhang, Peng; Tan, Chengyu; Ni, Hui; Wu, Xueqin; Li, Ning; Jia, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tamarix hohenackeri Bunge is a salt cedar that grows widespread in the desert mountains in Xinjiang. T. hohenackeri has not been investigated earlier, although there are many reports of phytochemical work on other Tamarix species. Materials and Methods: To find out natural angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor and platelet aggregation inhibitors, the bioactive extract (ethyl acetate [EtOAc] fraction) from the dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri were investigated. The active fraction was purified by repeated column chromatography, including silica gel, Sephadex LH-20 column, medium-pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) (polyamide column) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The isolated major constituents were tested for their anti-platelet aggregation activity. Results: Bioassay-directed separation of the EtOAc fraction of the 70% ethanol extract from the air-dried aerial parts of T. hohenackeri led to the isolation of a new triterpenoid lactone (1), together with 13 known compounds (2-14). It was the first time to focus on screening bioactive constituents for this plant. The chemical structures were established on the basis of spectral data (ESI-MS and NMR). The results showed that the flavonoid compounds (7 and 8) and phenolic compounds (9, 10, 11, and 14) were potential ACE inhibitors. And the flavonoid compounds (5 and 7) showed significant anti-platelet aggregation activities. Conclusion: On the basis of the chemical and biological data, the material basis of ACE inhibitory activity for the active part was the phenolic constituents. However, the flavonoid compounds were responsible for the anti-platelet aggregation. The primary structure and activity relationship were also discussed respectively. PMID:24914275

  18. Clinical uses of radiolabeled platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Datz, F.L.; Christian, P.E.; Baker, W.J.

    1985-12-01

    Platelets were first successfully radiolabeled in 1953. At that time, investigators were primarily interested in developing a technique to accurately measure platelet life span in both normal and thrombocytopenic patients. Studies using platelets labeled with /sup 51/Cr have shown shortened platelet survival times in a number of diseases including idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, coronary artery disease, and diabetes mellitus. More recently, labels such as /sup 111/In have been developed that allow in vivo imaging of platelets. Indium-111 platelets are being used to better understand the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis, thrombophlebitis, pulmonary embolism and clotting disorders, and to improve the clinical diagnosis of these diseases.

  19. Equid herpesvirus type 1 activates platelets.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  20. Equid Herpesvirus Type 1 Activates Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Yeo, Wee Ming; Burnett, Deborah; DeAngelis, Nicole; Huang, Teng; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Catalfamo, James

    2015-01-01

    Equid herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) causes outbreaks of abortion and neurological disease in horses. One of the main causes of these clinical syndromes is thrombosis in placental and spinal cord vessels, however the mechanism for thrombus formation is unknown. Platelets form part of the thrombus and amplify and propagate thrombin generation. Here, we tested the hypothesis that EHV-1 activates platelets. We found that two EHV-1 strains, RacL11 and Ab4 at 0.5 or higher plaque forming unit/cell, activate platelets within 10 minutes, causing α-granule secretion (surface P-selectin expression) and platelet microvesiculation (increased small events double positive for CD41 and Annexin V). Microvesiculation was more pronounced with the RacL11 strain. Virus-induced P-selectin expression required plasma and 1.0 mM exogenous calcium. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced in factor VII- or X-deficient human plasma. Both P-selectin expression and microvesiculation were re-established in factor VII-deficient human plasma with added purified human factor VIIa (1 nM). A glycoprotein C-deficient mutant of the Ab4 strain activated platelets as effectively as non-mutated Ab4. P-selectin expression was abolished and microvesiculation was significantly reduced by preincubation of virus with a goat polyclonal anti-rabbit tissue factor antibody. Infectious virus could be retrieved from washed EHV-1-exposed platelets, suggesting a direct platelet-virus interaction. Our results indicate that EHV-1 activates equine platelets and that α-granule secretion is a consequence of virus-associated tissue factor triggering factor X activation and thrombin generation. Microvesiculation was only partly tissue factor and thrombin-dependent, suggesting the virus causes microvesiculation through other mechanisms, potentially through direct binding. These findings suggest that EHV-1-induced platelet activation could contribute to the thrombosis that occurs in

  1. Sports medicine applications of platelet rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Allan; Harmon, Kimberly; Woodall, James; Vieira, Amy

    2012-06-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is a powerful new biologic tool in sports medicine. PRP is a fraction of autologous whole blood containing and increased number of platelets and a wide variety of cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-B1), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) among many others. Worldwide interest in this biologic technology has recently risen sharply. Basic science and preclinical data support the use of PRP for a variety of sports related injuries and disorders. The published, peer reviewed, human data on PRP is limited. Although the scientific evaluation of clinical efficacy is in the early stages, elite and recreational athletes already use PRP in the treatment of sports related injuries. Many questions remain to be answered regarding the use of PRP including optimal formulation, including of leukocytes, dosage and rehabilitation protocols. In this review, a classification for platelet rich plasma is proposed and the in-vitro, preclinical and human investigations of PRP applications in sports medicine will be reviewed as well as a discussion of rehabilitation after a PRP procedure. The regulation of PRP by the World Anti-Doping Agency will also be discussed. PRP is a promising technology in sports medicine; however, it will require more vigorous study in order to better understand how to apply it most effectively.

  2. cDNA cloning and expression of the human A-type platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor establishes structural similarity to the B-type PDGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Claesson-Welsh, L.; Eriksson, A.; Westermark, B.; Heldin, C.H. )

    1989-07-01

    The primary structure of the human A-type receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) has been determined. A 6.5-kilobase (kb) transcript was identified through low-stringency hybridization with a probe derived from the B-type PDGF receptor cDNA. The sequence of a cDNA clone corresponding to the 6.5-kb transcript contains an open reading frame that predicts a 1,089-amino acid growth factor receptor-like molecule, which displays 44% overall amino acid similarity with the PDGF B-type receptor. The two receptors have a similar domain organization, with five immunoglobulin-like domains extracellularly and an intracellular split protein tyrosine kinase domain. Transfection of the new cDNA into COS cells led to the expression of a protein specifically recognized by an antiserum previously shown to react with the PDGF A-type receptor. The expressed protein was shown to display high-affinity binding of all three {sup 125}I-labeled dimeric forms of PdGF A and B chains in a manner that is characteristic for the PDGF A-type receptor.

  3. Normal platelets and megakaryocytes are produced in vivo in the absence of thrombopoietin.

    PubMed

    Bunting, S; Widmer, R; Lipari, T; Rangell, L; Steinmetz, H; Carver-Moore, K; Moore, M W; Keller, G A; de Sauvage, F J

    1997-11-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) has been established as the major regulator of megakaryocyte and platelet production. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that TPO affects both megakaryocyte proliferation and maturation. In vitro, TPO has been reported to be essential for full development of megakaryocytes and platelets. These studies are in contrast to results observed in vivo in mice deficient in the TPO or c-mpl gene (TPO-/- and c-mpl-/-). Both TPO-/- and c-mpl-/- mice exhibit a 90% reduction in megakaryocyte and platelet levels. But even with this small number of circulating platelets, these mice do not have any excessive bleeding. Ultrastructural analysis indicates that platelets and megakaryocytes present in the knockout mice are morphologically normal. Characterization of platelet function shows that platelets from knockout mice are functionally identical to the wild-type platelets as measured by upregulation of 125I-fibrinogen binding to platelets in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation and by platelet attachment to the immobilized extracellular matrix proteins, collagen and von Willebrand factor (vWF). These results demonstrate that in vivo, TPO is required for the control of megakaryocyte and platelet number but not for their maturation. Other factors with megakaryocytopoietic activity may be able to compensate for the maturational role of TPO and lead to the formation of normal megakaryocytes and platelets in TPO-/- and c-mpl-/- mice.

  4. Platelet-mediated adhesion facilitates leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Senfeng; Cao, Yanting; Zhang, Wenjian; Liu, Honglin; You, Jia; Yin, Yiqing; Lou, Jinning; Li, Chenghui

    2016-03-01

    Leukocyte transendothelial migration and sequestration are two distinct outcomes following leukocyte adhesion to endothelium during ischemia-reperfusion injury, in which platelets may play a pivotal role. In the present study, we established an in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation model to mimic ischemia-reperfusion injury and found platelet pre-incubation significantly increased leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells after hyoxia-reoxygenation (over 67%). Blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules inhibited leukocyte direct adhesion to endothelial cells, while platelet-mediated leukocyte adhesion was suppressed by blockade of platelet-expressed adhesion molecules. Further experiments revealed platelets acted as a bridge to mediate leukocyte adhesion, and platelet-mediated adhesion was the predominant pattern in the presence of platelets. However, platelet pre-incubation significantly suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration after hypoxia-reoxygenation (over 31%), which could be aggravated by blockade of endothelial-cell-expressed adhesion molecules, but alleviated by blockade of platelet- expressed adhesion molecules. This would indicate that platelet-mediated adhesion disrupted leukocyte transendothelial migration. An in vivo mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion model demonstrated leukocyte transfusion alone caused mild leukocyte adhesion to reperfused vessels and subsequent leukocyte infiltration, while simultaneous leukocyte and platelet transfusion led to massive leukocyte adhesion and sequestration within reperfused microvessels. Our studies revealed platelets enhanced leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells, but suppressed leukocyte transendothelial migration. Overall, this leads to leukocyte sequestration in hypoxia-reoxygenated microvessels.

  5. Investigation of platelet function and platelet disorders using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Rubak, Peter; Nissen, Peter H; Kristensen, Steen D; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2016-01-01

    Patients with thrombocytopenia or platelet disorders are at risk of severe bleeding. We report the development and validation of flow cytometry assays to diagnose platelet disorders and to assess platelet function independently of platelet count. The assays were developed to measure glycoprotein levels (panel 1) and platelet function (panel 2) in sodium citrated blood. Twenty healthy volunteers and five patients diagnosed with different platelet disorders were included. Glycoprotein expression levels of the receptors Ia, Ib, IIb, IIIa and IX were measured and normalised with forward scatter (FS) as a measurement of platelet size. Platelet function was assessed by CD63, P-selectin and bound fibrinogen in response to arachidonic acid, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide, ristocetin and thrombin receptor-activation peptide-6. All patients except one with suspected δ-granule defect showed aberrant levels of glycoproteins in panel 1. Glanzmann's thrombasthenia and genetically verified Bernard-Soulier syndrome could be diagnosed using panel 1. All patients showed reduced platelet function according to at least one agonist. Using panel 2 it was possible to diagnose Bernard-Soulier syndrome, δ-granule defect and GPVI disorder. By combining the two assays, we were able to diagnose different platelet disorders and investigate platelet function independent of platelet count.

  6. Reproducibility of Manual Platelet Estimation Following Automated Low Platelet Counts

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hosni, Zainab S; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Mamari, Sahimah; Al-Qasabi, Jamal; Davis, Hiedi; Al-Lawati, Hatim; Al-Riyami, Arwa Z

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Manual platelet estimation is one of the methods used when automated platelet estimates are very low. However, the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation has not been adequately studied. We sought to assess the reproducibility of manual platelet estimation following automated low platelet counts and to evaluate the impact of the level of experience of the person counting on the reproducibility of manual platelet estimates. Methods In this cross-sectional study, peripheral blood films of patients with platelet counts less than 100 × 109/L were retrieved and given to four raters to perform manual platelet estimation independently using a predefined method (average of platelet counts in 10 fields using 100× objective multiplied by 20). Data were analyzed using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) as a method of reproducibility assessment. Results The ICC across the four raters was 0.840, indicating excellent agreement. The median difference of the two most experienced raters was 0 (range: -64 to 78). The level of platelet estimate by the least-experienced rater predicted the disagreement (p = 0.037). When assessing the difference between pairs of raters, there was no significant difference in the ICC (p = 0.420). Conclusions The agreement between different raters using manual platelet estimation was excellent. Further confirmation is necessary, with a prospective study using a gold standard method of platelet counts. PMID:27974955

  7. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    mice and mice transfused with Syk inhibitor-treated platelets . Platelet lodging was remarkably decreased in lungs of mice transfused with Syk...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0523 TITLE: Complement Activation Alters Platelet ...30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0523 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  8. Recovery of Platelet Count among Apheresis Platelet Donors

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnamoorthy; Anandan, Ashwin; Panicker, Vinod Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Increase in awareness regarding use of single donor platelets and the availability of technology has resulted in increased platelet pheresis procedures. The interval between two succesive plateletpheresis donations is much less compared to whole blood donations. Plateletpheresis procedures are associated with short term and long term adverse events. The effect of plateletpheresis on haematopoietic system remains significant. Aim To study the recovery of platelet count to baseline in plateletpheresis donors. Materials and Methods Fifty, first time apheresis donors were followed for platelet count recovery. Platelet count was measured before donation and at 30 minutes, 48 hours, 7th day and 14th day post-donation. Donor platelet count recovery to baseline was observed during the two week period. Results were analysed statistically, p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Platelet count recovered to baseline by 7th day post-donation in 50% of donors in groups I (Pre-donation platelet count 1.5 lacs/μl to 2.2 lacs/μl) and II (Donors with platelet count >2.2 lacs/μl to 2.75 lacs/μl), 30% of donors in group III (Donors with platelet count >2.75 lacs/μl to 3.5 lacs/μl) of the donors. Donor’s platelet count recovered to baseline in 85% of donors by day 14 in across the three groups. Recruitment of platelets from spleen was observed in donors with pre-donation platelet count on the lower limit of normal. Conclusion By day 7, donor’s platelet count recovered to baseline in majority of the donors. Allowing enough recovery periods for donor platelet count, the minimum interval between two apheresis donations can be 7 days till more prospective studies conclude on the frequency and minimum interval between plateletpheresis donations. PMID:28208861

  9. Lyophilized Platelets: Challenges and Opportunities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    and protozoan infections; alloimmunization resulting in refracto- riness to future platelet transfusions; and graft-versus-host disease . The...for preparation of lyophilized platelets has recently been described.7 Freeze-dried platelets retain native von Willebrand factor-mediated adhesion

  10. A Computerized Prediction Model of Hazardous Inflammatory Platelet Transfusion Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Kim Anh; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Sebban, Marc; Fromont, Elisa; Chavarin, Patricia; Absi, Lena; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet component (PC) transfusion leads occasionally to inflammatory hazards. Certain BRMs that are secreted by the platelets themselves during storage may have some responsibility. Methodology/Principal Findings First, we identified non-stochastic arrangements of platelet-secreted BRMs in platelet components that led to acute transfusion reactions (ATRs). These data provide formal clinical evidence that platelets generate secretion profiles under both sterile activation and pathological conditions. We next aimed to predict the risk of hazardous outcomes by establishing statistical models based on the associations of BRMs within the incriminated platelet components and using decision trees. We investigated a large (n = 65) series of ATRs after platelet component transfusions reported through a very homogenous system at one university hospital. Herein, we used a combination of clinical observations, ex vivo and in vitro investigations, and mathematical modeling systems. We calculated the statistical association of a large variety (n = 17) of cytokines, chemokines, and physiologically likely factors with acute inflammatory potential in patients presenting with severe hazards. We then generated an accident prediction model that proved to be dependent on the level (amount) of a given cytokine-like platelet product within the indicated component, e.g., soluble CD40-ligand (>289.5 pg/109 platelets), or the presence of another secreted factor (IL-13, >0). We further modeled the risk of the patient presenting either a febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reaction or an atypical allergic transfusion reaction, depending on the amount of the chemokine MIP-1α (<20.4 or >20.4 pg/109 platelets, respectively). Conclusions/Significance This allows the modeling of a policy of risk prevention for severe inflammatory outcomes in PC transfusion. PMID:24830754

  11. Platelets participate in synovitis via Cox-1-dependent synthesis of prostacyclin independently of microparticle generation.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Larabee, Katherine; Shnayder, Ruslan; Jacobs, Kathleen; Farndale, Richard W; Ware, Jerry; Lee, David M

    2011-04-01

    In addition to the well-described role of platelets in thrombosis, a growing body of evidence implicates platelets in diverse inflammatory responses. We recently showed platelets can contribute to the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthritis via IL-1- containing microparticles. In this study, we demonstrate that platelets, and not platelet microparticles, actively contribute to synovitis via production of proinflammatory prostacyclin in an autoimmune arthritis model. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we establish that paracrine production of prostacyclin proceeds in the absence of cyclooxygenase-2. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that prostacyclin generation can arise via transcellular collaboration between platelets and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In addition to shedding light on an unappreciated pathway of lipid synthesis in arthritis, we further delineate a novel effector activity by which platelets can contribute to inflammatory disease.

  12. Reactions Induced by Platelet Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Kiefel, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Summary Platelet transfusions play a central role in therapeutic regimens for patients with hematologic/oncologic diseases who develop severe thrombocytopenia either in the course of their disease or following cytostatic therapy. Like other blood components, platelet transfusions have achieved a high degree of safety as far as transmission of viral diseases is concerned. However, transfusion of platelet concentrates is accompanied by a high frequency of febrile and anaphylactoid reactions. In rare cases, recipients of platelet concentrates are threatened by severe reactions as septic complications due to bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates, transfusion-related acute lung injury and severe anaphylactic episodes. PMID:21512624

  13. Cbl proteins in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Tsygankov, Alexander; Sanjay, Archana; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Their functional responses have to be tightly controlled as any disturbance may lead to bleeding disorders or thrombosis. It is thus important to clearly identify and understand the signaling mechanisms involved in platelet function. An important role of c-Cbl and Cbl-b ubiquitin ligases in platelet functional responses and in hematological malignancies has been recently described. Cbl proteins perform negative and positive regulation of several signaling pathways in platelets. In this review, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in platelet functional responses.

  14. Human Platelet Senescence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-30

    s by thP Spleen. We have recently made the interest inro o!bservat ion that the spleen preferentially sequesters mega- thrombocytes (o,7) (se...follow:ini th,’ inj,.cti(,n ,f anti-platelet antihody. Electron microscopy of blood from pati. with micrnthr’bteocyte, peaks reveal very small intact

  15. Platelet transport in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Le Goff, Anne; Blin, Antoine; Pujos, Justine; Magniez, Aurélie; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-11-01

    Blood platelets are small enucleated cells responsible for the arrest of bleeding. These cells have the ability to tether and translocate on injured vascular endothelium, thanks to a specific interaction between a receptor of their membrane and a protein expressed by the cells composing the inner wall of the vessel, the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Others cells have such abilities of rolling. Leucocytes, for example, translocate on surface due to a specific interaction between selectin molecules and their respective glycoprotein ligands. These kinds of cells present two modes of transport: they can either be advected by the flux, or translocate on surfaces due to specific ligand-receptor interactions. Our work consists first in studying experimentally the transport of platelets along a microchannel and then in modeling this particular cell transport. Due to these two modes of transport along a channel, platelets adhering to the surface are not equally distributed along the channel axis. We describe the evolution of the density of platelets with time and distance.

  16. Both TMEM16F-dependent and TMEM16F-independent pathways contribute to phosphatidylserine exposure in platelet apoptosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    van Kruchten, Roger; Mattheij, Nadine J A; Saunders, Christine; Feijge, Marion A H; Swieringa, Frauke; Wolfs, Jef L N; Collins, Peter W; Heemskerk, Johan W M; Bevers, Edouard M

    2013-03-07

    Scott syndrome, a bleeding disorder caused by defective phospholipid scrambling, has been associated with mutations in the TMEM16F gene. The role of TMEM16F in apoptosis- or agonist-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure was studied in platelets from a Scott syndrome patient and control subjects. Whereas stimulation of control platelets with the BH3-mimetic ABT737 resulted in 2 distinct fractions with moderate and high PS exposure, the high PS-exposing fraction was markedly delayed in Scott platelets. High, but not moderate, PS exposure in platelets was suppressed by chelation of intracellular Ca(2+), whereas caspase inhibition completely abolished ABT737-induced PS exposure in both Scott and control platelets. On the other hand, high PS exposure induced by the Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists convulxin/thrombin fully relied on mitochondrial depolarization and was virtually absent in Scott platelets. Finally, PS exposure induced by collagen/thrombin was partly affected in Scott platelets, and the residual PS positive fraction was insensitive to inhibition of caspases or mitochondrial depolarization. In conclusion, TMEM16F is not required for, but enhances, caspase-dependent PS exposure; convulxin-/thrombin-induced PS exposure is entirely dependent on TMEM16F, whereas collagen/thrombin-induced PS exposure results from 2 distinct pathways, one of which involves mitochondrial depolarization and is mediated by TMEM16F.

  17. Potent anti-platelet constituents from Centaurea iberica.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amna Nisar; Fatima, Itrat; Khaliq, Urooj Abdul; Malik, Abdul; Miana, Ghulam Abbas; Qureshi, Zia-Ur-Rehman; Rasheed, Huma

    2011-02-28

    New naturally occurring nitrogenous compounds 1 and 2, along with a new dimeric lignan glucoside 3, have been isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Centaurea iberica. Their structures have been elucidated through spectroscopic techniques. All the isolated compounds showed significant platelet aggregation inhibition.

  18. Comparative studies on homocysteine and its metabolite-homocysteine thiolactone action in blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, B; Kedzierska, M; Wachowicz, B

    2008-11-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy), an intermediate formed during the catabolism of the essential dietary amino acid methionine, and its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (TL) formed from Hcy in plasma, may be implicated in pathological haemostasis and atherosclerosis. The mechanism by which TL exerts the prothrombotic effect and influences blood platelets remains unclear. Activation of blood platelets plays an important role in prothrombotic events. The aim of our study was to establish and compare the influence of a reduced form of homocysteine (at final doses of 10-100 microM) and its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (0.1-1 microM), on platelet activation induced by thrombin (platelet aggregation), on platelet protein modifications (determined by parameters such as level of protein carbonyl groups, 3-nitrotyrosine residues in proteins) and on superoxide anion radicals ( O2-*) generation using the model system in vitro. We have observed that TL, like its precursor, Hcy, stimulates the generation of O2* in platelets and causes an augmentation of platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. Our present results in vitro also demonstrate that Hcy (10-100 microM) and TL at lower doses than Hcy (0.1-1 microM) cause modification of platelet proteins: diminished formation of carbonyl groups and distinctly decreased tyrosine nitration in platelet proteins after thrombin stimulation, but increased platelet aggregation induced by thrombin. TL like Hcy (at concentrations corresponding to concentrations in blood during hyperhomocysteinemia) modifies platelet responses to an important physiological agonist--thrombin.

  19. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  20. Does platelet count in platelet-rich plasma influence slope, maximal amplitude and lag phase in healthy individuals? Results of light transmission aggregometry.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Vani

    2015-01-01

    Light transmission aggregometry lacks in standardisation and normal reference values are not widely available. The aims of our study were to establish reference ranges for aggregation, slope and lag phase in healthy controls with platelet counts between 150 and 450 × 10(9)/l in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) as well as evaluate the influence of platelet count. Ninety-nine subjects were evaluated with four agonists and divided into two groups based on platelet count and the groups were compared by Student's t-test. There was no difference between the means of the two groups for amplitude and slope barring the lag phase for collagen. Platelet counts between 150 and 450 × 10(9)/l have no effects on light transmission aggregometry and hence adjustment of platelet count is not necessary.

  1. Role of Platelet Parameters on Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Case-Control Study in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a common otological disorder characterized by a hearing loss greater than 30 dB over three consecutive frequencies, in less than 72 hours. It has been established that platelet parameters, such as mean platelet volume, are associated with ischemic heart events, whose clinical manifestations are similar to those of SSNHL. Hence, we aimed to determine if the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width are related to the occurrence and severity of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. A case-control prospective study was conducted in a teaching hospital in Iran. One hundred-eight patients with SSNHL and an equal number of healthy, age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Peripheral venous blood samples were collected from the subjects, and the platelet count, mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width were measured with an automated blood cell counter. Analysis of the audiometry and hematological test results using SPSS22 software showed no statistical correlation between the platelet parameters and the occurrence of SSNHL, but correlation coefficients showed a significant correlation between PDW and hearing loss severity in patients group. However, further investigation is required to unequivocally establish the absence of correlation between the platelet parameters and occurrence of SSNHL. PMID:26829393

  2. Platelet growth factors from allogeneic platelet-rich plasma for clinical improvement in split-thickness skin graft

    PubMed Central

    Sonker, Atul; Dubey, Anju; Bhatnagar, Ankur; Chaudhary, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives: Platelets are a source of numerous growth factors which facilitate repair and healing. Thus platelet rich plasma has been increasingly used as a treatment modality in the field of reconstructive surgeries for wound healing. This preliminary study was carried out to explore whether platelet growth factors from platelet rich plasma could be used for enhancement of split thickness skin graft survival. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (13 males and 7 females) requiring split thickness skin graft for various clinical reasons were enrolled in the study. Platelet rich plasma was collected by apheresis and frozen at −80° C. It was thawed at room temperature immediately before its intended application. PRP was applied only on one half of the wound, while another half served as control. Patient was followed for 6 weeks. The effect was assessed at first dressing in terms of graft uptake and subsequently as time taken for complete healing. Results: There was 100% uptake of the graft in the area where platelet rich plasma was applied. In the control area, there was complete graft loss in 4 cases, partial loss in 7 cases and complete uptake in 9 cases. Conclusion: This study demonstrated promising results on application of PRP to split thickness skin grafts. Further randomized studies with greater sample size may be undertaken to establish platelet rich plasma as a validated treatment modality. PMID:26420935

  3. Inherited Platelet Function Disorders: Algorithms for Phenotypic and Genetic Investigation.

    PubMed

    Gresele, Paolo; Bury, Loredana; Falcinelli, Emanuela

    2016-04-01

    Inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs) manifest with mucocutaneous bleeding and are frequently difficult to diagnose due to their heterogeneity, the complexity of the platelet activation pathways and a lack of standardization of the platelet function laboratory assays and of their use for this purpose. A rational diagnostic approach to IPFDs should follow an algorithm where clinical examination and a stepwise laboratory evaluation play a crucial role. A streamlined panel of laboratory tests, with consecutive steps of increasing level of complexity, allows the phenotypic characterization of most IPFDs. A first-line diagnosis of a significant fraction of the IPFD may be made also at nonspecialized centers by using relatively simple tests, including platelet count, peripheral blood smear, light transmission aggregometry, measurement of platelet granule content and release, and the expression of glycoproteins by flow cytometry. Some of the most complex, second- and third-step tests may be performed only in highly specialized laboratories. Genotyping, including the widespread application of next-generation sequencing, has enabled discovery in the last few years of several novel genes associated with platelet disorders and this method may eventually become a first-line diagnostic approach; however, a preliminary clinical and laboratory phenotypic characterization nowadays still remains crucial for diagnosis of IPFDs.

  4. Flow cytometry analysis of porcine platelets: optimized methods for best results.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Kurz, Julia; Wendel, Hans Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Animal models are essential tools for the in vivo evaluation of pharmacological modulation of platelet function and the mechanisms underlying thrombosis. In particular, pigs are being increasingly used in cardiovascular and platelet research. One standard method for the investigation of platelet function under experimental conditions is flow cytometry. However, this approach is limited by a shortage of feasible antibodies and a lack of incubation protocols with regard to porcine platelets. This study aimed to establish a method for the investigation of porcine platelets in flow cytometry. Platelets from pigs and human donors were stained with various commercially available specific antibodies against platelet receptors CD41a, CD42bα, CD62P, activated CD41/CD61, and platelet-bound fibrinogen. Staining procedures were performed in undiluted or diluted whole blood (WB) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Samples were treated with PBS buffer as control or with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation. Flow cytometry was performed using standard methodology. Furthermore, platelet counts were determined and ADP-induced platelet aggregations of both species were examined to confirm that the agonist ADP reliably activates human as well as porcine platelets. Five of the investigated antibodies bound to human, but not to porcine platelets only. However, two chicken-derived antibodies directed against CD62P (09-143) and fibrinogen (09-038) as well as a monoclonal mouse anti-CD62P (KO2.5) and a polyclonal rabbit anti-fibrinogen antibody (F0111) allowed reliable detection of porcine platelet activation. Moreover, binding intensity of the 09-143 antibody was increased when incubated in porcine PRP compared to WB, whereas antibody binding of both anti-fibrinogen antibodies to porcine platelets was only observed when incubated in a WB-buffer solution. KO2.5 antibody binding was detectable employing PRP as well as the WB-buffer solution. The feasibility of our new

  5. Platelet satellitism: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed Central

    Payne, C. M.

    1981-01-01

    The ultrastructural morphology of platelet-polymorph (platelet-polymorphonuclear leukocyte) rosettes was investigated in EDTA-anticoagulated blood obtained from two patients who exhibited the phenomenon of platelet satellitism. Most of the platelet profiles were attached to the polymorph surface by broad areas of contact. Examination of these broad areas of contact at high magnification revealed an intercellular material of low electron density. This material appeared to form strands, which bridged the intercellular space and spanned the entire area formed by the apposing plasma membranes. Phagocytosis of entire platelets was only observed in 1 case. The platelet profiles that participated in rosette formation revealed a large number of glycogen particles, compared with unattached platelets. Ultrastructural examination of "stress" platelets obtained from five normal subjects treated with steroids similarly showed a large number of glycogen particles, although no rosette formation or phagocytosis of platelets was observed. The etiology of platelet satellitism is discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7223859

  6. Extracts from Tribulus species may modulate platelet adhesion by interfering with arachidonic acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The present work was designed to study the effects of crude extracts from Tribulus pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on selected biological functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus, at the final concentrations of 0.5, 5 and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin, was used. The effects of crude extracts from T. pterocarpus, T. pentandrus and T. parvispinus on adhesion of blood platelets to collagen were determined by method according to Tuszynski and Murphy. Arachidonic acid metabolism was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). In these studies we also compared the action of tested crude plant extracts with the effects of the polyphenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of T. pterocarpus, which has antiplatelet and antioxidative properties. The performed assays demonstrated that the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus and the phenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of this tested extract and its phenolic fraction on adhesion of resting platelets and thrombin - stimulated platelets to collagen was found. We also observed that the crude extract from T. pterocarpus, like the polyphenolic fraction from T. pterocarpus reduced TBARS production in blood platelets. In the comparative studies, the tested crude extract from T. pterocarpus was not found to be more effective antiplatelet factor, than the polyphenolic fraction from this plant. The results obtained suggest that T. pterocarpus may be a promising source of natural compounds, valuable in the prevention of the enhanced activity of blood platelets in numerous cardiovascular diseases.

  7. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  8. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  9. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5ppm for 6h) or sub-chronic (1ppm, 6h/day for 4days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  10. Complement activation on platelets correlates with a decrease in circulating immature platelets in patients with immune thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Andemariam, Biree; Yin, Wei; Bussel, James B

    2010-02-01

    The role of the complement system in immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is not well defined. We examined plasma from 79 patients with ITP, 50 healthy volunteers, and 25 patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia, to investigate their complement activation/fixation capacity (CAC) on immobilized heterologous platelets. Enhanced CAC was found in 46 plasma samples (59%) from patients with ITP, but no samples from patients with non-immune mediated thrombocytopenia. Plasma from healthy volunteers was used for comparison. In patients with ITP, an enhanced plasma CAC was associated with a decreased circulating absolute immature platelet fraction (A-IPF) (<15 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.027) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/l) (P = 0.024). The positive predictive value of an enhanced CAC for a low A-IPF was 93%, with a specificity of 77%. The specificity and positive predictive values increased to 100% when plasma CAC was defined strictly by enhanced C1q and/or C4d deposition on test platelets. Although no statistically significant correlation emerged between CAC and response to different pharmacological therapies, an enhanced response to splenectomy was noted (P < 0.063). Thus, complement fixation may contribute to the thrombocytopenia of ITP by enhancing clearance of opsonized platelets from the circulation, and/or directly damaging platelets and megakaryocytes.

  11. Human Platelet Senescence Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    ability to measure certain enzymes to their oxidation-reduc other enzymes which can be measured by o phosphatase , acid phosphatase , chymotryp...alkaline sin, trypsin, esterases (17)); M use of n A or wheat germ agglutinin in the second etect specific carbohydrate constituents. We have...Von Willebrand factor. Nurden and Caen also demonstrated that GPI was rich in sialic acid (5) and probably responsible for the platelets’ surface

  12. Hypothermia and Platelet Dysfunction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery, other major surgery, multiple trauma, cold exposure, and neonatal cold injury.1Ŗ The hemorrhagic diathesis...associated with hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery is considered to be primarily a platelet function defect.I6,17,23 We have...cardiopulmonary bypass during cardiac surgery.,8,24 Consistent with this data, other investigators have recently reported that normothermic cardiopulmonary

  13. [Platelet count in the cat].

    PubMed

    Moritz, A; Hoffmann, C

    1997-11-01

    The technique of collecting blood samples is primarily responsible for the appearance of platelet-agglomeration in cats. Blood obtained by the conventional way ("one syringe technology", drips of blood) caused in 52% of the cases an activation of the large and therefore active thrombocytes however. Rejection of the first 2-5 ml blood for the platelet count ("two syringe technology") reduced the rate of platelet-agglomeration significantly. No big differences in platelet-agglomeration were found with regard to the place used for collecting blood (V. cephalica antebrachii/V. jugularis). Platelet-agglutination was observed with Li-Heparin, K-EDTA, Na-Citrat or ACD anticoagulated blood samples. Citrat (Na-Citrat, ACD) seemed to have a stabilizing effect on feline thrombocytes as has been described for human thrombocytes. The platelet count in cats should be performed within 30 minutes.

  14. Human blood platelets at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, D. MACN.; Ausprunk, D.; Blevins, D.; Chao, F. C.; Curby, W.

    1987-01-01

    A set of freshly collected and separated human platelet suspensions were transported, in three types of plastic containers, on a 6 day, 2 hr mission of the orbiter Columbia to study the effect of prolonged exposure of human blood cells to microgravity. A controlled environment at a temperature of 22 + or - 1 deg with air flow was provided and another set of samples held on the ground acted as controls. Paired comparisons of platelets at ug versus controls at lxg revealed superior platelet survival at microgravity. When viewed in terms of plastic type, ug platelets in containers fabricated from PVC-TOTM displayed the best overall postflight viability.

  15. Platelet effects on ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Ashley N; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid; Sood, Anil K

    2014-06-01

    Growing understanding of the role of thrombocytosis, high platelet turnover, and the presence of activated platelets in the circulation in cancer progression and metastasis has brought megakaryocytes into focus. Platelet biology is essential to hemostasis, vascular integrity, angiogenesis, inflammation, innate immunity, wound healing, and cancer biology. However, before megakaryocyte/platelet-directed therapies can be considered for clinical use, understanding of the mechanism and biology of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in malignancy is required. Here, we provide an overview of the clinical implications, biological significance, and mechanisms of paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in the context of ovarian cancer.

  16. Platelets can enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Paré, Alexandre; Farndale, Richard W; Schumacher, H Ralph; Nigrovic, Peter A; Lacroix, Steve; Boilard, Eric

    2012-08-09

    Platelets survey blood vessels, searching for endothelial damage and preventing loss of vascular integrity. However, there are circumstances where vascular permeability increases, suggesting that platelets sometimes fail to fulfill their expected function. Human inflammatory arthritis is associated with tissue edema attributed to enhanced permeability of the synovial microvasculature. Murine studies have suggested that such vascular leak facilitates entry of autoantibodies and may thereby promote joint inflammation. Whereas platelets typically help to promote microvascular integrity, we examined the role of platelets in synovial vascular permeability in murine experimental arthritis. Using an in vivo model of autoimmune arthritis, we confirmed the presence of endothelial gaps in inflamed synovium. Surprisingly, permeability in the inflamed joints was abrogated if the platelets were absent. This effect was mediated by platelet serotonin accumulated via the serotonin transporter and could be antagonized using serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. As opposed to the conventional role of platelets to microvascular leakage, this demonstration that platelets are capable of amplifying and maintaining permeability adds to the rapidly growing list of unexpected functions for platelets.

  17. Overview of platelet physiology and laboratory evaluation of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M

    1999-06-01

    Appropriate laboratory testing for the platelet-type bleeding disorders hinges on an adequate assessment in the history and physical examination. Patients with histories and screening laboratory results consistent with coagulation disorders (hemophilia, disseminated intravascular coagulation) are not appropriate candidates for platelet function testing. In contrast, patients with a lifelong history of platelet-type bleeding symptoms and perhaps a positive family history of bleeding would be appropriate for testing. Figure 6 depicts one strategy to evaluate these patients. Platelet morphology can easily be evaluated to screen for two uncommon qualitative platelet disorders: Bernard-Soulier syndrome (associated with giant platelets) and gray platelet syndrome, a subtype of storage pool disorder in which platelet granulation is morphologically abnormal by light microscopy. If the bleeding disorder occurred later in life (no bleeding with surgery or trauma early in life), the focus should be on acquired disorders of platelet function. For those patients thought to have an inherited disorder, testing for vWD should be done initially because approximately 1% of the population has vWD. The complete vWD panel (factor VIII coagulant activity, vWf antigen, ristocetin cofactor activity) should be performed because many patients will have abnormalities of only one particular panel component. Patients diagnosed with vWD should be classified using multimeric analysis to identify the type 1 vWD patients likely to respond to DDAVP. If vWD studies are normal, platelet aggregation testing should be performed, ensuring that no antiplatelet medications have been ingested at least 1 week before testing. If platelet aggregation tests are normal and if suspicion for an inherited disorder remains high, vWD testing should be repeated. The evaluation of thrombocytopenia may require bone marrow examination to exclude primary hematologic disorders. If future studies with thrombopoietin assays

  18. Relationship between structure of phenothiazine analogues and their activity on platelet calcium fluxes.

    PubMed Central

    Enouf, J.; Lévy-Toledano, S.

    1984-01-01

    Phenothiazine analogues have been tested for their effect on calcium uptake into platelet membrane vesicles and on ionophore-induced platelet activation, both phenomena being Ca2+-dependent. Both calcium uptake into membrane vesicles and ionophore-induced platelet activation were inhibited by the drugs. Evidence for two inhibitors as potent as chlorpromazine and trifluoperazine was found. These drugs are apparently competitive inhibitors of calcium uptake. A structure-activity relationship has been established. The data suggest that the phenothiazines are able to inhibit calmodulin-insensitive calcium uptake of platelet membrane vesicles and that therefore they cannot be assumed to be selective inhibitors of calmodulin interactions under all circumstances. PMID:6697061

  19. Unravelling the different functions of protein kinase C isoforms in platelets.

    PubMed

    Heemskerk, Johan W M; Harper, Matthew T; Cosemans, Judith M E M; Poole, Alastair W

    2011-06-23

    Platelets tightly regulate haemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in most platelet responses implicated in thrombus formation. Recent pharmacological and mouse gene knockout approaches show that the conventional PKC isoforms and the novel PKC isoforms contribute in distinct ways to these platelet responses. We hypothesize that, in platelets and other cells, the characteristic functions of PKC isoforms are established through unique activation mechanisms and unique interacting protein partners, which result in isoform-specific patterns of substrate phosphorylation. For identifying the substrate proteins in a living cell, new methodology is available and discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  1. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  2. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  3. 21 CFR 864.9575 - Environmental chamber for storage of platelet concentrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to hold platelet-rich plasma within a preselected temperature range. (b) Classification. Class II... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental chamber for storage of platelet... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9575 Environmental chamber for storage of...

  4. Beta-lactam antibiotic-mediated changes in platelet reactivity and vascular endothelial functions.

    PubMed

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Caprino, L

    2001-05-01

    To evaluate vascular and platelet compatibility of intravenous administration of beta-lactam antibiotics, we assessed the effects of therapeutic concentrations of ceftriaxone, aztreonam, and ceftazidime on platelet reactivity to different agonists (sodium arachidonate, collagen and adenosine diphosphate) and on selected vascular endothelial functions (adenosine diphosphatase activity, prostacyclin production and t-PA release). Ceftriaxone and, to a lesser degree, aztreonam, enhanced platelet reactivity, evaluated as onset of platelet aggregating response, and increased thromboxane production to subthreshold concentrations of arachidonate. There was no modification in platelet reactivity after ceftazidime treatment. Ceftriaxone and ceftazidime, but not aztreonam, inhibited endothelial adenosine diphosphatase activity. Prostacyclin production and t-PA release were inhibited only by ceftriaxone at high concentrations. While it is difficult to establish which marker (platelet or endothelial functions) has more clinical reference in human vascular compatibility, it seems feasible to consider aztreonam the most compatible of the beta-lactams studied.

  5. Fractional randomness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapiero, Charles S.; Vallois, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    The premise of this paper is that a fractional probability distribution is based on fractional operators and the fractional (Hurst) index used that alters the classical setting of random variables. For example, a random variable defined by its density function might not have a fractional density function defined in its conventional sense. Practically, it implies that a distribution's granularity defined by a fractional kernel may have properties that differ due to the fractional index used and the fractional calculus applied to define it. The purpose of this paper is to consider an application of fractional calculus to define the fractional density function of a random variable. In addition, we provide and prove a number of results, defining the functional forms of these distributions as well as their existence. In particular, we define fractional probability distributions for increasing and decreasing functions that are right continuous. Examples are used to motivate the usefulness of a statistical approach to fractional calculus and its application to economic and financial problems. In conclusion, this paper is a preliminary attempt to construct statistical fractional models. Due to the breadth and the extent of such problems, this paper may be considered as an initial attempt to do so.

  6. Essential roles for platelets during neutrophil-dependent or lymphocyte-mediated defense against bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Dongxia; Sun, Chengming; Bao, Cuixia; Yi, Maoli; Xing, Li; Luo, Deyan

    2016-09-01

    Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes including the immune response against infection. More than 200 whole blood samples from patients and healthy controls were run in the System XE-5000 analyzer, and plasma fractions were separated for the following tests by ELISA, Luminex and light scattering. We describe two mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function against various bacterial pathogens based on increased mean platelet volume in gram-positive bacterial infections and increased platelet counts in gram-negative bacterial infections. Gram-negative bacteria activate platelets to recruit neutrophils, which participate in the immune response against infection. During this process, fractalkine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, interleukin-17A, tumor necrosis factor-α and platelet-activating factor were higher in patients infected with Escherichia coli; additionally, giant platelets were observed under the microscope. Meanwhile, we found that platelets played a different role in gram-positive bacterial infections. Specifically, they could actively adhere to gram-positive bacteria in circulation and transfer them to immune sites to promote antibacterial lymphocyte expansion. During this process, complement C3 and factor XI were more highly expressed in patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus; additionally, we detected more small platelets under the microscope. Platelets participate in the immune response against both gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, although the mechanisms differ. These results will help us understand the complex roles of platelets during infections, and direct our use of antibiotics based on clinical platelet data.

  7. Terminal platelet production is regulated by von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Nguyen, Kim Anh; Pietrzyk, Audrey; Casari, Caterina; Veyradier, Agnes; Denis, Cecile V; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    It is established that proplatelets are formed from mature megakaryocytes (MK) as intermediates before platelet production. Recently, the presence of proplatelets was described in blood incubated in static conditions. We have previously demonstrated that platelet and proplatelet formation is upregulated by MK exposure to high shear rates (1800 s(-1)) on immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether VWF is involved in the regulation of terminal platelet production in blood. To this end, Vwf (-/-) mice, a model of severe von Willebrand disease, were used to create a situation in which blood cells circulate in a vascular tree that is completely devoid of VWF. Murine platelets were isolated from Vwf (-/-) and Vwf (+/+) blood, exposed to VWF at 1800 s(-1) in a microfluidic platform, and examined by means of videomicroscopy, as well as fluorescence and activation studies. Proplatelets became visible within 5 minutes, representing 38% of all platelets after 12 minutes and 46% after 28 min. The proportion of proplatelets was 1.8-fold higher in blood from Vwf(-/-) mice than from Vwf(+/+) mice, suggesting a role of VWF in vivo. Fragmentation of these proplatelets into smaller discoid platelets was also observed in real-time. Platelets remained fully activatable by thrombin. Compensation of plasmatic VWF following hydrodynamic gene transfer in Vwf(-/-) mice reduced the percentage of proplatelets to wild-type levels. A thrombocytopenic mouse model was studied in the flow system, 7 days after a single 5-FU injection. Compared to untreated mouse blood, a 2-fold increase in the percentage of proplatelets was detected following exposure to 1800 s(-1) on VWF of samples from mice treated with 5-FU. In conclusion, VWF and shear stress together appear to upregulate proplatelet reorganization and platelet formation. This suggests a new function for VWF in vivo as regulator of bloodstream thrombopoiesis.

