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Sample records for platelet-activating factor production

  1. Interleukin 1 stimulates platelet-activating factor production in cultured human endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Breviario, F; Tetta, C; Aglietta, M; Mantovani, A; Dejana, E

    1986-01-01

    Monocyte-derived interleukin 1 (IL-1) was found to be a potent inducer of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (HEC). The product was identified as PAF by its behavior in chromatographic systems, its recovery of biological activity, and its physico-chemical properties and susceptibility to lipases. The response of HEC to IL-1 was concentration-dependent, took more than 2 h to become apparent, and decreased after 18 h of incubation. Most of the PAF produced was cell-associated and only a small amount (about 25% of the total) was released in the culture medium. To study the mechanism of IL-1-induced HEC-PAF production we tested the activity of 1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl/coenzyme A acetyltransferase in HEC. Acetyltransferase activity measured in IL-1-stimulated HEC lysates showed a three to five times greater maximum velocity, but the same Michaelis constant, as untreated cells. The regulation of PAF generation in HEC by IL-1 may be an important aspect of the two-way interaction between immunocompetent cells and vascular tissue. PMID:2872233

  2. Epidermal Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Activation and Ultraviolet B Radiation Result in Synergistic Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production

    PubMed Central

    Wolverton, Jay E.; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Yongxue; Zhang, Qiwei; Travers, Jeffrey B.

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) is a potent stimulator of epidermal cytokine production which has been implicated in photoaggravated dermatoses. In addition to cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), UVB generates bioactive lipids including platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our previous studies have demonstrated that UVB-mediated production of keratinocyte TNF-α is in part due to PAF. The current studies use a human PAF-receptor (PAF-R) negative epithelial cell line transduced with PAF-Rs and PAF–R-deficient mice to demonstrate that activation of the epidermal PAF-R along with UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of TNF-α. It should be noted that PAF-R effects are mimicked by the protein kinase C (PKC) agonist phorbol myristic acetate, and are inhibited by pharmacological antagonists of the PKC gamma isoenzyme. These studies suggest that concomitant PAF-R activation and UVB irradiation results in a synergistic production of the cytokine TNF-α which is mediated in part via PKC. These studies provide a novel potential mechanism for photosensitivity responses. PMID:19769579

  3. Activation of platelet-activating factor receptor in SZ95 sebocytes results in inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin E2 production.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiwei; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2006-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a group of phosphocholines with various biological effects mediated by the PAF receptor (PAF-R). Activation of the epidermal PAF-R induces the expression of inflammatory mediators, including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). The upregulation of COX-2 expression has been shown to be involved in sebocyte proliferation, sebaceous gland inflammation and carcinogenesis. The present study was designed to investigate whether PAF-R activation could induce the expression of COX-2 and production of PGE(2), as well as secretion of the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-8 (IL-8), in the immortalized sebaceous gland cell line SZ95. Using calcium mobilization studies, we first confirmed that PAF can signal through PAF-R in SZ95 sebocytes. We then found that the production of IL-8 was induced following treatment with PAF-R agonist, however blocked by a specific PAF-R antagonist. Induction of COX-2 expression and increased PGE(2) production were observed in SZ95 sebocytes after PAF-R activation. Finally, it was demonstrated that the production of PGE(2), induced by PAF-R activation and mediated by COX-2 expression, was blocked following PAF-R antagonism in SZ95 sebocytes. These studies suggest that SZ95 sebocytes express functional PAF-Rs and PAF-Rs are involved in regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators, including COX-2, PGE(2) and IL-8.

  4. Inhibitory effects of acetylmelodorinol, chrysin and polycarpol from Mitrella kentii on prostaglandin E₂ and Thromboxane B₂ production and platelet activating factor receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Saadawi, Sakina; Jalil, Juriyati; Jasamai, Malina; Jantan, Ibrahim

    2012-04-26

    Acetylmelodorinol, chrysin and polycarpol, together with benzoic acid, benzoquinone and stigmasterol were isolated from the leaves of Mitrella kentii (Bl.) Miq. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to inhibit prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and thromboxane B₂ (TXB₂) production in human whole blood using a radioimmunoassay technique. Their inhibitory effect on platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor binding to rabbit platelet was determined using ³H-PAF as a ligand. Among the compounds tested, chrysin showed a strong dose-dependent inhibitory activity on PGE(2) production (IC₅₀ value of 25.5 µM), which might be due to direct inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzymatic activity. Polycarpol, acetylmelodorinol and stigmasterol exhibited significant and concentration-dependent inhibitory effects on TXB₂ production with IC₅₀ values of 15.6, 19.1 and 19.4 µM, respectively, suggesting that they strongly inhibited COX-1 activity. Polycarpol and acetylmelodorinol showed strong dose-dependent inhibitory effects on PAF receptor binding with IC₅₀ values of 24.3 and 24.5 µM, respectively.

  5. The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid capsule surrogate of the Bacillus anthracis capsule induces nitric oxide production via the platelet activating factor receptor signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Jeon, Jun Ho; Park, Ok-Kyu; Chun, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Jungchan; Rhie, Gi-Eun

    2015-12-01

    The poly-γ-d-glutamic acid (PGA) capsule, a major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, confers protection of the bacillus from phagocytosis and allows its unimpeded growth in the host. PGA capsules released from B. anthracis are associated with lethal toxin in the blood of experimentally infected animals and enhance the cytotoxic effect of lethal toxin on macrophages. In addition, PGA capsule itself activates macrophages and dendritic cells to produce proinflammatory cytokine such as IL-1β, indicating multiple roles of PGA capsule in anthrax pathogenesis. Here we report that PGA capsule of Bacillus licheniformis, a surrogate of B. anthracis capsule, induces production of nitric oxide (NO) in RAW264.7 cells and bone marrow-derived macrophages. NO production was induced by PGA in a dose-dependent manner and was markedly reduced by inhibitors of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), suggesting iNOS-dependent production of NO. Induction of NO production by PGA was not observed in macrophages from TLR2-deficient mice and was also substantially inhibited in RAW264.7 cells by pretreatment of TLR2 blocking antibody. Subsequently, the downstream signaling events such as ERK, JNK and p38 of MAPK pathways as well as NF-κB activation were required for PGA-induced NO production. In addition, the induced NO production was significantly suppressed by treatment with antagonists of platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) or PAFR siRNA, and mediated through PAFR/Jak2/STAT-1 signaling pathway. These findings suggest that PGA capsule induces NO production in macrophages by triggering both TLR2 and PAFR signaling pathways which lead to activation of NF-kB and STAT-1, respectively.

  6. Platelet activating factor activity in the phospholipids of bovine spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Parks, J.E.; Hough, S.; Elrod, C. )

    1990-11-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has been detected in sperm from several mammalian species and can affect sperm motility and fertilization. Because bovine sperm contain a high percentage of ether-linked phospholipid precursors required for PAF synthesis, a study was undertaken to determine the PAF activity of bovine sperm phospholipids. Total lipids of washed, ejaculated bull sperm were extracted, and phospholipids were fractionated by thin-layer chromatography. Individual phospholipid fractions were assayed for PAF activity on the basis of (3H)serotonin release from equine platelets. PAF activity was detected in the PAF fraction (1.84 pmol/mumol total phospholipid) and in serine/inositol (PS/PI), choline (CP), and ethanolamine phosphoglyceride (EP) and cardiolipin (CA) fractions. Activity was highest in the CP fraction (8.05 pmol/mumol total phospholipid). Incomplete resolution of PAF and neutral lipids may have contributed to the activity in the PS/PI and CA fractions, respectively. Phospholipids from nonsperm sources did not stimulate serotonin release. Platelet activation by purified PAF and by sperm phospholipid fractions was inhibited by the receptor antagonist SRI 63-675. These results indicate that bovine sperm contain PAF and that other sperm phospholipids, especially CP and EP, which are high in glycerylether components, are capable of receptor-mediated platelet activation.

