Science.gov

Sample records for platelet-activating factor production

  1. Interleukin-6 stimulates neutrophil production of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Moore, F A; Barnett, C C; Silliman, C C; Peterson, V M

    1996-04-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is an integral mediator of the acute phase response to injury and infection; an exaggerated IL-6 response has been associated with adverse clinical events. The precise role of IL-6 is unclear, but it appears capable of modulating the functional repertoire of mature neutrophils (PMNs). Our previous work demonstrated that IL-6 -stimulated PMNs are primed by lower concentrations of platelet-activating factor (PAF) than nonstimulated PMNs. Recently, we have found that IL-6 suppresses PMN apoptosis via a PAF-like mechanism. We hypothesized that IL-6 stimulates PMNs to produce PAF. PMNs isolated from healthy human donors were incubated with IL-6 (0.1-100 ng/ml) at 37 degrees C. Lipid production was measured by use of thin-layer chromatography, and PAF quantitated with a scintillation proximity assay. IL-6 (1 and 10 ng/ml) stimulated PMNs to produce increase quantities of PAF. PAF production was associated with an increase in PMN cytosolic calcium. These data may provide mechanistic insight into IL-6 regulation of PMN-mediated cytotoxicity and the role of PAF in mediating IL-6 effects on PMNs.

  2. Interleukin 1 stimulates platelet-activating factor production in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Breviario, F; Tetta, C; Aglietta, M; Mantovani, A; Dejana, E

    1986-01-01

    Monocyte-derived interleukin 1 (IL-1) was found to be a potent inducer of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HEC). The product was identified as PAF by its behavior in chromatographic systems, its recovery of biological activity, and its physico-chemical properties and susceptibility to lipases. The response of HEC to IL-1 was concentration-dependent, took more than 2 h to become apparent, and decreased after 18 h of incubation. Most of the PAF produced was cell-associated and only a small amount (about 25% of the total) was released in the culture medium. To study the mechanism of IL-1-induced HEC-PAF production we tested the activity of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl/coenzyme A acetyltransferase in HEC. Acetyltransferase activity measured in IL-1-stimulated HEC lysates showed a three to five times greater maximum velocity, but the same Michaelis constant, as untreated cells. The regulation of PAF generation in HEC by IL-1 may be an important aspect of the two-way interaction between immunocompetent cells and vascular tissue. PMID:2872233

  3. Platelet-activating factor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Negro Alvarez, J M; Miralles López, J C; Ortiz Martínez, J L; Abellán Alemán, A; Rubio del Barrio, R

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), identified as 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine, exhibits potent proinflammatory properties. PAF is produced by numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, basophils, eosinophils and mastocytes. Since the discovery and identification of the chemical structure of PAF, a large variety of specific PAF-receptor antagonists, both natural and synthetic compounds, have been described. Intensive research has been conducted and development programs set up by more 25 pharmaceutical companies world-wide, studying the therapeutic interest of more than 50 PAF-receptors antagonists in various pathophysiological conditions. Medline (1966-1996), Embase (Excerpta Medica; 1974-1996), and other biomedical and drug directory databases were searched to identify English-language articles (basic science, clinical trial research, and review articles) and abstracts of conference proceedings on PAF receptor antagonists and related terms. The most important PAF receptor antagonists are reviewed with their effectiveness in various experimental tests. Fundamentally, PAF antagonists may be divided in two groups: natural and synthetic compounds. Natural (Ginkgolides, Kadsurenone, Chantancin, Phomactin, Swietemohonin A, Prehispalone, THC-7-oic acid, Aglafoline, FR 900452, PCA 4248 and SCH 37370), and synthetic antagonists (CV-3988, CV-6209, SRI 63-072, SRI 63-441, UR-10324, UR-11353, E-5880, CL 184005, 6-Mono and Bis-aryl phosphate antagonists, TCV-309, Ro-74719, WEB 2086, Y 24180, BN 50726, BN 50727, BN 50730, BN 50739, Ro 24-4736, Ro 24-0238, RP 55778, RP 59227, RP 66681, YM 264, YM 461, SM 10661, SR 27417, UK 74505, BB 182, BB 823, BB 654, SDZ 64-412, SDZ 65-123, L 652731, L 659898, L 668750, L 671284, L680573, L 680574, CIS 19, ABT-299 and Pinusolide) have a great variability in their chemical structure that might have importance in their different pharmacological profile. The great majority of these

  4. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  5. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor in SZ95 sebocytes results in inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin E2 production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2006-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a group of phosphocholines with various biological effects mediated by the PAF receptor (PAF-R). Activation of the epidermal PAF-R induces the expression of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). The upregulation of COX-2 expression has been shown to be involved in sebocyte proliferation, sebaceous gland inflammation and carcinogenesis. The present study was designed to investigate whether PAF-R activation could induce the expression of COX-2 and production of PGE(2), as well as secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), in the immortalized sebaceous gland cell line SZ95. Using calcium mobilization studies, we first confirmed that PAF can signal through PAF-R in SZ95 sebocytes. We then found that the production of IL-8 was induced following treatment with PAF-R agonist, however blocked by a specific PAF-R antagonist. Induction of COX-2 expression and increased PGE(2) production were observed in SZ95 sebocytes after PAF-R activation. Finally, it was demonstrated that the production of PGE(2), induced by PAF-R activation and mediated by COX-2 expression, was blocked following PAF-R antagonism in SZ95 sebocytes. These studies suggest that SZ95 sebocytes express functional PAF-Rs and PAF-Rs are involved in regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators, including COX-2, PGE(2) and IL-8.

  6. Modulatory effect of interleukin-10 on the production of platelet-activating factor and superoxide anions by human leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolati, B; Mariano, F; Montrucchio, G; Piccoli, G; Camussi, G

    1997-01-01

    We observed that human monocytes (MO) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produce platelet-activating factor (PAF) in a pattern characterized by an early and a delayed peak of synthesis. The early peak of PAF synthesis was due to a direct stimulation of these cells through mCD14 receptor as it was inhibited by anti-CD14 monoclonal antibody. The delayed and sustained peak of PAF synthesis was dependent on protein synthesis and cytokine production as shown by the inhibitory effect of cycloheximide on both MO and PMN, and of anti-tumour necrosis factor-alpha (anti-TNF-alpha) and of anti-interleukin-8 (anti-IL-8) neutralizing antibodies on MO and PMN respectively. IL-10 completely prevented this second, cytokine-dependent peak of PAF synthesis. In contrast, IL-10 markedly enhanced the first peak of PAF synthesis both in MO and PMN. Moreover, IL-10 was shown to modulate the production of superoxide anions (O2-) on both MO and PMN. As suggested by previous studies, IL-10 inhibited the delayed production of O2-. In the present study, we observed that IL-10 directly stimulated an early production of O2-. In addition, IL-10 enhanced the synthesis of O2- by MO and PMN challenged with LPS. The IL-10-induced O2- production was dependent, at least in part, from its effect on PAF synthesis, as it was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. These results suggest that IL-10 may upregulate the early synthesis of PAF and O2- triggered by direct LPS stimulation, whereas it may downregulate the delayed production of these mediators. PMID:9155653

  7. Platelet-activating factor drives eotaxin production in an allergic pleurisy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Klein, André; Pinho, Vanessa; Alessandrini, Ana Letícia; Shimizu, Takao; Ishii, Satoshi; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2002-01-01

    The activation of eosinophils via G-protein-coupled seven transmembran receptors play a necessary role in the recruitment of these cells into tissue. The present study investigates a role for PAF in driving eotaxin production and eosinophil recruitment in an allergic pleurisy model in mice. The intrapleural injection of increasing doses of PAF (10−11 to 10−9 moles per cavity) induced a dose- and PAF receptor-dependent recruitment of eosinophils 48 h after stimulation. Intrapleural injection of PAF induced the rapid (within 1 h) release of eotaxin into the pleural cavity of mice and an anti-eotaxin antibody effectively inhibited PAF-induced recruitment of eosinophils. Eosinophil recruitment in the allergic pleurisy was markedly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist UK-74,505 (modipafant, 1 mg kg−1). Moreover, recruitment of eosinophils in sensitized and challenged PAF receptor-deficient animals was lower than that observed in wild-type animals. Blockade of PAF receptors with UK-74,505 suppressed by 85% the release of eotaxin in the allergic pleurisy. Finally, the injection of a sub-threshold dose of PAF and eotaxin cooperated to induce eosinophil recruitment in vivo. In conclusion, the production of PAF in an allergic reaction could function in multiple ways to facilitate the recruitment of eosinophils  –  by facilitating eotaxin release and by cooperating with eotaxin to induce greater recruitment of eosinophils. PMID:11877329

  8. Inhibitory effects of acetylmelodorinol, chrysin and polycarpol from Mitrella kentii on prostaglandin E₂ and Thromboxane B₂ production and platelet activating factor receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Saadawi, Sakina; Jalil, Juriyati; Jasamai, Malina; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2012-04-26

    Acetylmelodorinol, chrysin and polycarpol, together with benzoic acid, benzoquinone and stigmasterol were isolated from the leaves of Mitrella kentii (Bl.) Miq. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) production in human whole blood using a radioimmunoassay technique. Their inhibitory effect on platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor binding to rabbit platelet was determined using ³H-PAF as a ligand. Among the compounds tested, chrysin showed a strong dose-dependent inhibitory activity on PGE(2) production (IC₅₀ value of 25.5 µM), which might be due to direct inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymatic activity. Polycarpol, acetylmelodorinol and stigmasterol exhibited significant and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on TXB₂ production with IC₅₀ values of 15.6, 19.1 and 19.4 µM, respectively, suggesting that they strongly inhibited COX-1 activity. Polycarpol and acetylmelodorinol showed strong dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PAF receptor binding with IC₅₀ values of 24.3 and 24.5 µM, respectively.

  9. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively.

  10. Biosynthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) via alternate pathways: subcellular distribution of products in HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Record, M.; Snyder, F.

    1986-05-01

    Final steps in the biosynthesis of PAF can be catalyzed by two different routes: CDP-choline:1-alkyl-2-acetyl-Gro cholinephosphotransferase (dithiothrietol (DTT)-insensitive) or acetyl-CoA:1-alkyl-2-lyso-GroPCho acetyltransferase. The authors have investigated the conversion of tritium-labeled 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-Gro and 1-alkyl-2-lyso-GroPCho (lyso-PAF) to PAF and other lipid products in HL-60 cells and in subcellular organelles isolated by centrifugation in a Percoll gradient. When cells are incubated with the labeled precursors (2 ..mu..M) the total amount of labeled PAF and 1-alkyl-2-acyl-GroPCho formed was similar from both precursors (60 pmol from 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-Gro and 50 pmol from lyso-PAF). However, PAF formed from 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-Gro represented 70% of the total products, whereas with lyso-PAF the major labeled product was 1-alkyl-2-acyl-GroPCho. Formation of PAF from 1-(/sup 3/H)alkyl-2-acetyl-Gro was linear to at least 30 min at 20/sup 0/C. After a 15-min incubation of this neutral lipid with HL-60 cells, the labeled PAF produced was located exclusively in the plasma membrane fraction as opposed to the label in the 1-alkyl-2-acyl-GroPCho, which was found only in the endoplasmic reticulum; none of the labeled PAF product was released to the media. The authors results suggest PAF might be synthesized by the DTT-insensitive cholinephosphotransferase at the site of the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells.

  11. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  12. Hydrolysis of platelet-activating factor by human serum paraoxonase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, L; Mackness, B; Durrington, P N; Hernandez, A; Mackness, M I

    2001-01-01

    Human serum paraoxonase (human PON1) has been shown to be important in the metabolism of phospholipid and cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides, thereby preventing the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and retarding atherogenesis. However, the exact substrate specificity of PON1 has not been established. In the present study we show that purified PON1 hydrolyses platelet-activating factor (PAF). We could find no evidence for contamination of our preparation with authentic platelet-activating-factor acetylhydrolase (PAFAH) by immunoblotting with a PAFAH monoclonal antibody or by sequencing the purified protein. In addition the specific PAFAH inhibitor SB-222657 did not affect the ability of PON1 to hydrolyse PAF (30.1+/-2.8 micromol/min per mg of protein with no inhibitor; 31.4+/-2.2 micromol/min per mg of protein with 100 nM inhibitor) or phenyl acetate (242.6+/-30.8 versus 240.8+/-31.5 micromol/min per mg of protein with and without inhibitor respectively). SB-222657 was also unable to inhibit PAF hydrolysis by isolated human high-density lipoprotein (HDL), but completely abolished the activity of human LDL. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) HDL, which does not contain PON1, was unable to hydrolyse PAF. These data provide evidence that PON1 may limit the action of this bioactive pro-inflammatory phospholipid. PMID:11171072

  13. Effect of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced mucus secretion in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Rene; Staats, Petra; Groneberg, David A; Wagner, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background Platelet activating factor and tachykinins (substance P, neurokinin A, neurokinin B) are important mediators contributing to increased airway secretion in the context of different types of respiratory diseases including acute and chronic asthma. Leukotriene receptor antagonists are recommended as add-on therapy for this disease. The cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist montelukast has been used in clinical asthma therapy during the last years. Besides its inhibitory action on bronchoconstriction, only little is known about its effects on airway secretions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity. Methods The effects of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity in the rat were assessed by quantification of secreted 35SO4 labelled mucus macromolecules using the modified Ussing chamber technique. Results Platelet activating factor potently stimulated airway secretion, which was completely inhibited by the platelet activating factor receptor antagonist WEB 2086 and montelukast. In contrast, montelukast had no effect on tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity. Conclusion Cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonism by montelukast reverses the secretagogue properties of platelet activating factor to the same degree as the specific platelet activating factor antagonist WEB 2086 but has no influence on treacheal secretion elicited by tachykinins. These results suggest a role of montelukast in the signal transduction pathway of platelet activating factor induced secretory activity of the airways and may further explain the beneficial properties of cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonists. PMID:18289370

  14. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, generates two bioactive products during the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein: use of a novel inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, C H; Moores, K E; Boyd, H F; Dhanak, D; Ife, R J; Leach, C A; Leake, D S; Milliner, K J; Patterson, R A; Suckling, K E; Tew, D G; Hickey, D M

    1999-01-01

    A novel and potent azetidinone inhibitor of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), i.e. platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is described for the first time. This inhibitor, SB-222657 (Ki=40+/-3 nM, kobs/[I]=6. 6x10(5) M-1.s-1), is inactive against paraoxonase, is a poor inhibitor of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and has been used to investigate the role of Lp-PLA2 in the oxidative modification of lipoproteins. Although pretreatment with SB-222657 did not affect the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by Cu2+ or an azo free-radical generator as determined by assay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, in both cases it inhibited the elevation in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Moreover, the significantly increased monocyte chemoattractant activity found in a non-esterified fatty acid fraction from LDL oxidized by Cu2+ was also prevented by pretreatment with SB-222657, with an IC50 value of 5.0+/-0.4 nM. The less potent diastereoisomer of SB-222657, SB-223777 (Ki=6.3+/-0.5 microM, kobs/[I]=1.6x10(4) M-1.s-1), was found to be significantly less active in both assays. Thus, in addition to generating lysophosphatidylcholine, a known biologically active lipid, these results demonstrate that Lp-PLA2 is capable of generating oxidized non-esterified fatty acid moieties that are also bioactive. These findings are consistent with our proposal that Lp-PLA2 has a predominantly pro-inflammatory role in atherogenesis. Finally, similar studies have demonstrated that a different situation exists during the oxidation of high-density lipoprotein, with enzyme(s) other than Lp-PLA2 apparently being responsible for generating lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:10024526

  15. Platelet-activating factor-induced increases in glucose kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Hargrove, D.M.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a postulated mediator of many of the early hemodynamic effects of endotoxin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether in vivo administration of PAF could produce alterations in whole-body glucose metabolism that would mimic those seen during endotoxemia. Glucose kinetics were assessed in chronically catheterized conscious rats by the constant infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose before and for 4 h after either a bolus injection or a constant infusion of PAF. The bolus injection of PAF elevated the rate of glucose appearance (R{sub a}; 44%) for 1.5 h. The lower PAF infusion rate decreased blood pressure 11% to 104 mmHg, whereas the higher infusion rate decreased pressure 34% to 77 mmHg. Both PAF infusion rates produced elevations in plasma glucose and glucose R{sub a} throughout the 4-h infusion period in a dose-related manner. The PAF infusions also induced dose-related increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamine levels throughout the infusion period. Because the constant infusion of PAF did stimulate many of the hemodynamic and metabolic alterations produced by endotoxin, this study provides additional support for the potential importance of PAF as a mediator of the early hemodynamic and metabolic sequela of endotoxin shock. Furthermore, the PAF-induced changes in glucose metabolism appear to be mediated by the resultant elevation in plasma catecholamines.

  16. Polymorphic phase behavior of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, C; Mason, J T; Stephenson, F A; Levin, I W

    1986-01-01

    Vibrational Raman and 31P NMR spectroscopic experiments have been performed as a function of temperature on aqueous dispersions of 1-0-octadecyl-2-acetoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, a chemically synthesized platelet-activating factor. In the temperature range of -7 to 30 degrees C, the C(18)/PAF-H2O system is shown, upon heating, to undergo two thermal phase transitions centered at 9.2 degrees and 18.4 degrees C. The low temperature transition, attributed to the interdigitated lamellar gel (II)----gel (I) phase transition, is characterized by the breakdown of large lamellar organizations into small, but aggregated, bilayer vesicles. The high-temperature transition corresponds to the interdigitated lamellar gel (I)----micellar transition. The molecular ordering and packing structure of C(18)/PAF in the two lamellar phases and phase transition regions are described. It appears that the interdigitated lamellar gel (I) phase is unique for C(18)/PAF dispersions when compared with the behavior of other chemically closely related phospholipids in excess water. PMID:3697472

  17. Experimental acute pancreatitis induced by platelet activating factor in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Emanuelli, G.; Montrucchio, G.; Gaia, E.; Dughera, L.; Corvetti, G.; Gubetta, L.

    1989-01-01

    This study indicates that a single injection of platelet activating factor (PAF, 50-500 ng) into the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery of rabbits induces dose-dependent morphologic alterations of pancreatic tissue and increases serum amylase levels, both consistent with the development of an acute pancreatitis. The main histologic findings observed by light microscopy 24-72 hours after the injection of PAF were edema, polymorphonuclear neutrophil infiltration, cell vacuolization, and acinar cell necrosis. Fat cell necrosis was present in 30% of animals. By electron microscopy an increase of the number of zymogen granules in the apical region of acinar cells was observed 3 hours after PAF challenge. At 24-72 hours, many acinar cells showed vacuoles containing myelinlike figures, zymogen granules, and cellular debris. Pancreatic lesions developed in the area supplied by the artery injected with PAF and they were completely antagonized by the pretreatment of rabbits with CV 3988, a specific antagonist of PAF. In addition, the significant protective effect of atropine suggests a potential role for cholinergic mechanisms in the pancreatic alterations induced by PAF. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2464939

  18. Gastric secretion of platelet activating factor and precursors in healthy humans: effect of pentagastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, I; Denizot, Y; Hochlaf, S; Rigaud, D; Vatier, J; Benveniste, J; Lewin, M J; Mignon, M

    1993-01-01

    The release of platelet activating factor (PAF-ACETHER or PAF) and its precursors in the gastric lumen was assessed in 13 normal subjects in basal condition and after stimulation by gastrin. Acid, pepsin, and sialic acid outputs were determined under the same conditions. Gastric juice was collected using a nasogastric tube after overnight fast in basal condition for 60 minutes, then under pentagastrin infusion (6 micrograms/kg/hr for 60 minutes). Platelet activating factor was detected at low concentration in 4/13 subjects under basal condition (mean (SEM) 1.2 (0.6) pg/hr) while high concentrations of lyso platelet activating factor (6.1 (1.8) microgram/hr) and of alkyl-acyl-glycerophosphocholine (AAGPC) (11.5 (3) micrograms/hr) were found in 13 and 11 subjects, respectively. Platelet activating factor was not detected during pentagastrin infusion, while lyso platelet activating factor and alkyl-acyl-glycerophosphocholine were detected in 13 and in 12 subjects, respectively. Compared with the basal condition these platelet activating factor precursors increased significantly (p < 0.001) going up to fivefold baseline (31.8 (6.8) micrograms/hr and 53 (9.3) micrograms/hr respectively) in response to pentagastrin. There was a positive correlation between platelet activating factor precursors and acid or pepsin output but not between platelet activating factor precursors and sialic acid. As sialic acid may be considered an index of mucus glycoprotein degradation, it seems that gastrin stimulation of gastric epithelial cells results in a concomittant secretion of platelet activating factor precursors, acid, and pepsin irrespective of mucus glycoprotein degradation. PMID:8174952

  19. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  20. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  1. Possible mechanisms for the differential effects of high linoleate safflower oil and high alpha-linolenate perilla oil diets on platelet-activating factor production by rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Oh-hashi, K; Takahashi, T; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, T; Okuyama, H

    1997-12-01

    As compared with high dietary linoleate safflower oil, high dietary alpha-linolenate perilla oil decreased platelet-activating factor (PAF) production by nearly half in calcium ionophore (CaI)-stimulated rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In the CaI-stimulated PMN from the perilla oil group, the accumulated amount of arachidonate (AA) plus eicosapentaenoate (EPA) was 30% less and that of lyso-PAF was 50% less, indicating that the decreased availability of lyso-PAF is a factor contributing to the relatively low PAF production. Consistently, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, increased free fatty acids (FFA) and decreased PAF production possibly by decreasing the availability of lyso-PAF. Although, leukotrienes (LTs) have been proposed to stimulate PAF production synergistically, a potent LTB4 receptor antagonist, ONO-4057, decreased the formation of free fatty acids and LTB4, but stimulated PAF production somewhat, indicating that LTB4 may not stimulate PAF production in PMN. Lysophospholipid-induced transacylase (CoA-independent transacylase) activity in PMN homogenates was 25-30% lower in the perilla oil group but no significant differences were observed in the lyso-PAF acetyltransferase and PAF acetylhydrolase activities between the two dietary groups. Thus, decreased transacylase activity is another factor associated with the relatively low PAF production in the perilla oil group.

  2. Identification of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in human skin.

    PubMed

    Marques, Mariangela; Pei, Yong; Southall, Michael D; Johnston, John M; Arai, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Takao; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2002-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases are a family of specialized phospholipase A2 enzymes. They serve an anti-inflammatory function by converting the proinflammatory autocoid, PAF, into biologically inactive lyso-PAF, by the removal of the sn-2 acetyl group of this glycerophospholipid. Similarly, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases can also degrade oxidatively modified sn-2 polyunsaturated-fatty-acid-containing phospholipids, which are toxic to cells. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is a recently cloned member of this family of specialized phospholipases. Consistent with a potential role of this intracellular enzyme in protecting membrane phospholipids against oxidative stress, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II has been shown to translocate from cytosol to membranes in response to pro-oxidative stressors, and overexpression of this enzyme decreases the cytotoxic effects of these agents. The objective of this study was to assess whether platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is involved in protecting skin against oxidative stress. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protein was demonstrated in human skin by immunohistochemistry, with the highest levels of the enzyme found in sebaceous glands and lesser amounts in epidermal keratinocytes. Treatment of epidermal cells with t-butylhydroperoxide or ultraviolet B radiation resulted in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II translocation from cytosol to membranes. To assess the role of this enzyme in epidermal function, a recombinant retroviral strategy was used to overexpress platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT. Overexpression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protected HaCaT cells against apop tosis induced by oxidative stressors t-butylhydroperoxide and ultraviolet B radiation. Similar levels of apoptosis, however, were seen in both control and platelet-activating-factor

  3. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-09-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas.

  4. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-01-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas. PMID:1385272

  5. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  6. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  7. Platelet-activating factor receptor contributes to antileishmanial function of miltefosine.

    PubMed

    Gangalum, Pallavi R; de Castro, Waldionê; Vieira, Leda Q; Dey, Ranadhir; Rivas, Luis; Singh, Shailza; Majumdar, Subrata; Saha, Bhaskar

    2015-06-15

    Miltefosine [hexadecylphosphocholine (HPC)] is the only orally bioavailable drug for the disease visceral leishmaniasis, which is caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania donovani. Although miltefosine has direct leishmanicidal effects, evidence is mounting for its immune system-dependent effects. The mechanism of such indirect antileishmanial effects of miltefosine remains to be discovered. As platelet-activating factor and HPC share structural semblances and both induce killing of intracellular Leishmania, we surmised that platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor had a significant role in the antileishmanial function of miltefosine. The proposition was supported by molecular dynamic simulation of HPC docking into PAF receptor and by comparison of its leishmanicidal function on PAF receptor-deficient macrophages and mice under HPC treatment. We observed that compared with wild-type macrophages, the PAF receptor-deficient macrophages showed 1) reduced binding of a fluorescent analog of HPC, 2) decreased TNF-α production, and 3) lower miltefosine-induced killing of L. donovani. Miltefosine exhibited significantly compromised leishmanicidal function in PAF receptor-deficient mice. An anti-PAF receptor Ab led to a significant decrease in miltefosine-induced intracellular Leishmania killing and IFN-γ production in a macrophage-T cell coculture system. These results indicate significant roles for PAF receptor in the leishmanicidal activity of HPC. The findings open new avenues for a more rational understanding of the mechanism of action of this drug as well as for improved therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.F.; Chap, H.; Braquet, P.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1987-02-15

    /sup 32/P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca/sup 2 +/ from internal stores (Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca/sup 2 +/ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  10. The Feverfew plant-derived compound, parthenolide enhances platelet production and attenuates platelet activation through NF-κB inhibition.

    PubMed

    Sahler, Julie; Bernard, Jamie J; Spinelli, Sherry L; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    Few treatments are available that can safely and effectively stimulate new platelet production for thrombocytopenic patients. Additionally, recipients of transfused platelets may experience an inflammatory response due to stored platelets becoming unnecessarily activated, thus creating the need for suitable agents that will dampen undesirable platelet activation. We investigated the effect of the feverfew plant-derived compound, parthenolide on platelet production and platelet activation because of its well-studied ability to induce apoptosis or differentiation in some types of cancer. Parthenolide was used to treat human megakaryoblastic cell lines, primary human and mouse megakaryocytes. Resulting platelet production and function was measured via flow cytometry. The two most common parthenolide signaling mechanisms, oxidative stress and nuclear factor-κB inhibition, were assessed within the megakaryocytes using reactive oxygen species, glutathione and luciferase reporter assays. The influence of parthenolide on ex vivo platelet activation was tested with parthenolide pretreatment followed by collagen or thrombin activation. The resulting P-selectin surface expression and released soluble CD40 ligand was measured. Parthenolide stimulates functional platelet production from human megakaryocyte cell lines, and from primary mouse and human megakaryocytes in vitro. Parthenolide enhances platelet production via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB signaling in megakaryocytes and is independent of the parthenolide-induced oxidative stress response. Additionally, parthenolide treatment of human peripheral blood platelets attenuated activation of stimulated platelets. Overall, these data reveal that parthenolide has strong potential as a candidate to enhance platelet production and to dampen undesirable platelet activation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal structure of phospholipase A2 complex with the hydrolysis products of platelet activating factor: equilibrium binding of fatty acid and lysophospholipid-ether at the active site may be mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying H; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Berg, Otto G; Jain, Mahendra K; Bahnson, Brian J

    2002-12-17

    We have solved the 1.55 A crystal structure of the anion-assisted dimer of porcine pancreatic group IB phospholipase A2 (PLA2), complexed with the products of hydrolysis of the substrate platelet activating factor. The dimer contains five coplanar phosphate anions bound at the contact surface between the two PLA2 subunits. This structure parallels a previously reported anion-assisted dimer that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate of PLA2 bound to a substrate interface [Pan, Y. H., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 609-617]. The dimer structure has a molecule of the product acetate bound in subunit A and the other product 1-octadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC-ether) to subunit B. Therefore, this structure is of the two individual product binary complexes and not of a ternary complex with both products in one active site of PLA2. Protein crystals with bound products were only obtained by cocrystallization starting from the initial substrate. In contrast, an alternate crystal form was obtained when PLA2 was cocrystallized with LPC-ether and succinate, and this crystal form did not contain bound products. The product bound structure has acetate positioned in the catalytic site of subunit A such that one of its oxygen atoms is located 3.5 A from the catalytic calcium. Likewise, a longer than typical Ca-to-Gly(32) carbonyl distance of 3.4 A results in a final Ca coordination that is four-coordinate and has distorted geometry. The other oxygen of acetate makes hydrogen bonds with N(delta)(1)-His(48), O(delta)(1)-Asp(49), and the catalytic assisting water (w7). In contrast, the glycerophosphocholine headgroup of LPC-ether in subunit B makes no contacts with calcium or with the catalytic residues His(48) or Asp(49). The tail of the LPC-ether is located near the active site pocket with the last nine carbons of the sn-1- acyl chain refined in two alternate conformations. The remaining atoms of the LPC-ether product have been modeled into the solvent channel but have their

  12. Conversion of 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerols to platelet activating factor and related phospholipids by rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, M.L.; Lee, T.; Cress, E.A.; Malone, B.; Fitzgerald, V.; Snyder, F.

    1984-10-15

    The metabolic pathway for 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerols, a recently discovered biologically active neutral lipid class, was elucidated in experiments conducted with rabbit platelets. The total lipid extract obtained from platelets incubated with 1-(1-,2-/sup 3/H)alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerols or 1-alkyl-2-(/sup 3/H)acetyl-sn-glycerols contained at least six metabolic products. The six metabolites, identified on the basis of chemical and enzymatic reactions combined with thin-layer or high-performance liquid chromatographic analyses, corresponded to 1-alkyl-sn-glycerols, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphates, 1-alkyl-2-acyl(long-chain)-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines, 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamines, 1-alkyl-2-acyl(long-chain)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines, and 1-alkyl-2-actyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines (platelet activating factor). These results indicate that the metabolic pathway for alkylacetylglycerols involves reaction steps catalyzed by the following enzymatic activities: choline- and ethanolamine- phosphotransferases, acetyl-hydrolase, an acyltransferase, and a phosphotransferase. The step responsible for the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor would appear to be the most important reaction in this pathway and this product could explain the hypotensive activities previously described for alkylacetyl-(or propionyl)-glycerols. Of particular interest was the preference exhibited for the utilization of the 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol species in the formation of platelet activating factor.

  13. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  14. The direct factor Xa inhibitor Rivaroxaban reduces platelet activation in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Ulrike; Fraccarollo, Daniela; Micka, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas

    2013-08-01

    Platelet activation in congestive heart failure (CHF) contributes to an increased risk for thromboembolic complications. Rivaroxaban, the first oral direct FXa inhibitor is approved in Europe for prevention and treatment of venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and prevention of thromboembolic events in atrial fibrillation. As heart failure is an important risk factor for thromboembolism and increased platelet activation is common in heart failure, we investigated the potential effect of Rivaroxaban treatment on platelets in an experimental CHF model. Chronic myocardial infarction was induced in male Wistar rats by coronary ligation. Rats were randomized to placebo or Rivaroxaban (3 and 10mg/kg once daily). After 10 weeks platelet activation was assessed. Platelet-bound fibrinogen, detected by flow-cytometry, was significantly increased in CHF-Placebo (p<0.05) and reduced following treatment with Rivaroxaban (p<0.05 vs. CHF-Placebo). ADP-induced aggregation was significantly enhanced in CHF-Placebo vs. sham-operated animals (p<0.05) and normalized following chronic FXa inhibition (p<0.05 vs. CHF-Placebo). In separate in vitro experiments, attenuated platelet aggregation was present after incubating whole blood directly with Rivaroxaban but absent when the experiment was performed in platelet-rich plasma only. Thus, a direct effect on platelets could be excluded. Chronic direct factor Xa inhibition using Rivaroxaban reduces platelet activation in CHF rats by attenuating the secondary phase of ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Thus, Rivaroxaban may constitute a useful approach to prevent thromboembolic complications and reduce platelet activation in CHF at the same time. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolism of platelet activating factor (PAF) by rabbit renal homogenates

    SciTech Connect

    Cagen, L.M.; Yeh, Y.M.; Baer, P.G.

    1986-05-01

    Rabbit renal cortical slices convert added (alkyl-/sup 3/H)-PAF to metabolites that cochromatograph with lyso-PAF and alkyl-acyl glycerophosphocholine (AAGPC) and to a tritiated nonpolar metabolite that is the principal product recovered from the tissues. Rabbit renal cortical homogenates convert mixtures of (alkyl-/sup 3/H)-PAF and (choline-/sup 14/C)-PAF to products that cochromatograph with lyso-PAF and with AAGPC and to a tritiated nonpolar and a /sup 14/C-labeled polar metabolite. Formation of the latter products follow parallel time courses; they are the principal species present after extended incubation (30 min). Enzymatic capacity for formation of these metabolites is concentrated in the microsomal fraction (100,000 x g pellet). Their formation by washed microsomes does not require the addition of cofactors, but their rate of formation is enhanced in the presence of high concentrations of Ca/sup + +/ (1mM) and abolished by EDTA (1.25mM) or EGTA (1.25mM). Formation of the polar metabolite does not appear to be due to phospholipase C or D activity. Its formation is not enhanced by addition of glutathione or 2-amino-6,7-dimethyl-tetrahydropteridine, cofactors that support oxidative dealkylation of alkyl ether phospholipids in other tissues. Conversion of PAF to final products other than AAGPC appears to be a significant pathway for disposition of this substance in rabbit kidney.

  16. Platelet activation using electric pulse stimulation: growth factor profile and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Torres, Andrew S; Caiafa, Antonio; Garner, Allen L; Klopman, Steve; LaPlante, Nicole; Morton, Christine; Conway, Kenneth; Michelson, Alan D; Frelinger, Andrew L; Neculaes, V Bogdan

    2014-09-01

    Autologous platelet gel therapy using platelet-rich plasma has emerged as a promising alternative for chronic wound healing, hemostasis, and wound infection control. A critical step for this therapeutic approach is platelet activation, typically performed using bovine thrombin (BT) and calcium chloride. However, exposure of humans to BT can stimulate antibody formation, potentially resulting in severe hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. Electric pulse stimulation using nanosecond PEFs (pulse electric fields) is an alternative, nonbiochemical platelet activation method, thereby avoiding exposure to xenogeneic thrombin and associated risks. In this study, we identified specific requirements for a clinically relevant activator instrument by dynamically measuring current, voltage, and electric impedance for platelet-rich plasma samples. From these samples, we investigated the profile of growth factors released from human platelets with electric pulse stimulation versus BT, specifically platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor β, and epidermal growth factor, using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Electric pulse stimulation triggers growth factor release from platelet α-granules at the same or higher level compared with BT. Electric pulse stimulation is a fast, inexpensive, easy-to-use platelet activation method for autologous platelet gel therapy.

  17. Endogenous bacterial toxins are required for the injurious action of platelet-activating factor in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, X M; MacKendrick, W; Tien, J; Huang, W; Caplan, M S; Hsueh, W

    1995-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), an endogenous mediator for experimental sepsis, has been shown to induce shock and intestinal necrosis in vivo. However, it is unclear whether PAF exerts its injurious effects on the intestinal tissue directly or via synergism with other endogenous products. The aim of this study was to examine the role of endogenous bacterial products, such as endotoxin, in PAF-induced intestinal injury. PAF (3 micrograms/kg) was injected intravenously into normally colonized rats, germfree rats, and normal rats pretreated with a combination of antibiotics, and the systemic response and intestinal injury were assessed. PAF did not cause prolonged shock, leukopenia, hemoconcentration, and bowel necrosis in germfree rats. When germfree rats were primed with a low dose (0.5 mg/kg) of endotoxin, the protection was lost. Combined treatment of the normally colonized rats with neomycin, polymyxin B, and metronidazole for 7 days largely protected the animal from PAF-induced shock and intestinal necrosis. PAF does not directly induce prolonged hypotension, hemoconcentration, persistent leukopenia, and gross intestinal necrosis but causes these changes via a synergism with endogenous bacterial toxins, presumably from the gut flora.

  18. Role of cytokines and platelet-activating factor in inflammatory bowel disease. Implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A; Longo, W E; Mazuski, J E; Vernava, A M; Kaminski, D L

    1996-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and cytokines, such as interleukins, tumor necrosis factor, and others, are thought to play a role in the inflammatory process involving gastrointestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, ischemic colitis, or antibiotic-associated colitis. This study was undertaken to review the latest literature on the role of PAF and cytokines in the genesis of inflammatory bowel disease and implications for therapy and management. PAF is an endogenous phospholipid involved in hypersensitivity and inflammatory reactions such as platelet and neutrophil aggregation, vasodilation, increased vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion, which have been associated with inflammatory processes. Cytokines are peptides that regulate and coordinate inflammatory and immunologic responses. Increased production of cytokines has been reported during Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis and is correlated with disease activity. Because PAF and cytokines may have an important role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease, their inhibition by specific antagonists, mediators, or other agents such as steroids may have a potential therapeutic benefit in treatment and management of these inflammatory diseases in the near future.

  19. Interaction of platelet-activating factor with cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, L; Chilton, F H; Proud, D

    1991-01-01

    The present study has examined the interaction of platelet-activating factor (PAF) with cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells (GTE). PAF stimulated GTE to release endogenous arachidonic acid and metabolize it to prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha (PGE2 and PGF2 alpha). Prostanoid production by GTE in response to PAF was dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) and was maximal within 5 min. PGE2 and PGF2 alpha levels increased by 3.3 +/- 0.8 and 3.2 +/- 0.6 ng/10(6) cells respectively over basal levels in response to 100 nM-PAF. The ability of GTE to synthesize and/or catabolize PAF was also examined. GTE readily incorporated [3H]acetate into a product which migrated on t.l.c. with PAF. However, further characterization of this product suggested that label had not been incorporated into PAF, but rather that it was incorporated into another lipid product with chromatographic characteristics similar to those of PAF. In contrast, GTE readily metabolized PAF to inactive products. When [3H]PAF was incubated with GTE, 50% of the total [3H]PAF added was catabolized in approx. 15 min. The major route of catabolism of PAF by GTE was the deacetylation-reacylation pathway, which yielded 1-O-[3H]alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine. Determination of the nature of the long-chain acyl group incorporated into the sn-2 position of the newly synthesized products revealed that oleic and linoleic acids were the major fatty acids present. Taken together, these results suggest that respiratory epithelial cells respond to stimulation by PAF with enhanced production of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, and also have the capacity to modulate inflammatory reactions in the airways by their ability to degrade this potent inflammatory mediator. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2064601

  20. Increase in plasma platelet-activating factor levels in enterally fed preterm infants.

    PubMed

    MacKendrick, W; Hill, N; Hsueh, W; Caplan, M

    1993-01-01

    Because platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), we designed a prospective study to examine plasma PAF levels during the first 14 days of feeding in a population of neonates of less than 32 weeks gestation. We found that significantly more patients had detectable plasma PAF levels on days 3 and 14 of feeding when compared to their prefeeding levels (7% on day 0 vs. 26% at day 3, p = 0.04; none on day 0 vs. 18.5% at day 14, p = 0.01). This finding could not be explained by decreased plasma activity of acetylhydrolase, the PAF breakdown enzyme, spontaneous endotoxinemia or a maturational effect. None of the infants who developed detectable PAF levels after feedings were begun went on to develop NEC. We conclude that our findings may reflect increased intestinal PAF production with the provision of feedings to some premature infants. However, this phenomenon by itself does not appear to be a sufficient condition for the subsequent development of NEC.

  1. Oxygen radicals inhibit human plasma acetylhydrolase, the enzyme that catabolizes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, G; Oriente, A; Napoli, C; Palumbo, G; Chiariello, P; Marone, G; Condorelli, M; Chiariello, M; Triggiani, M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) can exert profound inflammatory effects at very low concentrations. In plasma, PAF is hydrolyzed to lyso-PAF by acetylhydrolase, an enzyme that circulates bound to LDL. Previous studies suggest that oxygen radicals may act synergistically with PAF to potentiate tissue injury. However, mechanisms underlying this interaction have not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether oxygen radicals may inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase activity was measured in human plasma and purified LDL before and after exposure to radicals (10-20 nmol/min per ml) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase. Oxygen radicals induced > 50% loss of PAF acetylhydrolase activity within 60 s and almost complete inactivation by 10 min. This phenomenon was irreversible and independent of oxidative modification of LDL. Inactivation occurred without changes in the affinity constant of the enzyme (Km was 17.9 microM under control conditions and 15.1 microM after exposure to oxygen radicals). Inactivation was prevented by the scavengers superoxide dismutase or dimethylthiourea or by the iron chelator deferoxamine. Thus, superoxide-mediated, iron-catalyzed formation of hydroxyl radicals can rapidly and irreversibly inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. Since concomitant production of PAF and oxygen radicals can occur in various forms of tissue injury, inactivation of acetylhydrolase might represent one mechanism by which oxygen radicals may potentiate and prolong the proinflammatory effects of PAF. Images PMID:8200975

  2. Vitamin C blocks inflammatory platelet-activating factor mimetics created by cigarette smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, H A; Weyrich, A S; Saetzler, R K; Jurek, A; Arfors, K E; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1997-01-01

    Cigarette smoking within minutes induces leukocyte adhesion to the vascular wall and formation of intravascular leukocyte-platelet aggregates. We find this is inhibited by platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists, and correlates with the accumulation of PAF-like mediators in the blood of cigarette smoke-exposed hamsters. These mediators were PAF-like lipids, formed by nonenzymatic oxidative modification of existing phospholipids, that were distinct from biosynthetic PAF. These PAF-like lipids induced isolated human monocytes and platelets to aggregate, which greatly increased their secretion of IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. Both events were blocked by a PAF receptor antagonist. Similarly, blocking the PAF receptor in vivo blocked smoke-induced leukocyte aggregation and pavementing along the vascular wall. Dietary supplementation with the antioxidant vitamin C prevented the accumulation of PAF-like lipids, and it prevented cigarette smoke-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular wall and formation of leukocyte-platelet aggregates. This is the first in vivo demonstration of inflammatory phospholipid oxidation products and it suggests a molecular mechanism coupling cigarette smoke with rapid inflammatory changes. Inhibition of PAF-like lipid formation and their intravascular sequela by vitamin C suggests a simple dietary means to reduce smoking-related cardiovascular disease. PMID:9153277

  3. Platelet-activating factor receptor agonists mediate xeroderma pigmentosum A photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongxue; Harrison, Kathleen A; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Murphy, Robert C; Rezania, Samin; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-03-16

    To date, oxidized glycerophosphocholines (Ox-GPCs) with platelet-activating factor (PAF) activity produced non-enzymatically have not been definitively demonstrated to mediate any known disease processes. Here we provide evidence that these Ox-GPCs play a pivotal role in the photosensitivity associated with the deficiency of the DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPA). It should be noted that XPA-deficient cells are known to have decreased antioxidant defenses. These studies demonstrate that treatment of human XPA-deficient fibroblasts with the pro-oxidative stressor ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and PAF receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity in comparison with gene-corrected cells. The UVB irradiation-generated PAF-R agonists were inhibited by antioxidants. UVB irradiation of XPA-deficient (Xpa-/-) mice also resulted in increased PAF-R agonistic activity and skin inflammation in comparison with control mice. The increased UVB irradiation-mediated skin inflammation and TNF-α production in Xpa-/- mice were blocked by systemic antioxidants and by PAF-R antagonists. Structural characterization of PAF-R-stimulating activity in UVB-irradiated XPA-deficient fibroblasts using mass spectrometry revealed increased levels of sn-2 short-chain Ox-GPCs along with native PAF. These studies support a critical role for PAF-R agonistic Ox-GPCs in the pathophysiology of XPA photosensitivity.

  4. Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Agonists Mediate Xeroderma Pigmentosum A Photosensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yongxue; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Murphy, Robert C.; Rezania, Samin; Konger, Raymond L.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    To date, oxidized glycerophosphocholines (Ox-GPCs) with platelet-activating factor (PAF) activity produced non-enzymatically have not been definitively demonstrated to mediate any known disease processes. Here we provide evidence that these Ox-GPCs play a pivotal role in the photosensitivity associated with the deficiency of the DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPA). It should be noted that XPA-deficient cells are known to have decreased antioxidant defenses. These studies demonstrate that treatment of human XPA-deficient fibroblasts with the pro-oxidative stressor ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and PAF receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity in comparison with gene-corrected cells. The UVB irradiation-generated PAF-R agonists were inhibited by antioxidants. UVB irradiation of XPA-deficient (Xpa−/−) mice also resulted in increased PAF-R agonistic activity and skin inflammation in comparison with control mice. The increased UVB irradiation-mediated skin inflammation and TNF-α production in Xpa−/− mice were blocked by systemic antioxidants and by PAF-R antagonists. Structural characterization of PAF-R-stimulating activity in UVB-irradiated XPA-deficient fibroblasts using mass spectrometry revealed increased levels of sn-2 short-chain Ox-GPCs along with native PAF. These studies support a critical role for PAF-R agonistic Ox-GPCs in the pathophysiology of XPA photosensitivity. PMID:22303003

  5. Deficiency of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase is a severity factor for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, Diana M.; Numao, Toshio; Tsodikov, Alexander; Vaitkus, Darius; Fukuda, Takeshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fueki, Naoto; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Makino, Sohei; Prescott, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Asthma, a family of airway disorders characterized by airway inflammation, has an increasing incidence worldwide. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) may play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Its proinflammatory actions are antagonized by PAF acetylhydrolase. A missense mutation (V279F) in the PAF acetylhydrolase gene results in the complete loss of activity, which occurs in 4% of the Japanese population. We asked if PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency correlates with the incidence and severity of asthma in Japan. We found that the prevalence of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency is higher in Japanese asthmatics than healthy subjects and that the severity of this syndrome is highest in homozygous-deficient subjects. We conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase gene is a modulating locus for the severity of asthma. PMID:10194471

  6. Platelet-activating factor: a candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced neurotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gelbard, H A; Nottet, H S; Swindells, S; Jett, M; Dzenko, K A; Genis, P; White, R; Wang, L; Choi, Y B; Zhang, D

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of central nervous system disease during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection revolves around productive viral infection of brain macrophages and microglia. Neuronal losses in the cortex and subcortical gray matter accompany macrophage infection. The question of how viral infection of brain macrophages ultimately leads to central nervous system (CNS) pathology remains unanswered. Our previous work demonstrated high-level production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, arachidonic acid metabolites, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) from HIV-infected monocytes and astroglia (H. E. Gendelman, P. Genis, M. Jett, and H. S. L. M. Nottet, in E. Major, ed., Technical Advances in AIDS Research in the Nervous System, in press; P. Genis, M. Jett, E. W. Bernton, H. A. Gelbard, K. Dzenko, R. Keane, L. Resnick, D. J. Volsky, L. G. Epstein, and H. E. Gendelman, J. Exp. Med. 176:1703-1718, 1992). These factors, together, were neurotoxic. The relative role(s) of each of these candidate neurotoxins in HIV-1-related CNS dysfunction was not unraveled by these initial experiments. We now report that PAF is produced during HIV-1-infected monocyte-astroglia interactions. PAF was detected at high levels in CSF of HIV-1-infected patients with immunosuppression and signs of CNS dysfunction. The biologic significance of the results for neurological disease was determined by addition of PAF to cultures of primary human fetal cortical or rat postnatal retinal ganglion neurons. Here, PAF at concentrations of > or = 300 pg/ml produced neuronal death. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 or memantine partially blocked the neurotoxic effects of PAF. The identification of PAF as an HIV-1-induced neurotoxin provides new insights into how HIV-1 causes neurological impairment and how it may ultimately be ameliorated. PMID:8207837

  7. D-lactic acid interferes with the effects of platelet activating factor on bovine neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Alarcón, P; Conejeros, I; Carretta, M D; Concha, C; Jara, E; Tadich, N; Hidalgo, M A; Burgos, R A

    2011-11-15

    D-lactic acidosis occurs in ruminants, such as cattle, with acute ruminal acidosis caused by ingestion of excessive amounts of highly fermentable carbohydrates. Affected animals show clinical signs similar to those of septic shock, as well as acute laminitis and liver abscesses. It has been proposed that the inflammatory response and susceptibility to infection could both be caused by the inhibition of phagocytic mechanisms. To determine the effects of d-lactic acid on bovine neutrophil functions, we pretreated cells with different concentrations of D-lactic acid and measured intracellular pH using 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and calcium flux using FLUO-3 AM-loaded neutrophils. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using a luminol chemiluminescence assay, and MMP-9/gelatinase-B granule release was measured by zymography. CD11b and CD62L/l-selectin expression, changes in cell shape, superoxide anion production, phagocytosis of Escherichia coli-Texas red bioparticles, and apoptosis were all measured using flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that D-lactic acid reduced ROS production, CD11b upregulation and MMP-9 release in bovine neutrophils treated with 100 nM platelet-activating factor (PAF). D-lactic acid induced MMP-9 release and, at higher concentrations, upregulated CD11b expression, decrease L-selectin expression, and induces late apoptosis. We concluded that D-lactic acid can interfere with neutrophil functions induced by PAF, leading to reduced innate immune responses during bacterial infections. Moreover, the increase of MMP-9 release and CD11b expression induced by 10mM D-lactic acid could promote an nonspecific neutrophil-dependent inflammatory reaction in cattle with acute ruminal acidosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  9. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor-binding antagonist activity of Malaysian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Jantan, I; Rafi, I A A; Jalil, J

    2005-01-01

    Forty-nine methanol extracts of 37 species of Malaysian medicinal plants were investigated for their inhibitory effects on platelet-activating factor (PAF) binding to rabbit platelets, using 3H-PAF as a ligand. Among them, the extracts of six Zingiberaceae species (Alpinia galanga Swartz., Boesenbergia pandurata Roxb., Curcuma ochorrhiza Val., C. aeruginosa Roxb., Zingiber officinale Rosc. and Z. zerumbet Koenig.), two Cinnamomum species (C. altissimum Kosterm. and C. pubescens Kochummen.), Goniothalamus malayanus Hook. f. Momordica charantia Linn. and Piper aduncum L. are potential sources of new PAF antagonists, as they showed significant inhibitory effects with IC50 values ranging from 1.2 to 18.4 microg ml(-1).

  10. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR(-/-)) mice were inoculated intracranially with 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR(-/-) mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR(-/-) mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR(-/-) mice showed less TCD4(+), TCD8(+) and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR(-/-) mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  11. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Levine, B A; Olson, M S

    1993-05-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  12. Human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase. Oxidatively fragmented phospholipids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Stremler, K E; Stafforini, D M; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase hydrolyzes the sn-2 acetyl residue of PAF, but not phospholipids with long chain sn-2 residues. It is associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, and is the LDL-associated phospholipase A2 activity that specifically degrades oxidatively damaged phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., Zimmerman, G. A., and McIntyre, T. M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 5331-5334). To identify potential substrates, we synthesized phosphatidylcholines with sn-2 residues from two to nine carbon atoms long, and found the V/k ratio decreased as the sn-2 residue was lengthened: the C5 homolog was 50%, the C6 20%, while the C9 homolog was only 2% as efficient as PAF. However, the presence of an omega-oxo function radically affected hydrolysis: the half-life of the sn-2 9-aldehydic homolog was identical to that of PAF. We oxidized [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine and isolated a number of more polar phosphatidylcholines. We treated these with phospholipase C, derivatized the resulting diglycerides for gas chromatographic/mass spectroscopic analysis, and found a number of diglycerides where the m/z ratio was consistent with a series of short to medium length sn-2 residues. We treated the polar phosphatidylcholines with acetylhydrolase and derivatized the products for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The liberated residues were more polar than straight chain standards and had m/z ratios from 129 to 296, consistent with short to medium chain residues. Therefore, oxidation fragments the sn-2 residue of phospholipids, and the acetylhydrolase specifically degrades such oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  13. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  14. Effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on pulmonary circulation in isolated rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Comellas, A; Tristano, S; Pesce, L; Friedman, E; Marcano, H; Sánchez de León, R

    1999-03-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of acute lung injury. The aim of this work is to study the effect of PAF on isolated and perfused rabbit lungs with blood and with a blood-free solution. 24 isolated and perfused rabbit lungs have been used: 8 control preparations (CP), 4 vehicles preparations (VP), 8 PAF preparations (PP) to which we administered PAF (1 microg/Kg of rabbit weight) and 4 acellular preparations (AP) with the same dose of PAF as in PP but dissolved in BSA-Krebs buffer solution. In the preparations pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa), airway pressure (Paw), left atria pressure (Pla) and fluid filtration rate (FFR) were registered. Ppa resulted in a significant difference in AP vs PP, with a value of 21 cm of water (CI 95%: 12-26) vs 205.1 cm of water (CI 95%: 141.3 - 271) respectively. A increase in FFR was observed in PP but it did not occur in AP, the difference being statistically significant: 5.515 g/min (CI 95 %: 2.425 - 8.865) vs 0.049 g/min (CI 95%: 0.008 - 0.32) respectively. Paw was statistically different in PP vs AP, with a value of 14.3 cm of water (CI 95%: 11.57 - 16.7) vs 8.5 cm of water (CI 95%: 8-9) respectively. These results suggest that PAF does not have a direct effect on the endothelium or smooth muscle in the production of lung edema.

  15. Intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase hydrolyses and inactivates platelet-activating factor by a phospholipase C activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Nilsson, Åke; Jönsson, Bo A. G.; Stenstad, Hanna; Agace, William; Cheng, Yajun; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase (alk-SMase) is a new member of the NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase) family that hydrolyses SM (sphingomyelin) to generate ceramide in the intestinal tract. The enzyme may protect the intestinal mucosa from inflammation and tumorigenesis. PAF (platelet-activating factor) is a pro-inflammatory phospholipid involved in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. We examined whether alk-SMase can hydrolyse and inactivate PAF. [3H]Octadecyl-labelled PAF was incubated with purified rat intestinal alk-SMase or recombinant human alk-SMase expressed in COS-7 cells. The hydrolytic products were assayed with TLC and MS. We found that alkSMase cleaved the phosphocholine head group from PAF and generated 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. Differing from the activity against SM, the activity against PAF was optimal at pH 7.5, inhibited by EDTA and stimulated by 0.1–0.25 mM Zn2+. The activity was abolished by site mutation of the predicted metal-binding sites that are conserved in all NPP members. Similar to the activity against SM, the activity against PAF was dependent on bile salt, particularly taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate. The Vmax for PAF hydrolysis was 374 μmol·h−1·(mg of protein)−1. The hydrolysis of PAF and SM could be inhibited by the presence of SM and PAF respectively, the inhibition of PAF hydrolysis by SM being stronger. The PAF-induced MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) activation and IL-8 (interleukin 8) release in HT-29 cells, and chemotaxis in leucocytes were abolished by alk-SMase treatment. In conclusion, alk-SMase hydrolyses and inactivates PAF by a phospholipase C activity. The finding reveals a novel function, by which alk-SMase may counteract the development of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:16255717

  16. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W.; Levine, B. A.; Olson, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494049

  17. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    PubMed

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  18. Characterization of a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase secreted by the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, M E; Gounaris, K; Selkirk, M E

    1996-01-01

    Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a small nematode parasite of the gastrointestinal tract of rodents, secretes an enzyme that cleaves the proinflammatory molecule platelet-activating factor to its inactive lyso-form. The enzyme activity of Ca(2+)-dependent and does not exhibit interfacial activation. It does not require the addition of reducing agents for maximal activity, and is not inhibited by thiol-active reagents. Sensitivity of inhibitors suggests the involvement of serine and histidine residues in the enzyme activity. As described for other platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases, it cannot cleave, nor is it inhibited by, long-chain diacyl phospholipids that are typical substrates for phospholipases A2. The purified enzyme was resolved by SDS/PAGE as a heterodimer composed of two protein subunits with apparent molecular masses of 38 and 25 kDa. The properties of the nematode enzyme thus differ from those described for the mammalian enzymes, but are more closely related to those of an acetylhydrolase than a phospholipase. PMID:8713083

  19. Oligomeric State Regulated Trafficking of Human Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase Type-II

    PubMed Central

    Monillas, Elizabeth S.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Thévenin, Anastasia F.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response. PMID:25707358

  20. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  1. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor by cultured rat Kupffer cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W; Siafaka-Kapadai, A; Olson, M S; Hanahan, D J

    1989-01-01

    Cultured rat Kupffer cells synthesize and release platelet-activating factor (PAF) when stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The production of PAF is concentration- and time-dependent and, based upon [3H]serotonin release assays, approx. 1.0 pmol of PAF is formed per 8 x 10(6) cells during 10 min of ionophore stimulation. It is suggested that Kupffer cells are important cellular components which produce and release PAF in order to facilitate communication between hepatic sinusoidal and parenchymal cells. Further, it is suggested that such mediator production in response to reticulo-endothelial cell stimulation causes the hepatic glycogenolytic response previously in the isolated perfused rat liver. PMID:2494988

  2. Stimulation of degranulation from human eosinophils by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Venge, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1989-05-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a highly active mediator which has been implicated in allergic inflammation and bronchial asthma, possibly by interacting with eosinophils. We have examined the effect of PAF on activation of purified human eosinophils as measured by degranulation (eosinophil peroxidase, eosinophil cationic protein, arylsulfatase B, beta-glucuronidase, and alkaline phosphatase) and oxidative metabolism (superoxide anion production). PAF induced enzyme release at concentrations ranging from 1 pM to 10 microM in a rapid (t1/2 5 to 8 min), Ca2+-dependent and noncytotoxic manner from both the specific and small granules, whereas its biologic precursor and metabolite, lyso-PAF, had no effect. For all enzymes, maximal enzyme release occurred at 100 nM PAF with a mean ED50 value of 1.47 +/- 0.4 nM. At this concentration the mean percentage of total enzyme release by PAF from specific granules was 20.3 +/- 1.6% (17.9% for eosinophil peroxidase, 20.6% for beta-glucuronidase, 22.4% for alkaline phosphatase) and 28.8 +/- 2.2% from small granules (arylsulfatase B). Calcium ionophore A23187, PMA, and opsonized zymosan also induced eosinophil degranulation but their peak effect after 10-min incubation with maximal release 14.7%, 12.9%, or 14.1%, respectively, was lower when compared with PAF. Incubation of eosinophils with the PAF-antagonist WEB 2086 led to a parallel shift of the dose-response curve to the right, indicating a competitive antagonism. PAF also caused generation of superoxide anions by human eosinophils but this occurred at higher concentrations of PAF (1 microM to 30 microM) with an ED50 of 8.4 +/- 0.9 microM. Again, this effect was competitively inhibited by WEB 2086. These studies demonstrate that PAF activates human eosinophils to release granule constituents and generate superoxide anions. Since both PAF and eosinophil products are associated with pathogenesis of bronchial asthma our findings may be of particular pathophysiologic relevance.