  8. Platelets: production, morphology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate, discoid cells, roughly 2-3 μm in diameter that function primarily as regulators of hemostasis, but also play secondary roles in angiogensis and innate immunity. Although human adults contain nearly one trillion platelets in circulation that are turned over every 8-10 days, our understanding of the mechanisms involved in platelet production is still incomplete. Platelets stem from large (30-100 μm) nucleated cells called megakaryocytes that reside primarily in the bone marrow. During maturation megakaryocytes extend long proplatelet elongations into sinusoidal blood vessels from which platelets ultimately release. During this process, platelets develop a number of distinguishable structural elements including: a delimited plasma membrane; invaginations of the surface membrane that form the open canalicular system (OCS); a closed-channel network of residual endoplasmic reticulum that form the dense tubular system (DTS); a spectrin-based membrane skeleton; an actin-based cytoskeletal network; a peripheral band of microtubules; and numerous organelles including α-granules, dense-granules, peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria. Proplatelet elongation and platelet production is an elaborate and complex process that defines the morphology and ultrastructure of circulating platelets, and is critical in understanding their increasingly numerous and varied biological functions.

  9. Deciphering the human platelet sheddome

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Karen P.; Barry, Colin; Tran, Anh N.; Traxler, Elizabeth A.; Wannemacher, Kenneth M.; Tang, Hsin-Yao; Speicher, Kaye D.; Blair, Ian A.; Speicher, David W.; Grosser, Tilo

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets shed surface proteins, potentially modifying platelet function as well as providing a source of bioactive fragments. Previous studies have identified several constituents of the platelet sheddome, but the full extent of shedding is unknown. Here we have taken a global approach, analyzing protein fragments in the supernate of activated platelets using mass spectroscopy and looking for proteins originating from platelet membranes. After removing plasma proteins and microparticles, 1048 proteins were identified, including 69 membrane proteins. Nearly all of the membrane proteins had been detected previously, but only 10 had been shown to be shed in platelets. The remaining 59 are candidates subject to confirmation. Based on spectral counts, protein representation in the sheddome varies considerably. As proof of principle, we validated one of the less frequently detected proteins, semaphorin 7A, which had not previously been identified in platelets. Surface expression, cleavage, and shedding of semaphorin 7A were demonstrated, as was its association with α-granules. Finally, cleavage of semaphorin 7A and 12 other proteins was substantially reduced by an inhibitor of ADAM17, a known sheddase. These results define a subset of membrane proteins as sheddome candidates, forming the basis for further studies examining the impact of ectodomain shedding on platelet function. PMID:20962327

  10. Biologic nanoparticles and platelet reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Virginia M; Hunter, Larry W; Chu, Kevin; Kaul, Vivasvat; Squillace, Phillip D; Lieske, John C; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2009-01-01

    Aim Nanosized particles (NPs) enriched in hydroxyapatite and protein isolated from calcified human tissue accelerate occlusion of endothelium-denuded arteries when injected intravenously into rabbits. Since platelet aggregation and secretory processes participate in normal hemostasis, thrombosis and vascular remodeling, experiments were designed to determine if these biologic NPs alter specific platelet functions in vitro. Methods Platelet-rich plasma was prepared from citrate anticoagulated human blood. Platelet aggregation and ATP secretion were monitored in response to thrombin receptor agonists peptide (10 μM) or convulxin (50 μg/ml) prior to and following 15 min incubation with either control solution, human-derived NPs, bovine-derived NPs or crystals of hydroxyapatite at concentrations of 50 and 150 nephelometric turbidity units. Results Incubation of platelets for 15 min with either human- or bovine-derived NPs reduced aggregation induced by thrombin receptor activator peptide and convulxin in a concentration-dependent manner. Hydroxyapatite caused a greater inhibition than either of the biologically derived NPs. Human-derived NPs increased ATP secretion by unstimulated platelets during the 15 min incubation period. Conclusion Effects of bovine-derived and hydroxyapatite NPs on basal release of ATP were both time and concentration dependent. These results suggest that biologic NPs modulate both platelet aggregation and secretion. Biologically derived NPs could modify platelet responses within the vasculature, thereby reducing blood coagulability and the vascular response to injury. PMID:19839809

  11. Platelets, inflammation and tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T

    2011-05-01

    Blood platelets have long been recognised to bring about primary haemostasis with deficiencies in platelet production and function manifesting in bleeding while upregulated function favourises arterial thrombosis. Yet increasing evidence indicates that platelets fulfil a much wider role in health and disease. First, they store and release a wide range of biologically active substances including the panoply of growth factors, chemokines and cytokines released from a-granules. Membrane budding gives rise to microparticles (MPs), another active participant within the blood stream. Platelets are essential for the innate immune response and combat infection (viruses, bacteria, micro-organisms). They help maintain and modulate inflammation and are a major source of pro-inflammatory molecules (e.g. P-selectin, tissue factor, CD40L, metalloproteinases). As well as promoting coagulation, they are active in fibrinolysis; wound healing, angiogenesis and bone formation as well as in maternal tissue and foetal vascular remodelling. Activated platelets and MPs intervene in the propagation of major diseases. They are major players in atherosclerosis and related diseases, pathologies of the central nervous system (Alzheimers disease, multiple sclerosis), cancer and tumour growth. They participate in other tissue-related acquired pathologies such as skin diseases and allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, liver disease; while, paradoxically, autologous platelet-rich plasma and platelet releasate are being used as an aid to promote tissue repair and cellular growth. The above mentioned roles of platelets are now discussed.

  12. Platelet coagulation-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Peter N

    2004-08-01

    The biochemical mechanisms by which activated platelets participate in exposing receptors for the assembly of enzyme-cofactor-substrate complexes at all stages of the blood coagulation cascade are reviewed. Information derived from studies conducted during the last 30 years supports the concept that the initiation of blood coagulation is triggered by exposure of tissue factor at injury sites, leading to the generation of minute quantities of thrombin (limited by tissue factor pathway inhibitor), sufficient to activate platelets, factors XI, VIII, and V, and trigger the consolidation pathway (i.e., the sequential activation of factors XI, IX, X, and prothrombin on the activated platelet surface), leading to the generation of sufficient thrombin to convert fibrinogen to fibrin and effect hemostasis. Platelets localize coagulation to the hemostatic thrombus and protect coagulation enzymes from inhibition by both plasma and platelet inhibitors (e.g., protease nexin 2), thus preventing disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  13. [Importance of the interaction of surface receptors with the cytoskeleton for platelet function].

    PubMed

    Meyer, M

    1990-01-01

    Two Triton-X-100-insoluble cytoskeletal fractions were prepared from washed human blood platelets by centrifugation: a low speed sediment (TP) and a fraction recovered as ultracentrifugation pellet (UP). Glycoproteins associated with both fractions prior to and after different times of thrombin activation were analyzed by electrophoretic techniques. In the TP fraction of unstimulated platelet the major membrane glycoproteins (GP) Ib and Ia were detected. After thrombin stimulation there is a rapid increase of GPs Ia, Ib, IIIb and a Mr 250,000-GP and a slower appearance of GPs IIb and IIIa in this fraction. The UP fraction contains mainly GPs Ib, Ia, IIb, IIIa and a Mr 250,000-GP. Thrombin activation does not cause any significant changes in the glycopeptide pattern of this fraction.

  14. Platelets and angiogenesis in malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sierko, Ewa; Wojtukiewicz, Marek Z

    2004-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that platelets play an important role in the process of tumor angiogenesis. Thrombocytosis is a frequent finding in cancer patients (10-57%). Although the mechanisms underlying thrombocytosis are not yet fully elucidated, tumor-derived factors with thrombopoietin-like activity and growth factors, platelet-derived microparticles, and factors secreted from bone marrow endothelial cells, as well as growth factors released by megakaryocytes (acting via an autocrine loop), are postulated to influence this process. The progression of cancer is associated with hypercoagulability, which results from direct influences of tumor cells and diverse indirect mechanisms. Activated platelets serve as procoagulant surfaces amplifying the coagulation reactions. It is well known that hemostatic proteins are involved in different steps of the angiogenic process. Furthermore, platelets adhering to endothelium facilitate adhesion of mononuclear cells (which exert various proangiogenic activities) to endothelial cells and their transmigration to the extravascular space. It was also documented that platelets induce angiogenesis in vivo. Platelets are a rich source of proangiogenic factors. They also store and release angiogenesis inhibitors. In addition, platelets express surface growth factor receptors, which may regulate the process of angiogenesis. Platelets also contribute directly to the process of basement membrane and extracellular matrix proteolysis by releasing proteinases, or indirectly via inducing endothelial cells and tumor cells to release proteolytic enzymes, as well as through the proteolytic activities of platelet-derived growth factors. The multidirectional activities of platelets in the process of new blood vessel formation during tumor development and metastasis formation may create the possibility of introducing antiplatelet agents for antiangiogenic therapy in cancer patients. Thus far experimental studies employing inhibitors of

  15. Platelets Participate in Synovitis via Cox-1–Dependent Synthesis of Prostacyclin Independently of Microparticle Generation

    PubMed Central

    Boilard, Eric; Larabee, Katherine; Shnayder, Ruslan; Jacobs, Kathleen; Farndale, Richard W.; Ware, Jerry; Lee, David M.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to the well-described role of platelets in thrombosis, a growing body of evidence implicates platelets in diverse inflammatory responses. We recently showed platelets can contribute to the pathophysiology of inflammatory arthritis via IL-1–containing microparticles. In this study, we demonstrate that platelets, and not platelet microparticles, actively contribute to synovitis via production of proinflammatory prostacyclin in an autoimmune arthritis model. Using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches, we establish that paracrine production of prostacyclin proceeds in the absence of cyclooxygenase-2. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that prostacyclin generation can arise via transcellular collaboration between platelets and fibroblast-like synoviocytes. In addition to shedding light on an unappreciated pathway of lipid synthesis in arthritis, we further delineate a novel effector activity by which platelets can contribute to inflammatory disease. PMID:21357261

  16. Platelet function and constituents of platelet rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, M H; Malhotra, A; Brighton, T; Walsh, W R; Lindeman, R

    2013-01-01

    Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) therapies require blood to be processed prior to application, however, the full assessment of the output of platelet sequestration devices is lacking. In this study the products of the Autologous Fluid Concentrator (Circle BiologicsTM, Minneapolis, MN) and the Gravitational Platelet Separation System (GPS, Biomet, Warsaw, IN, USA) were evaluated in terms of platelet viability and PRP constituents. The AFC and GPS produced 6.4 (±1.0) ml and 6.3 (±0.4) ml of PRP, with platelet recovery of 46.4% (±14.7%) and 59.8% (±24.2%) producing fold increases of platelets of 4.19 (±1.62) and 5.19 (±1.62), respectively. Fibrinogen concentration was increased above baseline PPP produced with the AFC. pH was lower for both of the processed samples than for whole blood. White Blood Cell count was increased around 5 fold. Functional tests showed preserved viability with both devices. This represents essential knowledge that every treating physician should have before they can confidently administer PRP therapy produced by any method. These are the first published results of platelet function for the GPS system and the first performance results of the AFC system. The PRP produced is classified according to broad classifications as Leukocyte-PRP (L-PRP) for both devices.

  17. Platelet factor XIIIa release during platelet aggregation and plasma clot strength measured by thrombelastography in patients with coronary artery disease treated with clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Kreutz, Rolf P; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Nystrom, Perry; Jin, Yan; Kreutz, Yvonne; Desta, Zeruesenay; Flockhart, David A

    2015-01-01

    It has been estimated that up to half of circulating factor XIIIa (FXIIIa) is stored in platelets. The release of FXIIIa from platelets upon stimulation with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) in patients with coronary artery disease treated with dual antiplatelet therapy has not been previously examined. Samples from 96 patients with established coronary artery disease treated with aspirin and clopidogrel were examined. Platelet aggregation was performed by light transmittance aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) as reference, and ADP 5 µM as agonist. Kaolin-activated thrombelastography (TEG) was performed in citrate PPP. PRP after aggregation was centrifuged and plasma supernatant (PSN) collected. FXIIIa was measured in PPP and PSN. Platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP 5 µM resulted in 24% additional FXIIIa release in PSN as compared to PPP (99.3 ± 27 vs. 80.3 ± 24%, p < 0.0001). FXIIIa concentration in PSN correlated with maximal plasma clot strength (TEG-G) (r = 0.48, p < 0.0001), but not in PPP (r = 0.15, p = 0.14). Increasing quartiles of platelet-derived FXIIIa were associated with incrementally higher TEG-G (p = 0.012). FXIIIa release was similar between clopidogrel responders and non-responders (p = 0.18). In summary, platelets treated with aspirin and clopidogrel release a significant amount of FXIIIa upon aggregation by ADP. Platelet-derived FXIIIa may contribute to differences in plasma TEG-G, and thus, in part, provide a mechanistic explanation for high clot strength observed as a consequence of platelet activation. Variability in clopidogrel response does not significantly influence FXIIIa release from platelets.

  18. Platelet-aggregating activity of released factor(s) from Trypanosoma brucei brucei.

    PubMed

    Nwagwu, M; Inyang, A L; Molokwu, R I; Essien, E M

    1989-12-01

    The effect of factors derived from Trypanosoma brucei brucei on rat platelets was studied. T. brucei at a concentration of 4 X 10(9) trypanosomes/ml phosphate saline glucose (PSG) was stored at -20 degrees C for 18 h, thawed, and a supernatant fraction, trypanosome-derived supernatant (TDS) was obtained by spinning the sample at 3000 g for 10 min at 20 degrees C. Normal rat platelets, prepared as platelet-rich plasma (PRP), were then incubated with TDS in the absence or presence of ADP (0.05-0.1 microM). The results showed that approximately 83% platelet aggregation was induced by addition of TDS (50 microliters; 113 micrograms protein) to 100 microliters PRP with a platelet count of 10(6). simultaneous addition of ADP and TDS to PRP produced a synergistic effect. It was also shown that a supernatant fraction, obtained by incubating live T. brucei (4 X 10(9)/microliters PSG) at 0 degrees C 1 h and spinning down the trypanosomes (3000 g for 10 min), also induced platelet aggregation. The nature of the factor(s) derived from, or released by, T. brucei inducing platelet aggregation is being investigated but it has been shown not to be ADP.

  19. The use of regression analysis in determining reference intervals for low hematocrit and thrombocyte count in multiple electrode aggregometry and platelet function analyzer 100 testing of platelet function.

    PubMed

    Kuiper, Gerhardus J A J M; Houben, Rik; Wetzels, Rick J H; Verhezen, Paul W M; van Oerle, Rene; Ten Cate, Hugo; Henskens, Yvonne M C; Lancé, Marcus D

    2017-01-09

    Low platelet counts and hematocrit levels hinder whole blood point-of-care testing of platelet function. Thus far, no reference ranges for MEA (multiple electrode aggregometry) and PFA-100 (platelet function analyzer 100) devices exist for low ranges. Through dilution methods of volunteer whole blood, platelet function at low ranges of platelet count and hematocrit levels was assessed on MEA for four agonists and for PFA-100 in two cartridges. Using (multiple) regression analysis, 95% reference intervals were computed for these low ranges. Low platelet counts affected MEA in a positive correlation (all agonists showed r(2) ≥ 0.75) and PFA-100 in an inverse correlation (closure times were prolonged with lower platelet counts). Lowered hematocrit did not affect MEA testing, except for arachidonic acid activation (ASPI), which showed a weak positive correlation (r(2) = 0.14). Closure time on PFA-100 testing was inversely correlated with hematocrit for both cartridges. Regression analysis revealed different 95% reference intervals in comparison with originally established intervals for both MEA and PFA-100 in low platelet or hematocrit conditions. Multiple regression analysis of ASPI and both tests on the PFA-100 for combined low platelet and hematocrit conditions revealed that only PFA-100 testing should be adjusted for both thrombocytopenia and anemia. 95% reference intervals were calculated using multiple regression analysis. However, coefficients of determination of PFA-100 were poor, and some variance remained unexplained. Thus, in this pilot study using (multiple) regression analysis, we could establish reference intervals of platelet function in anemia and thrombocytopenia conditions on PFA-100 and in thrombocytopenia conditions on MEA.

  20. The origins of major platelet receptor nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Clemetson, Kenneth J

    2017-01-01

    The nomenclature of the major platelet receptors may appear complex, but in fact there are logical reasons why it developed in the way it did. In this short review, I describe the origins of this nomenclature, how it developed as more information became available and as relationships were established with receptors on other types of cells. Difficulties have also arisen with alternative nomenclature systems and the various equivalences with these are described and listed. There remain areas such as immunology and transfusion where the accepted nomenclature leaves something to be desired, but it is unlikely that major changes will occur.

  1. Shiga toxin binds to activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S A; Polanowska-Grabowska, R K; Fujii, J; Obrig, T; Gear, A R L

    2004-03-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is associated with acute renal failure in children and can be caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli. Thrombocytopenia and formation of renal thrombi are characteristic of HUS, suggesting that platelet activation is involved in its pathogenesis. However, whether Shiga toxin directly activates platelets is controversial. The present study evaluates if potential platelet sensitization during isolation by different procedures influences platelet interaction with Shiga toxin. Platelets isolated from sodium citrate anticoagulated blood were exposed during washing to EDTA and higher g forces than platelets prepared from acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD) plasma. Platelet binding of Stx was significantly higher in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets. Binding of Stx was also increased with ACD-derived platelets when activated with thrombin (1 U mL-1) and exposure of the Gb3 Stx receptor was detected only on platelets subjected to EDTA, higher g forces or thrombin. EDTA-exposed platelets lost their normal discoid shape and were larger. P-selectin (CD62P) exposure was significantly increased in EDTA-washed preparations relative to ACD-derived platelets, suggesting platelet activation. Taken together, these results suggest that direct binding of Stx occurs only on 'activated' platelets rather than on resting platelets. The ability of Stx to interact with previously activated platelets may be an important element in understanding the pathogenesis of HUS.

  2. Radioimmune assay of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, G.J.; Machuga, E.T.

    1982-02-01

    Normal platelet function depends, in part, on platelet PG synthesis. PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) catalyzes the first step in PG synthesis, the formation of PGH/sub 2/ from arachidonic acid. Inhibition of the enzyme by ASA results in an abnormality in the platelet release reaction. Patients with pparent congenital abnormalities in the enzyme have been described, and the effects have been referred to as ''aspirin-like'' defects of the platelet function. These patients lack platelet PG synthetase activity, but the actual content of PG synthetase protein in these individuals' platelets is unknown. Therefore an RIA for human platelet PG synthetase would provide new information, useful in assessing the aspirin-like defects of platelet function. An RIA for human platelet PG synthetase is described. The assay utilizes a rabbit antibody directed against the enzyme and (/sup 125/I)-labelled sheep PG synthetase as antigen. The human platelet enzyme is assayed by its ability to inhibit precipitation of the (/sup 125/I)antigen. The assay is sensitive to 1 ng of enzyme. By the immune assay, human platelets contain approximately 1200 ng of PG synethetase protein per 1.5 mg of platelet protein (approximately 10/sup 9/ platelets). This content corresponds to 10,000 enzyme molecules per platelet. The assay provides a rapid and convenient assay for the human platelet enzyme, and it can be applied to the assessment of patients with apparent platelet PG synthetase (cyclo-oxygenase) deficiency.

  3. Platelet Interaction with Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Julia Barbara; Schrottmaier, Waltraud Cornelia; Salzmann, Manuel; Assinger, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Summary Beyond their traditional role in haemostasis and thrombosis, platelets are increasingly recognised as immune modulatory cells. Activated platelets and platelet-derived microparticles can bind to leukocytes, which stimulates mutual activation and results in rapid, local release of platelet-derived cytokines. Thereby platelets modulate leukocyte effector functions and contribute to inflammatory and immune responses to injury or infection. Platelets enhance leukocyte extravasation, differentiation and cytokine release. Platelet-neutrophil interactions boost oxidative burst, neutrophil extracellular trap formation and phagocytosis and play an important role in host defence. Platelet interactions with monocytes propagate their differentiation into macrophages, modulate cytokine release and attenuate macrophage functions. Depending on the underlying pathology, platelets can enhance or diminish leukocyte cytokine production, indicating that platelet-leukocyte interactions represent a fine balanced system to restrict excessive inflammation during infection. In atherosclerosis, platelet interaction with neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells accelerates key steps of atherogenesis by promoting leukocyte extravasation and foam cell formation. Platelet-leukocyte interactions at sites of atherosclerotic lesions destabilise atherosclerotic plaques and promote plaque rupture. Leukocytes in turn also modulate platelet function and production, which either results in enhanced platelet destruction or increased platelet production. This review aims to summarise the key effects of platelet-leukocyte interactions in inflammation, infection and atherosclerosis. PMID:27226790

  4. Inhibition of bovine platelets aggregation in response to Hyalomma anatolicum salivary gland proteins/peptides

    PubMed Central

    Surbhi; Sangwan, Nirmal; Sangwan, Arun K.; Singh, Vijender; Kumar, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ticks are obligate ectoparasites that have an impact on wide range of vertebrates and also act as a potential vector for the transmission of tropical theileriosis, babesiosis, etc., causing significant loss to livestock production worldwide. While feeding, they introduce their saliva containing different bioactive molecules into the host. These molecules have the capability to counteract the host hemostatic mechanism to suck host blood successfully. Therefore, the study was aimed to isolate anti-platelet aggregating peptides from salivary gland extract (SGE) of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks, a commonly available tick in India. Materials and Methods: Female H. anatolicum salivary glands were dissected out and SGE was prepared by homogenizing it in a suitable buffer under ice. Extract so obtained was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography using Sephacryl S-200 column. Total protein concentration in fractions was estimated and bovine platelets were isolated, stimulated with thrombin (positive control), treated with Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide (negative control) and with salivary gland fractions for identification of proteins/peptides having anti-platelet aggregating activities. Results: Proteins/peptides present in various salivary gland fractions inhibited the bovine platelet aggregation and the percent inhibition ranged between 33% and 35.8%. Conclusion: The results suggests that the fractions of H. anatolicum salivary glands possess thrombin-induced anti-platelet aggregating activity and which could be further exploited for raising anti-tick vaccine and also for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27956779

  5. Platelet high-density lipoprotein activates transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators, MAPPs, following thrombin digestion.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Haruhiko; Wu, Bin; Nagai, Yumiko; Tanaka, Sumiko; Onodera, Masayuki; Ogawa, Takafumi; Ueno, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    Macromolecular activators of phagocytosis from platelets (MAPPs), transferrin-derived phagocytosis activators released from platelets, activate leukocytic phagocytosis via Fcγ receptors. It has been found that MAPPs can be prepared using stored platelets or their lysate. Using this artificial MAPP production system, it has been found that they can be produced from precursors (tetrameric and dimeric transferrins) following reaction with a low-molecular-weight (LMW) activator of MAPPs, which is liberated from a high-molecular-weight activator of MAPP (HMW activator) by reaction with thrombin. In this study, the HMW activator in platelet lysate was characterized by assaying phagocytosis of washed neutrophils. In an ultracentrifugation study of the platelet lysate, HMW activator activity was observed in the fraction corresponding to the density of high-density lipoprotein (HDL). The activity was observed in the apolipoproteins obtained from the HDL fraction. Among the apolipoproteins tested only apolipoprotein CIII showed the activity to produce MAPP in vitro. Affinity chromatography of the apolipoproteins from the HDL fraction of the platelet lysate using an anti-apolipoprotein CIII column revealed that the substance that binds with the antibody showed MAPP-forming activity. In a gel filtration study of thrombin-treated apolipoprotein CIII, a peak of LMW activator activity was observed for fractions with a molecular size smaller than that of apolipoprotein CIII. Finally, MAPP-forming activity of HDL obtained from the plasma was examined. MAPP was formed only when delipidized HDL was used. In conclusion, it is suggested that platelet HDL is the HMW activator and that this activation is achieved via apolipoprotein CIII after thrombin reaction in platelets.

  6. Platelets effects on tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Goubran, Hadi A; Stakiw, Julie; Radosevic, Mirjana; Burnouf, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Unlike other blood cells, platelets are small anucleate structures derived from marrow megakaryocytes. Thought for almost a century to possess solely hemostatic potentials, platelets, however, play a much wider role in tissue regeneration and repair and interact intimately with tumor cells. On one hand, tumor cells induce platelet aggregation (TCIPA), known to act as the trigger of cancer-associated thrombosis. On the other hand, platelets recruited to the tumor microenvironment interact, directly, with tumor cells, favoring their proliferation, and, indirectly, through the release of a wide palette of growth factors, including angiogenic and mitogenic proteins. In addition, the role of platelets is not solely confined to the primary tumor site. Indeed, they escort tumor cells, helping their intravasation, vascular migration, arrest, and extravasation to the tissues to form distant metastasis. As expected, nonspecific or specific inhibition of platelets and their content represents an attractive novel approach in the fight against cancer. This review illustrates the role played by platelets at primary tumor sites and in the various stages of the metastatic process.

  7. Platelets in inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Jenne, Craig N; Kubes, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Although platelets are traditionally recognized for their central role in hemostasis, many lines of research clearly demonstrate these rather ubiquitous blood components are potent immune modulators and effectors. Platelets have been shown to directly recognize, sequester and kill pathogens, to activated and recruit leukocytes to sites of infection and inflammation, and to modulate leukocyte behavior, enhancing their ability to phagocytose and kill pathogens and inducing unique effector functions, such as the production of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). This multifaceted response to infection and inflammation is due, in part, to the huge array of soluble mediators and cell surface molecules expressed by platelets. From their earliest origins as primordial hemocytes in invertebrates to their current form as megakaryocyte-derived cytoplasts, platelets have evolved to be one of the key regulators of host intravascular immunity and inflammation. In this review, we present the diverse roles platelets play in immunity and inflammation associated with autoimmune diseases and infection. Additionally, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of platelet behavior made possible through the use of advanced imaging techniques that allow us to visualize platelets and their interactions, in real-time, within the intact blood vessels of a living host.

  8. Platelet function in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Núñez-Gil, Iván J; Bernardo, Esther; Feltes, Gisela; Escaned, Javier; Mejía-Rentería, Hernán D; De Agustín, José Alberto; Vivas, David; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Macaya, Carlos; Fernández-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TK) includes a transient left ventricular dysfunction without obstructive coronary disease, sometimes after stressful situations with elevated cathecolamines. Since catecholamines activate platelets we aimed to study the platelet influence in a TK setting. We included 32 patients with a TK diagnosis, 13 with an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and 18 healthy volunteers. Once consent informed was obtained, blood samples were extracted and processed (at admission and after 3 months follow-up). Clinical, ecg, echocardiographic and angiographic features were thoroughly recorded.Previous treatment before admission was similar between groups. No differences were observed in clinical features or any of the acute markers studied regarding platelet reactivity between TK compared to ACS. After follow-up, aggregation levels and platelet reactivity showed differences, mainly due to the antithrombotic therapy prescribed at discharge, but similar to volunteers. Circulating epinephrine during the acute phase was significantly higher in TK (p < 0.001). Patients with higher levels of epinephrine had elevated platelet activation and aggregation after 3 months. No differences were observed in Takotsubo acute platelet aggregation compared to patients with ACS, in spite of higher blood levels of adrenaline. Takotsubo patients had elevated platelet aggregation and activation compared with ACS patients at 3 months follow-up because they were less frequently on chronic clopidogrel and ASA. However, they had similar platelet aggregation and activation levels to healthy volunteers despite treatment with low-dose ASA. Takotsubo patients who had higher levels of adrenaline in the acute phase displayed increased platelet reactivity during follow-up.

  9. Dynamic platelet adhesion in patients with an acute coronary syndrome: The effect of antiplatelet therapy.

    PubMed

    Tsoumani, Maria E; Tatsidou, Prokopia T; Ntalas, Ioannis V; Goudevenos, John A; Tselepis, Alexandros D

    2016-12-01

    Platelet adhesion and aggregation are key functions leading to thrombus formation. The effect of aspirin, clopidogrel, and ticagrelor on platelet aggregation has been well established, however, there is limited data on the effect of these drugs on platelet adhesion. We therefore evaluated the effect of these drugs on platelet adhesion in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients. Citrated blood was collected from 50 ACS patients loaded with 325 mg of aspirin (baseline) and at 5 days after the administration of aspirin 100 mg/day and clopidogrel (600 mg loading dose, 75 mg/day) (n = 26) or ticagrelor (180 mg loading dose, 90 mg × 2/day) (n = 24). High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) to clopidogrel was estimated by vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation assay. Platelet adhesion to collagen was studied for 6 min under high shear stress and was evaluated using the time to platelet recruitment (TPR), the perimeter and average area of each adherent object, number of adherent objects, and the total percent of surface coverage (SC%). Six ACS patients exhibited HTPR to clopidogrel and excluded from the platelet adhesion assays. TPR and SC% values were similar among patient groups at baseline and controls. However, all other adhesion parameters were different in ACS patients, indicating the formation of more aggregates in regard to controls. At 5 days post-treatment with either clopidogrel or ticagrelor, the TPR values were increased and the SC% values were reduced to a similar extent compared with baseline. However, significant differences were observed in the ticagrelor group in the perimeter, number of adherent objects, and the average area of each adherent object indicating a more potent inhibition of adherence-induced platelet aggregation than clopidogrel. In conclusion, aspirin does not affect platelet adherence to collagen, whereas clopidogrel and ticagrelor inhibit to a similar extent dynamic platelet adhesion at 5 days post-treatment in

  10. Clearance of circulating activated platelets in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Norma; Malato, Simona; Femia, Eti A; Pugliano, Mariateresa; Campana, Lara; Lunghi, Francesca; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Lussana, Federico; Podda, Gianmarco; Cattaneo, Marco; Ciceri, Fabio; Manfredi, Angelo A

    2011-09-22

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET) and polycythemia vera (PV) are characterized by persistent platelet activation. The mechanisms involved in their clearance are poorly characterized. In the present study, we report that leukocytes were actively involved in platelet disposal in 51 patients with ET and 30 with PV, but not in 70 age- and sex-matched controls. The fraction of circulating neutrophils and monocytes that had phagocytosed platelets, as assessed by flow cytometry, was significantly higher in patients with PV or ET, independently of hydroxyurea treatment, than in controls. Platelet phagocytosis by circulating leukocytes was confirmed by confocal and electron microscopy. The lack of effect of hydroxyurea, which disrupts the P-selectin/P-selectin glycoprotein ligand 1 (PSGL-1) interaction, suggests a P-selectin-independent mechanism. This hypothesis was confirmed in an ad hoc animal model based on the in vivo injection of activated platelets from P-selectin(+/+) and P-selectin(-/-) mice. P-selectin expression was associated with an earlier and effective clearance of platelets by neutrophils. A second delayed, P-selectin-independent phase actively involved monocytes. Our results suggest that phagocytic clearance of platelets by leukocytes occurs in PV and ET, possibly involving P-selectin-dependent and -independent pathways, thus representing a novel mechanism to remove activated platelets from the circulation.

  11. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  12. Caspase-9 mediates the apoptotic death of megakaryocytes and platelets, but is dispensable for their generation and function.

    PubMed

    White, Michael J; Schoenwaelder, Simone M; Josefsson, Emma C; Jarman, Kate E; Henley, Katya J; James, Chloé; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Jackson, Shaun P; Huang, David C S; Kile, Benjamin T

    2012-05-03

    Apoptotic caspases, including caspase-9, are thought to facilitate platelet shedding by megakaryocytes. They are known to be activated during platelet apoptosis, and have also been implicated in platelet hemostatic responses. However, the precise requirement for, and the regulation of, apoptotic caspases have never been defined in either megakaryocytes or platelets. To establish the role of caspases in platelet production and function, we generated mice lacking caspase-9 in their hematopoietic system. We demonstrate that both megakaryocytes and platelets possess a functional apoptotic caspase cascade downstream of Bcl-2 family-mediated mitochondrial damage. Caspase-9 is the initiator caspase, and its loss blocks effector caspase activation. Surprisingly, steady-state thrombopoiesis is unperturbed in the absence of caspase-9, indicating that the apoptotic caspase cascade is not required for platelet production. In platelets, loss of caspase-9 confers resistance to the BH3 mimetic ABT-737, blocking phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and delaying ABT-737-induced thrombocytopenia in vivo. Despite this, steady-state platelet lifespan is normal. Casp9(-/-) platelets are fully capable of physiologic hemostatic responses and functional regulation of adhesive integrins in response to agonist. These studies demonstrate that the apoptotic caspase cascade is required for the efficient death of megakaryocytes and platelets, but is dispensable for their generation and function.

  13. Platelets in the immune response: Revisiting platelet-activating factor in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Parwinder; Jindal, Nina Lakhani; Jagdis, Amanda; Vadas, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening multisystem allergic reaction resulting from the sudden systemic release of biochemical mediators and chemotactic substances. Release of both preformed granule-associated mediators and newly generated lipid-derived mediators contributes to the amplification and prolongation of anaphylaxis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid-derived mediator the central role of which has been well established in experimental models of both immune-mediated and non-immune mediated anaphylaxis. It is produced and secreted by several types of cells, including mast cells, monocytes, tissue macrophages, platelets, eosinophils, endothelial cells, and neutrophils. PAF is implicated in platelet aggregation and activation through release of vasoactive amines in the inflammatory response, resulting in increased vascular permeability, circulatory collapse, decreased cardiac output, and various other biological effects. PAF is rapidly hydrolyzed and degraded to an inactive metabolite, lysoPAF, by the enzyme PAF acetylhydrolase, the activity of which has shown to correlate inversely with PAF levels and predispose to severe anaphylaxis. In addition to its role in anaphylaxis, PAF has also been implicated as a mediator in both allergic and nonallergic inflammatory diseases, including allergic rhinitis, sepsis, atherosclerotic disease, and malignancy, in which PAF signaling has an established role. The therapeutic role of PAF antagonism has been investigated for several diseases, with variable results thus far. Further investigation of its role in pathology and therapeutic modulation is highly anticipated because of the pressing need for more selective and targeted therapy for the management of severe anaphylaxis.

  14. Platelet and red blood cell indices in Harris platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naina, Harris V K; Harris, Samar

    2010-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias, including inherited giant platelet disorders (IGPD) or macro thrombocytopenias are relatively rare, but their prevalence is likely underestimated from complexities of diagnosis and a spectrum of subclinical phenotypes. Harris platelet syndrome (HPS) is the most common IGPD reported from the Indian subcontinent. Of note there are an increased number of hemoglobinopathies reported from the geographic location. We analysed red blood cell and platelet indices of blood donors with HPS from the north eastern part of India and compared them with blood indices of blood donors of south India. We found a statistically significant lower platelet count in blood donors with HPS (median, range) 132 (71-267) vs. 252 (160-478) as compared to donors from south India (P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume (MPV) was higher in donors with HPS 13.1, (range 12-21.9 fl) as compared to donors from south India 7.35 (range 6-9.2 fl) (P < 0.001). This study showed that blood donors with HPS had a low median platelet bio-mass 0.17 (0.10-0.38%) vs. 0.19 (0.13-0.28%) in donors from south India. The platelet distribution width (PDW) was 17.4 (14.9-19.6) in donors with HPS vs. 16.38 (15.2-18.5) in south Indian blood donors (P < 0.001). Thirty-three donors with HPS had a normal platelet count with MPV more than 12 fL. Only donors with HPS had giant platelets and thrombocytopenia on peripheral blood smear examination. None of these donors had Dohle body inclusion in their leukocytes. Compared to donors from south India, donors with HPS had a significantly lower hemoglobin 13.8 (12-16.3 gm/dL) vs. 14.8 (12-18) respectively (P < 0.001) while red distribution width (RDW) was higher in HPS 13.6 (11.5-16.7) vs. 12.8 (11.4-15.1). However we did not find any statistically significant difference in MCV, MCH, MCHC between the two groups. Peripheral blood smear did not show any obvious abnormal red blood cell morphology. In the blood donors with HPS we found a statistically higher MPV

  15. The Platelet Function Defect of Cardiopulmonary Bypass.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-24

    fibrinolytic and coagulation systems occur during CPB,1 a platelet function defect is generally considered to be the primary CPB-induced hemostatic...platelets.39 OKM5 (provided by Dr. Patricia Rao, Ortho Diagnostic Systems , Raritan, NJ) is directed against platelet membrane GPIV.40 Flow Cytometric...22 after degranulation.7-14-16-18 Utilizing washed platelet systems , Nieuwenhuis et al.14 found a modest increase during CPB of the platelet

  16. Autologous platelet-labeling in thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Sinzinger, H.; Virgolini, I.; Vinazzer, H. )

    1990-11-01

    Field studies performed with peripheral platelets obtained from 6 male volunteers aged 23 to 29 years revealed an extraordinary dependence of labeling efficiency on incubation time and platelet concentration after {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling. Since the monitoring of in vivo-platelet function in patients with thrombocytopenia may cause problems due to insufficient labeling results and homologous platelets may show a different in vivo behaviour to autologous ones, we have searched for the minimal amount of platelets necessary to allow appropriate labeling and imaging in patients with thrombocytopenia. In 15 patients with untreated thrombocytopenia aged 14 to 79 years demonstrating a mean peripheral platelet count of 2.509 +/- 1.45 x 10(4) cells/microliters autologous {sup 111}In-oxine platelet labeling was performed. The results indicate that approximately 1 x 10(8) (concentrated) platelets/ml are necessary to obtain an adequate labeling efficiency and recovery. This platelet concentration can be easily achieved by drawing one more Monovette of whole blood per each 5 x 10(4) platelets/microliter peripheral platelet count less than 2 x 10(5)/microliter. It is concluded, that calculation of the required number of platelets in advance, variation of the blood volume drawn and the volume of incubation buffer allow informative, qualitative and quantitative results using autologous platelets. The method presented effectively circumvents the requirement of homologous platelets for radiolabeling in thrombocytopenia.

  17. Platelet serotonin modulates immune functions.

    PubMed

    Mauler, M; Bode, C; Duerschmied, D

    2016-01-01

    This short review addresses immune functions of platelet serotonin. Platelets transport serotonin at a high concentration in dense granules and release it upon activation. Besides haemostatic, vasotonic and developmental modulation, serotonin also influences a variety of immune functions (mediated by different serotonin receptors). First, platelet serotonergic effects are directed against invading pathogens via activation and proliferation of lymphocytes, modulation of cytokine release, and recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation by induction of selectin expression on endothelial cells. Second, serotonin levels are elevated in autoimmune diseases, such as asthma or rheumatoid arthritis, and during tissue regeneration after ischemia of myocardium or brain. Specific antagonism of serotonin receptors appears to improve survival after myocardial infarction or sepsis and to attenuate asthmatic attacks in animal models. It will be of great clinical relevance if these findings can be translated into human applications. In conclusion, targeting immune modulatory effects of platelet serotonin may provide novel therapeutic options for common health problems.

  18. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Negative T cells than B6.lpr mice. This suggests that the absence of PF4 alleviates some tissue damage in the lupus prone mice. 6...mice with PF4-/- mice may alleviate multi organ dysfunction in Lupus prone mice. Reportable Outcomes Nothing to report Conclusions We have...dysfunction in lupus models. We have evaluated the relationship between Syk and platelets and have thus far identified a role for Syk in platelet lodging in

  19. Lysophosphatidic acids. Influence on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux.

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, J. M.; Kindom, S. E.; Peterson, D. A.; Peller, J.; Krantz, K. E.; White, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Decanoyl-, palmitoyl-, and oleoyl-lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were studied for their effects on platelet aggregation and intracellular calcium flux. Palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA both caused a concentration-dependent aggregation of human blood platelets at concentrations of 12--300 microM. Aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was enhanced at slightly lower concentrations. First-wave aggregation induced by these LPAs was not blocked by aspirin, indomethacin, or heparin, suggesting similarities to ADP aggregation. However, in washed platelets with a high calcium concentration, no serotonin secretion was observed, even though full aggregation occurred, suggesting that aggregation was not due to released ADP. This concept was supported by studies of platelets deficient in the storage pool of ADP and serotonin, which had a normal first-wave aggregation response to palmitoyl-LPA. Aggregation induced by palmitoyl LPA was inhibited by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), theophylline, and ethylenediaminotetraacetate (EDTA), though in the presence of EDTA shape change occurred. Aggregation stimulated by palmitoyl-LPA or oleoyl-LPA was characterized by changes in the shape of the platelets with development of pseudopods and centralization of granules closely surrounded by contractile microfilaments and supporting microtubules. The addition of palmitoyl-LPA and oleoyl-LPA, but not decanoyl-LPA, caused the release of calcium from a platelet membrane fraction that contains elements of the intracellular calcium storage system and actively concentrates this cation in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and magnesium. It is suggested that LPAs cause aggregation by stimulating the release of calcium intracellularly. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Text-Figure 6 PMID:112871

  20. Hydrodynamic effects and receptor interactions of platelets and their aggregates in linear shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, P; Diamond, S L

    1997-01-01

    We have modeled platelet aggregation in a linear shear flow by accounting for two body collision hydrodynamics, platelet activation and receptor biology. Considering platelets and their aggregates as unequal-sized spheres with DLVO interactions (psi(platelet) = -15 mV, Hamaker constant = 10(-19) J), detailed hydrodynamics provided the flow field around the colliding platelets. Trajectory calculations were performed to obtain the far upstream cross-sectional area and the particle flux through this area provided the collision frequency. Only a fraction of platelets brought together by a shearing fluid flow were held together if successfully bound by fibrinogen cross-bridging GPIIb/IIIa receptors on the platelet surfaces. This fraction was calculated by modeling receptor-mediated aggregation using the formalism of Bell (Bell, G. I. 1979. A theoretical model for adhesion between cells mediated by multivalent ligands. Cell Biophys. 1:133-147) where the forward rate of bond formation dictated aggregation during collision and was estimated from the diffusional limited rate of lateral association of receptors multiplied by an effectiveness factor, eta, to give an apparent rate. For a value of eta = 0.0178, we calculated the overall efficiency (including both receptor binding and hydrodynamics effects) for equal-sized platelets with 50,000 receptors/platelet to be 0.206 for G = 41.9 s(-1), 0.05 for G = 335 s(-1), and 0.0086 for G = 1920 s(-1), values which are in agreement with efficiencies determined from initial platelet singlet consumption rates in flow through a tube. From our analysis, we predict that bond formation proceeds at a rate of approximately 0.1925 bonds/microm2 per ms, which is approximately 50-fold slower than the diffusion limited rate of association. This value of eta is also consistent with a colloidal stability of unactivated platelets at low shear rates. Fibrinogen was calculated to mediate aggregation quite efficiently at low shear rates but not at

  1. Transgenic, inducible RNAi in megakaryocytes and platelets in mice

    PubMed Central

    TAKIGUCHI, M.; JAMES, C.; JOSEFSSON, E. C.; CARMICHAEL, C. L.; PREMSRIRUT, P. K.; LOWE, S. W.; HAMILTON, J. R.; HUANG, D. C. S.; KILE, B. T.; DICKINS, R. A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool for suppressing gene function. The tetracycline (tet)-regulated expression system has recently been adapted to allow inducible RNAi in mice, however its efficiency in a particular cell type in vivo depends on a transgenic tet transactivator expression pattern and is often highly variable. Objective We aimed to establish a transgenic strategy that allows efficient and inducible gene knockdown in particular hematopoietic lineages in mice. Methods and results Using a tet-regulated reporter gene strategy, we found that transgenic mice expressing the rtTA (tet-on) transactivator under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (CMV-rtTA mice) display inducible reporter gene expression with unusual and near-complete efficiency in megakaryocytes and platelets. To test whether the CMV-rtTA transgene can drive inducible and efficient gene knockdown within this lineage, we generated a novel mouse strain harboring a tet-regulated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting Bcl-xL, a pro-survival Bcl-2 family member known to be essential for maintaining platelet survival. Doxycycline treatment of adult mice carrying both transgenes induces shRNA expression, depletes Bcl-xL in megakaryocytes and triggers severe thrombocytopenia, whereas doxycycline withdrawal shuts off shRNA expression, normalizes Bcl-xL levels and restores platelet numbers. These effects are akin to those observed with drugs that target Bcl-xL, clearly demonstrating that this transgenic system allows efficient and inducible inhibition of genes in megakaryocytes and platelets. Conclusions We have established a novel transgenic strategy for inducible gene knockdown inmegakaryocytes and platelets that will be useful for characterizing genes involved in platelet production and function in adult mice. PMID:21138522

  2. Fractional market dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Nick

    2000-12-01

    A new extension of a fractality concept in financial mathematics has been developed. We have introduced a new fractional Langevin-type stochastic differential equation that differs from the standard Langevin equation: (i) by replacing the first-order derivative with respect to time by the fractional derivative of order μ; and (ii) by replacing “white noise” Gaussian stochastic force by the generalized “shot noise”, each pulse of which has a random amplitude with the α-stable Lévy distribution. As an application of the developed fractional non-Gaussian dynamical approach the expression for the probability distribution function (pdf) of the returns has been established. It is shown that the obtained fractional pdf fits well the central part and the tails of the empirical distribution of S&P 500 returns.