  7. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, generates two bioactive products during the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein: use of a novel inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, C H; Moores, K E; Boyd, H F; Dhanak, D; Ife, R J; Leach, C A; Leake, D S; Milliner, K J; Patterson, R A; Suckling, K E; Tew, D G; Hickey, D M

    1999-01-01

    A novel and potent azetidinone inhibitor of the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2), i.e. platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, is described for the first time. This inhibitor, SB-222657 (Ki=40+/-3 nM, kobs/[I]=6. 6x10(5) M-1.s-1), is inactive against paraoxonase, is a poor inhibitor of lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase and has been used to investigate the role of Lp-PLA2 in the oxidative modification of lipoproteins. Although pretreatment with SB-222657 did not affect the kinetics of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by Cu2+ or an azo free-radical generator as determined by assay of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOHs), conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances, in both cases it inhibited the elevation in lysophosphatidylcholine content. Moreover, the significantly increased monocyte chemoattractant activity found in a non-esterified fatty acid fraction from LDL oxidized by Cu2+ was also prevented by pretreatment with SB-222657, with an IC50 value of 5.0+/-0.4 nM. The less potent diastereoisomer of SB-222657, SB-223777 (Ki=6.3+/-0.5 microM, kobs/[I]=1.6x10(4) M-1.s-1), was found to be significantly less active in both assays. Thus, in addition to generating lysophosphatidylcholine, a known biologically active lipid, these results demonstrate that Lp-PLA2 is capable of generating oxidized non-esterified fatty acid moieties that are also bioactive. These findings are consistent with our proposal that Lp-PLA2 has a predominantly pro-inflammatory role in atherogenesis. Finally, similar studies have demonstrated that a different situation exists during the oxidation of high-density lipoprotein, with enzyme(s) other than Lp-PLA2 apparently being responsible for generating lysophosphatidylcholine. PMID:10024526

  8. Platelet-activating factor-induced increases in glucose kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, C.H.; Dobrescu, C.; Hargrove, D.M.; Bagby, G.J.; Spitzer, J.J. )

    1988-02-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a postulated mediator of many of the early hemodynamic effects of endotoxin. The aim of the present study was to determine whether in vivo administration of PAF could produce alterations in whole-body glucose metabolism that would mimic those seen during endotoxemia. Glucose kinetics were assessed in chronically catheterized conscious rats by the constant infusion of (6-{sup 3}H)- and (U-{sup 14}C)glucose before and for 4 h after either a bolus injection or a constant infusion of PAF. The bolus injection of PAF elevated the rate of glucose appearance (R{sub a}; 44%) for 1.5 h. The lower PAF infusion rate decreased blood pressure 11% to 104 mmHg, whereas the higher infusion rate decreased pressure 34% to 77 mmHg. Both PAF infusion rates produced elevations in plasma glucose and glucose R{sub a} throughout the 4-h infusion period in a dose-related manner. The PAF infusions also induced dose-related increases in plasma glucagon and catecholamine levels throughout the infusion period. Because the constant infusion of PAF did stimulate many of the hemodynamic and metabolic alterations produced by endotoxin, this study provides additional support for the potential importance of PAF as a mediator of the early hemodynamic and metabolic sequela of endotoxin shock. Furthermore, the PAF-induced changes in glucose metabolism appear to be mediated by the resultant elevation in plasma catecholamines.

  9. Prostanoid production in the presence of platelet activation in hypoxic cocaine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Togna, G; Graziani, M; Sorrentino, C; Caprino, L

    1996-01-01

    To extend our previous in vitro data, we investigated the effects of cocaine on thromboxane A2 (TXA2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) production in vivo in the rat. To obtain the slight platelet activation that our in vitro experiments showed useful to highlight the effect of cocaine, we infused cocaine in rats in the presence of platelet-activating factors (circulation of blood through a perspex vascular device or by infusion of sodium arachidonate) and in various respiratory conditions. Experiments were conducted in rats breathing atmospheric air (normoxic conditions) and in rats breathing an oxygen-poor mixture (hypoxic conditions). In rats under hypoxic conditions cocaine invariably increased TXA2 plasma levels, whereas in normoxic conditions it increased TXA2 only in the presence of platelet-activating factors. Cocaine significantly increased PGI2 plasma levels in arachidonate-treated rats in hypoxic respiratory conditions; in normoxic conditions cocaine left PGI2 levels unchanged. These results support the hypothesis that in cocaine users who have concomitant pathological conditions able to activate platelets, such as atherosclerosis, coronary vasospasm or ischaemia, or both, cocaine may contribute to the onset of thrombotic phenomena by interfering with the prostaglandin system.

  10. Gastric secretion of platelet activating factor and precursors in healthy humans: effect of pentagastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Sobhani, I; Denizot, Y; Hochlaf, S; Rigaud, D; Vatier, J; Benveniste, J; Lewin, M J; Mignon, M

    1993-01-01

    The release of platelet activating factor (PAF-ACETHER or PAF) and its precursors in the gastric lumen was assessed in 13 normal subjects in basal condition and after stimulation by gastrin. Acid, pepsin, and sialic acid outputs were determined under the same conditions. Gastric juice was collected using a nasogastric tube after overnight fast in basal condition for 60 minutes, then under pentagastrin infusion (6 micrograms/kg/hr for 60 minutes). Platelet activating factor was detected at low concentration in 4/13 subjects under basal condition (mean (SEM) 1.2 (0.6) pg/hr) while high concentrations of lyso platelet activating factor (6.1 (1.8) microgram/hr) and of alkyl-acyl-glycerophosphocholine (AAGPC) (11.5 (3) micrograms/hr) were found in 13 and 11 subjects, respectively. Platelet activating factor was not detected during pentagastrin infusion, while lyso platelet activating factor and alkyl-acyl-glycerophosphocholine were detected in 13 and in 12 subjects, respectively. Compared with the basal condition these platelet activating factor precursors increased significantly (p < 0.001) going up to fivefold baseline (31.8 (6.8) micrograms/hr and 53 (9.3) micrograms/hr respectively) in response to pentagastrin. There was a positive correlation between platelet activating factor precursors and acid or pepsin output but not between platelet activating factor precursors and sialic acid. As sialic acid may be considered an index of mucus glycoprotein degradation, it seems that gastrin stimulation of gastric epithelial cells results in a concomittant secretion of platelet activating factor precursors, acid, and pepsin irrespective of mucus glycoprotein degradation. PMID:8174952

  11. Mobilization of hepatic calcium pools by platelet activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lapointe, D.S.; Hanahan, D.J.; Olson, M.S.

    1987-03-24

    In the perfused rat liver, platelet activating factor, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (AGEPC), infusion produces an extensive but transient glycogenolytic response which at low AGEPC concentrations is markedly dependent upon the perfusate calcium levels. The role of calcium in the glycogenolytic response of the liver to AGEPC was investigated by assessing the effect of AGEPC on various calcium pools in the intact liver. Livers from fed rats were equilibrated with /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/, and the kinetics of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux were determined in control, AGEPC-stimulated, and phenylephrine-stimulated livers during steady-state washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/. AGEPC treatment had only a slight if any effect on the pattern of steady-state calcium efflux from the liver, as opposed to major perturbations in the pattern of calcium efflux effected by the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine. Infusion of short pulses of AGEPC during the washout of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from labeled livers caused a transient release of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ which was not abolished at low calcium concentrations in the perfusate. Infusion of latex beads, which are removed by the reticuloendothelial cells, caused the release of hepatic /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in a fashion similar to the case with AGEPC. The findings indicate that AGEPC does not perturb a major pool of calcium within the liver as occurs upon ..cap alpha..-adrenergic stimulation; it is likely that AGEPC mobilizes calcium from a smaller yet very important pool, very possibly from nonparenchymal cells in the liver.

  12. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  13. Identification of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in human skin.

    PubMed

    Marques, Mariangela; Pei, Yong; Southall, Michael D; Johnston, John M; Arai, Hiroyuki; Aoki, Junken; Inoue, Takao; Seltmann, Holger; Zouboulis, Christos C; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2002-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases are a family of specialized phospholipase A2 enzymes. They serve an anti-inflammatory function by converting the proinflammatory autocoid, PAF, into biologically inactive lyso-PAF, by the removal of the sn-2 acetyl group of this glycerophospholipid. Similarly, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases can also degrade oxidatively modified sn-2 polyunsaturated-fatty-acid-containing phospholipids, which are toxic to cells. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is a recently cloned member of this family of specialized phospholipases. Consistent with a potential role of this intracellular enzyme in protecting membrane phospholipids against oxidative stress, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II has been shown to translocate from cytosol to membranes in response to pro-oxidative stressors, and overexpression of this enzyme decreases the cytotoxic effects of these agents. The objective of this study was to assess whether platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II is involved in protecting skin against oxidative stress. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protein was demonstrated in human skin by immunohistochemistry, with the highest levels of the enzyme found in sebaceous glands and lesser amounts in epidermal keratinocytes. Treatment of epidermal cells with t-butylhydroperoxide or ultraviolet B radiation resulted in platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II translocation from cytosol to membranes. To assess the role of this enzyme in epidermal function, a recombinant retroviral strategy was used to overexpress platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II in the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT. Overexpression of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase II protected HaCaT cells against apop tosis induced by oxidative stressors t-butylhydroperoxide and ultraviolet B radiation. Similar levels of apoptosis, however, were seen in both control and platelet-activating-factor

  14. Possible mechanisms for the differential effects of high linoleate safflower oil and high alpha-linolenate perilla oil diets on platelet-activating factor production by rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Oh-hashi, K; Takahashi, T; Watanabe, S; Kobayashi, T; Okuyama, H

    1997-12-01

    As compared with high dietary linoleate safflower oil, high dietary alpha-linolenate perilla oil decreased platelet-activating factor (PAF) production by nearly half in calcium ionophore (CaI)-stimulated rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In the CaI-stimulated PMN from the perilla oil group, the accumulated amount of arachidonate (AA) plus eicosapentaenoate (EPA) was 30% less and that of lyso-PAF was 50% less, indicating that the decreased availability of lyso-PAF is a factor contributing to the relatively low PAF production. Consistently, eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), a dual inhibitor of cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase, increased free fatty acids (FFA) and decreased PAF production possibly by decreasing the availability of lyso-PAF. Although, leukotrienes (LTs) have been proposed to stimulate PAF production synergistically, a potent LTB4 receptor antagonist, ONO-4057, decreased the formation of free fatty acids and LTB4, but stimulated PAF production somewhat, indicating that LTB4 may not stimulate PAF production in PMN. Lysophospholipid-induced transacylase (CoA-independent transacylase) activity in PMN homogenates was 25-30% lower in the perilla oil group but no significant differences were observed in the lyso-PAF acetyltransferase and PAF acetylhydrolase activities between the two dietary groups. Thus, decreased transacylase activity is another factor associated with the relatively low PAF production in the perilla oil group.