  3. Platelet activating factor, lyso-platelet activating factor and arachidonic acid release in normal human skin and the influence of topical steroid treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, R M; Lawlor, F; Judge, M R; Courtney, P; Barlow, R; Kobza Black, A; Mallet, A I; Greaves, M W

    1993-01-01

    1. Previous, in vitro, studies have established the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) by the 're-modelling' pathways in which the activation of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme catalyses the hydrolysis of an ether-acyl-phosphocholine to give concomitant release of lyso-PAF, the immediate precursor of PAF, and arachidonic acid, the precursor of the icosanoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between PAF and eicosanoid release in human skin, and to study the effect of treatment of skin with a topical steroid, on the release of PAF, lyso-PAF and arachidonic acid. 2. A novel assay procedure was developed for the simultaneous assay of PAF and lyso-PAF in skin exudates from abrasions and suction blisters in normal human skin. In addition we assayed arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a representative eicosanoid. 3. The mean amounts of mediator recovered in the first 30 min period following abrasion were PAF 0.43, lyso-PAF 11.9, PGE2 25.7 and arachidonic acid 760 pmol/sample. The molar ratio of PAF:lyso-PAF:arachidonic acid in skin exudates from abrasions was 1:30:1800 and in suction blister exudates was 1:90:3660. 4. Time course studies showed a decline in the recoveries of arachidonic acid and lyso-PAF, of about 50% in 2 h. In contrast, PAF was recovered in exudates at a constant rate over 2 h but PGE2 release decreased by more than 90% after the initial 30 min period. 5. Topical application under occlusion, of 0.05% clobetasol propionate, a potent corticosteroid, significantly reduced lyso-PAF by 30% in suction blister exudates but did not significantly alter the concentrations of PAF or arachidonic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8329291

  4. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  5. An IR Spectroscopic Characterization Of The Blood Component Platelet Activating Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mushayakarara, E. C.; Mantsch, H. H.

    1985-12-01

    The platelet activating factor, PAF, has been recently identified as an ether lipid with dramatic bioreactivity. The present IR spectroscopic investigation demonstrates that in an aqueous environment PAF can assume three different structures, a micellar form at tempera-tures above 21°C, a solid-like opaque lamellar form at temperatures below 12°C, and an intermediate transparent lamellar form that exists at temperatures between 12 and 21 °C. The three structures are separated by two reversible phase transitions; however, the rate of the reversed micellar to lamellar change is negatively temperature dependent, i.e., about 6 min at -1°C and 12 min at 3°C, and slower than the lamellar to micellar change.

  6. Crystallization and Preliminary X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of Human Plasma Platelet Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Wilder, C; Bahnson, B

    2009-01-01

    The plasma form of the human enzyme platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) has been crystallized, and X-ray diffraction data were collected at a synchrotron source to a resolution of 1.47 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit cell parameters of a = 116.18, b = 83.06, c = 96.71 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 115.09 and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PAF-AH functions as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger by reducing the levels of the signaling molecule PAF. Additionally, the LDL bound enzyme has been linked to atherosclerosis due to its hydrolytic activities of pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  7. Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Initiates Contact of Acinetobacter baumannii Expressing Phosphorylcholine with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smani, Younes; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; López-Rojas, Rafael; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; Ibáñez-Martínez, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion is an initial and important step in Acinetobacter baumannii causing infections. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such a step between A. baumannii and the host cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the phosphorylcholine (ChoP)-containing outer membrane protein of A. baumannii binds to A549 cells through platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), resulting in activation of G protein and intracellular calcium. Upon A. baumannii expressing ChoP binding to PAFR, clathrin and β-arrestins, proteins involved in the direction of the vacuolar movement, are activated during invasion of A. baumannii. PAFR antagonism restricts the dissemination of A. baumannii in the pneumonia model. These results define a role for PAFR in A. baumannii interaction with host cells and suggest a mechanism for the entry of A. baumannii into the cytoplasm of host cells. PMID:22689572

  8. Immune complex induced pancreatitis: effect of BN 52021, a selective antagonist of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Jancar, S; De Giaccobi, G; Mariano, M; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Sirois, P; Braquet, P

    1988-05-01

    A model of acute pancreatitis was developed by induction of an immune complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction in rats. This acute inflammatory reaction was characterized by intense interstitial edema, neutrophil infiltration and margination, and congestion of small vessels whereas serum amylase levels remained unchanged. Microscopic examination of the pancreatic tissue revealed the presence of immune complex deposition around blood vessels and ducts. Vascular permeability, as measured by Evan's blue extravasation increased by 6 fold. In addition, circulating platelets dropped to 50% of normal levels. Injection of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the peritoneal cavity of rats also produced an increase in vascular permeability in the pancreas. A selective PAF-antagonist, BN 52021 reduced by approximately 50% the increase in vascular permeability produced by immune complex in the pancreas as well as that elicited by intraperitoneal injection of PAF. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the pathological manifestations of immune complex-mediated pancreatitis.

  9. Host response of platelet-activating factor receptor-deficient mice during pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Weijer, Sebastiaan; Leemans, Jaklien C; Florquin, Sandrine; Shimizu, Takao; Ishii, Satoshi; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid with potent, diverse actions, which has been implicated as an important mediator in host defence against several intracellular pathogens. To determine the role of PAF in host defence in pulmonary tuberculosis, PAF receptor-deficient (PAFR−/−) and wild-type (PAFR+/+) mice were infected intranasally with a virulent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterial outgrowth in lungs and liver did not differ significantly between PAFR−/− and PAFR+/+ mice at 2 or 6 weeks postinfection. After 28 weeks, 86% of PAFR−/− mice and 79% of PAFR+/+ mice had died (non-significant). In addition, both mouse strains were indistinguishable with respect to histopathology, the recruitment and activation of lymphocytes, and cytokine concentrations in the lung. These data suggest that PAF is not involved in the protective immune response to tuberculosis. PMID:12871222

  10. Coronary vasoconstriction in the rat, isolated perfused heart induced by platelet-activating factor is mediated by leukotriene C4.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, P. J.; Stewart, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (Paf, 0.04-4.50 nmol) dose-dependently induced coronary vasoconstriction and decreased cardiac contractility in rat, isolated perfused hearts and concomitantly released leukotriene-like bioactivity into the cardiac effluent. Platelet-activating factor (0.9 nmol) induced an increase in 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) of cardiac effluents following partial purification using C18 Sep-Paks. The leukotriene-like bioactivity released by Paf was identified as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) using a combination of isolation on reverse phase-h.p.l.c. (r.p.h.p.l.c.) and quantitation by RIA. In addition, LTB4 was also identified by r.p.h.p.l.c. and the levels, determined by RIA, were within the range having biological activity. The release of cyclo-oxygenase products by Paf was prevented by indomethacin (2.8 microM), markedly attenuated by diethylcarbamazine (7.7 mM) but unaffected by FPL 55712 (1.9 microM)-pretreatment. Furthermore, LTC4 (50 pmol) did not increase the release of the cyclo-oxygenase products measured. The release of LTB4 and LTC4 appeared to be unaffected by indomethacin pretreatment whereas diethylcarbamazine-pretreatment markedly inhibited release. The coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf (0.9 nmol) was attenuated by pretreatment with indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine, whereas FPL 55712 caused a marked inhibition of the response. In contrast, the decrease in cardiac contractility was prevented by indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine and unaffected by FPL 55712 pretreatment. It is concluded that LTC4 may be largely responsible for the coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf with cyclo-oxygenase products having a possible modulatory role whereas the latter appear to be involved in the Paf-induced decrease in cardiac contractility. PMID:3091131

  11. Evidence for immunoglobulin Fc receptor-mediated prostaglandin2 and platelet-activating factor formation by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwirth, R.; Singhal, P.; Diamond, B.; Hays, R.M.; Lobmeyer, L.; Clay, K.; Schlondorff, D.

    1988-09-01

    The possibility of Fc-dependent uptake of IgG immune complexes was examined in subcultured rat mesangial cells free of monocytes. 195Au-labeled colloidal gold particles were coated either with BSA only or with BSA followed by rabbit anti-BSA-IgG or the F(ab')2 fragment of the IgG. Mesangial cells preferentially took up 195Au particles covered with BSA-anti-BSA-IgG over those covered with BSA or the F(ab')2 fragment. This uptake was a time-dependent and saturable process inhibitable by sodium azide or cytochalasin B. Using phase-contrast microscopy in the light reflectance mode, it was established that essentially all mesangial cells took up IgG-coated gold particles. By electron microscopy the process was shown to consist of vesicular uptake with delivery to endosomes. Mesangial binding-uptake of the IgG-covered particles was associated with stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and production of platelet-activating factor, a lipid mediator of inflammation. To characterize the potential Fc receptor for IgG we used the rosetting technique with sheep red blood cells coated with IgG subclass-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies. 50% of mesangial cells exhibited rosetting with red cells coated with mouse IgG2a, whereas negligible rosetting was observed with IgG2b or IgG1. Competition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgG2a binding. We conclude that cultured rat mesangial cells exhibit specific receptors for IgG and that occupancy of Fc receptors results in endocytosis and is associated with generation of PGE2 and platelet-activating factor. These observations may be of significance for immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

  12. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  13. Platelet-activating factor content in boar spermatozoa correlates with fertility.

    PubMed

    Roudebush, W E; Diehl, J R

    2001-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of platelet-activating factor [1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF] content in spermatozoa between two groups of boars that differ in farrow rate percentages. The boar farrow rate was defined as High if it was > or = 70% and Low if it was < 70%. Fresh, extended semen was collected from sexually mature boars and used in the PAF extractions. Platelet-activating factor was detected in all semen samples assayed. The amount of PAF detected in spermatozoa obtained from the High group ranged from 1.90 to 11.30 pM/10(6) cells. The level of PAF in the Low group ranged from 0.92 to 4.96 pM/10(6) cells. Regression analysis revealed a positive (R2 = 0.369) and significant (P = 0.021) relationship between PAF content in boar spermatozoa and farrow rate. Spermatozoa-derived PAF levels (mean +/- SEM) were significantly higher (P = 0.015) in the High-farrow group (6.75 +/- 1.25 pM/10(6) cells) than in the Low-farrow group (2.45 +/- 0.51 pM/10(6) cells). The PAF content in spermatozoa was significantly higher (P = 0.035) in the High-average (> or = 10.5/litter) number of piglets born group (5.78 +/- 1.24 pM/10(6) cells) than in the Low-average (< 10.5/litter) number of piglets born group (3.34 +/- 1.19 pM/10(6) cells). Additionally, PAF content in spermatozoa was significantly higher (P = 0.034) in the High-average (> or = 9/litter) number of piglets born alive group (6.82 +/- 1.35 pM/10(6) cells) than the Low-average (< 9/litter) number of piglets born alive group (3.00 +/- 0.87 pM/10(6) cells). The data demonstrate that PAF is present in boar spermatozoa and that levels are significantly higher in individuals with a high-farrow rate status and high-number of piglets born and born-alive.

  14. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  15. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  16. Essential role of platelet activation via protease activated receptor 4 in tissue factor-initiated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Nathalie; Chobaz-Péclat, Veronique; Hamilton, Justin; Spee, Pieter; Wagtmann, Nicolai; So, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tissue factor (TF) activation of the coagulation proteases enhances inflammation in animal models of arthritis and endotoxemia, but the mechanism of this effect is not yet fully understood – in particular, whether this is primarily due to fibrin formation or through activation of protease activated receptors (PARs). Methods We induced extravascular inflammation by injection of recombinant soluble murine TF (sTF1–219) in the hind paw. The effects of thrombin inhibition, fibrinogen and platelet depletion were evaluated, as well as the effects of PAR deficiency using knockout mice deficient for each of the PARs. Results Injection of soluble TF provoked a rapid onset of paw swelling. Inflammation was confirmed histologically and by increased serum IL-6 levels. Inflammation was significantly reduced by depletion of fibrinogen (P < 0.05) or platelets (P = 0.015), and by treatment with hirudin (P = 0.04) or an inhibitor of activated factor VII (P < 0.001) compared with controls. PAR-4-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced paw swelling (P = 0.003). In contrast, a deficiency in either PAR-1, PAR-2 or PAR-3 did not affect the inflammatory response to soluble TF injection. Conclusion Our results show that soluble TF induces acute inflammation through a thrombin-dependent pathway and both fibrin deposition and platelet activation are essential steps in this process. The activation of PAR-4 on platelets is crucial and the other PARs do not play a major role in soluble TF-induced inflammation. PMID:18412955

  17. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome.

  18. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor exacerbates renal inflammation and promotes fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Correa-Costa, Matheus; Andrade-Oliveira, Vinicius; Braga, Tarcio T; Castoldi, Angela; Aguiar, Cristhiane F; Origassa, Clarice S T; Rodas, Andrea C D; Hiyane, Meire I; Malheiros, Denise M A C; Rios, Francisco J O; Jancar, Sonia; Câmara, Niels O S

    2014-04-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a lipid mediator with important pro-inflammatory effects, being synthesized by several cell types including kidney cells. Although there is evidence of its involvement in acute renal dysfunction, its role in progressive kidney injury is not completely known. In the present study, we investigated the role of PAF receptor (PAFR) in an experimental model of chronic renal disease. Wild-type (WT) and PAFR knockout (KO) mice underwent unilateral ureter obstruction (UUO), and at kill time, urine and kidney tissue was collected. PAFR KO animals compared with WT mice present: (a) less renal dysfunction, evaluated by urine protein/creatinine ratio; (b) less fibrosis evaluated by collagen deposition, type I collagen, Lysyl Oxidase-1 (LOX-1) and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) gene expression, and higher expression of bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) (3.3-fold lower TGF-β/BMP-7 ratio); (c) downregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecule-related machinery genes; and (d) lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These indicate that PAFR engagement by PAF or PAF-like molecules generated during UUO potentiates renal dysfunction and fibrosis and might promote epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Also, early blockade of PAFR after UUO leads to a protective effect, with less fibrosis deposition. In conclusion, PAFR signaling contributes to a pro-inflammatory environment in the model of obstructive nephropathy, favoring the fibrotic process, which lately will generate renal dysfunction and progressive organ failure.

  19. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  20. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers.

    PubMed

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica; Burgos, Rafael Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response.

  1. Platelet activating factor produced in vitro by Kaposi's sarcoma cells induces and sustains in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Arese, M; Montrucchio, G; Barra, L; Primo, L; Benelli, R; Sanavio, F; Aglietta, M; Ghigo, D; Rola-Pleszczynski, M R

    1995-01-01

    Imbalance in the network of soluble mediators may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). In this study, we demonstrated that KS cells grown in vitro produced and in part released platelet activating factor (PAF), a powerful lipid mediator of inflammation and cell-to-cell communication. IL-1, TNF, and thrombin enhanced the synthesis of PAF. PAF receptor mRNA and specific, high affinity binding site for PAF were present in KS cells. Nanomolar concentration of PAF stimulated the chemotaxis and chemokinesis of KS cells, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. The migration response to PAF was inhibited by WEB 2170, a hetrazepinoic PAF receptor antagonist. Because neoangiogenesis is essential for the growth and progression of KS and since PAF can activate vascular endothelial cells, we examined the potential role of PAF as an instrumental mediator of angiogenesis associated with KS. Conditioned medium (CM) from KS cells (KS-CM) or KS cells themselves induced angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment in a murine model in which Matrigel was injected subcutaneously. These effects were inhibited by treating mice with WEB 2170. Synthetic PAF or natural PAF extracted from plasma of patients with classical KS also induced angiogenesis, which in turn was inhibited by WEB 2170. The action of PAF was amplified by expression of other angiogenic factors and chemokines: these included basic and acidic fibroblast growth factor, placental growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and its specific receptor flk-1, hepatocyte growth factor, KC, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Treatment with WEB 2170 abolished the expression of the transcripts of these molecules within Matrigel containing KS-CM. These results indicate that PAF may cooperate with other angiogenic molecules and chemokines in inducing vascular development in KS. Images PMID:7543496

  2. Platelet-activating Factor does not Mediate UVB-induced Local Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Yao, Yongxue; Konger, Raymond L.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2012-01-01

    The lipid mediator Platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by UVB have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated systemic immunosuppression. Importantly, employing the ability of distant UVB irradiation to inhibit contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses to the chemical antigen dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) to an area of unirradiated murine skin, we and others have demonstrated that UVB-mediated systemic immunosuppression was only observed in PAF-R expressing wild type (WT) mice and not in PAF-R-knockout (Pafr−/−) mice. As it is not known if PAF is involved in UVB-mediated local immunosuppression, these studies compared local UVB on CHS responses in WT versus Pafr−/− mice. We demonstrate that the application of DNFB onto UVB exposed (locally) area of mouse skin resulted in a similar significant inhibition of subsequent CHS responses in both WT and Pafr−/− mice compared to sham-irradiated control mice. Furthermore, the expression of langerin, a marker for the presence of Langerhans cells was substantially reduced equally in the epidermal ears of UVB-irradiated WT and Pafr−/− mice compared to their respective sham control groups. These findings indicate that the PAF-R is not involved UVB-induced local immunosuppression. PMID:22211638

  3. Levels of gingival tissue platelet activating factor after conventional and regenerative periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Keles, Gonca Cayir; Cetinkaya, Burcu Ozkan; Ayas, Bulent; Isildak, Ibrahim; Diraman, Emine; Koprulu, Hulya; Acikgoz, Gokhan

    2007-12-01

    The hypothesis, a relationship between gingival tissue platelet activating factor (PAF) levels and healing after periodontal surgery, was tested by measuring PAF levels in gingival tissues collected from sites that had undergone flap surgery and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or flap surgery alone. Using a split-mouth design, 20 intrabony defects were randomly assigned to treatment with flap surgery and GTR (group 1) or with flap surgery alone (group 2). Gingival tissue samples were obtained at surgery (baseline) and at 6-month follow-up evaluation visit. One half of each sample was used for analysis of PAF levels by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the other half of the sample was used for histomorphometric analysis that included measurements of number and diameter of blood vessels. PAF levels and diameter of blood vessels were significantly decreased (p < 0.01), and the number of blood vessels was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in both groups after 6 months compared to the baseline values. Postoperative number of blood vessels were significantly higher in group 1 (p < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference in postoperative PAF levels between the two groups (p > 0.05). Based on the reported results, it is suggested that a decrease in gingival PAF levels might be found after conventional and regenerative periodontal surgery.

  4. Effect of ozone on platelet activating factor metabolism in phorbol-differentiated HL60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Friedman, M. )

    1992-11-01

    The mechanisms of ozone (O3) toxicity in the lung may involve the formation of lipid inflammatory mediators. We have previously demonstrated that exposure to O3 in vitro results in increased accumulation and release of platelet activating factor (PAF) in the macrophage-like cell line HL60 differentiated with phorbol ester (dHL60). In the present study we have examined possible biochemical mechanisms responsible for the O3-induced increase in PAF levels in dHL60 cells. Specifically, we studied the effect of O3 on phospholipase A2 (PLA2), acetyltransferase, acetylhydrolase, and reacylation activities. dHL60 cells were exposed to 1.0 ppm O3 or air alone. O3 exposure was found to significantly decrease dHL60 cell acetylhydrolase activity by 36%. Additional experiments demonstrated that extracellular acetylhydrolase activity, but not intracellular acetylhydrolase activity, was inhibited by O3 exposure of dHL60 cells. O3 exposure resulted in a small (13%) but statistically significant reduction in reacylation activity in dHL60 cells. In addition, a significant (22%) contribution of PLA2 activation to the O3-induced increase in PAF levels was also found. Basal and calcium ionophore-induced acetyltransferase activity was found to be unaffected by exposure of dHL60 cells to O3. These data suggest that in vitro exposure to O3 affects both synthetic and degradative pathways of PAF metabolism in dHL60 cells.

  5. Platelet activating factor induces dopamine release in PC-12 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bussolino, F.; Tessari, F.; Turrini, F.; Braquet, P.; Camussi, G.; Prosdocimi, M.; Bosia, A. Institut Henri Beaufour, Le Plessis Robinson )

    1988-10-01

    The ability of platelet activating factor (PAF) to stimulate dopamine release and modify calcium homeostasis in PC-12 cell line was studied. PAF-induced dopamine release is related to its molecular form, with only the R-form steric configuration ((R)PAF), but not its S-form or its 2-lyso derivative, effective at being active. In addition, PAF acts at very low concentrations in a dose-dependent manner (0.1-30 nM). Preincubation with PAF receptor antagonists (CV-3988 and BN52021) as well as the specific desensitization of PC-12 cells to (R)PAF abolish the (R)PAF-induced dopamine release. Several lines of evidence suggest that dopamine release is dependent on a (R)PAF-induced calcium influx and efflux modulation. Dopamine release by PC-12 cells challenged with (R)PAF is associated with a rapid {sup 45}Ca influx and efflux and a rise in cytoplasmic calcium concentrations ((Ca{sup 2+}){sub i}) evaluated by using the calcium indicators fura-2 and quin2. At 30 nM (R)PAF, the absence of extracellular calcium inhibits the dopamine release but not the rise of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} from the internal stores, suggesting the importance of calcium influx in (R)PAF-induced dopamine release. PAF, which has been reported to be synthesized by stimulated neuronal cells may thus have a physiological modulatory role on cells with neurosecretory properties.

  6. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  7. Platelets in the immune response: Revisiting platelet-activating factor in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Parwinder; Jindal, Nina Lakhani; Jagdis, Amanda; Vadas, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening multisystem allergic reaction resulting from the sudden systemic release of biochemical mediators and chemotactic substances. Release of both preformed granule-associated mediators and newly generated lipid-derived mediators contributes to the amplification and prolongation of anaphylaxis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid-derived mediator the central role of which has been well established in experimental models of both immune-mediated and non-immune mediated anaphylaxis. It is produced and secreted by several types of cells, including mast cells, monocytes, tissue macrophages, platelets, eosinophils, endothelial cells, and neutrophils. PAF is implicated in platelet aggregation and activation through release of vasoactive amines in the inflammatory response, resulting in increased vascular permeability, circulatory collapse, decreased cardiac output, and various other biological effects. PAF is rapidly hydrolyzed and degraded to an inactive metabolite, lysoPAF, by the enzyme PAF acetylhydrolase, the activity of which has shown to correlate inversely with PAF levels and predispose to severe anaphylaxis. In addition to its role in anaphylaxis, PAF has also been implicated as a mediator in both allergic and nonallergic inflammatory diseases, including allergic rhinitis, sepsis, atherosclerotic disease, and malignancy, in which PAF signaling has an established role. The therapeutic role of PAF antagonism has been investigated for several diseases, with variable results thus far. Further investigation of its role in pathology and therapeutic modulation is highly anticipated because of the pressing need for more selective and targeted therapy for the management of severe anaphylaxis.

  8. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  9. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor as a promising target for cancer cell repopulation after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Jr, I A; Chammas, R; Lepique, A P; Jancar, S

    2017-01-01

    A major drawback of radiotherapy is the accelerated growth of the surviving tumor cells. Radiotherapy generates a variety of lipids that bind to the receptor for platelet-activating factor, expressed by cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, using the TC-1 tumor cell line, we found that irradiation induced a twofold increase in receptor expression and generated agonists of receptor. Irradiated cells induced a 20-fold increase in live TC-1 proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, subcutaneous co-injection of irradiated TC-1 cells with TC-1 expressing luciferase (TC-1 fluc+) markedly increased TC-1 fluc+ proliferation in a receptor-dependent way. Moreover we used a human carcinoma cell line not expressing the PAF receptor (KBM) and the same cell transfected with the receptor gene (KBP). Following co-injection of live KBP cells with irradiated KBM in RAG mice, the tumor growth was significantly increased compared with tumor formed following co-injection of live KBM with irradiated KBM. This tumor cell repopulation correlated with increased infiltration of tumor-promoting macrophages (CD206+). We propose that receptor represents a possible target for improving the efficacy of radiotherapy through inhibition of tumor repopulation. PMID:28134937

  10. Regulation of platelet activating factor receptor coupled phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C activity

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The major objectives of this study were two-fold. The first was to establish whether binding of platelet activating factor (PAF) to its receptor was integral to the stimulation of polyphosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) in rabbit platelets. The second was to determine regulatory features of this receptor-coupled mechanism. ({sup 3}H)PAF binding demonstrated two binding sites, a high affinity site with a inhibitory constant (Ki) of 2.65 nM and a low affinity site with a Ki of 0.80 {mu}M. PAF receptor coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific PLC was studied in platelets which were made refractory, by short term pretreatments, to either PAF or thrombin. Saponin-permeabilized rabbit platelets continue to regulate the mechanism(s) coupling PAF receptors to PLC stimulation. However, TRP{gamma}S and GDP{beta}S, which affect guanine nucleotide regulatory protein functions, were unable to modulate the PLC activity to any appreciable extent as compared to PAF. The possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) activation in regulating PAF-stimulated PLC activity was studied in rabbit platelets pretreated with staurosporine followed by pretreatments with PAF or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA).

  11. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M.; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome. PMID:28157211

  12. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  13. Regional Neonatal Associates for cooperative study of platelet-activating factor (PAF). Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, F.

    1992-11-01

    Lipid inflammatory mediators are thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the respiratory distress syndrome, including neonatal lung injury and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). One such mediator is platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent bioactive phospholipid that induces adverse airway, vascular, and microcirculatory responses. To study the role of PAF in neonatal lung disease, we used an {sup 125}I-radioimmunoassay to measure PAF in whole blood and tracheal lavage in very low birthweight infants at 1, 3, 5, 9, 21 and 28 days after birth. PAF was found in the pulmonary lavagate and blood of ventilated infants as early as one day after birth. Lavagate levels of PAF increased with acute injury (pneumothorax, pneumonia) but were not associated with BPD. Our results indicate PAF could be associated with the pathogenesis of BPD. We suggest that as a consequence of the pathophysiologic processes associated with BPD, PAF is released by pulmonary cells. Our preliminary data indicate that low birthweight infants also have lower PAF acetylhydrolase levels in cord blood and tracheal lavagate as compared to adults. Therefore, it is possible the increased levels of PAF in the blood of low birthweight infants might be due to persistent transient increases in PAF alveolar levels coupled with lower blood acetylhydrolase activities and could be important in the development of symptoms associated with BPD. Future plans for this project call for completing the enzymatic study of acetylhydrolase activity in pulmonary lavage of the BPD infants.

  14. A structure-activity relationship study of platelet-activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Surles, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Several analogues of platelet-activating factor (1-0-alkyl-2-0-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, PAF), an alkylglycerophospholipid that was found to be a mediator in Type I immediate hypersensitivity and also possessed potent hypotensive properties, were synthesized. These PAF analogues were evaluated in a qualitative structure-activity relationship study for their rabbit neutrophil degranulation properties and their antihypertensive properties in rats. Variations were made in each of the moieties attached to the three glycerol backbone carbons. Variation in sn-1-0-alkyl chain length from fourteen to nineteen carbons and introduction of one or two double bonds revealed that the 1-0-hexadecyl species of PAF was the most active analogue in this series in our assay systems. Substitution of various deoxyalkyl groups for the 2-0-acetyl moiety resulted in severely diminished bioactivities and no inhibition of rat plasma acetylhydrolase activity. Substitution of bulky trialkylammonium moieties for the trimethylammonium portion of the phosphocholine moiety resulted in an analogue (triethylammonium, 41) with reduced immediate hypersensitivity properties and 560% relative antihypertensive potency.

  15. Inhibitory effect of trichothecene mycotoxins on bovine platelets stimulated by platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, P A; Ross, M L; Bondy, G S

    1987-01-01

    Several species of fungi, which infect cereals and grains, can produce a class of compounds, known as trichothecene mycotoxins, which is characterized by a substituted epoxy-trichothecene ring structure. Cattle are susceptible to intoxication from feeds contaminated with T-2 toxin, one of the more potent trichothecene mycotoxins, while swine refuse to ingest feed contaminated with T-2 toxin. The bovine platelet has been used as a model cell system to evaluate the effects of T-2 toxin and its natural metabolites, HT-2 toxin and T-2 tetraol, on cell function in vitro. Due to the lipophilic nature of these mycotoxins, a biologically active phospholipid was used to stimulate the platelets in the presence and absence of the toxins. The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its major metabolite HT-2 toxin inhibited platelet activating factor-stimulated bovine platelets, suspended in homologous plasma, in a concentration but not time dependent manner. Significant inhibition of platelet function (p less than 0.01) occurred with 135 ng T-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets and with 77 ng HT-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets. These mycotoxins exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the platelet aggregation response. In contrast, the minor metabolite T-2 tetraol had no inhibitory effect on platelet function and had no influence on the responses of T-2 toxin or HT-2 toxin when the mycotoxins were present together in the platelet suspensions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3453270

  16. Chemotherapeutic agents subvert tumor immunity by generating agonists of platelet-activating factor

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Ravi P.; Ocana, Jesus A.; Harrison, Kathleen A.; Ferracini, Matheus; Touloukian, Christopher E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Sun, Louis; Loesch, Mathew; Murphy, Robert C.; Althouse, Sandra K.; Perkins, Susan M.; Speicher, Paul J.; Tyler, Douglas S.; Konger, Raymond L.; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress suppresses host immunity by generating oxidized lipid agonists of the platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF-R). Because many classical chemotherapeutic drugs induce reactive oxygen species (ROS), we investigated whether these drugs might subvert host immunity by activating PAF-R. Here we show that PAF-R agonists are produced in melanoma cells by chemotherapy that is administered in vitro, in vivo or in human subjects. Structural characterization of the PAF-R agonists induced revealed multiple oxidized glycerophosphocholines that are generated non-enzymatically. In a murine model of melanoma, chemotherapeutic administration could augment tumor growth by a PAF-R-dependent process that could be blocked by treatment with antioxidants or cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors or by depletion of regulatory T cells. Our findings reveal how PAF-R agonists induced by chemotherapy treatment can promote treatment failure. Further, they offer new insights into how to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by blocking its heretofore unknown impact on PAF-R activation. PMID:25304264

  17. Phospholipase A2 from bovine seminal plasma is a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Soubeyrand, S; Lazure, C; Manjunath, P

    1998-01-01

    The major phospholipase A2 activity from bovine seminal plasma was recently purified [Soubeyrand, Khadir, Brindle and Manjunath (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 222-227]. We here show that the 60 kDa enzyme is in fact a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Sequences of the N-terminus as well as of internal fragments showed 100% identity with the cDNA-deduced sequences of bovine plasma PAF-AH. The enzyme has kinetic properties similar to those of the human serum PAF-AH. Although capable of hydrolysing long-chained phosphatidylcholine, it displayed a highly preferential activity towards PAF. The enzyme activity towards phosphatidylcholine, but not PAF, was Ca2+-dependent. Biochemical characterization revealed that the enzyme is extensively N-glycosylated and that it exists predominantly as a dimer in solution. Western blot analysis revealed that the enzyme is highly heterogeneous in charge, with a maximal distribution at an isoelectric point of approx. 5.7. The enzyme was expressed exclusively in the seminal vesicles and the ampulla. No association of the enzyme with either epididymal or ejaculated spermatozoa could be detected. PMID:9405273

  18. Hydroxyl-platelet-activating factor exists in blood of healthy volunteers and periodontal patients.

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Tsoupras, Alexandros; Baltas, George; Kotsifaki, Helen; Mantzavinos, Zacharias; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2003-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are localized chronic inflammatory conditions of the gingival and underlying bone and connective tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory phospholipid mediator that has been previously detected in elevated levels in inflamed gingival tissues, in gingival crevicular fluid and in saliva, is implicated in periodontal disease. Our results from previous studies showed that the biologically active phospholipid detected in gingival crevicular fluid is a hydroxyl-PAF analogue. In this study, hydroxyl-PAF analogue was detected for the first time in human blood derived from patients with chronic periodontitis as well as from periodontally healthy volunteers. The hydroxyl-PAF analogue was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, detected by biological assays and identified by electrospray analysis. In addition, the quantitative determination of PAF and hydroxyl-PAF analogue (expressed as PAF-like activity) showed a statistically significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyl-PAF analogue levels to PAF levels in periodontal patients, suggesting that this bioactive lipid may play a role in oral inflammation. PMID:14514473

  19. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2017-02-03

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome.

  20. Serum platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase and paraoxonase-1 activity in horses infected with Leptospira spp.

    PubMed

    Turk, Romana; Habuš, Josipa; Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Svetina, Ante; Mojčec, Vesna; Perkov, Sonja; Belić, Maja; Starešina, Vilim; Turk, Nenad

    2011-05-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of infection with Leptospira spp. in horses on activities of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) and paraoxonase-1 (PON1) considering the anti-inflammatory/anti-oxidative properties of both enzymes. A total of 63 sport and leisure horses' sera were chosen among those routinely serologically examined on leptospirosis during the year 2009 in Croatia. Sera were divided into three groups according to the estimated level of antibody titre against Leptospira spp; group 1: sera serologically negative to leptospirosis (antibody titre<50) (n=21); group 2: sera with residual or anamnestic antibody titre (50-200) (n=23); group 3: sera with high antibody titre (≥1600) indicating recent Leptospira infection (n=19). Serum PAF-AH and PON1 activity was not significantly different between investigated groups (p>0.05). There were no statistical differences in lipid status parameters (p>0.05) among study groups as well. However, significant positive correlations (p<0.05) of PAF-AH and PON1 with total cholesterol and HDL-C were found. Results may indicate low levels of systemic inflammatory response and oxidative stress in horses with subclinical leptospirosis. Further studies with clinically manifested disease are needed to elucidate the potential role of PAF-AH and PON1 as prognostic markers of the leptospirosis outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism targets neuroinflammation in experimental epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Samii, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with the inflammatory process related to the basic mechanisms that lead to seizure susceptibility and brain damage. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent, short-lived phospholipid mediator of inflammation participates in physiological signaling in the brain. However, after seizures PAF accumulates in the brain and activates intracellular signaling related with inflammation-mediated excitotoxicity and hippocampal hyperexcitability. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of PAF antagonism on hippocampal hyperexcitability, seizure susceptibility and neuroprotection using the kindling paradigm and pilocarpine-induced seizure damage models. Methods The PAF antagonist, LAU-0901 (60 mg/kg, i.p.), or vehicle was administrated each day of kindling or daily during the four weeks after status epilepticus (SE). We analyzed seizure severity, electrical activity, cellular damage and inflammation in the hippocampi of both treated groups. Results LAU-0901 limits the progression of kindling and attenuates seizure susceptibility one week after the kindling procedure. Also, under the seizure-damage conditions studied here, we observed that LAU-0901 induces hippocampal neuroprotection and limits somatostatin interneuronal cell loss and inflammation. Discussion Our results indicate that modulation of PAF over-activity attenuates seizure susceptibility, hippocampal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation. PMID:21204830

  2. Impact of prostaglandin glaucoma drops on platelet-activating factor action: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Moschos, Marilita M; Nitoda, Eirini; Chatziralli, Irini P; Panos, Georgios D; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different prostaglandin analogs on platelet-activating factor (PAF) levels. Methods Three prostaglandin analogs were selected: bimatoprost 0.3 mg/mL, latanoprost 50 μg/mL, and tafluprost 15 μg/mL. Each drug sample was tested for its ability to cause platelet aggregation, which was measured as PAF-induced aggregation, before and after the addition of various concentrations of the examined sample, creating a linear curve of percentage inhibition (ranging from 0% to 100%) versus different concentrations of the sample. The concentration of the sample that inhibited 50% PAF-induced aggregation was calculated based on this curve, and this value was defined as IC50. In addition, the effect of eye drops on PAF metabolism was examined, through an in vitro analysis on PAF basic metabolic enzymes (PAF-cholinephosphotransferase, PAF-acetyl-CoA:1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine acetyltransferase, and PAF-acetylhydrolase). Results The IC50 values for Lumigan UD® (bimatoprost 0.3 mg/mL), Monoprost® (latanoprost 50 μg/mL), and Saflutan (tafluprost 15 μg/mL) were 8.7, 0.28, and 1.4 μg/mL, respectively. Discussion All three prostaglandin analogs suspended PAF, but bimatoprost induced the most potent inhibition, compared to tafluprost and to the weak effect of latanoprost. PMID:27994439

  3. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  4. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  5. Platelet Activating Factor Contributes to Vascular Leak in Acute Dengue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jeewandara, Chandima; Gomes, Laksiri; Wickramasinghe, N.; Gutowska-Owsiak, Danuta; Waithe, Dominic; Paranavitane, S. A.; Shyamali, N. L. A.; Ogg, Graham S.; Malavige, Gathsaurie Neelika

    2015-01-01

    Background Although plasma leakage is the hallmark of severe dengue infections, the factors that cause increased vascular permeability have not been identified. As platelet activating factor (PAF) is associated with an increase in vascular permeability in other diseases, we set out to investigate its role in acute dengue infection. Materials and Methods PAF levels were initially assessed in 25 patients with acute dengue infection to determine if they were increased in acute dengue. For investigation of the kinetics of PAF, serial PAF values were assessed in 36 patients. The effect of dengue serum on tight junction protein ZO-1 was determined by using human endothelial cell lines (HUVECs). The effect of dengue serum on and trans-endothelial resistance (TEER) was also measured on HUVECs. Results PAF levels were significantly higher in patients with acute dengue (n = 25; p = 0.001) when compared to healthy individuals (n = 12). In further investigation of the kinetics of PAF in serial blood samples of patients (n = 36), PAF levels rose just before the onset of the critical phase. PAF levels were significantly higher in patients with evidence of vascular leak throughout the course of the illness when compared to those with milder disease. Serum from patients with dengue significantly down-regulated expression of tight junction protein, ZO-1 (p = 0.004), HUVECs. This was significantly inhibited (p = 0.004) by use of a PAF receptor (PAFR) blocker. Serum from dengue patients also significantly reduced TEER and this reduction was also significantly (p = 0.02) inhibited by prior incubation with the PAFR blocker. Conclusion Our results suggest the PAF is likely to be playing a significant role in inducing vascular leak in acute dengue infection which offers a potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25646838

  6. Fc receptor triggering induces expression of surface activation antigens and release of platelet-activating factor in large granular lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Malavasi, F; Tetta, C; Funaro, A; Bellone, G; Ferrero, E; Franzone, A C; Dellabona, P; Rusci, R; Matera, L; Camussi, G

    1986-01-01

    Triggering of large granular lymphocyte (LGL) Fc receptor with a specific monoclonal antibody (AB8.28) linked to an insoluble matrix induces cell activation, as witnessed by expression of HLA class II (DR and DQ) molecules and interleukin 2 receptor. Moreover, this event is accompanied by a concomitant release of platelet-activating factor by LGL. We conclude that the Fc receptor molecule identified by mAb AB8.28 represents a trigger for LGL activation. PMID:3085094

  7. Platelet-activating factor increases reactive oxygen species-mediated microbicidal activity of human macrophages infected with Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Borges, Arissa Felipe; Morato, Camila Imai; Gomes, Rodrigo Saar; Dorta, Miriam Leandro; de Oliveira, Milton Adriano Pelli; Ribeiro-Dias, Fátima

    2017-09-29

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is produced by macrophages during inflammation and infections. We evaluated whether PAF is able to modulate the infection of human macrophages by Leishmania braziliensis, the main Leishmania sp. in Brazil. Monocyte-derived macrophages were incubated with promastigote forms in absence or presence of exogenous PAF. We observed that the treatment of macrophages with low concentrations of PAF prior to infection increased the phagocytosis of L. braziliensis. More importantly, exogenous PAF reduced the parasitism when it was added before, during or after infection. In addition, treatment with a PAF antagonist (PCA 4248) resulted in a significant increase of macrophage infection in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that endogenous PAF is important to control L. braziliensis infection. Mechanistically, while exogenous PAF increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) treatment with PCA 4248 reduced oxidative burst during L. braziliensis infection. The microbicidal effects of exogenous PAF were abolished when macrophages were treated with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. The data show that PAF promotes the production of ROS induced by L. braziliensis, suggesting that this lipid mediator may be relevant to control L. braziliensis infection in human macrophages. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Platelet activating factors alters calcium homeostasis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF), a potent in vivo mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, induced a rapid (onset less than 30 s), concentration-dependent (threshold approximately 10(-11) M, half-maximal approximately 10(-10) M, maximal approximately 10(-8)-10(-7) M) efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from preloaded cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In contrast, deacetylated and other PAF analogues were essentially ineffective. PAF (10(-7) M) was also shown to increase cytosolic free calcium (49 +/- 5%) in suspensions of quin 2 (calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye)-loaded BAEC. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was not blocked by aspirin treatment (100 or 500 microM, 30 min). In the absence of external calcium, PAF was still highly effective in stimulating unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting that PAF mobilized a sequestered pool of intracellular calcium. CV-3988, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BAEC with PAF (10(-8) M, 15 min), but not with other PAF analogues, resulted in a decrease in subsequent PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting an agonist-specific desensitization. PAF also stimulated a 30% net decrease in the equilibrium /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ content of BAEC within 1 min, which gradually recovered to prestimulus levels in 10-15 min. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also observed in endothelial cells cultured from human umbilical vein and baboon cephalic vein but not from cultured human dermal fibroblasts or bovine aortic smooth muscle. These studies provide direct evidence for agonist- and cell-specific effects of PAF on vascular endothelium.

  9. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action.

  10. Endogenous nitric oxide protects against platelet-activating factor-induced bowel injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    MacKendrick, W; Caplan, M; Hsueh, W

    1993-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes bowel necrosis in animal models that is histologically identical to that seen in neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis, but little is known about endogenous mechanisms that might protect against PAF-induced bowel injury. We hypothesized that endogenous nitric oxide might represent such a protective mechanism. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with 2.5 mg/kg NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a potent nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and given injections of 1.5 micrograms/kg PAF 15 min later. Animals treated with normal saline placebo, L-NAME alone, and PAF alone were also studied. Superior mesenteric artery blood flow and blood pressure were continuously recorded. At the end of 2 h or upon death of the animal, hematocrit was measured and intestinal samples were taken for histologic examination and determination of myeloperoxidase activity, a measure of intestinal neutrophil content. Compared with animals given PAF alone, animals pretreated with L-NAME followed by PAF developed significantly worse bowel injury (median injury scores: 2.5 versus 0.5, p = 0.005), hemoconcentration (final hematocrit 65.2 +/- 2.0% versus 53.9 +/- 1.0%, p < 0.001), and intestinal myeloperoxidase activity (12.45 +/- 1.94 U/g versus 6.51 +/- 0.57 U/g, p < 0.01). The last two effects were further accentuated when 10 mg/kg L-NAME was given before PAF. Treatment with sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor, for 10 min before and after PAF administration reversed the effects of L-NAME. Animals pretreated with phenylephrine rather than L-NAME did not develop worse injury than animals treated with PAF alone despite comparable reductions in superior mesenteric blood flow before PAF treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety profile of the new platelet-activating factor antagonist apafant in man.

    PubMed

    Brecht, H M; Adamus, W S; Heuer, H O; Birke, F W; Kempe, E R

    1991-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a unique phospholipid mediator with multifunctional properties. Evidence generated in experimental studies suggests that PAF plays a pathogenetic role in anaphylactic, inflammatory and immunogenic reactions. Apafant (WEB 2086, CAS 105219-56-5), a novel synthetic PAF receptor antagonist, was administered to a total of 101 healthy volunteers within 5 studies to investigate its pharmacologic activity, pharmacokinetic behaviour and safety profile. Pharmacologic activity was monitored by inhibition of 5 x 10(-8) mol/l PAF-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo. The following treatment schedules were studied: oral single dose 1.25 to 400 mg; oral multiple dose 100 mg t.i.d. over 7 days; i.v. infusion 0.5 to 50 mg (over 30 min); inhalative administration up to 1.0 mg. PAF induced platelet aggregation was virtually completely inhibited by single oral doses of 20 mg upwards, throughout during the multiple oral dose study, at all dose levels tested in the i.v. study and (significantly but not completely) at 0.5 and 1.0 mg in the inhalative study. Following oral administrations (capsules) apafant is absorbed rapidly (tmax 1 to 2 h), there is linear pharmacokinetics for the mean plasma concentrations of apafant measured by RIA as well as for the areas under the curve (AUCs). Approximately 60% of apafant is bound to plasma protein, the mean volume of distribution is 28 l, about 44% of an oral dose is excreted in the urine, the mean renal clearance is 192 ml/min. No accumulation of the drug occurred in volunteers with normal kidney function. No clinically relevant drug related adverse events or changes in laboratory or vital parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and ECG were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Effects of platelet activating factor and related lipids on phase transition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bratton, D L; Harris, R A; Clay, K L; Henson, P M

    1988-06-07

    Recent evidence localizing the inflammatory mediator, platelet activating factor, (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) to the membranes of stimulated neutrophils raises the possibility that PAF may, in addition to its activities as a mediator, alter the physical properties of membranes. Accordingly, the effects of PAF and related alkyl ether and acyl analogs on phase transition thermodynamics of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were studied using fluorescence polarization of the fluorescent probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). PAF, its ester analog (1-palmitoyl-2-acetylphosphatidylcholine) and both the corresponding alkyl and acyl lysophospholipid analogs (each at a concentration of 10 mol%) significantly decreased the phase transition temperature and broadened the phase transition of DPPC (P less than 0.05). The relative potency of the lipids in causing this effect was ester-PAF greater than or equal to PAF greater than or equal to lyso-PAF greater than lyso-PC suggesting that the fluidization of the synthetic membranes was attributable to both the 2-position acetyl group and the 1-position alkyl linkage. Furthermore, using various related compounds, increases in chain length and degree of unsaturation in the 2-position were shown to enhance the depression in transition temperature and broadening of the phase transition. Phase transition thermodynamics were also assessed using differential scanning calorimetry. Similar depression in the phase transition temperature was measured for PAF and both the alkyl and acyl lysophospholipids. Broadening of the phase transition for DPPC by the various analogs was assessed by calculation of transition peak width and cooperative unit. Data from fluorescence polarization and differential scanning calorimetry provide similar though not identical results and support the hypothesis that the unique features of PAF may alter membrane physical properties and could ultimately explain some of its biologic

  13. Renal metabolism and urinary excretion of platelet-activating factor in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Noris, M.; Perico, N.; Macconi, D.; Nanni, V.; Dadan, J.; Peterlongo, F.; Remuzzi, G. )

    1990-11-15

    The origin of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the urine remains ill defined. The present study documents that (3H)PAF (3.5 mu Ci) injected into the renal artery of isolated control rat kidney preparations perfused at constant pressure with a cell-free medium containing 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) was excreted in negligible amounts (0.034%) in the urine, whereas 6% was retained by the kidney. When kidneys were perfused with a BSA-free medium, 0.029 and 71% of the total radioactivity added to the perfusate was recovered in the urine and in the renal tissue, respectively. (3H)PAF urine excretion in proteinuric kidneys from adriamycin-treated rats was still negligible (0.015%). Analysis of the renal tissue-retained radioactivity in control and proteinuric kidneys perfused with 1% BSA indicated metabolism into long chain acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine species, lyso-PAF, glycerols, and intact PAF. Thin layer chromatography analysis of (3H)glycerol fraction in these renal extracts showed two major components comigrating with 1-O-alkylglycerol and 1-O-alkyl-2-fatty acylglycerol. Isolated proximal tubules, but not glomeruli from nephrotic rats exposed to increasing concentrations of BSA (0-4%), had a higher PAF uptake than control tubules for BSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.1%. Our findings in the isolated perfused kidneys indicate that, in normal conditions, circulating PAF is excreted in the urine in negligible amounts and that the altered glomerular permeability to proteins does not affect this excretion rate. Moreover, analysis of renal tissue radioactivity documented that the renal metabolism of PAF is comparable in control and nephrotic kidneys.

  14. Potential Angiogenic Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Sapino, Anna; Bussolati, Benedetta; Ghisolfi, Gianpiero; Rizea-Savu, Simona; Silvestro, Luigi; Lupia, Enrico; Camussi, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34- and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested. PMID:9811351

  15. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  16. Potential angiogenic role of platelet-activating factor in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Montrucchio, G; Sapino, A; Bussolati, B; Ghisolfi, G; Rizea-Savu, S; Silvestro, L; Lupia, E; Camussi, G

    1998-11-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34-and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested.

  17. pA2 values for antagonists of platelet activating factor on aggregation of rabbit platelets.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, S. R.; Barnett, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. The relative potencies, and equilibrium dissociation constants, for nine antagonists of platelet activating factor (Paf) have been determined on rabbit platelets (in diluted platelet-rich plasma (PRP)) in experiments in which the aggregatory response to Paf was measured. 2. Log concentration-response (% maximum) curves to Paf were obtained in the absence (controls) and presence of different concentrations of each Paf antagonist drug. The antagonists shifted the Paf curves to a higher concentration range and the slopes of the Schild plots, constructed from these data, suggested that the drugs were competitive antagonists of Paf. The slopes of the Schild plots for CV-3988 and SRI 63-119 were greater than 1. 3. The pA2 values (pKB values in parentheses) were: WEB 2086 7.31 (7.63); SRI 63-119 6.95; L-652,731 6.71 (6.73); BN 52021 6.38 (6.47); SRI 63-072 6.36 (6.43); CV-3988 5.87; 48740 RP 4.97 (5.07); ketotifen 4.94 (4.95); thiazinamium 4.73 (4.76). 4. This study provides, for the first time, some functional response data for Paf antagonists (pKB values) which are in an appropriate form for use in classifying putative Paf receptors. The study also provides the comparative potencies of these Paf antagonists in inhibiting Paf-induced platelet aggregation. WEB 2086 was the most potent of the drugs examined. PMID:3293683

  18. Palliation of bone cancer pain by antagonists of platelet-activating factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Morita, Katsuya; Shiraishi, Seiji; Motoyama, Naoyo; Kitayama, Tomoya; Kanematsu, Takashi; Uezono, Yasuhito; Dohi, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Bone cancer pain is the most severe among cancer pain and is often resistant to current analgesics. Thus, the development of novel analgesics effective at treating bone cancer pain are desired. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists were recently demonstrated to have effective pain relieving effects on neuropathic pain in several animal models. The present study examined the pain relieving effect of PAF receptor antagonists on bone cancer pain using the femur bone cancer (FBC) model in mice. Animals were injected with osteolytic NCTC2472 cells into the tibia, and subsequently the effects of PAF receptor antagonists on pain behaviors were evaluated. Chemical structurally different type of antagonists, TCV-309, BN 50739 and WEB 2086 ameliorated the allodynia and improved pain behaviors such as guarding behavior and limb-use abnormalities in FBC model mice. The pain relieving effects of these antagonists were achieved with low doses and were long lasting. Blockade of spinal PAF receptors by intrathecal injection of TCV-309 and WEB 2086 or knockdown of the expression of spinal PAF receptor protein by intrathecal transfer of PAF receptor siRNA also produced a pain relieving effect. The amount of an inducible PAF synthesis enzyme, lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 2 (LPCAT2) protein significantly increased in the spinal cord after transplantation of NCTC 2472 tumor cells into mouse tibia. The combination of morphine with PAF receptor antagonists develops marked enhancement of the analgesic effect against bone cancer pain without affecting morphine-induced constipation. Repeated administration of TCV-309 suppressed the appearance of pain behaviors and prolonged survival of FBC mice. The present results suggest that PAF receptor antagonists in combination with, or without, opioids may represent a new strategy for the treatment of persistent bone cancer pain and improve the quality of life of patients.

  19. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  20. Platelet-activating factor in the enteric nervous system of the guinea pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Fang, Xiu-Cai; Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Xia, Yun

    2006-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory mediator that may influence neuronal activity in the enteric nervous system (ENS). Electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR were used to study the action of PAF and the expression of PAF receptor (PAFR) in the ENS. PAFR immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by 6.9% of the neurons in the myenteric plexus and 14.5% of the neurons in the submucosal plexus in all segments of the guinea pig intestinal tract as determined by double staining with anti-human neuronal protein antibody. PAFR IR was found in 6.1% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 35.8% of the neurons with IR for neuropeptide Y (NPY), 30.6% of the neurons with IR for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and 1.96% of the neurons with IR for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the submucosal plexus. PAFR IR was also found in 1.5% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 51.1% of the neurons with IR for NPY, and 32.9% of the neurons with IR for ChAT in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, exposure to PAF (200-600 nM) evoked depolarizing responses (8.2 +/- 3.8 mV) in 12.4% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.5% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology, whereas in the myenteric preparations, depolarizing responses were elicited by a similar concentration of PAF in 9.5% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.0% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology. The results suggest that subgroups of secreto- and musculomotor neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses express PAFR. Coexpression of PAFR IR with ChAT IR in the myenteric plexus and ChAT IR and VIP IR in the submucosal plexus suggests that PAF, after release in the inflamed bowel, might act to elevate the excitability of submucosal secretomotor and myenteric musculomotor

  1. Alkali-induced corneal stromal melting prevention by a novel platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    He, Jiucheng; Bazan, Nicolas G; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of LAU0901 (2,4,6-trimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-3,5-dicarboxylic acid ester), a novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, on a rabbit model of severe corneal alkali injury. Adult New Zealand albino rabbits were anesthetized and the right eyes were injured with 2N sodium hydroxide for 60 seconds using a 12-mm plastic well, then rinsed. After the injury, 10 rabbits were treated topically with LAU0901 every 2 hours 4 times per day and received a subconjunctival injection of 200 microL of LAU0901 once per week and 10 rabbits were treated with vehicle the same way. Over the course of 4 weeks, the corneas were examined daily by slitlamp microscopy and corneal ulcers were graded with a clinical scoring system. Ten additional rabbits were treated as described but 1 rabbit from each group was killed at 1, 3, 7, 14, or 21 days after injury. The corneas were processed for histopathologic and immunofluorescence examination. Persistent epithelial defects were present in both groups from day 5 postinjury, but from day 9 through day 25, the average clinical scores of both epithelial defects and stromal ulcerations in the vehicle-treated eyes were significantly higher than those in the LAU0901-treated eyes (P<.01). By day 28, 90% of the eyes in the vehicle-treated group perforated, while only 20% of the eyes in the LAU0901-treated group developed deep ulceration and none were perforated. Histologic examination showed that the corneas treated with LAU0901 for 4 weeks were completely reepithelialized, with fewer inflammatory polymorphonuclear leukocytes and more repair fibroblasts (myofibroblasts) in the stroma as compared with those treated with vehicle. LAU0901 inhibits corneal ulceration and perforation in a severe alkali-burn model in the rabbit. In the cornea, PAF is a strong inflammatory mediator, a chemotactic to inflammatory polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and an inducer of several proteases that degrade the extracellular matrix

  2. Characterization of Streptococcal Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase Variants That Are Involved in Innate Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsEM1) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsEM1 and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsEM28) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsEM28 is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsEM1, SsEM28, SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsEM28 or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsEM1 and SsEM28 had kcat values of 373 s−1 and 467 s−1, respectively, that were ≥30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s−1). The comparison of SsEM1, SsEM28, and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsEM28 possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsEM1 but have similar potency with SsEM1 in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sseM28 in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsEM28 in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion. PMID:23774595

  3. Characterization of streptococcal platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase variants that are involved in innate immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsE(M1)) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsE(M1) and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsE(M28)) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsE(M28) is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsE(M28) or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsE(M1) and SsE(M28) had kcat values of 373 s(-1) and 467 s(-1), respectively, that were ≥ 30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s(-1)). The comparison of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsE(M28) possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsE(M1) but have similar potency with SsE(M1) in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sse(M28) in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsE(M28) in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion.