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Ion Channelome of Human Platelets and Megakaryocytic Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Joy R.; Amisten, Stefan; Goodall, Alison H.; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ion channels have crucial roles in all cell types and represent important therapeutic targets. Approximately 20 ion channels have been reported in human platelets; however, no systematic study has been undertaken to define the platelet channelome. These membrane proteins need only be expressed at low copy number to influence function and may not be detected using proteomic or transcriptomic microarray approaches. In our recent work, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) provided key evidence that Kv1.3 is responsible for the voltage-dependent K+ conductance of platelets and megakaryocytes. The present study has expanded this approach to assess relative expression of 402 ion channels and channel regulatory genes in human platelets and three megakaryoblastic/erythroleukaemic cell lines. mRNA levels in platelets are low compared to other blood cells, therefore an improved method of isolating platelets was developed. This used a cocktail of inhibitors to prevent formation of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, and a combination of positive and negative immunomagnetic cell separation, followed by rapid extraction of mRNA. Expression of 34 channel-related transcripts was quantified in platelets, including 24 with unknown roles in platelet function, but that were detected at levels comparable to ion channels with established roles in haemostasis or thrombosis. Trace expression of a further 50 ion channel genes was also detected. More extensive channelomes were detected in MEG-01, CHRF-288–11 and HEL cells (195, 185 and 197 transcripts, respectively), but lacked several channels observed in the platelet. These “channelome” datasets provide an important resource for further studies of ion channel function in the platelet and megakaryocyte. PMID:27277069

  4. Understanding Multiplication of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetland, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Discussed the use of Cuisenaire rods in teaching the multiplication of fractions. Considers whole number times proper fraction, proper fraction multiplied by proper fraction, mixed number times proper fraction, and mixed fraction multiplied by mixed fractions. (JN)

  5. Unraveling mechanisms that control platelet production.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Joseph E

    2013-02-01

    Platelets are formed by giant precursor cells called megakaryocytes that reside within the bone marrow. The generation of platelets, and their release into the bloodstream by megakaryocytes, requires a complex series of remodeling events powered by the cytoskeleton to result in the release of many platelets from a single megakaryocyte. Abnormalities in this process can result in thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) and can lead to increased risk of bleeding. This review describes the process of platelet production in detail and discusses new insights into novel platelet biology.

  6. Detection of platelet alloimmunity with a platelet-associated IgG assay

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Bishop, J.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-06-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence PA-IgG assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets. The assay identified serum alloantibodies in 10 out of 14 multitransfused patients and for two of three infants with neonatal thrombocytopenia. The correct separation of all multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups by the PA-IgG assay was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. The allogeneic nature of the serum antibodies was demonstrated by progressive absorption of the antibody with increasing numbers of allogeneic platelets but not with autologous platelets. The sensitivity of the PA-IgG assay for detection of serum alloantibodies was superior to that of platelet aggregation, platelet serotonin release, and lymphocytotoxicity testing. In dilution experiments with alloimmune serum, elevated levels of serum PA-IgG could still be detected on donor platelets when platelet aggregation and serotonin release tests became negative. Platelet survival studies with selected platelets performed in the 10 alloimmunized, multitransfused patients confirmed the results of the PA-IgG assays, predicting alloimmunity to the donor platelets. In contrast, platelet aggregation, platelet serotonin release, and lymphocytotoxicity testing indicated alloimmunity for 50% or less of the patients. Reduced platelet survival times were also seen with HLA A- and HLA B-matched donor platelets when donor-recipient incompatibility was demonstrated by the PA-IgG assay. Thus the PA-IgG assay provides a sensitive method to detect serum platelet alloantibodies and may offer a technique in platelet crossmatching.

  7. Impact of reticulated platelets on antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is independent of platelet turnover.

    PubMed

    Stratz, Christian; Nührenberg, Thomas; Amann, Michael; Cederqvist, Marco; Kleiner, Pascal; Valina, Christian M; Trenk, Dietmar; Neumann, Franz-Josef; Hochholzer, Willibald

    2016-10-28

    Reticulated platelets are associated with impaired antiplatelet response to thienopyridines. It is uncertain whether this interaction is caused by a decreased drug exposure due to high platelet turnover reflected by elevated levels of reticulated platelets or by intrinsic properties of reticulated platelets. This study sought to investigate if the impact of reticulated platelets on early antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is mainly caused by platelet turnover as previously suggested. Elective patients undergoing coronary intervention were randomised to loading with clopidogrel 600 mg or prasugrel 60 mg (n=200). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet reactivity was determined by impedance aggregometry before, at 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes and at day 1 after loading. Immature platelet count was assessed as marker of reticulated platelets by flow cytometry. Platelet reactivity increased with rising levels of immature platelet count in both groups. This effect was more distinctive in patients on clopidogrel as compared to patients on prasugrel. Overall, immature platelet count correlated well with on-treatment platelet reactivity at all time-points (p < 0.001). These correlations did not change over time in the entire cohort as well as in patients treated with clopidogrel or prasugrel indicating an effect independent of platelet turnover (comparison of correlations 120 minutes/day 1: p = 0.64). In conclusion, the association of immature platelet count with impaired antiplatelet response to thienopyridines is similar early and late after loading. This finding suggests as main underlying mechanism another effect of reticulated platelets on thienopyridines than platelet turnover.

  8. Inherited platelet disorders: toward DNA-based diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lentaigne, Claire; Freson, Kathleen; Laffan, Michael A.; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Variations in platelet number, volume, and function are largely genetically controlled, and many loci associated with platelet traits have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWASs).1 The genome also contains a large number of rare variants, of which a tiny fraction underlies the inherited diseases of humans. Research over the last 3 decades has led to the discovery of 51 genes harboring variants responsible for inherited platelet disorders (IPDs). However, the majority of patients with an IPD still do not receive a molecular diagnosis. Alongside the scientific interest, molecular or genetic diagnosis is important for patients. There is increasing recognition that a number of IPDs are associated with severe pathologies, including an increased risk of malignancy, and a definitive diagnosis can inform prognosis and care. In this review, we give an overview of these disorders grouped according to their effect on platelet biology and their clinical characteristics. We also discuss the challenge of identifying candidate genes and causal variants therein, how IPDs have been historically diagnosed, and how this is changing with the introduction of high-throughput sequencing. Finally, we describe how integration of large genomic, epigenomic, and phenotypic datasets, including whole genome sequencing data, GWASs, epigenomic profiling, protein–protein interaction networks, and standardized clinical phenotype coding, will drive the discovery of novel mechanisms of disease in the near future to improve patient diagnosis and management. PMID:27095789

  9. Role of red cells in preventing the growth of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Machi, J; Sigel, B; Ramos, J R; Justin, J R; Feinberg, H; LeBreton, G C; Robertson, A L

    1984-10-01

    Using high-resolution real-time two-dimensional ultrasound, we have investigated the role of red cells in the growth of already established platelet aggregates under controlled flow conditions. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) was circulated in vitro in horizontally and vertically arranged tubing at mean shear rate ranging from 60 to 0 sec-1, and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was used to induce platelet aggregation. ADP-induced platelet aggregates grew in size and tended to sediment as shear rate decreased, in particular, below 10 sec-1. At 0 sec-1 (stasis), large clusters of platelet aggregates formed. The addition of washed red cells to produce a hematocrit of only 2% significantly interfered with the growth and sedimentation of platelet aggregates as shear rate was reduced. Formaldehyde-hardened erythrocytes had a similar effect in preventing the growth of platelet aggregates, suggesting that mechanical collision of red cells with platelet aggregates may be the cause of growth inhibition. Therefore, the thrombotic process may be enhanced in red cell poor zones in circulation resulting from flow disturbances associated with vascular stenosis or within artificial organs and extracorporeal systems. The present study also suggested that red cell free PRP should be carefully administered therapeutically.

  10. The contribution of platelets to the pathogenesis of Raynaud's phenomenon and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pauling, J D; O'Donnell, V B; Mchugh, N J

    2013-01-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) describes the excessive vascular response of the digital vessels in response to cold exposure and emotional stress. It is typically the earliest manifestation of systemic sclerosis (SSc), a multisystem disease of unknown aetiology characterised by vasculopathy, inflammation and fibrosis. The biological actions of platelets are known to extend beyond primary haemostasis with a growing appreciation of their contribution to vascular function, inflammation and wound repair. This has led to a considerable body of work evaluating associations between platelet function analysis and RP/SSc. This review provides a conceptual framework upon which the potential contribution of platelets to vascular dysfunction, autoimmunity and tissue remodelling in RP and SSc is considered. We describe the existing evidence to support excessive platelet activation in RP and SSc, ranging from the early studies of platelet aggregability and circulating platelet-derived mediators, to the important findings of the recent work that has begun to explore the potential direct pathogenic role of platelets in established murine models of SSc. We shall describe and critically appraise the findings of previous therapeutic studies evaluating the use of anti-platelet agents in RP and SSc, along with their implications for future therapeutic intervention in these conditions.

  11. Human platelet lysate: Replacing fetal bovine serum as a gold standard for human cell propagation?

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Strunk, Dirk; Koh, Mickey B C; Schallmoser, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The essential physiological role of platelets in wound healing and tissue repair builds the rationale for the use of human platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine. Abundant growth factors and cytokines stored in platelet granules can be naturally released by thrombin activation and clotting or artificially by freeze/thaw-mediated platelet lysis, sonication or chemical treatment. Human platelet lysate prepared by the various release strategies has been established as a suitable alternative to fetal bovine serum as culture medium supplement, enabling efficient propagation of human cells under animal serum-free conditions for a multiplicity of applications in advanced somatic cell therapy and tissue engineering. The rapidly increasing number of studies using platelet derived products for inducing human cell proliferation and differentiation has also uncovered a considerable variability of human platelet lysate preparations which limits comparability of results. The main variations discussed herein encompass aspects of donor selection, preparation of the starting material, the possibility for pooling in plasma or additive solution, the implementation of pathogen inactivation and consideration of ABO blood groups, all of which can influence applicability. This review outlines the current knowledge about human platelet lysate as a powerful additive for human cell propagation and highlights its role as a prevailing supplement for human cell culture capable to replace animal serum in a growing spectrum of applications.

  12. [Methods of preparation of the platelet-rich plasma used in medicine as an accelerator of tissue regeneration].

    PubMed

    Kesy, Lena; Kopczyński, Przemysław; Baszczuk, Aleksandra; Kopczyński, Zygmunt

    2014-04-01

    Platelet rich plasma is being increasingly used in the modem medicine as a material, stimulating regeneration and accelerating tissue healing. Platelet rich plasma is an autologous platelet concentrate, which is obtained from the peripheral blood of the patient. The method of extraction is based on the isolation of platelets during centrifugation of the whole blood, drew on anticoagulant. With the difference in density between the various cellular components of blood, such as red blood cells, buffy coat and platelet poor plasma, the separation into individual fractions is possible. At the present moment no optimal method of preparation of the platelet rich plasma has been found. On the market there are a number of commercial collection systems available, differing from each other in centrifugation parameters, type of container to which blood is collected and anticogulant used. Unfortunately, this can lead to obtaining platelet rich plasma with a varying number of platelets, leukocytes and resulting in a different concentration of growth factors. This is important, because the studies show, that a positive clinical effect depends on the quality of the used platelet-rich plasma.

  13. Fractional calculus in bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Magin, Richard L

    2004-01-01

    Fractional calculus (integral and differential operations of noninteger order) is not often used to model biological systems. Although the basic mathematical ideas were developed long ago by the mathematicians Leibniz (1695), Liouville (1834), Riemann (1892), and others and brought to the attention of the engineering world by Oliver Heaviside in the 1890s, it was not until 1974 that the first book on the topic was published by Oldham and Spanier. Recent monographs and symposia proceedings have highlighted the application of fractional calculus in physics, continuum mechanics, signal processing, and electromagnetics, but with few examples of applications in bioengineering. This is surprising because the methods of fractional calculus, when defined as a Laplace or Fourier convolution product, are suitable for solving many problems in biomedical research. For example, early studies by Cole (1933) and Hodgkin (1946) of the electrical properties of nerve cell membranes and the propagation of electrical signals are well characterized by differential equations of fractional order. The solution involves a generalization of the exponential function to the Mittag-Leffler function, which provides a better fit to the observed cell membrane data. A parallel application of fractional derivatives to viscoelastic materials establishes, in a natural way, hereditary integrals and the power law (Nutting/Scott Blair) stress-strain relationship for modeling biomaterials. In this review, I will introduce the idea of fractional operations by following the original approach of Heaviside, demonstrate the basic operations of fractional calculus on well-behaved functions (step, ramp, pulse, sinusoid) of engineering interest, and give specific examples from electrochemistry, physics, bioengineering, and biophysics. The fractional derivative accurately describes natural phenomena that occur in such common engineering problems as heat transfer, electrode/electrolyte behavior, and sub

  14. Dynamic light scattering can determine platelet function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Nathan

    2011-10-01

    Platelet transfusions are life-saving procedures for patients who are bleeding or undergoing chemotherapy. The effectiveness of transfusions depends on the number of platelets transfused and the platelet function. Platelet function correlates with proportion of discoid to activated platelets, morphology response to temperature stress, and inversely correlates with microparticle content. ThromboLUX is a novel device that determines platelet function by measuring all of these characteristics using dynamic light scattering (DLS). During periods of stress, such as decreased temperature, cytoskeletal rearrangements will cause normal, discoid platelets to activate and become spiny spheres. The formation of pseudopods of various lengths facilitates the clotting cascade and also increases the apparent size of platelets. ThromboLUX uses a 37-20-37 C temperature cycle that mimics the bleeding, storage, and transfusion process. As the temperature fluctuates, DLS will measure the changing platelet hydrodynamic radius and the size of any microparticles present. ThromboLUX analysis of platelet concentrates in vitro would allow determination of high platelet function units before transfusion and would therefore improve transfusion outcomes and patient safety. This study examined how DLS is able to distinguish between discoid and activated platelets as well as measure the parameters that contribute to high platelet function.

  15. Relationships between platelet counts, platelet volumes and reticulated platelets in patients with ITP: evidence for significant platelet count inaccuracies with conventional instrument methods.

    PubMed

    Diquattro, M; Gagliano, F; Calabrò, G M; Tommasi, M; Scott, C S; Mancuso, G; Palma, B; Menozzi, I

    2009-04-01

    The platelet count has a primary role in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). This study analysed the accuracy of ITP patient platelet counts determined by Abbott CD-Sapphire (impedance/optical) and Bayer Advia 120 (optical) analyses, compared with a reference immunoplatelet method. Instrument platelet estimates showed broad equivalence in the higher range of observed values, but significant discrepancies against the immunoplatelet count were seen when platelet counts were <10 x 10(9)/l. CD-Sapphire mean platelet volume (MPV) results revealed increased (>12 fl) platelet volumes in eight of eight ITP patients with counts of <20 x 10(9)/l compared with 6/6 and 5/13 patients with platelet counts of 20-50 and >50 x 10(9)/l. In contrast, Bayer Advia MPV values showed no relationship with the platelet count. Increased reticulated platelets were associated with an increasing CD-Sapphire MPV (R(2) = 0.61) and a decreasing platelet count. High (>40%) reticulated platelet values were seen in 9/9 patients with immunoplatelet counts of <20 x 10(9)/l compared with 0/19 patients with platelet counts above 20 x 10(9)/l. There may be a need for caution in the interpretation of platelet counts in ITP patients obtained with conventional instrument methods, and therapeutic decisions should ideally be validated by reference immunoplatelet procedures.

  16. Platelet function tests: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Liotta, Agatina Alessandrello; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation - adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation - have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered.

  17. Platelet function tests: a comparative review

    PubMed Central

    Paniccia, Rita; Priora, Raffaella; Alessandrello Liotta, Agatina; Abbate, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    In physiological hemostasis a prompt recruitment of platelets on the vessel damage prevents the bleeding by the rapid formation of a platelet plug. Qualitative and/or quantitative platelet defects promote bleeding, whereas the high residual reactivity of platelets in patients on antiplatelet therapies moves forward thromboembolic complications. The biochemical mechanisms of the different phases of platelet activation – adhesion, shape change, release reaction, and aggregation – have been well delineated, whereas their complete translation into laboratory assays has not been so fulfilled. Laboratory tests of platelet function, such as bleeding time, light transmission platelet aggregation, lumiaggregometry, impedance aggregometry on whole blood, and platelet activation investigated by flow cytometry, are traditionally utilized for diagnosing hemostatic disorders and managing patients with platelet and hemostatic defects, but their use is still limited to specialized laboratories. To date, a point-of-care testing (POCT) dedicated to platelet function, using pertinent devices much simpler to use, has now become available (ie, PFA-100, VerifyNow System, Multiplate Electrode Aggregometry [MEA]). POCT includes new methodologies which may be used in critical clinical settings and also in general laboratories because they are rapid and easy to use, employing whole blood without the necessity of sample processing. Actually, these different platelet methodologies for the evaluation of inherited and acquired bleeding disorders and/or for monitoring antiplatelet therapies are spreading and the study of platelet function is strengthening. In this review, well-tried and innovative platelet function tests and their methodological features and clinical applications are considered. PMID:25733843

  18. 12 CFR 5.67 - Fractional shares.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... fair price upon the fraction not being issued through its sale, or the purchase of the additional fraction required for a full share, if there is an established and active market in the national bank's stock; (c) Remit the cash equivalent of the fraction not being issued to those to whom fractional...

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Polymer-Based Composites with Magnetic Aligned Hexagonal Boron Nitride Platelets.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chao; Duan, Bin; Li, Lan; Xie, Bin; Huang, Mengyu; Luo, Xiaobing

    2015-06-17

    Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) platelets are widely used as the reinforcing fillers for enhancing the thermal conductivity of polymer-based composites. Since hBN platelets have high aspect ratio and show a highly anisotropic thermal property, the thermal conductivity of the hBNs-filled composites should be strongly associated with the platelets' orientation. However, the orientation effect has been explored less frequently due to the technical difficulties in precontrol of the platelets' orientation in the polymer matrix. In this paper, we report the use of magnetic fields to assemble the platelets into various microstructures and to study the thermal conductivities of the designed composites. The experimental results showed that thermal conductivities are dramatically different among these composites. For instance, the thermal conductivities of the composites with platelets oriented parallel and perpendicular to the heat flux direction are respectively 44.5% higher and 37.9% lower than that of unaligned composites at the volume fraction of 9.14%. The results were also analyzed by a theoretical model. The model suggests that the orientation of the hBN platelets is the main reason for the variance in the thermal conductivity.

  20. Platelet function alterations and their relation to P-selectin (CD62P) expression in children with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Zuhal K; Orhan, Mehmet F; Büyükavcı, Mustafa

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) may cause platelet aggregation dysfunction and this can be reversed by iron therapy. On the other hand, it has been reported that the platelet fractions carrying the platelet activation markers, CD62P and CD63, are increased in thalassemic patients and there is a significant correlation between the increased levels of soluble P-selectin and free iron in sickle cell disease. This study was performed to investigate the alterations of platelet functions and whether iron deficiency results in diminished expression of activation marker (P-selectin; CD62P) leading to platelet aggregation dysfunction in children with IDA. Hemoglobin, erythrocyte indices (mean erythrocyte volume and red blood cell distribution width), serum levels of iron, transferrin and ferritin, platelet aggregation tests (with ADP, collagen, and ristocetin), PFA-100 closure time, and CD62P expression were evaluated in fasting blood samples of 22 children with IDA and 20 children without anemia. CD62P expression was detected by flow cytometry in normal and 5 μmol/l ADP-activated platelets. Mean closure times were longer in the patient group than control. In platelet aggregation tests, mean values of maximum aggregation times by ristocetin, ADP, and collagen were also more prolonged in patient group. Ristocetin-induced maximum aggregation rates (amplitude) were significantly higher in patients. However, ADP and collagen induction did not produce the same effect. CD62P expressions were significantly higher on activated platelets of the patient group, although they were similar in both groups before activation by ADP. These findings suggest that platelet aggregation and adhesion have been delayed in children with IDA; however, platelet function abnormalities are not associated with CD62P expression on platelet surface.

  1. Platelet-rich plasma preparation for regenerative medicine: optimization and quantification of cytokines and growth factors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is nowadays widely applied in different clinical scenarios, such as orthopedics, ophthalmology and healing therapies, as a growth factor pool for improving tissue regeneration. Studies into its clinical efficiency are not conclusive and one of the main reasons for this is that different PRP preparations are used, eliciting different responses that cannot be compared. Platelet quantification and the growth factor content definition must be defined in order to understand molecular mechanisms behind PRP regenerative strength. Standardization of PRP preparations is thus urgently needed. Methods PRP was prepared by centrifugation varying the relative centrifugal force, temperature, and time. Having quantified platelet recovery and yield, the two-step procedure that rendered the highest output was chosen and further analyzed. Cytokine content was determined in different fractions obtained throughout the whole centrifugation procedure. Results Our method showed reproducibility when applied to different blood donors. We recovered 46.9 to 69.5% of total initial platelets and the procedure resulted in a 5.4-fold to 7.3-fold increase in platelet concentration (1.4 × 106 to 1.9 × 106 platelets/μl). Platelets were highly purified, because only <0.3% from the initial red blood cells and leukocytes was present in the final PRP preparation. We also quantified growth factors, cytokines and chemokines secreted by the concentrated platelets after activation with calcium and calcium/thrombin. High concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor, endothelial growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF) were secreted, together with the anti-inflammatory and proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-13, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-α. No cytokines were secreted before platelet activation. TGF-β3 and IFNγ were not detected in any studied fraction. Clots obtained after platelet coagulation

  2. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  3. Mystery Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  4. Pitch Fractionation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-15

    13 3. Solvent Fractionation Experiments .................................... 15 4. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra for A240 Petrolem Pitch AG 12...34 and Mesophase Pitch AG 164B ............................... 21 5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra ................................... 23 6...compared by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis using a Digilab Model FTS 14 spectrophotometer (Rockwell International, Anaheim, California

  5. [Activation and inhibitory mechanisms of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue

    2014-07-01

    Exposure of platelets to subendothelial matrices initiates physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. Under high shear stress, von Willebrand factor bridges newly exposed collagen to glycoprotein (GP) Ib on platelets. This initial tethering facilitates association between the collagen receptor GPVI and collagen, which generates tyrosine kinase-dependent activation signals, followed by release of secondary mediators and integrin activation. Activated integrin can bind to their ligands including fibrinogen. The released secondary mediators, ADP and thromboxane A2, activate integrin of flowing platelets, which enables formation of platelet thrombi by binding of activated flowing platelets and adhered platelets to collagen via binding between activated aIIbbeta3 integrin and fibrinogen. Platelets also have inhibitory mechanisms, which help to prevent unwanted platelet activation in vivo.

  6. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-06-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (HpD) i.v. prior to red light irradiation and the platelet-rich plasma was prepared and irradiated by red light. The platelets were processed for EM examination and stereological analysis. It was shown the 16 hrs after irradiation almost all platelets were necrotized; 8 hours after irradiation about one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged. Immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformated, showing significantly increased mean area, perimeter and short axis, and mean cell volume and cell surface area. The findings indicate that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly damaged by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. The early platelet photoactivation may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  7. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION FEED ENVELOPE

    SciTech Connect

    HERTING DL

    2008-03-19

    Laboratory work was completed on a set of evaporation tests designed to establish a feed envelope for the fractional crystallization process. The feed envelope defines chemical concentration limits within which the process can be operated successfully. All 38 runs in the half-factorial design matrix were completed successfully, based on the qualitative definition of success. There is no feed composition likely to be derived from saltcake dissolution that would cause the fractional crystallization process to not meet acceptable performance requirements. However, some compositions clearly would provide more successful operation than other compositions.

  8. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2 (-∙)) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5- 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2 (-∙) in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases.

  9. Hippophae rhamnoides L. Fruits Reduce the Oxidative Stress in Human Blood Platelets and Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Malinowska, Paulina; Żuchowski, Jerzy; Stochmal, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Effects of the phenolic fraction from Hippophae rhamnoides fruits on the production of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, a marker of lipid peroxidation) and the generation of superoxide anion (O2−∙) in human blood platelets (resting platelets and platelets stimulated by a strong physiological agonist, thrombin) were studied in vitro. We also examined antioxidant properties of this fraction against human plasma lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation induced by a strong biological oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or H2O2/Fe (a donor of hydroxyl radicals). The tested fraction of H. rhamnoides (0.5– 50 µg/mL; the incubation time: 15 and 60 min) inhibited lipid peroxidation induced by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. The H. rhamnoides phenolic fraction inhibited not only plasma lipid peroxidation, but also plasma protein carbonylation stimulated by H2O2 or H2O2/Fe. Moreover, the level of O2−∙ in platelets significantly decreased. In comparative experiments, the H. rhamnoides fraction was a more effective antioxidant than aronia extract or grape seed extract (at the highest tested concentration, 50 µg/mL). The obtained results suggest that H. rhamnoides fruits may be a new, promising source of natural compounds with antioxidant and antiplatelet activity beneficial not only for healthy people, but also for those with oxidative stress-associated diseases. PMID:26933473

  10. Anti-platelet effect of cumanastatin 1, a disintegrin isolated from venom of South American Crotalus rattlesnake.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Manuel; Lucena, Sara; Aguilar, Irma; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Salazar, Ana M; Sánchez, Elda E; Girón, Maria E; Carvajal, Zoila; Arocha-Piñango, Carmen L; Guerrero, Belsy

    2009-03-01

    Disintegrins have been previously described in the venom of several snake families inhibiting signal transduction, cell-cell interactions, and cell-matrix interactions and may have therapeutic potential in heart attacks, thrombotic diseases, and cancers. This investigation describes the first disintegrin isolated from South American Crotalus venom (Venezuelan rattlesnake Crotalus durissus cumanensis), which inhibits platelet adhesion to matrix proteins. C. d. cumanensis crude venom was first separated on a Sephadex G-100 column into 4 fractions (SI to SIV). Crude venom and SIII fraction significantly diminished platelet adhesion to fibrinogen (Fg) and to fibronectin (Fn). Anti-adhesive SIII fraction was further separated by DEAE-Sephacel followed by C-18 reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The platelet anti-adhesive fraction obtained was designated as cumanastatin-1. This disintegrin has a mass of 7.442 kDa as determined by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and pI of 8.5. Cumanastatin-1 also inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation with an IC(50) of 158 nM. However, it did not significantly inhibit collagen and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Cumanastatin-1 considerably inhibited anti-alpha(IIb)beta(3) integrin binding to platelets in a dose-dependent manner; however, it did not present any effect on the alpha(5)beta(1) integrin or on P-selectin.

  11. Comparative lipidomics and proteomics analysis of platelet lipid rafts using different detergents.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Davani, Siamak; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène; Meneveau, Nicolas; Montange, Damien

    2016-11-01

    Lipid rafts play a pivotal role in physiological functions of platelets. Their isolation using nonionic mild detergents is considered as the gold standard method, but there is no consensual detergent for lipid raft studies. We aimed to investigate which detergent is the most suitable for lipid raft isolation from platelet membrane, based on lipidomics and proteomics analysis. Platelets were obtained from healthy donors. Twelve sucrose fractions were extracted by three different detergents, namely Brij 35, Lubrol WX, and Triton X100, at 0.05% and 1%. After lipidomics analysis and determination of fractions enriched in cholesterol (Ch) and sphingomyelin (SM), proteomics analysis was performed. Lipid rafts were mainly observed in 1-4 fractions, and non-rafts were distributed on 5-12 fractions. Considering the concentration of Ch and SM, Lubrol WX 1% and Triton X100 1% were more suitable detergents as they were able to isolate lipid raft fractions that were more enriched than non-raft fractions. By proteomics analysis, overall, 822 proteins were identified in platelet membrane. Lipid raft fractions isolated with Lubrol WX 0.05% and Triton X100 1% contained mainly plasma membrane proteins. However, only Lubrol WX 0.05 and 1% and Triton X100 1% were able to extract non-denaturing proteins with more than 10 transmembrane domains. Our results suggest that Triton X100 1% is the most suitable detergent for global lipid and protein studies on platelet plasma membrane. However, the detergent should be adapted if investigation of an association between specific proteins and lipid rafts is planned.

  12. Patterning surfaces for controlled platelet adhesion and detection of dysfunctional platelets.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wei; Shi, Qiang; Wong, Shing-Chung; Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Hengchong; Yin, Jinghua

    2013-06-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in thrombus formation and in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis. Patterning surfaces for controlled platelet adhesion paves the way for adhesion and activation mechanisms in platelets and detection of platelet functional defects. Here, a new and simple method based on controlled polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) on the surface of styrene-block-(ethylene-co-butylene)-block-styrene (SEBS) is shown. The competition between polymerization and degradation enables platelet adhesion on SEBS to be switched on and off. The adhesive sites of the platelets can be down to single cell level, and the dysfunctional platelets can be quantitatively detected.

  13. Fractional Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-11-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schrödinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schrödinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional "Bohr atom") and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schrödinger equations.

  14. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  15. Selection of donor platelets for alloimmunized patients using a platelet-associated IgG assay

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, T.J.; Kim, B.K.; Steiner, M.; Baldini, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    A quantitative immunofluorescence platelet-associated immunoglobulin-G (PA-IgG) assay was used to detect alloimmunity to platelets in 8/12 multitransfused patients and to perform platelet crossmatching in the 8 alloimmunized patients. The correct separation of multitransfused patients into alloimmune and nonalloimmune groups was substantiated with chromium-51-labeled platelet survival studies. For 5 alloimmunized patients, compatible and incompatible donor platelets were demonstrated by PA-IgG crossmatching and were confirmed by platelet survival studies. With the other 3 alloimmunized patients, only Pa-IgG incompatible donor platelets were found. Survival studies with 5 of these incompatible donor platelets showed markedly reduced survival times on 4 occasions. Pa-IgG compatible donor platelets survived 3.5 to 8.7 days, while Pa-IgG incompatible platelets showed survival times of 0.1 to 2.4 days.

  16. Interaction of inorganic nanoparticles of lunar soil simulant with blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Kasatkina, Ludmila; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy; Slenzka, Klaus

    Blood platelets play a central role in the physiology of primary hemostasis and in the patholog-ical processes of arterial thrombosis. Also, blood platelets contain neuronal high-affinity Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 -3) and are able to uptake glutamate, thereby playing possible physiological role in extracellular glutamate homeostasis in the mammalian CNS as an additional powerful target for excessive neurotoxic glutamate accumulation and storage. The health effects of lunar soil exposure are almost completely unknown, whereas the observations suggest that it can be deleterious to human physiology. It is important that the components of lunar soil may be internalized with lipid fractions of the lung epithelium, which in turn may help ions to overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of JSC-1a Lunar Soil Simulant (LSS) (Orbital Technologies Corporation, Madison, USA) on platelets isolated from rabbit blood. We revealed that platelets were not indifferent to the expo-sure to LSS. Flow cytometric analysis showed that the incubation of platelets with LSS resulted in an upper shift of platelet spot in histograms presenting cell size (FS) and granularity (SS) as x and y coordinates, thereby demonstrating apparent increase in platelet granularity. Analysis of control platelet preparation did not reveal the alterations in platelet size and granularity during the same incubation period. LSS scatter per se did not cover area of platelet prepara-tion in histogram. Using Zetasizer Nanosystem (Malvern Instruments) with helium-neon laser for dynamic light scattering (DLS), the platelet size before and after the addition of LSS was measured. We have found the increase in the mean size of the population of platelets from 2.45 ±0.09 µm in control to 3.0 ± 0.25 µm in the presence of LSS. Thus, we report that inorganic nanoparticles of LSS bind to blood platelets and this fact may have considerable harmful conse-quences to human

  17. Dengue platelets meet Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

    PubMed

    Bray, Paul F

    2013-11-14

    In this issue of Blood, Hottz et al provide compelling evidence that dengue virus (DV) induces (1) platelet synthesis of interleukin-1b (IL-1b); (2) platelet-derived IL-1b–containing microvesicles (MVs) that increase vascular permeability; and (3) DV-triggered inflammasome activation in platelets.

  18. 21 CFR 864.6675 - Platelet aggregometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... shape and platelet aggregation following the addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet rich... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Platelet aggregometer. 864.6675 Section 864.6675...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6675...

  19. 21 CFR 864.6675 - Platelet aggregometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... shape and platelet aggregation following the addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet rich... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Platelet aggregometer. 864.6675 Section 864.6675...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Manual Hematology Devices § 864.6675...

  20. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  1. Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining of immature platelets in donors.

    PubMed

    Pogorelov, Valery M; Beskorovainova, Victoria Ju; Chanieva, Marem I; Dyagileva, Olga A; Naumova, Iren N; Skedina, Marina A

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen in platelets (PLTs) on smears of peripheral blood of 40 donors was investigated by the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) method. Three groups were formed. Group 1 was consisted of 21 men undergoing the donor selection procedure. Additionally, 9 first-time donors undergoing plateletpheresis (Group 2) and 10 donors who frequently underwent platelet apheresis (Group 3) were studied as a model of relative thrombocytopenia. Cell sizes were measured with the use of a Image Analyzer "ASPBC" (Russia). The training procedure and classification of PAS-blood PLTs were made on the basis of expert evaluation. In this article, we have established three facts. First, the PAS-positive PLT area was larger than that of the PAS-negative cells (9.5 ± 3.6 sq.mkm vs. 3.9 ± 1.3 sq.mkm, p < 0.001, n = 21). The PAS-positivity of PLTs was 23.1 ± 9.2%. Second, the PAS-positivity correlated (r(S) = 0.63, p < 0.05) with the immature platelets fraction (IPF %), determined using Sysmex XE-2100. The mean IPF was 2.1 ± 1.0% (range 0.3-4.6%). Third, using the IPF% values obtained in Group 1, we found a significantly higher level of IPF in the samples both in Group 2 [mean value 4.2 ± 2.0% (range 1.9-7.0), p < 0.01] and in Group 3 [mean value 5.1 ± 2.5% (range 1.2-8.6), p < 0.004] with relative thrombocytopenia [Group 2: median 198 (95% confidence interval, CI 166-227) vs. median 229 (95% CI 206-267), p < 0.05; Group 3: median 142.5 (95% CI 132-173) vs. median 214.5 (95% CI 196-267), p < 0.01] after plateletpheresis. There was also a significant difference between the pre- and post-plateletpheresis for IPF% in Group 2 and Group 3: median 1.7 (95% CI 1.4-4.0) vs. median 4.0 (95% CI 2.7-5.8), p < 0.05 and median 4.0 (95% CI 2.7-6.0) vs. median 5.1 (95% CI 3.3-6.9), p < 0.01. The increased IPF shows a correlation with the PAS positivity [r(S) = 0.5 (p = 0.14) and r(S) = 0.6 (p = 0.05)] which has a tendency to

  2. A Model for Studying the Hemostatic Consumption or Destruction of Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Josefsson, Emma C.; Henley, Katya J.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental issue in understanding homeostasis of the hematopoietic system is to what extent intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate cell fate. We recently revisited this issue for the case of blood platelets and concluded that platelet life span is largely regulated by internal factors, in contrast to the long-held view that accumulated damage from the environment triggers clearance. However, it is known that in humans there is an ongoing fixed requirement for platelets to maintain hemostasis and prevent bleeding; hence a proportion of platelets may be consumed in such processes before the end of their natural life span. Whether it is possible to detect this random loss of platelets in normal individuals at steady-state is unknown. To address this question, we have developed a mathematical model that independently incorporates age-independent random loss and age-dependent natural senescent clearance. By fitting to population survival curves, we illustrate the application of the model in quantifying the fixed requirement for platelets to maintain hemostasis in mice, and discuss the relationship with previous work in humans. Our results suggest a higher requirement for platelets in mice than in humans, however experimental uncertainty in the data limits our ability to constrain this quantity. We then explored the relationship between experimental uncertainty and parameter constraint using simulated data. We conclude that in order to provide useful constraint on the random loss fraction the standard error in the mean of the data must be reduced substantially, either through improving experimental uncertainty or increasing the number of experimental replicates to impractical levels. Finally we find that parameter constraint is improved at higher values of the random loss fraction; thus the model find utility in situations where the random loss fraction is expected to be high, for example during active bleeding or some types of thrombocytopenia. PMID:23505441

  3. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  4. Platelet-rich plasma therapy - future or trend?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Chronic complex musculoskeletal injuries that are slow to heal pose challenges to physicians and researchers alike. Orthobiologics is a relatively newer science that involves application of naturally found materials from biological sources (for example, cell-based therapies), and offers exciting new possibilities to promote and accelerate bone and soft tissue healing. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an orthobiologic that has recently gained popularity as an adjuvant treatment for musculoskeletal injuries. It is a volume of fractionated plasma from the patient's own blood that contains platelet concentrate. The platelets contain alpha granules that are rich in several growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor-β, insulin-like growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor, which play key roles in tissue repair mechanisms. PRP has found application in diverse surgical fields to enhance bone and soft-tissue healing by placing supra-physiological concentrations of autologous platelets at the site of tissue damage. The relative ease of preparation, applicability in the clinical setting, favorable safety profile and possible beneficial outcome make PRP a promising therapeutic approach for future regenerative treatments. However, there is a large knowledge gap in our understanding of PRPs mechanism of action, which has raised skepticism regarding its potential efficacy and use. Thus, the aim of this review is to describe the various factors proposed to contribute to the biological activity of PRP, and the published pre-clinical and clinical evidence to support it. Additionally, we describe the current techniques and technology for PRP preparation, and review the present shortcomings of this therapy that will need to be overcome if it is to gain broad acceptance. PMID:22894643

  5. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  6. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-09

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage.

  7. Isotope fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    A rash of new controversy has emerged around the subject of mass-independent isotope fractionation effects, particularly in the case of the oxygen isotopes. To be sure, the controversy has been around for awhile, but it has been given new impetus by the results of a recent study by Mark H. Thiemens and John E. Heidenreich III of the University of California, San Diego (Science, March 4, 1983).Gustav Arrhenius has been trying to convince the planetary science community that chemical effects in isotope fractionation processes could explain observations in meteorites that appear to be outside of the traditionally understood mass-dependent fractionations (G. Arrhenius, J . L. McCrumb, and N. F. Friedman, Astrophys. Space Sci, 65, 297, 1974). Robert Clayton had made the basic observations of oxygen in carbonaceous chondrites that the slope of the δ17 versus δ18 line was 1 instead of the slope of ½ characteristic of terrestrial rocks and lunar samples (Ann. Rev. Nucl. Part. Sci., 28, 501, 1978). The mass-independent effects were ascribed to the apparent contribution of an ancient presolar system component of O16.

  8. Biochemical properties of platelet microparticle membranes formed during exocytosis resemble organelles more than plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Lundell, Kerstin; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2002-08-14

    Studies of [3H]glycerol turnover in phosphatidylcholine (PC) in platelets revealed two metabolic pools, a 'low turnover PC' in collagen-induced microparticles with specific radioactivity only 10% of that found in the 'high turnover PC' of bulk platelet PC. Isolated organelle fractions of [3H]glycerol-labelled platelets contained [3H]PC with specific radioactivities about 20% of that in membrane fractions. These results together with studies on distribution of concanavalin A-FITC and GPlb, a plasma membrane receptor, indicate that microparticles formed during exocytosis are not simple vesiculations of plasma membrane, but they seem rather to originate from a relatively metabolically static membrane pool not accessible to extracellular reagents.

  9. Platelet count and platelet indices in women with preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    AlSheeha, Muneera A; Alaboudi, Rafi S; Alghasham, Mohammad A; Iqbal, Javed; Adam, Ishag

    2016-01-01

    Background Although the exact pathophysiology of preeclampsia is not completely understood, the utility of different platelets indices can be utilized to predict preeclampsia. Objective To compare platelet indices, namely platelet count (PC), mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW), and PC to MPV ratio in women with preeclampsia compared with healthy controls. Setting Qassim Hospital, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Design A case–control study. Sixty preeclamptic women were the cases and an equal number of healthy pregnant women were the controls. Results There was no significant difference in age, parity, and body mass index between the study groups. Sixteen and 44 of the cases were severe and mild preeclampsia, respectively. There was no significant difference in PDW and MPV between the preeclamptic and control women. Both PC and PC to MPV ratios were significantly lower in the women with preeclampsia compared with the controls. There was no significant difference in the PC, PDW, MPV, and PC to MPV ratio when women with mild and severe preeclampsia were compared. Using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, the PC cutoff was 248.0×103/µL for diagnosis of pre-eclampsia (P=0.019; the area under the ROC curve was 62.4%). Binary regression suggests that women with PC <248.010×103/µL were at higher risk of preeclampsia (odds ratio =2.2, 95% confidence interval =1.08–4.6, P=0.03). The PC/MPV cutoff was 31.2 for diagnosis of preeclampsia (P=0.035, the area under the ROC curve was 62.2%). Conclusion PC <248.010×103/µL and PC to MPV ratio 31.2 are valid predictors of preeclampsia. PMID:27920548

  10. Pooled platelet concentrates: an alternative to single donor apheresis platelets?

    PubMed

    Pietersz, R N I

    2009-10-01

    Three types of platelet concentrates (PC) are compared: PC either processed with the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or the Buffy coat (BC) method from whole blood units and PC obtained by apheresis. Leuko-reduction (LR) pre-storage is advocated to improve quality of the PC during storage and reduce adverse reactions in recipients. Standardization of methods allow preparation of PC with comparable yields of approximately 400 x 10(9) platelets in pooled non-LR-PRP, approximately 370 x 10(9) in pooled LR-BC-PC and in LR apheresis PC the number of platelets can be targeted on 350 x 10(9) or more with devices of various manufacturers. While viral transmission can be prevented by outstanding laboratory tests, the risk of bacterial contamination should be reduced by improved arm disinfection, deviation of the first 20-30 ml of blood and culture or rapid detection assays of the PC pre-issue. In a large prospective multicenter trial no significant difference was observed between cultures of apheresis PC (n = 15,198): 0.09% confirmed positive units versus 0.06% in pooled BC-PC (n = 37,045), respectively. Though platelet activation as measured by CD62 expression may differ in vitro in PC obtained with various apheresis equipment, and also between PC processed with the two whole blood methods there is scarce literature about the clinical impact of these findings. In conclusion the final products of LR-PC derived from whole blood or obtained by apheresis can be comparable, provided the critical steps of the processing method are identified and covered and the process is in control.