  15. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-01-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas. PMID:1385272

  16. Role of platelet activating factor in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Dembinski, A; Konturek, P J; Warzecha, Z; Jaworek, J; Gustaw, P; Tomaszewska, R; Stachura, J

    1992-09-01

    The importance of platelet activating factor in acute pancreatitis was examined by determining the tissue content of endogenous platelet activating factor and the protective effects of TCV-309, a highly selective platelet activating factor blocker, against caerulein induced pancreatitis in rats. Infusion of caerulein (10 micrograms/kg/h) for five hours resulted in about 70% increase in pancreatic weight, 22% rise in protein content, 50% reduction in tissue blood flow, nine fold increase in tissue level of platelet activating factor and 165% rise in plasma amylase as well as histological evidence of acute pancreatitis. Such infusion of caerulein in chronic pancreatic fistula rats caused a marked increase in protein output from basal secretion of 10 mg/30 minutes to 40 mg/30 minutes in the first hour of infusion followed by a decline in protein output to 15-20 mg/30 minutes in the following hours of the experiment. Exogenous platelet activating factor (50 micrograms/kg) injected ip produced similar alterations in weight, protein content, blood flow, and histology of the pancreas but the increment in serum amylase was significantly smaller and pancreatic secretion was reduced below the basal level. TCV-309 (50 micrograms/kg) given ip before caerulein or platelet activating factor administration significantly reduced the biochemical and morphological alterations caused by caerulein and abolished those induced by exogenous platelet activating factor. These results indicate that platelet activating factor plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis probably by reducing the blood flow and increasing vascular permeability in the pancreas.

  17. Platelet activating factor raises intracellular calcium ion concentration in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Peritoneal cells from thioglycollate-stimulated mice were allowed to adhere to coverglasses for 2 h to give a dense monolayer of adherent cells greater than 95% of which were macrophages. After incubation with the tetra-acetoxymethyl ester of quin2, coverglasses were rinsed with Ca2+-free saline, oriented at a 45 degree angle in square cuvettes containing a magnetically driven stir bar, and analyzed for changes in quin2 fluorescence in a spectrofluorimeter. Such fluorescence, taken as an indication of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i), increased as exogenous calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]o) was raised to 1 mM. At [Ca2+]o approximately equal to 10 microM, [Ca2+]i = 72 +/- 14 nM (n = 26); at [Ca2+]o = 1 mM, [Ca2+]i = 140-220 nM, levels not increased by N, N, N', N'-tetrakis (2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine, a membrane-permeant chelator of heavy metals than can quench quin2. Addition of mouse alpha + beta fibroblast interferon, lipopolysaccharide, thrombin, collagen, vasopressin, ADP, compound 48/80, or U46619 did not change [Ca2+]i. However, addition of platelet activating factor (PAF) (2-20 ng/ml) raised [Ca2+]i by 480 nM within 1 min if [Ca2+]o = 1 mM. In the presence of 5 mM EGTA, PAF raised [Ca2+]i by 25 nM. This suggests that PAF causes influx of exogenous Ca2+, as well as releasing some Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Consistent with these results, when PAF was added to 1 mM Ca2+ in the presence of 100 microM Cd2+ or Mn2+ to block Ca2+ influx, [Ca2+]i increased by only intermediate amounts; at the times of such dampened peak response, [Ca2+]i could be raised within 1 min to normal PAF-stimulated levels by chelation of the exogenous heavy metals with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Normal PAF responses were observed in the presence of indomethacin. The lowest dose of PAF observed to raise [Ca2+]i was 0.1 ng/ml. Response of [Ca2+]i to 2-20 ng/ml PAF was transient, and second applications had no effect. The PAF response also was seen in

  18. Platelet Activating Factor: A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    Factor for Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Larry W. Daniel, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Wake Forest University...A Growth Factor for Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0682 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Larry W...Relevance: If PAF is found to be a growth and angiogenic factor for breast cancer cells, these studies can be followed up by in vivo studies in nude

  19. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.F.; Chap, H.; Braquet, P.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1987-02-15

    /sup 32/P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca/sup 2 +/ from internal stores (Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca/sup 2 +/ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced angiogenesis depends on in situ platelet-activating factor biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell growth in vitro, is angiogenic in vivo. Therefore, it was suggested that the angiogenic properties of this agent might be consequent to the production of secondary mediators. Since TNF-alpha stimulates the synthesis of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by monocytes and endothelial cells, we investigated the possible involvement of PAF in the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha. Angiogenesis was studied in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model the angiogenesis induced by TNF-alpha was shown to be inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. Moreover, in mice injected with TNF-alpha, PAF was detected within the Matrigel, 6 and 24 h after TNF-alpha injection. The synthesis of PAF within the Matrigel was concomitant with the early migration of endothelial cells and infiltration of monocytes. No infiltration of lymphocytes or polymorphonuclear leukocytes was observed. Synthetic PAF as well as PAF extracted and purified from mice challenged with TNF-alpha induced a rapid angiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170. These results suggest that the angiogenic effect of TNF-alpha is, at least in part, mediated by PAF synthesized from monocytes and/or endothelial cells infiltrating the Matrigel plug. PMID:7516414

  1. Crystal structure of phospholipase A2 complex with the hydrolysis products of platelet activating factor: equilibrium binding of fatty acid and lysophospholipid-ether at the active site may be mutually exclusive.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying H; Yu, Bao-Zhu; Berg, Otto G; Jain, Mahendra K; Bahnson, Brian J

    2002-12-17

    We have solved the 1.55 A crystal structure of the anion-assisted dimer of porcine pancreatic group IB phospholipase A2 (PLA2), complexed with the products of hydrolysis of the substrate platelet activating factor. The dimer contains five coplanar phosphate anions bound at the contact surface between the two PLA2 subunits. This structure parallels a previously reported anion-assisted dimer that mimics the tetrahedral intermediate of PLA2 bound to a substrate interface [Pan, Y. H., et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 609-617]. The dimer structure has a molecule of the product acetate bound in subunit A and the other product 1-octadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (LPC-ether) to subunit B. Therefore, this structure is of the two individual product binary complexes and not of a ternary complex with both products in one active site of PLA2. Protein crystals with bound products were only obtained by cocrystallization starting from the initial substrate. In contrast, an alternate crystal form was obtained when PLA2 was cocrystallized with LPC-ether and succinate, and this crystal form did not contain bound products. The product bound structure has acetate positioned in the catalytic site of subunit A such that one of its oxygen atoms is located 3.5 A from the catalytic calcium. Likewise, a longer than typical Ca-to-Gly(32) carbonyl distance of 3.4 A results in a final Ca coordination that is four-coordinate and has distorted geometry. The other oxygen of acetate makes hydrogen bonds with N(delta)(1)-His(48), O(delta)(1)-Asp(49), and the catalytic assisting water (w7). In contrast, the glycerophosphocholine headgroup of LPC-ether in subunit B makes no contacts with calcium or with the catalytic residues His(48) or Asp(49). The tail of the LPC-ether is located near the active site pocket with the last nine carbons of the sn-1- acyl chain refined in two alternate conformations. The remaining atoms of the LPC-ether product have been modeled into the solvent channel but have their

  2. Platelet-activating factor: receptors and signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chao, W; Olson, M S

    1993-06-15

    During the past two decades, studies describing the chemistry and biology of PAF have been extensive. This potent phosphoacylglycerol exhibits a wide variety of physiological and pathophysiological effects in various cells and tissues. PAF acts, through specific receptors and a variety of signal transduction systems, to elicit diverse biochemical responses. Several important future directions can be enumerated for the characterization of PAF receptors and their attendant signalling mechanisms. The recent cloning and sequence analysis of the gene for the PAF receptor will allow a number of important experimental approaches for characterizing the structure and analysing the function of the various domains of the receptor. Using molecular genetic and immunological technologies, questions relating to whether there is receptor heterogeneity, the precise mechanism(s) for the regulation of the PAF receptor, and the molecular details of the signalling mechanisms in which the PAF receptor is involved can be explored. Another area of major significance is the examination of the relationship between the signalling response(s) evoked by PAF binding to its receptor and signalling mechanisms activated by a myriad of other mediators, cytokines and growth factors. A very exciting recent development in which PAF receptors undoubtedly play a role is in the regulation of the function of various cellular adhesion molecules. Finally, there remain many incompletely characterized physiological and pathophysiological situations in which PAF and its receptor play a crucial signalling role. Our laboratory has been active in the elucidation of several tissue responses in which PAF exhibits major autocoid signalling responses, e.g. hepatic injury and inflammation, acute and chronic pancreatitis, and cerebral stimulation and/or trauma. As new experimental strategies are developed for characterizing the fine structure of the molecular mechanisms involved in tissue injury and inflammation, the