  4. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  5. Platelet activating factor: release from colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis and its effect on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1996-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis. They may stimulate intestinal secretion and contribute to the production of diarrhoea. Platelet activating factor (PAF) may be responsible for a high proportion of this secretory response. Biopsy specimens from inflamed and quiescent mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis and normal human colonic mucosa were cultured or co-cultured. The release of PAF, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene D4 into the culture medium was measured and the ability of this culture medium, from inflamed and normal tissues, to influence secretion in rat colonic mucosa was assessed. PAF was liberated by inflamed tissue. Its release from quiescent but not normal tissue was stimulated by medium in which inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues had been cultured and by exogenous bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, but not by histamine. PAF stimulated eicosanoid production. The rise in short circuit current produced in vitro by inflamed tissue culture medium was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist (CV 6209) (46%) (32.4 (2.9) v 17.5 (1.19) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005) and further by combined cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) (58%) (32.4 (2.9) v 13.6 (1.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005). Mepacrine and hydrocortisone attenuated considerably the electrical response evoked by medium from inflamed mucosa to a similar extent (32.4 (2.9) v 6.3 (1.2) v 5.1 (0.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.001). These data suggest that PAF accounted for 46% of the culture medium secretory effect. Thus, any attempt to block its release in patients with ulcerative colitis may have only a partial effect on their symptoms. PMID:8675086

  6. Impaired anaphylactic responses with intact sensitivity to endotoxin in mice lacking a platelet-activating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Kuwaki, T; Nagase, T; Maki, K; Tashiro, F; Sunaga, S; Cao, W H; Kume, K; Fukuchi, Y; Ikuta, K; Miyazaki, J; Kumada, M; Shimizu, T

    1998-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator with diverse biological activities in addition to its well-known ability to stimulate platelet aggregation. Pharmacologic studies had suggested a role for PAF in pregnancy, neuronal cell migration, anaphylaxis, and endotoxic shock. Here we show that disruption of the PAF receptor gene in mice caused a marked reduction in systemic anaphylactic symptoms. Unexpectedly, however, the PAF receptor-deficient mice developed normally, were fertile, and remained sensitive to bacterial endotoxin. These mutant mice clearly show that PAF plays a dominant role in eliciting anaphylaxis, but that it is not essential for reproduction, brain development, or endotoxic shock.

  7. Quinidine, but Not Eicosanoid Antagonists or Dexamethasone, Protect the Gut from Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Vasoconstriction, Edema and Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Lautenschläger, Ingmar; Frerichs, Inéz; Dombrowsky, Heike; Sarau, Jürgen; Goldmann, Torsten; Zitta, Karina; Albrecht, Martin; Weiler, Norbert; Uhlig, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal circulatory disturbances, atony, edema and swelling are of great clinical relevance, but the related mechanisms and possible therapeutic options are poorly characterized, in part because of the difficulties to comprehensively analyze these conditions. To overcome these limitations we have developed a model of the isolated perfused rat small intestine where all of these symptoms can be studied simultaneously. Here we used this model to study the role of eicosanoids, steroids and quinidine in platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced intestinal disorders. A vascular bolus of PAF (0.5 nmol) triggered release of thromboxane and peptidoleukotrienes into the vascular bed (peak concentration 35 nM and 0.8 nM) and reproduced all symptoms of intestinal failure: mesenteric vasoconstriction, translocation of fluid and macromolecules from the vasculature to the lumen and lymphatics, intestinal edema formation, loss of intestinal peristalsis and decreased galactose uptake. All effects of PAF were abolished by the PAF-receptor antagonist ABT491 (2.5 μM). The COX and LOX inhibitors ASA and AA861 (500 μM, 10 μM) did not exhibit barrier-protective effects and the eicosanoid antagonists SQ29548 and MK571 (10 μM, each) only moderately attenuated the loss of vascular fluid, the redistribution to the lumen and the transfer of FITC dextran to the lumen. The steroid dexamethasone (10 μM) showed no barrier-protective properties and failed to prevent edema formation. Quinidine (100 μM) inhibited the increase in arterial pressure, stabilized all the intestinal barriers, and reduced lymph production and the transfer of FITC dextran to the lymph. While quinidine by itself reduced peristalsis, it also obviated paralysis, preserved intestinal functions and prevented edema formation. We conclude that quinidine exerts multiple protective effects against vasoconstriction, edema formation and paralysis in the intestine. The therapeutic use of quinidine for intestinal ailments

  8. Fish oil supplementation decreases oxidative stress but does not affect platelet-activating factor bioactivity in lungs of asthmatic rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, A L; Miranda, D T S Z; Dias, B C L; Campos, R M; Massaro, M C; Michelotto, P V; West, A L; Miles, E A; Calder, P C; Nishiyama, A

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fish oil supplementation increases the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cellular membranes. The highly unsaturated nature of n-3 PUFA could result in an enhanced lipid peroxidation in the oxidative environment characteristic of asthma. The oxidative reaction cascade culminates in an increased production of components associated to oxidative stress and of an important proinflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like lipid. We evaluated the effect of fish oil supplementation in asthmatic rats upon the PAF bioactivity and parameters related to oxidative stress in the lung. Fish oil supplementation of asthmatic rats resulted in lower concentrations of nitrite (1.719 ± 0.137 vs. 2.454 ± 0.163 nmol/mL) and lipid hydroperoxide (72.190 ± 7.327 vs. 120.200 ± 11.270 nmol/mg protein). In asthmatic animals, fish oil increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (33.910 ± 2.325 vs. 24.110 ± 0.618 U/mg protein) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) (164.100 ± 31.250 vs. 12.590 ± 5.234 U/mg protein). However, fish oil did not affect PAF bioactivity in lung tissue of asthmatic rats (0.545 ± 0.098 340/380 vs. 0.669 ± 0.101 340/380 nm ratio). Considering the two-step process--oxidative stress and PAF bioactivity--fish oil exhibited a divergent action on these aspects of asthmatic inflammation, since the supplement lowered oxidative stress in the lungs of asthmatic rats, presenting an antioxidant effect, but did not affect PAF bioactivity. This suggests a dual effect of fish oil on oxidative stress and inflammation in asthma.

  9. Effect of platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase on the formation and action of minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A D; Navab, M; Hama, S Y; Sevanian, A; Prescott, S M; Stafforini, D M; McIntyre, T M; Du, B N; Fogelman, A M; Berliner, J A

    1995-01-01

    Mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein (MM-LDL) produced by oxidative enzymes or cocultures of human artery wall cells induces endothelial cells to produce monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and to bind monocytes. HDL prevents the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures of artery wall cells. Using albumin treatment and HPLC we have isolated and partially characterized bioactive oxidized phospholipids in MM-LDL. Platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), a serine esterase, hydrolyzes short chain acyl groups esterified to the sn-2 position of phospholipids such as PAF and particular oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. Treatment of MM-LDL with PAF-AH (2-4 x 10(-2) U/ml) eliminated the ability of MM-LDL to induce endothelial cells to bind monocytes. When HDL protected against the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures, lysophosphatidylcholine was detected in HDL; whereas when HDL was pretreated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, HDL was no longer protective and lysophosphatidylcholine was undetectable. HPLC analysis also revealed that the active oxidized phospholipid species in MM-LDL had been destroyed after PAF-AH treatment. In addition, treatment of MM-LDL with albumin removed polar phospholipids that, when reisolated, induced monocyte binding to endothelial cells. These polar phospholipids, when treated with PAF-AH, lost biological activity and were no longer detected by HPLC. These results suggest that PAF-AH in HDL protects against the production and activity of MM-LDL by facilitating hydrolysis of active oxidized phospholipids to lysolipids, thereby destroying the biologically active lipids in MM-LDL. PMID:7860760

  10. Selective relocalization and proteasomal downregulation of PKCalpha induced by platelet-activating factor in retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Faghiri, Zahra; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2006-01-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) are key cell-signaling mediators in retinal physiology and pathophysiology. The cellular localization of PKC isoforms is important in defining their activity and specificity; the present study investigated the modulatory potential of the proinflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) on the subcellular distribution of PKCalpha, beta, and delta isotypes. This study used real-time visualization of green fluorescent protein fused to PKCalpha, beta, or delta in the human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line ARPE-19. In PAF-stimulated ARPE-19 cells, PKCalpha translocated to the plasma membrane and then colocalized with Golgi markers p230 and GM130; PKCbeta translocated to the plasma membrane but not to the Golgi; and PKCdelta translocated to the Golgi. Pretreatment with PKC inhibitor calphostin C abolished the PAF-induced translocation of PKCalpha to the plasma membrane or to the Golgi, but the Golgi inhibitor Brefeldin A only prevented the accumulation of PKCalpha in Golgi, without affecting its membrane relocalization. PAF promoted depletion of PKCalpha and delta isoforms but not that of PKCbeta. Proteasome inhibitors lactacystin and MG-132 prevented the PAF-induced depletion of PKCalpha, but the inhibitor of lysosomal proteolysis E-64d was ineffective in rescuing PKCalpha. These results suggest that the PAF-induced downregulation of PKCalpha occurs principally through the proteasomal pathway. This remarkable PAF-mediated diversity in PKC translocation and downregulation highlights the significance of isotype-specific PKC activation in signaling pathways in ARPE-19 cells. These signaling events may be critical during RPE responses to oxidative stress, inflammation, and retinal degenerations, when PAF production is enhanced.

  11. Attenuation of Folic Acid-Induced Renal Inflammatory Injury in Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Negishi, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Nakao, Akihide; Fujita, Toshiro; Toda, Akiko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Noiri, Eisei

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator with various biological activities, plays an important role in inflammation by recruiting leukocytes. In this study we used platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR)-deficient mice to elucidate the role of PAF in inflammatory renal injury induced by folic acid administration. PAFR-deficient mice showed significant amelioration of renal dysfunction and pathological findings such as acute tubular damage with neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation observed with antibody to 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (day 2), and interstitial fibrosis with macrophage infiltration associated with expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the kidney (day 14). Acute tubular damage was attenuated by neutrophil depletion using a monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to acute phase injury. Macrophage infiltration was also decreased when treatment with a PAF antagonist (WEB2086) was started after acute phase. In vitro chemotaxis assay using a Boyden chamber demonstrated that PAF exhibits a strong chemotactic activity for macrophages. These results indicate that PAF is involved in pathogenesis of folic acid-induced renal injury by activating neutrophils in acute phase and macrophages in chronic interstitial fibrosis. Inhibiting the PAF pathway might be therapeutic to kidney injury from inflammatory cells. PMID:16651609

  12. [Changes of prostaglandin D2,carboxypeptidase A3 and platelet activating factor in guinea pig in anaphylactic shock].

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Xiang-jie; Yan, Xue-bin; Gao, Cai-rong

    2012-06-01

    To detect the changes of leukotriene E4(LTE4), prostaglandin D2(PGD2), carboxypeptidase A3(CPA3) and platelet activating factor (PAF) in guinea pigs died from anaphylactic shock. Guinea pigs were used for establishing anaphylactic shock models. The levels of LTE4, PGD2 and CPA3, and PAF were detected in urine, plasma, and brain tissues with ELISA kit, respectively. The significant biomarkers were selected comparing with control group. The changes of PGD2, CPA3 and PAF in the guinea pigs at time zero, 12 and 24 hours after death were observed and compared respectively. The effect of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) to PAF in guinea pig brain was examined and compared. There were no statistically differences of LTE4 levels in urine observed between experimental group and control group. The levels of CPA3, PGD2 and PAF in the experimental group were significantly higher than that in the control group at 0 h. The levels of PAF at 12 and 24 hours after anaphylactic shock were significantly higher than that in the control group. The levels of PAF decreased significantly after pretreatment with PAF-AH. LTE4 in urine cannot be selected as a biomarker to determine the anaphylactic shock. PGD2 and CPA3 in plasma, and PAF in brain tissue may be used as biomarkers to determine the anaphylactic shock. PAF-AH may be potentially useful for clinical treatment of anaphylactic shock.

  13. Coagulation factor XI promotes distal platelet activation and single platelet consumption in the bloodstream under shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Itakura, Asako; Wiesenekker, Chantal P.; Vetter, Ralf; Maas, Coen; Gailani, David; Tucker, Erik I.; Gruber, András; Gerdes, Christoph; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Coagulation factor XI (FXI) has been shown to contribute to thrombus formation on collagen or tissue factor (TF)-coated surfaces in vitro and in vivo by enhancing thrombin generation. Whether the role of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation is restricted to the local site of thrombus formation is unknown. This study was aimed to determine whether FXI could promote both proximal and distal platelet activation and aggregate formation in the bloodstream. Approach and Results Pharmacological blockade of FXI activation or thrombin activity in blood did not affect local platelet adhesion, yet reduced local platelet aggregation, thrombin localization and fibrin formation on immobilized collagen and TF under shear flow, ex vivo. Downstream of the thrombus formed on immobilized collagen or collagen and 10 pM TF, platelet CD62P expression and microaggregate formation and progressive platelet consumption were significantly reduced in the presence of FXI-function blocking antibodies or a thrombin inhibitor in a shear rate- and time-dependent manner. In a non-human primate model of thrombus formation, we found that inhibition of FXI reduced single platelet consumption in the bloodstream distal to a site of thrombus formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the FXI-thrombin axis contributes to distal platelet activation and procoagulant microaggregate formation in the blood flow downstream of the site of thrombus formation. Our data highlights FXI as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting distal thrombus formation without affecting proximal platelet adhesion. PMID:26769048

  14. Elevated plasma platelet activating factor, platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase levels and risk of coronary heart disease or blood stasis syndrome of coronary heart disease in Chinese: a case control study: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guo-Hua; Xiong, Shang-Quan; Mei, Li-Juan; Chen, Hai-Ying; Wang, Ting; Chu, Jian-Feng

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the association between plasma platelet activating factor (PAF) and platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) levels and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) or blood stasis syndrome (BSS) of CHD. Questionnaire, routine clinical assays and plasma levels of PAF, PAF-AH and inflammatory factors hs-CRP and IL-6 were investigated or measured for 120 controls and 150 CHD patients (66 non-BSS and 84 BSS). Plasma PAF levels were higher in CHD patients [49.7 (34.8-73.2 pg/mL)] than in controls [23.8 (14.9-42.3 pg/mL)] (P < 0.001), and in BSS [56.0 (40.1-86.1 pg/mL)] than in non-BSS [47.4 (29.0-67.4 pg/mL)] (P = 0.027). Similarly, plasma PAF-AH levels were higher in CHD patients [11.5 (7.5-15.6 μmol/L)] than in controls [8.1 (5.4-12.6 μmol/L)] (P < 0.001), and in BSS [13.4 (8.7-18.5 μmol/L)] than in non-BSS [9.5 (7.3-14.3 μmol/L)] (P = 0.014). After adjustment for the confounded effects of inflammatory factors or conventional risk factors, plasma PAF and PAF-AH levels still had a significant difference between CHD patients and controls, but plasma PAF-AH rather than PAF levels had a significant difference between BSS and non-BSS. Elevated plasma PAF level contributed to the risk of CHD rather than BSS, and elevated plasma PAF-AH level was an independent risk factor of CHD and BSS.

  15. Crosstalk between Protease-activated Receptor 1 and Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Regulates Melanoma Cell Adhesion Molecule (MCAM/MUC18) Expression and Melanoma Metastasis*

    PubMed Central

    Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Balasubramanian, Krishnakumar; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Zigler, Maya; Wang, Hua; Petersson, Frederik; Price, Janet E.; Schroit, Alan; Prieto, Victor G.; Hung, Mien-Chie; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    The cellular and molecular pathways that regulate platelet activation, blood coagulation, and inflammation are emerging as critical players in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate a novel signaling mechanism whereby protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) mediates expression of melanoma cell adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18 (MUC18), a critical marker of melanoma metastasis, via activation of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) and cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). We found that PAR1 silencing with small hairpin RNA inhibits MUC18 expression in metastatic melanoma cells by inhibiting CREB phosphorylation, activity, and binding to the MUC18 promoter. We further demonstrate that the PAF/PAFR pathway mediates MUC18 expression downstream of PAR1. Indeed, PAR1 silencing down-regulates PAFR expression and PAF production, PAFR silencing blocks MUC18 expression, and re-expression of PAFR in PAR1-silenced cells rescues MUC18 expression. We further demonstrate that the PAR1-PAFR-MUC18 pathway mediates melanoma cell adhesion to microvascular endothelial cells, transendothelial migration, and metastatic retention in the lungs. Rescuing PAFR expression in PAR1-silenced cells fully restores metastatic phenotype of melanoma, indicating that PAFR plays critical role in the molecular mechanism of PAR1 action. Our results link the two pro-inflammatory G-protein-coupled receptors, PAR1 and PAFR, with the metastatic dissemination of melanoma and suggest that PAR1, PAFR, and MUC18 are attractive therapeutic targets for preventing melanoma metastasis. PMID:19703903

  16. Platelet-activating factor, tumor necrosis factor, hypoxia and necrotizing enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, W; Caplan, M S; Sun, X; Tan, X; MacKendrick, W; Gonzalez-Crussi, F

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is poorly understood. We have established several animal models of NEC by using a combination of various stimuli and stress, including endotoxin, PAF, TNF, and hypoxia. We discuss the mechanism of their actions and the possible roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of human NEC.

  17. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  18. Involvement of platelet activating factor, histamine and serotonin in acute lethal shock induced by Candida albicans water-soluble extracellular polysaccharide fraction (CAWS) in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagi-Miura, Noriko; Shingo, Yuko; Kurihara, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Kazuo; Ohno, Naohito

    2007-07-01

    CAWS (Candida albicans water-soluble extracellular polysaccharide fraction) is a water-soluble extracellular mannoprotein-beta-glucan complex obtained from the culture supernatant following the culture of pathogenic Candida albicans in a completely synthetic medium. CAWS administered intraperitoneally induces vasculitis in mice, however, administered intravenously, it causes lethal shock. The acute lethal reaction to CAWS occurs within 1 h of intravenous administration, with the mice demonstrating anaphylactic shock-like symptoms including convulsion, diarrhea, and collapse. In this study, we analyzed the factors involved in this lethal effect. We examined physiologically active substances believed to be involved in anaphylactic shock, and found that the lethal effect of CAWS could be inhibited by blocking histamine, serotonin, and platelet activating factor (PAF) simultaneously, but by blocking only one. This finding strongly suggests that the acute lethal reaction to CAWS is a result of the simultaneous production of several physiologically active substances.

  19. Thrombin generation by activated factor VII on platelet activated by different agonists. Extending the cell-based model of hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul; Scazziota, Alejandra Silvia; Herrera, Maria de Lourdes; Gonzalez, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is crucial in normal hemostasis. Using a clotting system free of external tissue factor, we investigated whether activated Factor VII in combination with platelet agonists increased thrombin generation (TG) in vitro. Methods and results TG was quantified by time parameters: lag time (LT) and time to peak (TTP), and by amount of TG: peak of TG (PTG) and area under thrombin formation curve after 35 minutes (AUC→35min) in plasma from 29 healthy volunteers using the calibrated automated thrombography (CAT) technique. TG parameters were measured at basal conditions and after platelet stimulation by sodium arachidonate (AA), ADP, and collagen (Col). In addition, the effects of recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa) alone or combined with the other platelet agonists on TG parameters were investigated. We found that LT and TTP were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) and PTG and AUC→35min were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in platelet rich plasma activated with AA, ADP, Col, and rFVIIa compared to non-activated platelet rich plasma from normal subjects (p = 0.01). Furthermore platelet rich plasma activated by the combined effects of rFVIIa plus AA, ADP or Col had significantly reduced LT and TTP and increased AUC→35min (but not PTG) when compared to platelet rich plasma activated with agonists in the absence of rFVIIa. Conclusion Platelets activated by AA, ADP, Col or rFVIIa triggered TG. This effect was increased by combining rFVIIa with other agonists. Our intrinsic coagulation system produced a burst in TG independent of external tissue factor activity an apparent hemostatic effect with little thrombotic capacity. Thus we suggest a modification in the cell-based model of hemostasis. PMID:16630353

  20. Antigen-and ionophore-stimulated synthesis of platelet-activating factor by the cloned mast cell line, MC9

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, M.W.; Billah, M.M.; Siegel, M.I.

    1987-05-14

    MC9 mast cells stimulated by a soluble (calcium ionophore A23187) or by an Fc epsilon-receptor agonist (IgE plus hapten) produce platelet activating factor (PAF). MC9 cells incorporate either exogenous (/sup 3/H)acetic acid or (/sup 3/H)lyso-PAF into PAF. PAF was identified by mobility on thin layer chromatography, platelet aggregatory activity inhibitable by known PAF antagonists, and by enzymatic modification. Quantified by aggregation of rabbit platelets, MC9 cells produce 6 pmoles PAF/10(6) cells. MC9 cells express acetyltransferase activity of 0.19 nmole/5 min-mg protein. Analysis of MC9 phospholipids by HPLC showed that MC9 cells contain large amounts of phosphatidylcholine (82 nmoles/10(7) cells) but contain little ether-linked phosphatidylcholine (4 nmoles/10(7) cells).

  1. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Walker, Chelsey P.; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M.; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15–16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  2. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  3. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides in horse platelets: possible relationship to Ca2+ mobilization during stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Billah, M M; Lapetina, E G

    1983-01-01

    Stimulation of horse platelets with platelet-activating factor (PAF) induces a rapid degradation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2]. Addition of 0.1 microM PAF for 5 sec to platelets prelabeled with 32P induces a 50% loss of [32P]PtdIns(4,5)P2. 32P-Labeled phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate (PtdIns4P) and [32P]phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) also are decreased, albeit at a slower rate. Loss of 32P radioactivity correlates with a net loss of fatty acids from both polyphosphoinositides. Stimulation of platelets with PAF also produces formation of [32P]phosphatidic acid and [32P]lysophosphatidylinositol. The initial disappearance of inositol lipids is subsequently followed by resynthesis, as evidenced by increased incorporation of 32P into PtdIns(4,5)P2, PtdIns4P, and PtdIns. The resynthesis of the inositides increases with time and is proportional to the concentration of PAF. Prostacyclin (1 microM) inhibits (i) the formation of phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidylinositol and (ii) the resynthesis of polyphosphoinositides induced by 0.03 microM PAF without affecting the initial loss of PtdIns(4,5)P2. The loss of inositol lipids appears to be a primary event of platelet activation. The initial loss of polyphosphoinositides might be linked to the initiation of cellular activation by mobilizing membrane-bound Ca2+, whereas the subsequent formation of these lipids might be involved in mechanisms to prevent overstimulation of the cell. PMID:6341992

  4. Inhibition of platelet activation by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS)-silenced (tearless) onion juice.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Susan J; Rippon, Paula; Butts, Chrissie; Olsen, Sarah; Shaw, Martin; Joyce, Nigel I; Eady, Colin C

    2013-11-06

    Onion and garlic are renowned for their roles as functional foods. The health benefits of garlic are attributed to di-2-propenyl thiosulfinate (allicin), a sulfur compound found in disrupted garlic but not found in disrupted onion. Recently, onions have been grown with repressed lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) activity, which causes these onions to produce increased amounts of di-1-propenyl thiosulfinate, an isomer of allicin. This investigation into the key health attributes of LFS-silenced (tearless) onions demonstrates that they have some attributes more similar to garlic and that this is likely due to the production of novel thiosulfinate or metabolites. The key finding was that collagen-induced in vitro platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by tearless onion extract over normal onion extract. Thiosulfinate or derived compounds were shown not to be responsible for the observed changes in the inflammatory response of AGS (stomach adenocarcinoma) cells to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) when pretreated with model onion juices. A preliminary rat feeding trial indicated that the tearless onions may also play a key role in reducing weight gain.

  5. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  6. Prevotella intermedia Induces Severe Bacteremic Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Mice with Upregulated Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Expression

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells. PMID:24478074

  7. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-06-06

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED.

  8. The role of endogenous nitric oxide and platelet-activating factor in hypoxia-induced intestinal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Caplan, M S; Hedlund, E; Hill, N; MacKendrick, W

    1994-02-01

    Nitric oxide is an endothelium-derived relaxing factor that promotes capillary integrity, inhibits leukocyte adherence and activation, and scavenges oxygen radicals. Because these effects are important in experimental intestinal injury, we studied the role of NO inhibition on hypoxia-induced bowel necrosis in the rat and investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor (PAF) and NO in this model. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with either hypoxia, NO synthase inhibition (NG-methyl-L-arginine [LNMA] or NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME]), hypoxia+LNMA, hypoxia+LNMA+NO donors, or hypoxia+LNMA+PAF receptor inhibition. Evaluations included blood pressure, superior mesenteric artery blood flow, arterial blood gases, histological intestinal injury, intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and intestinal PAF activity. We found that hypoxia alone for 90 minutes (10% O2, partial O2 pressure = 45 mm Hg) or LNMA alone had no detrimental effects. However, hypoxia+LNMA together caused hypotension, metabolic acidosis, intestinal injury, increased intestinal myeloperoxidase activity, and elevated intestinal PAF concentrations that were prevented by exogenous L-arginine. Furthermore, the hypotension and intestinal injury was prevented by PAF receptor blockade. We conclude that endogenous NO protects the intestine from hypoxia-induced inflammation and injury, and the balance between local PAF and NO modulates the outcome of hypoxia-stressed intestine.

  9. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase deficiency. A missense mutation near the active site of an anti-inflammatory phospholipase.

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, D M; Satoh, K; Atkinson, D L; Tjoelker, L W; Eberhardt, C; Yoshida, H; Imaizumi, T; Takamatsu, S; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Gray, P W; Prescott, S M

    1996-01-01

    Deficiency of plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase is an autosomal recessive syndrome that has been associated with severe asthma in Japanese children. Acquired deficiency has been described in several human diseases usually associated with severe inflammation. PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the degradation of PAF and related phospholipids, which have proinflammatory, allergic, and prothrombotic properties. Thus, a deficiency in the degradation of these lipids should increase the susceptibility to inflammatory and allergic disorders. Miwa et al. reported that PAF acetylhydrolase activity is absent in 4% of the Japanese population, which suggests that it could be a common factor in such disorders, but the molecular basis of the defect is unknown. We show that inherited deficiency of PAF acetylhydrolase is the result of a point mutation in exon 9 and that this mutation completely abolishes enzymatic activity. This mutation is the cause of the lack of enzymatic activity as expression in E. coli of a construct harboring the mutation results in an inactive protein. This mutation as a heterozygous trait is present in 27% in the Japanese population. This finding will allow rapid identification of subjects predisposed to severe asthma and other PAF-mediated disorders. PMID:8675689

  10. In vitro effects of vitamin supplements on platelet-activating factor and its metabolism in age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Moschos, Marilita M; Chatziralli, Irini P; Stamatakis, George; Papakonstantinou, Vasiliki D; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to investigate for the first time a series of vitamin supplements used for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) as potential inhibitors of platelet-activating factor (PAF). Various vitamin supplements were tested in washed rabbit platelets (WRPs), in order to investigate the interaction between vitamin supplements (InShape, Nutrof, Ocuvite, Vitalux) and inhibition of PAF-induced platelet aggregation. Additionally, we examined their ability to affect PAF-metabolism, through their in vitro effect on PAF basic metabolic enzymes (PAF-CPT, lyso PAF-AT, and PAF-AH). Nutrof exhibited the strongest anti-PAF activity, while Vitalux was the most potent anti-inflammatory factor. This is the first study to bring in surface potent anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activities of some vitamin supplements used against AMD, through their in vitro anti-PAF effects in WRPs and the rabbit plasma and leukocyte PAF metabolism, suggesting a promising role of vitamin supplements and especially resveratrol, concerning its potent anti-angiogenic activity in AMD.

  11. Effect of platelet-activating factor antagonists (BN-52021, WEB-2170, and BB-882) on bacterial translocation in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    de Souza, L J; Sampietre, S N; Assis, R S; Knowles, C H; Leite, K R; Jancar, S; Monteiro Cunha, J E; Machado, M C

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is an important source of pancreas infection in acute pancreatitis. The effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis has been proved in various studies. The aim of this study was to determine whether potent PAF antagonists influence bacterial translocation in acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced in 62 Wistar rats by injection of 2.5% sodium taurocholate into the biliopancreatic duct. The rats treated with PAF factor antagonists received intravenous injection of WEB-2170 (10 mg/kg), lexipafant (5 mg/kg), and BN-52021 (5 mg/kg) 30 minutes before induction of acute pancreatitis. Six hours after induction of acute pancreatitis, bacteriologic cultures and histologic scoring of tissues were performed. There was a statistically significant reduction in bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph nodes and liver but not to the pancreas of the rats treated with PAF antagonists. No significant increase in the intestinal bacterial population of any group was found. There were no statistical differences between the pancreatic histologic scores of the groups. PAF antagonists reduced bacterial translocation to distant sites other than the pancreas, preventing the bacterial dissemination that occurs in the early phase of acute pancreatitis and may have beneficial effects on the evolution of this disease.

  12. Investigations of human platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase: role of lipoxygenase products in platelet activation1[S

    PubMed Central

    Ikei, Kenneth N.; Yeung, Jennifer; Apopa, Patrick L.; Ceja, Jesús; Vesci, Joanne; Holinstat, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Human platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) has recently been shown to play an important role in regulation of human platelet function by reacting with arachidonic acid (AA). However, a number of other fatty acids are present on the platelet surface that, when cleaved from the phospholipid, can be oxidized by 12-LOX. We sought to characterize the substrate specificity of 12-LOX against six essential fatty acids: AA, dihomo-γ-linolenic acid (DGLA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), α-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosadienoic acid (EDA), and linoleic acid (LA). Three fatty acids were comparable substrates (AA, DGLA, and EPA), one was 5-fold slower (ALA), and two showed no reactivity with 12-LOX (EDA and LA). The bioactive lipid products resulting from 12-LOX oxidation of DGLA, 12-(S)-hydroperoxy-8Z,10E,14Z-eicosatrienoic acid [12(S)-HPETrE], and its reduced product, 12(S)-HETrE, resulted in significant attenuation of agonist-mediated platelet aggregation, granule secretion, αIIbβ3 activation, Rap1 activation, and clot retraction. Treatment with DGLA similarly inhibited PAR1-mediated platelet activation as well as platelet clot retraction. These observations are in surprising contrast to our recent work showing 12(S)-HETE is a prothrombotic bioactive lipid and support our hypothesis that the overall effect of 12-LOX oxidation of fatty acids in the platelet is dependent on the fatty acid substrates available at the platelet membrane. PMID:22984144

  13. Platelet-activating factor: diminished acetylcholine release from rat brain slices is mediated by a Gi protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Y; Yue, T L; Feuerstein, G; Friedman, E

    1994-11-01

    The effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on neurotransmitter release from rat brain slices prelabeled with [3H]acetylcholine ([3H]ACh), [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE), or [3H]serotonin ([3H]5-HT) was studied. PAF inhibited K+ depolarization-induced [3H]ACh release in slices of brain cortex and hippocampus by up to 59% at 10 nM but did not inhibit [3H]ACh release in striatal slices. PAF did not affect 5-HT or NE release from cortical brain slices. The inhibition of K(+)-evoked [3H]ACh release induced by PAF was prevented by pretreating tissues with several structurally different PAF receptor antagonists. The effect of PAF was reversible and was not affected by pretreating brain slices with tetrodotoxin. PAF-induced inhibition of [3H]ACh release was blocked 90 +/- 3 and 86 +/- 2% by pertussis toxin and by anti-G alpha i1/2 antiserum incorporated into cortical synaptosomes, respectively. The results suggest that PAF inhibits depolarization-induced ACh release in brain slices via a G alpha i1/2 protein-mediated action and that PAF may serve as a neuromodulator of brain cholinergic system.

  14. Identification and functional characterization of platelet-activating factor receptors in human leukocyte populations using polyclonal anti-peptide antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, E; Dagenais, P; Alami, N; Rola-Pleszczynski, M

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the successful cloning of a receptor for platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator of inflammation, was reported. Here we investigated the distribution and potential diversity of human PAF receptors (hPAF-Rs) among individual leukocyte populations by (i) hPAF-R mRNA transcription studies and (ii) analysis of cell surface expression of hPAF-R protein using a polyclonal anti-peptide antibody (anti-hPAF-R164-173). Northern blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting with anti-hPAF-R antibody indicated that monocytic, neutrophilic, and B-lymphocytic cell lines all shared a similar hPAF-R species, whereas resting T-cell and natural killer cell lines failed to express detectable levels of either hPAF-R protein or mRNA. Peripheral blood leukocyte populations showed a distribution of hPAF-R cell surface expression similar to that of the corresponding cell lines. Furthermore, binding of anti-hPAF-R164-173 antiserum, purified IgG, or Fab and F(ab')2 fragments to the receptor of all investigated PAF-R-positive cell lines induced an increase in intracellular free calcium concentration. The characterization of the expression of a lipid ligand receptor using antibodies against an intrinsic portion of the receptor protein has, to our knowledge, never been reported previously. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8390683

  15. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  16. Protective effect of platelet activating factor antagonists on cultured endothelial cell lysis induced by elastase or activated neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, P.; Vicart, P.; Paulin, D.; Chignard, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The mechanism(s) responsible for injury of endothelial cells induced by human leukocyte elastase (HLE) was investigated in an immortalized venous human endothelial cell line (IVEC). 2. First, the proteinase concentrations and incubation delays necessary to trigger a significant IVEC cytotoxicity were determined by chromium assays. Thus, exposure of IVEC for 6 h to 10 micrograms ml-1 HLE resulted in 22 +/- 2.8% lysis and 36.4 +/- 5.4% detachment (mean +/- s.e. mean; n = 4; P < 0.05). 3. WEB 2086, a specific platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, induced a significant concentration-dependent decrease of such a lysis (39.6 +/- 7.7% protection at 100 microM; n = 4). This potential role for PAF was confirmed with two other antagonists of this lipid mediator, i.e., BN 52021 and RP 48740. 4. Finally, we demonstrated that pretreatment of IVEC with WEB 2086 protected significantly against cell lysis induced by stimulated human neutrophils, an experimental model in which HLE participates. PMID:8851508

  17. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) biosynthesis is inhibited by phenolic compounds in U-937 cells under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Vlachogianni, Ioanna C; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Stamatakis, George M; Kostakis, Ioannis K; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induced platelet activating factor (PAF) synthesis in U-937 cells through stimulation of acetyl-CoA:lysoPAF-acetyltransferase (lyso PAF-AT) at 3 h and DTT-independentCDP-choline-1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol cholinophosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) at 0.5 h. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tyrosol (T), resveratrol (R) and their acetylated derivatives(AcDs) which exhibit enhanced bioavailability, on PAF synthesis in U-937 after IL-1β stimulation. The specific activity of PAF enzymes and intracellular levels were measured in cell homogenates. T and R concentration capable of inducing 50% inhibition in IL-1β effect on lyso PAF-AT was 48 μΜ ± 11 and 157 μΜ ± 77, for PAF-CPT 246 μΜ ± 61 and 294 μΜ ± 102, respectively. The same order of concentration was also observed on inhibiting PAF levels produced by IL-1β. T was more potent inhibitor than R (p<0.05). AcDs of T retain parent compound inhibitory activity, while in the case of R only two AcDs retain the activity. The observed inhibitory effect by T,R and their AcDs, may partly explain their already reported beneficial role.

  18. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  19. Platelet-activating factor induces cell cycle arrest and disrupts the DNA damage response in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Puebla-Osorio, N; Damiani, E; Bover, L; Ullrich, S E

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid modulator of inflammation that has diverse physiological and pathological functions. Previously, we demonstrated that PAF has an essential role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced immunosuppression and reduces the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that UV-induced PAF is contributing to skin cancer initiation by inducing immune suppression and also affecting a proper DNA damage response. The exact role of PAF in modulating cell proliferation, differentiation or transformation is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which PAF affects the cell cycle and impairs early DNA damage response. PAF arrests proliferation in transformed and nontransformed human mast cells by reducing the expression of cyclin-B1 and promoting the expression of p21. PAF-treated cells show a dose-dependent cell cycle arrest mainly at G2–M, and a decrease in the DNA damage response elements MCPH1/BRIT-1 and ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (ATR). In addition, PAF disrupts the localization of p-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), and phosphorylated-ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (p-ATR) at the site of DNA damage. Whereas the potent effect on cell cycle arrest may imply a tumor suppressor activity for PAF, the impairment of proper DNA damage response might implicate PAF as a tumor promoter. The outcome of these diverse effects may be dependent on specific cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25950475

  20. The effect of platelet activating factor antagonist on ozone-induced airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, W.C.; Bethel, R.A. )

    1992-10-01

    We investigated the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in ozone-induced airway responses by examining the effects of L659,989, a potent PAF antagonist, on bronchial hyperresponsiveness and airway inflammation. Twenty-four male guinea pigs were studied in four equal groups. Total lung resistance (RL) in intubated and spontaneously breathing animals was measured in a constant-volume body plethysmograph. Dose-response curves to methacholine were determined in all animals at the start of the experiment. These were repeated on a separate day after the following types of treatments: air exposure in Group 1, intraperitoneally administered alcohol and air exposure in Group 2; intraperitoneally administered alcohol and ozone exposure in Group 3, and intraperitoneally administered L659,989 (a specific PAF antagonist), 5 mg/kg dissolved in alcohol, and ozone exposure in Group 4. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed after the second methacholine challenge, and the bronchial mucosa was also examined for inflammatory cells. Exposure to 3 ppm ozone for 2 h resulted in a three-doubling concentration increase in bronchial responsiveness, which was not significantly inhibited by prior treatment with L659,989. Ozone induced a 1.8-fold increase in BAL total cell count, increased eosinophilic influx into the airways, and increased eosinophilic infiltration in the bronchial mucosa, which were all not inhibited by L659,989 pretreatment. The results suggest that PAF may not have an essential role in ozone-induced airway hyperresponsiveness and nonallergic airway inflammation.

  1. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels.

    PubMed

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process.

  2. Effect of platelet-activating factor on the growth of human erythroid and myeloid CD34+ progenitors.

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, F; Gachard, N; Allegraud, A; Dulery, C; Praloran, V; Denizot, Y

    1998-01-01

    We have assessed the effect of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a biologically active phospholipid present in the human marrow, on the growth of human marrow and blood CD34+ progenitors. While the metabolization rate of PAF by CD34+ cells is low (weak acetylhydrolase and acylation processes) it is readily catabolized by the acetylhydrolase activity present in the growth medium (10% fetal calf serum + 10% 5637-conditioned medium). Treatment of marrow CD34+ cells with the non-metabolizable PAF agonist C-PAF (1 nM to 100 nM) immediately before semi-solid culture significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the number of BFU-E but not of CFU-GM colonies. Treatment of marrow or blood CD34+ cells with C-PAF (10-100 nM) for 3 days in liquid medium before semi-solid culture significantly (P < 0.01) decreased the number of BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies. Treatment of blood CD34+ cells with the two PAF receptor antagonists CV 3988 and BN 52021 (1 microM) had no significant effect on the number of BFU-E and CFU-GM colonies suggesting no role of endogenous PAF in these processes. These results show that exogenous PAF downregulates human erythropoiesis and myelopoiesis, a result that might be of importance during inflammatory states. PMID:9836496

  3. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  4. Antiplatelet aggregation and platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonistic activities of the essential oils of five Goniothalamus species.

    PubMed

    Moharam, Bushra Abdulkarim; Jantan, Ibrahim; Ahmad, Fasihuddin bin; Jalil, Juriyati

    2010-07-29

    Nine essential oils, hydrodistilled from different parts of five Goniothalamus species (G. velutinus Airy-Shaw, G. woodii Merr., G. clemensii Ban, G. tapis Miq. and G. tapisoides Mat Salleh) were evaluated for their ability to inhibit platelet aggregation in human whole blood using an electrical impedance method and their inhibitory effects on platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor binding with rabbit platelets using 3H-PAF as a ligand. The chemical composition of the oils was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The bark oil of G. velutinus was the most effective sample as it inhibited both arachidonic acid (AA) and ADP-induced platelet aggregation with IC(50) values of 93.6 and 87.7 microg/mL, respectively. Among the studied oils, the bark oils of G. clemensii, G. woodii, G. velutinus and the root oil of G. tapis showed significant inhibitory effects on PAF receptor binding, with IC(50 )values ranging from 3.5 to 10.5 microg/mL. The strong PAF antagonistic activity of the active oils is related to their high contents of sesquiterpenes and sesquiterpenoids, and the individual components in the oils could possibly produce a synergistic effect in the overall antiplatelet activity of the oils.

  5. Neutrophil migration across monolayers of cytokine-prestimulated endothelial cells: a role for platelet-activating factor and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that neutrophils respond with a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i during adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells (EC), caused by EC membrane-associated platelet-activating factor (PAF). In the present study, we investigated whether this form of PAF was important in neutrophil adherence and migration across monolayers of rIL-1 beta- or rTNF alpha-prestimulated EC. PAF receptor antagonists prevented neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated EC by approximately 60% (P less than 0.005) without interfering with the process of adherence. The antagonists WEB 2086 and L-652,731 had no effect on neutrophil migration across resting EC induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). A murine anti-IL-8 antiserum was found to also partially inhibit the neutrophil transmigration across cytokine-activated EC. When the anti-IL-8 antiserum was used in combination with a PAF receptor antagonist, neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated monolayers of EC was completely prevented. During transmigration, LAM-1 and CD44 on the neutrophils were down-modulated; both WEB 2086 and anti-IL-8 antiserum partially prevented this down-modulation caused by cytokine- prestimulated EC. Our results indicate that human neutrophils are activated and guided by EC-associated PAF and EC-derived IL-8 during the in vitro diapedesis in between cytokine-stimulated EC. PMID:1315317

  6. Short term effects of indomethacin on rat small intestinal permeability. Role of eicosanoids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mion, F; Cuber, J C; Minaire, Y; Chayvialle, J A

    1994-01-01

    Short term effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability were studied on a model of rat isolated vascularly perfused terminal ileum. The objectives of this study were (a) to assess the effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability and histology; (b) to assess the effects of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and platelet activating factor (PAF) on the same parameters; (c) to evaluate the role of these inflammation mediators on indomethacin induced permeability modifications. Intravascular administration of 1.25 and 2.5 mM indomethacin induced a significant increase of 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate. Histological analysis showed only mucosal oedema. Pretreatment with 16,16 dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 did not reverse these changes. Intravascular administration of PAF, leukotrienes B4 and D4 provoked a significant rise in 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate and intraluminal protein leakage, with an intense vascocongestion of the mucosal capillaries. These changes were completely prevented by perfusion of the respective specific antagonists (BN52021 for PAF, LY255,583 for leukotriene B4 and MK571 for leukotriene D4). None of these three antagonists, however, or MK886, a selective 5'-lipo-oxygenase inhibitor, could reverse the indomethacin induced permeability changes. Indomethacin induced increased intestinal permeability at these high concentrations does not seem to be a result of changed prostanoid or PAF metabolism. Alternative mechanisms of the initial damage of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs should be sought. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8174986

  7. Accumulation of phosphatidic acid mass and increased de novo synthesis of glycerolipids in platelet-activating-factor-activated human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Tou, J; Jeter, J R; Dola, C P; Venkatesh, S

    1991-01-01

    Incubation of human neutrophils with 100 nM-platelet-activating factor (PAF) but without cytochalasin B resulted in a rapid (5 s) accumulation (1.6-fold) of phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) mass. The increased PtdOH mass reached a maximum (2.8-fold) at 1 min and remained elevated (1.7-fold) at 10 min. No methylamine-stable lyso-PtdOH was detectable in the total lipid extract from control or from PAF-activated cells, suggesting that diacyl-PtdOH was the predominant species. In PAF-activated cells, changes in 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) mass were not detectable at 5 or 15 s. Increased DG mass (1.7-fold) was detected between 30 s and 2 min, but then it declined to basal levels by 10 min. PAF enhanced [3H]glycerol incorporation into PtdOH and DG by 2- and 3-fold respectively during 1-10 min incubations. PAF also increased the radioactivity but not the mass of phosphatidylinositol and of choline glycerophospholipid by 8-fold and 4-fold respectively at 10 min. In addition, PAF-activated cells showed increased (2-fold) glycerol incorporation into triacylglycerol. These results demonstrate that PAF enhances rapid accumulation of diacyl-PtdOH mass, and that increased de novo synthesis may contribute to PtdOH mass accumulation. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1662484

  8. Sequential expression of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor in rat hippocampal neurons after fluid percussion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqiang; Shu, Qingming; Li, Lingzhi; Ge, Maolin; Zhang, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes gene expression changes in different brain regions. Occurrence and development of traumatic brain injury are closely related, involving expression of three factors, namely cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. However, little is known about the correlation of these three factors and brain neuronal injury. In this study, primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons were subjected to fluid percussion injury according to Scott's method, with some modifications. RT-PCR and semi-quantitative immunocytochemical staining was used to measure the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. Our results found that cyclooxygenase-2 expression were firstly increased post-injury, and then decreased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached peaks at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Similar sequential changes in glutamate receptor 2 were observed, with highest levels mRNA and protein expression at 8 and 12 hours post-injury respectively. On the contrary, the expressions of platelet activating factor receptor were firstly decreased post-injury, and then increased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached the lowest levels at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Totally, our findings suggest that these three factors are involved in occurrence and development of hippocampal neuronal injury. PMID:25206921

  9. Semi-synthetic preparation of 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) using plant cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, N.; Mangold, H.K.

    1985-04-01

    Incubation of photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and heterotrophic cell suspension cultures of soya (Glycine max) with 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycerol or rac-1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecylglycerol leads in high yield (up to 78%) to labeled 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. Alkaline hydrolysis of the choline glycerophospholipids yields pure 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. 1-O-(1'-14C)Hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) is obtained by acetylating the lyso compound. The semi-synthetic preparation described leads to labeled platelet activating factor in an overall yield of 50-60% without loss of specific activity.

  10. An essential role for platelet-activating factor in activating mast cell migration following ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Chen, Limo; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D.; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y.; Ma, Ying; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The UVB (290–320 nm) radiation in sunlight is responsible for inducing skin cancer. Exposure to UV radiation is also immunosuppressive, and the systemic immune suppression induced by UV is a well-recognized risk factor for cancer induction. As UVB radiation is absorbed within the upper layers of the skin, indirect mechanisms must play a role in activating systemic immune suppression. One prominent example is mast cell migration, which from the skin to the draining LN is an essential step in the cascade of events leading to immune suppression. What triggers mast cell migration is not entirely clear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAF, a lipid mediator of inflammation produced by the skin in response to UV exposure, is involved. Mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh/W-sh) are resistant to the suppressive effect of UV radiation, and reconstituting mast cell-deficient mice with normal bone marrow-derived mast cells restores susceptibility to immunosuppression. However, when mast cells from PAFR−/− mice were used, the reconstituted mice were not susceptible to the suppressive effects of UV. Furthermore, PAFR−/− mice showed impaired UV-induced mast cell migration when compared with WT mice. Finally, injecting PAF into WT mice mimicked the effect of UV irradiation and induced mast cell migration but not in PAFR−/− mice. Our findings indicate that PAFR binding induces mast cells to migrate from the skin to the LNs, where they mediate immune suppression. PMID:24009177

  11. Differences in the acyl composition of the platelet-activating factor (PAF) precursor and other choline phosphoglycerides of the rabbit retinal rod outer segments and neural retina.

    PubMed

    Bazan, H E; Hurst, J S; Bazan, N G

    1994-01-01

    Choline phosphoglycerides comprise almost half of vertebrate retinal phospholipids. This lipid pool contains the precursor of the potent lipid mediator, platelet-activating factor. The acyl composition and distribution of the different subclasses of the choline phosphoglycerides (alkylacyl-[or the precursor of platelet-activating factor], alkenylacyl-[or choline plasmalogen] and diacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine) were studied in intact rabbit retina, neural retina and rod outer segments. Choline phosphoglycerides were isolated by high performance liquid chromatography and derivatized by acetylation after phospholipase C treatment. The derivatives were purified by high performance liquid chromatography and subjected to methanolysis. Fatty acids were analyzed by capillary gas liquid chromatography. In the intact retina and in the neural retina, the alkylacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine and alkenylacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine comprise 1.2% and 1.5%, respectively, of the total choline phosphoglycerides, whereas the rod outer segments contain twice the proportion of the precursor of platelet-activating factor and no detectable plasmalogens. On a mole percent basis, arachidonic acid was highest in the neural retinal alkenylacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine (27%), 18% in the alkylacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine and only 5% in the diacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine. However, alkylacyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine from rod outer segments was enriched in docosapentaenoic acid (18%) while arachidonic acid was in the 3-4% range. Our results suggest that, in the neural retina, alkyl-arachidonoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine is a source of both platelet-activating factor and of arachidonic acid which may be a substrate for both prostaglandins and lipoxygenase metabolites during an inflammatory episode and may contribute to the retinal pathology.

  12. Protein kinase CK2/PTEN pathway plays a key role in platelet-activating factor-mediated murine anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nam-In; Yoon, Ha-Yong; Kim, Han-A; Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Han, Myung-Kwan; Lee, Young-Rae; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Soh, Byoung-Yul; Shin, Sook-Jeong; Im, Suhn-Young; Lee, Hern-Ku

    2011-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a major mediator in the induction of fatal hypovolemic shock in murine anaphylaxis. This PAF-mediated effect has been reported to be associated with PI3K/Akt-dependent eNOS-derived NO. The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is phosphatidylinositol phosphate phosphatase, which negatively controls PI3K by dephosphorylating the signaling lipid, phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. In this study, we examined the possible involvement of PTEN in PAF-mediated anaphylactic shock. Induction of anaphylaxis or PAF injection resulted in a rapid decrease in PTEN activity, followed by increases in PI3K activity and phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. Systemic administration of adenoviruses carrying PTEN cDNA (adenoviral PTEN), but not the control AdLacZ, not only attenuated anaphylactic symptoms, but also reversed anaphylaxis- or PAF-induced changes in PTEN and PI3K activities, as well as phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS. We found that the decreased PTEN activity was associated with PTEN phosphorylation, the latter effect being prevented by the protein kinase CK2 inhibitor, DMAT. DMAT also inhibited anaphylactic symptoms as well as the anaphylaxis- or PAF-mediated PTEN/PI3K/Akt/eNOS signaling cascade. CK2 activity was increased by PAF. The present data provide, as the key mechanism underlying anaphylactic shock, PAF triggers the upstream pathway CK2/PTEN, which ultimately leads to the activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS. Therefore, CK2/PTEN may be a potent target in the control of anaphylaxis and other many PAF-mediated pathologic conditions.

  13. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  14. Evidence for Lipid Packaging in the Crystal Structure of the GM2-Activator Complex with Platelet Activating Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Christine S.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2010-11-16

    GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP) is a lipid transfer protein that has the ability to stimulate the enzymatic processing of gangliosides as well as T-cell activation through lipid presentation. Our previous X-ray crystallographic studies of GM2-AP have revealed a large lipid binding pocket as the central overall feature of the structure with non-protein electron density within this pocket suggesting bound lipid. To extend these studies, we present here the 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of GM2-AP complexed with platelet activating factor (PAF). PAF is a potent phosphoacylglycerol whose toxic patho-physiological effects can be inhibited by GM2-AP. The structure shows an ordered arrangement of two bound lipids and a fatty acid molecule. One PAF molecule binds in an extended conformation within the hydrophobic channel that has an open and closed conformation, and was seen to contain bound phospholipid in the low pH apo structure. The second molecule is submerged inside the pocket in a U-shaped conformation with its head group near the single polar residue S141. It was refined as lyso-PAF as it lacks electron density for the sn-2 acetate group. The alkyl chains of PAF interact through van der Waals contacts, while the head groups bind in different environments with their phosphocholine moieties in contact with aromatic rings (Y137, F80). The structure has revealed further insights into the lipid binding properties of GM2-AP, suggesting an unexpected unique mode of lipid packaging that may explain the efficiency of GM2-AP in inhibiting the detrimental biological effects of PAF.

  15. Characterization of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Stafforini, D M; Imaizumi, T; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated as a mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. A specific degradative enzyme found in plasma, PAF acetylhydrolase, plays important roles in various pathophysiological events induced by PAF. Human macrophages and Hep G2 cells secrete PAF acetylhydrolase with characteristics identical to the plasma activity. Other investigators reported that apolipoprotein B may possess phospholipase A2 activity, which suggested that apolipoprotein B might be a zymogen for PAF acetylhydrolase. However, while macrophages express PAF acetylhydrolase activity, we did not detect cDNAs for apolipoprotein B in a cDNA library from these cells, indicating that macrophages do not express this protein. In contrast, Hep G2 cells had high levels of cDNA for apolipoprotein B, as expected. We next injected Xenopus laevis oocytes with poly(A)+ RNA extracted from cultured human macrophages and Hep G2 cells. Twenty-five to 50% of Xenopus oocytes injected with poly(A)+ RNA from macrophages or Hep G2 cells secreted a PAF acetylhydrolase activity (1.0-7.8 nmol/ml per h) that also utilized a synthetic oxidized phospholipid as substrate. The activity secreted by poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes associated with lipoproteins and transferred between the particles in a pH-dependent manner, much like the plasma activity. These experiments establish that the properties of the enzyme released from poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes are identical to those of the plasma form of PAF acetylhydrolase and that the activity detected is not the expression of a domain in apolipoprotein B. Images PMID:7937948

  16. An oxidized derivative of phosphatidylcholine is a substrate for the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Stremler, K E; Stafforini, D M; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1989-04-05

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a glycerophospholipid that has diverse potent biological actions. A plasma enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acetoyl group of PAF and thereby abolishes its bioactivity. This PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for phospholipids, such as PAF, with a short acyl group at the sn-2 position. The majority of it (60-70%) is associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the remainder is with high density lipoprotein (HDL). LDL also has a phospholipase A2 activity that is specific for oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may be important in determining how LDL is recognized by cellular receptors. We previously have purified and characterized the PAF acetylhydrolase from human plasma. We now have found that the purified PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the oxidized fragments of arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of phosphatidylcholine. One of the preferred substrates appeared by mass spectrometry to have 5-oxovalerate at the sn-2 position. We synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and found that the PAF acetylhydrolase had the same apparent Km for it (11.3 microM) as for PAF (12.5 microM), with Vmax values of 100 and 167 mumol/h/mg of protein, respectively. We also conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase is the sole activity in LDL that degrades oxidized phospholipids since we found co-localization of the activity against both substrates to LDL and HDL, and precipitation of enzyme activity with an antibody to the PAF acetylhydrolase. Thus, the PAF acetylhydrolase in human plasma degrades oxidized phospholipids, which may be involved in the modification of apolipoprotein B100 and other pathological processes.

  17. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides via phospholipase A2 in primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, T.; Hasegawa, K.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-07-01

    Addition of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to cells doubly labeled with (/sup 14/C)glycerol plus (/sup 3/H)arachidonic acid resulted in a transient decrease of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI) and a transient increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). (/sup 3/H)Arachidonate-labeled PI, on the other hand, decreased in a time-dependent manner. The radioactivity in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylserine did not change significantly. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio decreased in PI in a time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of a phospholipase A2 activity. Although PAF also induced a gradual increase of diacylglycerol (DG), the increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled DG paralleled the loss of triacyl (/sup 14/C)glycerol and the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of DG was 16 times smaller than that of PI. Thus, DG seemed not to be derived from PI. In myo- (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled cells, PAF induced a transient decrease of (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (TPI) and (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) at 1 min. PAF stimulation of cultured hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/Pi induced a transient decrease of (/sup 32/P)polyphosphoinositides at 20 sec to 1 min. (/sup 32/P)LPI appeared within 10 sec after stimulation and paralleled the loss of (/sup 32/P)PI. (/sup 3/H)Inositol triphosphate, (/sup 3/H)inositol diphosphate, and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate, which increased in a time-dependent manner upon stimulation with adrenaline, did not accumulate with the stimulation due to PAF. These observations indicate that PAF causes degradation of inositol phospholipids via phospholipase A2 and induces a subsequent resynthesis of these phospholipids.