  11. Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Immunofluorescence as Indicators of Platelet Compatibility.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-23

    Studies were performed to determine if the increase in MPV was due to the presence of alloantibodies or if it was due to ABO isoagglutinins anti-A and...blood group types (Tables IA and 1B). Sera from donors with blood group type 0 containing anti-A and anti-B isoagglutinins always caused type A...platelets to swell (range 7-24%) (Table 1A). Mixtures of B and 0 platelets with sera containing anti-A and anti-B isoagglutinins demonstrated no change or

  12. Hemolysis after ABO-incompatible platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Chow, M P; Yung, C H; Hu, H Y; Tzeng, C H

    1991-08-01

    An 18 year old girl, with acute myeloid leukemia, developed progressive hemolysis after receiving multiple transfusions with ABO-incompatible platelets. It was caused by passive transfusion of anti-A and -B isoagglutinin from the donor plasma. Her hemoglobin level returned to normal after giving group compatible or pooled and reduced volume platelet concentrates. Transfusing group-incompatible platelets is not contraindicated, but donor plasma reduction should be considered for those patients who need prolonged platelet support. Testing for isoagglutinin titer in group O donors is an alternate method to reduce the incidence of plasma-induced hemolysis in group-incompatible platelet transfusions.

  13. Acetal phosphatidic acids: novel platelet aggregating agents.

    PubMed

    Brammer, J P; Maguire, M H; Walaszek, E J; Wiley, R A

    1983-05-01

    1 Palmitaldehyde, olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids induced rapid shape change and dose-dependent biphasic aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma; aggregation was reversible at low doses and irreversible at high doses of the acetal phosphatidic acids. The palmitaldehyde congener elicited monophasic dose-dependent aggregation of sheep platelets in platelet-rich plasma.2 The threshold concentration for palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid (PGAP)-induced platelet aggregation was 2.5-5 muM for human platelets and 0.25-0.5 muM for sheep platelets. PGAP was 4-5 times as potent versus human platelets as the olealdehyde and linolealdehyde acetal phosphatidic acids, which were equipotent.3 PGAP-induced irreversible aggregation of [(14)C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([(14)C]-5-HT)-labelled human platelets in platelet-rich plasma was accompanied by release of 44.0+/-2.4% (s.e.) of the platelet [(14)C]-5-HT; reversible aggregation was not associated with release. In contrast, PGAP-induced release of [(14)C]-5-HT-labelled sheep platelets was dose-dependent.4 The adenosine diphosphate (ADP) antagonist, 2-methylthio-AMP, and the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, aspirin, abolished PGAP-induced second phase aggregation and release in human platelets but did not affect the first, reversible, phase of aggregation. Both the first and second phases of PGAP-induced aggregation were abolished by chlorpromazine, by the phospholipase A(2) inhibitor, mepacrine, and by nmolar concentrations of prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)); these agents abolished the second, but not the first phase of ADP-induced aggregation.5 The related phospholipids, lecithin, lysolecithin and phosphatidic acid, at <100 muM, neither induced aggregation of human platelets in platelet-rich plasma, nor modified PGAP-induced aggregation; 1-palmityl lysophosphatidic acid elicited aggregation of human platelets at a threshold concentration of 100 muM.6 It is concluded that the acetal phosphatidic acids

  14. Platelet actively cooled thermal management devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueggenburg, H. H.; Hidahl, J. W.; Kessler, E. L.; Rousar, D. C.

    1992-07-01

    An overview of 28 years of actively-cooled platelet thermal management devices design and development history is presented. Platelet devices are created by bonding together thin metal sheets (platelets) which contain chemically-etched coolant pasages. The bonding process produces an intricate and precise matrix of coolant passages and structural walls contained within a monolithic structure. Thirteen specific applications for platelet thermal management devices are described. These devices are cooled using convective, film, and transpiration cooling techniques. Platelet thermal management devices have been fabricated from a variety of metals, cooled with a variety of fluids, and operated at heat fluxes up to 200 Btu/sq in.-sec.

  15. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man.

    PubMed

    Mezzano, D; Hwang, K; Catalano, P; Aster, R H

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 = 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets = 7.57 mu3, LD platelets = 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  16. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    SciTech Connect

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  17. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation.

  18. Platelet Cryopreservation Using Dimethyl Sulfoxide,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    plateletpheresis methods or cell separators. In recent studies, the corrected count increment following 66 transfusions of frozen platelets collected using the...Haemonetics Model 30 processor (Haemonetics Corp., Natick, Mass.) was 12,3000 (range 0-36,800) compared to a mean CCI of 11,7000 (0-34,900) using manual plateletpheresis technique (N = 211).

  19. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of anti-platelet-active compounds from the root of Ashitaba (Angelica keiskei Koidz.).

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ju; Park, Ye Oak; Yu, Chengguang; Lee, Sung Eun; Park, Young Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is fundamental to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including the induction of thrombosis and arteriosclerosis. Anti-platelet activity of a crude methanol extract and solvent fractions of Ashitaba roots (Angelica keiskei Koidz.) was evaluated using a turbidimetric method using washed rabbit platelets. We identified the anti-platelet activities of two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of Ashitaba roots by using a bioassay-guided isolation method. 4-Hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol effectively inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (IC50 of 41.9 and 35.9 μM, respectively), platelet-activating factor (IC50 of 46.1 and 42.3 μM, respectively) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (IC50 of 16.5 and 45.9 μM, respectively). These compounds did not inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (IC50 of>80 μM). The results suggest that the chalcones 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol may be potent anti-thrombotic components of A. keiskei Koidz.

  20. Treatment of chronic venous leg ulcers by platelet gel.

    PubMed

    Ficarelli, Elena; Bernuzzi, Gino; Tognetti, Elena; Bussolati, Ovidio; Zucchi, Alfredo; Adorni, Daniela; De Panfilis, Giuseppe

    2008-07-01

    Chronic venous leg ulcers (CVLU) are chronic wounds, associated with long-standing venous hypertension, which have a poor prognosis for healing. In the process of wound healing the first step is represented by platelet aggregation and subsequent release of growth factors and other mediators, which play a key role in the repair response. Platelet gel (PG), a hemocomponent obtained by mixing platelets, thrombin, and calcium, is able, when applied topically, to release platelet mediators that likely favor CVLU healing. However, unstandardized protocols have been described in studies utilizing PG for the regeneration of a number of tissues, including CVLU; the relative clinical outcomes were hence highly variable. In our experience the topical use of PG, together with the strict adherence to the principles of good wound care, quickly promoted increased granulation tissue, followed by a complete CVLU epithelization. Although further studies and trials are needed to establish the major outcome affecting rules for optimal indications, preparation, and use of PG for CVLU treatment, PG can be undoubtedly considered a useful tool, able to improve the management of CVLU.

  1. Mean platelet volume in young children with urinary tract infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I Re; Shin, Jae Il; Park, Se Jin; Oh, Ji Young; Kim, Ji Hong

    2015-01-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) has not yet been well-established in urinary tract infection (UTI). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of MPV as an acute phase reactant in children with UTI. Data from 118 young children (<2 years) with UTI between 2012 and 2013 were grouped as acute pyelonephritis (APN) and lower UTI according to the dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan abnormalities. MPV, platelet distribution width (PDW) platelet count, and other infection markers (white blood cell [WBC] count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR], and C-reactive protein [CRP]) were measured. WBC (P = 0.001), ESR (P = 0.005), CRP (P < 0.001) and MPV levels (P = 0.011) were significantly higher in the APN group than those in the lower UTI group. MPV positively correlated with PDW, CRP and negatively with platelet count. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed that CRP and MPV were independent predictive factors for APN patients. However, the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve analysis for MPV was lower than CRP. Our results suggest that MPV can be an inflammatory marker in UTI, but the predictive value of MPV was not superior to CRP in the diagnosis of APN. PMID:26666588

  2. Platelets and viruses: an ambivalent relationship.

    PubMed

    Flaujac, Claire; Boukour, Siham; Cramer-Bordé, Elisabeth

    2010-02-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a frequent complication of viral infections providing evidence that interaction of platelets with viruses is an important pathophysiological phenomenon. Multiple mechanisms are involved depending on the nature of the viruses involved. These include immunological platelet destruction, inappropriate platelet activation and consumption, and impaired megakaryopoiesis. Viruses bind platelets through specific receptors and identified ligands, which lead to mutual alterations of both the platelet host and the viral aggressor. We have shown that HIV-1 viruses are internalized specifically in platelets and megakaryocytes, where they can be either sheltered, unaltered (with potential transfer of the viruses into target organs), or come in contact with platelet secretory products leading to virus destruction and facilitated platelet clearance. In this issue, we have reviewed the various pathways that platelets use in order to interact with viruses, HIV and others. This review also shows that more work is still needed to precisely identify platelet roles in viral infections, and to answer the challenge of viral safety in platelet transfusion.

  3. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  4. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheremata, William A; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Yeon S; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS) patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP), P-selectin expression (CD62p), circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg)], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p < 0.001) and CD62p expression was also markedly elevated (p < 0.001). Both are markers of platelet activation. Platelet-associated IgM, but not IgG, was marginally elevated in MS (p = 0.01). Protein S in MS patients did not differ significantly from normal values. Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted. PMID:18588683

  5. Early increase in DcR2 expression and late activation of caspases in the platelet storage lesion.

    PubMed

    Plenchette, S; Moutet, M; Benguella, M; N'Gondara, J P; Guigner, F; Coffe, C; Corcos, L; Bettaieb, A; Solary, E

    2001-10-01

    Platelet transfusion is widely used to prevent bleeding in patients with severe thrombocytopenia. The maximal storage duration of platelet concentrates is usually 5 days, due to the platelet storage lesion that impairs their functions when stored for longer times. Some of the morphological and biochemical changes that characterize this storage lesion are reminiscent of cell death by apoptosis. The present study analyzed whether proteins involved in nucleated cell apoptosis could play a role in the platelet storage lesion. Storage of leukocyte-depleted platelets obtained by apheresis is associated with a late and limited activation of caspases, mainly caspase-3. This event correlates with an increased expression of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim in the particulate fraction and a slight and late release of the pro-apoptotic mitochondrial protein Diablo/Smac in the cytosol. Platelets do not express the death receptors Fas, DR4 and DR5 on their plasma membrane, while the expression of the decoy receptor DcR2 increases progressively during platelet storage. Addition of low concentrations of the cryoprotector dimethylsulfoxide accelerates platelet caspase activation during storage, an effect that is partially prevented by the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. Altogether, DcR2 expression on the plasma membrane is an early event while caspase activation is a late event during platelet storage. These observations suggest that caspases are unlikely to account for the platelet storage lesion. As a consequence, addition of caspase inhibitors may not improve the quality of platelet concentrates stored in standard conditions.

  6. Numerical simulation of platelet margination in microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The adhesion of platelets to vascular walls is the first step in clotting. This process critically depends on the preferential concentration of platelets near walls. The presence of red blood cells, which are the predominant blood constituents, is known to affect the steady state platelet concentration and the dynamic platelet margination, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood to-day. We use a direct numerical simulation to study the platelet margination process, with particular emphasis on the Stokesian hydrodynamic interactions among red cells, platelets, and vessel walls. Well-known mechanical models are used for the shearing and bending stiffness of red cell membranes, and the stiffer platelets are modeled as rigid discoids. A boundary integral formulation is used to solve the flow field, where the numerical solution procedure is accelerated by a parallel O(N N) smooth particle-mesh Ewald method. The effects of red cell hematocrit and deformability will be discussed.

  7. Mean platelet volume as an indicator of platelet rejuvenation following bone-marrow transplantation. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Seanger, D.G.

    1986-07-01

    Thrombocytopenia of unpredictable duration and severity is an expected outcome of the radiation/chemotherapy protocols performed prior to bone-marrow transplantation. Serial evaluation of the platelet count and mean platelet volume of patients diagnosed with acute leukemia demonstrated the mean platelet volume to increase into reference limits 24 to 40 hours prior to a rise in the platelet count in those patients whose bone-marrow successfully responded to induction chemotherapy. Serial platelet counts and measurements of mean platelet volume were performed on 31 patients following bone marrow transplantation. Numerous platelet transfusions, together with sustained thrombocytopenia, inhibited accurate assessment of 29 of 31 patients. Two patients, however, demonstrated a rise in the mean platelet volume prior to an increase in the platelet count. Both of these patients received no platelet transfusions during the period preceding or following the rise in the platelet count. It was proposed that the serial evaluation of the mean platelet volume may assist practitioners in the decision-making process of deciding whether platlet transfusions are required, or an increase in the number of circulating platelets is imminent. A decision not to transfuse would have the direct benefit of decreasing patient costs, in conjunction with eliminating a potential source for the development of an antibody against platelets.

  8. Syncytiotrophoblast Extracellular Vesicles from Pre-Eclampsia Placentas Differentially Affect Platelet Function

    PubMed Central

    Tannetta, Dionne S.; Hunt, Kathryn; Jones, Chris I.; Davidson, Naomi; Coxon, Carmen H.; Ferguson, David; Redman, Christopher W.; Gibbins, Jonathan M.; Sargent, Ian L.; Tucker, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia (PE) complicates around 3% of all pregnancies and is one of the most common causes of maternal mortality worldwide. The pathophysiology of PE remains unclear however its underlying cause originates from the placenta and manifests as raised blood pressure, proteinuria, vascular or systemic inflammation and hypercoagulation in the mother. Women who develop PE are also at significantly higher risk of subsequently developing cardiovascular (CV) disease. In PE, the failing endoplasmic reticulum, oxidative and inflammatory stressed syncytiotrophoblast layer of the placenta sheds increased numbers of syncytiotrophoblast extracellular vesicles (STBEV) into the maternal circulation. Platelet reactivity, size and concentration are also known to be altered in some women who develop PE, although the underlying reasons for this have not been determined. In this study we show that STBEV from disease free placenta isolated ex vivo by dual placental perfusion associate rapidly with platelets. We provide evidence that STBEV isolated from normal placentas cause platelet activation and that this is increased with STBEV from PE pregnancies. Furthermore, treatment of platelets with aspirin, currently prescribed for women at high risk of PE to reduce platelet aggregation, also inhibits STBEV-induced reversible aggregation of washed platelets. Increased platelet reactivity as a result of exposure to PE placenta derived STBEVs correlates with increased thrombotic risk associated with PE. These observations establish a possible direct link between the clotting disturbances of PE and dysfunction of the placenta, as well as the known increased risk of thromboembolism associated with this condition. PMID:26551971

  9. Lung vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease mediated by arteriolar neutrophil-platelet microemboli

    PubMed Central

    Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Jimenez, Maritza A.; Vats, Ravi; Tutuncuoglu, Egemen; Jonassaint, Jude; Kato, Gregory J.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), the polymerization of intraerythrocytic hemoglobin S promotes downstream vaso-occlusive events in the microvasculature. While vaso-occlusion is known to occur in the lung, often in the context of systemic vaso-occlusive crisis and the acute chest syndrome, the pathophysiological mechanisms that incite lung injury are unknown. We used intravital microscopy of the lung in transgenic humanized SCD mice to monitor acute vaso-occlusive events following an acute dose of systemic lipopolysaccharide sufficient to trigger events in SCD but not control mice. We observed cellular microembolism of precapillary pulmonary arteriolar bottlenecks by neutrophil-platelet aggregates. Blood from SCD patients was next studied under flow in an in vitro microfluidic system. Similar to the pulmonary circulation, circulating platelets nucleated around arrested neutrophils, translating to a greater number and duration of neutrophil-platelet interactions compared with normal human blood. Inhibition of platelet P-selectin with function-blocking antibody attenuated the neutrophil-platelet interactions in SCD patient blood in vitro and resolved pulmonary arteriole microembolism in SCD mice in vivo. These results establish the relevance of neutrophil-platelet aggregate formation in lung arterioles in promoting lung vaso-occlusion in SCD and highlight the therapeutic potential of targeting platelet adhesion molecules to prevent acute chest syndrome. PMID:28097236

  10. Evidence for direct transfer of tissue factor from monocytes to platelets in whole blood.

    PubMed

    Sovershaev, Mikhail A; Egorina, Elena M; Osterud, Bjarne; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2012-06-01

    Varying specificity of anti-tissue factor (anti-TF) antibodies gives rise to erroneous conclusions on TF positivity of platelets. Although monocytes are a well established source of TF in whole blood, there is no consensus whether platelets express or acquire TF from external sources. To test whether platelets can acquire TF expressed in monocytes, we studied a transfer of TF-yellow fluorescent protein (TF-YFP) from monocytes nucleofected with TF-YFP to platelets in a whole blood model. Platelets isolated from whole blood were found positive for TF when immunostained with anti-TF antibody from one supplier, whereas no platelet TF antigen was found in whole blood immunostained with anti-TF antibody from another supplier. Both antibodies recognized TF in monocytes. Platelets isolated from whole blood reconstituted with monocytes expressing TF-YFP fusion protein were found positive for TF-YFP only after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Taken together, TF protein could be transferred from monocytes upon stimulation with LPS.

  11. Targeting a novel domain in podoplanin for inhibiting platelet-mediated tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Takaya; Takemoto, Ai; Takagi, Satoshi; Takatori, Kazuki; Sato, Shigeo; Takami, Miho; Fujita, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Podoplanin/Aggrus is a sialoglycoprotein expressed in various cancers. We previously identified podoplanin as a key factor in tumor-induced platelet aggregation. Podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation enhances tumor growth and metastasis by secreting growth factors and by forming tumor emboli in the microvasculature. Thus, precise analysis of the mechanisms of podoplanin-mediated platelet aggregation is critical for developing anti-tumor therapies. Here we report the discovery of a novel platelet aggregation-inducing domain, PLAG4 (81-EDLPT-85). PLAG4 has high homology to the previously reported PLAG3 and contributes to the binding of its platelet receptor CLEC-2. Mutant analyses indicated that PLAG4 exhibits a predominant platelet-aggregating function relative to PLAG3 and that conserved Glu81/Asp82/Thr85 residues in PLAG4 are indispensable for CLEC-2 binding. By establishing anti-PLAG4-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies, we confirmed its role in CLEC-2 binding, platelet aggregation, and tumor emboli formation. Our results suggest the requirement of simultaneous inhibition of PLAG3/4 for complete suppression of podoplanin-mediated tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:26684030

  12. Role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability to protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, S.K.; Burhop, K.E.; Kaplan, J.E.; Malik, A.B. )

    1988-04-01

    The authors examined the role of platelets in maintenance of pulmonary vascular integrity by inducing thrombocytopenia in sheep using antiplatelet serum (APS). A causal relationship between thrombocytopenia and increase in pulmonary vascular permeability was established by platelet repletion using platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Sheep were chronically instrumented and lung lymph fistulas prepared to monitor pulmonary lymph flow (Q{sub lym}). A balloon catheter was positioned in the left atrium to assess pulmonary vascular permeability to protein after raising the left atrial pressure (P{sub la}). Thrombocytopenia was maintained for 3 days by daily intramuscular APS injections. In studies using cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial monolayers, transendothelia permeability of {sup 125}I-labeled albumin was reduced 50 and 95%, respectively, when 2.5 {times} 10{sup 7} or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} platelets were added onto endothelial monolayers. However, addition of 5 {times} 10{sup 6} platelets or 5 {times} 10{sup 7} red blood cells did not reduce endothelial monolayer albumin permeability. Results indicate that platelets are required for the maintenance of pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduction in permeability appears to involve an interaction of platelets with the endothelium.

  13. Platelet Function Tests in Bleeding Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lassila, Riitta

    2016-04-01

    Functional disorders of platelets can involve any aspect of platelet physiology, with many different effects or outcomes. These include platelet numbers (thrombocytosis or thrombocytopenia); changes in platelet production or destruction, or capture to the liver (Ashwell receptor); altered adhesion to vascular injury sites and/or influence on hemostasis and wound healing; and altered activation or receptor functions, shape change, spreading and release reactions, procoagulant and antifibrinolytic activity. Procoagulant membrane alterations, and generation of thrombin and fibrin, also affect platelet aggregation. The above parameters can all be studied, but standardization and quality control of assay methods have been limited despite several efforts. Only after a comprehensive clinical bleeding assessment, including family history, information on drug use affecting platelets, and exclusion of coagulation factor, and tissue deficits, should platelet function testing be undertaken to confirm an abnormality. Current diagnostic tools include blood cell counts, platelet characteristics according to the cell counter parameters, peripheral blood smear, exclusion of pseudothrombocytopenia, whole blood aggregometry (WBA) or light transmission aggregometry (LTA) in platelet-rich plasma, luminescence, platelet function analysis (PFA-100) for platelet adhesion and deposition to collagen cartridges under blood flow, and finally transmission electron microscopy to exclude rare structural defects leading to functional deficits. The most validated test panels are included in WBA, LTA, and PFA. Because platelets are isolated from their natural environment, many simplifications occur, as circulating blood and interaction with vascular wall are omitted in these assays. The target to reach a highly specific platelet disorder diagnosis in routine clinical management can be exhaustive, unless needed for genetic counseling. The elective overall assessment of platelet function disorder

  14. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  15. Survey of current practice for monitoring and management of platelet refractoriness in Italy.

    PubMed

    Quaglietta, Anna; Nicolucci, Antonio; Accorsi, Patrizia; Pompa, Alessandra; Pierelli, Luca; Iacone, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    Platelet transfusion failure is a common phenomenon affecting from 7% to 34% of haematology-oncology patients. Monitoring the efficacy of platelet transfusion through the evaluation of a post-transfusion platelet count and clinical response represent an important guide for subsequent transfusions and for the detection of refractoriness. The aim of this survey was to investigate physicians' attitudes and practices regarding the monitoring of platelet response and the management of platelet refractoriness. An e-mail based survey was conducted among the heads of blood banks with a hemapheresis ward in Italy. Heads of 64 centers out of the 122 initially identified (52%) completed the entire survey. Apheresis, buffy-coat pool, and platelet rich plasma represented an average of 46%, 38% and 17% of the total number of transfusions, respectively. In the prophylaxis of hemorrhagic episodes, most of the centers utilized as standard dose one unit of apheresis platelets (55.7%) and/or one unit of buffy-coat pool platelets (42.6%), while 11.4% of respondents used an average of 6 units of platelet rich plasma. In only 27.9% of the centers was the platelet dose established based on the body weight of the recipient. Only one-third of the centers evaluated the response to platelet transfusion in all patients, while the rate increased to 60% in onco-hematological patients. Among patients transfused on an outpatient basis, the rate dropped to 20%, and a platelet sample taken 10 min after transfusion was generally used. The survey documented a substantial lack of interaction between the clinician requesting the transfusion and the one responsible for the preparation and delivery of the product, with both figures involved in the diagnosis of refractoriness in only one-third of the centers. In conclusion, despite being a frequent condition, platelet refractoriness is still managed with a high degree of heterogeneity and often overlooked. Better adherence to existing guidelines and

  16. The role of mean platelet volume in patients with Takayasu arteritis.

    PubMed

    Peng, You-Fan; Guo, Jing; Deng, Yi-Bin

    2017-03-01

    Background Takayasu arteritis is a chronic non-specific inflammatory disease and mean platelet volume can either be decreased or increased during inflammation. However, there are no published data to confirm an association between mean platelet volume and Takayasu arteritis. Our aim was to evaluate the role of mean platelet volume in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Methods A total of 119 consecutive patients with Takayasu arteritis and 217 healthy individuals were included in this study. Forty-five Takayasu arteritis patients with active disease were followed with prednisone therapy. Results Mean platelet volume of patients was low compared with control groups (10.1 ± 1.47 fL vs. 11.2 ± 0.91 fL; P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume was lower in active Takayasu arteritis than in inactive Takayasu arteritis patients (9.3 ± 1.39 fL vs. 10.6 ± 1.28 fL; P< 0.001). Mean platelet volume values were significantly increased after prednisone treatment (9.3 ± 1.45 fL vs. 10.5 ± 1.29 fL; P < 0.001). Mean platelet volume negatively correlated with C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, neutrophil count and platelet count (r = - 0.219, P = 0.018; r = - 0.296, P < 0.001; r = - 0.273, P = 0.003; r =-0.486, P< 0.001), and positively correlated with platelet distribution width (r=0.304, P ≤ 0.001) in patients with Takayasu arteritis. An inverse correlation between mean platelet volume and erythrocyte sedimentation rate was observed in active Takayasu arteritis patients (r = -0.406, P = 0.010). In multiple linear regression analysis, mean platelet volume was independently correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate in patients with Takayasu arteritis. Conclusions Our results suggest that mean platelet volume may identify active disease in patients with Takayasu arteritis, and the values of mean platelet volume may help to establish remission of active disease after treatment in

  17. Platelet quantification and growth factor analysis from platelet-rich plasma: implications for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Eppley, Barry L; Woodell, Jennifer E; Higgins, Joel

    2004-11-01

    Growth factors released from activated platelets initiate and modulate wound healing in both soft and hard tissues. A recent strategy to promote the wound-healing cascade is to prepare an autologous platelet concentrate suspended in plasma, also known as platelet-rich plasma, that contains growth factors and administer it to wound sites. The purpose of this study was to quantitate platelet number and growth factors released from a prepared platelet concentrate. Whole blood was drawn from 10 healthy patients undergoing cosmetic surgery and concentrated into platelet-rich plasma. Platelet counts on whole blood and platelet-rich plasma were determined using a Cell-Dyn 3200. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB, transforming growth factor-beta1, vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelial growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor-1 were measured in the platelet-rich plasma using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. In addition, platelet activation during the concentration procedure was analyzed by measuring P selectin values in blood serum. An 8-fold increase in platelet concentration was found in the platelet-rich plasma compared with that of whole blood (baseline whole blood, 197 +/- 42 x 10 platelets/microl; platelet concentrate, 1600 +/- 330 x 10 platelets/microl). The concentration of growth factors also increased with increasing platelet number. However, growth factor concentration varied from patient to patient. On average for the whole blood as compared with platelet-rich plasma, the platelet-derived growth factor-BB concentration increased from 3.3 +/- 0.9 ng/ml to 17 +/- 8 ng/ml, transforming growth factor-beta1 concentration increased from 35 +/- 8 ng/ml to 120 +/- 42 ng/ml, vascular endothelial growth factor concentration increased from 155 +/- 110 pg/ml to 955 +/- 1030 pg/ml, and endothelial growth factor concentration increased from 129 +/- 61 pg/ml to 470 +/- 320 pg/ml. No increase was found for insulin-like growth factor-1. In addition, no

  18. 111In platelet imaging of left ventricular thrombi. Predictive value for systemic emboli

    SciTech Connect

    Stratton, J.R.; Ritchie, J.L. )

    1990-04-01

    To determine whether a positive indium 111 platelet image for a left ventricular thrombus, which indicates ongoing thrombogenic activity, predicts an increased risk of systemic embolization, we compared the embolic rate in 34 patients with positive {sup 111}In platelet images with that in 69 patients with negative images during a mean follow-up of 38 +/- 31 (+/- SD) months after platelet imaging. The positive and negative image groups were similar with respect to age (59 +/- 11 vs. 62 +/- 10 years), prevalence of previous infarction (94% vs. 78%, p less than 0.05), time from last infarction (28 +/- 51 vs. 33 +/- 47 months), ejection fraction (29 +/- 14 vs. 33 +/- 14), long-term or paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (15% vs. 26%), warfarin therapy during follow-up (26% vs. 20%), platelet-inhibitory therapy during follow-up (50% vs. 33%), injected {sup 111}In dose (330 +/- 92 vs. 344 +/- 118 microCi), and latest imaging time (greater than or equal to 48 hours in all patients). During follow-up, embolic events occurred in 21% (seven of 34) of patients with positive platelet images for left ventricular thrombi as compared with 3% (two of 69) of patients with negative images (p = 0.002). By actuarial methods, at 42 months after platelet imaging, only 86% of patients with positive images were embolus free as compared with 98% of patients with negative images (p less than 0.01).

  19. [Pathogen inactivation of platelets: organization consequences for platelet transfusion].

    PubMed

    Chavarin, P; DePutter, C; Boussoulade, F; Acquart, S; Vidal, M; Argaud, C; Fabrigli, P; Garraud, O

    2011-08-01

    In the past few years, pathogen reduction technologies for labile blood products have been part of the enhancement of global transfusion safety regarding residual risks of transmitting infectious pathogens. Having carried out a feasibility study for the implementation of pathogen inactivation of platelet concentrates by means of the amotosalen/HCl/UVA (Intercept™) technology, and participated to a reinforced haemovigilance study, we took the opportunity to analyze the organization consequences for platelet concentrates inventory and distribution. This impact study first indicated that those novel needs forced the blood donation service, as well as the labile blood product preparation laboratory, to review and improve practices; secondly, it showed that the routine implementation has little (no major) consequence in the overall organization, independently of the economic consequences (not covered here).

  20. From Students' Problem-Solving Strategies to Connections in Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Alfinio; Klein, Erika

    2005-01-01

    Strategies that children used to solve a fraction problem are presented, and an insight into how students think about divisions and fractions is described. Teachers can use these strategies to help students establish connections related to fractions.

  1. Evidence that the platelet plasma membrane does not contain a (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-dependent ATPase.

    PubMed

    Steiner, B; Lüscher, E F

    1985-09-10

    The present study was designed to determine the subcellular distribution of the platelet (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase. Human platelets were surface labeled by the periodate-boro[3H]hydride method. Plasma membrane vesicles were then isolated to a purity of approx. 90% by a procedure utilizing wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatography. These membranes were found to be 2.6-fold enriched in surface glycoproteins compared to an unfractionated vesicle fraction and almost 7-fold enriched compared to intact platelets. In contrast, the isolated plasma membranes showed a decreased specific activity of the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase compared to the unfractionated vesicle fraction. This decrease in specific activity was found to be similar to that of an endoplasmic reticulum marker, glucose-6-phosphatase, and to that of a platelet inner membrane marker, phospholipase A2. We conclude, therefore, that the (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-ATPase is not located in the platelet plasma membrane but is restricted to membranes of intracellular origin.

  2. Antioxidative effects of extracts from Trifolium species on blood platelets exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Moniuszko-Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-12-01

    Clovers (Trifolium) may possess a significant therapeutic potential, but the effects of compounds from these plants on blood platelets and haemostasis have been poorly recognized. The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidative action of extracts from three species of clovers: Trifolium pratense, Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum in the protection of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were pre-incubated with crude extract and phenolic fraction of T. pratense or phenolic fractions of T. scabrum and T. pallidum, at the final concentrations of 0.5-50 μg/ml. Then, for the induction of oxidative stress, 100 μM peroxynitrite was added. The antioxidative activity of plant extracts was assessed by measurements of the level of 3-nitrotyrosine, thiol groups and lipid peroxidation products (hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances). Despite the significant differences in the composition of the investigated extracts, we observed antioxidative effects of all used mixtures. The presence of Trifolium extracts considerably reduced the peroxynitrite-mediated modifications of proteins and diminished peroxidation of lipids in platelets. Our results indicate on a strong antioxidative activity of the tested extracts-statistically significant effects were found even for the lowest concentrations (0.5 μg/ml) of all extracts. This action may be useful in the protection of blood components, very susceptible to oxidative modifications. The obtained results suggest that the examined clovers are a promising source of compounds, valuable for the protection against oxidative stress-induced damage to blood platelets.

  3. Establishing operations

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Jack

    1993-01-01

    The first two books on behavior analysis (Skinner, 1938; Keller & Schoenfeld, 1950) had chapter-length coverage of motivation. The next generation of texts also had chapters on the topic, but by the late 1960s it was no longer being given much treatment in the behavior-analytic literature. The present failure to deal with the topic leaves a gap in our understanding of operant functional relations. A partial solution is to reintroduce the concept of the establishing operation, defined as an environmental event, operation, or stimulus condition that affects an organism by momentarily altering (a) the reinforcing effectiveness of other events and (b) the frequency of occurrence of that part of the organism's repertoire relevant to those events as consequences. Discriminative and motivative variables can be distinguished as follows: The former are related to the differential availability of an effective form of reinforcement given a particular type of behavior; the latter are related to the differential reinforcing effectiveness of environmental events. An important distinction can also be made between unconditioned establishing operations (UEOs), such as food deprivation and painful stimulation, and conditioned establishing operations (CEOs) that depend on the learning history of the organism. One type of CEO is a stimulus that has simply been paired with a UEO and as a result may take on some of the motivative properties of that UEO. The warning stimulus in avoidance procedures is another important type of CEO referred to as reflexive because it establishes its own termination as a form of reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has accomplished such termination. Another CEO is closely related to the concept of conditional conditioned reinforcement and is referred to as a transitive CEO, because it establishes some other stimulus as a form of effective reinforcement and evokes the behavior that has produced that other stimulus. The multiple control of human

  4. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  5. Trehalose lyophilized platelets for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Pietramaggiori, Giorgio; Kaipainen, Arja; Ho, David; Orser, Cindy; Pebley, Walter; Rudolph, Alan; Orgill, Dennis P

    2007-01-01

    Fresh platelet preparations are utilized to treat a wide variety of wounds, although storage limitations and mixed results have hampered their clinical use. We hypothesized that concentrated lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations, preserved with trehalose, maintain and possibly enhance fresh platelets' ability to improve wound healing. We studied the ability of a single dose of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets to enhance wound healing when topically applied on full-thickness wounds in the genetically diabetic mouse. We compared these results with the application of multiple doses of fresh platelet preparations and trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets as well as multiple doses of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and wounds left untreated. Trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelets, in single and multiple applications, multiple applications of fresh platelets and multiple applications of VEGF increased granulation tissue deposition, vascularity, and proliferation when compared with untreated wounds, as assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Wounds treated with multiple doses of VEGF and a single dose of freeze-dried platelets reached 90% closure faster than wounds left untreated. A single administration of trehalose lyophilized and reconstituted platelet preparations enhanced diabetic wound healing, therefore representing a promising strategy for the treatment of nonhealing wounds.

  6. Detection of microbial contamination in platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, Tracy L.; Leparc, German; Huffman, Debra E.; Gennaccaro, Angela L.; Garcia-Lopez, Alicia; Klungness, Greta; Stephans, Christie; Garcia-Rubio, Luis H.

    2005-03-01

    In the United States, approximately 100 patients develop fatal sepsis associated with platelet transfusions every year. Current culture methods take 24-48 hours to acquire results, which in turn decrease the shelf life of platelets. Many of the microorganisms that contaminate platelets can replicate easily at room temperature, which is the necessary storage temperature to keep platelets functional. Therefore, there is a need for in-situ quality control assessment of the platelet quality. For this purpose, a real time spectrophotometric technique has been developed. The Spectral Acquisition Processing Detection (SAPD) method, comprised of a UV-vis spectrophotometer and modeling algorithms, is a rapid method that can be performed prior to platelet transfusion to decrease the risk of bacterial infection to patients. The SAPD method has been used to determine changes in cell suspensions, based on size, shape, chemical composition and internal structure. Changes in these cell characteristics can in turn be used to determine microbial contamination, platelet aging and other physiologic changes. Detection limits of this method for platelet suspensions seeded with bacterial contaminants were identified to be less than 100 cfu/ml of sample. Bacterial counts below 1000 cfu/ml are not considered clinically significant. The SAPD method can provide real-time identification of bacterial contamination of platelets affording patients an increased level of safety without causing undue strain on laboratory budgets or personnel while increasing the time frame that platelets can be used by dramatically shortening contaminant detection time.

  7. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  8. Mouse prenatal platelet-forming lineages share a core transcriptional program but divergent dependence on MPL.

    PubMed

    Potts, Kathryn S; Sargeant, Tobias J; Dawson, Caleb A; Josefsson, Emma C; Hilton, Douglas J; Alexander, Warren S; Taoudi, Samir

    2015-08-06

    The thrombopoietic environment of the neonate is established during prenatal life; therefore, a comprehensive understanding of platelet-forming cell development during embryogenesis is critical to understanding the etiology of early-onset thrombocytopenia. The recent discovery that the first platelet-forming cells of the conceptus are not megakaryocytes (MKs) but diploid platelet-forming cells (DPFCs) revealed a previously unappreciated complexity in thrombopoiesis. This raises important questions, including the following. When do conventional MKs appear? Do pathogenic genetic lesions of adult MKs affect DPFCs? What role does myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL), a key regulator of adult megakaryopoiesis, play in prenatal platelet-forming lineages? We performed a comprehensive study to determine the spatial and temporal appearance of prenatal platelet-forming lineages. We demonstrate that DPFCs originate in the yolk sac and then rapidly migrate to other extra- and intraembryonic tissues. Using gene disruption models of Gata1 and Nfe2, we demonstrate that perturbing essential adult MK genes causes an analogous phenotype in the early embryo before the onset of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell-driven (definitive) hematopoiesis. Finally, we present the surprising finding that DPFC and MK commitment from their respective precursors is MPL independent in vivo but that completion of MK differentiation and establishment of the prenatal platelet mass is dependent on MPL expression.

  9. Platelet function tests in clinical cardiology: unfulfilled expectations.

    PubMed

    Gorog, Diana A; Fuster, Valentin

    2013-05-28

    This review is a critical evaluation of publications in the past decade on the usefulness of platelet function tests (PFTs) in clinical cardiology, in aiding diagnosis, predicting risk, and monitoring therapy. The ideal PFT should: 1) detect baseline platelet hyperreactivity; 2) allow individualization of antiplatelet medication; 3) predict thrombotic risk; and 4) predict bleeding risk. The practicalities of clinical cardiology demand rapid, accurate, and reliable tests that are simple to operate at the bedside and available 24 h a day, 7 days a week. Point-of-care PFTs most widely evaluated clinically include PFA-100 and VerifyNow. None of these tests can reliably detect platelet hyperreactivity and thus identify a prothrombotic state. Identification of antiplatelet nonresponsiveness or hyporesponsiveness is highly test specific, and does not allow individualization of therapy. The power of PFTs in predicting thrombotic events for a given individual is variable and often modest, and alteration of antithrombotic treatment on the basis of the results of PFTs has not been shown to alter clinical outcome. PFTs in current mainstream use cannot reliably assess bleeding risk. These tests have been in use for over a decade, but the hopes raised by PFTs in clinical practice remain unfulfilled. Although physiologically relevant measurement of platelet function now is more important than ever, a critical reappraisal of available techniques in light of clinical requirements is needed. The use of native blood, global stimulus instead of individual agonists, contribution of thrombin generation by activated platelets to the test results, and establishment of a PFT therapeutic range for each antiplatelet drug should be considered and is discussed.

  10. Mean Platelet Volume and Platelet Distribution Width as Markers in the Diagnosis of Acute Gangrenous Appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhe; Pan, Jiyong; Zhang, Yingyi; Wang, Ziyi; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Baoshun; Shi, Lei; Jing, Huirong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Acute gangrenous appendicitis (AGA) is a common medical condition; however, the grade of appendicitis usually cannot be established preoperatively. We have attempted to identify some indicators, such as the mean platelet volume (MPV) and the platelet distribution width (PDW), to diagnose AGA. Aims. To evaluate whether or not the MPV and PDW are suitable markers to diagnose AGA. Methods. A retrospective study of 160 patients with AGA and 160 healthy patients was undertaken. Disease diagnosis was confirmed based on the pathologic examination of surgical specimens. Patient white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil ratio (NR), platelet (PLT) count, MPV, PDW, and hematocrit (HCT) were analyzed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of these indices in AGA. Results. There were no significant differences between the AGA and control groups in age and gender. Compared to the control group, the WBC count, NR, and PDW were significantly higher (P < 0.001, resp.) and the MPV and HCT were significantly lower (P < 0.001, resp.) in the AGA group. The diagnostic specificities of the WBC count, NR, PLT count, MPV, PDW, and HCT were 86.3%, 92.5%, 58.1%, 81.7%, 83.9%, and 66.3%, respectively. Therefore, the NR had the highest diagnostic specificity for the diagnosis of AGA. Conclusions. This is the first study to assess the MPV and PDW in patients with AGA. Our present study showed that the MPV is reduced and the PDW is increased in patients with AGA; the sensitivity of PDW was superior to the MPV. A decreased MPV value and an increased PDW could serve as two markers to diagnose AGA. The NR had the highest specificity for the diagnosis of AGA. PMID:26688600

  11. Platelets are not critical effector cells for the time course of murine passive crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein, Bernd; Daniel, Christoph; Johnson, Richard J; Amann, Kerstin U; Hugo, Christian P M

    2013-01-01

    Although platelets are well-known effector cells of inflammatory renal disease, clinical studies were not able to establish platelet inhibition as an effective therapy. Our previous studies using Vasodilator stimulated Phosphoprotein- and P2Y1-deficient mice suggested some early, but no long-term effects of platelets in passive crescentic glomerulonephritis. To define the role of platelets for this disease model, passive crescentic glomerulonephritis was induced in 72 C57Bl/6 mice by intraperitoneal injection of sheep anti-rabbit glomerular basement membrane antibody on 2 consecutive days. Platelets were depleted using anti-glycoprotein Ibα antibodies (p0p3/p0p4) every 4th day. Mice treated with equal amounts of sterile Phosphate buffered solution or rat-IgG served as controls. Blood, urine, and tissues were harvested on days 3 and 28. Renal tissue sections were evaluated after immunostaining using (semi)quantitative and computer-assisted image analysis. Compared to controls, efficient depletion was achieved as indicated by a markedly prolonged bleeding time and a more than 90% reduction in platelet counts (800/nl vs. 42/nl; P < 0.001). Functional (creatinine-clearance and proteinuria) parameters demonstrated no significant differences between the groups. Neither parameters of renal injury (glomerulosclerosis and fibrosis) nor glomerular/tubulointerstitial matrix expansion (by collagen IV staining), glomerular capillary rarefaction (lectin staining), and the glomerular/tubulointerstitial proliferative response (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) demonstrated any differences between platelet-depleted mice and PBS- or rat-IgG-treated nephritic mice at any time point. Despite effective platelet inhibition/depletion, neither the short- nor long-term course of passive crescentic nephrotoxic nephritis was affected. These data indicate that platelets play a minor role during the time course of this disease model in the mouse.

  12. Indium-111 platelet imaging for detection of platelet deposition in abdominal aneurysms and prosthetic arterial grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, J.L.; Stratton, J.R.; Thiele, B.; Haminton, G.W.; Warrick, L.N.; Huang, T.W.; Harker, L.A.