  3. Interaction of platelet-activating factor with cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, L; Chilton, F H; Proud, D

    1991-01-01

    The present study has examined the interaction of platelet-activating factor (PAF) with cultured guinea pig tracheal epithelial cells (GTE). PAF stimulated GTE to release endogenous arachidonic acid and metabolize it to prostaglandins E2 and F2 alpha (PGE2 and PGF2 alpha). Prostanoid production by GTE in response to PAF was dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) and was maximal within 5 min. PGE2 and PGF2 alpha levels increased by 3.3 +/- 0.8 and 3.2 +/- 0.6 ng/10(6) cells respectively over basal levels in response to 100 nM-PAF. The ability of GTE to synthesize and/or catabolize PAF was also examined. GTE readily incorporated [3H]acetate into a product which migrated on t.l.c. with PAF. However, further characterization of this product suggested that label had not been incorporated into PAF, but rather that it was incorporated into another lipid product with chromatographic characteristics similar to those of PAF. In contrast, GTE readily metabolized PAF to inactive products. When [3H]PAF was incubated with GTE, 50% of the total [3H]PAF added was catabolized in approx. 15 min. The major route of catabolism of PAF by GTE was the deacetylation-reacylation pathway, which yielded 1-O-[3H]alkyl-2-acyl-sn-glycerophosphocholine. Determination of the nature of the long-chain acyl group incorporated into the sn-2 position of the newly synthesized products revealed that oleic and linoleic acids were the major fatty acids present. Taken together, these results suggest that respiratory epithelial cells respond to stimulation by PAF with enhanced production of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha, and also have the capacity to modulate inflammatory reactions in the airways by their ability to degrade this potent inflammatory mediator. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2064601

  4. Deficiency of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase is a severity factor for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, Diana M.; Numao, Toshio; Tsodikov, Alexander; Vaitkus, Darius; Fukuda, Takeshi; Watanabe, Naoto; Fueki, Naoto; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Zimmerman, Guy A.; Makino, Sohei; Prescott, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Asthma, a family of airway disorders characterized by airway inflammation, has an increasing incidence worldwide. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) may play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. Its proinflammatory actions are antagonized by PAF acetylhydrolase. A missense mutation (V279F) in the PAF acetylhydrolase gene results in the complete loss of activity, which occurs in 4% of the Japanese population. We asked if PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency correlates with the incidence and severity of asthma in Japan. We found that the prevalence of PAF acetylhydrolase deficiency is higher in Japanese asthmatics than healthy subjects and that the severity of this syndrome is highest in homozygous-deficient subjects. We conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase gene is a modulating locus for the severity of asthma. PMID:10194471

  5. Vitamin C blocks inflammatory platelet-activating factor mimetics created by cigarette smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, H A; Weyrich, A S; Saetzler, R K; Jurek, A; Arfors, K E; Zimmerman, G A; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1997-01-01

    Cigarette smoking within minutes induces leukocyte adhesion to the vascular wall and formation of intravascular leukocyte-platelet aggregates. We find this is inhibited by platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists, and correlates with the accumulation of PAF-like mediators in the blood of cigarette smoke-exposed hamsters. These mediators were PAF-like lipids, formed by nonenzymatic oxidative modification of existing phospholipids, that were distinct from biosynthetic PAF. These PAF-like lipids induced isolated human monocytes and platelets to aggregate, which greatly increased their secretion of IL-8 and macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha. Both events were blocked by a PAF receptor antagonist. Similarly, blocking the PAF receptor in vivo blocked smoke-induced leukocyte aggregation and pavementing along the vascular wall. Dietary supplementation with the antioxidant vitamin C prevented the accumulation of PAF-like lipids, and it prevented cigarette smoke-induced leukocyte adhesion to the vascular wall and formation of leukocyte-platelet aggregates. This is the first in vivo demonstration of inflammatory phospholipid oxidation products and it suggests a molecular mechanism coupling cigarette smoke with rapid inflammatory changes. Inhibition of PAF-like lipid formation and their intravascular sequela by vitamin C suggests a simple dietary means to reduce smoking-related cardiovascular disease. PMID:9153277

  6. Platelet-activating factor receptor agonists mediate xeroderma pigmentosum A photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongxue; Harrison, Kathleen A; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Murphy, Robert C; Rezania, Samin; Konger, Raymond L; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2012-03-16

    To date, oxidized glycerophosphocholines (Ox-GPCs) with platelet-activating factor (PAF) activity produced non-enzymatically have not been definitively demonstrated to mediate any known disease processes. Here we provide evidence that these Ox-GPCs play a pivotal role in the photosensitivity associated with the deficiency of the DNA repair protein xeroderma pigmentosum type A (XPA). It should be noted that XPA-deficient cells are known to have decreased antioxidant defenses. These studies demonstrate that treatment of human XPA-deficient fibroblasts with the pro-oxidative stressor ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation resulted in increased reactive oxygen species and PAF receptor (PAF-R) agonistic activity in comparison with gene-corrected cells. The UVB irradiation-generated PAF-R agonists were inhibited by antioxidants. UVB irradiation of XPA-deficient (Xpa-/-) mice also resulted in increased PAF-R agonistic activity and skin inflammation in comparison with control mice. The increased UVB irradiation-mediated skin inflammation and TNF-α production in Xpa-/- mice were blocked by systemic antioxidants and by PAF-R antagonists. Structural characterization of PAF-R-stimulating activity in UVB-irradiated XPA-deficient fibroblasts using mass spectrometry revealed increased levels of sn-2 short-chain Ox-GPCs along with native PAF. These studies support a critical role for PAF-R agonistic Ox-GPCs in the pathophysiology of XPA photosensitivity.

  7. Oxygen radicals inhibit human plasma acetylhydrolase, the enzyme that catabolizes platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, G; Oriente, A; Napoli, C; Palumbo, G; Chiariello, P; Marone, G; Condorelli, M; Chiariello, M; Triggiani, M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) can exert profound inflammatory effects at very low concentrations. In plasma, PAF is hydrolyzed to lyso-PAF by acetylhydrolase, an enzyme that circulates bound to LDL. Previous studies suggest that oxygen radicals may act synergistically with PAF to potentiate tissue injury. However, mechanisms underlying this interaction have not been elucidated. In this study we investigated whether oxygen radicals may inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase activity was measured in human plasma and purified LDL before and after exposure to radicals (10-20 nmol/min per ml) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase. Oxygen radicals induced > 50% loss of PAF acetylhydrolase activity within 60 s and almost complete inactivation by 10 min. This phenomenon was irreversible and independent of oxidative modification of LDL. Inactivation occurred without changes in the affinity constant of the enzyme (Km was 17.9 microM under control conditions and 15.1 microM after exposure to oxygen radicals). Inactivation was prevented by the scavengers superoxide dismutase or dimethylthiourea or by the iron chelator deferoxamine. Thus, superoxide-mediated, iron-catalyzed formation of hydroxyl radicals can rapidly and irreversibly inactivate PAF acetylhydrolase. Since concomitant production of PAF and oxygen radicals can occur in various forms of tissue injury, inactivation of acetylhydrolase might represent one mechanism by which oxygen radicals may potentiate and prolong the proinflammatory effects of PAF. Images PMID:8200975

  8. Platelet-activating factor: a candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1-induced neurotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gelbard, H A; Nottet, H S; Swindells, S; Jett, M; Dzenko, K A; Genis, P; White, R; Wang, L; Choi, Y B; Zhang, D

    1994-01-01

    The pathogenesis of central nervous system disease during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection revolves around productive viral infection of brain macrophages and microglia. Neuronal losses in the cortex and subcortical gray matter accompany macrophage infection. The question of how viral infection of brain macrophages ultimately leads to central nervous system (CNS) pathology remains unanswered. Our previous work demonstrated high-level production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, arachidonic acid metabolites, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) from HIV-infected monocytes and astroglia (H. E. Gendelman, P. Genis, M. Jett, and H. S. L. M. Nottet, in E. Major, ed., Technical Advances in AIDS Research in the Nervous System, in press; P. Genis, M. Jett, E. W. Bernton, H. A. Gelbard, K. Dzenko, R. Keane, L. Resnick, D. J. Volsky, L. G. Epstein, and H. E. Gendelman, J. Exp. Med. 176:1703-1718, 1992). These factors, together, were neurotoxic. The relative role(s) of each of these candidate neurotoxins in HIV-1-related CNS dysfunction was not unraveled by these initial experiments. We now report that PAF is produced during HIV-1-infected monocyte-astroglia interactions. PAF was detected at high levels in CSF of HIV-1-infected patients with immunosuppression and signs of CNS dysfunction. The biologic significance of the results for neurological disease was determined by addition of PAF to cultures of primary human fetal cortical or rat postnatal retinal ganglion neurons. Here, PAF at concentrations of > or = 300 pg/ml produced neuronal death. The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 or memantine partially blocked the neurotoxic effects of PAF. The identification of PAF as an HIV-1-induced neurotoxin provides new insights into how HIV-1 causes neurological impairment and how it may ultimately be ameliorated. PMID:8207837