  18. Effects of platelet activating factor on contractile force and 45Ca fluxes in guinea-pig isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Diez, J.; Delpón, E.; Tamargo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of platelet activating factor (PAF) were studied on the electromechanical properties and 45Ca2+ fluxes of guinea-pig isolated atria. 2 Both in spontaneously beating and electrically driven atria, PAF (10(-12)-10(-7) M) increased atrial rate but produced a biphasic effect on contractile force. At low concentrations (up to 10(-10) M) it produced a positive inotropic effect, while at higher concentrations PAF exerted a negative inotropic effect. A similar biphasic effect was observed in the slow contractions elicited by isoprenaline in K(+)-depolarized atrial fibres. 3. The positive inotropic effect of PAF was prevented by verapamil, whereas pretreatment of atria with propranolol, phentolamine, indomethacin or atropine did not modify its positive and negative inotropic actions. BN 52021, a specific PAF antagonist, abolished both the positive and negative inotropic effects. 4. PAF had no effect on the characteristics of the action potentials recorded in either normally polarized or K(+)-depolarized (slow action potential) atrial fibres. 5. At concentrations at which it increased contractile force, PAF potentiated the contractile responses to Ca2+ (0.9-9 mM), whereas at negative inotropic concentrations it inhibited them. The negative inotropic effect of PAF was partially reversed in 70% Na+ medium. 6. At 10(-11) M, PAF increased 45Ca2+ uptake and reduced the rate coefficient (kcm) for the 45Ca2+ efflux. This increase in 45Ca2+ uptake was abolished in atria pretreated with verapamil or BN 52021. However, 10(-7) M PAF modified neither 45Ca2+ uptake nor efflux in atrial muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2379035

  19. Memory enhancement by intrahippocampal, intraamygdala, or intraentorhinal infusion of platelet-activating factor measured in an inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, I; Fin, C; Schmitz, P K; Da Silva, R C; Jerusalinsky, D; Quillfeldt, J A; Ferreira, M B; Medina, J H; Bazan, N G

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is thought to be a retrograde messenger in long-term potentiation (LTP), enhances glutamate release and LTP through an action on presynaptic nerve endings. The PAF antagonist BN 52021 blocks CA1 LTP in hippocampal slices, and, when infused into rat dorsal hippocampus pre- or posttraining, blocks retention of inhibitory avoidance. Here we report that memory is affected by pre- or posttraining infusion of the PAF analog 1-O-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (mc-PAF) into either rat dorsal hippocampus, amygdala, or entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in these brain regions. After recovery from surgery, the animals were trained in step-down inhibitory avoidance or in a spatial habituation task and tested for retention 24 h later. mc-PAF (1.0 microgram per side) enhanced retention test performance of the two tasks when infused into the hippocampus before training without altering training session performance. In addition, mc-PAF enhanced retention test performance of the avoidance task when infused into (i) the hippocampus 0 but not 60 min after training; (ii) the amygdala immediately after training; and (iii) the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. In confirmation of previous findings, BN 52021 (0.5 microgram per side) was found to be amnestic for the avoidance task when infused into the hippocampus or the amygdala immediately but not 30 or more minutes after training or into the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. These findings support the hypothesis that memory involves PAF-regulated events, possibly LTP, generated at the time of training in hippocampus and amygdala and 100 min later in the entorhinal cortex. PMID:7761446

  20. Activity and distribution of plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and their neonates.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qian; He, Guo-Lin; Zhang, Li; Bai, Huai; Liu, Xing-Hui; Fan, Ping

    2016-09-01

    Abnormal activity and distribution of plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) are associated with chronic inflammatory status. In this study, we investigate the activity and distribution of plasma PAF-AH and their association with metabolic components in mothers with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and in their neonates. Based on the International Association of Diabetes Pregnancy Study Group criteria, we performed a case-controlled study of 101 women with GDM, 98 women with uncomplicated pregnancies, 142 neonates of mothers with GDM and 121 neonates of mothers with uncomplicated pregnancies. Plasma PAF-AH, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated PAF-AH (H-PAF-AH) and apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoprotein-associated PAF-AH (apoB-PAF-AH) activities were measured using the trichloroacetic acid precipitation procedure with PAF C-16 as a substrate. The plasma PAF-AH and apoB-PAF-AH activities, triglyceride (TG) levels, atherogenic index and TG/HDL-C ratio were increased, and the H-PAF-AH proportions were decreased in the mothers with GDM compared with the control mothers (p < 0.05). Multivariate regression analyses demonstrated that the apoB and TG levels were significant predictors of plasma PAF-AH or apoB-PAF-AH activities, while the low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, weight gain during pregnancy and age were associated with H-PAF-AH activities. The neonates of mothers with GDM had higher plasma insulin and glucose concentrations (p < 0.05) and tended to exhibit increased serum apoB levels (p = 0.062) compared with the neonates of mothers with uncomplicated pregnancies. The mothers with GDM presented with a state of chronic inflammation, and these mothers and their neonates also exhibited unfavourable metabolic profiles in terms of glucose and lipids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Understanding the connection between platelet-activating factor, a UV-induced lipid mediator of inflammation, immune suppression and skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid mediators of inflammation play important roles in several diseases including skin cancer, the most prevalent type of cancer found in the industrialized world. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen and is the primary cause of skin cancer. UV radiation is also a potent immunosuppressive agent, and UV-induced immunosuppression is a well-known risk factor for skin cancer induction. An essential mediator in this process is the glyercophosphocholine 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine commonly referred to as platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is produced by keratinocytes in response to diverse stimuli and exerts its biological effects by binding to a single specific G-protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) expressed on a variety of cells. This review will attempt to describe how this lipid mediator is involved in transmitting the immunosuppressive signal from the skin to the immune system, starting from its production by keratinocytes, to its role in activating mast cell migration in vivo, and to the mechanisms involved that ultimately lead to immune suppression. Recent findings related to its role in regulating DNA repair and activating epigenetic mechanisms, further pinpoint the importance of this bioactive lipid, which may serve as a critical molecular mediator that links the environment (UVB radiation) to the immune system and the epigenome. PMID:27073146

  2. Understanding the connection between platelet-activating factor, a UV-induced lipid mediator of inflammation, immune suppression and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    Lipid mediators of inflammation play important roles in several diseases including skin cancer, the most prevalent type of cancer found in the industrialized world. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen and is the primary cause of skin cancer. UV radiation is also a potent immunosuppressive agent, and UV-induced immunosuppression is a well-known risk factor for skin cancer induction. An essential mediator in this process is the glyercophosphocholine 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine commonly referred to as platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is produced by keratinocytes in response to diverse stimuli and exerts its biological effects by binding to a single specific G-protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) expressed on a variety of cells. This review will attempt to describe how this lipid mediator is involved in transmitting the immunosuppressive signal from the skin to the immune system, starting from its production by keratinocytes, to its role in activating mast cell migration in vivo, and to the mechanisms involved that ultimately lead to immune suppression. Recent findings related to its role in regulating DNA repair and activating epigenetic mechanisms, further pinpoint the importance of this bioactive lipid, which may serve as a critical molecular mediator that links the environment (UVB radiation) to the immune system and the epigenome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Stimulus-response coupling in human platelets. Changes evoked by platelet-activating factor in cytoplasmic free calcium monitored with the fluorescent calcium indicator quin2.

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, T J; Sanchez, A; Rink, T J

    1984-01-01

    The role of changes in cytoplasmic free calcium, [Ca2+]i, in the responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF) was studied in human platelets loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator, quin2. In the presence of 1 mM external calcium, PAF raised [Ca2+]i 8-10-fold in a few seconds to peak near 1 microM. [Ca2+]i then declined over several minutes towards the basal level. In the absence of external calcium there was a much smaller increase in [Ca2+]i of similar pattern. These findings suggest that PAF increases [Ca2+]i partly by discharge of internal Ca2+, but mainly by stimulated influx. Blockade of cyclo-oxygenase with aspirin only slightly reduced the [Ca2+]i changes, indicating that thromboxane A2 is not a major mediator of the calcium movements. In control conditions PAF could stimulate shape-change, aggregation and secretion. Aggregation and secretion were roughly halved by blockade of cyclo-oxygenase. Shape-change and secretion still occurred under conditions where the [Ca2+]i rise was small or suppressed, indicating a role for intracellular activators other than Ca2+. The possible involvement of products of phosphoinositide breakdown is discussed. PMID:6426464

  4. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.H.; Abraham, W.M.; Groscurth, P.; Qiao, B.Y.; Perruchoud, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  5. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Block, L H; Abraham, W M; Groscurth, P; Qiao, B Y; Perruchoud, A P

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  6. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2: modulation by cytosolic phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor, and cyclooxygenase-2 in neuronal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2003-02-27

    Activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) is an early event in brain injury, which leads to the formation and accumulation of bioactive lipids: platelet-activating factor (PAF), free arachidonic acid, and eicosanoids. A cross-talk between secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) and cPLA(2) in neural signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment of neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates a neuronal signaling cascade that includes activation of cPLA(2), arachidonic acid release, PAF production, and induction of COX-2.

  7. Synthesis of 1-acyl-2-[3H]acetyl-SN-glycero-3-phosphocholine, a structural analog of platelet activating factor, by vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mueller, H W; Nollert, M U; Eskin, S G

    1991-05-15

    Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECS) were challenged with thrombin in the presence of [3H]acetate to stimulate the production of radiolabeled platelet activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-[3H]acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-O-alkyl-2-[3H]acetyl-GPC). The 3H-product was isolated by thin-layer chromatography, and 1-radyl-2[3H],3- diacetylglycerols were prepared by phospholipase C digestion and subsequent acetylation at the sn-3 position. When the 1-radyl-2[3H],3-diacetylglycerols were analyzed by zonal thin-layer chromatography, 96-97% of the radiolabeled derivative migrated with 1-acyl-2,3-diacetylglycerol standard. Only minor amounts (3-4%) of 1-alkyl-2[3H],3-diacetylglycerol were observed, demonstrating that the predominant acetylated product synthesized by thrombin-stimulated HUVECS was 1-acyl-2-[3H]acetyl-GPC. This relative abundance of 1-acyl-2-[3H]-acetyl-GPC was not significantly affected by thrombin dose, incubation time, or cell passage, and was also observed in HUVECS challenged with ionophore A23187. In addition, the acetylated product from ionophore A23187- or bradykinin-stimulated bovine aortic endothelial cells contained 90% 1-acyl-2-[3H]acetyl-GPC, suggesting that the synthesis of the 1-acyl PAF analog is not unique to HUVECS. These findings demonstrate that PAF is a minor synthetic component of HUVECS and bovine aortic endothelial cells. In light of the integral role which the vascular endothelial cell plays in the regulation of thrombosis, these findings also suggest that the production of 1-acyl-2-acetyl-GPC may be biologically important.

  8. Platelet-activating factor stimulation of tyrosine kinase and its relationship to phospholipase C in rabbit platelets: Studies with genistein and monoclonal antibody to phosphotyrosine

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, A.; Paul, A.K.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1990-04-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory lipid that has platelet-stimulating property. PAF receptor-coupled activation of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) and phosphorylation of several proteins has already been established in our laboratory. To investigate further the molecular mechanism and relationship between activation of PLC and protein phosphorylation, we have used Genistein (a putative inhibitor of tyrosine-specific protein kinases), phosphotyrosine antibody, and phosphoamino acid analysis to probe the involvement of tyrosine kinase in this process. Washed rabbit platelets were loaded with myo-(2-3H)inositol and challenged with PAF (100 nM) after pretreatment with Genistein. PLC-mediated production of radioactive inositol monophosphate, inositol diphosphate, and inositol triphosphate was monitored. PAF alone caused stimulation of PLC activity (( 3H)inositol triphosphate production), whereas pretreatment with Genistein (0.5 mM) diminished PAF-stimulated PLC activity to basal level. Genistein also blocked PAF-stimulated platelet aggregation at this dose. In contrast to Genistein, staurosporine which inhibits protein kinase C, potentiated PAF-stimulated (3H)inositol triphosphate production. Genistein substantially inhibited the combined effects of staurosporine and PAF on inositol triphosphate production. Genistein also reduced PAF-induced phosphorylation of Mr 20,000 and 50,000 proteins. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced Mr 40,000 protein phosphorylation was also affected by Genistein. The above results suggested that Genistein inhibited tyrosine kinase at an early stage of signal transduction by inhibiting PLC. This, in turn, decreased the activation of protein kinase C and, therefore, caused a reduction in Mr 40,000 protein phosphorylation.

  9. Synthesis and release of platelet-activating factor is inhibited by plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor or alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and is stimulated by proteinases

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    TNF and IL-1 stimulate the synthesis and release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by neutrophils and vascular endothelial cells. Serum inhibits PAF production even after inactivation of an acetylhydrolase that degrades PAF. Human plasma was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography, and two inhibitory fractions were detected, one containing PAF-acetylhydrolase activity and the other alpha 1- proteinase inhibitor. Low concentrations of this antiproteinase and of human plasma alpha 1-antichymotrypsin inhibited TNF-induced PAF synthesis in neutrophils, macrophages, and vascular endothelial cells. Both antiproteinases also inhibited PAF production stimulated by phagocytosis in macrophages and induced with IL-1 in neutrophils or with TNF in vascular endothelial cells. These results suggest that a proteinase activated on the plasma membrane or secreted by these cells is involved in promoting PAF synthesis. Indeed, addition of elastase to macrophages, neutrophils, and endothelial cells stimulated synthesis and release of PAF much faster than TNF. A similar stimulation was observed in incubations with cathepsin G. To identify a proteinase activated in TNF-treated cells, neutrophils and endothelial cells were incubated with specific chloromethyl ketone inhibitors of elastase and cathepsin G. Synthesis of PAF was significantly inhibited by low concentrations of the cathepsin G inhibitor. The finding that antiproteinases are inhibitory at concentrations 100-fold lower than those present in plasma raises questions as to the ability of TNF and IL-1 to stimulate neutrophils in circulation or endothelial cells to synthesize PAF. We propose that PAF production is limited to zones of close contact between cells, which exclude antiproteinases. PMID:3049910

  10. Vasoactive side effects of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations in a rat model and their treatment with recombinant platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Teeling, J L; Verhoeven, A J; Rigter, G M; Agterberg, J; Tool, A T; Koenderman, A H; Kuijpers, T W; Hack, C E

    2000-03-01

    Previously, we observed in a rat model that intravenous administration of intramuscular immunoglobulin preparations induced a long-lasting hypotension, which appeared to be associated with the presence of IgG polymers and dimers in the preparations, but unrelated to complement activation. We found evidence that this hypotensive response is mediated by platelet-activating factor (PAF) produced by macrophages. In this study, we compared the vasoactive effects of 16 intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products from 10 different manufacturers, in anesthetized rats. Eight of the IVIG preparations showed no hypotensive effects (less than 15% decrease), whereas the other 8 had relatively strong effects (15%-50% decrease). The hypotensive effects correlated with the IgG dimer content of the preparations. Pretreatment of the rats with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase completely prevented the hypotensive reaction on IVIG infusion, and administration after the onset of hypotension resulted in normalization of the blood pressure. We also observed PAF production on in vitro incubation of human neutrophils with IVIG, which could be blocked by anti-Fcgamma receptor antibodies. This indicates that induction of PAF generation may also occur in a human system. Our findings support the hypothesis that the clinical side effects of IVIG in patients may be caused by macrophage and neutrophil activation through interaction of IgG dimers with Fcgamma receptors. Because phagocyte activation may also lead to the release of other inflammatory mediators, recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) provides a useful tool to determine whether PAF plays a role in the clinical side effects of IVIG. If so, rPAF-AH can be used for the treatment of those adverse reactions. (Blood. 2000;95:1856-1861)

  11. The membrane attack complex of complement contributes to plasmin-induced synthesis of platelet-activating factor by endothelial cells and neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Lupia, Enrico; Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Bergerone, Serena; Emanuelli, Giorgio; Camussi, Giovanni; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2003-01-01

    Thrombolytic agents, used to restore blood flow to ischaemic tissues, activate several enzymatic systems with pro-inflammatory effects, thus potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of ischaemia–reperfusion injury. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid mediator of inflammation, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of this process. We previously showed that the infusion of streptokinase (SK) induces the intravascular release of PAF in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and that cultured human endothelial cells (EC) synthesized PAF in response to SK and plasmin (PLN). In the present study, we investigated the role of the membrane attack complex (MAC) of complement in the PLN-induced synthesis of PAF. In vivo, we showed a correlation between the levels of soluble terminal complement components (sC5b-9) and the concentrations of PAF detected in blood of patients with AMI infused with SK. In vitro both EC and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), incubated in the presence of PLN and normal human serum, showed an intense staining for the MAC neoepitope, while no staining was detected when they were incubated with PLN in the presence of heat-inactivated normal human serum. Moreover, the insertion of MAC on EC and PMN plasmamembrane elicited the synthesis of PAF. In conclusion, our results elucidate the mechanisms involved in PAF production during the activation of the fibrinolytic system, showing a role for complement products in this setting. The release of PAF may increase the inflammatory response, thus limiting the beneficial effects of thrombolytic therapy. Moreover, it may have a pathogenic role in other pathological conditions, such as transplant rejection, tumoral angiogenesis, and septic shock, where fibrinolysis is activated. PMID:12871223

  12. Identification of selective covalent inhibitors of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 from the screening of an oxadiazolone-capped peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bani Kanta; Liu, Xiaodan; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A potent and selective inhibitor of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 (PAFAH1B2) is described. The compound was derived by improvement of a modest affinity primary hit isolated from the screening of a bead-displayed peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library tethered to an oxadiazolone 'warhead'. The oxadiazolone moiety of the inhibitors was found to react covalently with the active site serine residue of PAFAH1B2. This screening strategy may be useful for the identification of many selective, covalent inhibitors of serine hydrolases.

  13. Antiplatelet activity of L-sulforaphane by regulation of platelet activation factors, glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and thromboxane A2.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chung-Hun; Shin, Jang-In; Mo, Sang Joon; Yun, Sung-Jo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Rhee, Yun-Hee

    2013-07-01

    L-sulforaphane was identified as an anticarcinogen that could produce quinine reductase and a phase II detoxification enzyme. In recent decades, multi-effects of L-sulforaphane may have been investigated, but, to the authors' knowledge, the antiplatelet activation of L-sulforaphane has not been studied yet.In this study, 2 μg/ml of collagen, 50 μg/ml of ADP and 5 μg/ml of thrombin were used for platelet aggregations with or without L-sulforaphane. L-sulforaphane inhibited the platelet aggregation dose-dependently. Among these platelet activators, collagen was most inhibited by L-sulforaphane, which markedly decreased collagen-induced glycoprotein IIb/IIIa activation and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) formation in vitro. L-sulforaphane also reduced the collagen and epinephrine-induced pulmonary embolism, but did not affect prothrombin time (PT) in vivo. This finding demonstrated that L-sulforaphane inhibited the platelet activation through an intrinsic pathway.L-sulforaphane had a beneficial effect on various pathophysiological pathways of the collagen-induced platelet aggregation and thrombus formation as a selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonist. Thus, we recommend L-sulforaphane as a potential antithrombotic drug.

  14. The impact of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like mediators on the functional activity of neutrophils: anti-inflammatory effects of human PAF-acetylhydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, T W; Van Den Berg1, J M; Tool, A T J; Roos, D

    2001-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory agent in infectious and inflammatory diseases, partly due to the activation of infiltrating phagocytes. PAF exerts its actions after binding to a monospecific PAF receptor (PAFR). The potent bioactivity is reflected by its ability to activate neutrophils at picomolar concentrations, as defined by changes in levels of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and induction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization at nanomolar concentration. The role of PAF in neutrophil survival is, however, less well appreciated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of synthetic PAFR-antagonists on various neutrophil functions were compared with the effect of recombinant human plasma-derived PAF-acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH), as an important enzyme for PAF degradation in blood and extracellular fluids. We found that endogenously produced PAF (–like) substances were involved in the spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils. At concentrations of 8 µg/ml or higher than normal plasma levels, rPAF-AH prevented spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis (21 ± 4% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; control) versus 62 ± 12% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; rPAF-AH 20 µg/ml); P < 0·01), during overnight cultures of 15 h. This effect depended on intact enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH and was not due to the resulting product lyso-PAF. The anti-inflammatory activity of rPAF-AH toward neutrophils was substantiated by its inhibition of PAF-induced chemotaxis and changes in [Ca2+]i. In conclusion, the efficient and stable enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH over so many hours of coculture with neutrophils demonstrates the potential for its use in the many inflammatory processes in which PAF (–like) substances are believed to be involved. PMID:11298128

  15. Small bowel injury associated to allergy is triggered by platelet-activating factor, mast cells, neutrophils and protected by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Kwasniewski, Fábio H; Landgraf, Richardt G; Jancar, Sonia

    2008-02-01

    Allergy to components of the diet is followed by gut inflammation which in children, sometimes progress to mucosal lesions and anaphylaxis. In newborns suffering of cow's milk allergy, bloody stools, rectal bleeding and ulcerations are found. The rat systemic anaphylaxis is a suitable model to study the intestinal lesions associated to allergy. In the present study we used this model to investigate some mechanisms involved. We found that 15 min after antigen challenge of sensitized rats, hemorrhagic lesions develop in the small intestine. The lesions were more severe in jejunum and ileum compared to duodenum. Pretreatment of the rats with a platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonist (WEB-2170) reduced the lesions whereas inhibition of endogenous nitric oxide by l-NAME, greatly increased the hemorrhagic lesions and mortality. Both, lesions and mortality were reversed by l-arginine. The hemorrhagic lesions were also significantly reduced by the mast cell stabilizers, disodium cromoglycate and ketotifen as well as by neutrophils depletion (with anti-PMN antibodies) or inhibition of selectin binding (by treatment with fucoidan). Thus, the intestinal hemorrhagic lesions in this model are dependent on platelet-activating factor, mast cell granule-derived mediators and neutrophils. Endogenous nitric oxide and supplementation with l-arginine has a protective role, reducing the lesions and preventing mortality. These results contributed to elucidate mechanisms involved in intestinal lesions which could be of relevance to human small bowel injury associated to allergy.

  16. Influence of Free Fatty Acids, Lysophosphatidylcholine, Platelet-Activating Factor, Acylcarnitine, and Echinocandin B on 1,3-β-d-Glucan Synthase and Callose Synthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Kauss, Heinrich; Jeblick, Wolfgang

    1986-01-01

    The activity of 1,3-β-d-glucan synthase assayed in the presence of digitonin in a microsomal preparation from suspension-cultured cells of Glycine max can be fully inhibited by unsaturated fatty acids, trienoic acids being most effective. Lysophosphatidylcholine, platelet-activating factor, acylcarnitine, and Echinocandin B can also fully inhibit the enzyme. Inhibition is observed both when the enzyme is activated by Ca2+ or by trypsinization. At low amounts some of the substances can also cause stimulation. These effects all may result from a displacement of certain endogenous phospholipids necessary for optimal activity of the 1,3-β-d-glucan synthase. In the absence of digitonin the enzyme activity is greatly stimulated by lysophosphatidylcholine, platelet-activating factor, acylcarnitine, and Echinocandin B within a certain concentration range, presumably by rendering the microsomal vesicles permeable to the substrate and Ca2+. Dibucaine does not cause such an effect. Acylcarnitine and Echinocandin B at low concentrations can induce callose synthesis in vivo; this effect is enhanced by chitosan. At higher concentrations the two substances and polyunsaturated fatty acids cause severe electrolyte leakage. The effects are discussed in regard to the induction of callose synthesis by enforced Ca2+ influx, and its modulation by membrane lipids. PMID:16664610

  17. Vascular endothelial (VEGF) and epithelial growth factor (EGF) as well as platelet-activating factor (PAF) and receptors are expressed in the early pregnant canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Somi, S; Sabitzer, S; Klein, D; Reinbacher, E; Kanca, H; Beceriklisoy, H B; Aksoy, O A; Kucukaslan, I; Macun, H C; Aslan, S

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the course of expression of platelet-activating factor (PAF), PAF-receptor (PAF-R), epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGF-R, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in uterine tissue during canine pregnancy. For this purpose, 20 bitches were ovariohysterectomized at days 10-12 (n = 10), 18-25 (n = 5) and 28-45 (n = 5) days after mating, respectively. The pre-implantation group was proven pregnant by embryo flushing of the uterus after the operation, the others by sonography. Five embryo negative, that is, non-pregnant, bitches in diestrus (day 10-12) served as controls. Tissue samples from the uterus (placentation sites and horn width, respectively) were excised and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen after embedding in Tissue Tec(®). Extraction of mRNA for RT-PCR was performed with Tri-Reagent. In the embryos, mRNA from all factors except VEGF was detected. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of PAF and PAFR as well as VEGF and VEGFR2 during the pre-implantation stage than in all other stages and a strong upregulation of EGF during implantation were characteristic. The course of EGF was in diametrical opposition to the course of the receptor. These results point towards an increased demand for VEGF, EGF and PAF during the earliest stages of canine pregnancy.

  18. Equine platelets inhibit E. coli growth and can be activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid although superoxide anion production does not occur and platelet activation is not associated with enhanced production by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Aktan, I; Dunkel, B; Cunningham, F M

    2013-04-15

    Activated platelets can contribute to host defense through release of products with bactericidal actions such as antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as by forming heterotypic aggregates with neutrophils and enhancing their antimicrobial properties. Whilst release of vasoactive mediators from equine platelets in response to stimuli including bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been documented, neither ROS production, nor the effects of activated platelets on equine neutrophil ROS production, have been reported. This study first sought evidence that activated equine platelets inhibit bacterial growth. Platelet superoxide production in response to stimuli including Escherichia coli-derived LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus was then determined. The ability of LPS and LTA to up-regulate platelet P-selectin expression and induce platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation was investigated and the effect of co-incubating activated platelets with neutrophils on superoxide production measured. Growth of E. coli was inhibited in a time-dependent manner, and to a similar extent, by addition of platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet poor plasma (PPP) obtained by centrifugation of PRP. Activation of platelets in PRP by addition of thrombin led to a significant increase in the inhibitory action between 0.5 and 2h. Although phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) caused superoxide production by equine platelets in a protein kinase C-dependent manner, thrombin, platelet activating factor (PAF), LPS, LTA and formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP) were without effect. LPS and LTA did induce platelet activation, measured as an increase in P-selectin expression (% positive cells: 17±3 (un-stimulated); 63±6 (1μg/ml LPS); 64±6 (1μg/ml LTA); n=5) but not platelet superoxide production or heterotypic aggregate formation. Co-incubation of activated platelets with neutrophils did not increase neutrophil superoxide production. This

  19. Relative sensitivities of plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and paraoxonase to in vitro gas-phase cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, J K; Knoff, L J; Tribble, D L; Forte, T M

    2001-03-01

    In order to identify potential atherogenic properties of gas-phase cigarette smoke, we utilized an in vitro exposure model to determine whether the activities of several putative anti-atherogenic enzymes associated with plasma lipoproteins were compromised. Exposure of heparinized human plasma to gas-phase cigarette smoke produced a dose-dependent reduction in the activity of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Reductions of nearly 50% in PAF-AH activity were observed following exposure to gas-phase smoke from four cigarettes over an 8-h period. During this time of exposure, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was rendered almost completely inactive (>80%). In contrast, paraoxonase was totally unaffected by cigarette smoke. Supplementation of plasma with 1 mM reduced glutathione was found to protect both PAF-AH and LCAT from cigarette smoke, suggesting that cysteine modifications may have contributed to the inhibition of these two enzymes. To evaluate this possibility, we blocked the free cysteine residues of these enzymes with the reversible thiol-modifying reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid (DTNB). Reversal of the DTNB-cysteine adducts following cigarette smoke exposures revealed that LCAT, but not PAF-AH, was protected. Moreover, high doses (1.0-10 mM) of acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal, reactive aldehydic species associated with cigarette smoke, completely inhibited plasma LCAT activity, whereas PAF-AH was resistant to such exposures. Taken together, these results indicate a divergence regarding the underlying mechanism of PAF-AH and LCAT inhibition upon exposure to gas-phase cigarette smoke. While LCAT was sensitive to exposure to volatile aldehydic products involving, in part, cysteine and/or active site modifications, the enzyme PAF-AH exhibited an apparent resistance. The latter suggests that the active site of PAF-AH is in a microenvironment that lacks free cysteine residues and/or is shielded from volatile aldehydic combustion

  20. Lipoprotein lipase and hydrofluoric acid deactivate both bacterial lipoproteins and lipoteichoic acids, but platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase degrades only lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ho Seong; Nahm, Moon H

    2009-08-01

    To identify the Toll-like receptor 2 ligand critically involved in infections with gram-positive bacteria, lipoprotein lipase (LPL) or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is often used to selectively inactivate lipoproteins, and hydrofluoric acid (HF) or platelet-activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) is used to selectively inactivate lipoteichoic acid (LTA). However, the specificities of these chemical reactions are unknown. We investigated the reaction specificities by using two synthetic lipoproteins (Pam(3)CSK(4) and FSL-1) and LTAs from pneumococci and staphylococci. Changes in the structures of the two synthetic proteins and the LTAs were monitored by mass spectrometry, and biological activity changes were evaluated by measuring tumor necrosis factor alpha production by mouse macrophage cells (RAW 264.7) following stimulation. PAF-AH inactivated LTA without reducing the biological activities of Pam(3)CSK(4) and FSL-1. Mass spectroscopy confirmed that PAF-AH monodeacylated pneumococcal LTA but did not alter the structure of either Pam(3)CSK(4) or FSL-1. As expected, HF treatment reduced the biological activity of LTA by more than 80% and degraded LTA. HF treatment not only deacylated Pam(3)CSK(4) and FSL-1 but also reduced the activities of the lipoproteins by more than 60%. Treatment with LPL decreased the biological activities by more than 80%. LPL also removed an acyl chain from the LTA and reduced its activity. Our results indicate that treatment with 1% H(2)O(2) for 6 h at 37 degrees C inactivates Pam(3)CSK(4), FSL-1, and LTA by more than 80%. Although HF, LPL, and H(2)O(2) treatments degrade and inactivate both lipopeptides and LTA, PAF-AH selectively inactivated LTA with no effect on the biological and structural properties of the two lipopeptides. Also, the ability of PAF-AH to reduce the inflammatory activities of cell wall extracts from gram-positive bacteria suggests LTA to be essential in inflammatory responses to gram-positive bacteria.

  1. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Loh, Lip Nam; Gao, Geli; Tuomanen, Elaine I

    2017-01-03

    The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen infecting the respiratory tract and brain. It is an established model organism for understanding how infection injures the host. During infection or bacterial growth, bacteria shed their cell wall (CW) into the host environment and trigger inflammation. A previous study has shown that CW enters and crosses cell barriers by interacting with a receptor on the surfaces of host cells, termed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr). In the present study, by using cells that are depleted of PAFr, we identified a second pathway with features of macropinocytosis, which is a receptor-independent fluid uptake mechanism by cells. Each pathway contributes approximately the same amount of cell wall trafficking, but the PAFr pathway is silent, while the new pathway appears to contribute to the host inflammatory response to CW insult. Copyright © 2017

  2. Paraoxonase 1 and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase activities in patients with low hdl-cholesterol levels with or without primary hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Brites, Fernando Daniel; Verona, Julián; Schreier, Laura Ester; Fruchart, Jean-Charles; Castro, Graciela Rosa; Wikinski, Regina Luisa

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that high density lipoprotein (HDL)-deficient states are associated with reduced paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. However, HDL reduction caused by primary hypertriglyceridemia has not been fully explored. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether PON1 and platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), two antioxidant enzymes, were altered in patients with low HDL-cholesterol levels with or without primary hypertriglyceridemia in comparison with control normolipemic subjects. We studied 24 patients with low HDL-cholesterol levels with (n=12) or without (n=12) primary hypertriglyceridemia in comparison with 12 control subjects who presented normal HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Paraoxon and phenylacetate were used as substrate for measuring PON1 activities and 1-hexadecyl-2-[3H]acetyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine for platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity. Double substrate method was used to assign phenotypes. Lipid, lipoprotein, apolipoprotein, and lipoprotein particles were determined by standardized methods. Both PON1 activities were significantly reduced in patients with low HDL-cholesterol levels. This reduction could be selectively attributed to the hypertriglyceridemic subgroup. PAF-AH activity was not different between hypoalphalipoproteinemic patients and controls. PON1 activities correlated positively and significantly with HDL-cholesterol, HDL2-cholesterol, HDL3-cholesterol, HDL-phospholipids, apo A-I, apo A-II, and LpA-I:A-II. PAF-AH correlated positively and significantly with total and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol. Data from this study would suggest that in hypoalphalipoproteinemic syndrome, particularly when associated with hypertriglyceridemia, there is impairment in enzymatic antioxidant activity exclusively related with HDL.

  3. Characterization of platelet-activating factor synthesized by normal and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-primed human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Triggiani, M; Schleimer, R P; Tomioka, K; Hubbard, W C; Chilton, F H

    1992-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine) is a mediator involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases associated with tissue eosinophil infiltration. Previous studies utilizing bioassay or assaying enzymes associated with PAF biosynthesis have suggested that human eosinophils produce PAF. The present study has extended these initial studies by identifying and quantifying the different PAF molecular species and analogues synthesized by human eosinophils in response to A23187 and f-Met-Leu-Phe (FMLP). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric analysis indicated that A23187-stimulated eosinophils produce at least three molecular species of PAF. The predominant species is 1-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (16:0) followed by 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:0) and 1-octadecyl-2-acetyl-GPC (18:1). Eosinophils stimulated with FMLP produce approximately 100-fold smaller quantities of PAF relative to those produced in response to A23187 and only the 16:0 molecular species could be measured. A small percentage (comprising between 2 and 5%) of the 2-acetylated phospholipids produced by eosinophils was the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. Long-term (72 hr) incubation with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) resulted in a three- to fourfold increase in PAF synthesis from eosinophils stimulated with FMLP, without changes in the profile of PAF molecular species or in the percentage of the 1-acyl analogue of PAF. These data indicate that human eosinophils can produce various molecular species of PAF and that this process can be quantitatively enhanced by GM-CSF. PMID:1493922

  4. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  5. Inhibition of platelet-activating factor- and zymosan-activated serum-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils by nedocromil sodium, BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, P. L.; Warringa, R. A.; Kok, P. T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inflammatory cells such as eosinophils and neutrophils are thought to contribute actively to the pathogenesis of asthma since they infiltrate into the lung tissue. These cells are mobilized by lipid-like and protein-like chemotactic factors. As illustrative examples of both groups, platelet-activating-factor (Paf) and zymosan-activated-serum (ZAS) were used in this study. The inhibitory effects of nedocromil sodium, the Paf antagonist BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate on Paf- and ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were evaluated. 2. All tested drugs inhibited Paf-induced neutrophil chemotaxis with approximately the same potency (IC50 approximately 1 nM). 3. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were equally potent in inhibiting ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (IC50 = 0.1-1 microM), whereas BN 52021 was considerably less potent (IC30 = 10 microM). 4. To find out whether the drugs tested could inhibit early events in cell activation, their capacity to inhibit Paf- and ZAS-induced cytosolic free Ca2+-mobilization was investigated. BN 52021, at a concentration of 100 microM, completely inhibited Paf-induced Ca2+-mobilization and inhibited ZAS-induced Ca2+-mobilization by about 50%. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were ineffective. PMID:2551444

  6. Contribution of the platelet activating factor signaling pathway to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction during experimental sepsis by ExoU producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Plotkowski, Maria Cristina; Estato, Vanessa; Santos, Sabrina Alves; da Silva, Mauricio Costa Alves; Miranda, Aline Silva; de Miranda, Pedro Elias; Pinho, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo; Morandi, Verônica; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Vianna, Albanita; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy was used to assess the involvement of ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, in dysfunction of cerebral microcirculation during experimental pneumosepsis. Cortical vessels from mice intratracheally infected with low density of the ExoU-producing PA103 P. aeruginosa strain exhibited increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venule endothelium, decreased capillar density and impaired arteriolar response to vasoactive acetylcholine. These phenomena were mediated by the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) pathway because they were reversed in mice treated with a PAFR antagonist prior to infection. Brains from PA103-infected animals exhibited a perivascular inflammatory infiltration that was not detected in animals infected with an exoU deficient mutant or in mice treated with the PAFR antagonist and infected with the wild type bacteria. No effect on brain capillary density was detected in mice infected with the PAO1 P. aeruginosa strain, which do not produce ExoU. Finally, after PA103 infection, mice with a targeted deletion of the PAFR gene exhibited higher brain capillary density and lower leukocyte adhesion to venule endothelium, as well as lower increase of systemic inflammatory cytokines, when compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, our results establish a role for PAFR in mediating ExoU-induced cerebral microvascular failure in a murine model of sepsis. PMID:26187894

  7. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. PMID:28049146

  8. Key role of glycoprotein Ib/V/IX and von Willebrand factor in platelet activation-dependent fibrin formation at low shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Cosemans, Judith M. E. M.; Schols, Saskia E. M.; Stefanini, Lucia; de Witt, Susanne; Feijge, Marion A. H.; Hamulyák, Karly; Deckmyn, Hans; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    A microscopic method was developed to study the role of platelets in fibrin formation. Perfusion of adhered platelets with plasma under coagulating conditions at a low shear rate (250−1) resulted in the assembly of a star-like fibrin network at the platelet surface. The focal fibrin formation on platelets was preceded by rises in cytosolic Ca2+, morphologic changes, and phosphatidylserine exposure. Fibrin formation was slightly affected by αIIbβ3 blockage, but it was greatly delayed and reduced by the following: inhibition of thrombin or platelet activation; interference in the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to glycoprotein Ib/V/IX (GpIb-V-IX); plasma or blood from patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease; and plasma from mice deficient in VWF or the extracellular domain of GpIbα. In this process, the GpIb-binding A1 domain of VWF was similarly effective as full-length VWF. Prestimulation of platelets enhanced the formation of fibrin, which was abrogated by blockage of phosphatidylserine. Together, these results show that, in the presence of thrombin and low shear flow, VWF-induced activation of GpIb-V-IX triggers platelet procoagulant activity and anchorage of a star-like fibrin network. This process can be relevant in hemostasis and the manifestation of von Willebrand disease. PMID:21037087

  9. The platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene derived from Trichoderma harzianum induces maize resistance to Curvularia lunata through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Gao, Jinxin; Wang, Meng; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum was upregulated by the interaction of T. harzianum with maize roots or the foliar pathogen Curvularia lunata. PAF-AH was associated with chitinase and cellulase expressions, but especially with chitinase, because its activity in the KO40 transformant (PAF-AH disruption transformant) was lower, compared with the wild-type strain T28. The result demonstrated that the colonization of maize roots by T. harzianum induced systemic protection of leaves inoculated with C. lunata. Such protection was associated with the expression of inducible jasmonic acid pathway-related genes. Moreover, the data from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the concentration of jasmonic acid in maize leaves was associated with the expression level of defense-related genes, suggesting that PAF-AH induced resistance to the foliar pathogen. Our findings showed that PAF-AH had an important function in inducing systemic resistance to maize leaf spot pathogen.

  10. Polyunsaturated fatty acids block platelet-activating factor-induced phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt-mediated apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Caplan, Michael S; Li, Dan; Jilling, Tamas

    2008-05-01

    We have shown earlier that platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes apoptosis in enterocytes via a mechanism that involves Bax translocation to mitochondria, followed by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation. Herein we report that, in rat small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6), these downstream apoptotic effects are mediated by a PAF-induced inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Treatment with PAF results in rapid dephosphorylation of Akt, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, and the YXXM p85 binding motif of several proteins and redistribution of Akt-pleckstrin homology domain-green fluorescent protein, i.e., an in vivo phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate sensor, from membrane to cytosol. The proapoptotic effects of PAF were inhibited by both n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids but not by a saturated fatty acid palmitate. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, did not influence the baseline or PAF-induced apoptosis, but 2-bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, inhibited all of the proapoptotic effects of PAF. Our data strongly suggest that an inhibition of the PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway is the main mechanism of PAF-induced apoptosis in enterocytes and that polyunsaturated fatty acids block this mechanism very early in the signaling cascade independently of any effect on prostaglandin synthesis, and probably directly via an effect on protein palmitoylation.

  11. Polyunsaturated fatty acids block platelet-activating factor-induced phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/Akt-mediated apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jing; Caplan, Michael S.; Li, Dan; Jilling, Tamas

    2009-01-01

    We have shown earlier that platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes apoptosis in enterocytes via a mechanism that involves Bax translocation to mitochondria, followed by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation. Herein we report that, in rat small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6), these downstream apoptotic effects are mediated by a PAF-induced inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway. Treatment with PAF results in rapid dephosphorylation of Akt, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, and the YXXM p85 binding motif of several proteins and redistribution of Akt-pleckstrin homology domain-green fluorescent protein, i.e., an in vivo phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate sensor, from membrane to cytosol. The proapoptotic effects of PAF were inhibited by both n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids but not by a saturated fatty acid palmitate. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, did not influence the baseline or PAF-induced apoptosis, but 2-bromopalmitate, an inhibitor of protein palmitoylation, inhibited all of the proapoptotic effects of PAF. Our data strongly suggest that an inhibition of the PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway is the main mechanism of PAF-induced apoptosis in enterocytes and that polyunsaturated fatty acids block this mechanism very early in the signaling cascade independently of any effect on prostaglandin synthesis, and probably directly via an effect on protein palmitoylation. PMID:18356536

  12. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction.

  13. Contribution of the platelet activating factor signaling pathway to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction during experimental sepsis by ExoU producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Plotkowski, Maria Cristina; Estato, Vanessa; Santos, Sabrina Alves; da Silva, Mauricio Costa Alves; Miranda, Aline Silva; de Miranda, Pedro Elias; Pinho, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo; Morandi, Verônica; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Vianna, Albanita; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos

    2015-10-01

    Intravital microscopy was used to assess the involvement of ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, in dysfunction of cerebral microcirculation during experimental pneumosepsis. Cortical vessels from mice intratracheally infected with low density of the ExoU-producing PA103 P. aeruginosa strain exhibited increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venule endothelium, decreased capillar density and impaired arteriolar response to vasoactive acetylcholine. These phenomena were mediated by the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) pathway because they were reversed in mice treated with a PAFR antagonist prior to infection. Brains from PA103-infected animals exhibited a perivascular inflammatory infiltration that was not detected in animals infected with an exoU deficient mutant or in mice treated with the PAFR antagonist and infected with the wild type bacteria. No effect on brain capillary density was detected in mice infected with the PAO1 P. aeruginosa strain, which do not produce ExoU. Finally, after PA103 infection, mice with a targeted deletion of the PAFR gene exhibited higher brain capillary density and lower leukocyte adhesion to venule endothelium, as well as lower increase of systemic inflammatory cytokines, when compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, our results establish a role for PAFR in mediating ExoU-induced cerebral microvascular failure in a murine model of sepsis. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Edematogenic activity of scorpion venoms from the Buthidae family and the role of platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide in paw edema induced by Tityus venoms.

    PubMed

    Severino, D N; Pereira, R L; Knysak, I; Cândido, D M; Kwasniewski, F H

    2009-02-01

    We compared the edematogenic activity of venoms of scorpions from the Buthidae family, Tityus bahiensis (Tbv), Tityus serrulatus (Tsv) and Rhopalurus rochai (Rrv). Three doses (20, 40 and 80 microg/kg sc) of each venom were administrated in hind paw of mice and edema was measured from 5 min to 24 h. Tbv and Tsv both induced edema of rapid onset (135% of increase at 15 min); Rrv induced only a mild edema (40% of increase). We then investigated the involvement of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in Tbv and Tsv-induced paw edema. Pretreatment of mice with a PAF antagonist (WEB-2170) inhibited Tsv but not Tbv-induced edema. Pretreatment with a non selective inhibitor of NO-synthases (L: -NAME) inhibited or increased the edema depending on the dose and the time the edema was measured. In conclusion, the venoms from Tityus are stronger inducers of edema than the venom from the Rhopalurus scorpion. The venoms of Tityus species are similar in potency and time-course edema development. PAF is involved in the edema induced only by Tsv.

  15. Effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcoenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) on tissue paraoxonase 1 and plasma platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase activities.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Jamroz, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of pravastatin and fluvastatin on paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity in plasma, liver, heart, and kidney, as well as on plasma platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in the rat. The animals received pravastatin at doses of 4 and 40 mg/kg/d or fluvastatin at doses of 2 or 20 mg/kg/d for 3 weeks. Fluvastatin (20 mg/kg/d) reduced plasma PON1 activity toward paraoxon and phenyl acetate by 23.6% and 17.4%, respectively. The lower dose of this drug as well as both doses of pravastatin had no effect on plasma PON1. PON1 activity toward paraoxon in the liver of rats treated with 20 mg/kg/d fluvastatin was 27.5% lower than in the control group, and the activity toward phenyl acetate was reduced by 25.4% and 35.9% in rats receiving 2 and 20 mg/kg/d of this drug, respectively. Fluvastatin at 2 and 20 mg/kg/d also decreased cardiac PON1 by 31.3% and 27.3%, respectively. Both statins reduced PON1 activity in the renal cortex and medulla. Statins had no effect on plasma PAF-AH. It is concluded that fluvastatin reduces PON1 activity more efficiently than does pravastatin. Reducing effect on PON1 may negatively modulate atheroprotective potential of statins and may contribute to differences in antiatherosclerotic properties of different drugs in this group.

  16. Platelet-activating factor levels of serum and gingival crevicular fluid in nonsmoking patients with periodontitis and/or coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zheng, Pei; Zhu, Haihua; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhao, Lili; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Eberhard, Jörg; Lins, Markus; Jepsen, Søren

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate systemic and local levels of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent proinflammatory mediator implicated in cardiovascular pathophysiology in adult nonsmoking patients with periodontitis with or without coronary heart disease (CHD). Eighty-seven volunteers, 25 periodontitis patients, 19 periodontitis with CHD patients, 19 CHD patients, and 24 healthy controls were included, and periodontal conditions were assessed. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and venous blood were collected, and PAF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PAF levels in serum (303.3 ± 204 pg/ml) and in GCF (26.3 ± 6 pg/μl) of the periodontitis group with CHD, the periodontitis group (serum, 302.4 ± 241 pg/ml and GCF, 26.3 ± 8 pg/μl) and the CHD group (serum, 284.7 ± 192 pg/ml and GCF, 20.8 ± 6 pg/μl) were significantly higher than the healthy control group (serum, 65.4 ± 35 pg/ml and GCF, 7.7 ± 3 pg/μl; p < 0.05). In summary, the present study could demonstrate that in patients with periodontitis, the inflammatory mediator PAF is released into serum at least in the same range as for patients with coronary heart disease. However, no additive effects were seen when both conditions were present.

  17. CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) is required for degranulation of human eosinophils induced by human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Kita, H

    1994-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests adhesion molecules play an important role in the function of leukocytes. Because human eosinophils are known to express beta 2 integrins, we hypothesized that these adhesion molecules mediate the effector function of eosinophils. Normal human eosinophils incubated in albumin-coated polystyrene plates released granule protein and produced superoxide anion when stimulated with human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage CSF (rGM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), or PMA. Simultaneous monitoring of eosinophil adhesion and degranulation showed that degranulation was always preceded by cellular adhesion regardless of stimuli. Furthermore, eosinophil degranulation induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was abolished in suspension culture of the cells when the cell suspensions were gently stirred. To identify the molecules involved in this adhesion-dependent degranulation, we have investigated the effects of mAbs (mAb) against beta 2 integrins. mAb reactive with CD18 markedly inhibited the eosinophil adhesion and degranulation induced by PAF and human rGM-CSF. mAb reactive with CD11b also moderately inhibited the adhesion and degranulation. In contrast, mAb reactive with CD11a slightly enhanced or showed no effect on the adhesion and degranulation by human rGM-CSF or PAF. Superoxide production induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was also abolished by the treatment of cells with anti-CD18 mAb. mAb against CD11b and CD18 had little effect on degranulation and superoxide production induced by PMA. These results indicate that CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-dependent cellular adhesion plays an important role in the degranulation and superoxide production of eosinophils induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF, and that these mechanisms may be employed in vivo where eosinophils contact with stromal cells and/or proteins.

  18. Rupatadine inhibits inflammatory mediator release from human laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cultured mast cells stimulated by platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Alevizos, Michail; Karagkouni, Anna; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Makris, Michael; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2013-12-01

    Mast cells are involved in allergy and inflammation by the secretion of multiple mediators, including histamine, cytokines, and platelet-activating factor (PAF), in response to different triggers, including emotional stress. PAF has been associated with allergic inflammation, but there are no clinically available PAF inhibitors. To investigate whether PAF could stimulate human mast cell mediator release and whether rupatadine (RUP), a dual histamine-1 and PAF receptor antagonist, could inhibit the effect of PAF on human mast cells. Laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cultured mast cells were stimulated with PAF (0.001, 0.01, and 0.1 μmol/L) and substance P (1 μmol/L) with or without pretreatment with RUP (2.5 and 25 μmol/L), which was added 10 minutes before stimulation. Release of β-hexosaminidase was measured in supernatant fluid by spectrophotoscopy, and histamine, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PAF stimulated a statistically significant release of histamine, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor (0.001-0.1 μmol/L) that was comparable to that stimulated by substance P. Pretreatment with RUP (25 μmol/L) for 10 minutes inhibited this effect. In contrast, pretreatment of laboratory of allergic diseases 2 cells with diphenhydramine (25 μmol/L) did not inhibit mediator release, suggesting that the effect of RUP was not due to its antihistaminic effect. PAF stimulates human mast cell release of proinflammatory mediators that is inhibited by RUP. This action endows RUP with additional properties in treating allergic inflammation. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, platelet-activating factor, and arachidonic acid metabolites in interleukin-1-induced resistance to infection in neutropenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogels, M T; Hermsen, C C; Huys, H L; Eling, W M; van der Meer, J W

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge in granulocytopenic and in normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. The mechanism behind this protection has only partially been elucidated. Since IL-1 induces production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), and arachidonic acid metabolites, we investigated the potential role of these substances in IL-1-induced protection. Low doses of murine TNF-alpha but not of human TNF-alpha enhanced survival, suggesting an effect via the type II TNF receptor rather than the type I TNF receptor, which has little species specificity. In line with this TNF-alpha-induced protection from infection, pretreatment with a low dose of a rat anti-murine TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody tended to inhibit IL-1-induced protection, suggesting a role of TNF-alpha as a mediator of IL-1-induced enhanced resistance to infection. Pretreatment with higher doses of anti-TNF-alpha, however, showed a dose-related protective effect per se, which could be further enhanced by a suboptimal dose of IL-1. A combination of optimal doses of anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1 produced an increase in survival similar to that produced by separate pretreatments. This lack of further enhancement of survival by combined optimal pretreatments suggests a similar mechanism of protection, most likely attenuation of deleterious effects of overproduced proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha during lethal infection. Pretreatment with different doses of GM-CSF before a lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge in neutropenic mice did not enhance survival. Different doses of WEB 2170, a selective PAF receptor antagonist, of MK-886, a selective inhibitor of leukotriene biosynthesis, or of several cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not reduce the protective effect of IL-1 pretreatment. We conclude that IL-1-induced nonspecific

  20. The effect of platelet activating factor antagonist BN 52021 on bacterial translocation and ICAM-I expression in experimental obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Akyürek, Nusret; Salman, Bülent; Irkörücü, Oktay; Tezcaner, Tugan; Azili, Cem; Erdem, Ozlem; Akca, Gülçin; Akin, Okan; Tatlicioglu, Ertan

    2005-01-01

    Expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in an obstructive jaundice model and the potential protective role of platelet activating factor antagonist over small intestine and liver together with its effects on bacterial translocation are examined in this study. Forty-eight male Wistar albino rats were assigned into four equal groups of 12. In groups I and II, animals were sham operated. In groups III and IV, common bile duct ligation and division were performed. In group I and group III, 0.5 ml/day normal saline was applied intraperitoneally daily from day 2 to 6 of the study; in group II and group IV, 1 mg/kg/day BN 52021 was applied intraperitoneally daily from day 2 to 6 of the study. All animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. ICAM-1 expression (CD54 positivity) was analyzed in the liver and ileum tissue by immunohistochemical method. Samples from blood, liver mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen were cultured under aerobic conditions. It is revealed that ICAM-1 expression was statistically higher in group III, with highest bacterial translocation and liver and spleen injury when compared to other groups. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), bilirubin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin 1beta(IL-1beta) values were at the highest level in group III, and there was a statistical decrease in group IV compared to group III. The administration of BN52021 in experimental obstructive jaundice is a useful way to reduce liver and intestinal mucosal villi damage by inhibiting bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response.

  1. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE. PMID:27651919

  2. Platelet activation indices and apolipoproteins in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Catalano, M; Belletti, S; Russo, U; Aronica, A; Carzaniga, G; Seregni, R; Libretti, A

    1988-10-01

    We have studied the platelet activation indices beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG and platelet factor 4(PF4), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) and apolipoprotein (A1, A2, B, C2, C3, E) profiles of 22 untreated essential hypertensive subjects (WHO stages 1 and 2) and 22 controls, to see if there might be some causal relationship between lipoprotein abnormalities and greater platelet activation. The results showed the patients had both greater platelet activation than the controls, as demonstrated by higher plasma beta-TG levels (P less than 0.01) and lower apolipoprotein A2 levels (P less than 0.05). However there were no significant correlations between the platelet activation indices and the plasma levels of apolipoproteins, lipoproteins or lipids in either group.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor-1 potentiates platelet activation via the IRS/PI3Kalpha pathway.

    PubMed

    Hers, Ingeborg

    2007-12-15

    As insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is present in the alpha granules of platelets and its receptor is expressed on the platelet surface, it may contribute to the amplification of platelet responses and pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. The functional and signaling pathways that are involved in IGF-1 modulation of platelet function, however, are presently unknown. Here, I report that IGF-1 stimulation of platelets results in dose-dependent phosphorylation of the IGF receptor in the range of 1 to 100 nM. Phosphorylation of the IGF receptor is rapid and sustained, with maximal phosphorylation reached within 1 minute. Furthermore, IGF-1 stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and IRS-2 and their association with the p85 subunit of phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K). IGF-1-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 and IRS-2 and subsequent p85 binding is transient and precedes phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) on Ser473. PAR-1-mediated platelet aggregation is potentiated by IGF-1 and this potentiation, together with PKB phosphorylation, is abolished by the PI3Kalpha inhibitors PI-103 and PIK-75. Importantly, the IGF receptor inhibitor NVP-AEW541 and the neutralization antibody alphaIR3 inhibit SFLLRN-stimulated aggregation, implicating IGF-1 in autocrine regulation of platelet function. These results demonstrate that IGF-1 activates the IGF receptor/IRS/PI3K/PKB pathway, and that PI3Kalpha is essential for the potentiatory effect of IGF-1 on platelet responses.

  4. Reactivation of Gαi-coupled formyl peptide receptors is inhibited by Gαq-selective inhibitors when induced by signals generated by the platelet-activating factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Holdfeldt, André; Dahlstrand Rudin, Agnes; Gabl, Michael; Rajabkhani, Zahra; König, Gabriele M; Kostenis, Evi; Dahlgren, Claes; Forsman, Huamei

    2017-09-01

    Formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-desensitized neutrophils display increased production/release of superoxide (O2(-)) when activated by platelet-activating factor (PAF), a priming of the response achieved through a unique receptor crosstalk mechanism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an inhibitor selective for small, heterotrimeric G proteins belonging to the Gαq subclass on that receptor crosstalk. We show that signals generated by FPRs and the PAF receptor (PAFR) induce activation of the neutrophil O2(-), producing NADPH-oxidase, and that response was sensitive to Gαq inhibition in cells activated by PAF, but no inhibition was obtained in cells activated by FPR agonists. Signaling in naive neutrophils is terminated fairly rapidly, and the receptors become homologously desensitized. The downstream sensitivity to Gαq inhibition in desensitized cells displaying increased production/release of O2(-) through the PAFR receptor crosstalk mechanism also comprised the reactivation of the FPRs, and the activation signals were redirected from the PAFR to the desensitized/reactivated FPRs. The Gαq-dependent activation signals generated by the PAFRs activate the Gαi-coupled FPRs, a receptor crosstalk that represents a novel pathway by which G protein-coupled receptors can be regulated and signaling can be turned on and off. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  6. Aspirin Hydrolysis in Plasma Is a Variable Function of Butyrylcholinesterase and Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase 1b2 (PAFAH1b2)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Hartiala, Jaana; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman; Tang, W. H. Wilson; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin is rapidly hydrolyzed within erythrocytes by a heterodimer of PAFAH1b2/PAFAH1b3 but also in plasma by an unidentified activity. Hydrolysis in both compartments was variable, with a 12-fold variation in plasma among 2226 Cleveland Clinic GeneBank patients. Platelet inhibition by aspirin was suppressed in plasma that rapidly hydrolyzed aspirin. Plasma aspirin hydrolysis was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery disease compared with control subjects (16.5 ± 4.4 versus 15.1 ± 3.7 nmol/ml/min; p = 3.4 × 10−8). A genome-wide association study of 2054 GeneBank subjects identified a single locus immediately adjacent to the BCHE (butyrylcholinesterase) gene associated with plasma aspirin hydrolytic activity (lead SNP, rs6445035; p = 9.1 × 10−17). However, its penetrance was low, and plasma from an individual with an inactivating mutation in BCHE still effectively hydrolyzed aspirin. A second aspirin hydrolase was identified in plasma, the purification of which showed it to be homomeric PAFAH1b2. This is distinct from the erythrocyte PAFAH1b2/PAFAH1b3 heterodimer. Inhibitors showed that both butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and PAFAH1b2 contribute to aspirin hydrolysis in plasma, with variation primarily reflecting non-genetic variation of BChE activity. Therefore, aspirin is hydrolyzed in plasma by two enzymes, BChE and a new extracellular form of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, PAFAH1b2. Hydrolytic effectiveness varies widely primarily from non-genetic variation of BChE activity that affects aspirin bioavailability in blood and the ability of aspirin to inhibit platelet aggregation. PMID:23508960

  7. Different contributions of platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide in long-term potentiation of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    PubMed

    Pettorossi, V E; Grassi, S

    2001-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the differential role of nitric oxide (NO) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) in long-term potentiation (LTP) induced in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by high-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the primary vestibular afferents. The NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (carboxy-PTIO) and the PAF receptor antagonist ginkgolide B (BN-52021) were administered before and after induction of potentiation. The effect of carboxy-PTIO was to completely prevent LTP. By contrast, BN-52021 only reduced the amplitude of HFS potentiation, which could develop fully at the drug washout or decline to zero, becoming a short-term phenomenon, in the case of long-lasting PAF receptor block. Both drugs, when given after HFS, had no effect on the already established potentiation, but whilst BN-52021 showed an influence within 5 min of the LTP induction, carboxy-PTIO did not affect the response once HFS was delivered. Moreover, we showed that the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, and methylcarbamyl PAF (mc-PAF) induced LTP which was associated with an increase in glutamate release as shown by reduction in the paired-pulse facilitation ratio. The mc-PAF LTP was prevented by the NO scavenger, while NO LTP was only reduced by BN-52021. We suggest that NO and PAF are implicated as retrograde messengers in two different phases of vestibular LTP: NO in the induction phase; and PAF in the full expression phase.