    1981-04-01

    Thirty-four platelet imaging studies were performed in 23 patients to determine whether platelet deposition could be detected in patients with vascular aneurysms (18 patients) or in patients in whom Dacron prosthetic grafts had been placed (5 patients). In patients in whom abnormal platelet deposition was detected, the effect of administration of platelet-active drugs on platelet deposition was examined. Of the 18 patients with an aneurysm, 12 had equivocally positive studies on initial imaging and 2 had equivocally positive images. Of five patients with Dacron arterial grafts in place, four had diffuse platelet deposition in the grafts; the fifth patient had a platelet deposition only in a pseudoaneurysm. Eight patients with an abdominal aneurysm and positive or equivocally positive baseline images were restudied during platelet-active drug therapy either with aspirin plus dipyridamole (seven patients) or with sulfinpyrazone (four patients). No patient studied during treatment with aspirin plus dipyridamole had detectably decreased platelet deposition compared with baseline determinations. In contrast, two of four patients studied while receiving sulfinpyrazone showed decreased platelet deposition. Thus, platelet imaging may be of value for studying platelet physiology in vivo and for assessing platelet-active drugs and the thrombogenicity of prosthetic graft materials in human beings.

  13. Effect of sildenafil on platelet function and platelet cGMP of patients with erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Akand, M; Gencer, E; Yaman, Ö; Erişgen, G; Tekin, D; Özdiler, E

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of sildenafil on platelet function and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in patients with erectile dysfunction, we evaluated the association between erectile function and platelet responses after administration of 100 mg sildenafil. Erectile responses were monitored after 8 daily doses of the drug. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and simultaneous adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and cGMP levels were determined before and after sildenafil therapy. Basal levels for platelet aggregation, ATP release and cGMP were compared with age-matched controls. There was no difference among basal levels of platelet responses between patients and controls, except for ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). It was significantly higher in the patient group. Analysis of the responses to sildenafil revealed that for the patients who showed a positive erectile response, there was a significant increase in platelet cGMP (P = 0.028) and a decrease in ADP-induced platelet aggregation (P = 0.04). However, for those who showed a negative or poor erectile response, there was no change in platelet cGMP levels and platelet functions. Sildenafil did not affect collagen-induced platelet responses although cGMP levels of the responders increased. It is concluded that sildenafil increases platelet cGMP in the patients with positive erectile response. Therefore, it has been speculated that platelet cGMP may be used as an index for erectile response.

  14. Platelet Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Potential Mediator of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Maloney, James P; Ambruso, Daniel R; Voelkel, Norbert F; Silliman, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Objective The occurrence of non-hemolytic transfusion reactions is highest with platelet and plasma administration. Some of these reactions are characterized by endothelial leak, especially transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). Elevated concentrations of inflammatory mediators secreted by contaminating leukocytes during blood product storage may contribute to such reactions, but platelet-secreted mediators may also contribute. We hypothesized that platelet storage leads to accumulation of the endothelial permeability mediator vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and that intravascular administration of exogenous VEGF leads to extensive binding to its lung receptors. Methods Single donor, leukocyte-reduced apheresis platelet units were sampled over 5 days of storage. VEGF protein content of the centrifuged supernatant was determined by ELISA, and the potential contribution of VEGF from contaminating leukocytes was quantified. Isolated-perfused rat lungs were used to study the uptake of radiolabeled VEGF administered intravascularly, and the effect of unlabeled VEGF on lung leak. Results There was a time-dependent release of VEGF into the plasma fraction of the platelet concentrates (62 ± 9 pg/ml on day one, 149 ± 23 pg/ml on day 5; mean ± SEM, p<0.01, n=8) and a contribution by contaminating leukocytes was excluded. Exogenous 125I-VEGF bound avidly and specifically to the lung vasculature, and unlabeled VEGF in the lung perfusate caused vascular leak. Conclusion Rising concentrations of VEGF occur during storage of single donor platelet concentrates due to platelet secretion or disintegration, but not due to leukocyte contamination. Exogenous VEGF at these concentrations rapidly binds to its receptors in the lung vessels. At higher VEGF concentrations, VEGF causes vascular leak in uninjured lungs. These data provide further evidence that VEGF may contribute to the increased lung permeability seen in TRALI associated with platelet products. PMID

  15. Extracts from Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum aerial parts as modulators of blood platelet adhesion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kolodziejczyk-Czepas, Joanna; Olas, Beata; Malinowska, Joanna; Wachowicz, Barbara; Szajwaj, Barbara; Kowalska, Iwona; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of reports indicate that some species of clover (Trifolium) may have remarkable medical importance; however, the effects of these plants on blood platelets and hemostasis are inadequately recognized. This work was designed to study the effects of Trifolium pallidum and Trifolium scabrum extracts on the functions of human blood platelets in vitro. Platelet suspensions were preincubated with extracts from aerial parts of T. pallidum (phenolic fraction and clovamide fraction) and T. scabrum (phenolic fraction) at the final concentrations of 12.5, 25, and 50 µg/ml. Then, for platelet activation thrombin (0.1 U/ml), thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 20 µM), or adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 1 µM) were used. The effects of Trifolium extracts on adhesion of blood platelets to fibrinogen and collagen were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Platelet aggregation was monitored on a dual-channel Chronolog aggregometer. In these studies, we also compared the action of tested plant extracts with the effects of another antiplatelet plant-derived compound - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The performed assays demonstrated that the tested extracts might influence the platelet functions in vitro. The inhibitory, concentration-dependent effects of all tested extracts on adhesion of thrombin-stimulated platelets to collagen was found. Both extracts from T. pallidum and from T. scabrum reduced the thrombin-induced platelet adhesion to fibrinogen. Furthermore, in the presence of all three extracts, the platelet aggregation induced by thrombin was slightly inhibited. Our results also indicate that the tested plant extracts (at the highest concentrations used of 50 µg/ml), similar to purified resveratrol, inhibit selected steps of platelet activation stimulated by both proteolytic (thrombin) and nonproteolytic agonists (TRAP or ADP). In the comparative studies, T. pallidum and T. scabrum extracts was not found

  16. Functional Effect of the Mutations Similar to the Cleavage during Platelet Activation at Integrin β3 Cytoplasmic Tail when Expressed in Mouse Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiansong; Long, Zhangbiao; Zhou, Yulan; Liu, Ping; Tao, Lanlan; Ruan, Zheng; Xiao, Bing; Zhang, Wei; Li, Dongya; Dai, Kesheng; Mao, Jianhua; Xi, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies in Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that truncational mutations of β3 at sites of F754 and Y759 mimicking calpain cleavage regulate integrin signaling. The roles of the sequence from F754 to C-terminus and the conservative N756ITY759 motif in platelet function have yet to be elaborated. Mice expressing β3 with F754 and Y759 truncations, or NITY deletion (β3-ΔTNITYRGT, β3-ΔRGT, or β3-ΔNITY) were established through transplanting the homozygous β3-deficient mouse bone marrow cells infected by the GFP tagged MSCV MigR1 retroviral vector encoding different β3 mutants into lethally radiated wild-type mice. The platelets were harvested for soluble fibrinogen binding and platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. Platelet adhesion on fibrinogen- and collagen-coated surface under flow was also tested to assess the ability of the platelets to resist hydrodynamic drag forces. Data showed a drastic inhibition of the β3-ΔTNITYRGT platelets to bind soluble fibrinogen and spread on immobilized fibrinogen in contrast to a partially impaired fibrinogen binding and an almost unaffected spreading exhibited in the β3-ΔNITY platelets. Behaviors of the β3-ΔRGT platelets were consistent with the previous observations in the β3-ΔRGT knock-in platelets. The adhesion impairment of platelets with the β3 mutants under flow was in different orders of magnitude shown as: β3-ΔTNITYRGT>β3-ΔRGT>β3-ΔNITY to fibrinogen-coated surface, and β3-ΔTNITYRGT>β3-ΔNITY>β3-ΔRGT to collagen-coated surface. To evaluate the interaction of the β3 mutants with signaling molecules, GST pull-down and immunofluorescent assays were performed. Results showed that β3-ΔRGT interacted with kindlin but not c-Src, β3-ΔNITY interacted with c-Src but not kindlin, while β3-ΔTNITYRGT did not interact with both proteins. This study provided evidence in platelets at both static and flow conditions that the calpain cleavage-related sequences of integrin β3, i.e. T755

  17. Complement Activation Alters Platelet Function

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    2004; Danese et al., 2003). Recent studies have demonstrated a role for platelets in the development of both innate and adaptive immune responses...mediated modulation of adaptive immunity. A communication link between innate and adaptive immune compartments. Immunity 19:9-19. 4. Fleming, S.D., M...Monestier, and G.C. Tsokos. 2004. Accelerated ischemia/reperfusion- induced injury in autoimmunity-prone mice. Journal of immunology 173:4230-4235

  18. Haplotype of platelet receptor P2RY12 gene is associated with residual clopidogrel on-treatment platelet reactivity*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Xiao-yan; Li, Jun-lei; Zhang, Yong; Xu, Yang; Yang, Xue-li; Fu, Yu; Liang, Guang-kai; Lu, Yun; Liu, Jian; Shi, Lu-wen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate a possible association between common variations of the P2RY12 and the residual clopidogrel on-treatment platelet reactivity after adjusting for the influence of CYP2C19 tested by thromboelastography (TEG). Methods: One hundred and eighty patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) treated with clopidogrel and aspirin were included and platelet function was assessed by TEG. Five selected P2RY12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs6798347, rs6787801, rs6801273, rs6785930, and rs2046934), which cover the common variations in the P2RY12 gene and its regulatory regions, and three CYP2C19 SNPs (*2,*3,*17) were genotyped and possible haplotypes were analyzed. Results: The high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) prevalence defined by a platelet inhibition rate <30% by TEG in adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-channel was 69 (38.33%). Six common haplotypes were inferred from four of the selected P2RY12 SNPs (denoted H0 to H5) according to the linkage disequilibrium R square (except for rs2046934). Haplotype H1 showed a significantly lower incidence of HTPR than the reference haplotype (H0) in the total study population while haplotypes H1 and H2 showed significantly lower incidences of HTPR than H0 in the nonsmoker subgroup after adjusting for CYP2C19 effects and demographic characteristics. rs2046934 (T744C) did not show any significant association with HTPR. Conclusions: The combination of common P2RY12 variations including regulatory regions rather than rs2046934 (T744C) that related to pharmacodynamics of clopidogrel in patients with ACS was independently associated with residual on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity. This is apart from the established association of the CYP2C19. This association seemed more important in the subgroup defined by smoking. PMID:28070995

  19. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  20. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    DOE PAGES

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; ...

    2016-05-11

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in highdegree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifoldmore » singularities. Upon taking the AdS3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Lastly, our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.« less

  1. Imaging the elastic modulus of human platelets during thrombin-induced activation using scanning ion conductance microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rheinlaender, Johannes; Vogel, Sebastian; Seifert, Jan; Schächtele, Marc; Borst, Oliver; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schäffer, Tilman E

    2015-02-01

    Platelet activation plays a critical role in haemostasis and thrombosis. It is well-known that platelets generate contractile forces during activation. However, their mechanical material properties have rarely been investigated. Here, we use scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) to visualise morphological and mechanical properties of live human platelets at high spatial resolution. We found that their mean elastic modulus decreases during thrombin-induced activation by about a factor of two. We observed a similar softening of platelets during cytochalasin D-induced cytoskeleton depolymerisation. However, thrombin-induced temporal and spatial modulations of the elastic modulus were substantially different from cytochalasin D-mediated changes. We thereby provide new insights into the mechanics of haemostasis and establish SICM as a novel imaging platform for the ex vivo investigation of the mechanical properties of live platelets.

  2. Platelets: cell proliferation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ross, R

    1979-04-01

    Intimal smooth muscle proliferation is the hallmark of the lesions of atherosclerosis. Endothelial injury is postulated to precede this intimal smooth muscle proliferative response, which is mediated by a potent mitogenic factor derived from adherence, aggregation, and release by platelets at sites of endothelial injury. Smooth muscle proliferation is accompanied by varying amounts of connective tissue formation and intracellular and extracellular lipid deposition, dependent upon the risk factors encountered in each patient. The platelet-derived mitogen (PF) is a stable, cationic, relatively low molecular weight (10,000-30,000) protein that has been partially purified by ion exchange chromotography and gel filtration. Less than 100 ng of PF/ml culture medium can stimulate sparse 3T3 cells or smooth muscle cells, but not endothelial cells, to undergo multiple cell divisions in the presence of 5% cell-free, plasma-derived serum. The latter contains no mitogenic activity. The interaction of the platelet mitogen and plasma-derived components, including lipoproteins, plays a critical role in smooth muscle proliferation in vitro and in vivo in the induction of the lesions of atherosclerosis.

  3. Inhibitory effects of Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark extract on platelet aggregation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation through suppressions of arachidonic acid liberation and ERK1/2 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Son, Dong-Ju; Lim, Yong; Park, Young-Hyun; Chang, Sung-Keun; Yun, Yeo-Pyo; Hong, Jin-Tae; Takeoka, Gary R; Lee, Kwang-Geun; Lee, Sung-Eun; Kim, Mi-Ran; Kim, Jeong-Han; Park, Byeoung-Soo

    2006-11-03

    The antiplatelet and antiproliferative activities of extract of Tabebuia impetiginosa inner bark (taheebo) were investigated using washed rabbit platelets and cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. n-Hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions showed marked and selective inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by collagen and arachidonic acid (AA) in a dose-dependent manner. These fractions, especially the chloroform fraction, also significantly suppressed AA liberation induced by collagen in [(3)H]AA-labeled rabbit platelets. The fractions, especially the chloroform fraction, potently inhibited cell proliferation and DNA synthesis induced by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, and inhibited the levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK1/2) mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) stimulated by PDGF-BB, in the same concentration range that inhibits VSMC proliferation and DNA synthesis.

  4. The impact of platelet transfusion characteristics on posttransfusion platelet increments and clinical bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Triulzi, Darrell J; Assmann, Susan F; Strauss, Ronald G; Ness, P M; Hess, John R; Kaufman, Richard M; Granger, Suzanne; Slichter, Sherrill J

    2012-06-07

    Platelet characteristics, such as platelet dose, platelet source (apheresis vs pooled), platelet donor-recipient ABO compatibility, and duration of platelet storage, can affect posttransfusion platelet increments, but it is unclear whether these factors impact platelet transfusion efficacy on clinical bleeding. We performed secondary analyses of platelet transfusions given in the prospective randomized Platelet Dose Study, which included 1272 platelet-transfused hematology-oncology patients who received 6031 prophylactic platelet transfusions. The primary outcome of these analyses was time from first transfusion to first World Health Organization ≥ grade 2 bleeding. Platelet transfusion increments were assessed at 0.25 to 4 hours and 16 to 32 hours after platelet transfusion. There were 778 patients evaluable for analysis of time to bleeding. Adjusted models showed that randomized dose strategy, platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage did not predict this outcome. Platelet increments were generally higher for transfusions of apheresis platelets, ABO-identical platelets, and platelets stored 3 days versus 4 to 5 days. Thus, although platelet source, ABO compatibility, and duration of storage exert a modest impact on both absolute and corrected posttransfusion platelet increments, they have no measurable impact on prevention of clinical bleeding. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00128713.

  5. Therapeutic platelet reduction: Use in postsplenectomy thrombocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Gita; Talekar, Manjubala S.; Verma, Sanjiv Kumar; Rehmani, Babar; Gupta, Vibha; Agarwal, Amit; Harsh, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic platelet reduction is an effective modality for the reduction of platelet count in patients with treatment of extreme thrombocytosis resulting from a variety of primary and secondary causes of thrombocytosis, which may be associated with thrombotic or hemorrhagic complications of varying degrees. These cases when symptomatic fall into the ASFA Category II indication for therapeutic platelet apheresis procedure. Here, we report a case of postsplenectomy secondary thrombocytosis presenting with extremely high platelet counts and subsequent thrombosis in the shunt and successful treatment after therapeutic platelet reduction. The case is being presented to bring forth the fact that therapeutic platelet reduction is an easy procedure that gives quick and good results and also to bring to the attention of transfusion specialists an associated but as yet unreported procedural finding. PMID:25722581

  6. Mean platelet volume in acute rheumatic fever.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ahmet; Aypar, Ebru; Odabas, Dursun

    2013-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is still an endemic disease, especially among school-aged children in developing countries. Mean platelet volume (MPV), which is commonly used as a measure of platelet size, indicates the rate of platelet production and platelet activation. We aimed to investigate MPV in children with ARF. The study population consisted of 40 children with ARF (32 patients with carditis and 8 patients without carditis) and 40 healthy control subjects. White blood cell (WBC) and platelet counts were significantly higher and MPV values were significantly lower in patients with ARF during the acute stage when compared to controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein values significantly decreased in patients with ARF after the treatment when compared to baseline, whereas MPV values increased. MPV values were negatively correlated with ESR and WBC, and platelet counts. In conclusion, during the acute stage of ARF, MPV values were lower when compared to controls.

  7. Nouvelle cuisine: platelets served with inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Rick; Zufferey, Anne; Boilard, Eric; Semple, John W

    2015-06-15

    Platelets are small cellular fragments with the primary physiological role of maintaining hemostasis. In addition to this well-described classical function, it is becoming increasingly clear that platelets have an intimate connection with infection and inflammation. This stems from several platelet characteristics, including their ability to bind infectious agents and secrete many immunomodulatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as their expression of receptors for various immune effector and regulatory functions, such as TLRs, which allow them to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Furthermore, platelets contain RNA that can be nascently translated under different environmental stresses, and they are able to release membrane microparticles that can transport inflammatory cargo to inflammatory cells. Interestingly, acute infections can also result in platelet breakdown and thrombocytopenia. This report highlights these relatively new aspects of platelets and, thus, their nonhemostatic nature in an inflammatory setting.

  8. The Role of Platelets in Venous Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Montoro-García, Silvia; Schindewolf, Marc; Stanford, Sophia; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Thiele, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Multiple factors contribute to the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Platelets have attracted much interest in arterial cardiovascular disease, whereas their role in VTE has received much less attention. Recent evidence suggests that platelets may play a more important role in VTE than previously anticipated. This review discusses the mechanisms that link platelets with venous thrombotic disease and their potential applications as novel risk factors for VTE. In addition, animal studies and randomized clinical trials that highlight the potential effect of antiplatelet therapy in venous thrombosis are evaluated to assess the role of platelets in VTE. The clinical significance of platelets for VTE risk assessment in specific patient cohorts and their role as a suitable therapeutic target for VTE prevention is acknowledged. The role of platelets in VTE is a promising field for future research.

  9. Anti-platelets in diabetes management.

    PubMed

    Grantham, N M; Magliano, D J; Tai, G; Cohen, N; Shaw, J E

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence of anti-platelet use, and the extent to which contraindications to anti-platelet therapy prevent its use, in 726 diabetic patients attending a private clinic. Among those who reported a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), 87.1% were on anti-platelet therapy. Of those without prior CVD but with at least one CVD risk factor, 59.8% were not on anti-platelet therapy, but only 7.1% of these had a contraindication to anti-platelet therapy. This study showed that high usage of anti-platelet therapy in diabetic patients with prior CVD is achievable, and that contraindications did not explain low use in those without prior CVD.

  10. Blood platelet aggregation and personality traits.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, C D; Thomas, G; Olewine, D; Zyzanski, S J; Simpson, M T; Hames, C G

    1975-12-01

    Changes in blood platelet aggregation may precipitate episodes of arterial occlusive diseases. Little is known, however, regarding the influence of psychological traits, emotional states and other behavioral stressors on platelet aggregation phenomena. This study examined 46 healthy college men at rest and after submaximal treadmill exercise. Associations were found between the duration of platelet aggregation and a number of scores from the California Psychological Inventory and self-administered anxiety scales. The more socially adequate, poised and dominant persons--those with more mature ego development and less overt anxiety--had platelets with more prolonged aggregation reactions to the in vitro introduction of noradrenalin. Irreversible aggregation of platelets occurred more regularly to lower in vitro concentrations of noradrenalin in platelet samples drawn from subjects who were less anxious and tended to be more rigidly defensive. It is premature to attempt to derive clinical implications from this exploratory work, but some implications for the design of future research are discussed.

  11. Size Dependent Platelet Subpopulations: Relationship of Platelet Volume to Ultrastructure Enzymatic Activity, and Function.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-10

    of the present apheresis instruments to separate the larger more functional platelets from the smaller ones. The selective isolation of large... PLATELET VOLUME T. -(U) BOSTON UNIV MA SCHOOL OF I MEDICINE C B THOMPSON ET RL 10 MAR 83 BUSM-93-89 UNIIDN919CA89 /68 6ilfflfllflflflflll l...N00014-79-C-0168 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 83-08 SIZE DEPENDENT PLATELET SUBPOPULATIONS: RELATIONSHIP OF PLATELET VOLUME TO ULTRASTRUCTURE. ENZYMATIC ACTIVITY

  12. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM signaling and vascular integrity in inflammation and development.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Bergmeier, W

    2016-04-01

    Platelets are essential for maintaining hemostasis following mechanical injury to the vasculature. Besides this established function, novel roles of platelets are becoming increasingly recognized, which are critical in non-injury settings to maintain vascular barrier integrity. For example, during embryogenesis platelets act to support the proper separation of blood and lymphatic vessels. This role continues beyond birth, where platelets prevent leakage of blood into the lymphatic vessel network. During the course of inflammation, platelets are necessary to prevent local hemorrhage due to neutrophil diapedesis and disruption of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, platelets also work to secure tumor-associated blood vessels, inhibiting excessive vessel permeability and intra-tumor hemorrhaging. Interestingly, many of these novel platelet functions depend on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling but not on signaling via G protein-coupled receptors, which plays a crucial role in platelet plug formation at sites of mechanical injury. Murine platelets express two ITAM-containing receptors: the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which functionally associates with the collagen receptor GPVI, and the C-type lectin-like 2 (CLEC-2) receptor, a hemITAM receptor for the mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin. Human platelets express an additional ITAM receptor, FcγRIIA. These receptors share common downstream effectors, including Syk, SLP-76 and PLCγ2. Here we will review the recent literature that highlights a critical role for platelet GPVI/FcRγ and CLEC-2 in vascular integrity during development and inflammation in mice and discuss the relevance to human disease.

  13. Extending The Shelf Life Of Blood Platelets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas M.

    1988-01-01

    New method of storing human blood platelets extends vitality for transfusions. Packaged as suspension in sterile liquid in plastic blood bags. Each bag placed between pair of plastic grids, and rubberbands placed around sandwich thus formed to hold together. Stored upright in open air or in container through which air pumped at rate of at least 45 L/min. Ensures that platelets receive ample oxygen and expiratory carbon dioxide form platelets removed before pH drops to harmful levels.

  14. Status Report on Cryopreservation of Human Platelets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-27

    Platelets." In: Erythrocytes, Path.44:678, 1965. lets contributed to our excellent re- Thrombocytes and Leukocytes. Eds. * suits. The observations in...the methodsof measurement: 80% when the platelet counts were made by phase microscopy ,85% by Coulter counter, and 60% by the Technicon. These... microscopy , 85’/ by Coulter counter, and 60% by the Technicon. These platelets had 5 1 Cr survival values in viv’o about 50’le of those observed for

  15. Platelet mimicry: The emperor's new clothes?

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Hunter, Alan Christy; Peer, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Here we critically examine whether coating of nanoparticles with platelet membranes can truly disguise them against recognition by elements of the innate immune system. We further assess whether the "cloaking technology" can sufficiently equip nanoparticles with platelet-mimicking functionalities to include in vivo targeting of damaged blood vessels and binding to platelet-adhering opportunistic pathogens. We present views for improved, and pharmaceutically viable nanoparticle design strategies.

  16. Platelet Glycoprotein lb-1X and Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    of mouse models of platelet dysfunction in the progression of cancer to metastatic disease . During the next year we propose to examine the relevance...spread of metastatic disease represents a fundamental change in significantly shortening the life span of patients with breast cancer. Thus...von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombin, illustrating platelet GP Ib-IX as a major initiator of platelet thrombus formation in the arterial

  17. Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX and Malignancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    cancer to metastatic disease . During the next year we propose to examine the relevance of platelet receptors in models of spontaneous metastasis. A...the prognosis for recovery from breast cancer cannot be under emphasized. Indeed, the spread of metastatic disease represents a fundamental change in...IX have been identified, including von Willebrand factor (vWF) and thrombin, illustrating platelet GP Ib-IX as a major initiator of platelet thrombus

  18. The role of RNA uptake in platelet heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Lauren; Beaulieu, Lea M; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Freedman, Jane E

    2017-03-09

    The role of platelets in regulating vascular homeostasis has expanded beyond mediation of haemostasis and thrombosis. The discovery of platelet RNA and the presence of subpopulations of platelets containing varying amounts of RNA suggest a role for platelet transcripts in vascular function. As the RNA in anucleated platelets is biologically functional and may transfer to other vascular cells, we hypothesised that platelet RNA diminishes over the lifespan of the platelet with diminishing platelet size due to horizontal cellular transfer. The purpose of this study is to determine if platelet RNA variance is the result of horizontal cellular transfer between platelets and other vascular cells. Utilising platelet sorting and RNA sequencing, we found that smaller platelets contained a more diverse set of transcripts than larger platelets. Further investigation using fluorescence imaging, gene expression analyses and in vitro and in vivo modelling revealed that platelets take up RNA from other vascular cells in a complex manner, revealing a dynamic role for platelets in modulating vascular homeostasis through bidirectional RNA transfer. The resultant RNA profile heterogeneity suggests unique functional roles for platelets dependent on size and complexity. This study expands our basic understanding of platelet function and heterogeneity and is the first to evaluate endogenous vascular RNA uptake and its relation to platelet processes. Our findings describe a novel endogenous phenomenon that can help elucidate the platelet's role in these non-thrombotic and haemostatic fields, as well as present potential for diagnostic and therapeutic development.

  19. Characterization of UBO-QIC as a Gαq inhibitor in platelets.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Vaishali; Patel, Akruti; Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Dangelmaier, Carol; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-01

    Gαq plays an important role in platelet activation by agonists such as thrombin, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thromboxane. The significance of Gαq signaling in platelets was established using YM254890, a Gαq/11-specific inhibitor and Gαq knockout murine platelets. However, YM-254890 is no longer available for investigators and there is a need to characterize other Gαq inhibitors. The aim of this study is to characterize the specificity of a compound, {L-threonine,(3R)-N-acetyl-3-hydroxy-L-leucyl-(aR)-a-hydroxybenzenepropanoyl-2,3-idehydro-N-methylalanyl-L-alanyl-N-methyl-L-alanyl-(3R)-3-[[(2S,3R)-3-hydroxy-4-methyl-1-oxo-2-[(1-oxopropyl)amino]pentyl]oxy]-L-leucyl-N,O-dimethyl-,(7 → 1)-lactone (9CI)} (UBO-QIC), as a Gαq inhibitor in platelets. Human platelets treated with UBO-QIC showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of platelet aggregation and secretion by protease-activated receptors (PAR) agonists, U46619 and ADP. UBO-QIC also abolished Gαq pathway signaling events such as calcium mobilization and pleckstrin phosphorylation. UBO-QIC had no nonspecific effects on the Gα12/13 pathway since platelet shape change was intact in Gαq knockout murine platelets stimulated with PAR agonists in the presence of the inhibitor. In addition, UBO-QIC-treated platelets did not affect collagen-related peptide-induced platelet activation suggesting that this inhibitor had no non-specific effects on the GPVI pathway. Furthermore, Akt phosphorylation downstream of the Gαi and Gαz pathways, and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation downstream of the Gαs pathway were not inhibited in UBO-QIC-treated platelets. UBO-QIC is a specific inhibitor for Gαq, which can be a useful tool for investigating Gαq-coupled receptor signaling pathways in platelets.

  20. Response of Northern Elephant Seal platelets to pressure and temperature changes: a comparison with human platelets.

    PubMed

    Field, Cara L; Tablin, Fern

    2012-08-01

    Mammalian blood platelets are activated by physiological agonists such as collagen or thrombin, or by physical stimuli such as cold temperatures and rapid decompression. Marine mammals regularly experience cold temperatures, high pressures and rapid decompression while diving, yet do not appear to suffer from thrombotic events during routine dive activity. We evaluated the effects of cold temperature and high pressure excursions on Northern Elephant Seal (NES) platelets and compared NES platelet response to that of human platelets subjected to identical stimuli. NES platelets undergo cold-induced activation when chilled to 4 °C, and 3 distinct phase transitions can be measured using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. NES platelet membrane lipid composition was determined using thin layer chromatography and NES platelets were found to have three times the amount of cholesterol (21% by weight) as human platelets. When exposed to high pressure-rapid decompression excursion, NES platelets did not undergo morphological shape change nor bind increased amounts of fibrinogen, while human platelets were significantly activated by the same excursion. These results demonstrate that while NES platelets are activated by the physical stimulus of cold temperatures, they are resistant to decompression-induced activation. We suggest that the composition of NES platelet membranes may play an important role in preventing pressure-related activation.

  1. Platelet activation of platelet concentrates derived from buffy coat and apheresis methods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Soleimany Ferizhandy

    2011-02-01

    Preparation for storage may cause platelet activation. The quality of platelet concentrates plays an important role in transfusion therapy. Platelet concentrates are produced by different centrifugation methods; buffy coat (buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates-BC) and plateletpheresis (apheresis-derived platelet concentrates-APC). Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: platelet, WBC and RBC counts pH, volume, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and Annexin V. The present paper compares the quality of both platelet preparations in vitro. In this experimental study, 30 platelet concentrates were harvested with the Haemonetics MCS plus and 30 units via the buffy coat (BC) method. The percentages of Annexin V expression, PF4 levels, platelet, WBC and RBC counts, pH and volume were measure immediately after collection and after 3 days of storage. During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed, no significant pH or RBC, difference in comparison with apheresis preparations (p>0.05). During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed a significant increase in the PF4 and Annexin V expression, compared to the apheresis preparations on day three (p<0.05). The kinetics of PF4 and Annexin V levels are influenced by the method used to prepare platelets for storage. The different levels of PF4 and Annexin V in BCs and APCs clearly demonstrates a progressive activation of BC platelets exceeding that of APC. However, in vivo studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  2. Mean platelet volume in patients with fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Haliloğlu, S; Carlioglu, A; Sahiner, E; Karaaslan, Y; Kosar, A

    2014-10-01

    Fibromyalgia is a syndrome characterised by chronic widespread pain at multiple tender points, as well as joint stiffness and systemic symptoms. The aetiology and pathogenesis of fibromyalgia still remain unclear, although many contributory factors have been suggested. The presence of some common features between fibromyalgia and cardiovascular risk factors (e.g. depression and sleep disturbance) led to question of whether there is there a relationship between fibromyalgia and cardiovascular disease and/or atherosclerosis. Mean platelet volume, which is a determinant of platelet activation, is a newly emerging independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease.The present study was designed to evaluate levels of mean platelet volume in patients with fibromyalgia; the study population consisted of 283 individuals with this syndrome, who were compared with 72 healthy controls. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, white blood cell count, platelet count and mean platelet volume levels were retrospectively recorded via the computerised patient database. The levels of mean platelet volume were significantly higher in the fibromyalgia group than in the control group (8.09 ± 0.84 fl and 7.73 ± 0.65 fl, respectively, p < 0.001). There were no statistical differences between groups with regard to platelet count and other parameters. These results suggest that an early atherosclerosis marker, mean platelet volume, is elevated in patients with fibromyalgia. This indicates increased platelet activation and therefore a higher risk of future cardiovascular disease.

  3. Platelet antibodies in idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed Central

    Veenhoven, W A; Van der Schans, G S; Nieweg, H O

    1980-01-01

    An immunofluorescence (IF) technique for the detection of antibodies was applied to idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). Serum platelet antibodies were found in thirteen out of twenty-two patients (59 percent) with active disease, but in only four out of fifteen patients (27 percent) who had attained remission. Direct tests for platelet-associated IgG were positive in 36 and 44 percent of these patients respectively. In two cases IgM was observed on the patients' platelet membranes. C3 was not detedted on patients' platelets. Platelet-associated IgG was also found in several other disorders and its occurrence is not therefore diagnostic of ITP. In addition, serum platelet antibodies do not indicate specifically ITP as they may also be due to previous isoimmunization. Antibodies in the sera of patients with ITP generally did not fix Clq and in most cases bound to platelets only in the presence of EDTA. In contrast, isoantibodies often fixed Clq and they had equal affinity for platelets suspended in ACD or EDTA plasma. This was confirmed by quantitative data on IgG binding by platelets obtained by measuring 125-I-labelled protein A uptake. The simplicity of the IF technique permits its routine application and the technique may give useful information with respect to the nature of the antibodies. It must, however, be considered of limited value in the diagnosis of ITP. PMID:6991171

  4. Modulatory effect of coffee on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, Shobha; Rauf, Arun A

    2010-01-01

    Blood platelets play a major role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and thrombosis. Conflicting information exists regarding the effect of coffee consumption on the cardiovascular system. We have investigated whether the consumption of moderate amount of coffee affect platelet functions and primary hemostasis in vivo in normal and high fat diet fed rats. Coffee fed group showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in mean platelet volume, platelet crit and platelet distribution width as compared to high fat diet (HFD) group. The concentration of malondialdehyde in platelets increased in atherosclerotic group indicates the increased thromboxane A2 (TXA2) production from membrane arachidonic acid and it was decreased in coffee treated group. Platelet aggregation studies with ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and epinephrine showed significant (P < 0.05) decrease in aggregation in coffee fed group. Scanning electron microscopic studies revealed that platelet aggregation tendency increased in HFD group and was reduced in coffee fed group. These results indicate that coffee is active in inhibiting platelet aggregation, a critical step involved in thrombosis.

  5. [Cardiology. Platelet function testing for clinicians].

    PubMed

    Pellaton, Cyril; Eeckhout, Eric; Silvain, Johanne; Montalescot, Gilles; Collet, Jean-Phillipe

    2014-01-15

    Platelet P2YI2 receptor inhibition with clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor plays a key role to prevent recurrent ischaemic events after percutaneous coronary intervention in acute coronary syndromes or elective settings. The degree of platelet inhibition depends on the antiplatelet medication used and is influenced by clinical and genetic factors. A concept of therapeutic window exists. On one side, efficient anti-aggregation is required in order to reduce cardio-vascular events. On the other side, an excessive platelet inhibition represents a risk of bleeding complications. This article describes the current knowledge about some platelet function tests and genetic tests and summarises their role in the clinical practice.

  6. Ultrastructural studies of the gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, J G

    1979-05-01

    The gray platelet syndrome (GPS) is a rare inherited disorder in which peripheral blood platelets are relatively large, vacuolated, and almost devoid of cytoplasmic granulation. In the present study we have evaluated the ultrastructure and cytochemistry of platelets from 2 patients with the GPS to determine precisely which organelles are missing from their cells. The findings indicate that gray platelets contain normal numbers of mitochondria, dense bodies, peroxisomes, and lysosomes but specifically lack alpha-granules. Preliminary studies of megakaryocytes from 1 of the 2 patients suggest that the defect in granule formation may lie at the level of the Golgi zone.

  7. Identification of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Aline Aparecida; Zulli, Roberto; Soares, Sheila; de Castro, Vagner; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the occurrence and the causes of platelet refractoriness in oncohematologic patients. INTRODUCTION: Platelet refractoriness (unsatisfactory post-transfusion platelet increment) is a severe problem that impairs the treatment of oncohematologic patients and is not routinely investigated in most Brazilian services. METHODS: Forty-four episodes of platelet concentrate transfusion were evaluated in 16 patients according to the following parameters: corrected count increment, clinical conditions and detection of anti-platelet antibodies by the platelet immunofluorescence test (PIFT) and panel reactive antibodies against human leukocyte antigen class I (PRA-HLA). RESULTS: Of the 16 patients evaluated (median age: 53 years), nine (56%) were women, seven of them with a history of pregnancy. An unsatisfactory increment was observed in 43% of the transfusion events, being more frequent in transfusions of random platelet concentrates (54%). Platelet refractoriness was confirmed in three patients (19%), who presented immunologic and non-immunologic causes. Alloantibodies were identified in eight patients (50%) by the PIFT and in three (19%) by the PRA-HLA. Among alloimmunized patients, nine (64%) had a history of transfusion, and three as a result of pregnancy (43%). Of the former, two were refractory (29%). No significant differences were observed, probably as a result of the small sample size. CONCLUSION: The high rate of unsatisfactory platelet increment, refractoriness and alloimmunization observed support the need to set up protocols for the investigation of this complication in all chronically transfused patients, a fundamental requirement for the guarantee of adequate management. PMID:21437433

  8. Effect of photodynamic therapy on mouse platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuannong; Chi, Shunji; Deng, Jinsheng; Zhang, Hua; Liang, Junlin; Ha, Xian-wen

    1993-03-01

    Normal mice received hematoporphyrin derivative (10 mg/kg iv) immediately, 24 or 48 hrs prior to red light irradiation. The blood was collected and the platelet-rich plasma was irradiated by red light (100 J/cm2). The platelets were fixed immediately, 8 or 16 hrs after irradiation, and processed for EM examination. In comparison with those of control mice, the platelets of all experimental mice showed structural changes: 16 hrs after irradiation all platelets were necrotized; 8 hrs after irradiation almost one fourth of the platelets were necrotized and the remaining were considerably damaged; immediately after irradiation a small number of platelets became necrotic and most other platelets were swollen and deformed, often with many cytoplasmic projections and considerable dilatation of the canalicular membrane system. Our findings provided a clear evidence that platelets are highly sensitive to PDT action and can be directly and rapidly injured by PDT even in the absence of vascular endothelial cells. Our results give firm support to the hypothesis that both endothelial cells and platelets may play an important role in the initiation of early vascular damage and microcirculatory alterations induced by PDT in vivo.

  9. Aging of platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smethurst, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    A goal of platelet storage is to maintain the quality of platelets from the point of donation to the point of transfusion - to suspend the aging process. This effort is judged by clinical and laboratory measures with varying degrees of success. Recent work gives encouragement that platelets can be maintained ex vivo beyond the current 5 -7 day shelf life whilst maintaining their quality, as measured by posttransfusion recovery and survival. However, additional measures are needed to validate the development of technologies that may further reduce the aging of stored platelets, or enhance their hemostatic properties.

  10. Platelet-rich plasma stimulates osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMPs

    SciTech Connect

    Tomoyasu, Akihiro; Higashio, Kanji; Kanomata, Kazuhiro; Goto, Masaaki; Kodaira, Kunihiko; Serizawa, Hiroko; Suda, Tatsuo; Nakamura, Atsushi; Nojima, Junya; Fukuda, Toru; Katagiri, Takenobu . E-mail: katagiri@saitama-med.ac.jp

    2007-09-14

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is clinically used as an autologous blood product to stimulate bone formation in vivo. In the present study, we examined the effects of PRP on proliferation and osteoblast differentiation in vitro in the presence of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). PRP and its soluble fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation of myoblasts and osteoblastic cells in the presence of BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-6 or BMP-7. The soluble PRP fraction stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in 3D cultures using scaffolds made of collagen or hydroxyapatite. Moreover, heparin-binding fractions obtained from serum also stimulated osteoblastic differentiation in the presence of BMP-4. These results suggested that platelets contain not only growth factors for proliferation but also novel potentiator(s) for BMP-dependent osteoblastic differentiation.

  11. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s−1, regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates. PMID:28058084

  12. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-11-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s(-1), regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates.

  13. Physiologic and pathologic changes of platelets in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Valera, Marie-Cecile; Parant, Olivier; Vayssiere, Christophe; Arnal, Jean-François; Payrastre, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Platelets are key players in haemostasis and thrombus formation. Defects affecting platelets during pregnancy can lead to heterogeneous complications, such as thrombosis, first trimester miscarriage and postpartum haemorrhage. The incidence of complications is increased in women who have heritable platelet function disorders. Modifications of platelet count or platelet functions during normal pregnancy and preeclampsia will be summarized and the management of pregnant women with heritable platelet function disorders will be discussed.

  14. Comparative antiadhesive properties of crude extract and phenolic fraction isolated from aerial parts of Tribulus pterocarpus during severe hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Tomczynska, Malgorzata; Malinowska, Joanna; Morel, Agnieszka; Hamed, Arafa I; Oleszek, Wieslaw; Stochmal, Anna; Olas, Beata

    2013-06-01

    The phenolic fraction and the crude extract from Tribulus pterocarpus have different biological activity, including antiplatelet-antiadhesive properties. Since it is demonstrated that hyperhomocysteinemia may act as stimulator of blood platelet activation (platelet adhesion, aggregation, and secretion), but various antiplatelet compounds are able to reduce hyperactivation of blood platelets induced by hyperhomocysteinemia. The aim of our present experiments was to investigate in vitro one of the step in platelet activation process - platelet adhesion to collagen induced by the model of severe hyperhomocyateinemia in the presence of the phenolic fraction and the crude extract from T. pterocarpus. Severe hyperhomocysteinemia was induced by reduced form of Hcy in the concentrations 0.1mM and 1mM, or using HTL in the concentrations 0.1, 0.5 and 1 μM. Adhesion of blood platelets to collagen was determined according to Tuszynski and Murphy. We observed that the phenolic fraction and the crude extract from T. pterocarpus have the inhibitory effect on platelet adhesion during severe hyperhomocysteinemia. The action of tested phenolic and crude extract was concentration-dependent, but the phenolic fraction was stronger antiadhesive action than the crude extract. We suggest that T. pterocarpus may be good source of antiplatelet compounds during hyperhomocysteinemia.

  15. Mechanism study of endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation of low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anjin; Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jie; Zhao, Xue; Yan, Meixing

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have indicated that fucoidan fractions with low molecular weight and different sulfate content from Laminaria japonica could inhibit the activation of platelets directly by reducing the platelet aggregation. To explore the direct effect of LMW fucoidan on the platelet system furthermore and examine the possible mechanism, the endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation effects of two LMW fucoidan were investigated. In the present study, Endothelial injury model of rats was made by injection of adrenaline (0.4 mg kg-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured. vWF level was be investigated in vivo and in vitro as an important index of endothelial injury. LMW fucoidan could significantly reduce vWF level in vascular endothelial injury rats and also significantly reduce vWF level in vitro. The number of EMPs was be detected as another important index of endothelial injury. The results showed that LMW fucoidan reduced EMPs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor. In this study, it was found that by inhibiting platelet adhesion, LMW fucoidan played a role in anti-thrombosis and the specific mechanism of action is to inhibit the flow of extracellular Ca2+. All in a word, LMW fucoidan could inhibit the activation of platelets indirectly by reducing the concentration of EMPs and vWF, at the same time; LMW fucoidan inhibited the activation of platelets directly by inhibiting the flow of extracellular Ca2+.