  9. The Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Chronic Inflammation, Immune Activation, and Comorbidities Associated with HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros; Papakonstantinou, Vasiliki; Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Chini, Maria; Lazanas, Marios C.; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of highly effective antiretroviral therapy, cardiovascular disease has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among people with treated HIV-1, but the pathogenesis is unclear. Platelet-activating factor is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that has immunomodulatory effects and a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular disease. Limited scientific evidence suggests that the platelet-activating factor pathway may be a mechanistic link between HIV-1 infection, systemic inflammation, and immune activation that contribute to pathogenesis of chronic HIV-related comorbidities, including cardiovascular disease and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. In this review, we examine the mechanisms by which the cross-talk between HIV-1, immune dysregulation, inflammation, and perturbations in the platelet-activating factor pathway may directly affect HIV-1 immunopathogenesis. Understanding the role of platelet-activating factor in HIV-1 infection may pave the way for further studies to explore therapeutic interventions, such as diet, that can modify platelet-activating factor activity and use of platelet-activating factor inhibitors that might improve the prognosis of HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:26616844

  10. Role of platelet-activating factor in polymorphonuclear neutrophil recruitment in reperfused ischemic rabbit heart.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Alloatti, G.; Mariano, F.; Comino, A.; Cacace, G.; Polloni, R.; De Filippi, P. G.; Emanuelli, G.; Camussi, G.

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the role of platelet-activating factor in the recruitment of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) in a rabbit model of cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. The accumulation of PMN was evaluated 2 and 24 hours after removal of 40 minutes of coronary occlusion by morphometric analysis and 111In-labeled PMN infiltration. The administration of two structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor-receptor antagonists (SDZ 63-675, 5 mg/kg body weight, and WEB 2170, 5 mg/kg body weight) before reperfusion significantly reduced the accumulation of PMN, as well as the hemodynamic alterations and the size of necrotic area. Two hours after reperfusion, the percentage of increase of 111In-labeled PMN in transmural central ischemic zone was significantly reduced in rabbits pretreated with SDZ 63-675 (51.4 +/- 7.9) or WEB 2170 (32.4 +/- 8.8) with respect to untreated rabbits (107.6 +/- 13.5). The morphometric analysis of myocardial sections confirmed the reduction of PMN infiltration at 2 hours and demonstrated that at 24 hours the phenomenon was even more significant. In addition, SDZ 63-675 and WEB 2170 prevented early transient bradycardia and hypotension and reduced the infarct size, judged by staining with tetrazolium at 2 and 24 hours after reperfusion, and by histological examination at 24 hours. These results suggest that platelet-activating factor is involved in the accumulation of PMN in the reperfused ischemic myocardium and contributes to the evolution of myocardial injury. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8434642

  11. Human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase. Oxidatively fragmented phospholipids as substrates.

    PubMed

    Stremler, K E; Stafforini, D M; Prescott, S M; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase hydrolyzes the sn-2 acetyl residue of PAF, but not phospholipids with long chain sn-2 residues. It is associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL) particles, and is the LDL-associated phospholipase A2 activity that specifically degrades oxidatively damaged phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., Zimmerman, G. A., and McIntyre, T. M. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 5331-5334). To identify potential substrates, we synthesized phosphatidylcholines with sn-2 residues from two to nine carbon atoms long, and found the V/k ratio decreased as the sn-2 residue was lengthened: the C5 homolog was 50%, the C6 20%, while the C9 homolog was only 2% as efficient as PAF. However, the presence of an omega-oxo function radically affected hydrolysis: the half-life of the sn-2 9-aldehydic homolog was identical to that of PAF. We oxidized [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine and isolated a number of more polar phosphatidylcholines. We treated these with phospholipase C, derivatized the resulting diglycerides for gas chromatographic/mass spectroscopic analysis, and found a number of diglycerides where the m/z ratio was consistent with a series of short to medium length sn-2 residues. We treated the polar phosphatidylcholines with acetylhydrolase and derivatized the products for analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. The liberated residues were more polar than straight chain standards and had m/z ratios from 129 to 296, consistent with short to medium chain residues. Therefore, oxidation fragments the sn-2 residue of phospholipids, and the acetylhydrolase specifically degrades such oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  12. Oxidatively fragmented phosphatidylcholines activate human neutrophils through the receptor for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Smiley, P L; Stremler, K E; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1991-06-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) activates neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes, PMN) through a receptor that specifically recognizes short sn-2 residues. We oxidized synthetic [2-arachidonoyl]phosphatidylcholine to fragment and shorten the sn-2 residue, and then examined the phospholipid products for the ability to stimulate PMN. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was fragmented by ozonolysis to 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. This phospholipid activated human neutrophils at submicromolar concentrations, and is effects were inhibited by specific PAF receptor antagonists WEB2086, L659,989, and CV3988. 1-Palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine next was fragmented by an uncontrolled free radical-catalyzed reaction: it was treated with soybean lipoxygenase to form its sn-2 15-hydroperoxy derivative (which did not activate neutrophils) and then allowed to oxidize under air. The secondary oxidation resulted in the formation of numerous fragmented phospholipids (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103), some of which activated PMN. Hydrolysis of sn-2 residues with phospholipase A2 destroyed biologic activity, as did hydrolysis with PAF acetylhydrolase. PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for short or intermediate length sn-2 residues and does not hydrolyze the starting material (Stremler, K. E., Stafforini, D. M., Prescott, S. M., and McIntyre, T. M. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 11095-11103). Neutrophil activation was completely blocked by L659,989, a specific PAF receptor antagonist. We conclude that diacylphosphatidylcholines containing an sn-2 polyunsaturated fatty acyl residue can be oxidatively fragmented to species with sn-2 residues short enough to activate the PAF receptor of neutrophils. This suggests a new mechanism for the appearance of biologically active phospholipids, and shows

  13. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Levine, B A; Olson, M S

    1993-05-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis.

  14. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR(-/-)) mice were inoculated intracranially with 10(4) plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR(-/-) mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR(-/-) mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR(-/-) mice showed less TCD4(+), TCD8(+) and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR(-/-) mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  15. Intestinal alkaline sphingomyelinase hydrolyses and inactivates platelet-activating factor by a phospholipase C activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun; Nilsson, Åke; Jönsson, Bo A. G.; Stenstad, Hanna; Agace, William; Cheng, Yajun; Duan, Rui-Dong

    2005-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase (alk-SMase) is a new member of the NPP (nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase) family that hydrolyses SM (sphingomyelin) to generate ceramide in the intestinal tract. The enzyme may protect the intestinal mucosa from inflammation and tumorigenesis. PAF (platelet-activating factor) is a pro-inflammatory phospholipid involved in pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. We examined whether alk-SMase can hydrolyse and inactivate PAF. [3H]Octadecyl-labelled PAF was incubated with purified rat intestinal alk-SMase or recombinant human alk-SMase expressed in COS-7 cells. The hydrolytic products were assayed with TLC and MS. We found that alkSMase cleaved the phosphocholine head group from PAF and generated 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol. Differing from the activity against SM, the activity against PAF was optimal at pH 7.5, inhibited by EDTA and stimulated by 0.1–0.25 mM Zn2+. The activity was abolished by site mutation of the predicted metal-binding sites that are conserved in all NPP members. Similar to the activity against SM, the activity against PAF was dependent on bile salt, particularly taurocholate and taurochenodeoxycholate. The Vmax for PAF hydrolysis was 374 μmol·h−1·(mg of protein)−1. The hydrolysis of PAF and SM could be inhibited by the presence of SM and PAF respectively, the inhibition of PAF hydrolysis by SM being stronger. The PAF-induced MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) activation and IL-8 (interleukin 8) release in HT-29 cells, and chemotaxis in leucocytes were abolished by alk-SMase treatment. In conclusion, alk-SMase hydrolyses and inactivates PAF by a phospholipase C activity. The finding reveals a novel function, by which alk-SMase may counteract the development of intestinal inflammation and colon cancer. PMID:16255717