  8. The alkyl-ether phospholipid platelet-activating factor is a stimulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, R; Calogero, A E; Ehrlich, Y H; Brucke, T; Chrousos, G P; Gold, P W

    1989-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a naturally occurring alkyl-ether phospholipid which serves as an extracellular mediator in various cellular processes. Here we examined the effects of PAF on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in vivo and in vitro. PAF injected iv to rats (125, 250, and 500 ng/100 g BW) caused significant stimulation of pituitary ACTH and adrenal corticosterone secretion. The peak of PAF effect was recorded 10 min after the injection. Intraperitoneal injection of the PAF receptor antagonist BN 52021 prevented the ACTH-releasing effect of PAF. In explanted rat hypothalami maintained viable in vitro, PAF stimulated immunoreactive CRH secretion in a bell-shaped dose-response fashion. The maximal stimulatory effect occurred at the concentration of 10 nM. Higher concentrations appeared to cause desensitization. Alprazolam (1 microM) and BN 52021 (1 microM), two structurally different PAF receptor antagonists, inhibited this effect. The inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism, indomethacin, eicosatetraynoic acid, and the calcium channel blocker verapamil, inhibited PAF-stimulated CRH secretion, suggesting mediation by Ca2+ influx and phospholipase-A2 activation. In addition, we found that 1 nM PAF weakly stimulated ACTH secretion by dispersed rat pituicytes. This stimulatory effect of PAF was also inhibited by the receptor antagonists alprazolam and BN 52021. Our data suggest that PAF plays a role in the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and glucocorticoid secretion and can perhaps serve as a mediator in the interactions of the immune system with the central nervous system.

  9. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  10. Expression, purification and characterization of a human serine-dependent phospholipase A2 with high specificity for oxidized phospholipids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, S Q; Southan, C; Boyd, H F; Terrett, J A; MacPhee, C H; Moores, K; Gloger, I S; Tew, D G

    1998-01-01

    Using expressed sequence tag (EST) homology screening, a new human serine dependent phospholipase A2 (HSD-PLA2) was identified that has 40% amino acid identity with human low density lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LDL-PLA2). HSD-PLA2 has very recently been purified and cloned from brain tissue but named PAF-AH II. However, because the homology with LDL-PLA2 suggested a broader substrate specificity than simply platelet activating factor (PAF), we have further characterized this enzyme using baculovirus-expressed protein. The recombinant enzyme, which was purified 21-fold to homogeneity, had a molecular mass of 44kDa and possessed a specific activity of 35 micromol min-1 mg-1 when assayed against PAF. Activity could also be measured using 1-decanoyl-2-(4-nitrophenylglutaryl) phosphate (DNGP) as substrate. Like LDL-PLA2, HSD-PLA2 was able to hydrolyse oxidatively modified phosphatidylcholines when supplemented to human LDL prior to copper-stimulated oxidation. A GXSXG motif evident from sequence information and inhibition of its activity by 3,4, dichloroisocoumarin, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DENP) confirm that the enzyme is serine dependent. Moreover, sequence comparison indicates the HSD-PLA2 probable active site triad positions are shared with LDL-PLA2 and a C. elegans homologue, suggesting that these sequences comprise members of a new enzyme family. Although clearly structurally related with similar substrate specificities further work reported here shows HSD-PLA2 and LDL-PLA2 to be different with respect to chromosomal localization and tissue distribution. PMID:9494101

  11. Oxidatively modified LDL contains phospholipids with platelet-activating factor-like activity and stimulates the growth of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heery, J M; Kozak, M; Stafforini, D M; Jones, D A; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative modification of lipoproteins is believed to be important in the genesis of atherosclerosis. We established cultures of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and exposed them to native LDL or oxidized LDL. Oxidized LDL, but not native LDL, was mitogenic as measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into DNA. This effect was concentration dependent, averaged 288% of control, and was blocked by a platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that phospholipids with PAF-like activity were generated during the oxidation of LDL. To test this hypothesis we extracted phospholipids from copper-oxidized LDL and assayed for PAF-like activity. Phospholipids extracted from oxidized LDL and purified by HPLC induced neutrophil adhesion equivalent to PAF (10 nM) and were mitogenic for smooth muscle cells. These effects were not seen with phospholipids extracted from native LDL and were blocked by two structurally different, competitive antagonists of the PAF receptor. The effects of these lipids were also abolished by pretreating them with PAF acetylhydrolase. Finally, we used Chinese hamster ovary cells that had seen stably transfected with a cDNA for the PAF receptor to confirm that phospholipids from oxidized LDL act via this receptor. We found that PAF (control) and the oxidized phospholipids each induced release of arachidonic acid from the transfected cells, but had no effect on wildtype Chinese hamster ovary cells, which lack the PAF receptor. This effect was also blocked by a PAF receptor antagonist. Thus, phospholipids generated during oxidative modification of LDL may participate in atherosclerosis by stimulating SMC proliferation and leukocyte activation. Images PMID:7593619

  12. The GPIIb/IIIa antagonist eptifibatide markedly potentiates platelet-leukocyte interaction and tissue factor expression following platelet activation in whole blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Thomas; Zhao, Lian; Temmler, Uta; Bath, Philip; Heptinstall, Stan; Lösche, Wolfgang

    2002-11-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the most important initiator of intravascular coagulation. Activated platelets are able to adhere to leukocytes and this heterotypic cell-cell interaction results in a CD62P-dependent TF expression on monocytes. GPIIb/IIIa antagonists are inhibitors of the common pathway of platelet aggregation and they are widely used in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing coronary interventions. As GPIIb/IIIa antagonists do not prevent platelet activation we investigated the effect a GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, eptifibatide, on the formation of platelet-leukocyte conjugates and leukocyte TF expression. Flow cytometry was used to detect conjugates and TF. When platelets in citrated human blood were stimulated for 30 min with collagen there was a increase in the number of both neutrophils and monocytes with the platelet-specific antigen CD42a, indicating the formation of platelet-neutrophil (P/N) and platelet-monocyte (P/M) conjugates. P/M formation was associated with about a 2.5-fold increase in TF expression on monocytes, whereas P/N formation changed TF expression neutrophils only by about 10%. Eptifibatide enhanced dose-dependently (0.0625-1.5 microg/ml) both collagen-induced P/M formation and monocyte TF expression. Maximum enhancement by about 60 and 120%, respectively, was observed at 0.5 microg/ml eptifibatide. In contrast, eptifibatide had only a minor effect on P/N formation and no effect on neutrophil TF expression. The augmented P/M formation and monocyte TF expression in the presence of a GPIIb/IIIa antagonist may be relevant to the poor antithrombotic efficiency of oral GPIIb/IIIa antagonists as shown in recent large clinical trials.

  13. The paraoxonase 1 (PON1), platelet-activating factor acetylohydrolase (PAF-AH) and dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) activity in the metformin treated normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Wójcicka, Grażyna; Jamroz-Wiśniewska, Anna; Czechowska, Grażyna; Korolczuk, Agnieszka; Marciniak, Sebastian; Bełtowski, Jerzy

    2016-10-15

    Antidiabetic agents per se, apart from their glucose-lowering effect, can have an important impact on modifying the cardiovascular risk. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the known cardio-protective effects of metformin are linked to its potential ability to affect activities of HDL's paraoxonase (PON1) and platelet activating factor acetylohydrolase (PAF-AH) or via its interaction with the asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA)- dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) axis. Normal and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats were treated with metformin (300mg/kg; 4 weeks). The activity of PON1, PAF-AH and DDAH were measured spectrophotometrically. The plasma ADMA level was determined by ELISA method. In STZ-induced diabetic rats the long-term administration of metformin normalized reduced PON1 activity assayed toward paraoxon (+42.5%, P<0.05), phenyl acetate (+22.35%, P<0.05) and γ-decanolactone (+108.0%, P<0.01), without affecting elevated PAF-AH activity in the plasma. Moreover, metformin increased DDAH activity in the renal cortex (+38.24%, P<0.01). Additionally metformin administration caused the increase in PON1 activity in the liver (+29.2%, P<0.01) accompanied by the reduction in the lipid peroxidation (-59.8%, P<0.001). Similarly, in non-diabetic treated rats the increase in liver PON1 activity was observed toward both paraoxon (+80.19%, P<0.001) and phenyl acetate (+29.3%, P<0.05), respectively. The present study has demonstrated that insulin-sensitizer metformin is important for preserving antioxidant HDL function in diabetes. Metformin might also exert its effect against diabetic complications by improving DDAH activity in the kidney and increasing PON1 activity in the liver. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Higher plasma platelet-activating factor levels are associated with increased risk of vertebral fracture and lower bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonmok; Kim, Beom-Jun; Ahn, Seong Hee; Lee, Seung Hun; Koh, Jung-Min

    2015-11-01

    Despite experimental and animal evidence showing the detrimental effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on bone metabolism, there are no clinical studies relating PAF to osteoporosis-related phenotypes. This case-control study investigates the association between plasma PAF, osteoporotic vertebral fracture (VF), and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Korean women. Among 474 eligible women not taking any drug or having any disease that could affect bone metabolism, we identified 73 cases defined as subjects with radiological VF. The controls were randomly selected from the remaining 401 subjects and matched 1:1 to cases in terms of both age and body mass index (BMI). Lateral thoracolumbar radiographs, BMD, and plasma PAF levels were determined for all subjects. Postmenopausal women with VF demonstrated 34.6 % higher plasma PAF levels than subjects without VF after adjusting for age, BMI, smoking habits, alcohol intake, regular exercise, and parental history of osteoporotic fractures (P = 0.021). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that the odds ratio for VF linearly increased across increasing PAF quartiles (P for trend = 0.040) and the odds for VF were 2.88-fold higher in subjects in the highest quartile in comparison with those in the lowest quartile (95 % CI 1.04-8.01). Plasma PAF levels were inversely correlated with BMD at various sites (γ = -0.253 to -0.176, P = 0.003-0.041). These findings suggest that plasma PAF may be a potential biomarker for predicting poor bone health in postmenopausal women.

  15. Beneficial effects of TCV-309, a novel potent and selective platelet activating factor antagonist in endotoxin and anaphylactic shock in rodents.

    PubMed

    Terashita, Z; Kawamura, M; Takatani, M; Tsushima, S; Imura, Y; Nishikawa, K

    1992-02-01

    Pharmacological profiles of a novel specific platelet activating factor (PAF) antagonist, TCV-309 (3-bromo-5-[N-phenyl-N-[2-[2- (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-isoquinolycarbonyloxy)ethyl] carbamoyl]ethyl] carbamoyl]-1-propylpyridinium nitrate] and its beneficial effects in shock were examined. TCV-309 specifically inhibited PAF-induced aggregation of rabbit and human platelets, and [3H]PAF binding to rabbit platelet microsomes with IC50 values of 33, 58 and 27 nM, respectively. It was as potent as WEB 2086 and more potent than CV-6209 and CV-3988. TCV-309 did not cause hemolysis in human or rat blood due to a detergent-like action. In rats, TCV-309 selectively inhibited the PAF-induced hypotension, hemoconcentration and death with ED50 values of 2.7, 6.4 and 1.7 micrograms/kg (i.v.), respectively. TCV-309 most potently protected mice from death induced by PAF and due to anaphylactic shock with ED50 values of 2.1 and 2.6 micrograms/kg (i.v.), respectively, when compared with CV-3988, CV-6209, WEB 2086 (i.v.) and L-652731 (p.o.). TCV-309 also reversed PAF-induced hypotension and endotoxin-induced hypotension in rats with ED50 values of 3.3 and 1.2 micrograms/kg (i.v.), respectively. There was a significant linear relationship between the ability (ED50 value) of these PAF antagonists to prevent death induced by PAF and death due to anaphylactic shock in mice, and between their reversing ability (ED50 value) for the hypotension induced by PAF and endotoxin in rats. TCV-309 (100 micrograms/kg i.v.) protected rats from death induced by endotoxin. Thus, PAF may be a lethal mediator in anaphylactic shock and a hypotensive mediator in endotoxin shock in rodents.

  16. Effect of bovine serum albumin on the synthesis of prostaglandin and incorporation of (/sup 3/H)acetate into platelet-activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Heinsohn, C.; Polgar, P.; Fishman, J.; Taylor, L.

    1987-09-01

    The binding of fatty acids by bovine serum albumin (BSA) is well documented. However, the interaction between the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) and the trapping of arachidonate released from cellular lipid stores is not as well understood. In this communication, we relate the trapping of fatty acids to the synthesis of PGs and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)acetate into platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our results show that, as determined by radioimmunoassay, BSA inhibits bradykinin (BK) (5 ng/ml) and ionophore A23187 (10 microM)-stimulated synthesis of PGs in human embryo lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments using prelabel with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate followed by extraction and thin-layer chromatography show that, in the presence of 2 mg/ml BSA, IMR-90 release essentially only fatty acid following stimulation with bradykinin. Little if any prostaglandin and no endoperoxide are detected. In the same experiment, in absence of BSA, about 70% of the released label is detected as prostaglandin. alpha-Cyclodextrin, another trapper of fatty acid, inhibits PG synthesis in much the same way. BSA and alpha-cyclodextrin also inhibit prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells derived from the calf pulmonary artery. However, the inhibition of PG synthesis in these cells is not as complete as that in the IMR-90. In contrast to the effect of the trappers on PG synthesis, BSA and alpha-cyclodextrin are observed to potentiate BK- and ionophore-stimulated incorporation of (3H)acetate into PAF in the endothelial cells. The labeled PAF is not released from the cells in either the presence or absence of the trappers, leading us to conclude that BSA causes an increase in acetate-labeled cellular PAF by trapping released fatty acid.

  17. Lipoteichoic acid from Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits the expression of platelet-activating factor receptor induced by Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in human monocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hangeun; Jung, Bong Jun; Jeong, Jihye; Chun, Honam; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2014-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) plays an important role in bacterial infection and inflammation. We examined the effect of the bacterial cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus plantarum (pLTA) and Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA) on PAFR expression in THP-1, a monocyte-like cell line. LPS and aLTA, but not pLTA, significantly increased PAFR expression, whereas priming with pLTA inhibited LPSmediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, and CD14 increased with LPS and aLTA treatments, but was inhibited by pLTA pretreatment. Neutralizing antibodies against TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 showed that these receptors were important in LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. PAFR expression is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Blocking PAF binding to PAFR using a PAFR inhibitor indicated that LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAF expression affected TNF-α production. In the mouse small intestine, pLTA inhibited PAFR, TLR2, and TLR4 expression that was induced by heat-labile toxin. Our data suggested that pLTA has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the expression of PAFR that was induced by pathogenic ligands.

  18. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770

  19. Release of platelet activating factor in rabbits with antibody-mediated injury of the lung: the role of leukocytes and of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Camussi, G; Pawlowski, I; Bussolino, F; Caldwell, P R; Brentjens, J; Andres, G

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes the release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) into the circulation of rabbits with acute pulmonary injury induced by antibody reacting with pulmonary endothelium. Eight rabbits were injected i.v. with 2 mg/kg of body weight of goat anti-rabbit lung angiotensin-converting enzyme gamma-globulin (GtARbACE). All animals developed acute pneumonitis, characterized by severe endothelial damage, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and platelets (Plt) in the lumina of alveolar capillaries, and deposits of goat IgG and rabbit C3 along alveolar capillary walls. Six of the rabbits died from acute pulmonary edema. PAF was detected in the plasma of all animals within 5 min after injection of GtARbACE. Five other rabbits were depleted of leukocytes by nitrogen mustard and then injected with 2 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE. In three of these rabbits release of PAF was demonstrated, though in amounts smaller than in non-leukocyte-depleted rabbits; all three animals died from pulmonary edema. After injection of 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE in six additional rabbits, three of them leukocyte-depleted, small amounts of PAF were detected in the circulation. None of these six rabbits died of pulmonary edema. PAF release was not observed in ten rabbits injected i.v. with 2 or 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of normal goat gamma-globulin. In separate experiments in vitro, incubation of isolated lung or thoracic aorta with GtARbACE resulted in deposits of goat IgG along endothelia and significant release of PAF. PAF was also released from endothelial cells removed from thoracic aorta by cellulose acetate paper and then incubated with GtARbACE. When segments of thoracic aorta were stripped of endothelium and then incubated with GtARbACE, PAF release could not be shown. The data obtained are consistent with the interpretation that PAF released into the circulation after binding of GtARbACE to the endothelia of lung and aorta originates from

  20. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  1. Activation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release via protein kinase C-alpha in HEC-1B human endometrial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Dearn, S.; Rahman, M.; Lewis, A.; Ahmed, Z.; Eggo, M. C.; Ahmed, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impairment of the fertility in the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor transgenic female mice suggests changes in PAF functions can influence uterine receptivity. We hypothesized that vasodilatory actions of PAF in the uterus was exerted by PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) release via activation of isoenzyme-specific protein kinase C (PKC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Inducible and endothelial NOS was shown by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR in cDNA synthesized from RNA extract of proliferative and secretory endometrium as well endometrial epithelial cell lines HEC-1B. The effect of WEB2170, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and Ro31-8220 on PAF mediated NO release by HEC-1B cell was determined. PAF induced translocation of PKCalpha in HEC-1B cell and its antagonist effect by Ro 31-8220 was studied by Western immunoblot analysis. PKC isoenzyme regulated by PAF was determined in HEC-1B cell lysate by immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: PAF-evoked a rapid and concentration-dependent biphasic increase in total NO in human HEC-1B endometrial epithelial cell line [as measured by a Sievers NOA 280A NO Chemiluminescent Analyser.] This increase in NO release was attenuated by the PAF receptor antagonist, WEB2170. Inhibition of NO synthesis by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine produced marked dose-dependent attenuation of PAF-mediated NO release, indicating nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation. PAF-mediated NO release was also inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 and by the removal of extracellular calcium, suggesting a dependency on PKC and calcium, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed expression of inducible NOS and endothelial NOS in human endometrium, myometrium and HEC-1B cells. Western immunoblot analysis showed PKCalpha, betaII and iota were the principal isozymes present in the HEC-1B cell line and normal endometrium, suggesting that both HEC-1B cells and normal endometrium have similar PKC isozymes. PAF induced the translocation of

  2. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in leukocytes and body composition in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Panagiotakos, Demosthenis B; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2009-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) also known as serum platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity constitutes a novel risk marker for cardiovascular disease. Leukocytes constitute one main cellular source of circulating Lp-PLA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of both serum and leukocyte PAF-AH activities with fat distribution and lean tissue. One hundred healthy volunteers without cardiovascular disease history participated in this study (n = 52 men, 44 ± 13 years and n = 48 women, 43 ± 13 years). Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, while anthropometrical indices were also measured. The activity of Lp-PLA2 and levels of lipid and glycemic parameters were determined in fasting samples. Results Mean Lp-PLA2 activity was 24.8 ± 4.5 and 19.6 ± 5.0 nmol/min/mL in men and women, respectively (P < 0.001). Mean activity of PAF-AH in leukocyte homogenates was 386 ± 127 pmol/min/mg and 292 ± 92 pmol/min/mg in men and women, correspondingly (P < 0.001). In multiple regression models upper and total adiposity measures were positively associated with Lp-PLA2 activity in men after adjusting for LDL-cholesterol, age, smoking, hs-CRP and physical activity, whereas no associations were found with PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity. Hierarchical analysis revealed that the variables with the highest explanatory ability of Lp-PLA2 activity in men, were DXA deriving L1–L4 region of interest and arms fat (increase in R2 = 0.136, P = 0.005 and increase in R2 = 0.118, P = 0.009, respectively), followed by trunk fat and total fat. In women, no association of body composition variables with Lp-PLA2 nor PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity was found. Conclusion Lp-PLA2 activity is differentiated across levels of adiposity and topology of adipose tissue, whereas no association was found regarding PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity. Our findings suggest that Lp-PLA2 may

  3. [Effects of Tongxinluo Capsule on Platelet Activating Factor, Vascular Endothelial Function, Blood Flow of Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients after Delayed Percutaneous Coronary Intervention].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhang-qiang; Hong, Lang; Wang, Hong; Yin, Qiu-lin

    2016-04-01

    To explore effects of Tongxinluo Capsule (TC) on platelet activating factor (PAF), vascular endothelial function, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) blood flow, and heart function in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients after delayed percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Totally 80 AMI inpatients were recruited at Department of Cardiology, People's Hospital of Jiangxi Province, from Jan. 2008 to Sep.2013. Those in line with inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to TC treatment group and the conventional treatment group by random digit table, 40 in each group. Besides, another 40 healthy subjects from examinees at Outpatient Department were recruited as a healthy control group. PCI was performed after 1-week treatment. Then blood samples were collected, and then blood contents of CD62P, CD63, GP II b/III a, ET-1, NO, and plasma von Willebrand factor (vWF) levels were detected. Coronary TIMI blood flow and corrected TIMI frame count (CTFC) were determined during PCI. Meanwhile, noninvasive blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded before and after PCI, and cardiac function measured. They were compared with the healty control group. Compared with the healthy control group, blood contents of CD62p, CD63, GP II b/IIIa receptor compound, vWF, and ET-1 significantly increased, but NO significantly decreased in AMI patients (all P < 0.05). After 1-week intervention of TC, blood contents of CD62p, CD63, GP II b/IIIa receptor compound, vWF, NO, and ET-1 significantly decreased (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Compared with the conventional treatment group at the same time point, blood contents of CD62p, CD63, GP II b/IIIa receptor compound, vWF, and ET-1 decreased more significantly in the TC group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), increased NO levels were also more obviously seen (P < 0.01). The aforesaid parameters changed more obviously at day 30, as compared with those changes at week 1 (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The TIMI blood flow grade and CTFC were more

  4. Role of multiligand/RAGE axis in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-03-01

    In the context of plaque progression, platelet hyperactivity associated with hyperlipidemia contributes to the development of a pro-thrombotic state. In this context, it has been demonstrated that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) significantly increases platelet activation and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression at the platelet surface membrane. In addition to AGEs, other ligands (S100, HMGB1 and amyloid β, among others) of RAGE have raised particular attention in platelet activation. Therefore, in this article we describe platelet hyperactivity by AGEs via RAGE-independent and RAGE-dependent pathways.

  5. Mechanisms of hemolysis-associated platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Helms, C. C.; Marvel, M.; Zhao, W.; Stahle, M.; Vest, R.; Kato, G. J.; Lee, J. S.; Christ, G.; Gladwin, M. T.; Hantgan, R. R.; Kim-Shapiro, D. B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Intravascular hemolysis occurs after blood transfusion, in hemolytic anemias and other conditions, and is associated with hypercoagulable states. Hemolysis has been shown to potently activate platelets in vitro and in vivo and several mechanisms have been suggested to account for this including (1) direct activation by hemoglobin, (2) increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), (3) scavenging of nitric oxide by released hemoglobin, and (4) release of intraerythrocytic ADP. Objective The aim of the current study is to elucidate the mechanism of hemolysis-mediated platelet activation. Methods We used flow cytometry to detect PAC-1 binding to activated platelets for in vitro experiments and a Siemens’ Advia 120 hematology system to assess platelet aggregation using platelet counts from in vivo experiments in a rodent model. Results We show that Hb does not directly activate platelets. However, ADP bound to Hb can cause platelet activation. Furthermore, platelet activation due to shearing of RBCs is reduced in the presence of apyrase which metabolizes ADP to AMP. Use of ROS scavengers did not affect platelet activation. We also show that cell free Hb does enhance platelet activation by abrogating the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet activation. In vivo infusions of ADP and purified (ADP-free) Hb as well as hemolysate result in platelet aggregation as evidenced by decreased platelet counts. Conclusion Two primary mechanisms account for red blood cell hemolysis-associated platelet activation: ADP release which activates platelets and cell-free hemoglobin release which enhances platelet activation by lowering NO bioavailability. PMID:24119131

  6. Exercise and the platelet activator calcium chloride both influence the growth factor content of platelet-rich plasma (PRP): overlooked biochemical factors that could influence PRP treatment.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Bruce; Tol, Johannes L; Knez, Wade; Chalabi, Hakim

    2015-07-01

    There is strong evidence that exercise affects platelet haemostasis factors, but this potential effect on growth factor concentrations in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has never been studied. In addition, there is a paucity of studies focusing on the effects of activating agents used in conjunction with PRP. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of exercise on platelet and platelet-derived growth factors (PDGF)-AB, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) concentrations in PRP. The second aim was to study the effect of the activating agent calcium chloride (CaCl2) on growth factor concentration in relation to different exercise states. Controlled laboratory study. Ten healthy participants performed 1 h of submaximal exercise with blood being withdrawn immediately pre, post and 18 h following. PRP was prepared in each condition in both an activated CaCl2 and non-activated form. Concentrations of PDGF-AB, HGF, IGF-1 and VEGF were evaluated using standard ELISA systems. Exercise had no significant effect on platelet concentration, but significantly suppressed both VEGF and PDGF-AB concentrations. Exercise state had no significant effect on IGF-1 or HGF concentration. Activation with CaCl2 resulted in a significant increase in PDGF-AB and IGF-1 concentrations, unchanged VEGF and significantly reduced HGF concentrations. Exercise significantly impacts on PDGFs in PRP with significantly reduced concentrations of VEGF and PDFG-AB. Furthermore, the activation of PRP with CaCl2 results in a differentiated GF release from platelets. These relevant factors can potentially influence outcome in daily clinical practice and are recommended to be accounted for in future study design. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  8. Platelet activation, adhesion, inflammation, and aggregation potential are altered in the presence of electronic cigarette extracts of variable nicotine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hom, Sarah; Chen, Li; Wang, Tony; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke extracts prepared from both mainstream and sidestream smoking have been associated with heightened platelet activation, aggregation, adhesion, and inflammation. Conversely, it has been shown that pure nicotine inhibits similar platelet functions. In this work, we 1) evaluated the effects of e-cigarette extracts on platelet activities and 2) elucidated the differences between the nicotine-dependent and non-nicotine dependent (e.g. fine particulate matter or toxic compounds) effects of tobacco and e-cigarette products on platelet activities. To accomplish these goals, platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 50) were exposed to tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts, and pure nicotine and changes in platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and inflammation were evaluated, using optical aggregation, flow cytometry, and ELISA methods. Interestingly, the exposure of platelets to e-vapor extracts induced a significant up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory gC1qR and cC1qR and induced a marked increase in the deposition of C3b as compared with traditional tobacco smoke extracts. Similarly, platelet activation, as measured by a prothrombinase based assay, and platelet aggregation were also significantly enhanced after exposure to e-vapor extracts. Finally, platelet adhesion potential toward fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other platelets was also enhanced after exposure to e-cigarette vapor extracts. In the presence of pure nicotine, platelet functions were observed to be inhibited, which further suggests that other constituents of tobacco smoke and electronic vapor can antagonize platelet functions, however, the presence of nicotine in extracts somewhat perpetuated the platelet functional changes in a dose-dependent manner.

  9. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  10. Platelet activity and outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Naidech, Andrew M; Bernstein, Richard A; Levasseur, Kimberly; Bassin, Sarice L; Bendok, Bernard R; Batjer, H Hunt; Bleck, Thomas P; Alberts, Mark J

    2009-03-01

    There are few data on platelet function in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). We prospectively enrolled 69 patients with ICH and measured platelet function on admission. Aspirin use before ICH was associated with reduced platelet activity. Less platelet activity was associated with intraventricular hemorrhage (516.5 [interquartile range (IQR), 454-629.25] vs 637 [IQR, 493-654] aspirin reaction units; p = 0.04) and death at 14 days (480.5 [IQR, 444.5-632.5] vs 626 [IQR, 494-652] aspirin reaction units; p = 0.04). Objective measures of platelet function on admission are associated with intraventricular hemorrhage and death after ICH.

  11. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheremata, William A; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Yeon S; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS) patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP), P-selectin expression (CD62p), circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg)], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p < 0.001) and CD62p expression was also markedly elevated (p < 0.001). Both are markers of platelet activation. Platelet-associated IgM, but not IgG, was marginally elevated in MS (p = 0.01). Protein S in MS patients did not differ significantly from normal values. Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted. PMID:18588683

  12. Regulation of platelet activating factor synthesis: modulation of 1-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in rat spleen microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1984-05-16

    1-Alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase plays an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor, a potent bioactive mediator. The authors tested the hypothesis that the activity of acetyltransferase may be modulated by enzymatic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The results showed that acetyltransferase activity in rat spleens was 2- to 3-fold higher in microsomes isolated in the presence of F/sup -/ than in those isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/. The microsomal acetyltransferase could be activated by preincubation of microsomes, isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/, with ATP, Mg/sup 2 +/, and the soluble fraction from rat spleen. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerols, plus Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhanced the activity. The increase in the activity of acetyltranferase was abolished by treatment of the activated microsomes with alkaline phosphatase. Conversely, the activity of acetyltransferase can be reactivated in the alkaline phosphatase-treated microsomes with incubation conditions that favor phosphorylation. Therefore, the findings suggest that acetyltransferase activity is regulated by reversible activation/inactivation through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

  13. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) is a novel receptor on platelets, activates platelets, and augments nuclear factor kappaB-dependent inflammation in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Roland; Bültmann, Andreas; Fischel, Sina; Gillitzer, Angelika; Cullen, Paul; Walch, Axel; Jost, Philipp; Ungerer, Martin; Tolley, Neal D; Lindemann, Stephan; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schömig, Albert; May, Andreas E

    2008-02-15

    In atherosclerosis, circulating platelets interact with endothelial cells and monocytes, leading to cell activation and enhanced recruitment of leukocytes into the vascular wall. The invasion of monocytes is accompanied by overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are thought to promote atherosclerosis and trigger plaque rupture. Following interaction with itself, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) induces MMP synthesis via a little-known intracellular pathway. Recently, we showed upregulation of EMMPRIN on monocytes during acute myocardial infarction. EMMPRIN also stimulates secretion of MMP-9 by monocytes and of MMP-2 by smooth muscle cells, indicating that it may be an important regulator of MMP activity. Expression of EMMPRIN on platelets has not been described until now. Here, we demonstrate that resting platelets show low surface expression of EMMPRIN, which is upregulated by various platelet stimulators (flow cytometry). EMMPRIN is located in the open canalicular system and in alpha granules of platelets (according to electron microscopy and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation). Platelet stimulation with recombinant EMMPRIN-Fc induced surface expression of CD40L and P-selectin (according to flow cytometry), suggesting that EMMPRIN-EMMPRIN interaction activates platelets. Coincubation of platelets with monocytes induced EMMPRIN-mediated nuclear factor kappaB activation (according to Western blot) in monocytes with increased MMP-9 (zymography), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion (according to ELISA) by monocytes. In conclusion, EMMPRIN displays a new platelet receptor that is upregulated on activated platelets. Binding of EMMPRIN to platelets fosters platelet degranulation. Platelet-monocyte interactions via EMMPRIN stimulate nuclear factor kappaB-driven inflammatory pathways in monocytes, such as MMP and cytokine induction. Thus, EMMPRIN may represent a novel target to diminish the burden of

  14. Platelets actively sequester angiogenesis regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Tai-Tung; Cassiola, Flavia; Kikuchi, Lena; Cervi, David; Podust, Vladimir; Italiano, Joseph E.; Wheatley, Erin; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Bender, Elise; Almog, Nava; Kieran, Mark W.; Folkman, Judah

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials with antiangiogenic agents have not been able to validate plasma or serum levels of angiogenesis regulators as reliable markers of cancer presence or therapeutic response. We recently reported that platelets contain numerous proteins that regulate angiogenesis. We now show that accumulation of angiogenesis regulators in platelets of animals bearing malignant tumors exceeds significantly their concentration in plasma or serum, as well as their levels in platelets from non–tumor-bearing animals. This process is selective, as platelets do not take up a proportional amount of other plasma proteins (eg, albumin), even though these may be present at higher concentrations. We also find that VEGF-enriched Matrigel pellets implanted subcutaneously into mice or the minute quantities of VEGF secreted by microscopic subcutaneous tumors (0.5-1 mm3) result in an elevation of VEGF levels in platelets, without any changes in its plasma levels. The profile of other angiogenesis regulatory proteins (eg, platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor) sequestered by platelets also reflects the presence of tumors in vivo before they can be macroscopically evident. The ability of platelets to selectively take up angiogenesis regulators in cancer-bearing hosts may have implications for the diagnosis and management of many angiogenesis-related diseases and provide a guide for antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:19036702

  15. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  16. Platelet-Activating Factor Blockade Inhibits the T-Helper Type 17 Cell Pathway and Suppresses Psoriasis-Like Skin Disease in K5.hTGF-β1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Huettner, Barbara; Koefeler, Harald; Mayer, Gerlinde; Bambach, Isabella; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Michael P.; Wolf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent biolipid mediator, is involved in a variety of cellular transduction pathways and plays a prominent role in inducing inflammation in different organs. We used K5.hTGF-β1 transgenic mice, which exhibit an inflammatory skin disorder and molecular and cytokine abnormalities with strong similarities to human psoriasis, to study the pathogenic role of PAF. We found that injecting PAF into the skin of transgenic mice led to inflammation and accelerated manifestation of the psoriatic phenotype by a local effect. In contrast, injecting mice with PAF receptor antagonist PCA-4248 lowered the PAF level (most likely by depressing an autocrine loop) and neutrophil, CD68+ cell (monocyte/macrophage), and CD3+ T-cell accumulation in the skin and blocked progression of the psoriasis-like phenotype. This effect of PAF blockade was specific and similar to that of psoralen–UV-A and was paralleled by a decrease in abnormally elevated mRNA and/or protein levels of T-helper type 17 cell–related cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-23, IL-12A, and IL-6 and its transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. In contrast, PCA-4248 treatment up-regulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-10 in dorsal skin and release of IL-10 in serum and skin. Interfering with PAF may offer the opportunity to develop novel therapeutic strategies for inflammatory psoriasis and associated comorbidities, including metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, in which the IL-17 axis may be involved. PMID:21281802

  17. Insulin enhances platelet activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yngen, M; Li, N; Hjemdahl, P; Wallén, N H

    2001-10-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with an increased risk of atherothrombotic complications. There is accumulating evidence of platelet hyperreactivity in diabetes, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Platelets possess insulin receptors, but their physiological relevance is not clear, and data on insulin effects on platelet function in the literature are less than consistent. We therefore investigated the influence of insulin on platelet activation in vitro. Fasting blood samples were collected in 20 healthy males, using citrate or hirudin as anticoagulants. Platelet activation was measured as platelet P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding using whole blood flow cytometry in unstimulated and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulated samples, incubated with 0-10000 microU/ml insulin for 20 min. The effect of insulin (30 or 300 microU/ml, incubated for 3 min) on platelet aggregation was studied using Born aggregometry in platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Insulin enhanced platelet fibrinogen binding more than P-selectin expression in unstimulated and ADP stimulated samples (P<.001 by analysis of variance [ANOVA]; n=20). Insulin (30 or 300 microU/ml) also enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in PRP (P<.01 or P<.001; n=14). The platelet activating effect of insulin was verified in hirudinized samples (n=12), indicating that it was not dependent on unphysiologically low extracellular calcium concentrations. Thus, insulin enhances platelet activation in vitro, independently of extracellular calcium concentrations. Beneficial effects of insulin treatment on platelet function in vivo are probably related to improved metabolic control, rather than to direct platelet stabilizing effects.

  18. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  19. Rapid intracellular calcium changes in U937 monocyte cell line: transient increases in response to platelet-activating factor and chemotactic peptide but not interferon-gamma or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Maudsley, D J; Morris, A G

    1987-01-01

    The dye fura-2, a potentially more sensitive successor to quin2 for measuring intracellular free calcium ion concentrations [(Ca2+]i), has been applied here to investigate the possible involvement of early changes in [Ca2+]i in the stimulation of the human monocyte-macrophage-like cell line U937. The calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin, known pharmacological stimuli for macrophages, were found to cause sharp rises in [Ca2+]i as expected. Responses analogous to those reported for a murine macrophage cell (J774) were obtained on stimulation of U937 cells with ATP which caused rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 200 mM). In addition to ATP, several agents known to activate macrophages were used as stimuli. In particular, platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) was found to cause rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 400 nM) even at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. This contrasts with responses to ATP that were markedly reduced at 10(-6) M compared with 10(-5) M or above, suggesting that PAF is a highly potent stimulus for intracellular calcium mobilization in macrophages. Similar responses were obtained with chemotactic peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine). On the other hand, two agents known to be potent activators of macrophages, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide, had no rapid effect on [Ca2+]i. This may reflect differences in the kinetics of signal-response coupling or alternatively a different mechanism of action by-passing the need for rapid elevation of [Ca2+]i. PMID:3110054

  20. Picomolar platelet-activating factor mobilizes Ca to change platelet shape without activating phospholipase C or protein kinase C; simultaneous fluorometric measurement of intracellular free Ca concentration and aggregation.

    PubMed

    James-Kracke, M R; Sexe, R B; Shukla, S D

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate signal transduction mechanisms activated by low and high concentrations of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in rabbit platelets and to contrast the responses to those induced by thrombin. We measured changes in intracellular free calcium ([Ca++]i) with fura2, while monitoring light scatter simultaneously as a measure of shape change and aggregation in a dual-excitation dual-emission spectrofluorometer. An abrupt 20% fall in light scatter, coincident with the peak of the [Ca++]i, indicated shape change in Ca-containing or Ca-free medium and was blocked by BAPTA loading and 10 microM cytochalasin B. A secondary decline in light scatter, indicating aggregation, occurred only in Ca-containing medium and only under conditions favoring protein kinase C (PKC) activation. PAF at 10(-12) M did not increase 1,4,5-inositol triphosphate content, which suggested PKC would not be activated. However, PAF at 10(-12) rapidly increased [Ca++]i to 900 nM in 7 sec seemingly by Ca influx through receptor-operated channels inducing shape change. PAF at 10(-9) and 10(-8) M increased [Ca++]i to 2 microM in 12 sec and induced both shape change and aggregation. However, in platelets pretreated with 100 nM staurosporine to inhibit protein kinases, 10(-9) M PAF did not cause aggregation even though [Ca++]i still rose to 2 microM, which indicated that PKC plays a role in aggregation but not in Ca++ mobilization.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor-coupled G alpha q leads to stimulation of Src and focal adhesion kinase via two separate pathways in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Deo, Dayanand D; Bazan, Nicolas G; Hunt, Jay D

    2004-01-30

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a phospholipid second messenger, has diverse physiological functions, including responses in differentiated endothelial cells to external stimuli. We used human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model system. We show that PAF activated pertussis toxin-insensitive G alpha(q) protein upon binding to its seven transmembrane receptor. Elevated cAMP levels were observed via activation of adenylate cyclase, which activated protein kinase A (PKA) and was attenuated by a PAF receptor antagonist, blocking downstream activity. Phosphorylation of Src by PAF required G alpha(q) protein and adenylate cyclase activation; there was an absolute requirement of PKA for PAF-induced Src phosphorylation. Immediate (1 min) PAF-induced STAT-3 phosphorylation required the activation of G alpha(q) protein, adenylate cyclase, and PKA, and was independent of these intermediates at delayed (30 min) and prolonged (60 min) PAF exposure. PAF activated PLC beta 3 through its G alpha(q) protein-coupled receptor, whereas activation of phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) by PAF was independent of G proteins but required the involvement of Src at prolonged PAF exposure (60 min). We demonstrate for the first time in vascular endothelial cells: (i) the involvement of signaling intermediates in the PAF-PAF receptor system in the induction of TIMP2 and MT1-MMP expression, resulting in the coordinated proteolytic activation of MMP2, and (ii) a receptor-mediated signal transduction cascade for the tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK by PAF. PAF exposure induced binding of p130(Cas), Src, SHC, and paxillin to FAK. Clearly, PAF-mediated signaling in differentiated endothelial cells is critical to endothelial cell functions, including cell migration and proteolytic activation of MMP2.

  2. Platelet activation during exercise induced asthma: effect of prophylaxis with cromoglycate and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C E; Belfield, P W; Davis, S; Cooke, N J; Spencer, A; Davies, J A

    1986-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin were measured before and after exercise in nine asthmatic patients and 12 non-asthmatic volunteers. Exercise was preceded by administration in random order of either placebo, salbutamol 200 micrograms, or sodium cromoglycate 2 mg from a pressurised inhaler. In control subjects there were minimal changes in PEF and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin. In the asthmatic patients the typical changes in PEF were seen on exercise; plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin rose significantly in parallel, the rise preceding the fall in PEF. The changes in peak flow and platelet activation induced by exercise were attenuated by prior administration of salbutamol or cromoglycate. These results indicate that exercise induced asthma is associated with a rise in platelet release products similar to that observed in antigen induced asthma. PMID:2943049

  3. ITIM receptors: more than just inhibitors of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Coxon, Carmen H.; Geer, Mitchell J.

    2017-01-01

    Since their discovery, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-containing receptors have been shown to inhibit signaling from immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing receptors in almost all hematopoietic cells, including platelets. However, a growing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that this is an oversimplification, and that ITIM-containing receptors are versatile regulators of platelet signal transduction, with functions beyond inhibiting ITAM-mediated platelet activation. PECAM-1 was the first ITIM-containing receptor identified in platelets and appeared to conform to the established model of ITIM-mediated attenuation of ITAM-driven activation. PECAM-1 was therefore widely accepted as a major negative regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis for many years, but more recent findings suggest a more complex role for this receptor, including the facilitation of αIIbβ3-mediated platelet functions. Since the identification of PECAM-1, several other ITIM-containing platelet receptors have been discovered. These include G6b-B, a critical regulator of platelet reactivity and production, and the noncanonical ITIM-containing receptor TREM-like transcript-1, which is localized to α-granules in resting platelets, binds fibrinogen, and acts as a positive regulator of platelet activation. Despite structural similarities and shared binding partners, including the Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases Shp1 and Shp2, knockout and transgenic mouse models have revealed distinct phenotypes and nonredundant functions for each ITIM-containing receptor in the context of platelet homeostasis. These roles are likely influenced by receptor density, compartmentalization, and as-yet unknown binding partners. In this review, we discuss the diverse repertoire of ITIM-containing receptors in platelets, highlighting intriguing new functions, controversies, and future areas of investigation. PMID:28465343

  4. Lymphocyte-mediated regulation of platelet activation during desensitization in patients with hymenoptera venom hypersensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Ledru, E; Pestel, J; Tsicopoulos, A; Joseph, M; Wallaert, B; Tonnel, A B; Capron, A

    1988-01-01

    T cells from peripheral blood of hymenoptera sensitive patients were studied before and after venom desensitization. Before treatment, T cells showed a variable but higher proliferative response to allergen than T cells of treated patients or controls. While before desensitization, T cell products, specifically released after in vitro allergen stimulation, were able to amplify the IgE-dependent platelet activity, we showed that after treatment of the same patients, T cell products strongly reduced platelet activation. Considering the modifications in platelet activation previously observed in patients treated by specific immunotherapy, the present results suggest that, through a modification of T cell reactivity to allergen, T cell functions are modulated by desensitization, and emphasize the involvement of T cell products in the desensitization mechanisms. PMID:3263227

  5. Platelet activation in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tablin, F; Schumacher, T; Pombo, M; Marion, C T; Huang, K; Norris, J W; Jandrey, K E; Kittleson, M D

    2014-01-01

    Cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) are at risk for development of systemic thromboembolic disease. However, the relationship between platelet activation state and cardiovascular parameters associated with HCM is not well described. To characterize platelet activation by flow cytometric evaluation of platelet P-selectin and semiquantitative Western blot analysis of soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (sPECAM-1). Eight normal healthy cats (controls) owned by staff and students of the School of Veterinary Medicine and 36 cats from the UC Davis Feline HCM Research Laboratory were studied. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was used for all flow cytometry studies. Platelet surface CD41 and P-selectin expression were evaluated before and after ADP stimulation. sPECAM-1 expression was evaluated by Western blot analysis of platelet-poor plasma that had been stabilized with aprotinin. Standard echocardiographic studies were performed. Resting platelets from cats with severe HCM had increased P-selectin expression compared to controls, and expressed higher surface density of P-selectin reflected by their increased mean fluorescence intensities (MFI). Stimulation with ADP also resulted in significantly increased P-selectin MFI of platelets from cats with severe HCM. Increased P-selectin expression and MFI correlated with the presence of a heart murmur and end-systolic cavity obliteration (ESCO). sPECAM-1 expression from cats with moderate and severe HCM was significantly increased above those of control cats. P-selectin and sPECAM expression may be useful biomarkers indicating increased platelet activation in cats with HCM. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Navdaev, Alexey; Subramanian, Hariharan; Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  7. Src family kinases: at the forefront of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Mazharian, Alexandra; Mori, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in mediating the rapid response of platelets to vascular injury. They transmit activation signals from a diverse repertoire of platelet surface receptors, including the integrin αIIbβ3, the immunoreceptor tyrosine–based activation motif–containing collagen receptor complex GPVI-FcR γ-chain, and the von Willebrand factor receptor complex GPIb-IX-V, which are essential for thrombus growth and stability. Ligand-mediated clustering of these receptors triggers an increase in SFK activity and downstream tyrosine phosphorylation of enzymes, adaptors, and cytoskeletal proteins that collectively propagate the signal and coordinate platelet activation. A growing body of evidence has established that SFKs also contribute to Gq- and Gi-coupled receptor signaling that synergizes with primary activation signals to maximally activate platelets and render them prothrombotic. Interestingly, SFKs concomitantly activate inhibitory pathways that limit platelet activation and thrombus size. In this review, we discuss past discoveries that laid the foundation for this fundamental area of platelet signal transduction, recent progress in our understanding of the distinct and overlapping functions of SFKs in platelets, and new avenues of research into mechanisms of SFK regulation. We also highlight the thrombotic and hemostatic consequences of targeting platelet SFKs. PMID:25115887

  8. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge.

  9. Decreased organ failure in patients with severe SIRS and septic shock treated with the platelet-activating factor antagonist TCV-309: a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase II trial. TCV-309 Septic Shock Study Group.

    PubMed

    Poeze, M; Froon, A H; Ramsay, G; Buurman, W A; Greve, J W

    2000-10-01

    Sepsis and organ failure remain the main cause of death on the ICU. Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response, in which platelet-activating factor (PAF) is considered to play an important role. This study investigated whether treatment with the PAF-antagonist TCV-309 reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with septic shock. The study was conducted as a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled multicenter study. The included patients had to fulfill the SIRS criteria with a clinical suspicion of infection, an admission APACHE II score greater than 15, and shock, defined as a mean arterial pressure <70 mmHg and/or a decrease > or =40 mmHg despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Patients received 1.0 mg/kg TCV-309 or placebo, twice daily, intravenously during 14 days. The prospectively set goals were MOF score, recovery from shock, mortality, and assessment of the safety of the medication. A total of 98 patients were included of which 97 were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The overall survival at day 56 of TCV-309 treated patients was similar compared to placebo treated patients (51.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.47). In contrast, the mean percentage of failed organs per patient present after 14 days in the TCV-309 treated patients was significantly lower compared to the placebo treated patients (11.9% vs. 25.1%, P = 0.04), leading to a reduced need for vasopressors, dialysis, and ventilatory support. Furthermore, the mean APACHE-II score during treatment with TCV-309 was significantly lower and the number of patients recovered from shock after day 14 was significantly higher in the TCV-309 treated patient group (2/32 vs. 9/29, P = 0.01). The number of adverse events was not significantly different between the TCV-309 and placebo treated patients. TCV-309 did not change overall mortality of septic shock, however a substantial reduction in organ dysfunction and morbidity, frequently associated with septic shock was achieved, without significant

  10. Platelet activation as a marker of heart attack.

    PubMed

    Blann, Andrew D; Draper, Zoe

    2011-05-12

    A key component of the pathology of myocardial infarction (i.e. heart attack) is platelet-rich thrombosis within the coronary arteries. In many cases this occurs despite the use of anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin, and this, alongside other evidence, prompts the search for novel markers of platelet activity, such as levels of platelet product soluble P selectin in the plasma. However, by themselves, high levels of soluble P-selectin are of insufficient sensitivity and specificity to contribute to the management of the chest pain that may be a heart attack. Conversely, the current report shows that low levels of soluble P selectin contribute to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction because, as low levels are so rarely found in this condition, heart attack can be ruled out. If confirmed, this will be a major step forward in the management of acute chest pain.

  11. Effect of the R92H and A379V genotypes of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase on its enzyme activity, oxidative stress and metabolic profile in Chinese women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Renjiao; Song, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Bai, Huai; Zhang, Yujin; Liu, Qingqing; Guan, Linbo; Fan, Ping

    2017-03-20

    The G994T polymorphism in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) gene is associated with the risk of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between R92H and A379V variants of the PAF-AH gene and the risk of PCOS and to evaluate the effects of the genotypes on PAF-AH activities and clinical, metabolic and oxidative stress indexes in Chinese women. A total of 862 patients with PCOS based on the Rotterdam consensus criteria and 750 control women from a population of Chinese Han nationality in the Chengdu area were studied from 2006-2015. PAF-AH genotypes were determined by PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Plasma PAF-AH, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated PAF-AH (H-PAF-AH) and apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoprotein-associated PAF-AH (apoB-PAF-AH) activities were measured using the trichloroacetic acid precipitation procedure with PAF C-16 as a substrate. Circulating markers of oxidative stress, including serum total oxidant status, total antioxidant capacity, oxidative stress index and malondialdehyde levels, and clinical and metabolic parameters were also analyzed. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of R92H and A379V genotypes and alleles of the PAF-AH gene between PCOS and control groups (P > 0.05). Compared with patients with the 92RR genotype, patients with H allele of R92H (RH + HH genotype) had significantly higher plasma PAF-AH and apoB-PAF-AH activities (P < 0.05) and tended to exhibit increased H-PAF-AH activity (P = 0.063) after adjusted for age and BMI. However, when serum LDL-C, HDL-C, TG and HOMA index were added as covariates, the comparisons no longer remained statistical significance (P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in clinical, hormonal, metabolic and circulating oxidative stress parameters and the frequencies of PAF-AH G449T genotype according to PAF-AH R92H or A379V genotyping in

  12. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  13. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  14. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5ppm for 6h) or sub-chronic (1ppm, 6h/day for 4days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  15. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  16. Echicetin Coated Polystyrene Beads: A Novel Tool to Investigate GPIb-Specific Platelet Activation and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J.; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways. PMID:24705415

  17. Platelet activation of mechanical versus bioprosthetic heart valves during systole.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-03-11

    Thrombus formation is a major concern for recipients of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), which requires them to take anticoagulant drugs for the rest of their lives. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) do not require life-long anticoagulant therapy but deteriorate after 10-15years. The thrombus formation is initiated by the platelet activation which is thought to be mainly generated in MHVs by the flow through the hinge and the leakage flow during the diastole. However, our results show that the activation in the bulk flow during the systole phase might play an essential role as well. This is based on our results obtained by comparing the thrombogenic performance of a MHV and a BHV (as control) in terms of shear induced platelet activation under exactly the same conditions. Three different mathematical activation models including linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model are tested to quantify the platelet activation during systole using the previous simulations of the flow through MHV and BHV in a straight aorta under the same physiologic flow conditions. Results indicate that the platelet activation in the MHV at the beginning of the systole phase is slightly less than the BHV. However, at the end of the systole phase the platelet activation by the bulk flow for the MHV is several folds (1.41, 5.12, and 2.81 for linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model, respectively) higher than the BHV for all tested platelet activation models.

  18. Cocoa and wine polyphenols modulate platelet activation and function.

    PubMed

    Rein, D; Paglieroni, T G; Pearson, D A; Wun, T; Schmitz, H H; Gosselin, R; Keen, C L

    2000-08-01

    There is speculation that dietary polyphenols can provide cardioprotective effects due to direct antioxidant or antithrombotic mechanisms. We report in vitro and postingestion ex vivo effects of cocoa procyanidins, a procyanidin-rich cocoa beverage and dealcoholized red wine (DRW) on human platelet activation. In a series of in vitro studies, cocoa procyanidin trimers, pentamers or DRW (3 and 10 micromol/L) were incubated with citrated peripheral whole blood in the presence and absence of platelet agonists. Platelet activation was detected using fluorescent-labeled monoclonal antibodies recognizing the fibrinogen binding conformation of GPIIb-IIIa (referred to herein as PAC-1 binding) and the activation-dependent platelet epitope CD62P (P-selectin). The percentage of CD42a-positive platelets coexpressing PAC-1 binding and/or CD62P was determined by multiparameter flow cytometry. Procyanidin trimers, pentamers and DRW added to whole blood in vitro increased PAC-1 binding and P-selectin expression. In contrast, procyanidin trimers, pentamers and DRW inhibited the platelet activation in response to epinephrine. The effects on platelet activation of cocoa beverage and DRW consumption were also studied in healthy subjects. Citrated blood was obtained before and 2 and 6 h after the ingestion of a cocoa beverage, a caffeine-containing beverage, DRW or water. Platelet activation was measured by flow cytometry. The consumption of DRW did not affect the expression of activation-dependent platelet antigens, either unstimulated or after ex vivo activation with epinephrine. However, the consumption of DRW increased PAC-1 binding in response to 100 micromol/L ADP ex vivo. Cocoa consumption reduced platelet response to agonists ex vivo. The ingestion of water had no effect on platelet activation, whereas a caffeine-containing beverage augmented the response of platelets to epinephrine. In summary, select cocoa procyanidins and DRW added to whole blood in vitro increased

  19. Formation of a highly stable complex between BN 50730 [tetrahydro-4,7,8,10 methyl-1(chloro-2 phenyl)-6 (methoxy-4 phenyl-carbamoyl)-9 pyrido [4',3'-4,5] thieno [3,2-f] triazolo-1,2,4 [4,3-a] diazepine-1,4] and the platelet-activating factor receptor in rabbit platelet membranes.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Cruz, H N; Violante, F A; Cordeiro, R S; Martins, M A; Noël, F

    1996-01-26

    BN 50730 [tetrahydro-4,7,8,10 methyl-1(chloro-2 phenyl)-6 (methoxy-4 phenyl-carbamoyl)-9 pyrido [4',3'-4,5] thieno [3,2-f] triazolo-1,2,4 [4,3-alpha] diazepine-1,4], a novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist with a hetrazepine structure, decreased the maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of [3H]PAF in rabbit platelet membranes without altering its dissociation constant. Platelet aggregation induced by 1 microM PAF was prevented by preincubation with 1 microM BN 50730. The washing of the platelets preincubated with BN 50730 failed to revert its inhibitory effects. We conclude that BN 50730 acts as a non-competitive antagonist of the PAF receptor, due to the formation of a highly stable drug-receptor complex.

  20. Platelets: active players in the pathogenesis of arthritis and SLE.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Blanco, Patrick; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2012-09-01

    Nearly one trillion platelets circulate in the blood to monitor and preserve the integrity of the vasculature. However, haemostasis is not their only function. Platelets are also potent immune cells capable of a range of effector responses. Studies have shown that platelets can have unexpected roles in rheumatic diseases. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), IL-1-containing platelet-derived vesicles called microparticles are abundant in arthritic joint fluid. These microparticles can elicit production of inflammatory mediators from resident synovial fibroblasts, which have an integral role in the development of arthritis. Platelets also serve as a source of prostaglandins that contribute to synovial inflammation. Furthermore, serotonin released by platelets helps drive the persistent vascular permeability that characterizes the microvasculature of the inflamed synovium, an unexpected function for a cell that more typically serves as a guardian of vascular integrity. Beyond RA, platelet activation has been observed in systemic lupus erythematosus, mediated at least in part through the interaction of circulating immune complexes with platelet Fc receptors and by promotion of interferon release from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. These findings point to a distinct role for platelets in autoimmunity and support the possibility that platelets are an attractive target in rheumatic disease.