  16. Platelet function in the postprandial period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postprandial hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia have been related to cardiovascular events. Among different underlying mechanisms platelet activation seems to be responsible too. No comparable data between various tests in normo- vs. hyperlipidemics before and at different time intervals are available after a fat meal. We aimed to compare 9 of them within the same patients at several time points in postprandial hyperlipidemia. Results For some tests baseline values between the groups were significantly different (TXB2, platelet sensitivity, sedimentation and WU-test). However, hyperlipidemia revealed a variable influence on the tests examined. Some of the available tests apparently sensitive to show platelet activation reflect the increase in triglycerides (TG), such as the sedimentation index. ADP-induced platelet aggregatory activity in count adjusted washed isolated platelet samples during postprandial hyperlipidemia indicates mildly enhanced platelet activity, but does not seem to induce significant changes in aggregation. In patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (> 400 mg/dl fasting) changes in platelet function are more pronounced due to delayed decay and may last up to 16 hours paralleling TG reaching the prevalue. The overwhelming majority of platelet function tests do not significantly respond to postprandial hyperlipidemia. The correlation between the tests applied is poor. For standardization purpose, platelet aggregation tests, aimed to examine proaggregatory capacity in atherosclerosis, should only be performed at the same time of the day after a fasting period > 6 hours. The great variation in preanalytical work-up on comparison of various tests, large number of platelet tests available and their respective potential value are discussed. Conclusions At present, the suspicion that platelet function is significantly activated in the postprandial period cannot be supported by any of the tests used. The information provided is valuable to

  17. Evaluation of platelet turnover by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Salvagno, G L; Montagnana, M; Degan, M; Marradi, P L; Ricetti, M M; Riolfi, P; Poli, G; Minuz, P; Santonastaso, C L; Guidi, G C

    2006-05-01

    The number of circulating newly produced platelets depends on the thrombopoietic capacity of bone marrow as well as platelet removal from the bloodstream. Flow cytometric analysis with thiazole orange (TO), a fluorescent dye that crosses platelet membranes and binds intracellular RNA, has been used to measure circulating reticulated platelets (RPs) with high RNA content as an index of platelet turnover. We first assessed the specificity of TO flow cytometry and then applied this method in the diagnosis of thrombocytopenia caused by impaired platelet production or increased destruction. We also explored the utility of TO flow cytometry to predict thrombocytopoiesis after chemotherapy-induced bone marrow aplasia. Venous blood, anticoagulated with K(2)EDTA, was incubated with 0.6 microg/ml TO plus an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody. The mean percentage of RPs in control subjects (n = 23) was 6.13 +/- 3.09%. RPs were 10.41 +/- 9.02% in patients (n = 10) with hematological malignancies during aplasia induced by chemotherapy and a significant increase in RPs (35.45 +/- 6.11%) was seen in the recovery phase. In 10 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, the percentage of TO positive platelets was 67.81 +/- 18.79 (P < 0.001 vs. controls). In patients with thrombocytopenia associated with hepatic cirrhosis (n = 21; 21.04 +/- 16.21%, P < 0.001 vs. controls) or systemic lupus erythematosus (n = 6, 29.08 +/- 15.57%; P < 0.001 vs. controls) increases in TO-stained platelets were also observed. Measurement of TO positive platelets may be a reliable tool for the laboratory identification of platelet disorders, with a higher sensitivity than measurement of platelet volume. Measurement of RPs may also prove useful to recognize the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms in thrombocytopenia.

  18. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  19. Platelet and not erythrocyte microparticles are procoagulant in transfused thalassaemia major patients.

    PubMed

    Agouti, Imane; Cointe, Sylvie; Robert, Stéphane; Judicone, Coralie; Loundou, Anderson; Driss, Fathi; Brisson, Alain; Steschenko, Dominique; Rose, Christian; Pondarré, Corinne; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Badens, Catherine; Dignat-George, Françoise; Lacroix, Romaric; Thuret, Isabelle

    2015-11-01

    The level of circulating platelet-, erythrocyte-, leucocyte- and endothelial-derived microparticles detected by high-sensitivity flow cytometry was investigated in 37 β-thalassaemia major patients receiving a regular transfusion regimen. The phospholipid procoagulant potential of the circulating microparticles and the microparticle-dependent tissue factor activity were evaluated. A high level of circulating erythrocyte- and platelet-microparticles was found. In contrast, the number of endothelial microparticles was within the normal range. Platelet microparticles were significantly higher in splenectomized than in non-splenectomized patients, independent of platelet count (P < 0·001). Multivariate analysis indicated that phospholipid-dependent procoagulant activity was influenced by both splenectomy (P = 0·001) and platelet microparticle level (P < 0·001). Erythrocyte microparticles were not related to splenectomy, appear to be devoid of proper procoagulant activity and no relationship between their production and haemolysis, dyserythropoiesis or oxidative stress markers could be established. Intra-microparticle labelling with anti-HbF antibodies showed that they originate only partially (median of 28%) from thalassaemic erythropoiesis. In conclusion, when β-thalassaemia major patients are intensively transfused, the procoagulant activity associated with thalassaemic erythrocyte microparticles is probably diluted by transfusions. In contrast, platelet microparticles, being both more elevated and more procoagulant, especially after splenectomy, may contribute to the residual thrombotic risk reported in splenectomized multi-transfused β-thalassaemia major patients.

  20. Subcellular localization of the heparin-neutralizing factor in blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Da Prada, M; Jakábová, M; Lüscher, E F; Pletscher, A; Richards, J G

    1976-01-01

    1. The distribution of the heparin-neutralizing factor (platelet factor 4, PF4) in subcellular organelles of blood platelets of rabbits and man was investigated. 2. In both species the organelles storing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT storage organelles) contained only trivial amounts of PF4. 3. In contrast, the content of PF4 was highest in the subcellular fractions rich in alpha-granules. 4. In conclusion, PF4 is probably localized in the alpha-granules and therefore the platelets contain at least two types of organelles (5-HT organelles and alpha-granules) capable of releasing their contents in response to the same stimuli, such as exposure to collagen, thrombin, etc. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:950602

  1. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E.; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A.; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C.; Kile, Benjamin T.; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya

    2014-01-01

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets. PMID:24599546

  2. Expansion of the neonatal platelet mass is achieved via an extension of platelet lifespan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jian; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Hu, Zhongbo; Mager, Donald E; Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Debrincat, Marlyse A; Pleines, Irina; Josefsson, Emma C; Kile, Benjamin T; Italiano, Joseph; Ramsey, Haley; Grozovsky, Renata; Veng-Pedersen, Peter; Chavda, Chaitanya; Sola-Visner, Martha

    2014-05-29

    The fetal/neonatal hematopoietic system must generate enough blood cells to meet the demands of rapid growth. This unique challenge might underlie the high incidence of thrombocytopenia among preterm neonates. In this study, neonatal platelet production and turnover were investigated in newborn mice. Based on a combination of blood volume expansion and increasing platelet counts, the platelet mass increased sevenfold during the first 2 weeks of murine life, a time during which thrombopoiesis shifted from liver to bone marrow. Studies applying in vivo biotinylation and mathematical modeling showed that newborn and adult mice had similar platelet production rates, but neonatal platelets survived 1 day longer in circulation. This prolonged lifespan fully accounted for the rise in platelet counts observed during the second week of murine postnatal life. A study of pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins showed that neonatal platelets had higher levels of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and were more resistant to apoptosis induced by the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 than adult platelets. However, genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of Bcl-2 alone did not shorten neonatal platelet survival or reduce platelet counts in newborn mice, indicating the existence of redundant or alternative mechanisms mediating the prolonged lifespan of neonatal platelets.

  3. Cryopreservation of buffy-coat-derived platelet concentrates in dimethyl sulfoxide and platelet additive solution.

    PubMed

    Johnson, L N; Winter, K M; Reid, S; Hartkopf-Theis, T; Marks, D C

    2011-04-01

    Platelets prepared in plasma can be frozen in 6% dimethyl sulfoxide (Me(2)SO) and stored for extended periods at -80°C. The aim of this study was to reduce the plasma present in the cryopreserved product, by substituting plasma with platelet additive solution (PAS; SSP+), whilst maintaining in vitro platelet quality. Buffy coat-derived pooled leukoreduced platelet concentrates were frozen in a mixture of SSP+, plasma and 6% Me(2)SO. The platelets were concentrated, to avoid post-thaw washing, and frozen at -80°C. The cryopreserved platelet units (n=9) were rapidly thawed at 37°C, reconstituted in 50% SSP+/plasma and stored at 22°C. Platelet recovery and quality were examined 1 and 24h post-thaw and compared to the pre-freeze samples. Upon thawing, platelet recovery ranged from 60% to 80%. However, there were differences between frozen and liquid-stored platelets, including a reduction in aggregation in response to ADP and collagen; increased CD62P expression; decreased viability; increased apoptosis and some loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Some recovery of these parameters was detected at 24h post-thaw, indicating an extended shelf-life may be possible. The data suggests that freezing platelets in 6% Me(2)SO and additive solution produces acceptable in vitro platelet quality.

  4. Transfusion of ABO-mismatched platelets leads to early platelet refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Carr, R; Hutton, J L; Jenkins, J A; Lucas, G F; Amphlett, N W

    1990-07-01

    Forty-three consecutive patients previously unexposed to platelets and undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia or autografting for relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma were randomized to receive transfused platelets of either their own ABO group (OG) or of a major mismatched group (MMG). The 26 evaluable patients were equally distributed between the two study groups. Nine of 13 (69%) MMG patients became refractory with a median onset at transfusion 7 (15 d), compared with only one of 13 (8%) OG patients (P = 0.001). Refractoriness was associated with the formation of high titre isoagglutinins, anti-HLA and platelet specific antibodies. In one patient refractoriness appeared to be due to high titre isoagglutinins alone. Six other patients developed an increase in isoagglutinin titre sufficient to adversely affect platelet increments. Patients receiving ABO-mismatched platelets had a higher incidence of anti-HLA antibodies (5 v. 1) and platelet specific antibodies (4 v. 1). ABO-mismatched platelets transfused prior to the onset of refractoriness resulted in increments similar to those achieved by ABO-matched platelets. The study demonstrates that ABO-mismatched platelets are as effective as matched platelets in patients with low titre isoagglutinins requiring only few transfusions. However, the greater incidence of early refractoriness induced in MMG patients indicates that ABO-mismatched platelets should not be given to patients with marrow failure requiring long-term support.

  5. Reelin is a platelet protein and functions as a positive regulator of platelet spreading on fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wei-Lien; Huang, Chien-Ling; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Chang-Huei; Stern, Arnold; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2010-02-01

    Abnormalities of platelet functions have been linked to reelin-impaired neuronal disorders. However, little attention has been given to understanding the interplay between reelin and platelet. In this study, reelin was found to present in the human platelets and megakaryocyte-like leukemic cells. Reelin-binding assays revealed that extracellular reelin can interact with platelets through the receptor belonging to the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family. The reelin-to-platelet interactions enhance platelet spreading on fibrinogen concomitant with the augmentation of lamellipodia formation and F-actin bundling. In contrast, reelin has no effect on integrin alphaIIbbeta3 activation and agonist-induced platelet aggregation. Molecular analysis revealed that the up-regulation of Rac1 activity and the inhibition of protein kinase C delta-Thr505 phosphorylation are important for reelin-mediated enhancement of platelet spreading on fibrinogen. These findings demonstrate for the first time that reelin is present in platelets and the reelin-to-platelet interactions play a novel role in platelet signaling and functions.

  6. [Platelet allo-antibodies identification strategies for preventing and managing platelet refractoriness].

    PubMed

    Basire, A; Picard, C

    2014-11-01

    Platelet refractoriness is a serious complication for patients receiving recurrent platelet transfusions, which can be explained by non-immune and immune causes. Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) allo-immunization, especially against HLA class I, is the major cause for immune platelet refractoriness. To a lesser extent, allo-antibodies against specific Human Platelet Antigen (HPA) are also involved. Pregnancy, transplantation and previous transfusions can lead to allo-immune reaction against platelet antigens. After transfusion, platelet count is decreased by accelerated platelet destruction related to antibodies fixation on incompatible platelet antigens. New laboratory tests for allo-antibodies identification were developed to improve sensibility and specificity, especially with the LUMINEX(®) technology. The good use and interpretation of these antibodies assays can improve strategies for platelet refractoriness prevention and management with a patient adapted response. Compatible platelets units can be selected according to their identity with recipient typing or immune compatibility regarding HLA or HPA antibodies or HLA epitope compatibility. Prospective studies are needed to further confirm the clinical benefit of new allo-antibodies identification methods and consensus strategies for immune platelet refractoriness management.

  7. Calreticulin Transacetylase mediated activation of human platelet nitric oxide synthase by acetyl group donor compounds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajit; Sushama, Anupam; Manral, Sushma; Sinha, Rajesh; Joshi, Rini; Singh, Usha; Rohil, Vishwajeet; Prasad, Ashok K; Parmar, Virinder S; Raj, Hanumantharao G

    2012-01-01

    Polyphenols have attracted immense interest because of their diverse biological and pharmacological activities. Surprisingly, not much is documented about the biological activities of acetoxy derivatives of polyphenol called polyphenolic acetates (PA). In our previous reports, we have conclusively established the Calreticulin Transacetylase (CRTAase) catalyzed activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by PA. In the present work, specificity of CRTAase to various classes of PA was characterized in human platelet. The effect of PA, on platelet NOS and intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation were studied in an elaborated manner. Platelet CRTAase exhibited differential specificities to polyphenolic acetates upon incubation with l-arginine leading to activation of NOS. The intraplatelet generation of NO was studied by flowcytometry using DCFH-DA. The differential specificities of CRTAase to PA were found to positively correlate with increased production of NO upon incubation of PRP with PA and l-arginine. Further, the inhibitory effect of l-NAME on PA induced NO formation in platelets substantiated the CRTAase catalyzed activation of NOS. The real-time RT-PCR profile of NOS isoforms confirmed the preponderance of eNOS over iNOS in human platelets on treatment with PA. Western blot analysis also reiterated the differential pattern of acetylation of eNOS by PA. PA were also found effective in increasing the intraplatelet cGMP levels and inhibiting ADP-induced platelet aggregation. It is worth mentioning that the effects of PA were found to be in tune with the specificities of platelet CRTAase to PA as the substrates.

  8. The omnipotent platelet. Part II: Further observations.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, L A

    1997-07-01

    Observation of platelet responses during acute injury or pathology can provide important information. The initial response is thrombocytopenia followed by thrombocytosis. In the case of injury with negative X-ray and appropriate thrombocytosis, a bone scan is indicated. The platelet responds like a sedimentation rate, which indicates the course of the injury or pathology.

  9. Synthetic materials for platelet quality control.

    PubMed

    Lott, J A; Hartzell, R K; Longberry, J

    1983-01-01

    At present, the quality control of platelet counting by semi-automated and automated methods does not meet ideal standards. Controls prepared from human or animal platelets have limited stability, and some synthetic platelet controls that are available do not have the size distribution of fresh platelets. The platelet control materials described here are wholly synthetic; however, their particle size distribution is like that of normal human platelets, and the dispersing medium has the viscosity and surface tension of plasma. Two types of products are described. The first type are dilutions of the synthetic platelets which are handled like 3000-fold dilutions of platelet-rich plasma and are intended for direct use on instruments like the Coulter ZBI. The two dilution levels gave counts of about 50,000 and 200,000/microL on the Coulter ZBI and were found to be stable for at least 30 days at - 20C, 4C, and 37C, and at least eight months at 25C. The second type of product is handled like whole blood and is intended for direct use on instruments like the Coulter Model S-Plus. This product gave counts of about 200,000/microL and was found to be stable for at least 120 days at - 20C, 4C, 25C, and 37C. Freezing at - 20C produced some aggregates that dispersed after thawing and standing for several days prior to testing.

  10. Daily prickly pear consumption improves platelet function.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, R; Budinsky, A; Efthimiou, Y; Stomatopoulos, J; Oguogho, A; Sinzinger, H

    2003-07-01

    Prickly pear is traditionally used by Pima Indians as a dietary nutrient against diabetes mellitus. We examined the effect of daily consumption of 250 g in 8 healthy volunteers and 8 patients with mild familial heterozygous hypercholesterolemia on various parameters of platelet function. Beside its action on lipids and lipoproteins, prickly pear consumption significantly reduced the platelet proteins (platelet factor 4 and beta-thromboglobulin), ADP-induced platelet aggregation and improved platelet sensitivity (against PGI2 and PGE1) in volunteers as well as in patients. Also plasma 11-DH-TXB2 and the WU-test showed a significant improvement in both patients and volunteers. In contrast, collagen-induced platelet aggregation and the number of circulating endothelial cells showed a significant response in patients only. No influence of prickly pear ingestion on peripheral platelet count was monitored. The dietary run-in period did not influence any of the parameters of haemostasis examined. No sex difference was seen. Prickly pear may induce at least part of its beneficial actions on the cardiovascular system via decreasing platelet activity and thereby improving haemostatic balance.

  11. Fractal and Euclidean descriptors of platelet shape.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Max-Joseph; Neeb, Heiko; Strasser, Erwin F

    2014-01-01

    Platelet shape change is a dynamic membrane surface process that exhibits remarkable morphological heterogeneity. Once the outline of an irregular shape is identified and segmented from a digital image, several mathematical descriptors can be applied to numerical characterize the irregularity of the shapes surface. 13072 platelet outlines (PLO) were segmented automatically from 1928 microscopic images using a newly developed algorithm for the software product Matlab R2012b. The fractal dimension (FD), circularity, eccentricity, area and perimeter of each PLO were determined. 972 PLO were randomly assigned for computer-assisted manual measurement of platelet diameter as well as number, width and length of filopodia per platelet. FD can be used as a surrogate parameter for determining the roughness of the PLO and circularity can be used as a surrogate to estimate the number and length of filopodia. The relationship between FD and perimeter of the PLO reveals the existence of distinct groups of platelets with significant structural differences which may be caused by platelet activation. This new method allows for the standardized continuous numerical classification of platelet shape and its dynamic change, which is useful for the analysis of altered platelet activity (e.g. inflammatory diseases, contact activation, drug testing).

  12. Clinica use of platelet additive solutions.

    PubMed

    van Rhenen, Dick J

    2007-12-01

    Randomised clinical trial (RCT) to study the clinical efficacy and safety of new platelet products using platelet additive solutions are scarce. In this paper a number of recent RCT's is discussed. It can be the start of a development where new transfusion products enter a RCT before the product is applied in clinical practice.

  13. Short-term exposure of platelets to glucose impairs inhibition of platelet aggregation by cyclooxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kobzar, Gennadi; Mardla, Vilja; Samel, Nigulas

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin treatment reduces cardiovascular events and deaths in high-risk non-diabetic patients, but not in patients suffering from diabetes. In these patients, hyperglycemia has been found to cause reduced platelet sensitivity to aspirin. It is supposed that long-term exposure of platelets to glucose leads to non-enzymatic glycosylation and impairs aspirin inhibition of platelet aggregation. On the other hand, short-term exposure of platelets to glucose also attenuates the effect of aspirin on platelets. The aim of the present work was to analyse the effect of short-term exposure of glucose on the inhibition of platelet aggregation by aspirin and other cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors. Already a 15 min exposure of platelets to glucose impaired aspirin inhibition of the platelet aggregation induced by collagen, thrombin, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and arachidonic acid (AA). Aspirin inhibition of platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was attenuated by 5.6, 11.2, 16.8, and 22.4 mM of glucose in a concentration-dependent way. The same effect was observed with indomethacin and acetaminophen used as cyclooxygenase inhibitors instead of aspirin. N-methyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, prevented the effect of glucose on aspirin, indomethacin and acetaminophen inhibition of platelet aggregation. Other monosaccharides, for example fructose and galactose, impaired aspirin inhibition as did glucose. Lactic acid (0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8 mM), the end product of anaerobic glycolysis in platelets, impaired the inhibition of platelet aggregation with aspirin in a concentration-dependent way but did not affect indomethacin. It is suggested that lactic acid might be a mediator of the effect of glucose on aspirin inhibition in platelets.

  14. Dynamic adhesion of eryptotic erythrocytes to immobilized platelets via platelet phosphatidylserine receptors.

    PubMed

    Walker, Britta; Towhid, Syeda T; Schmid, Evi; Hoffmann, Sascha M; Abed, Majed; Münzer, Patrick; Vogel, Sebastian; Neis, Felix; Brucker, Sara; Gawaz, Meinrad; Borst, Oliver; Lang, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Glucose depletion of erythrocytes triggers suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis, which leads to cell membrane scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Eryptotic erythrocytes adhere to endothelial cells by a mechanism involving phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface and CXCL16 as well as CD36 at the endothelial cell membrane. Nothing has hitherto been known about an interaction between eryptotic erythrocytes and platelets, the decisive cells in primary hemostasis and major players in thrombotic vascular occlusion. The present study thus explored whether and how glucose-depleted erythrocytes adhere to platelets. To this end, adhesion of phosphatidylserine-exposing erythrocytes to platelets under flow conditions was examined in a flow chamber model at arterial shear rates. Platelets were immobilized on collagen and further stimulated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 10 μM) or thrombin (0.1 U/ml). As a result, a 48-h glucose depletion triggered phosphatidylserine translocation to the erythrocyte surface and augmented the adhesion of erythrocytes to immobilized platelets, an effect significantly increased upon platelet stimulation. Adherence of erythrocytes to platelets was blunted by coating of erythrocytic phosphatidylserine with annexin V or by neutralization of platelet phosphatidylserine receptors CXCL16 and CD36 with respective antibodies. In conclusion, glucose-depleted erythrocytes adhere to platelets. The adhesive properties of platelets are augmented by platelet activation. Erythrocyte adhesion to immobilized platelets requires phosphatidylserine at the erythrocyte surface and CXCL16 as well as CD36 expression on platelets. Thus platelet-mediated erythrocyte adhesion may foster thromboocclusive complications in diseases with stimulated phosphatidylserine exposure of erythrocytes.

  15. Function of eltrombopag-induced platelets compared to platelets from control patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Haselboeck, Johanna; Kaider, Alexandra; Pabinger, Ingrid; Panzer, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Data on the in vivo function of platelets induced by the thrombopoietin receptor agonist eltrombopag are scarce. To assess a possible influence of eltrombopag we compared platelet function of eltrombopag-treated immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) patients (group 1; n=10) after treatment response to that from control ITP patients (group 2; n=12). We further analysed platelet function at baseline and after one, three, and four weeks of eltrombopag treatment and estimated daily changes of platelet function during the eltrombopag-induced platelet rise. The formation of platelet-monocyte aggregates (PMA), P-selectin expression [MFI], and platelet adhesion under high shear conditions (surface coverage, SC) in vivo and after in vitro addition of agonists (ADP, TRAP-6, Collagen) were similar between both groups after response to eltrombopag treatment. Only TRAP-6 induced a lower SC in the eltrombopag group (p=0.03). All platelet function parameters except for Collagen-induced P-selectin expression changed significantly during treatment with eltrombopag. PMA, naïve and after addition of ADP or TRAP-6 increased with increasing platelet counts. P-selectin expression decreased, when measured without and upon addition of ADP, increased in the presence of TRAP-6, and remained unchanged after addition of Collagen. SC increased during the eltrombopag-induced platelet rise. All significant changes of platelet function correlated to changes in platelet counts. Two patients developed venous thromboses during eltrombopag treatment, but no association with any distinct single platelet function parameter or combinations thereof was identifiable. Thus, eltrombopag-induced platelets function similar to those from control ITP patients without discernible increased hyper-reactivity.

  16. Increased platelet adhesion under flow conditions is induced by both thalassemic platelets and red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Neta; Spectre, Galia; Brill, Alexander; Zelig, Orly; Goldfarb, Ada; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer; Varon, David

    2008-11-01

    Thromboembolic complications are not uncommon in thalassemia. Previous studies suggest increased platelet aggregation and a potential role of pathological changes in the red blood cell (RBC) lipid membrane, induced by oxidative stress. In the present study, platelet adhesion and the effect of thalassemic RBC on platelet adhesion under flow conditions were evaluated, using the Cone and Plate (let) Analyzer(CPA). Twenty-two beta-thalassemia patients and 22 blood type-matched healthy controls were studied. An increased platelet adhesion (% surface coverage, SC), was observed in patients as compared to controls (p < 0.05). When platelet count and haematocrit were normalized by autologous reconstitution, a significant increase in platelet aggregation (average size, AS) was observed (p < 0.05). Increased platelet adhesion (SC and AS), was demonstrated in six patients with a history of thrombosis as compared to 16 patients without any history of thrombosis (p < or = 0.007) and in 17 splenectomized patients as compared to five non-splenectomized patients (p = 0.003). In reconstitution studies, thalassemic RBC mixed with normal platelet-rich plasma significantly increased platelet adhesion compared to normal RBC (SC p < 0.03, AS p < 0.02). Thalassemic platelets reconstituted with normal RBC, had increased aggregation (AS, p < 0.004) in comparison with normal platelets. The results indicate that increased platelet adhesion in beta-thalassemia is induced by both platelets and RBC. Increased platelet adhesion correlated with clinical thrombotic events and thus may suggest a mechanism of thrombosis in thalassemic patients. The potential application of the CPA in identifying thalassemic patients with high risk for thrombosis should be studied prospectively in a larger cohort of patients.

  17. EXTENDED STORAGE OF BUFFY-COAT PLATELET CONCENTRATES IN PLASMA OR A PLATELET ADDITIVE SOLUTION

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Bolgiano, Doug; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Bailey, S. Lawrence; Pellham, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet concentrates prepared from whole blood in the U.S. are made using the platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) method. The platelet concentrates must be made within 8 hours of blood collection and stored for only 5 days. In Europe and Canada, platelet concentrates are made using the buffy-coat (BC) method from whole blood held overnight at 22°C and storage times may be up to 7 days. Our studies were designed to determine how long BC platelets can be stored in plasma or Plasmalyte while meeting the FDA’s post-storage viability criteria. Study Design, Materials, And Methods Normal subjects donated whole blood that was stored at 22°C for 22 ± 2 hours prior to preparation of BC platelets. Platelets were stored for 5 to 8 days in either plasma or Plasmalyte concentrations of 65% or 80%. Radiolabeled autologous stored versus fresh platelet recoveries and survivals were assessed as well as post-storage in vitro assays. Results BC platelets stored in either plasma or 65% Plasmalyte met FDA post-storage platelet recovery criteria for 7 days but survivals for only 6 days, while storage in 80% Plasmalyte gave very poor results. Both stored platelet recoveries and survivals correlated with the same donor’s fresh results, but the correlation was much stronger between recoveries than survivals. In vitro measures of extent of shape change, morphology score, and pH best predicted post-storage platelet recoveries, while annexin V binding best predicted platelet survivals. Conclusion BC platelets stored in either plasma or 65% Plasmalyte meet FDA’s post-storage viability criteria for 6 days. PMID:24673482

  18. Proteomic approaches to dissect platelet function: half the story

    PubMed Central

    Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Perrotta, Peter L.; Bahou, Wadie F.

    2006-01-01

    Platelets play critical roles in diverse hemostatic and pathologic disorders and are broadly implicated in various biological processes that include inflammation, wound healing, and thrombosis. Recent progress in high-throughput mRNA and protein profiling techniques has advanced our understanding of the biological functions of platelets. Platelet proteomics has been adopted to decode the complex processes that underlie platelet function by identifying novel platelet-expressed proteins, dissecting mechanisms of signal or metabolic pathways, and analyzing functional changes of the platelet proteome in normal and pathologic states. The integration of transcriptomics and proteomics, coupled with progress in bioinformatics, provides novel tools for dissecting platelet biology. In this review, we focus on current advances in platelet proteomic studies, with emphasis on the importance of parallel transcriptomic studies to optimally dissect platelet function. Applications of these global profiling approaches to investigate platelet genetic diseases and platelet-related disorders are also addressed. PMID:16926286

  19. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  20. Platelet bioreactor-on-a-chip.

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Mazutis, Linas; Wu, Stephen; Sylman, Joanna L; Ehrlicher, Allen; Machlus, Kellie R; Feng, Qiang; Lu, Shijiang; Lanza, Robert; Neeves, Keith B; Weitz, David A; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-09-18

    Platelet transfusions total >2.17 million apheresis-equivalent units per year in the United States and are derived entirely from human donors, despite clinically significant immunogenicity, associated risk of sepsis, and inventory shortages due to high demand and 5-day shelf life. To take advantage of known physiological drivers of thrombopoiesis, we have developed a microfluidic human platelet bioreactor that recapitulates bone marrow stiffness, extracellular matrix composition,micro-channel size, hemodynamic vascular shear stress, and endothelial cell contacts, and it supports high-resolution live-cell microscopy and quantification of platelet production. Physiological shear stresses triggered proplatelet initiation, reproduced ex vivo bone marrow proplatelet production, and generated functional platelets. Modeling human bone marrow composition and hemodynamics in vitro obviates risks associated with platelet procurement and storage to help meet growing transfusion needs.

  1. Platelet storage pool deficiency in Jacobsen syndrome.

    PubMed

    White, James G

    2007-11-01

    Jacobsen syndrome and Paris-Trousseau Syndrome share similar congenital anomalies, thrombocytopenia, giant platelet alpha granules resulting from fusion of smaller organelles, and an 11q terminal deletion at 11q23.3. Similarities in the two cohorts have suggested that the Paris-Trousseau Syndrome is a variant of Jacobsen syndrome, or the same disorder. The present study has pointed out a significant difference between the two syndromes. Platelets from six patients with Jacobsen syndrome were markedly diminished in serotonin adenine nucleotide rich dense bodies, indicating the presence of platelet storage pool deficiency. Since platelet dense bodies are reported to be normal in size, number and distribution in the Paris-Trousseau Syndrome, the presence of platelet storage pool deficiency in six patients evaluated in the present study may distinguish the two disorders.

  2. [Platelet antigens: immunology and immuno-allergology].

    PubMed

    de Sousa, J C; Palma-Carlos, A G

    1996-02-01

    Platelet immunology allows the understanding of clinical findings in a genetic and serologic basis. Blood platelets bear common antigens and same specific antigens, classified in five groups (HPA 1 to 5), that are localized on membrane glycoproteins Ia, Ib alpha, IIb and IIIa. Antiplatelet autoimmunization is generally due to IgG antibodies against membrane complexes IIb/IIIa or Ib/lX. Antiplatelet alloimmunization, clinically resulting in Posttransfusion Purpura and Neonatal Thrombocytopenia is more frequently associated with anti-IIb/IIIa antibodies, either anti-HPA-1a or HPA-1b. Finally, platelet participation in immunoallergic reactions is discussed, focusing both platelet activation by allergen itself and platelet recruitment by other inflammatory cells.

  3. Physical properties of vapour grown indium monotelluride platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunjomana, A. G.; Chandrasekharan, K. A.; Teena, M.

    2015-02-01

    Indium monotelluride (InTe) crystals were grown from vapour phase under different temperature gradients by employing physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. The morphology of these crystals such as whiskers, needles, platelets etc., strongly depends on the temperature distribution in the horizontal dual zone furnace. InTe platelets were deposited by setting the temperature of the charge (TC) and growth (TS) zones at 1073 K and 773 K (ΔT=300 K), respectively, for different growth periods (24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h). The surface growth features have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopes, which indicate layer growth mechanism for all the crystals. Various crystals grown under ΔT=200 K and 300 K (retaining TS invariant) were examined by X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. InTe samples exhibited consistent lattice parameters, density and atomic percentage, establishing stoichiometry and chemical homogeneity. The results obtained for Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, power factor, dislocation density and microhardness are found to be reproducible as well. The vapour deposited InTe platelets are mechanically stable and possess high value of TEP, which ensure their practical application in thermoelectric power generation.

  4. Contact- and agonist-regulated microvesiculation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Li; Zaske, Ana-Maria; Zhou, Zhou; Fu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Xi; Conyers, Jodie L; Li, Min; Dong, Jing-fei; Zhang, Jianning

    2013-08-01

    After exposure to an agonist, platelets are activated and become aggregated. They also shed membrane microparticles that participate in the pathogenesis of thrombosis, hyper-coagulation and inflammation. However, microvesiculation can potentially disrupt the integrity of platelet aggregation by shedding the membrane receptors and phosphatidylserine critical for forming and stabilising a platelet clot. We tested the hypothesis that adhesion and microvesiculation are functions of different subsets of platelets at the time of haemostasis by real-time monitoring of agonist-induced morphological changes and microvesiculation of human platelets.We identified two types of platelets that are adherent to fibrinogen: a high density bubble shape (HDBS) and low-density spread shape (LDSS). Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) predominantly induced HDBS platelets to vesiculate, whereas LDSS platelets were highly resistant to such vesiculation. Thrombin-receptor activating peptide (TRAP) stabilised platelets against microvesiculation by promoting a rapid HDBS-to-LDSS morphological transition. These activities of ADP and TRAP were reversed for platelets in suspension, independent of an engagement integrin αIIbβ3. As the result of membrane contact, LDSS platelets inhibited the microvesiculation of HDBS platelets in response to ADP. Aspirin and clopidogrel inhibited ADP-induced microvesiculation through different mechanisms. These results suggest that platelet aggregation and microvesiculation occur in different subsets of platelets and are differently regulated by agonists, platelet-platelets and platelet-fibrinogen interactions.

  5. A rapid method for obtaining mesenchymal stem cells and platelets from bone marrow aspirate.

    PubMed

    Dozza, Barbara; Gobbi, Giuliana; Lucarelli, Enrico; Pierini, Michela; Di Bella, Claudia; Frisoni, Tommaso; Tazzari, Pier Luigi; Ricci, Francesca; Mirandola, Prisco; Carubbi, Cecilia; Giannini, Sandro; Donati, Davide; Vitale, Marco

    2014-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) are currently used alone or in combination for therapeutic applications especially for bone repair. We tested whether MSCs can be isolated from bone marrow (BM) aspirate using a commercially available kit commonly used to obtain PRP from peripheral blood (PB). Results revealed that mononuclear cells and platelets from both PB and BM could be efficiently isolated by obtaining a mononuclear and platelet rich fraction (PB-MPRF and BM-MPRF, respectively). Starting with comparable volumes, the number of platelets increased 1.5-fold in BM-MPRF compared to PB-MPRF. The number of clonogenic cells in BM-MPRF samples was significantly higher than whole BM samples as revealed by CFU-F assay (54.92 ± 8.55 CFU-F/1.5 x 10(5) nucleated cells and 32.50 ± 12.43 CFU-F/1.5 x 10(5) nucleated cells, respectively). Cells isolated from BM-MPRF after in vitro expansion fulfilled the definition of MSCs by phenotypic criteria, and differentiated along osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic lineages following induction. Results showed that the kit isolated MSCs and platelets from BM aspirate. Isolated MSCs were further expanded in a laboratory and BM-MPRF was used clinically following BM withdrawal for rapid intra-operative cell therapy for the treatment of bone defects.

  6. Cangrelor attenuates coated-platelet formation.

    PubMed

    Norgard, Nicholas B; Hann, Callie L; Dale, George L

    2009-01-01

    P2Y(12) inhibitors were introduced clinically as effective inhibitors of adenosine-5'-diphosphate (ADP) mediated platelet activation and aggregation. This class of pharmacological agents has enjoyed considerable success. Cangrelor is a recently developed P2Y(12) inhibitor that has the advantage of being an active drug not requiring metabolic conversion, although it is not orally available. Coated-platelets are a subclass of activated platelets generated on dual agonist activation with collagen plus thrombin; the primary hallmark of coated-platelets is their ability to support prothrombinase activity. Interestingly, we recently observed that the relatively weak agonist ADP potentiates the production of coated-platelets by the very strong agonists collagen plus thrombin, a previously unknown role for ADP. The authors sought in this study to determine if P2Y(12) inhibitors, such as cangrelor, were capable of attenuating this augmentation of coated-platelet generation. Cangrelor, at physiologically relevant concentrations, was able to eliminate the ADP-dependent increase in coated-platelet production with an IC(50) of 1.4 nM. Cangrelor, however, had no effect on thrombin-dependent platelet activation as measured by P-selectin expression. Although this in vitro study does not address the question of whether the effectiveness of cangrelor in vivo is partially due to an attenuation of coated-platelet production in addition to its documented antiaggregatory effects, it does reveal an unexpected action of cangrelor. Additional studies will be required to determine if all P2Y(12) inhibitors are equally effective in attenuating coated-platelet production.

  7. Qualitative disorders of platelets and megakaryocytes.

    PubMed

    Nurden, A T

    2005-08-01

    Qualitative disorders of platelet function and production form a large group of rare diseases which cover a multitude of genetic defects that by and large have as a common symptom, excessive mucocutaneous bleeding. Glanzmann thrombasthenia, is enabling us to learn much about the pathophysiology of integrins and of how alphaIIb beta3 functions. Bernard-Soulier syndrome, an example of macrothrombocytopenia, combines the production of large platelets with a deficit or non-functioning of the major adhesion receptor of platelets, the GPIb-IX-V complex. Amino acid substitutions in GPIb alpha, may lead to up-regulation and spontaneous binding of von Willebrand factor as in Platelet-type von Willebrand disease. In disorders with defects in the MYH9 gene, macrothrombocytopenias are linked to modifications in kidney, eye or ear, whereas other inherited thrombocytopenias variously link a low platelet count with a propensity to leukemia, skeletal defects, learning impairment, and abnormal red cells. Defects of secretion from platelets include an abnormal alpha-granule formation as in the gray platelet syndrome (with marrow myelofibrosis), and of organelle biogenesis in the Hermansky-Pudlak and Chediak-Higashi syndromes where platelet dense body defects are linked to abnormalities of other lysosomal-like organelles including melanosomes. Finally, defects involving surface receptors (P2Y(12), TPalpha) for activating stimuli, of proteins essential for signaling pathways (including Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome), and of platelet-derived procoagulant activity (Scott syndrome) show how studies on platelet disorders are helping unravel the pathways of primary hemostasis.

  8. Platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine: an update.

    PubMed

    De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Sommese, Linda; Casamassimi, Amelia; Napoli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Prior preclinical and clinical studies support the use of platelet-derived products for the treatment of soft and hard tissue lesions. These regenerative effects are controlled by autocrine and paracrine biomolecules including growth factors and cytokines contained in platelet alpha granules. Each growth factor is involved in a phase of the healing process, such as inflammation, collagen synthesis, tissue granulation, and angiogenesis collectively promoting tissue restitution. Platelet derivatives have been prepared as platelet-rich plasma, platelet gel, platelet-rich fibrin, and platelet eye drops. These products vary in their structure, growth factors, composition, and cytokine concentrations. Here, we review the current use of platelet-derived biological products focusing on the rationale for their use and the main requirements for their preparation. Variation in the apparent therapeutic efficacy may have resulted from a lack of reproducible, standardized protocols for preparation. Despite several individual studies showing favorable treatment effects, some randomized controlled trials as well as meta-analyses have found no constant clinical benefit from the application of platelet-derived products for prevention of tissue lesions. Recently, 3 published studies in dentistry showed an improvement in bone density. Seven published studies showed positive results in joint regeneration. Five published studies demonstrated an improvement in the wound healing, and an improvement of eye epithelial healing was observed in 2 reports. Currently, at least 14 ongoing clinical trials in phase 3 or 4 have been designed with large groups of treated patients (n > 100). Because the rationale of the therapy with platelet-derived compounds is still debated, a definitive insight can be acquired only when these large randomized trials will be completed.

  9. [Platelet hyperreactivity and antiaggregatory properties of nootropic drugs under conditions of alloxan-induced diabetes in rats].

    PubMed

    Zhiliuk, V I; Levykh, A É; Mamchur, V I

    2012-01-01

    The effects of nootropic drugs (noopept, pentoxifylline, piracetam, pramiracetam, Ginkgo biloba extract, entrop, cerebrocurin and citicoline) on platelet aggregation in rats with experimental diabetes have been studied. It is established that all these drugs exhibit an inhibitory action of various degrees against platelet hyperreactivity under conditions of chronic hyperglycemia. The maximum universality of the antiaggregatory action is characteristic of pramiracetam, entrop and Ginkgo biloba extract.

  10. Extracellular Fibrinogen-binding Protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus Inhibits the Formation of Platelet-Leukocyte Complexes.

    PubMed

    Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Abubaker, Aisha Alsheikh; Fortunato, Tiago M; Vara, Dina; Canobbio, Ilaria; Bagby, Stefan; Pula, Giordano

    2016-02-05

    Extracellular fibrinogen-binding protein (Efb) from Staphylococcus aureus inhibits platelet activation, although its mechanism of action has not been established. In this study, we discovered that the N-terminal region of Efb (Efb-N) promotes platelet binding of fibrinogen and that Efb-N binding to platelets proceeds via two independent mechanisms: fibrinogen-mediated and fibrinogen-independent. By proteomic analysis of Efb-interacting proteins within platelets and confirmation by pulldown assays followed by immunoblotting, we identified P-selectin and multimerin-1 as novel Efb interaction partners. The interaction of both P-selectin and multimerin-1 with Efb is independent of fibrinogen. We focused on Efb interaction with P-selectin. Excess of P-selectin extracellular domain significantly impaired Efb binding by activated platelets, suggesting that P-selectin is the main receptor for Efb on the surface of activated platelets. Efb-N interaction with P-selectin inhibited P-selectin binding to its physiological ligand, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), both in cell lysates and in cell-free assays. Because of the importance of P-selectin-PSGL-1 binding in the interaction between platelets and leukocytes, we tested human whole blood and found that Efb abolishes the formation of platelet-monocyte and platelet-granulocyte complexes. In summary, we present evidence that in addition to its documented antithrombotic activity, Efb can play an immunoregulatory role via inhibition of P-selectin-PSGL-1-dependent formation of platelet-leukocyte complexes.

  11. Partial Fractionation of Venoms from Two Iranian Vipers, Echis carinatus and Cerastes persicus Fieldi and Evaluation of Their Antiplatelet Activity.

    PubMed

    Mehdizadeh Kashani, Toktam; Vatanpour, Hossein; Zolfagharian, Hossein; Hooshdar Tehrani, Hasan; Heydari, Mohammad Hossein; Kobarfard, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Platelet aggregation inhibitory effect and anticoagulant properties of fractions separated from the venoms of Cerastes persicus fieldi and Echis carinatus were investigated. The partial fractionation was performed on a Sephadex G-100 column. Two fractions separated from Cerastes persicus fieldi showed anti platelet aggregation activity on ADP (200 μM)-induced platelet aggregation (ca 80% inhibition). Attempts to measure the antiplatelet aggregation activity of crude Echis carinatus venom and its fractions were not successful due to the protein coagulation of the plasma samples after the addition of venom. Anticoagulant activities of venoms were also evaluated. Total venom of Echis carinatus showed anti coagulant activity in PT test, while its fractions showed procoagulant activity.

  12. [Effect of leukocyte contamination on storage of platelet concentrates from buffy coats].

    PubMed

    Klüter, H; Klinger, M; Bauhaus, M; Kirchner, H

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effect of white cell contamination on thrombocytes prepared from pooled buffy coats over a storage period of 8 days. Using this novel technique, a leukocyte depletion filter can be easily integrated during PC preparation. In a paired study (n = 14) eight ABO-identical BC were pooled in a 2-liter PVC bag within 8 h after whole-blood donation, thoroughly mixed and divided into two identical fractions. After soft-spin centrifugation the platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was transferred either (fraction A) using a leukocyte filter (PL 50-HF, Pall) or (fraction B) directly into the storage bag (Pl-732, Baxter), and stored under routine conditions. On days 1, 3, 5, and 8, aliquots of PC were withdrawn for determination of cell count and different biochemical parameters and for morphometric analyses of platelet ultrastructure by electron microscopy. Results showed a lower thrombocyte yield and white cell count (p < 0.01) in fraction A (268 x 10(9) vs. 240 x 10(9); 51.1 x 10(6) vs. 0.04 x 10(6)), whereas no differences between the preparations could be detected by analysis of pH, pCO2, bicarbonate, and in LDH release over the storage period of 8 days. These results were supported in the study on the ultrastructural level where a good morphological integrity of the platelets was observed during the whole storage period in both fractions. In conclusion, storage lesions on platelets due to leukocyte effects are unlikely to occur in PC with white cell counts lower than 10(8)/l.