  16. Platelet-activating factor: a mediator of pancreatic inflammation during cerulein hyperstimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, W.; Levine, B. A.; Olson, M. S.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperstimulation of the exocrine pancreas with cerulein causes acute pancreatitis, characterized by intensive interstitial edema, acinar vacuolization, leukocytic infiltration, and hyperamylasemia. Whereas the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis is not well-defined, a local inflammatory response may contribute to the full expression of acute pancreatitis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) seems to be an important mediator of the inflammatory response. The present evidence includes: 1) pancreatic PAF levels increased in rats in which cerulein-induced pancreatitis was initiated, concomitant with an increase in calcium concentrations in the pancreatic tissue; 2) treatment of rats exposed to cerulein with WEB2170, a PAF receptor antagonist, was shown to reduce inflammatory injury, as demonstrated by decreases in pancreatic weight, Evan's blue extravasation, and myeloperoxidase activity and an improvement in pancreatic histology. In an idealized in vitro experiment mimicking cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis, in which pancreatic acini were employed, cerulein induced amylase release, an increase in [Ca2+]i, and an increase in PAF synthesis. Whereas amylase release was induced by low concentrations of cerulein (10(-11) mol/L), relatively high concentrations of cerulein (10(-9) mol/L) were required for the observed increases in PAF synthesis and the [Ca2+]i, indicating that these two responses may not occur under physiological conditions. The present study suggests that the pancreatic accumulation of PAF coupled with Ca2+ overload are important biochemical components of the pathophysiology of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. In fact, PAF production may serve as a primary mediator of inflammation observed during pancreatic hyperstimulation. This is an important observation that will allow a more detailed characterization of the molecular basis of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494049

  17. Oligomeric State Regulated Trafficking of Human Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase Type-II

    PubMed Central

    Monillas, Elizabeth S.; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Thévenin, Anastasia F.; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response. PMID:25707358

  18. Characterization of a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase secreted by the nematode parasite Nippostrongylus brasiliensis.

    PubMed Central

    Grigg, M E; Gounaris, K; Selkirk, M E

    1996-01-01

    Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a small nematode parasite of the gastrointestinal tract of rodents, secretes an enzyme that cleaves the proinflammatory molecule platelet-activating factor to its inactive lyso-form. The enzyme activity of Ca(2+)-dependent and does not exhibit interfacial activation. It does not require the addition of reducing agents for maximal activity, and is not inhibited by thiol-active reagents. Sensitivity of inhibitors suggests the involvement of serine and histidine residues in the enzyme activity. As described for other platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolases, it cannot cleave, nor is it inhibited by, long-chain diacyl phospholipids that are typical substrates for phospholipases A2. The purified enzyme was resolved by SDS/PAGE as a heterodimer composed of two protein subunits with apparent molecular masses of 38 and 25 kDa. The properties of the nematode enzyme thus differ from those described for the mammalian enzymes, but are more closely related to those of an acetylhydrolase than a phospholipase. PMID:8713083

  19. Oligomeric state regulated trafficking of human platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II.

    PubMed

    Monillas, Elizabeth S; Caplan, Jeffrey L; Thévenin, Anastasia F; Bahnson, Brian J

    2015-05-01

    The intracellular enzyme platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase type-II (PAFAH-II) hydrolyzes platelet-activating factor and oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. PAFAH-II in its resting state is mainly cytoplasmic, and it responds to oxidative stress by becoming increasingly bound to endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membranes. Numerous studies have indicated that this enzyme is essential for protecting cells from oxidative stress induced apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the oxidative stress response by PAFAH-II has not been fully resolved. Here, changes to the oligomeric state of human PAFAH-II were investigated as a potential regulatory mechanism toward enzyme trafficking. Native PAGE analysis in vitro and photon counting histogram within live cells showed that PAFAH-II is both monomeric and dimeric. A Gly-2-Ala site-directed mutation of PAFAH-II demonstrated that the N-terminal myristoyl group is required for homodimerization. Additionally, the distribution of oligomeric PAFAH-II is distinct within the cell; homodimers of PAFAH-II were localized to the cytoplasm while monomers were associated to the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi. We propose that the oligomeric state of PAFAH-II drives functional protein trafficking. PAFAH-II localization to the membrane is critical for substrate acquisition and effective oxidative stress protection. It is hypothesized that the balance between monomer and dimer serves as a regulatory mechanism of a PAFAH-II oxidative stress response.

  20. Nitric oxide mediates angiogenesis induced in vivo by platelet-activating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, G.; Lupia, E.; de Martino, A.; Battaglia, E.; Arese, M.; Tizzani, A.; Bussolino, F.; Camussi, G.

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the role of an endogenous production of nitric oxide (NO) in the in vitro migration of endothelial cells and in the in vivo angiogenic response elicited by platelet-activating factor (PAF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The NO synthase inhibitor, N omega-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), but not its enantiomer D-NAME, prevented chemotaxis of endothelial cells induced in vitro by PAF and by TNF. The motogenic activity of TNF was also inhibited by WEB 2170, a specific PAF-receptor antagonist. In contrast, chemotaxis induced by bFGF was not prevented by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. Angiogenesis was studied in vivo in a murine model in which Matrigel was used as a vehicle for the delivery of mediators. In this model, the angiogenesis induced by PAF and TNF was inhibited by WEB 2170 and L-NAME but not by D-NAME. In contrast, angiogenesis induced by bFGF was not affected by L-NAME or by WEB 2170. TNF, but not bFGF, induced PAF synthesis within Matrigel. These results suggest that NO mediates the angiogenesis induced by PAF as well as that induced by TNF, which is dependent on the production of PAF. In contrast, the angiogenic effect of bFGF appears to be both PAF and NO independent. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9250168

  1. Biosynthesis of platelet-activating factor by cultured rat Kupffer cells stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187.

    PubMed Central

    Chao, W; Siafaka-Kapadai, A; Olson, M S; Hanahan, D J

    1989-01-01

    Cultured rat Kupffer cells synthesize and release platelet-activating factor (PAF) when stimulated with calcium ionophore A23187. The production of PAF is concentration- and time-dependent and, based upon [3H]serotonin release assays, approx. 1.0 pmol of PAF is formed per 8 x 10(6) cells during 10 min of ionophore stimulation. It is suggested that Kupffer cells are important cellular components which produce and release PAF in order to facilitate communication between hepatic sinusoidal and parenchymal cells. Further, it is suggested that such mediator production in response to reticulo-endothelial cell stimulation causes the hepatic glycogenolytic response previously in the isolated perfused rat liver. PMID:2494988

  2. Platelet activating factor, lyso-platelet activating factor and arachidonic acid release in normal human skin and the influence of topical steroid treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Barr, R M; Lawlor, F; Judge, M R; Courtney, P; Barlow, R; Kobza Black, A; Mallet, A I; Greaves, M W

    1993-01-01

    1. Previous, in vitro, studies have established the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) by the 're-modelling' pathways in which the activation of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) enzyme catalyses the hydrolysis of an ether-acyl-phosphocholine to give concomitant release of lyso-PAF, the immediate precursor of PAF, and arachidonic acid, the precursor of the icosanoids. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between PAF and eicosanoid release in human skin, and to study the effect of treatment of skin with a topical steroid, on the release of PAF, lyso-PAF and arachidonic acid. 2. A novel assay procedure was developed for the simultaneous assay of PAF and lyso-PAF in skin exudates from abrasions and suction blisters in normal human skin. In addition we assayed arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a representative eicosanoid. 3. The mean amounts of mediator recovered in the first 30 min period following abrasion were PAF 0.43, lyso-PAF 11.9, PGE2 25.7 and arachidonic acid 760 pmol/sample. The molar ratio of PAF:lyso-PAF:arachidonic acid in skin exudates from abrasions was 1:30:1800 and in suction blister exudates was 1:90:3660. 4. Time course studies showed a decline in the recoveries of arachidonic acid and lyso-PAF, of about 50% in 2 h. In contrast, PAF was recovered in exudates at a constant rate over 2 h but PGE2 release decreased by more than 90% after the initial 30 min period. 5. Topical application under occlusion, of 0.05% clobetasol propionate, a potent corticosteroid, significantly reduced lyso-PAF by 30% in suction blister exudates but did not significantly alter the concentrations of PAF or arachidonic acid.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8329291

  3. Platelet-activating Factor Receptor Initiates Contact of Acinetobacter baumannii Expressing Phosphorylcholine with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smani, Younes; Docobo-Pérez, Fernando; López-Rojas, Rafael; Domínguez-Herrera, Juan; Ibáñez-Martínez, José; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion is an initial and important step in Acinetobacter baumannii causing infections. However, the exact molecular mechanism of such a step between A. baumannii and the host cells remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the phosphorylcholine (ChoP)-containing outer membrane protein of A. baumannii binds to A549 cells through platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), resulting in activation of G protein and intracellular calcium. Upon A. baumannii expressing ChoP binding to PAFR, clathrin and β-arrestins, proteins involved in the direction of the vacuolar movement, are activated during invasion of A. baumannii. PAFR antagonism restricts the dissemination of A. baumannii in the pneumonia model. These results define a role for PAFR in A. baumannii interaction with host cells and suggest a mechanism for the entry of A. baumannii into the cytoplasm of host cells. PMID:22689572

  4. Immune complex induced pancreatitis: effect of BN 52021, a selective antagonist of platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Jancar, S; De Giaccobi, G; Mariano, M; Mencia-Huerta, J M; Sirois, P; Braquet, P

    1988-05-01

    A model of acute pancreatitis was developed by induction of an immune complex mediated hypersensitivity reaction in rats. This acute inflammatory reaction was characterized by intense interstitial edema, neutrophil infiltration and margination, and congestion of small vessels whereas serum amylase levels remained unchanged. Microscopic examination of the pancreatic tissue revealed the presence of immune complex deposition around blood vessels and ducts. Vascular permeability, as measured by Evan's blue extravasation increased by 6 fold. In addition, circulating platelets dropped to 50% of normal levels. Injection of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the peritoneal cavity of rats also produced an increase in vascular permeability in the pancreas. A selective PAF-antagonist, BN 52021 reduced by approximately 50% the increase in vascular permeability produced by immune complex in the pancreas as well as that elicited by intraperitoneal injection of PAF. These results suggest that PAF plays a role in the pathological manifestations of immune complex-mediated pancreatitis.