  1. Platelet activation through a Bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    Platelet activation is one of the major drawbacks of the Mechanical Heart Valves (MHVs) which can increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients. The platelet activation in MHVs can be due to the abnormal shear stress during the systole, the backward leakage flow during the diastole, and the flow through the hinge region. We investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanism to the activation of platelets in MHVs by performing simulations of the flow through the MHV and in the hinge region. The large scale heart valve simulations are performed in a straight aorta using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm under physiological flow conditions. In addition, in order to perform the simulation of hinge region the flow field boundary conditions are obtained from the largescale simulations during a whole cardiac cycle. In order to investigate the role of hinge flow on platelet activation in MHVs, a 23mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve hinge with three different gap sizes is tested along with different platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of our results with different activation models. We compare the platelet activation of the hinge region against the bulk of the flow during one cardiac cycle. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  2. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  3. Platelet Activation, P-Selectin, and Eosinophil β1-Integrin Activation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gunderson, Kristin A.; Busse, William W.; Jarjour, Nizar N.; Mosher, Deane F.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Eosinophil β1-integrin activation correlates inversely with FEV1 and directly with eosinophil-bound P-selectin in subjects with nonsevere allergic asthma. Objectives: Determine the relationships between β1-integrin activation and pulmonary function or eosinophil-bound P-selectin in subjects with asthma of varying severity and discern the source of eosinophil-bound P-selectin. Methods: Blood was assayed by flow cytometry for P-selectin and activated β1-integrin on eosinophils and platelets. Plasma was analyzed with ELISA for soluble P-selectin, platelet factor 4, and thrombospondin-1. Measurements and Main Results: Activated β1-integrin correlated with eosinophil-bound P-selectin among all subjects with asthma even though activated β1-integrin was higher in subjects with nonsevere asthma than severe asthma. Activated β1-integrin correlated inversely with FEV1 corrected for FVC only in younger subjects with nonsevere asthma. Paradoxically, platelet surface P-selectin, a platelet activation marker, was low in subjects with severe asthma, whereas plasma platelet factor 4, a second platelet activation marker, was high. Correlations indicated that P-selectin–positive platelets complexed to eosinophils are the major source of the eosinophil-bound P-selectin associated with β1-integrin activation. After whole-lung antigen challenge of subjects with nonsevere asthma, a model of asthma exacerbation known to cause platelet activation, circulating eosinophils bearing P-selectin and activated β1-integrin disappeared. Conclusions: The relationship between eosinophil β1-integrin activation and pulmonary function was replicated only for younger subjects with nonsevere asthma. However, we infer that platelet activation and binding of activated platelets to eosinophils followed by P-selectin–mediated eosinophil β1-integrin activation occur in both nonsevere and severe asthma with rapid movement of platelet–eosinophil complexes into the lung in more severe

  4. LDL oxidation by platelets propagates platelet activation via an oxidative stress-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Roberto; Bartimoccia, Simona; Nocella, Cristina; Di Santo, Serena; Loffredo, Lorenzo; Illuminati, Giulio; Lombardi, Elisabetta; Boz, Valentina; Del Ben, Maria; De Marco, Luigi; Pignatelli, Pasquale; Violi, Francesco

    2014-11-01

    Platelets generate oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) via NOX2-derived oxidative stress. We investigated if once generated by activated platelets ox-LDL can propagate platelet activation. Experiments were performed in platelets from healthy subjects (HS), hyper-cholesterolemic patients and patients with NOX2 hereditary deficiency. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with LDL were associated with a dose-dependent increase of reactive oxidant species and ox-LDL. Agonist-stimulated platelets from HS added with a fixed dose of LDL (57.14 μmol/L) or added with homogenized human atherosclerotic plaque showed enhanced ox-LDL formation (approximately +50% and +30% respectively), which was lowered by a NOX2 inhibitor (approximately -35% and -25% respectively). Compared to HS, ox-LDL production was more pronounced in agonist-stimulated platelet rich plasma (PRP) from hyper-cholesterolemic patients but was almost absent in PRP from NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet aggregation and 8-iso-PGF2α-ΙΙΙ formation increased in LDL-treated washed platelets (+42% and +53% respectively) and PRP (+31% and +53% respectively). Also, LDL enhanced platelet-dependent thrombosis at arterial shear rate (+33%) but did not affect platelet activation in NOX2-deficient patients. Platelet activation by LDL was significantly inhibited by CD36 or LOX1 blocking peptides, two ox-LDL receptor antagonists, or by a NOX2 inhibitor. LDL-added platelets showed increased p38MAPK (+59%) and PKC (+51%) phosphorylation, p47(phox) translocation to platelet membrane (+34%) and NOX2 activation (+30%), which were inhibited by ox-LDL receptor antagonists. Platelets oxidize LDL, which in turn amplify platelet activation via specific ox-LDL receptors; both effects are mediated by NOX2 activation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of outdoor air pollutants on platelet activation in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Mark W; Bausch, Jan; Chalupa, David; Hopke, Philip K; Little, Erika L; Oakes, David; Stewart, Judith C; Utell, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that increases in exposure to ambient air pollution are associated with platelet activation and formation of circulating tissue factor-expressing microparticles. We studied 19 subjects with type 2 diabetes, without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease, who had previously participated in a human clinical study of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Blood was obtained for measurements of platelet activation following an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Center, prior to each of their two pre-exposure visits. Air pollution and meteorological data, including UFP counts, were analyzed for the 5 days prior to the subjects' arrival at the Clinical Research Center. Contrary to expectations, increases in UFP were associated with decreases in surface expression of platelet activation markers. The number of platelet-leukocyte conjugates decreased by -80 (95% confidence interval (CI) -123 to -37, p = 0.001) on the first lag day (20-44 h prior to the blood draw) and by -85 (CI -139 to -31, p = 0.005) on combined lag days 1 to 5, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in UFP particle number (2482). However, levels of soluble CD40L increased 104 (CI 3 to 205, p = 0.04) pg/ml per IQR increase in UFP on lag day 1, a finding consistent with prior platelet activation. We speculate that, in people with diabetes, exposure to UFP activates circulating platelets within hours of exposure, followed by an increase in soluble CD40L and a rebound reduction in circulating platelet surface markers.

  6. Effects of Outdoor Air Pollutants on Platelet Activation in People with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Mark W.; Bausch, Jan; Chalupa, David; Hopke, Philip K.; Little, Erika L.; Oakes, David; Stewart, Judith C.; Utell, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that increases in exposure to ambient air pollution are associated with platelet activation and formation of circulating tissue-factor-expressing microparticles. We studied 19 subjects with type 2 diabetes, without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease, who had previously participated in a human clinical study of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Blood was obtained for measurements of platelet activation following an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Center, prior to each of their two pre-exposure visits. Air pollution and meteorological data, including UFP counts, were analyzed for the 5 days prior to the subjects’ arrival at the Clinical Research Center. Contrary to expectations, increases in UFP were associated with decreases in surface expression of platelet activation markers. The number of platelet-leukocyte conjugates decreased by −80 (95% confidence interval (CI) −123 to −37, p=0.001) on the first lag day (20–44 hours prior to the blood draw) and by −85 (CI −139 to −31, p=0.005) on combined lag days 1 to 5, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in UFP particle number (2482). However, levels of soluble CD40L increased 104 (CI 3 to 205, p=0.04) pg/ml per IQR increase in UFP on lag day 1, a finding consistent with prior platelet activation. We speculate that, in people with diabetes, exposure to UFP activates circulating platelets within hours of exposure, followed by an increase in soluble CD40L and a rebound reduction in circulating platelet surface markers. PMID:23033996

  7. Streamlining the design of promising clinical trials: in-vitro testing of antithrombotic regimens and multiple agonists of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David J; Sobel, Burton E

    2009-03-01

    Platelets are activated in vivo by multiple agonists; however, platelet function testing in vitro has been performed predominantly with only one or two agonists of platelet activation. Greater insight into anticipated effects of antithrombotic regimens should enhance the design of successful clinical trials. To test this concept, we assessed platelet activation induced by multiple agonists and two antithrombotic regimens, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and eptifibatide compared with bivalirudin and cangrelor. Blood samples from 10 patients with coronary artery disease were spiked with pharmacologic concentrations achieved in vivo of either UFH (1.2 U/ml) and eptifibatide (1.7 microg/ml), or with bivalirudin (8 microg/ml) and cangrelor (500 nmol/l). Platelet function was assessed with the use of flow cytometry. Agonists included thrombin (50 nmol/l), adenosine diphosphate (1 micromol/l), the collagen-mimetic convulxin (5 ng/ml), and platelet-activating factor (10 nmol/l). When platelet activation was identified by the surface expression of P-selectin in response to multiple agonists, the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed activation more than UFH and eptifibatide. When platelet activation was identified by the activation of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (PAC-1 binding), the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor was more effective in suppressing activation in response to thrombin and adenosine diphosphate, whereas UFH and eptifibatide more effectively prevented binding of PAC-1 when platelets were activated with the collagen-mimetic convulxin. In conclusion, bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed platelet activation in response to diverse agonists in vitro more than UFH and eptifibatide. These results and this approach to selection of promising interventions should be helpful in streamlining the design of clinical trials.

  8. Palladin is involved in platelet activation and arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuejiao; Fan, Xuemei; Tan, Juan; Shi, Panlai; Wang, Xiyi; Wang, Jinjin; Kuang, Ying; Fei, Jian; Liu, Junling; Dang, Suying; Wang, Zhugang

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of actin cytoskeleton have been shown to play a critical role during platelet activation. Palladin is an actin-associated protein, serving as a cytoskeleton scaffold to bundle actin fibers and actin cross linker. The functional role of palladin on platelet activation has not been investigated. Here, we characterized heterozygous palladin knockout (palladin(+/-)) mice to elucidate the platelet-related functions of palladin. The results showed that palladin was expressed in platelets and moderate palladin deficiency accelerated hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. The aggregation of palladin(+/-) platelets was increased in response to low levels of thrombin, U46619, and collagen. We also observed enhanced spreading of palladin(+/-) platelets on immobilized fibrinogen (Fg) and increased rate of clot retraction in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) containing palladin(+/-) platelets. Furthermore, the activation of the small GTPase Rac1 and Cdc42, which is associated with cytoskeletal dynamics and platelet activation signalings, was increased in the spreading and aggregating palladin(+/-) platelets compared to that in wild type platelets. Taken together, these findings indicated that palladin is involved in platelet activation and arterial thrombosis, implying a potent role of palladin in pathophysiology of thrombotic diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Platelet activation in the postoperative period after lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, David I; Shimbo, Daichi; Kawut, Steven M; Sarkar, Joydeep; Hurlitz, Georg; D'Ovidio, Frank; Lederer, David J; Wilt, Jessie S; Arcasoy, Selim M; Pinsky, David J; D'Armiento, Jeanine M; Sonett, Joshua R

    2008-03-01

    During lung transplantation, cells in the pulmonary parenchyma are subjected to ischemia, hypothermic storage, and reperfusion injury. Platelets, whose granular contents include adhesion receptors, chemokines, and coactivating substances that activate inflammatory and coagulant cascades, likely play a critical role in the lung allograft response to ischemia and reperfusion. The platelet response to the pulmonary allograft, however, has never been studied. Here we report significant platelet activation immediately after lung transplantation. We performed a prospective cohort study comparing markers of platelet activation in patients undergoing lung transplantation and patients undergoing nontransplant thoracotomy. Plasma levels of soluble P-selectin, soluble CD40 ligand, and platelet-leukocyte conjugates were measured before surgery, after skin closure, and at 6 postoperative hours. Both soluble P-selectin and soluble CD40 ligand levels increased significantly after lung transplantation but not after thoracotomy. Additionally, platelet-monocyte conjugate fluorescence was significantly higher after lung transplantation than after thoracotomy alone. These findings suggest that platelet activation is significantly increased after lung transplantation beyond that expected from the postoperative state. The increase in circulating platelet-monocyte conjugates suggests an important interaction between platelets and inflammatory cells. Further research should examine whether platelet activation affects early graft function after lung transplantation.

  10. Abnormalities in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and platelet activation in adult patients after the Fontan procedure.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz-Pajak, Lidia; Hoffman, Piotr; Trojnarska, Olga; Lipczyńska, Magdalena; Podolec, Piotr; Undas, Anetta

    2014-04-01

    Thrombosis occurs in up to 30% of patients with various forms of congenital single ventricle after the Fontan procedure. We investigated hemostatic abnormalities in adult Fontan patients. Forty-eight Fontan patients between ages 18 and 40 years, including 10 (21%) patients with previous thromboembolism 5 to 15 years after surgery, and 35 control subjects matched for age and sex were studied. Coagulation factors and inhibitors, together with markers of fibrinolysis, platelets, and endothelial activation, were determined in peripheral venous blood plasma. Compared with control subjects, Fontan patients showed lower, although mostly within normal ranges, values of all coagulation factors, as well as reduced free protein S, in association with higher antithrombin and free tissue factor pathway inhibitor levels. Thrombin generation, reflected by prothrombin fragment 1.2, and platelet activation markers were increased in Fontan patients. The plasma clot lysis time was prolonged in Fontan patients, which was associated with an increased activity of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. Fontan patients with previous thromboembolism had lower oxygen saturation, coagulation factors V and VIII, and free protein S, and increased von Willebrand factor, soluble CD40 ligand, and P-selectin. Other laboratory or clinical parameters were not associated with prior thrombotic episodes. Adult Fontan patients are characterized by enhanced platelet activation and endothelial injury, heightened thrombin formation, and impaired fibrinolysis. Patients showed reduced free protein S levels, increased platelet activation, and endothelial damage after thromboembolic events observed late after Fontan surgery. Our findings indicate novel prothrombotic mechanisms in adult Fontan patients, which might help to optimize thromboprophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutamate mediates platelet activation through the AMPA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Craig N.; Sun, Henry; Ikeda, Masahiro; Beique, Jean-Claude; Swaim, Anne Marie; Mason, Emily; Martin, Tanika V.; Thompson, Laura E.; Gozen, Oguz; Ampagoomian, David; Sprengel, Rolf; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Faraday, Nauder; Huganir, Richard; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that binds to the kainate receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, and the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor (AMPAR). Each receptor was first characterized and cloned in the central nervous system (CNS). Glutamate is also present in the periphery, and glutamate receptors have been identified in nonneuronal tissues, including bone, heart, kidney, pancreas, and platelets. Platelets play a central role in normal thrombosis and hemostasis, as well as contributing greatly to diseases such as stroke and myocardial infarction. Despite the presence of glutamate in platelet granules, the role of glutamate during hemostasis is unknown. We now show that activated platelets release glutamate, that platelets express AMPAR subunits, and that glutamate increases agonist-induced platelet activation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that glutamate binding to the AMPAR increases intracellular sodium concentration and depolarizes platelets, which are important steps in platelet activation. In contrast, platelets treated with the AMPAR antagonist CNQX or platelets derived from GluR1 knockout mice are resistant to AMPA effects. Importantly, mice lacking GluR1 have a prolonged time to thrombosis in vivo. Our data identify glutamate as a regulator of platelet activation, and suggest that the AMPA receptor is a novel antithrombotic target. PMID:18283118

  12. Phage-Derived Protein Induces Increased Platelet Activation and Is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Amelieke J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Meis, Jacques F.; Roeleveld, Nel; Bentley, Stephen D.; Pastura, Alexander S.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van der Ven, Andre J.; de Mast, Quirijn; Zomer, Aldert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding about the severity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we investigated the association between the genotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae and disease outcomes for 349 bacteremic patients. A pneumococcal genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a strong correlation between 30-day mortality and the presence of the phage-derived gene pblB, encoding a platelet-binding protein whose effects on platelet activation were previously unknown. Platelets are increasingly recognized as key players of the innate immune system, and in sepsis, excessive platelet activation contributes to microvascular obstruction, tissue hypoperfusion, and finally multiorgan failure, leading to mortality. Our in vitro studies revealed that pblB expression was induced by fluoroquinolones but not by the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin G. Subsequently, we determined pblB induction and platelet activation by incubating whole blood with the wild type or a pblB knockout mutant in the presence or absence of antibiotics commonly administered to our patient cohort. pblB-dependent enhancement of platelet activation, as measured by increased expression of the α-granule protein P-selectin, the binding of fibrinogen to the activated αIIbβ3 receptor, and the formation of platelet-monocyte complex occurred irrespective of antibiotic exposure. In conclusion, the presence of pblB on the pneumococcal chromosome potentially leads to increased mortality in patients with an invasive S. pneumoniae infection, which may be explained by enhanced platelet activation. This study highlights the clinical utility of a bacterial GWAS, followed by functional characterization, to identify bacterial factors involved in disease severity. PMID:28096486

  13. Disabled-2 Is Required for Efficient Haemostasis and Platelet Activation by Thrombin in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hui-Ju; Huang, Chien-Ling; Chang, Yao-Wen; Huang, Ding-Yuan; Lin, Chung-Ching; Cooper, Jonathan A.; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Objective The essential role of platelet activation in haemostasis and thrombotic diseases focuses attention on unveiling the underlying intracellular signals of platelet activation. Disabled-2 (Dab2) has been implicated in platelet aggregation and in the control of clotting responses. However, there is not yet any in vivo study to provide direct evidence for the role of Dab2 in haemostasis and platelet activation. Approach and Results Megakaryocyte lineage-restricted Dab2 knockout (Dab2−/−) mice were generated to delineate in vivo functions of Dab2 in platelets. Dab2−/− mice appeared normal in size with prolonged bleeding time and impaired thrombus formation. Although normal in platelet production and granule biogenesis, Dab2−/− platelets elicited a selective defect in platelet aggregation and spreading on fibrinogen in response to low concentrations of thrombin, but not other soluble agonists. Investigation of the role of Dab2 in thrombin signaling revealed that Dab2 has no effect on the expression of thrombin receptors and the outside-in signaling. Dab2−/− platelets stimulated by low concentrations of thrombin were normal in Gαq-mediated calcium mobilization and PKC activation but were defective in Gα12/13-mediated RhoA-ROCKII activation. The attenuated Gα12/13 signaling led to impaired ADP release, Akt-mTOR and integrin αIIbβ3 activation, fibrinogen binding, and clot retraction. The defective responses of Dab2−/− platelets to low concentrations of thrombin stimulation may contribute to the impaired haemostasis and thrombosis of Dab2−/− mice. Conclusions This study sheds new insight in platelet biology and represents the first report demonstrating that Dab2 is a key regulator of haemostasis and thrombosis by functional interplay with Gα12/13-mediated thrombin signaling. PMID:25212232

  14. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    PubMed

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C; Sudano, Isabella; Lüscher, Thomas F; Camici, Giovanni G

    2010-01-22

    DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54+/-0.9427%, n=5, P<0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0%+/-4.031, n=9, P=0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388+/-2.212%, n=6, P=0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  16. Plasma concentrations of endotoxin and platelet activation in the developmental stage of oligofructose-induced laminitis.

    PubMed

    Bailey, S R; Adair, H S; Reinemeyer, C R; Morgan, S J; Brooks, A C; Longhofer, S L; Elliott, J

    2009-06-15

    The link between the fermentation of carbohydrate in the equine large intestine and the development of acute laminitis is poorly understood. Absorption of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) into the plasma has been observed in one experimental model of laminitis, but does not cause laminitis when administered alone. Thus, the potential role of endotoxin is unclear. Platelet activation has previously been demonstrated in the developmental stage of laminitis. Equine platelets are more sensitive than leukocytes to activation by endotoxin, and can be activated directly by LPS in the low pg/ml range, activating p38 MAP kinase and releasing serotonin (5-HT) and thromboxane. The objectives of this study were firstly to determine whether endotoxin and platelet activation could be measured in the plasma of horses in the developmental phase of laminitis induced with oligofructose. Secondly, the time course of events involving platelet activation and platelet-derived vasoactive mediator production was investigated. Laminitis was induced in six Standardbred horses by the administration of 10 g/kg bwt of oligofructose. Plasma samples were obtained every 4h, and platelet pellets were obtained by centrifugation. LPS was measured using a kinetic limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and platelet activation was assessed by Western blotting for the phosphorylated form of p38 MAP kinase. Plasma 5-HT was assayed by HPLC with electrochemical detection and thromboxane B(2) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Clinical signs of laminitis and histopathologic changes were observed in lamellar sections from five of the six horses. Onset of lameness was between 20 and 30 h after the administration of oligofructose. LPS increased above the limit of detection (0.6 pg/ml) to reach a peak of 2.4+/-1.0 pg/ml at 8 h. TNFalpha was also detectable in the plasma from 12 to 24 h. There was a time-dependent increase in platelet p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which peaked at approximately 12 h (3.8+/-1.3 fold

  17. Comparison of diverse platelet activation markers as indicators for left atrial thrombus in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski, Daniel; Poitz, David M; Plichta, Lina; Heidrich, Felix M; Wiedemann, Stephan; Ruf, Tobias; Mierke, Johannes; Löhn, Tobias; Jellinghaus, Stefanie; Strasser, Ruth H; Ibrahim, Karim; Pfluecke, Christian

    2017-03-13

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is well known for being a major risk factor of thromboembolic stroke. We could recently demonstrate an association of monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs) with the degree of thrombogenicity in patients with AF. This study investigated platelet activation markers, as potential biomarkers for the presence of left atrial (LA) thrombus in patients with AF. One hundred and eight patients with symptomatic AF underwent transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) before scheduled cardioversion or pulmonary vein isolation. In order to determine the content of MPAs by flow-cytometric quantification analyses, blood was drawn on the day of TEE. The soluble CD40 Ligand (sCD40L) and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) were obtained by Cytometric Bead Arrays (CBA). D-dimer levels were detected by quantitative immunological determination of fibrin degradation products. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic standard parameters were obtained from all patients, including the determination of the flow in the left atrial appendage (LAA). Patients with detected LA thrombus (n = 28) compared with patients without thrombus (n = 80) showed an increased number of common risk factors, such as age, diabetes, heart failure, and coronary artery disease (CAD). The presence of LA thrombus was associated with significantly increased levels of MPAs (147 ± 12 vs. 304 ± 29 per µl; p < 0.00), sCD40L (106.3 ± 31.0 vs. 33.5 ± 2.1 pg/ml, p = 0.027), and D-dimer (0.13 ± 0.02 vs. 0.69 ± 0.21 mg FEU/l, p = 0.015). In contrast, sP-selectin showed no association with LA thrombus. A multivariate regression analysis showed that MPAs, sCD40L as well as D-dimers were independent indicators for the existence of LA thrombus. MPAs above 170 cells/µl indicated LA thrombus with a high sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 73% (OR 62, 95% CI. 6.9-557.2, p < 0.001) in patients with AF, whereas the D-dimer lost their quality as independent indicator by using the conventional cut-off of 0

  18. Effect of splenectomy on platelet activation and decompression sickness outcome in a rat model of decompression.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Goanvec, Christelle; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michaël; Belhomme, Marc; Guerrero, François

    2014-09-01

    Splenic platelets have been recognized to have a greater prothrombotic potential than others platelets. We studied whether platelets released by splenic contraction could influence the severity and outcome of decompression sickness (DCS) and bubble-induced platelet activation. Sixteen, male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a control or a splenectomized group. Both groups were compressed to 1,000 kPa (90 metres' sea water) for 45 min while breathing air before staged decompression (5 min at 200 kPa, 5 min at 160 kPa and 10 min at 130 kPa). The onset time of DCS symptoms and of death were recorded during a 60-min observation period post dive. Parameters measured were platelet factor 4 (PF4) for platelet activation, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) for oxidative stress status and Von Willebrand factor (VWf) for endothelial activation. There were no differences between the groups in DCS outcome or in PF4, TBARS and VWf concentrations. These results do not support that the spleen and its exchangeable platelet pool is involved in DCS pathogenesis in a rat model, invalidating the hypothesis that increased decompression-induced platelet aggregation could be influenced by splenic contraction and then play a role in DCS outcome.

  19. Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriani, M.; Ghittori, S.; Prestinoni, A.; Longoni, P.; Cascone, G.; Gamba, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on hemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27 mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data, and smoking habits, were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.

  20. Inositoylated platelet-activating factor (Ino-C2-PAF) modulates dynamic lymphocyte-endothelial cell interactions and alleviates psoriasis-like skin inflammation in two complementary mouse models.

    PubMed

    Forkel, Susann; Schön, Margarete; Hildmann, Annette; Claßen, Anna; John, Swen-Malte; Danker, Kerstin; Schön, Michael P

    2014-10-01

    Psoriasis, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-governed inflammatory disorder with prominent dysregulation of cutaneous vascular functions, has evolved into a model disorder for studying anti-inflammatory therapies. We present experimental in vitro and in vivo data on 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-(2-(myo-inositolyl)-ethyl)-sn-glycero-3-(R/S)-phosphatidyl-choline (Ino-C2-PAF), the lead compound of a class of synthetic glycosylated phospholipids, in anti-inflammatory therapy. Ino-C2-PAF strongly induced apoptosis only in TNFα-stimulated, but not in untreated human vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, TNFα-induced endothelial adhesion molecules that mediated the rolling and firm adhesion of leukocytes (vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, and ICAM-1) were selectively downregulated by Ino-C2-PAF. Similarly, expression of L-selectin, VCAM-1 receptor α4β1 integrin , and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was reduced without induction of apoptosis. Functionally, these changes were accompanied by significant impairment of rolling and adhesion of human peripheral blood lymphocytes on TNFα-activated endothelial cells in a dynamic flow chamber system. When the therapeutic potential of Ino-C2-PAF was assessed in two complementary mouse models of psoriasis, K5.hTGFβ1 transgenic and JunB/c-Jun-deficient mice, Ino-C2-PAF led to significant alleviation of the clinical symptoms and normalized the pathological cutaneous changes including vascularization. There were no overt adverse effects. These findings suggested that Ino-C2-PAF is a potential candidate in the therapy of inflammatory skin diseases that include abnormal vascular functions.

  1. RGS10 Negatively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Tansey, Malú G.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins act as GTPase activating proteins to negatively regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Although several RGS proteins including RGS2, RGS16, RGS10, and RGS18 are expressed in human and mouse platelets, the respective unique function(s) of each have not been fully delineated. RGS10 is a member of the D/R12 subfamily of RGS proteins and is expressed in microglia, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and platelets. We used a genetic approach to examine the role(s) of RGS10 in platelet activation in vitro and hemostasis and thrombosis in vivo. GPCR-induced aggregation, secretion, and integrin activation was much more pronounced in platelets from Rgs10-/- mice relative to wild type (WT). Accordingly, these mice had markedly reduced bleeding times and were more susceptible to vascular injury-associated thrombus formation than control mice. These findings suggest a unique, non-redundant role of RGS10 in modulating the hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets in mice. RGS10 thus represents a potential therapeutic target to control platelet activity and/or hypercoagulable states. PMID:27829061

  2. Assessment of platelet activation in myeloproliferative disorders with complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Emilse; Alberto, Maria F; Meschengieser, Susana S; Lazzari, Maria A

    2004-04-01

    Bleeding and thrombosis in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) are common events, sometimes both are present in the same patient during the course of the disease. Platelet activation in patients with MPD is often suggested. The present study analyses the presence of circulating activated platelets, using simultaneously flow cytometry and aggregometric studies in MPD. We studied 28 patients: 13 with polycythaemia vera, seven with essential thrombocythaemia, and eight chronic myeloid leukaemia. We performed functional tests, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and flow cytometric assays (mepacrine staining and platelet activation markers CD62, CD63 and fibrinogen binding (B-FG)). Twenty-one MPD samples (75%) had reduced aggregation and ATP release. Acquired delta-SPD was detected in 11 of 28 MPD patients (39%), and we found no association between reduced mepacrine labelling and abnormal ATP release. High levels of activation markers were obtained: CD62 in 19 of 28 patients (68%), CD63 in 13 of 28 patients (46%) and B-FG in 19 of 28 patients (68%). The most prevalent abnormality was a reduced aggregation and ATP release. The lack of association between ATP release and mepacrine labelling suggests that other mechanisms, besides the deficit of intraplatelet ATP/adenosine diphosphate, might occur. High levels of activation markers were also observed. We conclude that both tests are complementary and necessary to understand the functional status of platelets in MPD.

  3. Shear-mediated platelet activation in patients implanted with continuous flow LVADs: A preliminary study utilizing the platelet activity state (PAS) assay.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Consolo, Filippo; Bluestein, Danny; Tran, Phat; Slepian, Marvin; Redaelli, Alberto; Pappalardo, Federico

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have emerged as vital life-saving therapeutic systems for patients with advanced and end-stage heart failure (HF). Despite their efficacy, VAD systems remain limited by post-implantation thrombotic complications. Shear-mediated platelet activation is the major driver of such complications in these devices. Nowadays few platelet function assays are routinely utilized in assessing the degree of platelet activation in VAD implanted patients. No assays exist that specifically target shear-mediated platelet activation. The platelet activity state (PAS) is a novel assay that has been well validated in vitro, measuring thrombin release as a surrogate for shear-mediated platelet activation. To date limited data exist as to the utility of this assay in the clinical setting. In the present study we evaluated eight LVAD patients' platelet activation level using the PAS assay. Simultaneous measurements of conventional prothrombotic and hemolysis markers, - i.e. fibrinogen and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) - were also performed. Trends as to alteration from baseline were studied. We observed that the PAS assay allowed detection of an abnormal level of platelet activation in one patient in our series who suffered from an overt thrombosis. Interestingly in the same patient no signal of major abnormality in fibrinogen or LDH was detected. Further for 7/8 patients who were free of thrombosis, no significant level of platelet activation was detected via PAS assay, while elevation in fibrinogen and LDH were observed. As such, from our observational series it appears that the PAS assay is a sensitive and specific indicator of shear-mediated platelet activation. Further patients' experience will help elucidate the role of this promising assay in the management of LVAD implanted patients.

  4. Effect of platelet activating factor antagonist treatment on gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Barbero, A.; Bosque, E.; Rivas-Cabaero, L.; Arévalo, M.

    1992-01-01

    To assess whether PAF could be involved in the gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity, we have studied the effect of PAF antagonist BN-52021 on renal function in rats after gentamicin (GENTA) treatment. Experiments were completed in 21 Wistar rats divided into three groups: group GENTA was injected with gentamicin 100 mg kg−1 body wt/day s.c. for 6 days. Group GENTA + BN received gentamicin and BN-52021 i.p. 5 mg kg−1 body wt/day. A third group served as control. Rats were placed in meta-bolic cages and plasma creatinine and creatinine clearance were measured daily. GENTA group showed a progressive increase in plasma creatinine, a drop in creatinine clearance and an increase in urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alkaline phosphatase. GENTA + BN group showed a lesser change in plasma creatinine and a creatinine clearance, but no difference with GENTA group in urinary excretion of NAG and AP were observed. Histological examination revealed a massive cortical tubular necrosis in rats treated with gentamicin, whereas in BN-52021 injected animals tubular damage was markedly attenuated. The present results suggest a role for PAF in the gentamicininduced nephro-toxicity. PMID:18475436

  5. Salivary Platelet Activating Factor Levels in Periodontal Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    multifarious and is activated through multiple mediators. The inflammatory process can be subdivided into acute and chronic inflammation. Stedman’s Medical...Just recently, inflammed human gingival tissues were analyzed and found to contain PAF (Noguchi, et al, 1989). Thus, multiple components of the...17.9% release of peroxidase, 20.6% release of P-glucuronidase, 22.4% release of alkaline phosphatase and 28.8% release of aryl sulfatase . At higher

  6. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-11-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s(-1), regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates.

  7. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s−1, regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates. PMID:28058084

  8. Platelet-activating protamine-heparin-antibodies lead to higher protamine demand in patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Grieshaber, Philippe; Bakchoul, Tamam; Wilhelm, Jochen; Wagner, Alexander; Wollbrück, Matthias; Böning, Andreas; Sachs, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Platelet-activating antibodies against protamine-heparin-complexes were described in patients undergoing cardiac surgery, but their clinical consequences remain unclear. This prospective single-center observational study aimed to describe the prevalence and clinical consequences of protamine-heparin-complex antibodies in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. A total of 200 patients undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were included. Blood samples were collected preoperatively and 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days after weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass. All sera were tested for the presence of protamine-heparin-complex antibodies using a modified heparin-induced platelet-activation assay. Specific Fcγ receptor IIa-dependent platelet activation was confirmed by repeated testing in the presence of the Fcγ receptor IIa-blocking antibody IV.3. Samples from 185 patients were obtained, of whom 24 patients (13%) were positive for protamine-heparin-complex antibodies preoperatively. In all positive samples, functional reactivity was reversible in the presence of IV.3. Although patients with a preoperative presence of protamine-heparin-complex antibodies were significantly older compared with patients negative for protamine-heparin-complex antibodies (73 ± 9.8 years vs 68 ± 10 years, P = .037), no other potential risk factors were identified at 1 day before operation. Patients with protamine-heparin-complex antibodies required significantly more protamine to neutralize heparin (47.66 mg vs 41.67 mg, P = .027). Protamine-heparin-complex antibodies have no significant influence on perioperative platelet numbers, bleeding complications, transfusion requirement, thromboembolic events, major cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, inflammation parameters, or kidney function. Protamine-heparin-complex antibodies occur frequently in patients undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass, resulting in specific platelet

  9. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of anti-platelet-active compounds from the root of Ashitaba (Angelica keiskei Koidz.).

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ju; Park, Ye Oak; Yu, Chengguang; Lee, Sung Eun; Park, Young Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is fundamental to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including the induction of thrombosis and arteriosclerosis. Anti-platelet activity of a crude methanol extract and solvent fractions of Ashitaba roots (Angelica keiskei Koidz.) was evaluated using a turbidimetric method using washed rabbit platelets. We identified the anti-platelet activities of two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of Ashitaba roots by using a bioassay-guided isolation method. 4-Hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol effectively inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (IC50 of 41.9 and 35.9 μM, respectively), platelet-activating factor (IC50 of 46.1 and 42.3 μM, respectively) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (IC50 of 16.5 and 45.9 μM, respectively). These compounds did not inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (IC50 of>80 μM). The results suggest that the chalcones 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol may be potent anti-thrombotic components of A. keiskei Koidz.

  10. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  11. Application of an optimized flow cytometry-based quantification of Platelet Activation (PACT): Monitoring platelet activation in platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; Henskens, Yvonne M. C.; de Laat, Bas; Huskens, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that flow cytometry is a reliable test to quantify platelet function in stored platelet concentrates (PC). It is thought that flow cytometry is laborious and hence expensive. We have optimized the flow cytometry-based quantification of agonist induced platelet activation (PACT) to a labor, time and more cost-efficient test. Currently the quality of PCs is only monitored by visual inspection, because available assays are unreliable or too laborious for use in a clinical transfusion laboratory. Therefore, the PACT was applied to monitor PC activation during storage. Study design and methods The optimized PACT was used to monitor 5 PCs during 10 days of storage. In brief, optimized PACT uses a ready-to-use reaction mix, which is stable at -20°C. When needed, a test strip is thawed and platelet activation is initiated by mixing PC with PACT. PACT was based on the following agonists: adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide (CRP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP-6). Platelet activation was measured as P-selectin expression. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) was performed as a reference. Results Both PACT and LTA showed platelet function decline during 10-day storage after stimulation with ADP and collagen/CRP; furthermore, PACT showed decreasing TRAP-induced activation. Major differences between the two tests are that PACT is able to measure the status of platelets in the absence of agonists, and it can differentiate between the number of activated platelets and the amount of activation, whereas LTA only measures aggregation in response to an agonist. Also, PACT is more time-efficient compared to LTA and allows high-throughput analysis. Conclusion PACT is an optimized platelet function test that can be used to monitor the activation of PCs. PACT has the same accuracy as LTA with regard to monitoring PCs, but it is superior to both LTA and conventional flow cytometry based tests with regard to labor

  12. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  13. Influence of red algal sulfated polysaccharides on blood coagulation and platelets activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina V; Byankina, Anna O; Kalitnik, Alexandra A; Kim, Yong H; Bogdanovich, Larisa N; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Yermak, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The influence of sulfated polysaccharides (λ-, κ-, and κ/β-carrageenan and porphyran) - on platelet activation was studied. Carrageenans were much weaker inhibitors of a coagulation process than heparin, while porphyran had not that effect. Results of the aPTT and PT assays suppose that carrageenans affected mostly intrinsic pathway of coagulation, while their effect on the extrinsic pathway is extremely low (λ and κ/β) or absent (κ, LMW derivative of κ-carrageenan). λ-Carrageenan was the most potent anticoagulant agent in TT, aPTT, PT, and anti-factor Xa activity. This sample was also the strongest inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in PRP. Generally, the correlation of anticoagulant and antithrombotic action in PRP is preserved for carrageenans but not for heparin. Carrageenans and porphyran affected platelet adhesion to collagen by influencing glycoprotein VI. Low molecular weight κ-carrageenan had a similar effect on platelet adhesion mediated with both major collagen receptors: integrin α2 β1 and glycoprotein VI as native polysaccharide had. Carrageenans resulted in activation of platelets under platelet adhesion mediated by integrin αIIb β3 with less degree than heparin. The least sulfated κ/β-carrageenan that possessed an inhibiting effect on thrombin- and collagen-induced aggregation of washed platelets and on the PT test but it had no significant effect on TT was the weakest promoter of integrin αIIb β3 mediated platelet activation. In summary, our study showed that the polysaccharide action was complex, since it depended on its molecular mass, sulfation degree, and monosaccharide contents (3,6-anhydrogalactose). Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. DREAM plays an important role in platelet activation and thrombogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyungho; Tseng, Alan; Barazia, Andrew; Italiano, Joseph E; Cho, Jaehyung

    2017-01-12

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM), a transcriptional repressor, is known to modulate pain responses. However, it is unknown whether DREAM is expressed in anucleate platelets and plays a role in thrombogenesis. By using intravital microscopy with DREAM-null mice and their bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrated that both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell DREAMs are required for platelet thrombus formation following laser-induced arteriolar injury. In a FeCl3-induced thrombosis model, we found that compared with wild-type (WT) control and nonhematopoietic DREAM knockout (KO) mice, DREAM KO control and hematopoietic DREAM KO mice showed a significant delay in time to occlusion. Tail bleeding time was prolonged in DREAM KO control mice, but not in WT or DREAM bone marrow chimeric mice. In vivo adoptive transfer experiments further indicated the importance of platelet DREAM in thrombogenesis. We found that DREAM deletion does not alter the ultrastructural features of platelets but significantly impairs platelet aggregation and adenosine triphosphate secretion induced by numerous agonists (collagen-related peptide, adenosine 5'-diphosphate, A23187, thrombin, or U46619). Biochemical studies revealed that platelet DREAM positively regulates phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity during platelet activation. Using DREAM-null platelets and PI3K isoform-specific inhibitors, we observed that platelet DREAM is important for α-granule secretion, Ca(2+) mobilization, and aggregation through PI3K class Iβ (PI3K-Iβ). Genetic and pharmacological studies in human megakaryoblastic MEG-01 cells showed that DREAM is important for A23187-induced Ca(2+) mobilization and its regulatory function requires Ca(2+) binding and PI3K-Iβ activation. These results suggest that platelet DREAM regulates PI3K-Iβ activity and plays an important role during thrombus formation. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  15. Kaempferol suppresses collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and protecting SHP-2 from oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su Bin; Jang, Ji Yong; Chae, Yun Hee; Min, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Park, Yunjeong; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated upon collagen stimulation act as second messengers to propagate various platelet-activating events. Among the ROS-generating enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) plays a prominent role in platelet activation. Thus, NOX has been suggested as a novel target for anti-platelet drug development. Although kaempferol has been identified as a NOX inhibitor, the influence of kaempferol on the activation of platelets and the underlying mechanism have never been investigated. Here, we studied the effects of kaempferol on NOX activation, ROS-dependent signaling pathways, and functional responses in collagen-stimulated platelets. Superoxide anion generation stimulated by collagen was significantly inhibited by kaempferol in a concentration-dependent manner. More importantly, kaempferol directly bound p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX, and significantly inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) and NOX activation. In accordance with the inhibition of NOX, ROS-dependent inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) was potently protected by kaempferol. Subsequently, the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (Syk, Vav1, Btk, and PLCγ2) of collagen receptor signaling pathways was suppressed by kaempferol. Kaempferol also attenuated downstream responses, including cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Ultimately, kaempferol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen in vitro and prolonged in vivo thrombotic response in carotid arteries of mice. This study shows that kaempferol impairs collagen-induced platelet activation through inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2. This effect suggests that kaempferol has therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases.

  16. Effects of Antimalarial Tafenoquine on Blood Platelet Activity and Survival.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hang; Bissinger, Rosi; Umbach, Anja T; Bhuyan, Abdulla Al Mamun; Lang, Florian; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2017-01-01

    -selectin abundance, and active αIIbβ3 integrin, but significantly increased ROS and annexin-V-binding, significantly augmented the effect of thrombin on caspase 3 activity and platelet volume and significantly enhanced platelet aggregation. Tafenoquine counteracts thrombin and CRP induced increase of cytosolic Ca2+ activity and platelet activation, but enhances platelet apoptosis and platelet aggregation. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Secretory phospholipase A2 modified HDL rapidly and potently suppresses platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Curcic, Sanja; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Knuplez, Eva; Eichmann, Thomas O; Frank, Saša; Zimmermann, Robert; Schicho, Rudolf; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2017-08-14

    Levels of secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) highly increase under acute and chronic inflammatory conditions. sPLA2 is mainly associated with high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and generates bioactive lysophospholipids implicated in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. Unexpectedly, pharmacological inhibition of sPLA2 in patients with acute coronary syndrome was associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. Given that platelets are key players in thrombosis and inflammation, we hypothesized that sPLA2-induced hydrolysis of HDL-associated phospholipids (sPLA2-HDL) generates modified HDL particles that affect platelet function. We observed that sPLA2-HDL potently and rapidly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by several agonists, P-selectin expression, GPIIb/IIIa activation and superoxide production, whereas native HDL showed little effects. sPLA2-HDL suppressed the agonist-induced rise of intracellular Ca(2+) levels and phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2, which trigger key steps in promoting platelet activation. Importantly, sPLA2 in the absence of HDL showed no effects, whereas enrichment of HDL with lysophosphatidylcholines containing saturated fatty acids (the main sPLA2 products) mimicked sPLA2-HDL activities. Our findings suggest that sPLA2 generates lysophosphatidylcholine-enriched HDL particles that modulate platelet function under inflammatory conditions.

  18. Unfractionated and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin and the Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors, IBMX and Cilostazol, Block Ex Vivo Equid Herpesvirus Type-1-Induced Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Serpa, Priscila B. S.; Zahid, Muhammad N.; Brooks, Marjory B.

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpes virus type-1 (EHV-1) is a major pathogen of horses, causing abortion storms and outbreaks of herpes virus myeloencephalopathy. These clinical syndromes are partly attributed to ischemic injury from thrombosis in placental and spinal vessels. The mechanism of thrombosis in affected horses is unknown. We have previously shown that EHV-1 activates platelets through virus-associated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation. Activated platelets participate in thrombus formation by providing a surface to localize coagulation factor complexes that amplify and propagate thrombin generation. We hypothesized that coagulation inhibitors that suppress thrombin generation (heparins) or platelet inhibitors that impede post-receptor thrombin signaling [phosphodiesterase (PDE) antagonists] would inhibit EHV-1-induced platelet activation ex vivo. We exposed platelet-rich plasma (PRP) collected from healthy horses to the RacL11 abortigenic and Ab4 neuropathogenic strains of EHV-1 at 1 plaque-forming unit/cell in the presence or absence of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or the PDE inhibitors, 3-isobutyl-1methylxanthine (IBMX), and cilostazol. We assessed platelet activation status in flow cytometric assays by measuring P-selectin expression. We found that all of the inhibitors blocked EHV-1- and thrombin-induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner. Platelet activation in PRP was maximally inhibited at concentrations of 0.05 U/mL UFH and 2.5 μg/mL LMWH. These concentrations represented 0.1–0.2 U/mL anti-factor Xa activity measured in chromogenic assays. Both IBMX and cilostazol showed maximal inhibition of platelet activation at the highest tested concentration of 50 μM, but inhibition was lower than that seen with UFH and LMWH. Our results indicate that heparin anticoagulants and strong non-selective (IBMX) or isoenzyme-3 selective (cilostazol) PDE antagonists inhibit ex vivo EHV-1-induced platelet activation

  19. Unfractionated and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin and the Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors, IBMX and Cilostazol, Block Ex Vivo Equid Herpesvirus Type-1-Induced Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Serpa, Priscila Beatriz da Silva; Zahid, Muhammad N; Brooks, Marjory B

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpes virus type-1 (EHV-1) is a major pathogen of horses, causing abortion storms and outbreaks of herpes virus myeloencephalopathy. These clinical syndromes are partly attributed to ischemic injury from thrombosis in placental and spinal vessels. The mechanism of thrombosis in affected horses is unknown. We have previously shown that EHV-1 activates platelets through virus-associated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation. Activated platelets participate in thrombus formation by providing a surface to localize coagulation factor complexes that amplify and propagate thrombin generation. We hypothesized that coagulation inhibitors that suppress thrombin generation (heparins) or platelet inhibitors that impede post-receptor thrombin signaling [phosphodiesterase (PDE) antagonists] would inhibit EHV-1-induced platelet activation ex vivo. We exposed platelet-rich plasma (PRP) collected from healthy horses to the RacL11 abortigenic and Ab4 neuropathogenic strains of EHV-1 at 1 plaque-forming unit/cell in the presence or absence of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or the PDE inhibitors, 3-isobutyl-1methylxanthine (IBMX), and cilostazol. We assessed platelet activation status in flow cytometric assays by measuring P-selectin expression. We found that all of the inhibitors blocked EHV-1- and thrombin-induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner. Platelet activation in PRP was maximally inhibited at concentrations of 0.05 U/mL UFH and 2.5 μg/mL LMWH. These concentrations represented 0.1-0.2 U/mL anti-factor Xa activity measured in chromogenic assays. Both IBMX and cilostazol showed maximal inhibition of platelet activation at the highest tested concentration of 50 μM, but inhibition was lower than that seen with UFH and LMWH. Our results indicate that heparin anticoagulants and strong non-selective (IBMX) or isoenzyme-3 selective (cilostazol) PDE antagonists inhibit ex vivo EHV-1-induced platelet activation

  20. Ligustrazine improves blood circulation by suppressing Platelet activation in a rat model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajuan; Zhu, Huizhi; Tong, Jiabing; Li, Zegeng

    2016-07-01

    Chuan-xiong (Ligusticum wallichii) is a traditional herbal medicine in Eastern Asia, but the effect of its active component ligustrazine remains unclear. We explored its effect and possible mechanism in a well-characterized rat model of allergic asthma. Ligustrazine suppressed bronchial hyper-responsiveness to methacholine, and suppressed lung inflammation in asthmatic rats. Ligustrazine exhibited potent immuno-modulatory and anti-inflammatory effects: it suppressed lymphocyte and eosinophil mobilization, and reduced cytokine IL-5 and IL-13 production significantly in lung tissues from asthmatic rats (P<0.05). Further histological examinations clearly demonstrated that ligustrazine improved blood circulation and ameliorated platelet activation, aggregation and adhesion, which induced sustained infiltration and activation of various inflammatory cells, including lymphocytes and eosinophils, followed by synthesis and release of a variety of pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines. The present study suggests that ligustrazine is a potent agent for the treatment of allergic asthma due to its strong anti-inflammatory and immuno-modulatory properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Preanalytical requirements for flow cytometric evaluation of platelet activation: choice of anticoagulant.

    PubMed

    Mody, M; Lazarus, A H; Semple, J W; Freedman, J

    1999-06-01

    Accurate assessment of in vivo or in vitro platelet activation requires optimal preanalytical conditions to prevent artefactual in vitro activation of the platelets. The choice of anticoagulant is one of the critical preanalytical conditions as anticoagulants exert different effects on the activation of platelets ex vivo. We tested the effectiveness of Diatube-H (also known as CTAD; sodium citrate, theophylline, adenosine and dipyridamole) and citrate vacutainer tubes in preventing artefactual activation of platelets and preserving functional reserve. Platelet surface expression of the CD62P (reflecting alpha granule release), CD63 (reflecting lysosomal release) and modulation of normal platelet membrane glycoproteins CD41a and CD42b, were measured in whole blood and in isolated platelets immediately after collection and at 6, 24 and 48 h after venipuncture. Samples taken into Diatube-H showed less spontaneous platelet activation than did those taken into citrate. To measure in vitro platelet functional reserve, thrombin was added as agonist to blood stored for varying periods up to 48 h. Although Diatube-H suppressed in vitro platelet activation for up to 4 h, in samples kept for 6-24 h before thrombin addition, the inhibitory effect was lost and platelets responded fully to agonist activation. Hence, Diatube-H preserved platelets and allowed for measurement of in vivo platelet activation as well as thrombin-induced in vitro platelet activation after 6-24 h, in both whole blood and isolated platelets.

  2. Prolonged Platelet Activation in Individuals with Elevated Blood Pressure in response to a Moderate Exercise Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Suzi; Adler, Karen A.; von Känel, Roland; Nordberg, Judy; Ziegler, Michael G.; Mills, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the magnitude of 20-min moderate exercise-induced platelet activation in 50 volunteers with normal (n= 31) or elevated BP (EBP; n=19). Blood was drawn before, immediately after and 25-min after exercise. Antibody-staining for platelet activation markers P-selectin and fibrinogen receptors was done with and without adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation in whole blood for flow cytometric analyses. Exercise led to increases in % aggregated platelets and % platelets expressing P-selectin or PAC-1 binding (p’s ≤ 0.001). This increase in % platelets expressing P-selectin continued even after 25-min rest only in the EBP group (p ≤ 0.01) accompanied by an increase in % aggregated platelets (p ≤ 0.05). Although ADP stimulation led to increased platelet activation at rest, it was attenuated following exercise, even among EBP individuals. A moderate exercise challenge induced prolonged platelet activation in individuals with EBP but attenuation in activation to further stimulation by an agonist. Findings suggest that a recovery period after physical stress appear critical in individuals with high BP regarding platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to an acute coronary syndrome in vulnerable individuals. PMID:19170949

  3. Antibodies Elicited by the Bovine Lungworm, Dictyocaulus viviparus, Cross-React with Platelet-Activating Factor▿

    PubMed Central

    Kooyman, Frans N. J.; de Vries, Erik; Ploeger, Harm W.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2007-01-01

    Parasite N-glycans may play an important role in helminth infections. As antibodies from Dictyocaulus viviparus-infected calves strongly react with N-glycans, we investigated the characteristics of the major immunodominant glycoprotein (GP300) of this parasite. Probing of worm extracts with various lectins demonstrated unique binding of GP300 to wheat germ agglutinin. Analysis of lectin-purified GP300 revealed that the glycan was substituted with phosphorylcholine and reacted with the phosphorylcholine-specific antibody TEPC-15. Competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with GP300-coated plates and GP300-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) in conjunction with free phosphorylcholine or TEPC-15 demonstrated that antibodies from infected calves recognized phosphorylcholine on GP300. Additional assays showed that these antibodies cross-reacted with the phosphorylcholine moiety present on platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), a proinflammatory mediator of the host. Heavily infected calves contained high levels of serum GP300-specific IgG1 but low levels of IgA and IgG2 and showed a reduced influx of eosinophils in the lungs, all consistent with a neutralization of PAF activity. In conclusion, we demonstrated that D. viviparus infection elicits GP300-specific antibodies that cross-react with PAF and may neutralize PAF function, thus limiting the development of a protective response as well as parasite-induced host pathology. PMID:17606606

  4. Platelet activation of platelet concentrates derived from buffy coat and apheresis methods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Soleimany Ferizhandy

    2011-02-01

    Preparation for storage may cause platelet activation. The quality of platelet concentrates plays an important role in transfusion therapy. Platelet concentrates are produced by different centrifugation methods; buffy coat (buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates-BC) and plateletpheresis (apheresis-derived platelet concentrates-APC). Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: platelet, WBC and RBC counts pH, volume, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and Annexin V. The present paper compares the quality of both platelet preparations in vitro. In this experimental study, 30 platelet concentrates were harvested with the Haemonetics MCS plus and 30 units via the buffy coat (BC) method. The percentages of Annexin V expression, PF4 levels, platelet, WBC and RBC counts, pH and volume were measure immediately after collection and after 3 days of storage. During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed, no significant pH or RBC, difference in comparison with apheresis preparations (p>0.05). During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed a significant increase in the PF4 and Annexin V expression, compared to the apheresis preparations on day three (p<0.05). The kinetics of PF4 and Annexin V levels are influenced by the method used to prepare platelets for storage. The different levels of PF4 and Annexin V in BCs and APCs clearly demonstrates a progressive activation of BC platelets exceeding that of APC. However, in vivo studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  5. The role of Nox1 and Nox2 in GPVI-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation☆

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, T.G.; Berndt, M.C.; Carrim, N.; Cowman, J.; Kenny, D.; Metharom, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Activation of the platelet-specific collagen receptor, glycoprotein (GP) VI, induces intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; however the relevance of ROS to GPVI-mediated platelet responses remains unclear. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the role of the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase (Nox)1 and 2 complexes in GPVI-dependent platelet activation and collagen-induced thrombus formation. Methods and results ROS production was measured by quantitating changes in the oxidation-sensitive dye, H2DCF-DA, following platelet activation with the GPVI-specific agonist, collagen related peptide (CRP). Using a pharmacological inhibitor specific for Nox1, 2-acetylphenothiazine (ML171), and Nox2 deficient mice, we show that Nox1 is the key Nox homolog regulating GPVI-dependent ROS production. Nox1, but not Nox2, was essential for CRP-dependent thromboxane (Tx)A2 production, which was mediated in part through p38 MAPK signaling; while neither Nox1 nor Nox2 was significantly involved in regulating CRP-induced platelet aggregation/integrin αIIbβ3 activation, platelet spreading, or dense granule and α-granule release (ATP release and P-selectin surface expression, respectively). Ex-vivo perfusion analysis of mouse whole blood revealed that both Nox1 and Nox2 were involved in collagen-mediated thrombus formation at arterial shear. Conclusion Together these results demonstrate a novel role for Nox1 in regulating GPVI-induced ROS production, which is essential for optimal p38 activation and subsequent TxA2 production, providing an explanation for reduced thrombus formation following Nox1 inhibition. PMID:24494191

  6. Atherosclerosis proceeds independently of thrombin-induced platelet activation in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J.R.; Cornelissen, I.; Mountford, J.K.; Coughlin, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet activation has long been postulated to contribute to the development of atherosclerotic plaques, although the mechanism by which this might occur remains unknown. Thrombin is a potent platelet activator and transfusion of thrombin-activated platelets into mice increases plaque formation, suggesting that thrombin-induced platelet activation might contribute to platelet-dependent atherosclerosis. Platelets from protease-activated receptor 4-deficient (Par4-/-) mice fail to respond to thrombin. To determine whether thrombin-activated platelets play a necessary role in a model of atherogenesis, we compared plaque formation and progression in Par4+/+ and Par4-/- mice in the atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) background. Littermate Par4+/+ and Par4-/- mice, all ApoE-/-, were placed on a Western diet (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) for 5 or 10 weeks. The percent of aortic lumenal surface covered by plaques in Par4+/+ and Par4-/- mice was not different at either time point (2.2 ± 0.3% vs. 2.5 ± 0.2% and 5.1 ± 0.4% vs. 5.6 ± 0.4% after 5 and 10 weeks, respectively). Further, no differences were detected in the cross-sectional area of plaques measured at the aortic root (1.53 ± 0.17 vs. 1.66 ± 0.16 × 105 μm2 and 12.56 ± 1.23 vs. 13.03 ± 0.55 × 105 μm2 after 5 and10 weeks, respectively). These findings indicate that thrombin-mediated platelet activation is not required for the early development of atherosclerotic plaques in the ApoE-/- mouse model and suggest that, if platelet activation is required for plaque formation under these experimental conditions, platelet activators other than thrombin suffice. PMID:19217621

  7. Association of platelet activation markers with recurrence of atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation.

    PubMed

    Pfluecke, Christian; Plichta, Lina; Tarnowski, Daniel; Forkmann, Mathias; Ulbrich, Stefan; Quick, Silvio; Heidrich, Felix M; Wiedemann, Stephan; Christoph, Marian; Poitz, David M; Wunderlich, Carsten; Strasser, Ruth H; Ibrahim, Karim

    2016-10-13

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is known to cause platelet activation. AF and its degree of thrombogenesis could be associated with monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs). We investigated on whether the content of MPAs or other platelet activation markers is associated with the recurrence of AF after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). A total of 73 patients with symptomatic AF underwent PVI. After 6 months, all patients were evaluated for episodes of AF recurrence. At the same time, flow-cytometric quantification analyses were performed to determine the content of MPAs. Further platelet activation parameters were detected by using either cytometric bead arrays or quantitative immunological determination. Patients with recurrent AF (n = 20) compared to individuals without AF relapse (n = 53) were associated with an increased content of MPAs (43 ± 3% vs. 33 ± 2%, p = 0.004), as well as an increased CD41 expression on monocytes (191 ± 20 vs. 113 ± 6, p = 0.001). The level of the soluble platelet activation markers such as D-dimer, sCD40L, and sP-selectin did not differ between these groups. The content of MPAs correlated weakly with the level of sCD40L (r = 0.26, p = 0.03), but not with sP-selectin and D-dimer, whereas sP-selectin and sCD40L correlated with each other (r = 0.38, p = 0.001). Only the cellular marker of platelet activation, the content of MPAs, was increased in patients with recurrent AF after PVI. In contrast, soluble markers remained unaltered. These data indicate a distinct mechanism and level of platelet activation in AF. The clinical relevance of MPAs in identifying AF recurrence or in guiding the therapy with anticoagulants remains to be elucidated.

  8. Anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Won; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a critical role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders and strokes. The inhibition of platelet function is beneficial for the treatment and prevention of these diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (EATN), a neolignan isolated from Myristica fragrans, using human platelets. EATN preferentially inhibited thrombin- and platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation without affecting platelet damage in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 3.2 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.3 μM, respectively. However, much higher concentrations of EATN were required to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid. EATN also inhibited thrombin-induced serotonin and ATP release, and thromboxane B2 formation in human platelets. Moreover, EATN caused an increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in thrombin-activated human platelets. Therefore, we conclude that the inhibitory mechanism of EATN on platelet aggregation may increase cAMP levels and subsequently inhibit intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by interfering with a common signaling pathway rather than by directly inhibiting the binding of thrombin or PAF to their receptors. This is the first report of the anti-platelet activity of EATN isolated from M. fragrans.

  9. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  10. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  11. Zinc is a transmembrane agonist that induces platelet activation in a tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Watson, Ben R; White, Nathan A; Taylor, Kirk A; Howes, Joanna-Marie; Malcor, Jean-Daniel M; Bihan, Dominique; Sage, Stewart O; Farndale, Richard W; Pugh, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Following platelet adhesion and primary activation at sites of vascular injury, secondary platelet activation is induced by soluble platelet agonists, such as ADP, ATP, thrombin and thromboxane. Zinc ions are also released from platelets and damaged cells and have been shown to act as a platelet agonist. However, the mechanism of zinc-induced platelet activation is not well understood. Here we show that exogenous zinc gains access to the platelet cytosol and induces full platelet aggregation that is dependent on platelet protein tyrosine phosphorylation, PKC and integrin αIIbβ3 activity and is mediated by granule release and secondary signalling. ZnSO4 increased the binding affinity of GpVI, but not integrin α2β1. Low concentrations of ZnSO4 potentiated platelet aggregation by collagen-related peptide (CRP-XL), thrombin and adrenaline. Chelation of intracellular zinc reduced platelet aggregation induced by a number of different agonists, inhibited zinc-induced tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibited platelet activation in whole blood under physiologically relevant flow conditions. Our data are consistent with a transmembrane signalling role for zinc in platelet activation during thrombus formation.