  13. Comparison of effects of aspirin and indomethacin on human platelet prostaglandin synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Crook, D; Collins, A J

    1977-01-01

    Human platelets were incubated in vitro with either aspirin or indomethacin and the prostaglandin synthetase activity of the resultant microsomal fraction from each incubation measured using a radiometric technique. Whereas aspirin produced a dose-related inhibition of the enzyme, indomethacin produced little or no inhibition over the same concentration range (10(-6) mol/l--10(-3) mol/l). Furthermore, administration of aspirin (600 mg) to volunteers produced a highly significant, prolonged inhibition of platelet microsomal prostaglandin synthetase whereas no inhibition was found with indomethacin (50 mg). As indomethacin is considerably more potent than aspirin as an inhibitor of human platelet prostaglandin synthetase in vitro, the results suggest a fundamental difference in the nature of the inhibition produced by each drug, aspirin being an essentially irreversible inhibitor whereas the inhibition produced by indomethacin is reversible. Studies with [3H-acetyl] aspirin have confirmed previous findings (Roth and Majerus, 1975) that aspirin produces an irreversible acetylation of a particulate fraction protein from human platelets. PMID:411427

  14. Inhibitory effect of trichothecene mycotoxins on bovine platelets stimulated by platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, P A; Ross, M L; Bondy, G S

    1987-01-01

    Several species of fungi, which infect cereals and grains, can produce a class of compounds, known as trichothecene mycotoxins, which is characterized by a substituted epoxy-trichothecene ring structure. Cattle are susceptible to intoxication from feeds contaminated with T-2 toxin, one of the more potent trichothecene mycotoxins, while swine refuse to ingest feed contaminated with T-2 toxin. The bovine platelet has been used as a model cell system to evaluate the effects of T-2 toxin and its natural metabolites, HT-2 toxin and T-2 tetraol, on cell function in vitro. Due to the lipophilic nature of these mycotoxins, a biologically active phospholipid was used to stimulate the platelets in the presence and absence of the toxins. The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its major metabolite HT-2 toxin inhibited platelet activating factor-stimulated bovine platelets, suspended in homologous plasma, in a concentration but not time dependent manner. Significant inhibition of platelet function (p less than 0.01) occurred with 135 ng T-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets and with 77 ng HT-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets. These mycotoxins exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the platelet aggregation response. In contrast, the minor metabolite T-2 tetraol had no inhibitory effect on platelet function and had no influence on the responses of T-2 toxin or HT-2 toxin when the mycotoxins were present together in the platelet suspensions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3453270

  15. The effects of drugs used in anaesthesia on platelet membrane receptors and on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle A

    2002-06-01

    Platelet dysfunctions are known origins of perioperative bleeding disorders which are a major concern in the management of surgical patients. Among multiple factors, interactions of drugs used in anaesthesia with platelets have been implicated to aggravate the risk of haemorrhagic complications. This paper reviews in vitro and in vivo studies which have examined the effects of inhalational, intravenous, and local anaesthetics, opioids, and muscle relaxants on platelets. A brief summary of platelet physiology, function tests, and flow cytometric assessment of membrane receptors is included. Although the results of many studies have been conflicting, it appears that halothane, sevoflurane, and propofol inhibit platelet function in a reversible and dose-related manner at concentrations used clinically. Ilalothane affects the intracellular activating second messenger inositol triphosphate, platelet calcium homeostasis, thromboxane A2 formation, and the inhibiting signal transduction pathway including cyclic adenosine monophosphate. The proposed platelet inhibiting mechanism of sevoflurane involves the suppression of thromboxane A2 formation. Propofol appears to cause platelet dysfunctions by inhibiting calcium mobilisation upon agonist stimulation. Nitrous oxide causes a modest suppression of calcium mobilisation. An interaction of local anaesthetics with components in the platelet membrane appears to account for their inhibiting effect, but only at concentrations far higher than that found during clinical use. A clinically relevant antithrombotic effect of regional anaesthesia has been observed, though. Isoflurane, enflurane, desflurane, barbiturates, etomidate, opioids, and muscle relaxants seem to have negligible effects on platelets at therapeutic concentrations. Anaesthetists should be aware of the potential impairment of the coagulation profile by anaesthetic agents.

  16. Platelet Lysates Produced from Expired Platelet Concentrates Support Growth and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jonsdottir-Buch, Sandra Mjoll; Lieder, Ramona; Sigurjonsson, Olafur Eysteinn

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells are promising candidates in regenerative cell therapy. Conventional culture methods involve the use of animal substances, specifically fetal bovine serum as growth supplement. Since the use of animal-derived products is undesirable for human applications, platelet lysates produced from human platelets are an attractive alternative. This is especially true if platelet lysates from already approved transfusion units at blood banks can be utilized. The purpose of this study was to produce human platelet lysates from expired, blood bank-approved platelet concentrates and evaluate their use as growth supplement in the culture of mesenchymal stem cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with one of three culture supplements; fetal bovine serum, lysates from freshly prepared human platelet concentrates, or lysates from expired human platelet concentrates. The effects of these platelet-derived culture supplements on basic mesenchymal stem cell characteristics were evaluated. All cultures maintained the typical mesenchymal stem cell surface marker expression, trilineage differentiation potential, and the ability to suppress in vitro immune responses. However, mesenchymal stem cells supplemented with platelet lysates proliferated faster than traditionally cultured cells and increased the expression of the osteogenic marker gene RUNX-2; yet no difference between the use of fresh and expired platelet concentrates was observed. Conclusion/Significance Our findings suggest that human platelet lysates produced from expired platelet concentrates can be used as an alternative to fetal bovine serum for mesenchymal stem cell culture to the same extent as lysates from fresh platelets. PMID:23874839

  17. Pythagorean Approximations and Continued Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Javier

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we will show that the Pythagorean approximations of [the square root of] 2 coincide with those achieved in the 16th century by means of continued fractions. Assuming this fact and the known relation that connects the Fibonacci sequence with the golden section, we shall establish a procedure to obtain sequences of rational numbers…

  18. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inherited gene mutation that limits the normal regulation and control, the complement system can damage our ... email: Evaren-Page@ouhsc.edu ), Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, College of Public Health, OUHSC Dee Terrell, PhD, ...

  19. Does size matter in platelet production?

    PubMed

    Thon, Jonathan N; Italiano, Joseph E

    2012-08-23

    Platelet (PLT) production represents the final stage of megakaryocyte (MK) development. During differentiation, bone marrow MKs extend and release long, branched proPLTs into sinusoidal blood vessels, which undergo repeated abscissions to yield circulating PLTs. Circular-prePLTs are dynamic intermediate structures in this sequence that have the capacity to reversibly convert into barbell-proPLTs and may be related to "young PLTs" and "large PLTs" of both inherited and acquired macrothrombocytopenias. Conversion is regulated by the diameter and thickness of the peripheral microtubule coil, and PLTs are capable of enlarging in culture to generate barbell-proPLTs that divide to yield 2 smaller PLT products. Because PLT number and size are inversely proportional, this raises the question: do macrothrombocytopenias represent a failure in the intermediate stages of PLT production? This review aims to bring together and contextualize our current understanding of terminal PLT production against the backdrop of human macrothrombocytopenias to establish how "large PLTs" observed in both conditions are similar, how they are different, and what they can teach us about PLT formation. A better understanding of the cytoskeletal mechanisms that regulate PLT formation and determine PLT size offers the promise of improved therapies for clinical disorders of PLT production and an important source of PLTs for infusion.

  20. Blood platelets in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gowert, Nina S; Donner, Lili; Chatterjee, Madhumita; Eisele, Yvonne S; Towhid, Seyda T; Münzer, Patrick; Walker, Britta; Ogorek, Isabella; Borst, Oliver; Grandoch, Maria; Schaller, Martin; Fischer, Jens W; Gawaz, Meinrad; Weggen, Sascha; Lang, Florian; Jucker, Mathias; Elvers, Margitta

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by neurotoxic amyloid-ß plaque formation in brain parenchyma and cerebral blood vessels known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Besides CAA, AD is strongly related to vascular diseases such as stroke and atherosclerosis. Cerebrovascular dysfunction occurs in AD patients leading to alterations in blood flow that might play an important role in AD pathology with neuronal loss and memory deficits. Platelets are the major players in hemostasis and thrombosis, but are also involved in neuroinflammatory diseases like AD. For many years, platelets were accepted as peripheral model to study the pathophysiology of AD because platelets display the enzymatic activities to generate amyloid-ß (Aß) peptides. In addition, platelets are considered to be a biomarker for early diagnosis of AD. Effects of Aß peptides on platelets and the impact of platelets in the progression of AD remained, however, ill-defined. The present study explored the cellular mechanisms triggered by Aß in platelets. Treatment of platelets with Aß led to platelet activation and enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and membrane scrambling, suggesting enhanced platelet apoptosis. More important, platelets modulate soluble Aß into fibrillar structures that were absorbed by apoptotic but not vital platelets. This together with enhanced platelet adhesion under flow ex vivo and in vivo and platelet accumulation at amyloid deposits of cerebral vessels of AD transgenic mice suggested that platelets are major contributors of CAA inducing platelet thrombus formation at vascular amyloid plaques leading to vessel occlusion critical for cerebrovascular events like stroke.

  1. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet-rich plasma. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700... § 864.5700 Automated platelet aggregation system. (a) Identification. An automated platelet...

  2. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  3. 21 CFR 864.5700 - Automated platelet aggregation system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... addition of an aggregating reagent to a platelet-rich plasma. (b) Classification. Class II (performance... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Automated platelet aggregation system. 864.5700... § 864.5700 Automated platelet aggregation system. (a) Identification. An automated platelet...

  4. Aspirin treatment reduces platelet resistance to deformation.

    PubMed

    Burris, S M; Smith, C M; Rao, G H; White, J G

    1987-01-01

    The present investigation has evaluated the influence of aspirin, its constituents, and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents on the resistance of human platelets to aspiration into micropipettes. Aspirin increased the length of platelet extensions into the micropipette over the entire negative tension range of 0.04 to 0.40 dynes/cm after exposure to the drug in vitro or after ingestion of the agent. Other cyclooxygenase inhibitors, ibuprofen and indomethacin, did not increase platelet deformability. The influence of aspirin was mimicked to some degree by high concentrations of salicylic acid, but acetylation of platelets with acetic anhydride had little influence on platelet deformability. Incubation of platelets with both salicylic acid and acetic anhydride had no more effect than salicylic acid alone. Benzoic acid, chemically similar to salicylic acid, had a minimal effect. The studies demonstrate that aspirin makes platelets more deformable, while components of the drug or other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents and cyclooxygenase inhibitors do not have the same influence on resistance to deformation.

  5. The York Platelet Syndrome: a third case.

    PubMed

    White, James G; Gunay-Aygun, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Our present study has described a third patient with the York Platelet Syndrome (YPS). The condition consists of a mitochondrial myopathy associated with unique platelet pathology. Their mitochondrial myopathy has not been completely delineated and will be the subject of further study. Platelet pathology in the new patient is essentially identical to that described in the first two patients. Thin sections of her thrombocytes reveal a normal complement of α and δ granules (dense bodies) in some, a decreased number in others and complete absence in a few. The unique pathological feature is the presence of giant organelles, including an intensely electron dense, huge body, the opaque organelle (OO) and a multilayered large body, the target organelle. In addition platelets from the new patient contain large masses and coils of smooth endoplasmic reticulum present infrequently in platelets of the first two patients. The giant opaque and target organelles appear to develop in rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum of the parent megakaryocyte and mature in the dense tubular system of circulating platelets. The relationship of the unique platelet pathology and mitochondrial myopathy has not been defined.

  6. Platelet thrombosis in cardiac-valve prostheses

    SciTech Connect

    Dewanjee, M.K.

    1989-01-01

    The contribution of platelets and clotting factors in thrombosis on cardiovascular prostheses had been quantified with several tracers. Thrombus formation in vivo could be measured semiquantitatively in animal models and patients with indium-111, Technetium-99m labeled platelets, iodine-123, iodine-131 labeled fibrinogen, and In-111 and Tc-99m labeled antibody to the fibrinogen-receptor on the platelet- membrane, or fibrin. The early studies demonstrated that certain platelet-inhibitors, e.g. sulfinpyrazone, aspirin or aspirin- persantine increased platelet survival time with mechanical valves implanted in the baboon model and patients. Thrombus localization by imaging is possible for large thrombus on thrombogenic surface of prosthesis in the acute phase. The majority of thrombus was found in the sewing ring (Dacron) in the acute phase in both the mechanical and tissue valves. The amount of retained thrombus in both mechanical and tissue valves in our one-day study in the dog model was similar (< 1% if injected In-111 platelets = 5 billion platelets). As the fibrous ingrowth covered the sewing ring, the thrombus formation decreased significantly. Only a small amount of thrombus was found on the leaflets at one month in both the dog and calf models. 38 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Platelet ITAM Signaling and Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R.; Kahn, Mark L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, i.e. the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to GPCRs, platelets express three glycoproteins (GP) that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) receptors: Fc receptor (FcR) γ chain, which is non-covalently associated with the GPVI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2 (CLEC2), the receptor for podoplanin, and FcγRIIA, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. While both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet GPCRs in hemostasis, the contribution of ITAM receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed over the last decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet ITAM signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet ITAM signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury. PMID:24677237

  8. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  9. Regulating billions of blood platelets: glycans and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Grozovsky, Renata; Giannini, Silvia; Falet, Hervé

    2015-01-01

    The human body produces and removes 1011 platelets daily to maintain a normal steady state platelet count. Platelet production must be regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. Multifaceted and complex mechanisms control platelet production and removal in physiological and pathological conditions. This review will focus on different mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. It will also briefly address platelet transfusion and the role of glycans in the clearance of stored platelets. PMID:26330242

  10. Regulating billions of blood platelets: glycans and beyond.

    PubMed

    Grozovsky, Renata; Giannini, Silvia; Falet, Hervé; Hoffmeister, Karin M

    2015-10-15

    The human body produces and removes 10(11) platelets daily to maintain a normal steady state platelet count. Platelet production must be regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. Multifaceted and complex mechanisms control platelet production and removal in physiological and pathological conditions. This review will focus on different mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. It will also briefly address platelet transfusion and the role of glycans in the clearance of stored platelets.

  11. Imipramine binding in subpopulations of normal human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Arora, R.C.; Meltzer, H.Y.

    1984-02-01

    Imipramine binding was studied in platelet membranes isolated with different proportions of heavy (young) and light (old) platelets. The B/sub max/, a measure of the number of binding sites, was greater in the heavier platelets than in the light platelets. However, the dissociation constant K/sub d/ (a reflection of the affinity of imipramine binding) was greater in the lighter platelets compared to the heavy platelets. These results indicate that differences in K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ in particular membrane preparation, could be due to the differences in the relative proportion of heavy and light platelets.

  12. Viability and functional integrity of washed platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Zylstra, V.W.; Clare, D.E.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Forstrom, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    The viability and functional integrity of saline- and ACD-saline-washed platelets were compared with those of unwashed platelets. After template bleeding time (TBT) was measured, 15 healthy volunteers underwent plateletpheresis and ingested 600 mg of aspirin. Autologous /sup 111/In-labeled platelets were transfused: unwashed (n = 5), washed with 0.9 percent saline solution (SS) (n = 5), and washed with a buffered 12.6 percent solution of ACD-A in 0.9 percent saline solution (n = 5). After transfusion, we measured TBT at 1, 4, and 24 hours; platelet survival at 10 minutes and 1, 4, and 24 hours and daily for 6 days; and the percentage of uptake in liver and spleen by quantitative whole-body radionuclide scintigraphy at 24 and 190 hours. We found that saline washing affected platelet recovery, 23.47 +/- 12 percent (p less than 0.001) as compared to 52.43 +/- 17 percent (p less than 0.002) for ACD-saline and 73.17 +/- 8 percent for control; that saline washing resulted in a greater liver uptake than control and ACD-saline-washed platelets (31.9 +/- 8% (p less than 0.001) vs 17.7 +/- 4.1 and 19.3 +/- 2.1% (p greater than 0.1), respectively); that, unlike control and ACD-saline-washed platelets, saline-washed platelets did not shorten bleeding time; and that neither type of washing affected survival. Although ACD-saline washing affects recovery, it also results in intact function, normal survival, higher recovery than SS platelets, and no significant liver uptake.

  13. Analysis of aggregation of platelets in thrombosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    Platelets are key players in thrombus formation by first rolling over collagen bound von Willebrand factor followed by formation of a stable interaction with collagen. The first adhered platelets bind additional platelets until the whole injury is sealed off by a platelet aggregate. The coagulation system stabilizes the formed platelet plug by creating a tight fibrin network, and then wound contraction takes place because of morphological changes in platelets. Coagulation takes place by platelet activation and aggregation mainly through fibrinogen polymerization into fibrin fibers. The process includes multiple factors, such as thrombin, plasmin, and local shear-rate which regulate and control the process. Coagulation can be divided into two pathways: the intrinsic pathway and the extrinsic pathway. The intrinsic pathway is initiated by the exposure of a negatively charged. It is able to activate factor XII, using a complex reaction that includes prekallikrein and high-molecular-weight kininogen as cofactors.. Thrombin is the final enzyme that is needed to convert fibrinogen into fibrin. The extrinsic pathway starts with the exposure of tissue factor to the circulating blood, which is the major initiator of coagulation. There are several feedback loops that reinforce the coagulation cascade, resulting in large amounts of thrombin. It is dependent on the presence of pro-coagulant surfaces of cells expressing negatively charged phospholipids--which include phosphatidylserine (PS)--on their outer membrane. PS-bearing surfaces are able to increase the efficiency of the reactions by concentrating and co-localizing coagulation factors.. Aggregation of platelets are analyzed and compared to adhesion of platelet to erythrocyte and to endothelial cells. This abstract is replacing MAR16-2015-020003.

  14. Safety of platelet transfusion: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Katus, M C; Szczepiorkowski, Z M; Dumont, L J; Dunbar, N M

    2014-08-01

    Platelet components became routinely available to many institutions in the late 1960s and since then utilization has steadily increased. Platelets are produced by three principal methods and their manufacturing process is regulated by multiple agencies. As the field of platelet transfusion has evolved, a broad array of strategies to improve platelet safety has developed. This review will explore the evolution of modern platelet component therapy, highlight the various risks associated with platelet transfusion and describe risk reduction strategies that have been implemented to improve platelet transfusion safety. In closing, the reader will be briefly introduced to select investigational platelet and platelet-mimetic products that have the potential to enhance platelet transfusion safety in the near future.

  15. Importance of measurement of platelet reactivity to ADP in patients with coronary artery disease: an historical account.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Udaya S; Mahla, Elisabeth; Gesheff, Martin G; Gurbel, Paul A

    2013-11-01

    The pivotal roles of platelets in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis at the site of plaque rupture are well established. The latter roles provide the fundamental basis for the most widely implemented pharmacologic management of coronary artery disease--dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin to inhibit platelet thromboxane A2 generation, and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor to prevent adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet activation. Although suboptimal pharmacodynamic efficacy, also described as high on-treatment platelet reactivity to ADP, has been associated with greater risk for post-stenting ischemic event occurrence, enhanced responsiveness is associated with higher risk for bleeding in selected patients. In this review article, we aim to provide an historical account of the one and a half century long journey starting with the first description of platelets through the first report of ex vivo measurement of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, the first demonstration of an association between ADP-induced platelet aggregation and post-stenting ischemic event occurrence, and finally to the most recent description of a 'therapeutic window' concept for P2Y12 receptor inhibitor therapy.

  16. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Luc H; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W; Gelb, Michael H; Boilard, Eric

    2014-10-02

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses.

  17. Platelets release mitochondria serving as substrate for bactericidal group IIA-secreted phospholipase A2 to promote inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Boudreau, Luc H.; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Cloutier, Nathalie; Soulet, Denis; Martin, Nicolas; Bollinger, James; Paré, Alexandre; Rousseau, Matthieu; Naika, Gajendra S.; Lévesque, Tania; Laflamme, Cynthia; Marcoux, Geneviève; Lambeau, Gérard; Farndale, Richard W.; Pouliot, Marc; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier; Nigrovic, Peter A.; Guderley, Helga; Lacroix, Steve; Thibault, Louis; Semple, John W.; Gelb, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a highly potent inflammatory trigger and is reportedly found outside the cells in blood in various pathologies. Platelets are abundant in blood where they promote hemostasis. Although lacking a nucleus, platelets contain functional mitochondria. On activation, platelets produce extracellular vesicles known as microparticles. We hypothesized that activated platelets could also release their mitochondria. We show that activated platelets release respiratory-competent mitochondria, both within membrane-encapsulated microparticles and as free organelles. Extracellular mitochondria are found in platelet concentrates used for transfusion and are present at higher levels in those that induced acute reactions (febrile nonhemolytic reactions, skin manifestations, and cardiovascular events) in transfused patients. We establish that the mitochondrion is an endogenous substrate of secreted phospholipase A2 IIA (sPLA2-IIA), a phospholipase otherwise specific for bacteria, likely reflecting the ancestral proteobacteria origin of mitochondria. The hydrolysis of the mitochondrial membrane by sPLA2-IIA yields inflammatory mediators (ie, lysophospholipids, fatty acids, and mtDNA) that promote leukocyte activation. Two-photon microscopy in live transfused animals revealed that extracellular mitochondria interact with neutrophils in vivo, triggering neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial wall. Our findings identify extracellular mitochondria, produced by platelets, at the midpoint of a potent mechanism leading to inflammatory responses. PMID:25082876

  18. SLAP/SLAP2 prevent excessive platelet (hem)ITAM signaling in thrombosis and ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Cherpokova, Deya; Bender, Markus; Morowski, Martina; Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Akbar, Sarah M; Sultan, Cheryl S; Hughes, Craig E; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Stoll, Guido; Dragone, Leonard L; Watson, Steve P; Tomlinson, Michael G; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein VI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 are essential platelet activating receptors in hemostasis and thrombo-inflammatory disease, which signal through a (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway. The adapter molecules Src-like adapter proteins (SLAP and SLAP2) are involved in the regulation of immune cell surface expression and signaling, but their function in platelets is unknown. In this study, we show that platelets expressed both SLAP isoforms and that overexpression of either protein in a heterologous cell line almost completely inhibited glycoprotein VI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 signaling. In mice, single deficiency of SLAP or SLAP2 had only moderate effects on platelet function, whereas double deficiency of both adapters resulted in markedly increased signal transduction, integrin activation, granule release, aggregation, procoagulant activity, and thrombin generation in response to (hem)ITAM-coupled, but not G protein-coupled, receptor activation. In vivo, constitutive SLAP/SLAP2 knockout mice displayed accelerated occlusive arterial thrombus formation and a dramatically worsened outcome after focal cerebral ischemia. This was attributed to the absence of both adapter proteins in platelets, as demonstrated by adoptive transfer of Slap(-/-)/Slap2(-/-) platelets into wild-type mice. Our results establish SLAP and SLAP2 as critical inhibitors of platelet (hem)ITAM signaling in the setting of arterial thrombosis and ischemic stroke.

  19. Platelet-cytokine Complex Suppresses Tumour Growth by Exploiting Intratumoural Thrombin-dependent Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Tung; Nishikawa, Tomoyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-01-01

    Tumours constitute unique microenvironments where various blood cells and factors are exposed as a result of leaky vasculature. In the present study, we report that thrombin enrichment in B16F10 melanoma led to platelet aggregation, and this property was exploited to administer an anticancer cytokine, interferon-gamma induced protein 10 (IP10), through the formation of a platelet-IP10 complex. When intravenously infused, the complex reached platelet microaggregates in the tumour. The responses induced by the complex were solely immune-mediated, and tumour cytotoxicity was not observed. The complex suppressed the growth of mouse melanoma in vivo, while both platelets and the complex suppressed the accumulation of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in the tumour. These results demonstrated that thrombin-dependent platelet aggregation in B16F10 tumours defines platelets as a vector to deliver anticancer cytokines and provide specific treatment benefits. PMID:27117228

  20. Secrets of platelet exocytosis – what do we really know about platelet secretion mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Golebiewska, Ewelina M; Poole, Alastair W

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation by extracellular matrix components or soluble agonists, platelets release in excess of 300 active molecules from intracellular granules. Those factors can both activate further platelets and mediate a range of responses in other cells. The complex microenvironment of a growing thrombus, as well as platelets' roles in both physiological and pathological processes, require platelet secretion to be highly spatially and temporally regulated to ensure appropriate responses to a range of stimuli. However, how this regulation is achieved remains incompletely understood. In this review we outline the importance of regulated secretion in thrombosis as well as in ‘novel’ scenarios beyond haemostasis and give a detailed summary of what is known about the molecular mechanisms of platelet exocytosis. We also discuss a number of theories of how different cargoes could be released in a tightly orchestrated manner, allowing complex interactions between platelets and their environment. PMID:24588354

  1. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  2. [Glycoproteins, inherited diseases of platelets, and the role of platelets in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Nurden, Alan T; Nurden, Paquita

    2013-02-01

    Recognition that platelets have a glycocalyx rich in membrane glycoproteins prompted the discovery in France that inherited bleeding syndromes due to defects of platelet adhesion and aggregation were caused by deficiencies in major receptors at the platelet surface. Identification of the alpha IIb beta3 integrin prompted the development of powerful anti-thrombotic drugs that have gained worldwide use. Since these discoveries, the genetic causes of many other defects of platelet function and production have been elucidated, with the identification of an ADP receptor, P2 Y12, another widespread target for anti-thrombotic drugs. Discovery of the molecular basis of a rare disease of storage of biologically active proteins in platelet alpha-granules has been accompanied by the recognition of the roles of platelets in inflammation, the innate immune system and tissue repair, opening new avenues for therapeutic advances.

  3. Transcellular lipoxygenase metabolism between monocytes and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bigby, T.D.; Meslier, N. )

    1989-09-15

    We have examined the effects of co-culture and in vitro co-stimulation on lipoxygenase metabolism in monocytes and platelets. Monocytes were obtained from the peripheral blood of normal volunteers by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and adherence to tissue culture plastic. Platelets were obtained from the platelet-rich plasma of the same donor. When 10(9) platelets and 2.5 x 10(6) monocytes were co-stimulated with 1 microM A23187, these preparations released greater quantities of 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, 5(S),12-(S)dihydroxy-6,10-trans-8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid, and leukotriene C4, 5(S)-hydroxy-6(R)-S-glutathionyl-7,9-trans-11,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic (LTC4) when compared with monocytes alone. Release of arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, delta 6-trans-LTB4, and delta 6-trans-12-epi-LTB4 from monocytes was decreased in the presence of platelets. A dose-response curve was constructed and revealed that the above changes became evident when the platelet number exceeded 10(7). Dual radiolabeling experiments with 3H- and 14C-arachidonic acid revealed that monocytes provided arachidonic acid, 5-HETE, and LTA4 for further metabolism by the platelet. Monocytes did not metabolize platelet intermediates detectably. In addition, as much as 1.2 microM 12(S)-hydroxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid and 12(S)-hydroperoxy-10-trans-5,8,14-cis-eicosatetraenoic acid had no effect on monocyte lipoxygenase metabolism. Platelets were capable of converting LTA4 to LTC4, but conversion of LTA4 to LTB4 was not detected. We conclude that the monocyte and platelet lipoxygenase pathways undergo a transcellular lipoxygenase interaction that differs from the interaction of the neutrophil and platelet lipoxygenase pathways. In this interaction monocytes provide intermediate substrates for further metabolic conversion by platelets in an unidirectional manner.

  4. Flow cytometric assessment of activation of peripheral blood platelets in dogs with normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Żmigrodzka, M; Guzera, M; Winnicka, A

    2016-01-01

    Platelets play a crucial role in hemostasis. Their activation has not yet been evaluated in healthy dogs with a normal and low platelet count. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of activators on platelet activation in dogs with a normal platelet count and asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. 72 clinically healthy dogs were enrolled. Patients were allocated into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 30 dogs with a normal platelet count, group 2 included 22 dogs with a platelet count between 100 and 200×109/l and group 3 consisted of 20 dogs with a platelet count lower than 100×109/l. Platelet rich-plasma (PRP) was obtained from peripheral blood samples using tripotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (K3-EDTA) as anticoagulant. Next, platelets were stimulated using phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or thrombin, stabilized using procaine or left unstimulated. The expression of CD51 and CD41/CD61 was evaluated. Co-expression of CD41/CD61 and Annexin V served as a marker of platelet activation. The expression of CD41/CD61 and CD51 did not differ between the 3 groups. Thrombin-stimulated platelets had a significantly higher activity in dogs with a normal platelet count than in dogs with asymptomatic thrombocytopenia. Procaine inhibited platelet activity in all groups. In conclusion, activation of platelets of healthy dogs in vitro varied depending on the platelet count and platelet activator.

  5. Activated platelets inhibit hepatocellular carcinoma cell differentiation and promote tumor progression via platelet-tumor cell binding

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jingchao; Li, Bing; Liu, Yue-Jian; Cheng, Cheng; Zhou, Chunyan; Zhao, Yongfu; Liu, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Lack of differentiation in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is associated with increased circulating platelet size. We measured platelet activation and plasma adenosine diphosphate (ADP) levels in HCC patients based on differentiation status. Local platelet accumulation and platelet-hepatoma cell binding were measured using immunohistochemistry (IHC) or flow cytometry. Using a xenograft assay in NON/SCID mice, we tested the effects of the anti-platelet drug clopidogrel on platelet activation, platelet infiltration, platelet-tumor cell binding and tumor cell differentiation. HCC patients with poor differentiation status displayed elevated platelet activation and higher ADP levels. Platelets accumulated within poorly differentiated tissues and localized at hepatoma cell membranes. Platelet-tumor cell binding was existed in carcinoma tissues, largely mediated by P-selectin on platelets. NOD/SCID mice with xenograft tumors also exhibited increased platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. Clopidogrel therapy triggered hepatoma cell differentiation by attenuating platelet activation and platelet-tumor cell binding. TCF4 knockdown promoted HepG-2 cell differentiation and inhibited tumor formation, and TCF4 could be the potential downstream target for clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27542264

  6. Subcellular distribution of the different platelet proteins phosphorylated on exposure of intact platelets to ionophore A23187 or to prostaglandin E1. Possible role of a membrane phosphopolypeptide in the regulation of calcium-ion transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, J E; Say, A K; Haslam, R J

    1979-01-01

    Exposure of 32P-labelled human platelets to ionophore A23187 results in an increased incorporation of 32P into polypeptides with apparent mol.wts. of 47 000 (P47) and 20 000 (P20), whereas exposure to prostaglandin E1 results in increased labelling of polypeptides with apparent mol.wts. of 24 000 (P24) and 22 000 (P22) [Haslam, Lynham & Fox (1979) Biochem. J. 178, 397-406]. Labelled platelets that had been incubated with ionophore A23187 or prostaglandin E1 were sonicated and rapidly separated into three fractions by differential centrifugation. Electron microscopy and measurement of marker enzymes indicated that the 1300-19 000 gav. particulate fraction was enriched in granules, mitochondria and plasma membranes, that the 19 000-90 000 gav. particulate fraction was enriched in both intracellular and plasma membranes and that the 90 000 gav. supernatant contained only soluble proteins. 32P-labelled phosphopolypeptide P47 was present almost exclusively in the 90 000 gav. supernatant, whereas phosphopolypeptide P20 was largely dephosphorylated under fractionation conditions that protected other phosphopolypeptides. 32P-labelled phosphopolypeptide P24 was enriched in both particulate fractions, but particularly in the 19 000-90 000 gav. fraction, and may therefore be present in both the intracellular and plasma membranes. Phosphopolypeptide P22 appeared to be similarly distributed. Both particulate fractions were capable of the ATP-dependent oxalate-stimulated uptake of Ca2+. When the 19 000-90 000 gav. membrane fraction was prepared from platelets that had been incubated with ionophore A23187, active uptake of Ca2+ did not occur, but when this fraction was isolated from platelets that had been exposed to prostaglandin E1, uptake of Ca2+ was significantly greater than observed with the corresponding membranes from control platelets. It is suggested that phosphorylation of polypeptide P24 (or P22) by a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase may promote the active

  7. The growth of charged platelets.

    PubMed

    Labbez, C; Jönsson, Bo; Woodward, Cliff; Nonat, A; Delhorme, M

    2014-11-21

    Growth models of charged nanoplatelets are investigated with Monte Carlo simulations and simple theory. In a first model, 2-dimensional simulations in the canonical ensemble are used to demonstrate that the growth of a single weakly charged platelet could be limited by its own internal repulsion. The short range attractive interaction in the crystal is modeled with a square well potential while the electrostatic interactions are described with a screened Coulomb potential. The qualitative behavior of this case can also be described by simply balancing the attractive crystal energy with the screened Coulomb repulsion between the crystal sites. This repulsion is a free energy term dominated by counterion entropy and of course reduced by added salt. For a strongly coupled system, that is with high charge density and divalent counterions as in calcium silicate hydrate, the main product of cement hydration, the screened Coulomb approximation becomes inadequate and the growth behavior has to be described with the full primitive model. In this case, the energetic interactions become relatively more important and the entropy of the system plays a minor role. As a consequence, the electrostatic interactions gradually become less of a hindrance for aggregation and in extreme cases electrostatics actually promote the growth. This is manifested as an increased aggregation with, for example, increasing surface charge density. In the presence of divalent calcium ions and at the high negative surface charge density typical for calcium silicate hydrate, electrostatic interactions are not a hindrance for an infinite growth of the particles. By combining experimental and simulated data we can show that the limited sized platelets found in cement paste is due to a very fast nucleation rate compared to the growth rate.

  8. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion.

  9. Expression and function of purinergic receptors in platelets from apheresis-derived platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Koessler, Juergen; Weber, Katja; Koessler, Angela; Yilmaz, Pinar; Boeck, Markus; Kobsar, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background The storage of platelets affects platelet integrity and functionality, a process named platelet storage lesion (PSL). Reduced adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation is a typical manifestation of PSL. However, the role of ADP receptors in this context has not been evaluated yet. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate surface expression and function of the purinergic receptors P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 in stored platelet concentrates. Material and methods Platelets were obtained from venous whole blood and from apheresis-derived platelet concentrates stored for 0, 2 and 5 days. Purinergic receptor expression was measured by flow cytometry and western blot analysis. Receptor function was determined by calcium-induced fluorescence (P2Y1 and P2X1) or by flow cytometric measurement of the platelet reactivity index (P2Y12). Results The basal surface expression and total content of purinergic receptors remained unchanged throughout storage. After an initial reduction during apheresis, P2X1-mediated calcium flux was maintained, whereas the P2Y1-mediated increase of calcium flux gradually decreased during the course of storage. In contrast, the platelet reactivity index was comparable in freshly obtained and stored platelets. Discussion The function of the P2Y12 receptor is maintained during storage of apheresis-derived platelet concentrates. However, the impairment of P2X1 and especially of P2Y1 receptor function indicated by decreased receptor-mediated calcium flux is an important mechanism contributing to reduced ADP responsiveness of stored platelets. PMID:26674810

  10. Platelet Integrin αIIbβ3 Inhibitor Rescues Progression of Apoptosis in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Wang, Qinghang; Nie, Yumei; Yan, Rong; Dai, Kesheng; Zhou, Birong

    2016-01-01

    Background Apoptosis plays an important role in the physiology of platelet function. We aimed to detect the effect of the platelet integrin αIIbβ3 inhibitor, tirofiban, on apoptotic events, including mitochondrial inner-membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure on platelet surface, and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), when washed platelets were stimulated with thrombin. Material/Methods The study included washed platelets from healthy humans, divided into 4 groups: vehicle, and tirofiban (0.05 μg/ml, 0.25 μg/ml, and 0.5 μg/ml). Platelets were pretreated with vehicle or tirofiban and incubated at 37°C with agitation for 6 h and 24 h. Before thrombin addition, the vehicle group divided into 2 equal groups. Except one vehicle group, the other 4 groups were all stimulated with thrombin (1 U/ml) for 30 min at 37°C. Using flow cytometry, we studied the ΔΨm and PS exposure on platelet surfaces, and the generation of ROS in platelets. Results We observed that at the time of 6 h and 24 h, thrombin-stimulated vehicle platelets induced significant depolarization of ΔΨm, higher PS exposure, and increased ROS production compared with the vehicle group (P<0.01). However, the tirofiban group had significantly more recovery of ΔΨm, PS exposure, and ROS production compared with the thrombin group (P<0.01). Conclusions The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 inhibitor, tirofiban, inhibits the depolarization of ΔΨm, PS exposure on platelet surface, and ROS production when stimulated with thrombin. These results suggest that αIIbβ3 inhibitor inhibits the initiation of apoptosis in platelets, showing a potential clinical application of tirofiban as an apoptosis inhibitor. PMID:27827357

  11. Evaluation of platelet thromboxane radioimmunoassay method to measure platelet life-span: Comparison with /sup 111/indium-platelet method

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Machac, J.; Badimon, L.; Lipszyc, H.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Fuster, V.

    1985-05-01

    The platelet activation during radiolabeling in vitro with Cr-51 and In-111 may affect the platelet life-span (PLS) in vivo. A new RIA method to measure PLS is being evaluated. Aspirin inhibits platelet thromboxane (TxA/sub 2/) by acetylating cyclooxygenase. The time required for the TxA/sub 2/ levels to return towards control values depends on the rate of new platelets entering circulation and is a measure of PLS. A single dose of aspirin (150mg) was given to 5 normal human subjects. Blood samples were collected for 2 days before aspirin and daily for 10 days. TxA/sub 2/ production in response to endogenous thrombin was studied by allowing 1 ml blood sample to clot at 37/sup 0/C for 90 min. Serum TxB/sub 2/ (stable breakdown product of Tx-A/sub 2/) levels determined by RIA technique. The plot of TxB/sub 2/ levels (% control) against time showed a gradual increase. The PLS calculated by linear regression analysis assuming a 2-day lag period before cyclooxygenase recovery is 9.7 +- 2.37. In the same 5 subjects, platelets from a 50ml blood sample were labeled with /sup 111/In-tropolone in 2 ml autologous plasma. Starting at 1 hr after injection of labeled platelets, 10 blood samples were obtained over a 8 day period. The PLS calculated based on a linear regression analysis is 10.2 +. 1.4. The PLS measured from the rate of platelet disappearance from circulation and the rate of platelet regeneration into circulation are quite comparable in normal subjects. TxA/sub 2/ regeneration RIA may provide a method to measure PLS without administering radioactivity to patient.

  12. Platelets self-assemble into porous nacre during freeze casting.

    PubMed

    Hunger, Philipp M; Donius, Amalie E; Wegst, Ulrike G K

    2013-03-01

    Nacre possesses a remarkable combination of mechanical properties. Its high stiffness, strength and toughness are attributed to a highly aligned structure of aragonite platelets "glued" together by a small fraction (∼5vol%) of polymer; theoretically it can be described by a shear-lag model of staggered tensile elements between which loads are transferred via shear. Despite extensive research, it has not been possible yet to manufacture this aligned structure as a bulk material of considerable volume with a fast and easy production process. Particularly porous materials would benefit from enhanced wall material properties to compensate for performance loss due to their high porosity. An important application for such porous materials are tissue scaffolds for bone substitution. Bone, like nacre, exhibits excellent mechanical properties, particularly an exceptionally high toughness, because of its composite structure of hydroxyapatite platelets aligned in a ∼35vol% polymer matrix. Through the freeze casting process, which results in a fast and straightforward self-assembly of platelet-shaped particles during directional solidification, highly porous bulk materials with nacre-like cell walls can now be created. This porous nacre outperforms by a factor of 1.5-4 in terms of stiffness, strength and toughness materials that have the same amount of porosity but do not exhibit the nacre-like microarchitecture. The self-assembly process presented in this study thus has tremendous potential for the creation of highly porous, yet mechanically strong tissue scaffolds for low or medium load bearing bone substitute materials. Due to the versatility of the freeze casting process, materials with a self-assembled cell wall structure can be created from high-aspect ratio particles of all material classes. This enables material optimization for a great variety of applications such as impact protection, filtration, catalysis, energy generation and storage, in addition to those with

  13. Anti-platelet aggregation triterpene saponins from the galls of Sapindus mukorossi.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Chi; Tsai, Wei-Jern; Liaw, Chia-Ching; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Wu, Yang-Chang; Kuo, Yao-Haur

    2007-09-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of an ethanolic extract of the galls of Sapindus mukorossi has resulted in the isolation of two new tirucallane-type triterpenoid saponins, sapinmusaponins Q (1) and R (2), along with three known oleanane-type triterpenoid saponins (3-5). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and chemical hydrolysis. Biological evaluation showed that both sapinmusaponins Q and R demonstrated more potent anti-platelet aggregation activity than aspirin.

  14. Understanding platelet generation from megakaryocytes: implications for in vitro–derived platelets

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Xiuli; Poncz, Mortimer; Gadue, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are anucleate cytoplasmic discs derived from megakaryocytes that circulate in the blood and have major roles in hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation, and vascular biology. Platelet transfusions are required to prevent the potentially life-threatening complications of severe thrombocytopenia seen in a variety of medical settings including cancer therapy, trauma, and sepsis. Platelets used in the clinic are currently donor-derived which is associated with concerns over sufficient availability, quality, and complications due to immunologic and/or infectious issues. To overcome our dependence on donor-derived platelets for transfusion, efforts have been made to generate in vitro–based platelets. Work in this area has advanced our understanding of the complex processes that megakaryocytes must undergo to generate platelets both in vivo and in vitro. This knowledge has also defined the challenges that must be overcome to bring in vitro–based platelet manufacturing to a clinical reality. This review will focus on our understanding of committed megakaryocytes and platelet release in vivo and in vitro, and how this knowledge can guide the development of in vitro–derived platelets for clinical application. PMID:26787738

  15. Aspirin inhibition of platelet deposition at angioplasty sites: demonstration by platelet scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Cuningham, D.A.; Kumar, B.; Siegel, B.A.; Gilula, L.A.; Totty, W.G.; Welch, M.J.

    1984-05-01

    In-111 platelet scintigraphy was used to evaluate the effects of prior aspirin administration on the accumulation of In-111-labeled autologous platelets at sites of arterial injury resulting from iliac, femoral, or popliteal transluminal angioplasty in a nonrandomized study of 17 men. The degree of platelet localization at angioplasty sites was significantly less in nine men who had received aspirin in varying doses within the 4 days before angioplasty than in eight men who had not received aspirin for at least two weeks. The results suggest that aspirin treatment before angioplasty limits the early platelet deposition at the angioplasty site in men.

  16. Anticoagulation inhibits tumor cell-mediated release of platelet angiogenic proteins and diminishes platelet angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    Battinelli, Elisabeth M; Markens, Beth A; Kulenthirarajan, Rajesh A; Machlus, Kellie R; Flaumenhaft, Robert; Italiano, Joseph E

    2014-01-02

    Platelets are a reservoir for angiogenic proteins that are secreted in a differentially regulated process. Because of the propensity for clotting, patients with malignancy are often anticoagulated with heparin products, which paradoxically offer a survival benefit by an unknown mechanism. We hypothesized that antithrombotic agents alter the release of angiogenesis regulatory proteins from platelets. Our data revealed that platelets exposed to heparins released significantly decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in response to adenosine 5'-diphosphate or tumor cells (MCF-7 cells) and exhibited a decreased angiogenic potential. The releasate from these platelets contained decreased proangiogenic proteins. The novel anticoagulant fondaparinux (Xa inhibitor) demonstrated a similar impact on the platelet angiogenic potential. Because these anticoagulants decrease thrombin generation, we hypothesized that they disrupt signaling through the platelet protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) receptor. Addition of PAR1 antagonists to platelets decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Exposure to a PAR1 agonist in the presence of anticoagulants rescued the angiogenic potential. In vivo studies demonstrated that platelets from anticoagulated patients had decreased VEGF release and angiogenic potential. Our data suggest that the mechanism by which antithrombotic agents increase survival and decrease metastasis in cancer patients is through attenuation of platelet angiogenic potential.