  5. Decrease in platelet activating factor stimulated phosphoinositide turnover during storage of human platelets in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, M.G.; Shukla, S.D. )

    1987-05-01

    Human platelet concentrate from the American Red Cross Blood Center was stored at 24{degree}C in a shaker and aliquots were taken out at time intervals aseptically. Platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated turnover of phosphoinositide (PPI) was monitored by assaying {sup 32}P incorporation into phosphoinositides using platelet rich plasma (PRP). Platelets in PRP were incubated with 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} M PAF at 37{degree}C with gentle shaking and after 5 min their lipids were extracted and analysed by TLC for {sup 32}P-phosphoinositides. The percent stimulation of {sup 32}P incorporation by PAF (over control) into PPI was approximately 250, 100, 60, 25 and 20 on days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6, respectively. This indicated a dramatic decrease in PAF responsive turnover of platelet PPI during storage. These findings have important implications in relation to PAF receptor activity and viability of platelets at different periods of storage.

  6. Crystallization and Preliminary X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis of Human Plasma Platelet Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Wilder, C; Bahnson, B

    2009-01-01

    The plasma form of the human enzyme platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) has been crystallized, and X-ray diffraction data were collected at a synchrotron source to a resolution of 1.47 {angstrom}. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit cell parameters of a = 116.18, b = 83.06, c = 96.71 {angstrom}, and {beta} = 115.09 and two molecules in the asymmetric unit. PAF-AH functions as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger by reducing the levels of the signaling molecule PAF. Additionally, the LDL bound enzyme has been linked to atherosclerosis due to its hydrolytic activities of pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids.

  7. Coronary vasoconstriction in the rat, isolated perfused heart induced by platelet-activating factor is mediated by leukotriene C4.

    PubMed Central

    Piper, P. J.; Stewart, A. G.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (Paf, 0.04-4.50 nmol) dose-dependently induced coronary vasoconstriction and decreased cardiac contractility in rat, isolated perfused hearts and concomitantly released leukotriene-like bioactivity into the cardiac effluent. Platelet-activating factor (0.9 nmol) induced an increase in 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1 alpha), PGF2 alpha, PGE2 and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) of cardiac effluents following partial purification using C18 Sep-Paks. The leukotriene-like bioactivity released by Paf was identified as leukotriene C4 (LTC4) using a combination of isolation on reverse phase-h.p.l.c. (r.p.h.p.l.c.) and quantitation by RIA. In addition, LTB4 was also identified by r.p.h.p.l.c. and the levels, determined by RIA, were within the range having biological activity. The release of cyclo-oxygenase products by Paf was prevented by indomethacin (2.8 microM), markedly attenuated by diethylcarbamazine (7.7 mM) but unaffected by FPL 55712 (1.9 microM)-pretreatment. Furthermore, LTC4 (50 pmol) did not increase the release of the cyclo-oxygenase products measured. The release of LTB4 and LTC4 appeared to be unaffected by indomethacin pretreatment whereas diethylcarbamazine-pretreatment markedly inhibited release. The coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf (0.9 nmol) was attenuated by pretreatment with indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine, whereas FPL 55712 caused a marked inhibition of the response. In contrast, the decrease in cardiac contractility was prevented by indomethacin or diethylcarbamazine and unaffected by FPL 55712 pretreatment. It is concluded that LTC4 may be largely responsible for the coronary vasoconstriction induced by Paf with cyclo-oxygenase products having a possible modulatory role whereas the latter appear to be involved in the Paf-induced decrease in cardiac contractility. PMID:3091131

  8. Evidence for immunoglobulin Fc receptor-mediated prostaglandin2 and platelet-activating factor formation by cultured rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neuwirth, R.; Singhal, P.; Diamond, B.; Hays, R.M.; Lobmeyer, L.; Clay, K.; Schlondorff, D.

    1988-09-01

    The possibility of Fc-dependent uptake of IgG immune complexes was examined in subcultured rat mesangial cells free of monocytes. 195Au-labeled colloidal gold particles were coated either with BSA only or with BSA followed by rabbit anti-BSA-IgG or the F(ab')2 fragment of the IgG. Mesangial cells preferentially took up 195Au particles covered with BSA-anti-BSA-IgG over those covered with BSA or the F(ab')2 fragment. This uptake was a time-dependent and saturable process inhibitable by sodium azide or cytochalasin B. Using phase-contrast microscopy in the light reflectance mode, it was established that essentially all mesangial cells took up IgG-coated gold particles. By electron microscopy the process was shown to consist of vesicular uptake with delivery to endosomes. Mesangial binding-uptake of the IgG-covered particles was associated with stimulation of PGE2 synthesis and production of platelet-activating factor, a lipid mediator of inflammation. To characterize the potential Fc receptor for IgG we used the rosetting technique with sheep red blood cells coated with IgG subclass-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies. 50% of mesangial cells exhibited rosetting with red cells coated with mouse IgG2a, whereas negligible rosetting was observed with IgG2b or IgG1. Competition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgG2a binding. We conclude that cultured rat mesangial cells exhibit specific receptors for IgG and that occupancy of Fc receptors results in endocytosis and is associated with generation of PGE2 and platelet-activating factor. These observations may be of significance for immune-mediated glomerular diseases.

  9. Nuclear localization of platelet-activating factor receptor controls retinal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    K Bhosle, Vikrant; Rivera, José Carlos; Zhou, Tianwei (Ellen); Omri, Samy; Sanchez, Melanie; Hamel, David; Zhu, Tang; Rouget, Raphael; Rabea, Areej Al; Hou, Xin; Lahaie, Isabelle; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; Chemtob, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a pleiotropic phospholipid with proinflammatory, procoagulant and angiogenic actions on the vasculature. We and others have reported the presence of PAF receptor (Ptafr) at intracellular sites such as the nucleus. However, mechanisms of localization and physiologic functions of intracellular Ptafr remain poorly understood. We hereby identify the importance of C-terminal motif of the receptor and uncover novel roles of Rab11a GTPase and importin-5 in nuclear translocation of Ptafr in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells. Nuclear localization of Ptafr is independent of exogenous PAF stimulation as well as intracellular PAF biosynthesis. Moreover, nuclear Ptafr is responsible for the upregulation of unique set of growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor, in vitro and ex vivo. We further corroborate the intracrine PAF signaling, resulting in angiogenesis in vivo, using Ptafr antagonists with distinct plasma membrane permeability. Collectively, our findings show that nuclear Ptafr translocates in an agonist-independent manner, and distinctive functions of Ptafr based on its cellular localization point to another dimension needed for pharmacologic selectivity of drugs. PMID:27462464

  10. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome.

  11. Essential role of platelet activation via protease activated receptor 4 in tissue factor-initiated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Busso, Nathalie; Chobaz-Péclat, Veronique; Hamilton, Justin; Spee, Pieter; Wagtmann, Nicolai; So, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tissue factor (TF) activation of the coagulation proteases enhances inflammation in animal models of arthritis and endotoxemia, but the mechanism of this effect is not yet fully understood – in particular, whether this is primarily due to fibrin formation or through activation of protease activated receptors (PARs). Methods We induced extravascular inflammation by injection of recombinant soluble murine TF (sTF1–219) in the hind paw. The effects of thrombin inhibition, fibrinogen and platelet depletion were evaluated, as well as the effects of PAR deficiency using knockout mice deficient for each of the PARs. Results Injection of soluble TF provoked a rapid onset of paw swelling. Inflammation was confirmed histologically and by increased serum IL-6 levels. Inflammation was significantly reduced by depletion of fibrinogen (P < 0.05) or platelets (P = 0.015), and by treatment with hirudin (P = 0.04) or an inhibitor of activated factor VII (P < 0.001) compared with controls. PAR-4-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced paw swelling (P = 0.003). In contrast, a deficiency in either PAR-1, PAR-2 or PAR-3 did not affect the inflammatory response to soluble TF injection. Conclusion Our results show that soluble TF induces acute inflammation through a thrombin-dependent pathway and both fibrin deposition and platelet activation are essential steps in this process. The activation of PAR-4 on platelets is crucial and the other PARs do not play a major role in soluble TF-induced inflammation. PMID:18412955