  12. Metformin Uniquely Prevents Thrombosis by Inhibiting Platelet Activation and mtDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Guang; Wei, Zeliang; Ji, Chengjie; Zheng, Huajie; Gu, Jun; Ma, Limei; Huang, Wenfang; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Zhang, Rui; Qin, Chaoyi; Wen, Li; Xing, Zhihua; Cao, Yu; Xia, Qing; Lu, Yanrong; Li, Ke; Niu, Hai; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis and its complications are the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes. Metformin, a first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes, is the only drug demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. However, whether metformin can effectively prevent thrombosis and its potential mechanism of action is unknown. Here we show, metformin prevents both venous and arterial thrombosis with no significant prolonged bleeding time by inhibiting platelet activation and extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Specifically, metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I and thereby protects mitochondrial function, reduces activated platelet-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species overload and associated membrane damage. In mitochondrial function assays designed to detect amounts of extracellular mtDNA, we found that metformin prevents mtDNA release. This study also demonstrated that mtDNA induces platelet activation through a DC-SIGN dependent pathway. Metformin exemplifies a promising new class of antiplatelet agents that are highly effective at inhibiting platelet activation by decreasing the release of free mtDNA, which induces platelet activation in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. This study has established a novel therapeutic strategy and molecular target for thrombotic diseases, especially for thrombotic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27805009

  13. Synthesis and Anti-Platelet Activity of Thiosulfonate Derivatives Containing a Quinone Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Bolibrukh, Khrystyna; Polovkovych, Svyatoslav; Khoumeri, Omar; Halenova, Tetyana; Nikolaeva, Irina; Savchuk, Olexiy; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice; Lubenets, Vira; Novikov, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    Thiosulfonate derivatives based on quinones were synthesized for studying “structure-activity relationship” compounds with an acylated and a free amino-group. Anti-platelet activity of the synthesized compounds was determined and the influence of substituents on the activity of the derivatives was assessed. PMID:26839819

  14. Platelet activation and thrombus formation relates to the presence of myocardial inflammation in patients with cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Bobbert, Peter; Weikert, Ulf; Schmidt-Lucke, Caroline; Skurk, Carsten; Meyer, Alexander; Steffens, Daniel; Schultheiss, Heinz Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2014-05-01

    Patients with cardiomyopathy show a significantly increased risk for thromboembolic events due to a hypercoagulable state and platelet dysfunction. The pathophysiologic mechanism underlying the increasing platelet activity in patients with cardiomyopathy remains unclear. We performed a clinical study to elucidate the link between myocardial tissue alterations and platelet activation in patients with cardiomyopathy. A total of 30 patients with suspected cardiomyopathy and 10 healthy control patients were included in our study. Hemodynamic parameters were measured by catheterization and echocardiography. Endomyocardial biopsies were taken to determine myocardial inflammation. Flow cytometry was performed to examine the platelet activation by quantification of p-selectin and thrombospondin expression on platelets. The p-selectin (8.46 ± 3.67 AU) and thrombospondin (26.56 ± 23.21 AU) expression was significantly correlated with the amount of CD3+ T cells (p-selectin: r=0.573, p<0.05; thrombospondin: r=0.488, p<0.05) and the endothelial/interstitial activation (p-selectin: r=0.521, p<0.05; thrombospondin: r=0.39, p<0.05). This was found to be independent of hemodynamic parameters, age, and gender. The platelet activation of patients (n=3) with echocardiographically documented ventricular thrombi was significantly increased (p-selectin: 12.57 ± 5.5 AU vs. 8.1 ± 3.2 AU, p<0.05) and this was associated with elevated myocardial inflammation scores. Myocardial inflammation is associated with a significant increase in platelet activation and ventricular thrombus formation independently of the hemodynamic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Platelet activation biomarkers in Berkeley sickle cell mice and the response to prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kousaku; Tanaka, Hisako; Samata, Naozumi; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Mizuno, Makoto; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is a common complication that occurs in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Although underlying mechanisms of VOC remain unclear, platelet activation has been associated with VOC. In the present study, plasma adenine nucleotide measurements using LC-ESI-MS/MS showed that plasma ADP in the Berkeley murine model of SCD was significantly higher (applox. 2.7-fold increase) compared with control mice. Assessment of platelet activation markers using flow cytometry indicated that in SCD mice at steady state (8 weeks old), circulating platelets were partially activated and this tended to increase with age (15 weeks old). The administration of prasugrel, a thienopiridyl P2Y12 antagonist, did not affect the activation state of circulating platelets suggesting P2Y12 independent mechanism of activation. In this murine SCD model, ex vivo addition of ADP or PAR4 TRAP resulted in further platelet activation as assessed by expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and P-selectin both at 8 and 15 weeks. In 15 weeks old SCD mice, agonist-induced increases in activation markers were enhanced compared to control mice. Oral administration of prasugrel effectively inhibited ex vivo platelet activation consistent with clinical data in patients with SCD. In conclusion, in the Berkeley murine model of SCD, we found evidence of basal and agonist-stimulated platelet activation which could in part be attenuated by prasugrel. These data are consistent with observations made in patients with SCD and suggest possible utility of this murine model and prasugrel therapy in exploring treatment options for patients with SCD.

  16. Temporal quantitative phosphoproteomics of ADP stimulation reveals novel central nodes in platelet activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Geiger, Jörg; Gambaryan, Stepan; Solari, Fiorella A.; Dell’Aica, Margherita; Loroch, Stefan; Mattheij, Nadine J.; Mindukshev, Igor; Pötz, Oliver; Jurk, Kerstin; Burkhart, Julia M.; Fufezan, Christian; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Walter, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) enhances platelet activation by virtually any other stimulant to complete aggregation. It binds specifically to the G-protein–coupled membrane receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12, stimulating intracellular signaling cascades, leading to integrin αIIbβ3 activation, a process antagonized by endothelial prostacyclin. P2Y12 inhibitors are among the most successful antiplatelet drugs, however, show remarkable variability in efficacy. We reasoned whether a more detailed molecular understanding of ADP-induced protein phosphorylation could identify (1) critical hubs in platelet signaling toward aggregation and (2) novel molecular targets for antiplatelet treatment strategies. We applied quantitative temporal phosphoproteomics to study ADP-mediated signaling at unprecedented molecular resolution. Furthermore, to mimic the antagonistic efficacy of endothelial-derived prostacyclin, we determined how Iloprost reverses ADP-mediated signaling events. We provide temporal profiles of 4797 phosphopeptides, 608 of which showed significant regulation. Regulated proteins are implicated in well-known activating functions such as degranulation and cytoskeletal reorganization, but also in less well-understood pathways, involving ubiquitin ligases and GTPase exchange factors/GTPase-activating proteins (GEF/GAP). Our data demonstrate that ADP-triggered phosphorylation occurs predominantly within the first 10 seconds, with many short rather than sustained changes. For a set of phosphorylation sites (eg, PDE3ASer312, CALDAG-GEFISer587, ENSASer109), we demonstrate an inverse regulation by ADP and Iloprost, suggesting that these are central modulators of platelet homeostasis. This study demonstrates an extensive spectrum of human platelet protein phosphorylation in response to ADP and Iloprost, which inversely overlap and represent major activating and inhibitory pathways. PMID:28060719

  17. Platelet activation after sorin freedom solo valve implantation: a comparative study with Carpentier-Edwards Perimount Magna.

    PubMed

    Repossini, Alberto; Tononi, Laura; Martinil, Giuliana; Di Bacco, Lorenzo; Girolettiz, Laura; Rosati, Fabrizio; Muneretto, Claudio

    2014-11-01

    As platelet activation is known to be a side effect of cardiac surgery, recent analyses have been conducted to identify the association between thrombocytopenia and aortic valve replacement (AVR) using a bioprosthesis. The type of bioprosthesis has been indicated as an independent risk factor for a lower postoperative platelet count, an association which has been mainly observed with the Sorin Freedom Solo valve. The study aim was to analyze platelet activation after AVR with two different bioprostheses, the Sorin Freedom SOLO (FS) and the Carpentier-Edwards Magna (CE). Thirty-eight consecutive patients undergoing aortic valve surgery were enrolled prospectively and assigned to either the FS group (n = 18) or the CE group (n = 20) according to their clinical evaluation. Five patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) were included as a control group. Clinical biochemical parameters (von Willebrand factor (vWF), prothrombin fragments 1+2 (F1+2), P-selectin, and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG)) were assessed preoperatively (TO), and at 1 h (T1), 48 h (T2) and seven days (T3) postoperatively. The two groups differed in terms of age (FS 77.3 +/- 7.0 years; CE 65.4 +/- 8.4 years; p < 0.05). Intraoperatively, parameters such as CPB time (FS 106.8 +/- 25.5 min; CE 108.2 +/- 23.4 min, p = NS) and aortic cross-clamp time (FS 78.1 +/- 22.8 min; CE 80.7 +/- 19.4 min, p = NS) were comparable. The platelet count was significantly reduced after FS implantation compared to the other groups. Factors involving platelet activation and blood coagulation activation assessed by means of prothrombin F1+2 (FS: TO = 0.48; T1 = 0.66; T2 = 0.46; T3 = 0.52 nmol/ml versus CE: T0 = 0.38; T1 = 0.68; T2 = 0.41; T3 = 0.49 nmol/ml); P-selectin (FS: T0 = 89.6; T1= 130.4; T2 = 92.6; T3 = 94.3 ng/ml versus CE: T0 = 81.4; T1 = 115.9; T2 = 92.2; T3 = 85.7 ng/ml); and beta-TG (FS: T0 = 6.7; T1 = 17.6; T2 = 8.6; T3 = 7.7 ng/ml versus CE: T0 = 7

  18. Platelet Activation after Presyncope by Lower Body Negative Pressure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pidcoke, Heather F.; Scherer, Michael R.; Ryan, Kathy L.; Rickards, Caroline A.; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Central hypovolemia elevates hemostatic activity which is essential for preventing exsanguination after trauma, but platelet activation to central hypovolemia has not been described. We hypothesized that central hypovolemia induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP) activates platelets. Eight healthy subjects were exposed to progressive central hypovolemia by LBNP until presyncope. At baseline and 5 min after presyncope, hemostatic activity of venous blood was evaluated by flow cytometry, thrombelastography, and plasma markers of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Cell counts were also determined. Flow cytometry revealed that LBNP increased mean fluorescence intensity of PAC-1 by 1959±455 units (P<0.001) and percent of fluorescence-positive platelets by 27±18%-points (P = 0.013). Thrombelastography demonstrated that coagulation was accelerated (R-time decreased by 0.8±0.4 min (P = 0.001)) and that clot lysis increased (LY60 by 6.0±5.8%-points (P = 0.034)). Plasma coagulation factor VIII and von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor activity increased (P = 0.011 and P = 0.024, respectively), demonstrating increased coagulation activity, while von Willebrand factor antigen was unchanged. Plasma protein C activity and tissue-type plasminogen activator increased (P = 0.007 and P = 0.017, respectively), and D-dimer increased by 0.03±0.02 mg l−1 (P = 0.031), demonstrating increased fibrinolytic activity. Plasma prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were unchanged. Platelet count increased by 15±13% (P = 0.014) and red blood cells by 9±4% (P = 0.002). In humans, LBNP-induced presyncope activates platelets, as evidenced by increased exposure of active glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, accelerates coagulation. LBNP activates fibrinolysis, similar to hemorrhage, but does not alter coagulation screening tests, such as prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. LBNP results in increased platelet counts

  19. Effects of plasma nitric oxide levels on platelet activation in single donor apheresis and random donor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Büyükkağnici, Demet Iren; Ilhan, Osman; Kavas, Güzin Ozelçi; Arslan, Onder; Arat, Mutlu; Dalva, Klara; Ayyildiz, Erol

    2007-02-01

    P-selectin is an useful marker to determine platelet activation and nitric oxide inhibits platelet activation, secretion, adhesion and aggregation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitric oxide and P-selectin values in both single donor apheresis and random donor platelet concentrates. According to the results of this study, we found that the best platelet concentrate is freshly prepared single donor apheresis concentrate and it is important to prevent activation at the beginning of the donation. Nitric oxide, which is synthesized from platelets during the storage period, is not sufficient to prevent platelet activation.

  20. Platelet Activation in Patients with Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis Undergoing Stent Revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, Satjit; Reed, Grant; Brewster, Pamela; Kennedy, David; Burket, Mark W.; Colyer, William; Yu, Haifeng; Zhang, Dong; Shapiro, Joseph I.; Cooper, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) is a marker of platelet activation; whether platelet activation occurs in the setting of renal artery stenosis and stenting is unknown. Additionally, the effect of embolic protection devices and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors on platelet activation during renal artery intervention is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Plasma levels of sCD40L were measured in healthy controls, patients with atherosclerosis without renal stenosis, and patients with renal artery stenosis before, immediately after, and 24 hours after renal artery stenting. Results Soluble CD40L levels were higher in renal artery stenosis patients than normal controls (347.5 ± 27.0 versus 65.2 ± 1.4 pg/ml, P < 0.001), but were similar to patients with atherosclerosis without renal artery stenosis. Platelet-rich emboli were captured in 26% (9 of 35) of embolic protection device patients, and in these patients sCD40L was elevated before the procedure. Embolic protection device use was associated with a nonsignificant increase in sCD40L, whereas sCD40L declined with abciximab after the procedure (324.9 ± 42.5 versus 188.7 ± 31.0 pg/ml, P = 0.003) and at 24 hours. Conclusions Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is associated with platelet activation, but this appears to be related to atherosclerosis, not renal artery stenosis specifically. Embolization of platelet-rich thrombi is common in renal artery stenting and is inhibited with abciximab. PMID:21817131

  1. Platelet Activation and Biofilm Formation by Aerococcus urinae, an Endocarditis-Causing Pathogen▿

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Oonagh; Mörgelin, Matthias; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Aerococcus urinae can cause infectious endocarditis (IE) in older persons. Biofilm formation and platelet aggregation are believed to contribute to bacterial virulence in IE. Five A. urinae isolates from human blood were shown to form biofilms in vitro, and biofilm formation was enhanced by the presence of human plasma. Four of the A. urinae isolates caused platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors. The Au3 isolate, which induced platelet aggregation in all donors, also activated platelets, as determined by flow cytometry. Platelet aggregation was dependent on bacterial protein structures and on platelet activation since it was sensitive to both trypsin and prostaglandin E1. Plasma proteins at the bacterial surface were needed for platelet aggregation; and roles of the complement system, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G were demonstrated. Complement-depleted serum was unable to support platelet aggregation by Au3 and complement blockade using compstatin-inhibited platelet activation. Platelet activation by Au3 was inhibited by blocking of the platelet fibrinogen receptor, and this isolate was also shown to bind to radiolabeled fibrinogen. Removal of IgG from platelet-rich plasma by a specific protease inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by A. urinae, and blockade of the platelet FcRγIIa hindered platelet activation induced by Au3. Convalescent-phase serum from a patient with A. urinae IE transferred the ability of the bacterium to aggregate platelets in an otherwise nonresponsive donor. Our results show that A. urinae exhibits virulence strategies of importance for IE. PMID:20696834

  2. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Salazar, Gustavo Adolfo; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Perales, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P) translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet proteome in dengue

  3. Platelet proteome reveals novel pathways of platelet activation and platelet-mediated immunoregulation in dengue.

    PubMed

    Trugilho, Monique Ramos de Oliveira; Hottz, Eugenio Damaceno; Brunoro, Giselle Villa Flor; Teixeira-Ferreira, André; Carvalho, Paulo Costa; Salazar, Gustavo Adolfo; Zimmerman, Guy A; Bozza, Fernando A; Bozza, Patrícia T; Perales, Jonas

    2017-05-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent human arbovirus disease worldwide. Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes syndromes varying from self-limiting febrile illness to severe dengue. Although dengue pathophysiology is not completely understood, it is widely accepted that increased inflammation plays important roles in dengue pathogenesis. Platelets are blood cells classically known as effectors of hemostasis which have been increasingly recognized to have major immune and inflammatory activities. Nevertheless, the phenotype and effector functions of platelets in dengue pathogenesis are not completely understood. Here we used quantitative proteomics to investigate the protein content of platelets in clinical samples from patients with dengue compared to platelets from healthy donors. Our assays revealed a set of 252 differentially abundant proteins. In silico analyses associated these proteins with key molecular events including platelet activation and inflammatory responses, and with events not previously attributed to platelets during dengue infection including antigen processing and presentation, proteasome activity, and expression of histones. From these results, we conducted functional assays using samples from a larger cohort of patients and demonstrated evidence for platelet activation indicated by P-selectin (CD62P) translocation and secretion of granule-stored chemokines by platelets. In addition, we found evidence that DENV infection triggers HLA class I synthesis and surface expression by a mechanism depending on functional proteasome activity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cell-free histone H2A released during dengue infection binds to platelets, increasing platelet activation. These findings are consistent with functional importance of HLA class I, proteasome subunits, and histones that we found exclusively in proteome analysis of platelets in samples from dengue patients. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of the platelet proteome in dengue

  4. Two-dimensional dynamic simulation of platelet activation during mechanical heart valve closure.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, S; Udaykumar, H S; Marshall, J S; Chandran, K B

    2006-10-01

    A major drawback in the operation of mechanical heart valve prostheses is thrombus formation in the near valve region. Detailed flow analysis in this region during the valve closure phase is of interest in understanding the relationship between shear stress and platelet activation. A fixed-grid Cartesian mesh flow solver is used to simulate the blood flow through a bi-leaflet mechanical valve employing a two-dimensional geometry of the leaflet with a pivot point representing the hinge region. A local mesh refinement algorithm allows efficient and fast flow computations with mesh adaptation based on the gradients of the flow field in the leaflet-housing gap at the instant of valve closure. Leaflet motion is calculated dynamically based on the fluid forces acting on it employing a fluid-structure interaction algorithm. Platelets are modeled and tracked as point particles by a Lagrangian particle tracking method which incorporates the hemodynamic forces on the particles. A platelet activation model is included to predict regions which are prone to platelet activation. Closure time of the leaflet is validated against experimental studies. Results show that the orientation of the jet flow through the gap between the housing and the leaflet causes the boundary layer from the valve housing to be drawn in by the shear layer separating from the leaflet. The interaction between the separating shear layers is seen to cause a region of intensely rotating flow with high shear stress and high residence time of particles leading to high likelihood of platelet activation in that region.

  5. The effect of exercise and training status on platelet activation: do cocoa polyphenols play a role?

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Quinn, H; Mok, M; Southgate, R J; Turner, A H; Li, D; Sinclair, A J; Hawley, J A

    2006-09-01

    Sedentary and trained men respond differently to the same intensity of exercise, this is probably related to their platelet reactivity and antioxidant capacity. There is growing interest in the utilization of antioxidant-rich plant extracts as dietary food supplements. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute bout of sub maximal exercise on platelet count and differential response of platelet activation in trained and sedentary subjects and to observe if cocoa polyphenols reverse the effect of exercise on platelet function. The practical significance of this study was that many sedentary people engage in occasional strenuous exercise that may predispose them to risk of heart disease. Fasting blood samples were collected from 16 male subjects, pre and post 1-h cycling exercise at 70% of maximal aerobic power (VO2max) before and after consumption of cocoa or placebo. Agonist stimulated citrated whole blood was utilized for measuring platelet aggregation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and platelet activation. Baseline platelet count (221 +/- 33 x 10(9)/L) and ATP release (1.4 +/- 0.6 nmol) increased significantly (P < 0.05) after exercise in all subjects. Baseline platelet numbers in the trained were higher (P < 0.05) than in the sedentary (235 +/- 37 vs. 208 +/- 34 x 10(9)/L), where as platelet activation in trained was lower (P < 0.05) than sedentary (51 +/- 6 vs. 59 +/- 5%). Seven days of cocoa polyphenol supplementation had little effect on any of the parameters measured. We conclude that trained subjects show decreased activation of stimulated platelets when compared to the sedentary subjects and short-term cocoa polyphenol supplementation did not decrease platelet activity in response to exercise independent of prior training status.

  6. In vivo platelet activation and platelet hyperreactivity in abacavir-treated HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Falcinelli, Emanuela; Francisci, Daniela; Belfiori, Barbara; Petito, Eleonora; Guglielmini, Giuseppe; Malincarne, Lisa; Mezzasoma, AnnaMaria; Sebastiano, Manuela; Conti, Valentina; Giannini, Silvia; Bonora, Stefano; Baldelli, Franco; Gresele, Paolo

    2013-08-01

    Abacavir (ABC) has been associated with ischaemic cardiovascular events in HIV-infected patients, but the pathogenic mechanisms are unknown. Aim of our study was to assess whether ABC induces in vivo platelet activation and ex vivo platelet hyper-reactivity. In a retrospective, case-control study, in vivo platelet activation markers were measured in 69 HIV-infected patients, before starting therapy and after 6-12 months of either ABC (n=35) or tenofovir (TDF) (n=34), and compared with those from 20 untreated HIV-infected patients. A subgroup of patients was restudied after 28-34 months for ex vivo platelet reactivity. In vivo platelet activation markers were assessed by ELISA or flow cytometry, ex vivo platelet reactivity by light transmission aggregometry (LTA) and PFA-100®. Thein vitro effects of the ABC metabolite, carbovir triphosphate, on aggregation and intra-platelet cGMP were also studied. sPLA2, sPsel and sGPV increased significantly 6-12 months after the beginning of ABC, but not of TDF or of no treatment. Ex vivo platelet function studies showed enhanced LTA, shorter PFA-100® C/ADP closure time and enhanced platelet expression of P-sel and CD40L in the ABC group. The intake of ABC blunted the increase of intraplatelet cGMP induced by nitric oxide (NO) and acutely enhanced collagen-induced aggregation. Preincubation of control platelets with carbovir triphosphate in vitro enhanced platelet aggregation and blunted NO-induced cGMP elevation. In conclusion, treatment with ABC enhances in vivo platelet activation and induces platelet hyperreactivity by blunting the inhibitory effects of NO on platelets. These effects may lead to an increase of ischaemic cardiovascular events.

  7. Computational evaluation of platelet activation induced by a bioprosthetic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Sirois, Eric; Sun, Wei

    2011-02-01

    It is known that bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) have better hemodynamics and lower thromboembolic events compared with their mechanical counterparts; however, patients implanted with BHVs still face the potential of such complications. The risk of a clinical thromboembolism is on average 0.7% per year in patients with tissue valves in sinus rhythm. In this study, we developed a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model of a BHV implanted in an aortic root and investigated the BHV-induced platelet activation using a damage accumulation model previously applied to mechanical valves. The CFD model was validated against published experimental data, including the flow velocity profile across the valve and the transvalvular pressure drop, and close matches were obtained. Hemodynamic performance measures such as flow velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, and wall shear stress were explored. Lagrangian particle tracking was used to calculate the extent of platelet activation for central bulk flow and flow in the vicinity of the leaflets. A peak flow of 2.22 m/s was observed at 40 msec after peak systole in the vicinity of a fold at the base of the leaflets. With the platelet activation expressed as 0-100% of activation threshold levels, mean damage on one pass was 2.489 × 10(-7)% and maximum damage on one pass was 8.778 × 10(-4)%. Our results suggested that the potential for BHV-induced platelet activation was low and that the leaflet's fully open geometry might play a role in the extent of blood element damage. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  9. Effect of remote ischemic preconditioning on platelet activation and reactivity induced by ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Stazi, Alessandra; Scalone, Giancarla; Laurito, Marianna; Milo, Maria; Pelargonio, Gemma; Narducci, Maria Lucia; Parrinello, Rossella; Figliozzi, Stefano; Bencardino, Gianluigi; Perna, Francesco; Lanza, Gaetano A; Crea, Filippo

    2014-01-07

    Radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation has been associated with some risk of thromboembolic events. Previous studies showed that preventive short episodes of forearm ischemia (remote ischemic preconditioning [IPC]) reduce exercise-induced platelet reactivity. In this study, we assessed whether remote IPC has any effect on platelet activation induced by radiofrequency ablation of atrial fibrillation. We randomized 19 patients (age, 54.7±11 years; 17 male) undergoing radiofrequency catheter ablation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation to receive remote IPC or sham intermittent forearm ischemia (control subjects) before the procedure. Blood venous samples were collected before and after remote IPC/sham ischemia, at the end of the ablation procedure, and 24 hours later. Platelet activation and reactivity were assessed by flow cytometry by measuring monocyte-platelet aggregate formation, platelet CD41 in the monocyte-platelet aggregate gate, and platelet CD41 and CD62 in the platelet gate in the absence and presence of ADP stimulation. At baseline, there were no differences between groups in platelet variables. Radiofrequency ablation induced platelet activation in both groups, which persisted after 24 hours. However, compared with control subjects, remote IPC patients showed a lower increase in all platelet variables, including monocyte-platelet aggregate formation (P<0.0001), CD41 in the monocyte-platelet aggregate gate (P=0.002), and CD41 (P<0.0001) and CD62 (P=0.002) in the platelet gate. Compared with control subjects, remote IPC was also associated with a significantly lower ADP-induced increase in all platelet markers. Our data show that remote IPC before radiofrequency catheter ablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation significantly reduces the increased platelet activation and reactivity associated with the procedure.

  10. Blocking α5β1 Integrin Attenuates sCD40L-Mediated Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Simic, Damir; Bogdan, Nancy; Teng, Fang; Otieno, Monicah

    2017-09-01

    The soluble form of CD40L (sCD40L) is a platelet-derived mediator that links inflammation, hemostasis, and vascular dysfunction. Indeed, blockade of CD40L by neutralizing antibodies or genetic disruption in mice prevents atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. Until recently, it was believed that CD40 and αIIbβ3 were the only receptors on platelets responsible for binding sCD40L, leading to platelet activation and initiation of thrombotic events. Recent findings showed α5β1 integrin as a novel platelet sCD40L receptor, with an unknown function. For the first time, using anti-α5β1 blocking antibodies, we show that sCD40L/α5β1 interaction leads to platelet activation as evaluated in the human whole blood. Establishing α5β1 integrin's role in platelet activation, and therefore thrombosis will help further shed light on the etiology of thrombotic disease.

  11. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited.

  12. Platelet Activation by Low Concentrations of Intact Oxidized LDL Particles Involves the PAF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Chen, Xi; Salomon, Robert G.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial depolarization aids platelet activation. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) contains the medium length oxidatively truncated phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl-lysoPAF (HAz-LPAF) that disrupts mitochondrial function in nucleated cells, so oxLDL may augment platelet activation. Methods and Results Flow cytometry showed intact oxLDL particles synergized with sub-threshold amounts of soluble agonists to increase intracellular Ca++, and initiate platelet aggregation and surface expression of activated gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin. oxLDL also induced aggregation and increased intracellular Ca++ in FURA2-labeled cells by itself at low, although not higher, concentrations. HAz-LPAF, alone and in combination with sub-stimulatory amounts of thrombin, rapidly increased cytoplasmic Ca++ and initiated aggregation. HAz-LPAF depolarized mitochondria in intact platelets, but this required concentrations beyond those that directly activated platelets. An unexpectedly large series of chemically pure truncated phospholipids generated by oxidative fragmentation of arachidonoyl-, docosahexaneoyl-, or linoleoyl alkyl phospholipids were platelet agonists. The PAF receptor, thought to effectively recognize only phospholipids with very short sn-2 residues, was essential for platelet activation because PAF receptor agonists blocked signaling by all these medium length phospholipids and oxLDL. Conclusions Intact oxLDL particles activate platelets through the PAF receptor, and the PAF receptor responds to a far wider range of oxidized phospholipids in oxLDL than anticipated. PMID:19112165

  13. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Platelets Activated by Pro-Thrombotic Oxidized Phospholipids and Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Titz, Bjoern; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Biswas, Sudipta; Graeber, Thomas G.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36) promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s) induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites) and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites) respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (de)phosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36. PMID:24400094

  14. Valsartan decreases platelet activity and arterial thrombotic events in elderly patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Wang, Hong-Yan; Cai, Fan; Wang, Ling-Jie; Zhang, Feng-Ru; Chen, Xiao-Nan; Yang, Qian; Jiang, Meng-Hui; Wang, Xue-Feng; Shen, Wei-Feng

    2015-01-20

    Angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT 1 R) antagonists are extensively used for blood pressure control in elderly patients with hypertension. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effects of AT 1 R antagonist valsartan on platelet aggregation and the occurrence of cardio-cerebral thrombotic events in elderly patients with hypertension. Two-hundred and ten patients with hypertension and aged > 60 years were randomized to valsartan (n = 140) or amlodipine (n = 70) on admission. The primary endpoint was platelet aggregation rate (PAR) induced by arachidonic acid at discharge, and the secondary endpoint was the rate of thrombotic events including brain infarction and myocardial infarction during follow-up. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were stimulated by angiotensin II (Ang II, 100 nmol/L) with or without pretreatment of valsartan (100 nmol/L), and relative expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and thromboxane B 2 (TXB 2 ) and both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) activities were assessed. Statistical analyses were performed by GraphPad Prism 5.0 software (GraphPad Software, Inc., California, USA). PAR was lower after treatment with valsartan (11.49 ± 0.69% vs. 18.71 ± 2.47%, P < 0.001), associated with more reduced plasma levels of COX-2 (76.94 ± 7.07 U/L vs. 116.4 ± 15.89 U/L, P < 0.001) and TXB 2 (1667 ± 56.50 pg/ml vs. 2207 ± 180.20 pg/ml) (all P < 0.001). Plasma COX-2 and TXB 2 levels correlated significantly with PAR in overall patients (r = 0.109, P < 0.001). During follow-up (median, 18 months), there was a significantly lower thrombotic event rate in patients treated with valsartan (14.3% vs. 32.8%, P = 0.002). Relative expression of COX-2 and secretion of TXB 2 with concordant phosphorylation of p38MAPK and NF-kB were increased in HAECs when stimulated by Ang II (100 nmol/L) but were significantly decreased by valsartan pretreatment (100 nmol/L). AT 1 R antagonist valsartan decreases platelet

  15. Aspirin Has Limited Ability to Modulate Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation Associated with Elevated Shear Stress of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Tran, Phat L.; Sheriff, Jawaad; Brengle, William; Ghosh, Ram; Chiu, Wei-Che; Redaelli, Alberto; Fiore, Gianfranco B.; Pappalardo, Federico; Bluestein, Danny; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) while effective in advanced heart failure, remain plagued by thrombosis related to abnormal flows and elevated shear stress. To limit cfVAD thrombosis, patients utilize complex anti-thrombotic regimens built upon a foundation of aspirin (ASA). While much data exists on ASA as a modulator of biochemically-mediated platelet activation, limited data exists as to the efficacy of ASA as a means of limiting shear-mediated platelet activation, particularly under elevated shear stress common within cfVADs. We investigated the ability of ASA (20, 25 and 125 μM) to limit shear-mediated platelet activation under conditions of: 1) constant shear stress (30 dyne/cm2 and 70 dyne/cm2); 2) dynamic shear stress, and 3) initial high shear exposure (70 dyne/cm2) followed by low shear exposure – i.e. a platelet sensitization protocol, utilizing a hemodynamic shearing device providing uniform shear stress in vitro. The efficacy of ASA to limit platelet activation mediated via passage through a clinical cfVAD system (DeBakey Micromed) in vitro was also studied. ASA reduced platelet activation only under conditions of low shear stress (38% reduction compared to control, n = 10, p < 0.004), with minimal protection at higher shear stress and under dynamic conditions (n = 10, p > 0.5) with no limitation of platelet sensitization. ASA had limited ability (25.6% reduction in platelet activation rate) to modulate shear-mediated platelet activation induced via cfVAD passage. These findings, while performed under “deconstructed” non-clinical conditions by utilizing purified platelets alone in vitro, provide a potential contributory mechanistic explanation for the persistent thrombosis rates experienced clinically in cfVAD patients despite ASA therapy. An opportunity exists to develop enhanced pharmacologic strategies to limit shear-mediated platelet activation at elevated shear levels associated with mechanical circulatory support

  16. Platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C involves phosphoinositide turnover and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton but not 20,000 dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Huzoor-Akbar; Anwer, K.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of phosphoinositides (PIns) and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton (P47) and 20,000 dalton (P20) proteins in platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C (PLC). PLC induced serotonin secretion (SS) and platelet aggregation (PA) in a concentration dependent manner. PLC (0.02 U/ml) caused phosphorylation of P47 in a time dependent manner (27% at 0.5 min to 378% at 7 min). PLC did not induce more than 15% phosphorylation of P20 by 7 min. Aspirin (500 ..mu..M) blocked phosphorylation of P20 but did not inhibit SS, PA or phosphorylation of P47. PLC (0.04 U/ml) decreased radioactivity (cpm) in /sup 32/P labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI-4,5-bis-PO4 (PIP2) and PI-4-PO4 (PIP) by 20%, 12% and 7.5% respectively at 15 sec. The level of PI but not that of PIP2 returned to base line in 3 min. PIP level increased above control values within one min. PLC increased phosphatidic acid level (75% at 0.5 min. to 1545% at 3 min). In other experiments PLC produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a time and concentration dependent manner. However, no DAG was detectable in the first 60 sec. These data suggest that: (a) PIns turnover and phosphorylation of P47 but not that of P20 is involved in platelet activation by PLC; and (b) DAG production from outer membrane phospholipids is not a prerequisite for platelet activation by PLC.

  17. Supplementation with mixed tocopherols increases serum and blood cell gamma-tocopherol but does not alter biomarkers of platelet activation in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Michael W; Ward, Natalie C; Wu, Jason H Y; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Puddey, Ian B; Croft, Kevin D

    2006-01-01

    Some studies have shown potential benefit of vitamin E on platelet function, but several clinical trials failed to show improved cardiovascular outcome with alpha-tocopherol supplementation. Gamma-tocopherol, a major dietary form of vitamin E, may have protective properties different from those of alpha-tocopherol. We compared the effects of supplementation with alpha-tocopherol (500 mg) and a gamma-tocopherol-rich compound (500 mg, containing 60% gamma-tocopherol) on serum and cellular tocopherol concentrations, urinary tocopherol metabolite excretion, and in vivo platelet activation in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Fifty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to receive either 500 mg alpha-tocopherol/d, 500 mg mixed tocopherols/d, or matching placebo. Serum, erythrocyte, and platelet tocopherol and urinary metabolite concentrations were measured at baseline and after the 6-wk intervention. Soluble CD40 ligand, urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B2, serum thromboxane B2, soluble P-selectin, and von Willebrand factor were measured as biomarkers of in vivo platelet activation. Serum alpha-tocopherol increased with both tocopherol treatments. Serum and cellular gamma-tocopherol increased 4-fold (P < 0.001) in the mixed tocopherol group, whereas red blood cell gamma-tocopherol decreased significantly after alpha-tocopherol supplementation. Excretion of alpha-carboxyethyl-hydroxychroman increased significantly after supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and mixed tocopherols. Excretion of gamma-carboxyethyl-hydroxychroman increased significantly after supplementation with mixed tocopherols and after that with alpha-tocopherol, which may reflect the displacement of gamma-tocopherol by alpha-tocopherol due to incorporation of the latter into lipoproteins in the liver. Neither treatment had any significant effect on markers of platelet activation. Supplementation with alpha-tocopherol decreased red blood cell gamma-tocopherol, whereas mixed tocopherols increased both serum

  18. Inhibitory effect of hydrophilic polymer brushes on surface-induced platelet activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yuquan; Lai, Benjamin F L; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Brooks, Donald E

    2010-12-08

    Poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) (PDMA) brushes are successfully grown from unplasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (uPVC) by well-controlled surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP). Molecular weights of the grafted PDMA brushes vary from ≈ 35,000 to 2,170000 Da, while the graft density ranges from 0.08 to 1.13 chains · nm(-2). The polydispersity of the grafted PDMA brushes is controlled within 1.20 to 1.80. Platelet activation (expression of CD62) and adhesion studies reveal that the graft densities of the PDMA brushes play an important role in controlling interfacial properties. PDMA brushes with graft densities between 0.35 and 0.50 chains · nm(-2) induce a significantly reduced platelet activation compared to unmodified uPVC. Moreover, the surface adhesion of platelets on uPVC is significantly reduced by the densely grafted PDMA brushes. PDMA brushes that have high molecular weights lead to a relatively lower platelet activation compared to low-molecular-weight brushes. However, the graft density of the brush is more important than molecular weight in controlling platelet interactions with PVC. PDMA brushes do not produce any significant platelet consumption in platelet rich plasma. Up to a seven-fold decrease in the number of platelets adhered on high graft density brushes is observed compared to the bare PVC surface. Unlike the bare PVC, platelets do not form pseudopodes or change morphology on PDMA brush-coated surfaces. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Mechanism of platelet activation induced by endocannabinoids in blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Brantl, S Annette; Khandoga, Anna L; Siess, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis, and circulating endocannabinoids might modulate platelet function. Previous studies concerning effects of anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) on platelets, mainly performed on isolated cells, provided conflicting results. We therefore investigated the action of three main endocannabinoids [anandamide, 2-AG and virodhamine (arachidonoylethanolamine)] on human platelets in blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). 2-AG and virodhamine induced platelet aggregation in blood, and shape change, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in PRP. The EC50 of 2-AG and virodhamine for platelet aggregation in blood was 97 and 160 µM, respectively. Lower concentrations of 2-AG (20 µM) and virodhamine (50 µM) synergistically induced aggregation with other platelet stimuli. Platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine resembled arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation: shape change, the first platelet response, ATP secretion and aggregation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine were all blocked by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or the specific thromboxane A2 (TXA2) antagonist daltroban. In addition, platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine in blood and PRP were inhibited by JZL184, a selective inhibitor of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). In contrast to 2-AG and virodhamine, anandamide, a substrate of fatty acid amidohydrolase, was inactive. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) agonists lacked stimulatory as well as inhibitory platelet activity. We conclude that 2-AG and virodhamine stimulate platelets in blood and PRP by a MAGL-triggered mechanism leading to free AA and its metabolism by platelet cyclooxygenase-1/thromboxane synthase to TXA2. CB1, CB2 or non-CB1/CB2 receptors are not involved. Our results imply that ASA and MAGL inhibitors will protect platelets from activation by high endocannabinoid levels, and that

  20. Low platelet activity predicts 30 days mortality in patients undergoing heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Sliwka, Joanna; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Zysko, Dorota; Zembala, Michal; Steter, Dawid; Zembala, Marian; Gierlotka, Marek; Kim, Moo Hyun; Serebruany, Victor

    2016-03-01

    Despite advanced techniques and improved clinical outcomes, patient survival following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is still a major concern. Therefore, predicting future CABG mortality represents an unmet medical need and should be carefully explored. The objective of this study is to assess whether pre-CABG platelet activity corresponds with 30 days mortality post-CABG. Retrospective analyses of platelet biomarkers and death at 30 days in 478 heart surgery patients withdrawn from aspirin or/and clopidogrel. Platelet activity was assessed prior to CABG for aspirin (ASPI-test) with arachidonic acid and clopidogrel (ADP-test) utilizing Multiplate impedance aggregometer. Most patients (n = 198) underwent conventional CABG, off-pump (n = 162), minimally invasive (n = 30), artificial valve implantation (n = 48) or valves in combination with CABG (n = 40). There were 22 deaths at 30 days, including 10 in-hospital fatalities. With the cut-off value set below 407 area under curve (AUC) for the ASPI-test, the 30-day mortality was 5.90% for the lower cohort and 2.66% for patients with significantly higher platelet reactivity (P = 0.038). For the ADP-test with a cut-off at 400AUC, the 30-day mortality was 9.68% for the lower cohort and 3.66% for patients with higher platelet reactivity, representing a borderline significant difference (P = 0.046). Aside from the platelet indices, patients who received red blood cell (RBC) concentrate had a highly significant (P < 0.0001) risk of death at 30 days. Both aspirin and clopidogrel tests were useful in predicting 30 days mortality following heart surgery, suggesting the danger of diminished platelet activity prior to CABG in such high-risk patients. These preliminary evidence supports early discontinuation of antiplatelet therapy for elective CABG and requires adequately powered randomized trials to test the hypothesis and potentially improve survival.

  1. The nitric oxide donor pentaerythritol tetranitrate reduces platelet activation in congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Flierl, Ulrike; Fraccarollo, Daniela; Widder, Julian D; Micka, Jan; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Platelet activation associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired endogenous platelet inhibition is part of the cardiovascular phenotype of congestive heart failure (CHF) and contributes to the increased risk for thromboembolic complications. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) has been shown to release nitric oxide without development of nitrate tolerance. We investigated the effect of chronic PETN treatment on platelet activation and aggregation in an experimental CHF model. Chronic ischemic heart failure was induced in male Wistar rats by coronary artery ligation. Starting 7 days thereafter, rats were randomised to placebo or PETN (80 mg/kg twice daily). After 9 weeks, activation of circulating platelets was determined measuring platelet bound fibrinogen, which requires activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on the platelet surface. Binding was quantified by flow-cytometry using a FITC-labelled anti-fibrinogen antibody. Platelet-bound fibrinogen was significantly increased in CHF-Placebo (mean fluorescence intensity: Sham 88±4, CHF-Placebo 104±6, p<0.05) and reduced following treatment with PETN (89±7, p<0.05 vs. CHF-Placebo). Maximal and final ADP-induced aggregation was significantly enhanced in CHF-Placebo vs. Sham-operated animals and normalized / decreased following chronic PETN treatment. Moreover, platelet adhesion was significantly reduced (number of adherent platelets: control: 85.6±5.5, PETN: 40±3.3; p<0.001) and VASP phosphorylation significantly enhanced following in vitro PETN treatment. Chronic NO supplementation using PETN reduces platelet activation in CHF rats. Thus, PETN may constitute a useful approach to prevent thromboembolic complications in CHF.

  2. The Nitric Oxide Donor Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Reduces Platelet Activation in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Flierl, Ulrike; Fraccarollo, Daniela; Widder, Julian D.; Micka, Jan; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet activation associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired endogenous platelet inhibition is part of the cardiovascular phenotype of congestive heart failure (CHF) and contributes to the increased risk for thromboembolic complications. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) has been shown to release nitric oxide without development of nitrate tolerance. We investigated the effect of chronic PETN treatment on platelet activation and aggregation in an experimental CHF model. Methods and Results Chronic ischemic heart failure was induced in male Wistar rats by coronary artery ligation. Starting 7 days thereafter, rats were randomised to placebo or PETN (80 mg/kg twice daily). After 9 weeks, activation of circulating platelets was determined measuring platelet bound fibrinogen, which requires activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on the platelet surface. Binding was quantified by flow-cytometry using a FITC-labelled anti-fibrinogen antibody. Platelet-bound fibrinogen was significantly increased in CHF-Placebo (mean fluorescence intensity: Sham 88±4, CHF-Placebo 104±6, p<0.05) and reduced following treatment with PETN (89±7, p<0.05 vs. CHF-Placebo). Maximal and final ADP-induced aggregation was significantly enhanced in CHF-Placebo vs. Sham-operated animals and normalized / decreased following chronic PETN treatment. Moreover, platelet adhesion was significantly reduced (number of adherent platelets: control: 85.6±5.5, PETN: 40±3.3; p<0.001) and VASP phosphorylation significantly enhanced following in vitro PETN treatment. Conclusion Chronic NO supplementation using PETN reduces platelet activation in CHF rats. Thus, PETN may constitute a useful approach to prevent thromboembolic complications in CHF. PMID:25928879

  3. Impact of commonly prescribed exercise interventions on platelet activation in physically inactive and overweight men.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Andrew; Linden, Matthew D; Robey, Elisa; Watts, Gerald F; Barrett, Hugh; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    The exercise paradox infers that, despite the well-established cardioprotective effects of repeated episodic exercise (training), the risk of acute atherothrombotic events may be transiently increased during and soon after an exercise bout. However, the acute impact of different exercise modalities on platelet function has not previously been addressed. We hypothesized that distinct modalities of exercise would have differing effects on in vivo platelet activation and reactivity to agonists which induce monocyte-platelet aggregate (MPA) formation. Eight middle-aged (53.5 ± 1.6 years) male participants took part in four 30 min experimental interventions (aerobic AE, resistance RE, combined aerobic/resistance exercise CARE, or no-exercise NE), in random order. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 1 h after each intervention, and incubated with one of three agonists of physiologically/clinically relevant pathways of platelet activation (thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 TRAP, arachidonic acid AA, and cross-linked collagen-related peptide xCRP). In the presence of AA, TRAP, and xCRP, both RE and CARE evoked increases in MPAs immediately post-exercise (P < 0.01), whereas only AA significantly increased MPAs immediately after AE (P < 0.01). These increases in platelet activation post-exercise were transient, as responses approached pre-exercise levels by 1 h. These are the first data to suggest that exercise involving a resistance component in humans may transiently increase platelet-mediated thrombotic risk more than aerobic modalities.

  4. Endothelial cells microparticle-associated protein disulfide isomerase promotes platelet activation in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-hui; Song, Dai-jun; Chen, Tong-shuai; Zhang, Wei; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Yun; Xing, Yan-qiu; Wang, Zhi-hao

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a common challenge in the world, and the platelet activation is enhanced in MetS patients. However, the fundamental mechanism that underlies platelet activation in MetS remains incompletely understood. Endothelial cells are damaged seriously in MetS patients, then they release more endothelial microparticles (EMPs). After all, whether the EMPs participate in platelet activation is still obscure. If they were, how did they work? Results We demonstrated that the levels of EMPs, PMPs (platelet derived microparticles) and microparticle-carried-PDI activity increased in MetS patients. IR endothelial cells released more EMPs, the EMP-PDI was more activated. EMPs can enhance the activation of CD62P, GPIIb/IIIa and platelet aggregation and this process can be partly inhibited by PDI inhibitor such as RL90 and rutin. Activated platelets stimulated by EMPs expressed more PDI on cytoplasm and released more PMPs. Materials and Methods We obtained plasma from 23 MetS patients and 8 normal healthy controls. First we built insulin resistance (IR) model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and then we separated EMPs from HUVECs culture medium and used these EMPs to stimulate platelets. Levels of microparticles, P-selectin(CD62P), Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) were detected by flow cytometry and levels of EMPs were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity was detected by insulin transhydrogenase assay. Platelet aggregation was assessed by turbidimetry. Conclusion EMPs can promote the activation of GPIIb/IIIa in platelets and platelet aggregation by the PDI which is carried on the surface of EMPs. PMID:27825126

  5. Effect of Red Blood Cells on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation in Tortuous Arterioles.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K W; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can lead to myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombosis may form in tortuous microvessels, which are often seen throughout the human body, but the microscale mechanisms and processes are not well understood. In straight vessels, the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) is known to push platelets toward walls, which may affect platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. However in tortuous vessels, the effects of RBC interactions with platelets in thrombosis are largely unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this work was to determine the physical effects of RBCs, platelet size, and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A discrete element computational model was used to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, aggregation, and shear-induced platelet activation of hundreds of individual platelets and RBCs in thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Results showed that high shear stress near the inner sides of curved arteriole walls activated platelets to initiate thrombosis. RBCs initially promoted platelet activation, but then collisions of RBCs with mural thrombi reduced the amount of mural thrombus and the size of emboli. In the absence of RBCs, mural thrombus mass was smaller in a highly tortuous arteriole compared to a less tortuous arteriole. In the presence of RBCs however, mural thrombus mass was larger in the highly tortuous arteriole compared to the less tortuous arteriole. As well, smaller platelet size yielded less mural thrombus mass and smaller emboli, either with or without RBCs. This study shed light on microscopic interactions of RBCs and platelets in tortuous microvessels, which have implications in various pathologies associated with thrombosis and bleeding.

  6. The human endogenous circadian system causes greatest platelet activation during the biological morning independent of behaviors.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Michelson, Alan D; Frelinger, Andrew L; Evoniuk, Heather; Kelly, Erin E; McCarthy, Mary; Doamekpor, Lauren A; Barnard, Marc R; Shea, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Platelets are involved in the thromboses that are central to myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes. Such adverse cardiovascular events have day/night patterns with peaks in the morning (~9 AM), potentially related to endogenous circadian clock control of platelet activation. The objective was to test if the human endogenous circadian system influences (1) platelet function and (2) platelet response to standardized behavioral stressors. We also aimed to compare the magnitude of any effects on platelet function caused by the circadian system with that caused by varied standardized behavioral stressors, including mental arithmetic, passive postural tilt and mild cycling exercise. We studied 12 healthy adults (6 female) who lived in individual laboratory suites in dim light for 240 h, with all behaviors scheduled on a 20-h recurring cycle to permit assessment of endogenous circadian function independent from environmental and behavioral effects including the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian phase was assessed from core body temperature. There were highly significant endogenous circadian rhythms in platelet surface activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa, GPIb and P-selectin (6-17% peak-trough amplitudes; p ≤ 0.01). These circadian peaks occurred at a circadian phase corresponding to 8-9 AM. Platelet count, ATP release, aggregability, and plasma epinephrine also had significant circadian rhythms but with later peaks (corresponding to 3-8 PM). The circadian effects on the platelet activation markers were always larger than that of any of the three behavioral stressors. These data demonstrate robust effects of the endogenous circadian system on platelet activation in humans--independent of the sleep/wake cycle, other behavioral influences and the environment. The 9 AM timing of the circadian peaks of the three platelet surface markers, including platelet surface activated GPIIb-IIIa, the final common pathway of platelet aggregation, suggests that endogenous circadian

  7. The Influence of Intermittent Hypoxemia on Platelet Activation in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Rahangdale, Shilpa; Yeh, Susie Yim; Novack, Victor; Stevenson, Karen; Barnard, Marc R.; Furman, Mark I.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Michelson, Alan D.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Literature regarding platelet function in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has considerable limitations. Given the central role of platelets in atherothrombosis and the known cardiovascular risk of OSA, we hypothesized that OSA severity is predictive of platelet function, independent of known comorbidities. Design: Obese subjects, without comorbidities, underwent overnight, in-lab polysomnography. The following morning, 5 biomarkers of platelet activation were measured by whole-blood flow cytometry at baseline and in response to agonists (no stimulation, stimulation with 5 μM ADP agonist, and stimulation with 20 μM ADP agonist): platelet surface P-selectin, activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, and GPIb receptor expression, platelet-monocyte aggregation (PMA) and platelet-neutrophil aggregation (PNA). Results: Of the 77 subjects, 47 were diagnosed with OSA (median apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of 24.7 ± 28.1/h in subjects with OSA and 3.0 ± 3.9/h in subjects without OSA, p < 0.001). The groups were matched for body mass index, with a mean body mass index of 40.3 ± 9.6 kg/m2 in subjects with OSA and 38.9 ± 6.0 kg/m2 in subjects without OSA (p = 0.48). A comparison of time spent with an oxygen saturation of less than 90% showed that subjects who had 1 minute or more of desaturation time per hour of sleep had lower GPIb fluorescence in circulating platelets, as compared with those subjects who had less than 1 minute of desaturation time per hour of sleep; similar findings were observed following 5 μM and 20 μM of ADP stimulation, as compared with control vehicle, suggesting higher levels of circulating platelet activity. In multivariate analyses, only nocturnal hypoxemia and female sex predicted agonist response. Platelet surface P-selectin, platelet surface-activated GPIIb/IIIa, PMA, and PNA were not significantly correlated with markers of OSA. Conclusions: In obese patients with OSA, platelet activation is associated with greater levels of oxygen

  8. Platelet activation by riboflavin and UV light: is it really the other side of the coin?

    PubMed

    Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Lanti, Alessandro; Fiorelli, Eleonora; Palazzo, Gloria; Guiducci, Giorgia; Messina, Francesca; De Masi, Alessandra; Ferraro, Angelo Salvatore; Chiru, Oana Marilena; Cerrone, Paola; Antonelli, Maddalena; Adorno, Gaspare

    2014-04-01

    Nowadays transfusion safety is still put at risk by contamination of pathogens. The Mirasol PRT System blocks the replication of pathogens and white blood cells. Our goal was to quantify the activation of platelets after treatment with the Mirasol device. From September to December 2013, 131 platelet collections were studied using a simple flow cytometric strategy. There was a significant correlation between the percentage of platelet activated before and after the treatment. Our results induced us to think that the activation of platelets after treatment was acceptable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamic redistribution of major platelet surface receptors after contact-induced platelet activation and spreading. An immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, N.; Guichard, J.; Breton-Gorius, J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors used an immunogold labeling procedure to investigate the redistribution of platelet receptors and their ligands on the surface of contact-activated adherent platelets before and after thrombin stimulation. During the initial stage of platelet adhesion, a typical segregation of receptors occurred. Gold particles identifying glycoprotein (GP) Ib (CD42b) and GPIIb-IIIa (CD41a) remained distributed over the entire platelet surface, whereas gold particles identifying GPIa-IIa (CDw 49b) and GPIV (CD36) were found essentially overlying the granulomere; p24 (CD9) was present at the peripheral platelet rim and over the cell body. An increased labeling of GPIIb-IIIa, GPIV and p24 was also observed on pseudopods, with GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV concentrated at the enlarged extremities and at sites of contact between two platelets, whereas GPIb was absent from pseudopods. After thrombin stimulation of adherent platelets, GPIb underwent a relocation to the cell center, in contrast to GPIIb-IIIa which still remained randomly distributed over the cell body. To investigate whether ligand distribution paralleled this receptor segregation, platelet released von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen (Fg) and thrombospondin (TSP) were visualized. During the early stages of platelet activation, surface labeling for all three adhesive proteins was minimal and almost undetectable. Occasionally, intragranular Fg and vWF was accessible to gold-coupled antibodies, with vWF exhibiting the typical eccentric alpha-granular localization. At later stages of activation and especially after thrombin stimulation, no surface labeling for vWF was observed, whereas immunogold particles identifying vWF were still present inside enlarged clear vacuoles. In contrast, labeling of Fg and TSP was increased over the granulomere and extended to the cell periphery and the pseudopods, but was absent from the hyalomere, despite the presence of GPIIb-IIIa molecules. Double labeling experiments showed

  10. Potential Participation of calpain in platelet activation studied by use of a cell penetrating calpain inhibitor (Calpeptin)

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Ariyoshi, Hideo; Uemura, Yoshio; Sakon, Masato; Kambayashi, Junichi; Mori, Takesada )

    1990-01-01

    Employing a cell penetrating calpain inhibitor (calpeptin), the role of calpain in platelet activation was examined. In washed platelets (WPs) both thrombin and collagen-induced platelet aggregation were dose-dependently inhibited by calpeptin. The addition of plasma to WPs interfered with the action of calpeptin, however more than 3 min preincubation of calpeptin with WPs completely abolished the influence of plasma. In thrombin-activated WPs with calcium, the increase of intracellular calcium concentration, (Ca{sup 2+})i, and the production of inositol triphosphate (IP{sub 3}) were dose-dependently inhibited by calpeptin. The generation of thromboxane B{sub 2} (TxB{sub 2}) was inhibited by calpeptin in collagen and thrombin-activated WPs. In ({sub 3}H)-arachidonic acid (AA)-labelled platelets, calpeptin increased the amount of ({sup 3}H)-AA liberated by inhibiting ({sup 3}H)-AA degradation after collagen or thrombin stimulation. When ({sup 14}C)-AA degradation by the platelet suspension was observed, calpeptin inhibited TxB{sub 2} and hydroxyheptadecatrienoic acid (HHT) generation but increased prostaglandin (PG) E{sub 1}, E{sub 2}, 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12HETE) and AA. Based on these findings, calpain may be involved in the activation phospholipase C and thromboxane synthetase.

  11. Spontaneous heparin-induced thrombocytopenia syndrome without any proximate heparin exposure, infection, or inflammatory condition: Atypical clinical features with heparin-dependent platelet activating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Okata, Takuya; Miyata, Shigeki; Miyashita, Fumio; Maeda, Takuma; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a thromboembolic disorder resembling heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), so-called spontaneous HIT syndrome, can occur in patients without any history of heparin exposure. It is likely due to anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/polyanion antibodies induced by other polyanions, such as bacterial surfaces and nucleic acids. We describe an atypical case of spontaneous HIT syndrome. A 70-year-old man suddenly presented with acute cerebral sinus thrombosis (CST). Soon after the initiation of unfractionated heparin (UFH) for the treatment of CST, his platelet count fell precipitously and he developed deep vein thrombosis, a clinical picture consistent with rapid-onset HIT but without any proximate episodes of heparin exposure, infection, trauma, surgery, or other acute illness. Antigen assays and a washed platelet activation assay indicated that the patient already possessed anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies with heparin-dependent platelet activation properties on admission. Cessation of UFH and initiation of argatroban resulted in prompt recovery of his platelet count without further thromboembolic events. We identified two similar cases in the literature. However, these patients do not meet the recently proposed criteria for spontaneous HIT syndrome. Even in atypical cases, however, inappropriate or delayed diagnosis of HIT appears to be associated with worse outcomes. We propose that these atypical cases should be included in the category of spontaneous HIT syndrome.

  12. Fish-Free Diet in Patients with Phenylketonuria Is Not Associated with Early Atherosclerotic Changes and Enhanced Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Htun, Patrik; Nee, Jens; Ploeckinger, Ursula; Eder, Klaus; Geisler, Tobias; Gawaz, Meinrad; Bocksch, Wolfgang; Fateh-Moghadam, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Since patients with phenylketonuria (PKU) have to follow a lifelong restriction of natural protein to lower phenylalanine-intake, they never eat fish. This diet may lead to a chronic deficit of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids with the risk of early atherosclerotic changes. The aim of the study was to analyse the fatty acid profile of PKU patients and to correlate the results with surrogate markers of early atherosclerotic changes [enhanced carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) and ß-stiffness index] and platelet activation. In 43 PKU patients and in 58 healthy controls we prospectively examined the fatty acid profile, CIMT, ß-stiffness index and platelet activation (flow cytometric determination of markers of platelet activation). CIMT was measured bilaterally by ultrasound. CIMTmean was defined as the mean value of the sum of CIMTleft and CIMTright. Despite of lower HDL-cholesterol and higher triglyceride concentrations in the PKU group, there was no significant difference in the omega-6 or omega-3 fatty acid profile, CIMT, ß-stiffness index between both groups. Platelet activation was not enhanced in the PKU group. Fish-free diet does not induce early atherosclerotic changes or enhanced platelet activation in PKU patients.