  17. Platelets and erythrocyte-bound platelets bind infectious HIV-1 in plasma of chronically infected patients.

    PubMed

    Beck, Zoltan; Jagodzinski, Linda L; Eller, Michael A; Thelian, Doris; Matyas, Gary R; Kunz, Anjali N; Alving, Carl R

    2013-01-01

    Chronic HIV-1 infection is associated with persistent viremia in most patients, but it remains unclear how free virus may survive the potential hostile effects of plasma. We investigated whether sites might exist on the surfaces of circulating blood cells for protection of infectious HIV-1 particles. Red blood cells (RBC) either from blood of uninfected normal individuals, or from blood obtained without EDTA from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, invariably contained a small number of RBC having attached platelets as determined by flow cytometry, light microscopy, and immunofluorescence microscopy. After mixing normal RBC with platelet-rich plasma, discrete populations of RBC, platelets, and complexes of platelets attached to RBC were purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Upon incubation of purified cells or platelets with HIV-1 followed by washing and co-incubation with CD4-positive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), platelets, and platelet-RBC complexes, but not platelet-free RBC, caused infection of PBMC. Infection was prevented by pre-treating the platelet-RBC complexes with EDTA. Plasma and RBC (comprising a RBC/platelet-RBC mixture) from chronically infected patients with low viral loads were also co-incubated with PBMC ex vivo to determine the presence of infectious HIV-1. All freshly isolated plasmas from the HIV-1-infected donors, obtained in the absence of anticoagulant, were noninfectious. Interestingly, the RBC from most of the patients caused cell-cell infection of PBMC that was prevented by stripping the RBC with EDTA. A monoclonal antibody to DC-SIGN partially inhibited cell-cell HIV-1 infection of PBMC by normal RBC pre-incubated with platelets and HIV-1. We conclude: (a) platelet-free EDTA-free plasma from chronically infected HIV-1 patients, although containing viral RNA, is an environment that lacks detectable infectious HIV-1; (b) platelets and platelet-RBC complexes, but not purified RBC, bind infectious HIV-1; (c) DC

  18. Genotyping for human platelet alloantigen polymorphisms: applications in the diagnosis of alloimmune platelet disorders.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R

    2008-09-01

    Molecular typing for platelet allelic polymorphisms was first made possible by discovery of the HPA-1a/1b single nucleotide polymorphism in 1989. Since then, six other biallelic human platelet antigen (HPA) systems have been determined and can be typed using genomic DNA. The introduction of polymerase chain reaction enabled development of several different assays including polymerase chain reaction-sequence-specific primer, melting curve analysis by LightCycler, and 5'-nuclease assays. More recently, multiplex polymerase chain reaction has allowed for the development of high-throughput assays for genotyping large numbers of patients and blood donors for not only platelet gene polymorphisms but also for those of other blood cell genes. Platelet genotyping is a valuable tool in confirming platelet antigen specificities of alloantibodies detected in patient sera to complement the clinical history in the diagnosis of alloimmune platelet disorders such as fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura, and multiplatelet transfusion refractoriness. In addition, it has made possible prenatal platelet typing of the fetus in suspected cases of FNAIT and large-scale blood donor typing for provision of antigen-negative platelets to transfuse highly alloimmunized patients. Platelet genotyping may also someday prove important as an aid in determining the relative risk of patients for various thrombotic disorders.

  19. Geldanamycin disrupts platelet-membrane structure, leading to membrane permeabilization and inhibition of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed Central

    Suttitanamongkol, S; Gear, A R; Polanowska-Grabowska, R

    2000-01-01

    Geldanamycin (GA), a benzoquinoid ansamycin antibiotic, has been used as a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and an anti-tumour agent and is known to bind to heat-shock protein 90. In the present study on human platelets we have found that GA inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, thrombin and the thrombin-receptor-activating peptide and caused platelet plasma-membrane damage, detected by leakage of adenine nucleotides as well as serotonin. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that platelet exposure to GA led to the formation of holes or fenestrations in the platelet plasma membrane, confirming GA's ability to initiate membrane damage. In addition, GA itself caused both the dephosphorylation and phosphorylation of proteins in resting platelets and prevented agonist-induced phosphorylation of pleckstrin, the 20-kDa myosin light chain and other proteins. Another ansamycin, herbimycin A, also inhibited platelet aggregation, but caused minimal membrane permeabilization, as detected by (3)H release from platelets labelled previously with [(3)H]adenine, and much less membrane damage, revealed by SEM. Overall, GA is able to disrupt membrane structure and inhibit platelet aggregation, an ability which may be linked to alterations in the activity of protein kinases and phosphatases. PMID:10620508

  20. Platelet lipidomics: a modern day perspective on lipid discovery and characterization in platelets

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Valerie B; Murphy, Robert C.; Watson, Steve P

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are diverse families of biomolecules that perform essential structural and signaling roles in platelets. Their formation and metabolism is tightly controlled by enzymes and signal transduction pathways, and their dysregulation leads to significant defects in platelet function and disease. Platelet activation is associated with significant changes to membrane lipids, and formation of diverse bioactive lipids that play essential roles in hemostasis. In recent years, new generation mass spectrometry analysis of lipids (termed “lipidomics”) has begun to alter our understanding of how these molecules participate in key cellular processes. While, the application of lipidomics to platelet biology is still in its infancy, seminal earlier studies have shaped our knowledge of how lipids regulate key aspects of platelet biology, including aggregation, shape change, coagulation and degranulation, as well as how lipids generated by platelets influence other cells, such as leukocytes and the vascular wall, and thus how they regulate hemostasis, vascular integrity and inflammation, as well as contribute to pathologies including arterial/deep vein thrombosis and atherosclerosis. This review will provide a brief historical perspective on the characterization of lipids in platelets, then an overview of the new generation lipidomic approaches, their recent application to platelet biology, and future perspectives for research in this area. The major platelet-regulatory lipid families, their formation, metabolism, and their role in health and disease, will be summarized. PMID:24677238

  1. Human platelet/erythroleukemia cell prostaglandin G/H synthase: cDNA cloning, expression, and gene chromosomal assignment

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, C.D.; Funk, L.B.; Kennedy, M.E.; Pong, A.S.; Fitzgerald, G.A. )

    1991-06-01

    Platelets metabolize arachidonic acid to thromboxane A{sub 2}, a potent platelet aggregator and vasoconstrictor compound. The first step of this transformation is catalyzed by prostaglandin (PG) G/H synthase, a target site for nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. We have isolated the cDNA for both human platelet and human erythroleukemia cell PGG/H synthase using the polymerase chain reaction and conventional screening procedures. The cDNA encoding the full-length protein was expressed in COS-M6 cells. Microsomal fractions from transfected cells produced prostaglandin endoperoxide derived products which were inhibited by indomethacin and aspirin. Mutagenesis of the serine residue at position 529, the putative aspirin acetylation site, to an asparagine reduced cyclooxygenase activity to barely detectable levels, an effect observed previously with the expressed sheep vesicular gland enzyme. Platelet-derived growth factor and phorbol ester differentially regulated the expression of PGG/H synthase mRNA levels in the megakaryocytic/platelet-like HEL cell line. The PGG/H synthase gene was assigned to chromosome 9 by analysis of a human-hamster somatic hybrid DNA panel. The availability of platelet PGG/H synthase cDNA should enhance our understanding of the important structure/function domains of this protein and it gene regulation.

  2. Mimicking adhesive functionalities of blood platelets using ligand-decorated liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Madhumitha; Modery, Christa L; Wong, Timothy L; Dzuricky, Michael; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2012-06-20

    Platelet transfusion is used for treating a variety of bleeding complications. Natural platelet-based transfusion products have very short storage life (3-7 days) and high risks of biological contamination and side effects. Consequently, there is significant clinical interest in synthetic platelet-mimetic constructs that can promote hemostasis, while allowing convenient large-scale production, easy portability, long storage life, and minimal biological risks. To this end, research efforts are being directed toward particles that can amplify aggregation of activated platelets or can mimic platelet's ability to undergo adhesion to various vascular matrix proteins. Here, we report on a synthetic construct design that combines the mimicry of platelet's shear-dependent adhesion to vWF and shear-independent adhesion to collagen under flow, on a single particle. For this, we have used 150-nm-diameter liposomes as model particles and have decorated their surface simultaneously with vWF-binding and collagen-binding recombinant protein fragments or synthetic peptide motifs. We demonstrate in vitro that these surface-modified liposomes are able to adhere onto vWF surfaces in a shear-dependent fashion and onto collagen surfaces in a shear-independent fashion under flow. Moreover, when the vWF-binding and the collagen-binding were integrated on a single liposomal platform, the resultant heteromultivalent liposomes showed significantly enhanced adhesion to a vWF/collagen mixed surface compared to liposomes bearing vWF-binding or collagen-binding ligands only, as long as the ligand motifs did not spatially interfere with each other. Altogether, our results establish the feasibility of efficiently mimicking platelet's dual adhesion mechanisms on synthetic particles.

  3. [Effects of Tanshinone IIa on cytokines and platelets in immune vasculitis and its mechanism].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Jing; Zhou, Min; Li, Xiao-Hui; Xu, You-Hua; Liu, Hong; Yang, Mo

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Tanshinone IIa on IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha cytokines in immune vasculitis and platelets, as well as their relationship. The model of immune vasculitis of rabbits were established by intravenous injection of bovine serum albumin twice. Experiment was divided into 4 groups: control group, model group, tanshinone IIa-treated group and aspirin-treated group. The platelet count, platelet aggregation of peripheral blood were determined. The levels of serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha were detected by ELISA. The pathological changes of immune vasculitis were analyzed by hematoxylin & eosin staining, elastic fibers staining and electron microscopy. The results showed that the levels of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha in model group were significantly higher than those in normal group (p < 0.05), while the level of IL-6 was not significantly different between various groups. The serum level of IL-1beta was correlated with platelet number, while serum levels IL-1beta and TNF-alpha were both correlated with the platelet aggregation. The treatment with tanshinone IIa could significantly decrease the serum levels of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and platelet number, and the efficacy of tanshinone IIa was same as aspirin. The tanshinone IIa and aspirin both could alleviate the vessels damage in patients with immune vasculitis. It is concluded that the tanshinone IIa may diminish the inflammation damage of vessels in patients with immune vasculitis through the inhibition of cytokines and platelets.

  4. Correlation Between Albuminuria and Spontaneous Platelet Microaggregate Formation in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Araki, Shin-ichi; Matsuno, Hiroyuki; Haneda, Masakazu; Koya, Daisuke; Kanno, Yosuke; Itho, Junko; Kishi, Akio; Isshiki, Keiji; Sugimoto, Toshiro; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Kashiwagi, Atsunori; Uzu, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Albuminuria in type 2 diabetic patients is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated the correlation between albuminuria and spontaneous microaggregation of platelets (SMAP) formed under shear stress. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The study subjects were 401 type 2 diabetic individuals (252 with normoalbuminuria and 149 with albuminuria) who were examined for SMAP under conditions of shear stress only (no agonist stimulation) and the reversibility of platelet microaggregation after stimulation with 1 μmol/l ADP, measured by a laser light-cattering method. Active glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) and P-selectin expression levels on platelets as an index of platelet activation were measured by whole-blood flow cytometry. RESULTS SMAP formation was noted in 53% of diabetic patients. All patients with SMAP showed an irreversible pattern of platelet microaggregates by a low dose of ADP. SMAP was observed in 75% of diabetic subjects with albuminuria and in 39% of those with normoalbuminuria. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified urinary albumin excretion rate and brachial-ankle pulse-wave velocity as independent factors associated with SMAP. The degree of SMAP correlated with active GPIIb/IIIa (γ = 0.59, P < 0.001) and P-selectin (γ = 0.55, P < 0.001) expression levels. These early-activated platelet profiles were significantly inhibited in albuminuric patients with aspirin intake, although the effect was incomplete. CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrated an independent association between albuminuria and early changes in activated platelet profiles of type 2 diabetic patients. Further follow-up and intervention studies are needed to establish whether the inhibition of SMAP affects the course of cardiovascular disease in type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:19675198

  5. Platelet utilization: a Canadian Blood Services research and development symposium.

    PubMed

    Webert, Kathryn E; Alam, Asim Q; Chargé, Sophie B; Sheffield, William P

    2014-04-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding platelet biology and in strengthening the clinical evidence base around platelet transfusion thresholds and appropriate platelet dosing. Platelet alloimmunization rates have also declined. Nevertheless, controversies and uncertainties remain that are relevant to how these products can best be used for the benefit of platelet transfusion recipients. Platelets are unique among the blood products directly derived from whole blood or apheresis donations in requiring storage, with shaking, at ambient temperature. Storage is accordingly constrained between the need to limit the growth of any microbes in the product and the need to minimize losses in platelet function associated with storage. Proteomic and genomic approaches are being applied to the platelet storage lesion. Platelet inventory management is made challenging by these constraints. Although bacterial screening has enhanced the safety of platelet transfusions, pathogen reduction technology may offer further benefits. Continuing clinical investigations are warranted to understand the value of transfusing platelets prophylactically or only in response to bleeding in different patient groups and how best to manage the most grievously injured trauma patients. Patients refractory to platelet transfusions also require expert clinical management. The engineering of platelet substitute products is an active area of research, but considerable hurdles remain before any clinical uses may be contemplated. Roles for platelets in biological areas distinct from hemostasis are also emerging. Platelet utilization is variably affected by all of the above factors, by demographic changes, by new medications, and by new patient care approaches.

  6. Current Status of Fractional Laser Resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Carniol, Paul J; Hamilton, Mark M; Carniol, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Fractional lasers were first developed based on observations of lasers designed for hair transplantation. In 2007, ablative fractional laser resurfacing was introduced. The fractionation allowed deeper tissue penetration, leading to greater tissue contraction, collagen production and tissue remodeling. Since then, fractional erbium:YAG resurfacing lasers have also been introduced. These lasers have yielded excellent results in treating photoaging, acne scarring, and dyschromia. With the adjustment of microspot density, pulse duration, number of passes, and fluence, the surgeon can adjust the treatment effects. These lasers have allowed surgeons to treat patients with higher Fitzpatrick skin types (types IV to VI) and greater individualize treatments to various facial subunits. Immunohistochemical analysis has demonstrated remodeling effects of the tissues for several months, producing longer lasting results. Adjuvant treatments are also under investigation, including concomitant face-lift, product deposition, and platelet-rich plasma. Finally, there is a short recovery time from treatment with these lasers, allowing patients to resume regular activities more quickly. Although there is a relatively high safety profile for ablative fractionated lasers, surgeons should be aware of the limitations of specific treatments and the associated risks and complications.

  7. Desmopressin (DDAVP) improves recruitment of activated platelets to collagen but simultaneously increases platelet endothelial interactions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Calmer, Simone; Ferkau, Annika; Larmann, Jan; Johanning, Kai; Czaja, Eliana; Hagl, Christian; Echtermeyer, Frank; Goudeva, Lilia; Heuft, Hans-Gert; Theilmeier, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Platelet dysfunction can cause clinically relevant bleeding. Treatment with DDAVP is advocated for this condition. DDAVP increases von Willebrand factor (VWF) on endothelial cells (ECs) and in plasma. VWF could facilitate platelet deposition on subendothelial collagen. VWF also facilitates platelet/EC interactions. Therefore DDAVP could precipitate thromboembolic events. We used a flow chamber model to study in vitro and ex vivo if DDAVP alters recruitment of platelets to EC and collagen. Resting or TRAP-activated platelets and EC were treated individually or simultaneously with 0.4 ng/ml DDAVP. Fluorophor-labeled platelets (10(6)/ml) were resuspended in reconstituted blood and superfused across EC and collagen in an in vitro flow chamber model at arterial shear (320 s(-1)). Adhesion of platelets to the respective surface was recorded fluorescence microscopically and platelet covered area was assessed. TRAP significantly induced adhesiveness of platelets for collagen and EC. DDAVP pretreatment of platelets did not affect adhesiveness of resting or TRAP-activated platelets for collagen or EC. Adhesiveness of resting but not TRAP-activated platelets was induced on DDAVP-treated EC. DDAVP-conditioned EC supernatant contained vWF and significantly increased platelet deposition on collagen. Platelets from patients with clinically suspected platelet dysfunction undergoing aortic valve replacement exhibited decreased platelet deposition on collagen surfaces. In summary, our data confirm that DDAVP can induce release of platelet adhesion promoting factors from EC, which is most likely vWF. DDAVP has no direct effect on platelets. Blood samples from DDAVP-treated patients do not exhibit significantly augmented platelet deposition on collagen ex vivo. This influence of released promoting factors might cause an increase of undesirable interactions of platelets with EC.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: gray platelet syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... platelets, which are blood cell fragments involved in blood clotting. People with this condition tend to bruise easily ... factors and other proteins that are important for blood clotting and wound healing . In response to an injury ...

  9. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  10. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  11. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  12. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  13. 21 CFR 640.20 - Platelets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... one unit of blood and resuspended in an appropriate volume of original plasma, as prescribed in § 640.24(d). (b) Source. The source material for Platelets is plasma which may be obtained by whole...

  14. [Platelet transfusion role in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Petermann, R

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal immune thrombocytopenia represent less than 5% of cases of early thrombocytopenia (early-onset<72hours post-delivery). As in adults, thrombocytopenia in neonates is defined as a platelet count less than 150G/L. They are either auto- or allo-immune. Thrombocytopenia resulting from transplacental passage of maternal antibodies directed to platelet membrane glycoproteins can be severe. The major complication of severe thrombocytopenia is bleeding and particularly intra-cranial haemorrhage and neurologic sequelea following. However, auto- and allo-immune thrombocytopenia have very different characteristics including the treatment management. In fact, this treatment is based on platelet transfusion associated or not to intravenous immunoglobulin administration. The purpose of this article is to remind platelet transfusion's place in neonatal immune thrombocytopenia in terms of recently published French guidelines and international practices.

  15. Propranolol modifies platelet serotonergic mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Zółtowski, R; Pawlak, R; Matys, T; Pietraszek, M; Buczko, W

    2002-06-01

    Though the mechanisms for the vascular actions of vasodilatory beta-blockers are mostly determined, some of their interactions with monoaminergic systems are not elucidated. Because there are evidences supporting a possible involvement of serotonin (5-HT) in the actions of beta-blockers, we studied the effect of propranolol on peripheral serotonergic mechanisms in normotensive and Goldblatt two-kidney - one clip (2K1C) hypertensive rats. In both groups of animals propranolol decreased systolic blood pressure, significantly increased whole blood serotonin concentration and at the same time it decreased platelet serotonin level. The uptake of the amine by platelets from hypertensive animals was lower than that of normotensive animals and it was decreased by propranolol only in the latter. In both groups propranolol inhibited potentiation of ADP-induced platelet aggregation by serotonin. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that propranolol modifies platelet serotonergic mechanisms in normotensive and renal hypertensive rats.

  16. Platelets in pulmonary vascular physiology and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Michael H.; Afshar-Kharghan, Vahid

    2012-01-01

    Almost a trillion platelets pass through the pulmonary circulation every minute, yet little is known about how they support pulmonary physiology or contribute to the pathogenesis of lung diseases. When considering this conundrum, three questions jump out: Does platelet production in the lungs occur? Why does severe thrombocytopenia—which undercuts the principal physiological role of platelets to effect hemostasis—not lead to pulmonary hemorrhage? Why does atherothrombosis—which platelets initiate, maintain, and trigger is other critically important arterial beds—not develop in the pulmonary artery? The purpose of this review is to explore these and derivative questions by providing data within a conceptual framework that begins to organize a subject that is largely unassembled. PMID:23130099

  17. Platelet miRNAs and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván; Alarcón, Marcelo

    2015-07-15

    Activated platelets play a critical role in the acute complications of atherosclerosis that cause life-threatening ischemic events at late stages of the disease. The miRNAs are a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that play a significant role in both inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases. The miRNAs are known to be present in platelets and exert important regulatory functions. Here we systematically examine the genes that are regulated by platelet miRNAs (miRNA-223,miRNA-126,miRNA-21, miRNA-24 and miRNA-197) and the association with cardiovascular disease risks. Platelet-secreted miRNAs could be novel biomarkers associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  18. Effects of drugs on platelet function.

    PubMed

    Morse, E E

    1977-01-01

    Numerous drugs and chemicals affect the function of human blood platelets. The mechanism of action of some medications is partly understood. Aspirin is the most frequently involved drug. It appears to interfere with the platelet release reaction by acetylation of a platelet membrane protein which may be involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins. Other anti-inflammatory drugs, including indomethacin, phenylbutazone, ibuprophen (Motrin) and clonixin, also interfere with the release reaction but have a shorter acting course than aspirin. Some drugs stimulate adenylcyclase (gliclazide) or block phosphodiesterase, (dipyridamole, caffeine) both of which actions lead to an increase in adenosine cyclic 3':5' monophosphate (cAMP) and decrease aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP). These interactions should be known to clinical scientists since patients using these medicaments may manifest abnormal platelet function tests in the laboratory and mild hemorrhagic syndromes in the clinic.

  19. Acid soluble, pepsin resistant platelet aggregating material

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.

    1982-08-31

    Disclosed is an acid soluble, pepsin resistant, platelet aggregating material isolated from equine arterial tissue by extraction with dilute aqueous acid. The method of isolation and use to control bleeding are described. 4 figs.

  20. [Blood platelets and asthma caused by aspirin].

    PubMed

    Joseph, M; Capron, A; Ameisen, J C; Martinot, J B; Tonnel, A B

    1987-10-01

    Platelets isolated from patients with aspirin-induced asthma (ASA patients) react abnormally in vitro to aspirin and to non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), by generating cytocidal molecules, that can kill parasitic larvae and to oxygen-dependent free radicles, which may be detected by chemiluminescence, although these drugs do not have a similar effect on platelets from normal donors or allergic asthmatics. The abnormality appears to be associated with the inhibiting properties of NSAID and aspirin on the cyclo-oxygenase pathway, that leads to a defect of the binding of prostaglandin endoperoxide PGH2 to its receptors on the platelet membrane. In addition, another metabolite from the lipoxygenase pathway which is at present poorly defined seems to participate in the anomaly. Sodium salicylate, a naturally produced catabolite of aspirin, that is well-tolerated by ASA patients, inhibits the abnormal response of the platelets and this opens new perspectives in the management of aspirin-sensitive intolerance.

  1. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  2. Platelet Disorders: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders depends on the cause. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Platelets (University of Oklahoma Health ... the Signs and Symptoms of Thrombocytopenia? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Diagnosis and Tests Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody ...

  3. Depression of platelet counts in apparently healthy children with asymptomatic malaria infection in a Nigerian metropolitan city.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, Zaccheaus Awortu; Uko, Emmanuel Kufre

    2007-09-01

    Asymptomatic malaria infection is a common feature of malaria endemic regions in the tropics. In this prospective cross sectional survey, involving 240 children aged 1 to 8 years (Boys = 117, Girls = 123; Ratio 1:1.05), the median platelet count was 115 x 10(9)/L (IQR 97.5-190). Thirty-three out of 240 (13.75%) of the children had thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 100 x 10(9)/L). Malaria parasite was found to exert significant reduction in platelet count. This reduction was more pronounced in children under 5 years and also at higher parasite counts. An inverse relationship was established between parasite density and platelet count (y = -0.017x + 96.2, r = -0.2). Thrombocytopenia is not only a feature of acute malaria infection but also that of asymptomatic malaria infection in the tropics and might be a useful indicator of malaria in children.

  4. [The effects of ticlopidine and nifedipine on platelet aggregation in patients with obliterating arteriopathy of the lower limbs].

    PubMed

    Hevia Alonso, A; Gago Angelino, J; López-Valpuesta, F J; Serrano Molina, J S; Fernández-Sanz, S

    1992-04-01

    This paper evaluates the antiaggregant action of ticlopidine and nifedipine in patients with obliterate arteriopathy in inferior limbs of arteriosclerotic etiology (OAIL). They were established 4 study groups: control, with health volunteers without treatment (N = 10); patients treated with placebo (n = 11); patients treated with 500 mg/day of ticlopidine (n = 12) and treated with 30 mg/day of nifedipine (n = 12). The last 3 groups the treatment duration was 30 days. It was studied the platelet aggregatory activity against ADP and collagen, before drug administration and at 15 and 30 days post-treatment. Our results suggest that: Platelet aggregation is increased in patients with AOMI compared with that observed in the control group. Ticlopidine inhibits platelet aggregation induced by ADP, but not that induced by collagen. Nifedipine doesn't produce any effect on platelet aggregation.

  5. Silencing porcine CMAH and GGTA1 genes significantly reduces xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by porcine livers

    PubMed Central

    Butler, James R.; Paris, Leela L.; Blankenship, Ross L.; Sidner, Richard A.; Martens, Gregory R.; Ladowski, Joeseph M.; Li, Ping; Estrada, Jose L; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A. Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background A profound thrombocytopenia limits hepatic xenotransplantation in the pig-to-primate model. Porcine livers also have shown the ability to phagocytose human platelets in the absence of immune-mediate injury. Recently, inactivation of the porcine ASGR1 gene has been shown to decrease this phenomenon. Inactivating GGTA1 and CMAH genes has reduced the antibody-mediated barrier to xenotransplantation; herein we describe the effect that these modifications have on xenogeneic consumption of human platelets in the absence of immune-mediated graft injury. Methods WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/−CMAH−/− knockout pigs were compared for their xenogeneic hepatic consumption of human platelets. An in vitro assay was established to measure the association of human platelets with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) by immunohistochemistry. Perfusion models were used to measure human platelet uptake in livers from WT, ASGR1−/−, GGTA1−/−, and GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− pigs. Results GGTA1−/−, CMAH−/− LSECs exhibited reduced levels of human platelet binding in vitro, when compared to GGTA1−/− and WT LSECs. In a continuous perfusion model, GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers consumed fewer human platelets than GGTA1−/− and WT livers. GGTA1−/− CMAH−/− livers also consumed fewer human platelets than ASGR1−/− livers in a single pass model. Conclusions Silencing the porcine carbohydrate genes necessary to avoid antibody-mediated rejection in a pig-to-human model also reduces the xenogeneic consumption of human platelets by the porcine liver. The combination of these genetic modifications may be an effective strategy to limit the thrombocytopenia associated with pig-to-human hepatic xenotransplantation. PMID:26906939

  6. Proteomic characterization of human platelet-derived microparticles.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Anna Laura; Caruso, Giuseppe; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Laganà, Aldo

    2013-05-07

    Microparticles (MPs) are small fragments of apoptotic or activated cells that may contribute to pathological processes in many diseases. Platelet-derived MPs (PMPs) are the most abundant type of MPs in human blood. To characterize the proteins in PMPs we used a shotgun proteomics approach by nanoHPLC separation followed by MS analysis on an LTQ Orbitrap XL. PMPs were produced from isolated platelets stimulated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP). We developed an analytical platform constituted by two different steps: in the first one we used a standard shotgun strategy; in the second one, to improve low-molecular weight, low-abundance-proteins identification, the samples were fractionated using hydrogel nanoparticles, an enrichment system based on a mixed mechanism of dimensional exclusion and colorant affinity. This was chosen to tackle a common issue with shotgun approaches, in which the low-abundance proteins are not detected when surveys are on a broad scale. By means of the entire analytical platform, we identified 603 proteins, 243 of which were not previously identified. A simple and straightforward procedure for the study of PMPs was provided, producing a tool for further understanding their biological and pathological roles, and a baseline for future studies aimed at discovering biomarkers involved in several diseases.

  7. Improving the bacteriological safety of platelet transfusions.

    PubMed

    Blajchman, Morris A; Goldman, Mindy; Baeza, Federico

    2004-01-01

    Despite the increased application of aseptic techniques for blood collection and the preparation of platelet concentrates, morbidity and mortality arising from the transfusion of bacterially contaminated allogeneic platelet products persist. This problem exists because stored platelet concentrates represent a nearly ideal growth medium for bacteria and because they are stored at temperatures (22 degrees +/- 2 degrees C) that facilitate bacterial growth. The presence of bacteria in blood components including platelets has been a problem for many decades and currently is the most common microbiological cause of transfusion-associated morbidity and mortality. A variety of strategies have been devised and/or proposed in an attempt to try to reduce the risk of transfusion-associated sepsis. These include pretransfusion bacterial detection, efforts to reduce the likelihood of bacterial contamination, the optimization of blood product processing and storage, reducing recipient exposure, and the introduction of pathogen inactivation methodology. With regard to doing bacterial detection, a number of automated detection systems have become available to test for contaminated platelet components, but their utility to some extent is restricted by the time they take to indicate the presence of bacteria and/or their lack of sensitivity to detect initially low bacterial loads. A variety of other approaches has been shown to reduce the risk of bacterial contamination and include filtration to remove leukocytes and bacteria, diversion of the initial aliquot of blood during donation, and improved donor skin disinfection. Platelet pathogen inactivation methods under investigation include the addition of L-carnitine, gamma-irradiation, riboflavin plus UVA irradiation, and amotosalen HCl plus UVA irradiation. The latter process is licensed for clinical use with platelets in some countries in Europe. All of these approaches, either collectively or individually, hold considerable promise

  8. [CD36 Antigen Deficiency and Platelet Transfusion].

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Yan; Zhou, Yan; Shen, Wei-Dong

    2016-06-01

    CD36 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, a multi-ligand receptor, possesses various biological functions. CD36 deficiency may stimulate the body to produce anti-CD36 alloimmune antibodies through the several pathways, such as blood transfusion, pregnancy or organ transplantation and so on, leading to the refractoriness of immune platelet transfusion and other diseases. The recent research advances of CD36 deficiency and its molecular biological basis, platelet transfusion and CD36 antibody detection are summarized briefey in this review.

  9. Platelet dynamics in three-dimensional simulation of whole blood.

    PubMed

    Vahidkhah, Koohyar; Diamond, Scott L; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2014-06-03

    A high-fidelity computational model using a 3D immersed boundary method is used to study platelet dynamics in whole blood. We focus on the 3D effects of the platelet-red blood cell (RBC) interaction on platelet margination and near-wall dynamics in a shear flow. We find that the RBC distribution in whole blood becomes naturally anisotropic and creates local clusters and cavities. A platelet can enter a cavity and use it as an express lane for a fast margination toward the wall. Once near the wall, the 3D nature of the platelet-RBC interaction results in a significant platelet movement in the transverse (vorticity) direction and leads to anisotropic platelet diffusion within the RBC-depleted zone or cell-free layer (CFL). We find that the anisotropy in platelet motion further leads to the formation of platelet clusters, even in the absence of any platelet-platelet adhesion. The transverse motion, and the size and number of the platelet clusters are observed to increase with decreasing CFL thickness. The 3D nature of the platelet-RBC collision also induces fluctuations in off-shear plane orientation and, hence, a rotational diffusion of the platelets. Although most marginated platelets are observed to tumble just outside the RBC-rich zone, platelets further inside the CFL are observed to flow with an intermittent dynamics that alters between sliding and tumbling, as a result of the off-shear plane rotational diffusion, bringing them even closer to the wall. To our knowledge, these new findings are based on the fundamentally 3D nature of the platelet-RBC interaction, and they underscore the importance of using cellular-scale 3D models of whole blood to understand platelet margination and near-wall platelet dynamics.

  10. Homocysteine and its thiolactone-mediated modification of fibrinogen affect blood platelet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Joanna; Olas, Beata

    2012-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcys) and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL) concentrations in organism are correlated with a number of serious pathologies. In the literature, there are few papers describing studies on the effects of homocysteine on proteins that participate in blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in human. However, mechanisms involved in the relationship between hyperhomocysteinemia and hemostatic process are still unclear. The role of N- or S-homocysteinylation (induced by Hcys and its derivatives) of different hemostatic proteins, including fibrinogen is also still poorly known. The aim of this study was to establish the functional changes of the fibrinogen molecule induced by Hcys (at final doses of 10-100 µM) and the most reactive form of Hcys - its cyclic thioester, homocysteine thiolactone (0.1-1 µM), and to examine the effects of these changes on the capability of fibrinogen to interact with human blood platelets (by measuring the platelet adhesion). Our present results demonstrated that Hcys-treated fibrinogen in comparison with native molecule had a distinct capability to mediate platelet adhesion. Both, unstimulated and thrombin-activated platelets showed a reduced ability to adhere to Hcys-mediated fibrinogen. HTL (at all tested concentrations) had similar properties when we used thrombin-activated platelets. In conclusion, the results reported in this study could be useful for a better understanding of changes in hemostasis during hyperhomocysteinemia.

  11. Increase of α-Secretase ADAM10 in Platelets Along Cognitively Healthy Aging.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Florian; Wolf, Dominik; Fellgiebel, Andreas; Endres, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    ADAM10 is one of the key players in ectodomain-shedding of the amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP). Previous research with postmortem tissue has shown reduced expression and activity of ADAM10 within the central nervous system (CNS) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. Determination of cerebral ADAM10 in living humans is hampered by its transmembrane property; only the physiological AβPP cleavage product generated by ADAM10, sAβPPα, can be assessed in cerebrospinal fluid. Establishment of surrogate markers in easily accessible material therefore is crucial. It has been demonstrated that ADAM10 is expressed in platelets and that platelet amount is decreased in AD patients. Just recently it has been shown that platelet ADAM10 and cognitive performance of AD patients positively correlate. In contrast to AD patients, to our knowledge almost no information has been published regarding ADAM10 expression during normal aging. We investigated ADAM10 amount and activity in platelets of cognitively healthy individuals from three different age groups ranging from 22-85 years. Interestingly, we observed an age-dependent increase in ADAM10 levels and activity in platelets.

  12. Metformin Uniquely Prevents Thrombosis by Inhibiting Platelet Activation and mtDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Guang; Wei, Zeliang; Ji, Chengjie; Zheng, Huajie; Gu, Jun; Ma, Limei; Huang, Wenfang; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Zhang, Rui; Qin, Chaoyi; Wen, Li; Xing, Zhihua; Cao, Yu; Xia, Qing; Lu, Yanrong; Li, Ke; Niu, Hai; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis and its complications are the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes. Metformin, a first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes, is the only drug demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. However, whether metformin can effectively prevent thrombosis and its potential mechanism of action is unknown. Here we show, metformin prevents both venous and arterial thrombosis with no significant prolonged bleeding time by inhibiting platelet activation and extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Specifically, metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I and thereby protects mitochondrial function, reduces activated platelet-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species overload and associated membrane damage. In mitochondrial function assays designed to detect amounts of extracellular mtDNA, we found that metformin prevents mtDNA release. This study also demonstrated that mtDNA induces platelet activation through a DC-SIGN dependent pathway. Metformin exemplifies a promising new class of antiplatelet agents that are highly effective at inhibiting platelet activation by decreasing the release of free mtDNA, which induces platelet activation in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. This study has established a novel therapeutic strategy and molecular target for thrombotic diseases, especially for thrombotic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27805009

  13. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-11-15

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered.

  14. Effects of irradiation on platelet function

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, G.; Adams, G.A.; Labow, R.S.

    1988-09-01

    Current medical practice involves the irradiation of blood components, including platelet concentrates, before their administration to patients with severe immunosuppression. The authors studied the effect of irradiation on in vitro platelet function and the leaching of plasticizers from the bag, both immediately and after 5 days of storage. The platelet count, white cell count, pH, glucose, lactate, platelet aggregation and release reaction, and serotonin uptake were not altered by the irradiation of random-donor or apheresis units with 2000 rads carried out at 0 and 24 hours and 5 days after collection. The leaching of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate from the plastic bags followed by the conversion to mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate was not increased by irradiation. Therefore, it is possible to irradiate platelet concentrates on the day of collection and subsequently store them for at least 5 days while maintaining in vitro function. This procedure could have considerable benefit for blood banks involved in the provision of many platelet products.

  15. Quasicrystalline tilings with nematic colloidal platelets

    PubMed Central

    Dontabhaktuni, Jayasri; Ravnik, Miha; Žumer, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Complex nematic fluids have the remarkable capability for self-assembling regular colloidal structures of various symmetries and dimensionality according to their micromolecular orientational order. Colloidal chains, clusters, and crystals were demonstrated recently, exhibiting soft-matter functionalities of robust binding, spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking, entanglement, shape-driven and topological driven assembly, and even memory imprinting. However, no quasicrystalline structures were found. Here, we show with numerical modeling that quasicrystalline colloidal lattices can be achieved in the form of original Penrose P1 tiling by using pentagonal colloidal platelets in layers of nematic liquid crystals. The tilings are energetically stabilized with binding energies up to 2500 kBT for micrometer-sized platelets and further allow for hierarchical substitution tiling, i.e., hierarchical pentagulation. Quasicrystalline structures are constructed bottom-up by assembling the boat, rhombus, and star maximum density clusters, thus avoiding other (nonquasicrystalline) stable or metastable configurations of platelets. Central to our design of the quasicrystalline tilings is the symmetry breaking imposed by the platelet shape and the surface anchoring conditions at the colloidal platelets, which are misaligning and asymmetric over two perpendicular mirror planes. Finally, the design of the quasicrystalline tilings as platelets in nematic liquid crystals is inherently capable of a continuous variety of length scales of the tiling, ranging over three orders of magnitude in the typical length (from to ), which could allow for the design of quasicrystalline photonics at multiple frequency ranges. PMID:24550269

  16. [The role of blood platelets in infections].

    PubMed

    Micota, Bartłomiej; Sadowska, Beata; Różalska, Barbara

    2015-05-17

    Platelets are primarily associated with their main function, hemostasis, although it is known that these cells also exhibit biological activity in cancer progression, inflammation and infectious processes. During infection platelets, due to the expression of specific receptors - Toll-like receptors (TLRs) - which recognize molecular patterns associated with pathogens - pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) - are activated by the presence of microorganism components and/or substances released from damaged cells/tissue. Further antimicrobial activity of platelets is based on their capacity for phagocytosis, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the synthesis, storage and release of proteins/peptides with antimicrobial activity. Another mechanism of platelet action is their immunomodulatory activity. It is based mainly on the ability to secrete chemotactic factors allowing the accumulation of professional immunocompetent cells at the site of infection, thus enhancing the effective eradication of an infectious agent. In chronic infections, platelets, due to release of numerous growth factors and various cytokines, support mechanisms of acquired immunity. They accelerate the maturation of dendritic cells, stimulate B cells to be immunoglobulin-producing plasma cells and potentiate the activity of T cells. Unfortunately, in certain situations (the existence of specific risk factors) the interaction of microorganisms with activated platelets may also be the cause of pathology within the cardiovascular system.

  17. Measurement of platelet P-selectin for remote testing of platelet function during treatment with clopidogrel and/or aspirin.

    PubMed

    Fox, S C; May, J A; Shah, A; Neubert, U; Heptinstall, S

    2009-06-01

    There is great interest in assessing the efficacy of treatment with clopidogrel and aspirin in patients with cardiovascular disease using procedures that can be used in a remote setting. Here we have established methods to assess the effects of clopidogrel and aspirin on platelets based on measurements of platelet P-selectin. Platelets were stimulated in whole blood by adding the combination of adenosine diphosphate and the TXA(2) mimetic U46619 (ADP/U4, designed to assess P2Y(12) inhibition) or the combination of arachidonic acid and epinephrine (AA/Epi, designed to assess COX-1 inhibition). The stimulated samples were then fixed using a fixative solution that provides stability for at least 9 days, and sent to a central laboratory for analysis of P-selectin by flow cytometry. Measurements were performed in blood from healthy volunteers and patients with cardiovascular disease. The inhibitory effects of clopidogrel and aspirin were assessed ex vivo and the effects of the direct acting P2Y(12) antagonist cangrelor and aspirin were assessed in vitro. Measurements of platelet aggregation were also performed for comparison. In healthy volunteers clopidogrel ex vivo and cangrelor in vitro markedly inhibited P-selectin expression induced by ADP/U4. Aspirin did not inhibit and did not interfere with the effects of clopidogrel or cangrelor using this test. There was very little overlap of results obtained in the absence and presence of clopidogrel or cangrelor. In contrast, over half of 42 patients with cardiovascular disease did not respond well to clopidogrel treatment, although cangrelor was still effective. Aspirin markedly inhibited P-selectin expression induced by AA/Epi. Clopidogrel had much less effect and did not interfere with the effects of aspirin. There was no overlap of results obtained in the absence and presence of aspirin. Aspirin provided near-complete inhibition in 29 of 30 patients with cardiovascular disease. Aggregometry measurements agreed well with

  18. Assessment of quality of platelets preserved in plasma and platelet additive solution: A Malaysian experience

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtar, Munirah Binti; Hashim, Hasna Binti; Joshi, Sanmukh R

    2016-01-01

    Background: A use of platelet additives solution (PAS) improves storage conditions so as to give increased shelf life to platelets and to maintain hemostatic function. Objective: The present study was aimed to compare in vitro quality of platelet rich plasma (PRP)-derived platelet concentrate (PC) during extended period of storage in plasma and in additive solution (Composol PS and Fresenius). Study Design: Randomized 19 PCs each were used in the study for plasma and PAS as the storage medium. The measurement parameters, including pH, total white blood cell (WBC) count, total platelet count, and platelet activation rate, were studied on day 1, day 5, and day 8 of the storage period. The sterility test was carried out on the eighth day of storage. Results: pH of PC suspended in PAS was significantly lower as compared to that in plasma (P < 0.001) for all the three days of sampling. The WBC count, both in plasma and in PAS, showed an acceptable values of being <0.2 Χ 109 /unit during the storage period. Platelet count in PAS was higher as compared to that in plasma, though it was not statistically significant. While both the groups showed increased platelet activation rate during the storage, the PCs suspended in PAS showed significantly higher platelet activation rate (p0.001). Results from sterility test showed no bacterial growth in the PCs in both the groups. Conclusion: Most parameters studied on platelet storage in suspending medium of native plasma and PAS remained well within the acceptable limits. However, the pH values and platelet activation rate significantly differed in PAS as compared with plasma. PMID:27011678

  19. Identification of membrane proteins mediating the interaction of human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, D; Jennings, L; Edwards, H

    1980-01-01

    Membrane glycoproteins that mediate platelet-platelet interactions were investigated by identifying those associated with the cytoskeletal structures from aggregated platelets. The cytoskeletal structures from washed platelets, thrombin-activated platelets (platelets incubated with thrombin in the presence of mM EDTA to prevent aggregation) and thrombin- aggregated platelets (platelets activated in the presence of mM Ca(++) were prepared by first treating platelet suspensions with 1 percent Triton X-100 and 5 mM EGTA and then isolating the insoluble residue by centrifugation. The readily identifiable structures in electron micrographs of the residue from washed platelets had the shape and dimensions of actin filaments. Analysis of this residue from washed platelets had the shape and dimensions of actin filaments. Analysis of this residue by SDS gel electrophoresis showed that it consisted primarily of three proteins: actin (mol wt = 43,000), myosin (mol wt = 200,000) and a high molecular weight polypeptide (mol wt = 255,000) which had properties indentical to actin-binding protein (filamin). When platelets are activated with thrombin in the presence of EDTA to prevent aggregation, there was a marked increase in the amount of insoluble precipitate in the subsequent Triton extraction. Transmission electron microscopy showed that this residue not only contained the random array of actin filaments as seen above, but also organized structures from individual platelets which appeared as balls of electron-dense filamentous material approximately 1mum in diameter. SDS polyacrylamide gel analysis of the Triton residue of activated platelets showed that this preparation contained more actin, myosin and actin-binding protein than that from washed platelets plus polypeptides with mol wt of 56,000 and 90,000 and other minor polypeptides. Thus, thrombin activation appeared to increase polymerization of actin in association with other cytoskeletal proteins into structures that

  20. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770