  13. Relationship between biomarkers of cigarette smoke exposure and biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and platelet activation in adult cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianmin; Liang, Qiwei; Frost-Pineda, Kimberly; Muhammad-Kah, Raheema; Rimmer, Lonnie; Roethig, Hans; Mendes, Paul; Sarkar, Mohamadi

    2011-08-01

    Cigarette smoking is a risk factor for several diseases, including cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer, but the role of specific smoke constituents in these diseases has not been clearly established. The relationships between biomarkers of potential harm (BOPH), associated with inflammation [white blood cell (WBC), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), fibrinogen, and von Willebrand factor (vWF)], oxidative stress [8-epi-prostaglandin F(2α) (8-epiPGF(2α))] and platelet activation [11-dehydro-thromboxin B(2) (11-dehTxB(2))], and machine-measured tar yields (grouped into four categories), biomarkers of exposure (BOE) to cigarette smoke: nicotine and its five metabolites (nicotine equivalents), 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol (total NNAL), carboxyhemoglobin, 1-hydroxypyrene, 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid, and monohydroxybutenyl-mercapturic acid, were investigated in 3,585 adult smokers and 1,077 nonsmokers. Overall, adult smokers had higher levels of BOPHs than nonsmokers. Body mass index (BMI), smoking duration, tar category, and some of the BOEs were significant factors in the multiple regression models. Based on the F value, BMI was the highest ranking factor in the models for WBC, hs-CRP, fibrinogen, and 8-epiPGF(2α), respectively, and gender and smoking duration for 11-dehTxB(2) and vWF, respectively. Although several demographic factors and some BOEs were statistically significant in the model, the R(2) values indicate that only up to 22% of the variability can be explained by these factors, reflecting the complexity and multifactorial nature of the disease mechanisms. The relationships between the BOEs and BOPHs observed in this study may help with the identification of appropriate biomarkers and improve the design of clinical studies in smokers. ©2011 AACR.

  14. Pharmacological studies on the antispasmodic, bronchodilator and anti-platelet activities of Abies webbiana.

    PubMed

    Yasin, Mamoona; Hussain Janbaz, Khalid; Imran, Imran; Gilani, Anwar-ul-Hassan; Bashir, Samra

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the antispasmodic, bronchodilator and anti-platelet activities of Abies webbiana to rationalize some of its folk uses in gut and airways disorders and inflammation. The crude extract of A. webbiana (Aw.Cr) caused a complete relaxation of both spontaneous and K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum in a concentration-dependent manner. Aw.Cr shifted the Ca(++) concentration-response curves (CRCs) to the right, in a fashion similar to verapamil, confirming its Ca(++) channel blocking (CCB) effect. In isolated rabbit tracheal preparations, it caused relaxation of carbachol (1 μM) and K(+) (80 mM)-induced contractions comparable to verapamil suggesting that the bronchodilatory effect may possibly be mediated through CCB activity. Aw.Cr was found to be the inhibitor of both ADP- and epinephrine-induced aggregation of human platelets thereby suggesting therapeutic potential in this plant against thrombo-embolic conditions. The exhibited anti-platelet effect was observed at low doses against epinephrine as compared to ADP. This study confirmed the presence of spasmolytic activity in Abies webbiana through possible blockade of Ca(++) channels providing evidence for its folkloric use in gut and respiratory disorders in addition to anti-platelet activity. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Conformational responses of an arachidonate- and U46619-binding haemoprotein in relation to platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, L K; Jamaluddin, M P

    1987-02-23

    Antibodies were raised, in rabbits, against an arachidonate- and U46619-binding protein purified from calf platelets. Spectral measurements and immunodiffusion experiments were employed to follow conformational responses of the protein in relation to platelet activation. Upon treatment with the platelet agonists, arachidonate and PGH2, as well as the common haem ligands, imidazole and CN-, the purified protein had its Soret band red-shifted, with hypochromicity, but the protein saturated with the agonists, not with the haem ligands, showed altered antigenic properties in immunodiffusion experiments. In an analogous manner activation of gel-filtered calf platelets with high concentrations of ADP and A23187, as well as by cold, had Soret bands of extracts of sonicated platelets red-shifted, with hypochromicity; concomitantly, antigenically different conformations of the protein appeared in Triton X-100 extracts of the activated platelets. A protein immunologically related to the platelet protein was detected in Triton X-100 extracts of calf neutrophils. It is suggested that conformational changes of the protein induced by arachidonate or prostaglandin endoperoxides or H2O2 formed in different compartments during platelet activation by different stimuli may be a biochemical mechanism of stimulus-response coupling and that similar mechanisms might operate in other cell types.

  16. Airway Platelet Activation is Associated with Airway Eosinophilic Inflammation in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Angela S; Kumar, Nikila; Lerner, Jennifer; Wiles, Andrew; Foerster, Matthew; Teach, Stephen J; Freishtat, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Background Allergic asthma is characterized by airway inflammation associated with recruitment and activation of eosinophils. In mice, allergen exposure induces platelet migration to the airways that is necessary for eosinophil recruitment and activation. We therefore hypothesized that in the airways of human subjects with asthma, (1) platelet activation would be positively associated with eosinophil activation and (2) platelet and eosinophil activation would both be associated with clinical asthma characteristics. Methods Nasal wash levels of p-selectin (a measure of platelet activation) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) (a measure of eosinophil activation) were compared with each other and with clinical asthma characteristics in a cross-sectional study of urban children and adolescents (6-20y) with asthma. Results Regression analysis revealed a significantly positive association between log10 p-selectin levels and log10 ECP levels (Beta=0.50 ng/mL [95%CI: 0.05 to 0.94 ng/mL]; P=0.029). Additionally, ECP was significantly and negatively associated with two asthma-related quality of life measurements and p-selectin was associated with one of these. Conclusions Our study shows the first significant association between platelet and eosinophil activation in airways of human subjects with asthma. These data provide a first step toward delineating what appears to be an important role for platelets in airway eosinophilia. PMID:20930644

  17. DPIV prediction of flow induced platelet activation-comparison to numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sagi; Einav, Shmuel; Alemu, Yared; Bluestein, Danny

    2007-04-01

    Flow induced platelet activation (PA) can lead to platelet aggregation, deposition onto the blood vessel wall, and thrombus formation. PA was thoroughly studied under unidirectional flow conditions. However, in regions of complex flow, where the platelet is exposed to varying levels of shear stress for varying durations, the relationship between flow and PA is not well understood. Numerical models were developed for studying flow induced PA resulting from stress histories along Lagrangian trajectories in the flow field. However, experimental validation techniques such as Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) were not extended to include such models. In this study, a general experimental tool for PA analysis by means of continuous DPIV was utilized and compared to numerical simulation in a model of coronary stenosis. A scaled up (5:1) 84% eccentric and axisymetric coronary stenosis model was used for analysis of shear stress and exposure time along particle trajectories. Flow induced PA was measured using the PA State (PAS) assay. An algorithm for computing the PA level in pertinent trajectories was developed as a tool for extracting information from DPIV measurements for predicting the flow induced thrombogenic potential. CFD, DPIV and PAS assay results agreed well in predicting the level of PA. In addition, the same trend predicted by the DPIV was measured in vitro using the Platelet Activity State (PAS) assay, namely, that the symmetric stenosis activated the platelets more as compared to the eccentric stenosis.

  18. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  19. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization, thromboxane A(2) formation, hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A(2) formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca(2+)](i) and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Mechanism study of endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation of low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anjin; Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jie; Zhao, Xue; Yan, Meixing

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have indicated that fucoidan fractions with low molecular weight and different sulfate content from Laminaria japonica could inhibit the activation of platelets directly by reducing the platelet aggregation. To explore the direct effect of LMW fucoidan on the platelet system furthermore and examine the possible mechanism, the endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation effects of two LMW fucoidan were investigated. In the present study, Endothelial injury model of rats was made by injection of adrenaline (0.4 mg kg-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured. vWF level was be investigated in vivo and in vitro as an important index of endothelial injury. LMW fucoidan could significantly reduce vWF level in vascular endothelial injury rats and also significantly reduce vWF level in vitro. The number of EMPs was be detected as another important index of endothelial injury. The results showed that LMW fucoidan reduced EMPs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor. In this study, it was found that by inhibiting platelet adhesion, LMW fucoidan played a role in anti-thrombosis and the specific mechanism of action is to inhibit the flow of extracellular Ca2+. All in a word, LMW fucoidan could inhibit the activation of platelets indirectly by reducing the concentration of EMPs and vWF, at the same time; LMW fucoidan inhibited the activation of platelets directly by inhibiting the flow of extracellular Ca2+.

  1. [Research on relationship of syndrome type and parameters of hemorheology and platelet activation in patients with acute gout arthritis of dampness-heat blockage type and stasis-heat accumulate type].

    PubMed

    Shao, Pei; Huang, Xing-tao; Zjang, Fan

    2006-11-01

    To study the relationship between syndrome type and the parameters of hemorrheology and platelet activation in patients with acute gout arthritis of dampness-heat blockage (DHB) type and stasis-heat accumulation (SHA) type. Forty patients with acute gouty arthritis were divided into 2 groups according to TCM syndrome differentiation, the DHB group (n=24) and the SHA group (n=16), and 20 healthy people were taken as the control group. Hemorrheological parameters, platelet activating factor (PAC-1) and P-selection (CD62p) in them were detected. Plasma viscosity, outcome of erythrocyte sedimentation and K value of its equation, levels of PAC-1 and CD62p were higher, erythrocyte electrophoresis index was significantly lower in gout patients of both types than those in the control group (all P < 0.01), and the levels of PAC-1 and CD62p in the SHA group were higher than those in the DHB group (P < 0.05). DHB type and SHA syndrome type of acute gout arthritis are correlated with parameters of hemorrheology and platelet activation, and the different levels of these pameters showed in the two types, may be the internal factors for their genesis.

  2. Anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies in complex with β2 glycoprotein I induce platelet activation via two receptors: apolipoprotein E receptor 2' and glycoprotein I bα.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Fei; Lu, Donghe; Sun, Na; Yin, Xiaoxue; Jin, Meili; Liu, Yanhong

    2016-03-01

    Anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI ) antibodies are important contributors to thrombosis, especially in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, the mechanism by which anti-β2GPI antibodies are involved in the pathogenesis of thrombosis is not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the role of anti- β2GPI antibodies in complexes with β2GPI as mediators of platelet activation, which can serve as a potential source contributing to thrombosis. We examined the involvement of the apolipoprotein E receptor 2' (apoER2') and glycoprotein I ba (GP I ba) in platelet activation induced by the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex. The interaction between the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex and platelets was examined using in vitro methods, in which the Fc portion of the antibody was immobilized using protein A coated onto a microtiter plate. Platelet activation was assessed by measuring GPII b/III a activation and P-selectin expression and thromboxane B2 production as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Our results revealed that the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex was able to activate platelets, and this activation was inhibited by either the anti-GP I bα antibody or the apoER2' inhibitor. Results showed that the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex induced platelet activation via GPI ba and apoER2', which may then contribute to the prothrombotic tendency in APS patients.

  3. Numerical Investigation of the Effects of Channel Geometry on Platelet Activation and Blood Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jingshu; Yun, B. Min; Fallon, Anna M.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Aidun, Cyrus K.; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2011-01-01

    Thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are believed to be due to the combination of high shear stresses and large recirculation regions. Relating blood damage to design geometry is therefore essential to ultimately optimize the design of BMHVs. The aim of this research is to quantitatively study the effect of 3D channel geometry on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation, and to choose an appropriate blood damage index (BDI) model for future numerical simulations. The simulations in this study use a recently developed lattice-Boltzmann with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) method [Wu, J., and C. K. Aidun. Int. J. Numer. Method Fluids 62(7):765–783, 2010; Wu, J., and C. K. Aidun. Int. J. Multiphase flow 36:202–209, 2010]. The channel geometries and flow conditions are re-constructed from recent experiments by Fallon [The Development of a Novel in vitro Flow System to Evaluate Platelet Activation and Procoagulant Potential Induced by Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Leakage Jets in School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Atlanta: Georgia Institute of Technology] and Fallon et al. [Ann. Biomed. Eng. 36(1):1]. The fluid flow is computed on a fixed regular ‘lattice’ using the LBM, and each platelet is mapped onto a Lagrangian frame moving continuously throughout the fluid domain. The two-way fluid–solid interactions are determined by the EBF method by enforcing a no-slip condition on the platelet surface. The motion and orientation of the platelet are obtained from Newtonian dynamics equations. The numerical results show that sharp corners or sudden shape transitions will increase blood damage. Fallon’s experimental results were used as a basis for choosing the appropriate BDI model for use in future computational simulations of flow through BMHVs. PMID:20976558

  4. Numerical investigation of the effects of channel geometry on platelet activation and blood damage.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingshu; Yun, B Min; Fallon, Anna M; Hanson, Stephen R; Aidun, Cyrus K; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2011-02-01

    Thromboembolic complications in Bileaflet mechanical heart valves (BMHVs) are believed to be due to the combination of high shear stresses and large recirculation regions. Relating blood damage to design geometry is therefore essential to ultimately optimize the design of BMHVs. The aim of this research is to quantitatively study the effect of 3D channel geometry on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation, and to choose an appropriate blood damage index (BDI) model for future numerical simulations. The simulations in this study use a recently developed lattice-Boltzmann with external boundary force (LBM-EBF) method [Wu, J., and C. K. Aidun. Int. J. Numer. Method Fluids 62(7):765-783, 2010; Wu, J., and C. K. Aidun. Int. J. Multiphase flow 36:202-209, 2010]. The channel geometries and flow conditions are re-constructed from recent experiments by Fallon [The Development of a Novel in vitro Flow System to Evaluate Platelet Activation and Procoagulant Potential Induced by Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve Leakage Jets in School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Atlanta: Georgia Institute of Technology] and Fallon et al. [Ann. Biomed. Eng. 36(1):1]. The fluid flow is computed on a fixed regular 'lattice' using the LBM, and each platelet is mapped onto a Lagrangian frame moving continuously throughout the fluid domain. The two-way fluid-solid interactions are determined by the EBF method by enforcing a no-slip condition on the platelet surface. The motion and orientation of the platelet are obtained from Newtonian dynamics equations. The numerical results show that sharp corners or sudden shape transitions will increase blood damage. Fallon's experimental results were used as a basis for choosing the appropriate BDI model for use in future computational simulations of flow through BMHVs.

  5. Increased soluble GPVI levels in cirrhosis: evidence for early in vivo platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Egan, Karl; Dillon, Audrey; Dunne, Eimear; Kevane, Barry; Galvin, Zita; Maguire, Patricia; Kenny, Dermot; Stewart, Stephen; Ainle, Fionnuala Ni

    2017-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a consequence of prolonged liver injury and is characterised by extensive tissue fibrosis: the deposition of collagen-rich extracellular matrix. The haemostatic balance is disordered in cirrhosis and coagulation activation appears to promote fibrosis. In spite of recent studies demonstrating a role for anticoagulant therapy in preventing cirrhosis progression, there has not been a change in clinical practice, suggesting that physicians are reluctant to anticoagulate patients with cirrhosis due to bleeding risks. Platelets play an important role in facilitating coagulation. Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is a platelet-specific collagen receptor that is shed from the platelet surface in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner in response to GPVI ligation and coagulation activation. Our aim was to use soluble GPVI levels to determine whether there was evidence for collagen and coagulation-induced platelet activation in early, well-compensated cirrhosis. Plasma soluble GPVI levels were quantified in 46 patients with mixed aetiology cirrhosis and 55 healthy controls using an immunoassay. In the cirrhosis group, soluble GPVI levels were significantly increased (5.8 ± 4.4 ng/ml, n = 46) compared to healthy controls (3.3 ± 3.4 ng/ml, n = 55, p < 0.05). This increase in soluble GPVI levels was still evident when levels were adjusted for platelet count (Healthy controls; 0.015 ± 0.018 ng/10(6) platelets/ml vs. cirrhosis; 0.048 ± 0.04 ng/10(6) platelets/ml, p < 0.0001). This study provides evidence for early platelet activation in patients with well-compensated cirrhosis. This may have translational implications for prognosis, treatment, and risk stratification.

  6. DUSP3 Phosphatase Deficiency or Inhibition Limit Platelet Activation and Arterial Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Lucia; Kuijpers, Marijke J; Gilio, Karen; Hego, Alexandre; Théâtre, Emilie; Maurissen, Lisbeth; Vandereyken, Maud; Diogo, Catia V; Lecut, Christelle; Guilmain, William; Bobkova, Ekaterina V; Eble, Johannes A.; Dahl, Russell; Drion, Pierre; Rascon, Justin; Mostofi, Yalda; Yuan, Hongbin; Sergienko, Eduard; Chung, Thomas DY; Thiry, Marc; Senis, Yotis; Moutschen, Michel; Mustelin, Tomas; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Heemskerk, Johan WM; Tautz, Lutz; Oury, Cécile; Rahmouni, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Background A limitation of current antiplatelet therapies is their inability to separate thrombotic events from bleeding occurrences. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to platelet activation is of importance for the development of improved therapies. Recently, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) have emerged as critical regulators of platelet function. Methods and Results This is the first report implicating the dual-specificity phosphatase 3 (DUSP3) in platelet signaling and thrombosis. This phosphatase is highly expressed in human and mouse platelets. Platelets from DUSP3-deficient mice displayed a selective impairment of aggregation and granule secretion mediated through the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and the C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). DUSP3-deficient mice were more resistant to collagen- and epinephrine-induced thromboembolism, compared to wild-type mice, and showed severely impaired thrombus formation upon ferric chloride-induced carotid artery injury. Intriguingly, bleeding times were not altered in DUSP3-deficient mice. At the molecular level, DUSP3 deficiency impaired Syk tyrosine phosphorylation, subsequently reducing phosphorylation of PLCγ2 and calcium fluxes. To investigate DUSP3 function in human platelets, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of DUSP3 was developed. This compound specifically inhibited collagen and CLEC-2-induced human platelet aggregation, thereby phenocopying the effect of DUSP3 deficiency in murine cells. Conclusions DUSP3 plays a selective and essential role in collagen- and CLEC-2-mediated platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo. Inhibition of DUSP3 may prove therapeutic for arterial thrombosis. This is the first time a PTP, implicated in platelet signaling, has been targeted with a small-molecule drug. PMID:25520375

  7. Effect of Antrodia camphorata on inflammatory arterial thrombosis-mediated platelet activation: the pivotal role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wan-Jung; Lin, Shih-Chang; Lan, Chang-Chou; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Hsia, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Yung-Kai; Lee, Hsiu-Chuan; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a rare Taiwanese medicinal mushroom. Antrodia camphorata extract has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammation, antimetastasis, and anticancer activities and plays a role in liver fibrosis, vasorelaxation, and immunomodulation. Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in intravascular thrombosis, which is involved in a wide variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation remains unclear. We examined the effects of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation. In the present study, Antrodia camphorata treatment (56-224 μg/mL) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not U46619, an analogue of thromboxane A2, thrombin, and arachidonic acid. Antrodia camphorata inhibited collagen-induced calcium (Ca(2+)) mobilization and phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) and Akt. In addition, Antrodia camphorata significantly reduced the aggregation and phosphorylation of PKC in phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activated platelets. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting of Ca(2+) and PKC cascade and the Akt pathway. Our study suggests that Antrodia camphorata may be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders.

  8. Effect of Antrodia camphorata on Inflammatory Arterial Thrombosis-Mediated Platelet Activation: The Pivotal Role of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wan-Jung; Lan, Chang-Chou; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Hsia, Chih-Hsuan; Lee, Hsiu-Chuan; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a rare Taiwanese medicinal mushroom. Antrodia camphorata extract has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammation, antimetastasis, and anticancer activities and plays a role in liver fibrosis, vasorelaxation, and immunomodulation. Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in intravascular thrombosis, which is involved in a wide variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation remains unclear. We examined the effects of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation. In the present study, Antrodia camphorata treatment (56–224 μg/mL) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not U46619, an analogue of thromboxane A2, thrombin, and arachidonic acid. Antrodia camphorata inhibited collagen-induced calcium (Ca2+) mobilization and phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) and Akt. In addition, Antrodia camphorata significantly reduced the aggregation and phosphorylation of PKC in phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activated platelets. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting of Ca2+ and PKC cascade and the Akt pathway. Our study suggests that Antrodia camphorata may be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders. PMID:25541625

  9. The critical roles of platelet activation and reduced NO bioavailability in fatal pulmonary arterial hypertension in a murine hemolysis model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Weiguo; Jin, Richard; Zhang, Jinyan; You, Tao; Peng, Zhihai; Ge, Xiaowen; Bronson, Roderick T.; Halperin, Jose A.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is suspected to be a strong mortality determinant of hemolytic disorders. However, direct contribution of acute intravascular hemolysis to fatal PAH has not been investigated. The roles of nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency and platelet activation in hemolysis-associated fatal PAH have been suspected but not been experimentally studied. We recently generated a unique intravascular hemolysis mouse model in which the membrane toxin, intermedilysin (ILY), exclusively lyses the erythrocytes of transgenically expressing human CD59 mice (ThCD59RBC), thereby inducing ILY-dose–dependent massive hemolysis. Using this murine hemolysis model, we found that the acute increase in pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right ventricle failure caused sudden death. Reduced NO bioavailability and massive platelet activation/aggregation leading to the formation of massive thrombosis specifically in the pulmonary microvasculature played the critical roles in pathogenesis of acute hemolysis-associated fatal PAH. Therapeutic interventions enhancing NO bioactivity or inhibiting platelet activation prevented sudden death or prolonged survival time via the suppression of the acute increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and improvement of right ventricle function. These findings further highlight the importance of the inhibition of platelet activation and the enhancement of NO bioavailability for the treatment and prevention of hemolysis-associated (fatal) PAH. PMID:20511540

  10. Systemic platelet dysfunction is the result of local dysregulated coagulation and platelet activation in the brain in a rat model of isolated traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ploplis, Victoria A; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; MorenoCaffaro, Maria; Sheets, Patrick; Thomas, Scott G; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Coagulopathy after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been extensively reported. Clinical studies have identified a strong relationship between diminished platelet-rich thrombus formation, responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate agonism, and severity of TBI. The mechanisms that lead to platelet dysfunction in the acute response to TBI are poorly understood. The development of a rodent model of TBI that mimics the coagulopathy observed clinically has recently been reported. Using immunohistochemical techniques and thromboelastography platelet mapping, the current study demonstrated that the expression of coagulation (tissue factor and fibrin) and platelet activation (P-selectin) markers in the injured brain paralleled the alteration in systemic platelet responsiveness to the agonists, adenosine diphosphate and arachodonic acid. Results of this study demonstrate that local procoagulant changes in the injured brain have profound effects on systemic platelet function.

  11. Effects of high-amount-high-intensity exercise on in vivo platelet activation: modulation by lipid peroxidation and AGE/RAGE axis.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Francesca; Vazzana, Natale; Iodice, Pierpaolo; Lattanzio, Stefano; Liani, Rossella; Bellomo, Rosa Grazia; Lessiani, Gianfranco; Perego, Francesca; Saggini, Raoul; Davì, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    Physical activity is associated with cardiovascular risk reduction, but the effects of exercise on platelet activation remain controversial. We investigated the effects of regular high-amount, high intensity aerobic exercise on in vivo thromboxane (TX)-dependent platelet activation and plasma levels of platelet-derived proteins, CD40L and P-selectin, and whether platelet variables changes may be related to changes in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and in the extent of oxidative stress and oxidative stress-related inflammation, as reflected by urinary isoprostane excretion and endogenous soluble receptor for advanced glycation end-products (esRAGE), respectively. Urinary excretion of 11-dehydro-TXB₂ and 8-iso-prostaglandin (PG)F(2α) and plasma levels of P-selectin, CD40L and esRAGE were measured before and after a eight-week standardised aerobic high-amount-high-intensity training program in 22 sedentary subjects with low-to-intermediate risk. Exercise training had a clear beneficial effect on HDL cholesterol (+10%, p=0.027) and triglyceride (-27%, p=0.008) concentration. In addition, a significant (p<0.0001) decrease in urinary 11-dehydro-TXB₂ (26%), 8-iso-PGF(2α) (21%), plasma P-selectin (27%), CD40L (35%) and a 61% increase in esRAGE were observed. Multiple regression analysis revealed that urinary 8-iso-PGF(2α) [beta=0.33, SEM=0.116, p=0.027] and esRAGE (beta=-0.30, SEM=31.3, p=0.046) were the only significant predictors of urinary 11-dehydro-TXB₂ excretion rate over the training period. In conclusion, regular high-amount-high-intensity exercise training has broad beneficial effects on platelet activation markers, paralleled and possibly associated with changes in the lipoprotein profile and in markers of lipid peroxidation and AGE/RAGE axis. Our findings may help explaining why a similar amount of exercise exerts significant benefits in preventing cardiovascular events.

  12. The changes of blood platelet activation in breast cancer patients before surgery, after surgery, and in various phases of the chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Czernek, Urszula; Szydłowska-Pazera, Katarzyna; Potemski, Piotr; Piekarski, Janusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Olas, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Blood platelets from patients with cancer (before or after the surgery) exhibit a variety of qualitative abnormalities. Different anti-cancer drugs may also induce the oxidative/nitrative stress in blood platelets and change their hemostatic properties. The aim of our study was to explain the effect of superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text]) production on hemostatic properties of blood platelets (activated by a strong physiological agonist - thrombin) from breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases (I-IV) of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). Patients were hospitalized in the Department of Oncological Surgery and at the Department of Chemotherapy, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. We measured the platelet aggregation as the marker of hemostatic activity of blood platelets. We observed an increase of [Formula: see text] in thrombin-activated blood platelets from patients with breast cancer (before or after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy) compared to the healthy group. Our other experiments demonstrated that aggregation (induced by thrombin) of blood platelets from patients with breast cancer before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases of the chemotherapy differs from aggregation of platelets obtained from healthy volunteers. Moreover, our results showed the correlation between the [Formula: see text] generation and changes of platelet aggregation in breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after the chemotherapy (I and IV phases). Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the production of [Formula: see text] in blood platelets (activated by thrombin) obtained from breast cancer patients may induce the changes of platelet aggregation, which may contribute in thrombosis in these patients.

  13. Relationships of different blood pressure categories to indices of inflammation and platelet activity in sustained hypertensive patients with uncontrolled office blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Dogan; Icli, Atilla; Aksoy, Fatih; Akcay, Salaheddin; Ozaydin, Mehmet; Ersoy, Ibrahim; Varol, Ercan; Dogan, Abdullah

    2013-10-01

    Failure to decrease blood pressure (BP) normally during nighttime (non-dipping) in hypertension is associated with higher cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition, non-dipping BP is associated with increased platelet activity and inflammatory response; however, there has been no study to evaluate the relationship of non-dipping BP to indices of platelet activity and inflammation in uncontrolled hypertensive patients. In the present study, hypertensive subjects with uncontrolled office BP were firstly divided into three groups: 84 subjects with white coat effect and 365 subjects with true uncontrolled hypertension. Then, true uncontrolled hypertensive patients were divided into two groups: 158 patients with dipping and 207 patients with non-dipping. Mean platelet volume (MPV), uric acid (UA), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) levels were studied. The general characteristics and risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) of the study population were similar among the groups. MPV, UA, GGT, CRP, and hs-CRP levels were significantly higher in non-dipper group than both dipper and white coat effect groups, and were significantly higher in dipper group than in white coat effect group (MPV: 9.1 ± 1.3, 8.7 ± 1.1, and 8. ± 0.9 fL; UA: 6.9 ± 1.2, 5.9 ± 1.4, and 4.1 ± 0.8 mg/dL; GGT: 38.9 ± 11.1, 33.6 ± 14.9, and 25.2 ± 9.2 U/L; CRP: 7.1 ± 2.4, 6.2 ± 1.9, and 3.9 ± 0.8 mg/dL; hs-CRP: 3.8 ± 1.5, 3.3 ± 1.2, and 2.0 ± 0.6, non-dipper, dipper, and white coat effect groups, respectively, all p values <0.01). All study parameters strongly correlated with each other. In conclusion, in hypertensive patients with uncontrolled office BP, presence of non-dipping BP is associated with increased platelet activity and inflammation, which can be one of the underlying plausible mechanisms of non-dipping BP status.

  14. Platelet activation following intravenous injection of a conventional heparin: absence of effect with a low molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172).

    PubMed Central

    Mikhailidis, D P; Fonseca, V A; Barradas, M A; Jeremy, J Y; Dandona, P

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of an intravenous injection of a conventional high molecular weight heparin (HMWH) were compared with those of a low molecular weight heparinoid (Org 10172). A bolus injection of HMWH (5000 iu) was associated with: (a) a small but significant prolongation of bleeding time (BT); (b) a significant fall in PRP platelet count; (c) significantly enhanced platelet aggregation; and (d) significantly increased platelet thromboxane A2 (TXA2) release. These changes were not observed following the intravenous injection of Org 10172 (3200 anti Xa U). 2. These experiments were repeated following the oral administration of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). HMWH again caused some enhancement of platelet aggregation despite the ASA-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation and TXA2 release. Administration of Org 10172 to subjects taking ASA did not alter any of the platelet function indices. 3. In additional control experiments the injection of 5000 iu of HMWH was associated with a significant fall in PRP but not whole blood platelet counts. This finding suggests that the fall in PRP platelet count is a methodological artefact. 4. The HMWH also induced a significantly greater increase in serum non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations than Org 10172. 5. The present findings indicate that Org 10172 is a less potent stimulator of platelet aggregation and lipolysis than HMWH. 6. The minor prolongation of the BT after HMWH is not compatible with enhanced aggregation but may be a consequence of alterations in the activity of coagulation factors and vascular-platelet interactions or of ongoing platelet activation accompanied by granule depletion. 7. The different effects of the two anticoagulants assessed suggests a therapeutic advantage in favour of Org 10172, especially in patients with hyperactive platelets. PMID:3689624

  15. Role of platelet-activating factor in the reperfusion injury of rabbit ischemic heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; de Paulis, R.; Comino, A.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study shows that the administration of the PAF receptor antagonist SDZ 63.675 (5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the hematologic and hemodynamic alterations, as well as the size of necrotic area in rabbits subjected to 40 minutes of coronary occlusion and reperfusion. Pretreatment with SDZ 63.675 prevented the reduction of platelet counts in the blood obtained from the right ventricle (86.6 +/- 2.8% of the control preischemia value) and the transient bradycardia (85.0 +/- 2.8%), the systemic hypotension (58.0 +/- 2.8%), and the increase in right ventricular pressure (125.0 +/- 3.6%) that were evident in the first minutes of reperfusion in untreated control rabbits. Two as well as 24 hours after reperfusion, the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium, was significantly reduced in rabbits treated with SDZ 63.675 (infarct size in control animals, 66.0 +/- 2.9% and 63.46 +/- 2.09% of the risk region at 2 or 24 hours, respectively, compared with 38.9 +/- 5.2% and 37.11 +/- 2.44% of the risk region at 2 and 24 hours in rabbits treated with SDZ 63.675). This result was confirmed by histologic examination of cardiac tissue 24 hours after reperfusion. In addition, SDZ 63.675 markedly reduced the accumulation of 111In-oxine-labeled platelets that occurs 15 minutes after reperfusion in the central ischemic area of the heart and in the lungs. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the evolution of myocardial injury observed during reperfusion. Images Figure 8 PMID:2372044

  16. The phospholipase C/protein kinase C pathway is involved in cathepsin G-induced human platelet activation: comparison with thrombin.

    PubMed Central

    Si-Tahar, M; Renesto, P; Falet, H; Rendu, F; Chignard, M

    1996-01-01

    Cathepsin G, an enzyme released by stimulated polymorphonuclear neutrophils, and thrombin are two human proteinases which potently trigger platelet activation. Unlike thrombin, the mechanisms by which cathepsin G initiates platelet activation have yet to be elucidated. The involvement of the phospholipase C (PLC)/protein kinase C (PKC) pathway in cathepsin G-induced activation was investigated and compared with stimulation by thrombin. Exposure of 5-[14C]hydroxytryptamine-labelled platelets to cathepsin G, in the presence of acetylsalicylic acid and phosphocreatine/creatine kinase, induced platelet aggregation and degranulation in a concentration-dependent manner (0.1-3.0 microM). Time-course studies (0-180 s) comparing equivalent concentrations of cathepsin G (3 microM) and thrombin (0.5 unit/ml) resulted in very similar transient hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and steady accumulation of phosphatidic acid. In addition cathepsin G, like thrombin, initiated the production of inositol phosphates. The neutrophil-derived proteinase also induced phosphorylation of both the myosin light chain and pleckstrin, a substrate for PKC, to levels similar to those observed in platelets challenged with thrombin. Inhibition of PKC by GF 109203X, a specific inhibitor, suppressed platelet aggregation and degranulation to the same extent for both proteinases. Using fura 2-loaded platelets, the rise in the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration induced by cathepsin G was shown to result, as for thrombin, from both mobilization of internal stores and Ca2+ entry across the plasma membrane. These findings provide evidence that cathepsin G stimulates the PLC/PKC pathway as potently as does thrombin, independently of thromboxane A2 formation and ADP release, and that this pathway is required for platelet functional responses. PMID:8573071

  17. Differential effect of the inhibition of Grb2-SH3 interactions in platelet activation induced by thrombin and by Fc receptor engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saci, Abdelhafid; Liu, Wang-Qing; Vidal, Michel; Garbay, Christiane; Rendu, Francine; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2002-01-01

    The adaptor protein Grb2 (growth factor receptor-bound protein 2) is involved in cell proliferation via the Ras signalling pathway. In order to study the role of Grb2 in blood platelet responses, we used a peptide containing two proline-rich sequences derived from Sos (peptidimer), which binds to Grb2-Src homology 3 domain (SH3) with a high affinity, and hence inhibits Grb2-SH3-mediated protein interactions. Platelet aggregation and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) release measured in the presence of the peptidimer were: (i) significantly decreased when induced by thrombin; and (ii) potentiated when induced by the engagement of the Fc receptor. In thrombin-activated platelets, the Grb2-SH2 domain formed an association with the beta3 subunit of the alphaIIb-beta3 integrin (GPIIb-IIIa), Shc, Syk, Src and SHP1 (SH2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1), whereas these associations did not occur after the engagement of the receptor for the Fc domain of IgG (FcgammaRIIa) or in resting platelets. Grb2-SH3 domains formed an association with the proline-rich sequences of Sos and Cbl in both resting and activated platelets, since the peptidimer abolished these associations. Inhibition of both fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation by the peptide RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) had no effect on thrombin-induced Grb2-SH2 domain association with the aforementioned signalling molecules, indicating that these associations occurred during thrombin-induced 'inside-out' signalling. Platelet aggregation induced by direct activation via alphaIIb-beta3 ('outside-in' signalling) was potentiated by the peptidimer. The results show that inhibition of Grb2-SH3 interactions with signal-transduction proteins down-regulates thrombin-induced platelet activation, but also potentiates Fc receptor- and alphaIIb-beta3-mediated platelet activation. PMID:11964172

  18. Tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin stimulates eosinophil oxidant production and toxicity towards human endothelium

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Eosinophils (EOs) participate in a variety of inflammatory states characterized by endothelial cell damage, such as vasculitis, pneumonitis, and endocarditis. We find that 100 U/ml TNF- alpha/cachectin (TNF), a concentration attainable in the blood of humans with parasitic infestations, stimulates highly purified populations of EOs to damage human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a model of human endothelium. This TNF-dependent EO cytotoxicity is strongly inhibited by heparin and methyprednisolone but unaffected by the platelet-activating factor antagonist BN52012 or scavengers of superoxide anion and H2O2, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Br- (100 microM) enhances EO/TNF damage to HUVEC, implicating the possible participation of EO peroxidase (EPO) in the killing mechanism. EOs adherent to FCS-coated plastic wells more than double their production of superoxide anion and the cytotoxic EPO-derived oxidant HOBr when exposed to TNF, showing that TNF activates the respiratory burst of EOs attached to a "physiologic" surface. Unlike PMNs, EOs were not irreversibly activated to kill unopsonized endothelium by previous exposure to TNF, and did not degranulate or upregulate CR3 expression as detected by Mo1 in the presence of 100 U/ml TNF. HUVEC exposed 18 h to TNF were considerably more susceptible to lysis by PMA-activated EOs and reagent H2O2, demonstrating a direct effect of TNF upon endothelium, perhaps through inhibition of antioxidant defenses. These findings suggest that abnormally elevated serum levels of TNF may provoke EOs to damage endothelial cells and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in hypereosinophilic states. PMID:1972179

  19. Tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin stimulates eosinophil oxidant production and toxicity towards human endothelium.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Vercellotti, G M; Walker, G; Nelson, R D; Jacob, H S

    1990-06-01

    Eosinophils (EOs) participate in a variety of inflammatory states characterized by endothelial cell damage, such as vasculitis, pneumonitis, and endocarditis. We find that 100 U/ml TNF-alpha/cachectin (TNF), a concentration attainable in the blood of humans with parasitic infestations, stimulates highly purified populations of EOs to damage human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a model of human endothelium. This TNF-dependent EO cytotoxicity is strongly inhibited by heparin and methyprednisolone but unaffected by the platelet-activating factor antagonist BN52012 or scavengers of superoxide anion and H2O2, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Br- (100 microM) enhances EO/TNF damage to HUVEC, implicating the possible participation of EO peroxidase (EPO) in the killing mechanism. EOs adherent to FCS-coated plastic wells more than double their production of superoxide anion and the cytotoxic EPO-derived oxidant HOBr when exposed to TNF, showing that TNF activates the respiratory burst of EOs attached to a "physiologic" surface. Unlike PMNs, EOs were not irreversibly activated to kill unopsonized endothelium by previous exposure to TNF, and did not degranulate or upregulate CR3 expression as detected by Mo1 in the presence of 100 U/ml TNF. HUVEC exposed 18 h to TNF were considerably more susceptible to lysis by PMA-activated EOs and reagent H2O2, demonstrating a direct effect of TNF upon endothelium, perhaps through inhibition of antioxidant defenses. These findings suggest that abnormally elevated serum levels of TNF may provoke EOs to damage endothelial cells and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in hypereosinophilic states.

  20. MALT1-ubiquitination triggers non-genomic NF-κB/IKK signaling upon platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that IKK complex plays an important non-genomic role in platelet function, i.e., regulates SNARE machinery-dependent membrane fusion. In this connection, it is well known that MALT1, whose activity is modulated by proteasome, plays an important role in the regulation of IKK complex. Therefore, the present studies investigated the mechanism by which IKK signaling is regulated in the context of the platelet proteasome. It was found that platelets express a functional proteasome, and form CARMA/MALT1/Bcl10 (CBM) complex when activated. Using a pharmacological inhibitor, the proteasome was found to regulate platelet function (aggregation, integrin activation, secretion, phosphatidylserine exposure and changes in intracellular calcium). It was also found to regulate thrombogenesis and physiologic hemostasis. We also observed, upon platelet activation, that MALT1 is ubiquitinated, and this coincides with the activation of the IKK/NF-κB-signaling pathway. Finally, we observed that the proteasome inhibitor blocks CBM complex formation and the interaction of IKKγ and MALT1; abrogates SNARE formation, and the association of MALT1 with TAK1 and TAB2, which are upstream of the CBM complex. Thus, our data demonstrate that MALT1 ubiquitination is critical for the engagement of CBM and IKK complexes, thereby directing platelet signals to the NF-κB pathway.

  1. Micro-structuring of polycarbonate-urethane surfaces in order to reduce platelet activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Johanna; Gester, Kathrin; Roggenkamp, Jan; Mager, Ilona; Maas, Judith; Jansen, Sebastian V; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In the development of new hemocompatible biomaterials, surface modification appears to be a suitable method in order to reduce the thrombogenetic potential of such materials. In this study, polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) tubes with different surface microstructures to be used for aortic heart valve models were investigated with regard to the thrombogenicity. The surface structures were produced by using a centrifugal casting process for manufacturing PCU tubes with defined casting mold surfaces which are conferred to the PCU surface during the process. Tubes with different structures defined by altering groove widths were cut into films and investigated under dynamic flow conditions in contact with porcine blood. The analysis was carried out by laser scanning microscopy which allowed for counting various morphological types of platelets with regard to the grade of activation. The comparison between plain and shaped PCU samples showed that the surface topography led to a decline of the activation of the coagulation cascade and thus to the reduction of the fibrin synthesis. Comparing different types of structures revealed that smooth structures with a small groove width (d ~ 3 μm) showed less platelet activation as well as less adhesion in contrast to a distinct wave structure (d ~ 90 μm). These results prove surface modification of polymer biomaterials to be a suitable method for reducing thrombogenicity and hence give reason for further alterations and improvements.

  2. Metabolic syndrome, platelet activation and the development of transient ischemic attack or thromboembolic stroke.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Mia-Jeanne; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of mortality in the world today, where transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a period of focal ischemia, the symptoms of which resemble a thromboembolic stroke. Contrary to stroke, TIA symptoms typically last less than one hour and necrosis is absent. Stroke is often preceded by TIA, making it an important predictor of future ischemic events. The causal role of atherosclerosis in the development of TIA is well established, however, research indicates that the atherosclerotic process begins years earlier with the development of metabolic syndrome, which affects approximately 45% of the adult population worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is present if three or more of the following is present: increased waist circumference, increased triglycerides, decreased HDL, increased fasting glucose and hypertension. This syndrome causes systemic inflammation that activates the coagulation system and may cause the formation of pathological thrombi. The role of platelets in stroke has been studied and platelet activation pathways identified. ADP and thromboxane A(2) are the most common activators of platelets in normal physiology. Several pharmacological treatments have been employed to prevent the activation of platelets, the most common of which include aspirin and P2Y(12)-inhibitors. Although treatment is administered strokes and subsequent TIAs are very common in individuals that suffered an initial event. This indicates that research needs to be done in order to elucidate new therapeutic targets, but also to better treat ischemic events to not only decrease the amount of recurring events but also decrease stroke mortality worldwide.

  3. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 promotes platelet activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwen; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Rong; Tian, Jingluan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Mengxing; Cui, Qingya; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Jiang, Miao; Li, Zhenyu; Ruan, Changgeng; He, Sudan; Dai, Kesheng

    2017-03-14

    Previous studies have shown that receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) is involved in many important biological processes, including necroptosis, apoptosis, and inflammation. Here we show that RIP3 plays a critical role in regulating platelet functions and in vivo thrombosis and hemostasis. Tail bleeding times were significantly longer in RIP3-knockout (RIP3(-/-)) mice compared with their wild-type (WT) littermates. In an in vivo model of arteriole thrombosis, mice lacking RIP3 exhibited prolonged occlusion times. WT mice repopulated with RIP3(-/-) bone marrow-derived cells had longer occlusion times than RIP3(-/-) mice repopulated with WT bone marrow-derived cells, suggesting a role for RIP3-deficient platelets in arterial thrombosis. Consistent with these findings, we observed that RIP3 was expressed in both human and mice platelets. Deletion of RIP3 in mouse platelets caused a marked defect in aggregation and attenuated dense granule secretion in response to low doses of thrombin or a thromboxane A2 analog, U46619. Phosphorylation of Akt induced by U46619 or thrombin was diminished in RIP3(-/-) platelets. Moreover, RIP3 interacted with Gα13 Platelet spreading on fibrinogen and clot retraction were impaired in the absence of RIP3. RIP3 inhibitor dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro and prevented arterial thrombus formation in vivo. These data demonstrate a role for RIP3 in promoting in vivo thrombosis and hemostasis by amplifying platelet activation. RIP3 may represent a novel promising therapeutic target for thrombotic diseases.

  4. Decrease of IgE-dependent platelet activation in Hymenoptera hypersensitivity after specific rush desensitization.

    PubMed Central

    Tsicopoulos, A; Tonnel, A B; Wallaert, B; Joseph, M; Ameisen, J C; Ramon, P; Dessaint, J P; Capron, A

    1988-01-01

    A receptor for the Fc fragment of IgE on human platelets has been recently described, which mediated an IgE-dependent activation in the presence of specific allergen. We investigated the allergen-induced activation of platelets from patients with Hymenoptera hypersensitivity before and after specific rush desensitization. Nineteen patients with a history of anaphylactic reactions were included (15 sensitive to yellow-jacket and four to honey-bee venom), fourteen/nineteen having experienced severe life-threatening systemic reactions and 5/19 large local reactions. All showed positive skin tests and high values of specific IgE. By comparison to the baseline results obtained before desensitization, a significant decrease of platelet activation (76.8% inhibition) after rush desensitization was observed. In the case of two polysensitized patients, after Hymenoptera venom desensitization alone, platelets not only lost their reactivity to venom but also towards the other allergen. This modulation of the IgE-dependent platelet reactivity during desensitization offers therefore a new approach for the study of allergen-induced desensitization. PMID:3383448

  5. Decrease of IgE-dependent platelet activation in Hymenoptera hypersensitivity after specific rush desensitization.

    PubMed

    Tsicopoulos, A; Tonnel, A B; Wallaert, B; Joseph, M; Ameisen, J C; Ramon, P; Dessaint, J P; Capron, A

    1988-03-01

    A receptor for the Fc fragment of IgE on human platelets has been recently described, which mediated an IgE-dependent activation in the presence of specific allergen. We investigated the allergen-induced activation of platelets from patients with Hymenoptera hypersensitivity before and after specific rush desensitization. Nineteen patients with a history of anaphylactic reactions were included (15 sensitive to yellow-jacket and four to honey-bee venom), fourteen/nineteen having experienced severe life-threatening systemic reactions and 5/19 large local reactions. All showed positive skin tests and high values of specific IgE. By comparison to the baseline results obtained before desensitization, a significant decrease of platelet activation (76.8% inhibition) after rush desensitization was observed. In the case of two polysensitized patients, after Hymenoptera venom desensitization alone, platelets not only lost their reactivity to venom but also towards the other allergen. This modulation of the IgE-dependent platelet reactivity during desensitization offers therefore a new approach for the study of allergen-induced desensitization.

  6. Platelets aggregation in pathological conditions: role of local shear rates and platelet activation delay time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zarif Khalili Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the initiation and formation of a thrombus, however their detailed motion in blood vessels with complex geometries, such as in the aneurysmal vessel or stenotic vessel in atherosclerosis, has not been studied systematically. Here, we perform spectral element simulations (NEKTAR code) to obtain the 3D flow field in blood vessel with cavities, and we apply the force coupling method (FCM) to simulate the motion of platelets in blood flow. Specifically, simulations of platelets are performed in a 0.25 mm diameter circular blood vessel with 1 mm length. Corresponding coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide input to the NEKTAR-FCM code. Simulations are conducted at several different Reynolds numbers (Re). An ellipsoid-shaped cavity is selected to intersect with the middle part of the circular vessel to represent the aneurysmal part of the blood vessel. Based on the simulation results, we quantify how the platelets motion and aggregation in the blood vessel cavities depend on Re, platelet activation delay time, and the geometry of the cavities.

  7. Marine Benthic Diatoms Contain Compounds Able to Induce Leukemia Cell Death and Modulate Blood Platelet Activity

    PubMed Central

    Prestegard, Siv Kristin; Oftedal, Linn; Coyne, Rosie Theresa; Nygaard, Gyrid; Skjærven, Kaja Helvik; Knutsen, Gjert; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Herfindal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the high abundance and species diversity of diatoms, only a few bioactive compounds from them have been described. The present study reveals a high number of mammalian cell death inducing substances in biofilm-associated diatoms sampled from the intertidal zone. Extracts from the genera Melosira, Amphora, Phaeodactylum and Nitzschia were all found to induce leukemia cell death, with either classical apoptotic or autophagic features. Several extracts also contained inhibitors of thrombin-induced blood platelet activation. Some of this activity was caused by a high content of adenosine in the diatoms, ranging from 0.07 to 0.31 μg/mg dry weight. However, most of the bioactivity was adenosine deaminase-resistant. An adenosine deaminase-resistant active fraction from one of the extracts was partially purified and shown to induce apoptosis with a distinct phenotype. The results show that benthic diatoms typically found in the intertidal zone may represent a richer source of interesting bioactive compounds than hitherto recognized. PMID:20098602

  8. Redox Proteomics and Platelet Activation: Understanding the Redox Proteome to Improve Platelet Quality for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sonego, Giona; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Blood banks use pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies to increase the safety of platelet concentrates (PCs). The characteristics of PI-treated PCs slightly differ from those of untreated PCs, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. One possible cause is the generation of oxidative stress during the PI process. This is of great interest since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers in platelet functions. Furthermore, there are links between protein oxidation and phosphorylation, another mechanism that is critical for cell regulation. Current research efforts focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and identifying new target proteins. Proteomics technologies represent powerful tools for investigating signaling pathways involving ROS and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, while quantitative techniques enable the comparison of the platelet resting state versus the stimulated state. In particular, redox cysteine is a key player in platelet activation upon stimulation by different agonists. This review highlights the experiments that have provided insights into the roles of ROS in platelet function and the implications for platelet transfusion, and potentially in diseases such as inflammation and platelet hyperactivity. The review also describes the implication of redox mechanism in platelet storage considerations. PMID:28208668

  9. Microfluidic emulation of mechanical circulatory support device shear-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Dimasi, Annalisa; Rasponi, Marco; Sheriff, Jawaad; Chiu, Wei-Che; Bluestein, Danny; Tran, Phat L; Slepian, Marvin J; Redaelli, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Thrombosis of ventricular assist devices (VADs) compromises their performance, with associated risks of systemic embolization, stroke, pump stop and possible death. Anti-thrombotic (AT) drugs, utilized to limit thrombosis, are largely dosed empirically, with limited testing of their efficacy. Further, such testing, if performed, typically examines efficacy under static conditions, which is not reflective of actual shear-mediated flow. Here we adopted our previously developed Device Thrombogenicity Emulation methodology to design microfluidic platforms able to emulate representative shear stress profiles of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. Our long-term goal is to utilize these systems for point-of-care (POC) personalized testing of AT efficacy under specific, individual shear profiles. First, we designed different types of microfluidic channels able to replicate sample shear stress patterns observed in MCS devices. Second, we explored the flexibility of microfluidic technology in generating dynamic shear stress profiles by modulating the geometrical features of the channels. Finally, we designed microfluidic channel systems able to emulate the shear stress profiles of two commercial VADs. From CFD analyses, the VAD-emulating microfluidic systems were able to replicate the main characteristics of the shear stress waveforms of the macroscale VADs (i.e., shear stress peaks and duration). Our results establish the basis for development of a lab-on-chip POC system able to perform device-specific and patient-specific platelet activation state assays.

  10. The tyrosine phosphatase CD148 is an essential positive regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Senis, Yotis A; Tomlinson, Michael G; Ellison, Stuart; Mazharian, Alexandra; Lim, Jenson; Zhao, Yan; Kornerup, Kristin N; Auger, Jocelyn M; Thomas, Steve G; Dhanjal, Tarvinder; Kalia, Neena; Zhu, Jing W; Weiss, Arthur; Watson, Steve P

    2009-05-14

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are also involved in pathologic conditions resulting from blocked blood vessels, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at sites of vascular injury are regulated by a diverse repertoire of tyrosine kinase-linked and G protein-coupled receptors. Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in initiating and propagating signaling from several platelet surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanism of how SFK activity is regulated in platelets remains unclear. CD148 is the only receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase identified in platelets to date. In the present study, we show that mutant mice lacking CD148 exhibited a bleeding tendency and defective arterial thrombosis. Basal SFK activity was found to be markedly reduced in CD148-deficient platelets, resulting in a global hyporesponsiveness to agonists that signal through SFKs, including collagen and fibrinogen. G protein-coupled receptor responses to thrombin and other agonists were also marginally reduced. These results highlight CD148 as a global regulator of platelet activation and a novel antithrombotic drug target.

  11. The tyrosine phosphatase CD148 is an essential positive regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Michael G.; Ellison, Stuart; Mazharian, Alexandra; Lim, Jenson; Zhao, Yan; Kornerup, Kristin N.; Auger, Jocelyn M.; Thomas, Steve G.; Dhanjal, Tarvinder; Kalia, Neena; Zhu, Jing W.; Weiss, Arthur; Watson, Steve P.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are also involved in pathologic conditions resulting from blocked blood vessels, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at sites of vascular injury are regulated by a diverse repertoire of tyrosine kinase–linked and G protein–coupled receptors. Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in initiating and propagating signaling from several platelet surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanism of how SFK activity is regulated in platelets remains unclear. CD148 is the only receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase identified in platelets to date. In the present study, we show that mutant mice lacking CD148 exhibited a bleeding tendency and defective arterial thrombosis. Basal SFK activity was found to be markedly reduced in CD148-deficient platelets, resulting in a global hyporesponsiveness to agonists that signal through SFKs, including collagen and fibrinogen. G protein–coupled receptor responses to thrombin and other agonists were also marginally reduced. These results highlight CD148 as a global regulator of platelet activation and a novel antithrombotic drug target. PMID:19246339

  12. Increased platelet activation in patients with stable and acute exacerbation of COPD.

    PubMed

    Maclay, John D; McAllister, David A; Johnston, Shonna; Raftis, Jennifer; McGuinnes, Catherine; Deans, Andrew; Newby, David E; Mills, Nicholas L; MacNee, William

    2011-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease. Interaction between inflammatory cells and activated platelets is important in the pathogenesis of atherothrombosis and may contribute to cardiovascular risk in patients with COPD. To assess platelet-monocyte aggregation in patients with COPD and matched controls, and in patients with an acute exacerbation of COPD. 18 men with COPD and 16 male controls matched for age and cigarette smoke exposure were recruited. A further 12 patients were investigated during and at least 2 weeks after hospitalisation for an acute exacerbation. Platelet-monocyte aggregation and platelet P-selectin expression were determined using flow cytometry. Patients with COPD had increased circulating platelet-monocyte aggregates compared with controls (mean (SD) 25.3 (8.3)% vs 19.5 (4.0)%, p=0.01). Platelet-monocyte aggregation was further increased during an acute exacerbation compared with convalescence (32.0 (11.0)% vs 25.5 (6.4)%, p=0.03). Platelet P-selectin expression and soluble P-selectin did not differ between groups. Patients with stable COPD have increased circulating platelet-monocyte aggregates compared with well-matched controls. Platelet activation is further increased in patients with COPD during an acute exacerbation. These findings identify a novel mechanism to explain the increased cardiovascular risk in COPD and suggest platelet inhibition as a plausible therapeutic target.

  13. [Polyserositic syndromes and/or sectorial dysventilation with platelet activation induced by immunoallergic etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    De Luca, L

    1989-01-01

    The author from a study of 5 dysventilatorial syndromes (bronchiolitis-PNX, pneumomediastinal aerial cystis of lung) and 5 polysierositic syndromes pleuritis and peritonitis) evices that all these syndromes show in the anamnesis or in present a viral infection from influenzal virus or rubeola. In addition to that, the Authors shows the presence of a food allergy asserted by RAST and/or Skin Prick Tests or FBST (Food Bronchostimulation test) and the introduction of a food allergen during the viral infection, and a great platelet's activation. The Author, besides, shows the association normal VES and normal neutrophil cells in the dysventilatorial syndrome and high VES, and high neutrophil cells in the polysierositic syndromes; in all cases the negativity of culture exams. Starting from these points she worked out a new etiopathogenetic theory: the viral localization on the Peyer's plates cause the expression on the epithelial surface of the gut's cells of SELF HLA II type recognition. The food allergens' introduction causes a great reaction of II, III, IV, VI type which involves the bronchus, alveolus, and the serous epithelium by PAF activation, in all cases and in the polisierositic syndrome a neutrophil activation as well. The author advices to prize the importance of cortisone therapy and of exclusion of food allergen by diet, besides advices the antibiotic therapy for covering only.

  14. Microfluidic Emulation of Mechanical Circulatory Support Device Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dimasi, A.; Rasponi, M.; Sheriff, J.; Chiu, W.-C.; Bluestein, D.; Tran, P.L.; Slepian, M. J.; Redaelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of ventricular assist devices (VADs) compromises their performance, with associated risks of systemic embolization, stroke, pump stop and possible death. Anti-thrombotic (AT) drugs, utilized to limit thrombosis, are largely dosed empirically, with limited testing of their efficacy. Further, such testing, if performed, typically examines efficacy under static conditions, which is not reflective of actual shear-mediated flow. Here we adopted our previously developed Device Thrombogenicity Emulation methodology to design microfluidic platforms able to emulate representative shear stress profiles of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. Our long-term goal is to utilize these systems for point-of-care (POC) personalized testing of AT efficacy under specific, individual shear profiles. First, we designed different types of microfluidic channels able to replicate sample shear stress patterns observed in MCS devices. Second, we explored the flexibility of microfluidic technology in generating dynamic shear stress profiles by modulating the geometrical features of the channels. Finally, we designed microfluidic channel systems able to emulate the shear stress profiles of two commercial VADs. From CFD analyses, the VAD-emulating microfluidic systems were able to replicate the main characteristics of the shear stress waveforms of the macroscale VADs (i.e. shear stress peaks and duration). Our results establish the basis for development of a lab-on-chip POC system able to perform device-specific and patient-specific platelet activation state assays. PMID:26578003

  15. Factors Influencing Productivity Change in the Forest Products Industry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    substitution together with nonneutral technical progress" (p.179) Solow (1957) in a landmark study developed a method for estimating * technological change... Solow approach to measuring total factor productivity is the impli- 30 cit assumption of neutral technological change. In the case of the forest products...Three Mississippi Counties. Mississippi Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin No. 713. Solow , R. M. 1959. Investment and Economic Growth: Some