  12. Are the changes in the peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels due to platelet activation?

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Millàs, Montserrat

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays an important role in central nervous system development, neurogenesis and neuronal plasticity. BDNF is also expressed in several non-neuronal tissues, and it could play an important role in other processes, such as cancer, angiogenesis, etc. Platelets are the major source of peripheral BDNF. However, platelets also contain high amounts of serotonin; they express specific surface receptors during activation, and a multitude of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory bioactive compounds are secreted from the granules. Until recently, there was insufficient knowledge regarding the relationship between BDNF and platelets. Recent studies showed that BDNF is present in two distinct pools in platelets, in α-granules and in the cytoplasm, and only the BDNF in the granules is secreted following stimulation, representing 30% of the total BDNF in platelets. BDNF has an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Low levels of serum BDNF have been described in patients with major depressive disorder, and BDNF levels increased with chronic antidepressant treatment. Interestingly, there is an association between depression and platelet function. This review analyzed studies that evaluated the relationship between BDNF and platelet activation and the effect of treatments on both parameters. Only a few studies consider this possible confounding factor, and it could be very important in diseases such as depression, which show changes in both parameters. PMID:27014600

  13. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  14. Platelet activating factor produced in vitro by Kaposi's sarcoma cells induces and sustains in vivo angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Bussolino, F; Arese, M; Montrucchio, G; Barra, L; Primo, L; Benelli, R; Sanavio, F; Aglietta, M; Ghigo, D; Rola-Pleszczynski, M R

    1995-01-01

    Imbalance in the network of soluble mediators may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). In this study, we demonstrated that KS cells grown in vitro produced and in part released platelet activating factor (PAF), a powerful lipid mediator of inflammation and cell-to-cell communication. IL-1, TNF, and thrombin enhanced the synthesis of PAF. PAF receptor mRNA and specific, high affinity binding site for PAF were present in KS cells. Nanomolar concentration of PAF stimulated the chemotaxis and chemokinesis of KS cells, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells. The migration response to PAF was inhibited by WEB 2170, a hetrazepinoic PAF receptor antagonist. Because neoangiogenesis is essential for the growth and progression of KS and since PAF can activate vascular endothelial cells, we examined the potential role of PAF as an instrumental mediator of angiogenesis associated with KS. Conditioned medium (CM) from KS cells (KS-CM) or KS cells themselves induced angiogenesis and macrophage recruitment in a murine model in which Matrigel was injected subcutaneously. These effects were inhibited by treating mice with WEB 2170. Synthetic PAF or natural PAF extracted from plasma of patients with classical KS also induced angiogenesis, which in turn was inhibited by WEB 2170. The action of PAF was amplified by expression of other angiogenic factors and chemokines: these included basic and acidic fibroblast growth factor, placental growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor and its specific receptor flk-1, hepatocyte growth factor, KC, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2. Treatment with WEB 2170 abolished the expression of the transcripts of these molecules within Matrigel containing KS-CM. These results indicate that PAF may cooperate with other angiogenic molecules and chemokines in inducing vascular development in KS. Images PMID:7543496

  15. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  16. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers.

    PubMed

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica; Burgos, Rafael Agustín

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response.

  17. Levels of gingival tissue platelet activating factor after conventional and regenerative periodontal surgery.

    PubMed

    Keles, Gonca Cayir; Cetinkaya, Burcu Ozkan; Ayas, Bulent; Isildak, Ibrahim; Diraman, Emine; Koprulu, Hulya; Acikgoz, Gokhan

    2007-12-01

    The hypothesis, a relationship between gingival tissue platelet activating factor (PAF) levels and healing after periodontal surgery, was tested by measuring PAF levels in gingival tissues collected from sites that had undergone flap surgery and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) or flap surgery alone. Using a split-mouth design, 20 intrabony defects were randomly assigned to treatment with flap surgery and GTR (group 1) or with flap surgery alone (group 2). Gingival tissue samples were obtained at surgery (baseline) and at 6-month follow-up evaluation visit. One half of each sample was used for analysis of PAF levels by high-performance liquid chromatography, and the other half of the sample was used for histomorphometric analysis that included measurements of number and diameter of blood vessels. PAF levels and diameter of blood vessels were significantly decreased (p < 0.01), and the number of blood vessels was significantly increased (p < 0.05) in both groups after 6 months compared to the baseline values. Postoperative number of blood vessels were significantly higher in group 1 (p < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference in postoperative PAF levels between the two groups (p > 0.05). Based on the reported results, it is suggested that a decrease in gingival PAF levels might be found after conventional and regenerative periodontal surgery.

  18. Phospholipase A2 from bovine seminal plasma is a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed Central

    Soubeyrand, S; Lazure, C; Manjunath, P

    1998-01-01

    The major phospholipase A2 activity from bovine seminal plasma was recently purified [Soubeyrand, Khadir, Brindle and Manjunath (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 222-227]. We here show that the 60 kDa enzyme is in fact a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Sequences of the N-terminus as well as of internal fragments showed 100% identity with the cDNA-deduced sequences of bovine plasma PAF-AH. The enzyme has kinetic properties similar to those of the human serum PAF-AH. Although capable of hydrolysing long-chained phosphatidylcholine, it displayed a highly preferential activity towards PAF. The enzyme activity towards phosphatidylcholine, but not PAF, was Ca2+-dependent. Biochemical characterization revealed that the enzyme is extensively N-glycosylated and that it exists predominantly as a dimer in solution. Western blot analysis revealed that the enzyme is highly heterogeneous in charge, with a maximal distribution at an isoelectric point of approx. 5.7. The enzyme was expressed exclusively in the seminal vesicles and the ampulla. No association of the enzyme with either epididymal or ejaculated spermatozoa could be detected. PMID:9405273

  19. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2017-02-03

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome.

  20. Inhibitory effect of trichothecene mycotoxins on bovine platelets stimulated by platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, P A; Ross, M L; Bondy, G S

    1987-01-01

    Several species of fungi, which infect cereals and grains, can produce a class of compounds, known as trichothecene mycotoxins, which is characterized by a substituted epoxy-trichothecene ring structure. Cattle are susceptible to intoxication from feeds contaminated with T-2 toxin, one of the more potent trichothecene mycotoxins, while swine refuse to ingest feed contaminated with T-2 toxin. The bovine platelet has been used as a model cell system to evaluate the effects of T-2 toxin and its natural metabolites, HT-2 toxin and T-2 tetraol, on cell function in vitro. Due to the lipophilic nature of these mycotoxins, a biologically active phospholipid was used to stimulate the platelets in the presence and absence of the toxins. The mycotoxin T-2 toxin and its major metabolite HT-2 toxin inhibited platelet activating factor-stimulated bovine platelets, suspended in homologous plasma, in a concentration but not time dependent manner. Significant inhibition of platelet function (p less than 0.01) occurred with 135 ng T-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets and with 77 ng HT-2 toxin per 10(6) platelets. These mycotoxins exerted an additive inhibitory effect on the platelet aggregation response. In contrast, the minor metabolite T-2 tetraol had no inhibitory effect on platelet function and had no influence on the responses of T-2 toxin or HT-2 toxin when the mycotoxins were present together in the platelet suspensions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3453270

  1. Hydroxyl-platelet-activating factor exists in blood of healthy volunteers and periodontal patients.

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulou, Smaragdi; Tsoupras, Alexandros; Baltas, George; Kotsifaki, Helen; Mantzavinos, Zacharias; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2003-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are localized chronic inflammatory conditions of the gingival and underlying bone and connective tissue. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent inflammatory phospholipid mediator that has been previously detected in elevated levels in inflamed gingival tissues, in gingival crevicular fluid and in saliva, is implicated in periodontal disease. Our results from previous studies showed that the biologically active phospholipid detected in gingival crevicular fluid is a hydroxyl-PAF analogue. In this study, hydroxyl-PAF analogue was detected for the first time in human blood derived from patients with chronic periodontitis as well as from periodontally healthy volunteers. The hydroxyl-PAF analogue was purified by high-performance liquid chromatography, detected by biological assays and identified by electrospray analysis. In addition, the quantitative determination of PAF and hydroxyl-PAF analogue (expressed as PAF-like activity) showed a statistically significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyl-PAF analogue levels to PAF levels in periodontal patients, suggesting that this bioactive lipid may play a role in oral inflammation. PMID:14514473

  2. Platelet activating factor-induced expression of p21 is correlated with histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Lege, Bree M.; Liu, Jingwei; Neelapu, Sattva S.; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated keratinocytes secrete the lipid mediator of inflammation, platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF plays an essential role in UV-induced immune suppression and skin cancer induction. Dermal mast cell migration from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced PAF activates mast cell migration by up-regulating mast cell CXCR4 surface expression. Recent findings indicate that PAF up-regulates CXCR4 expression via histone acetylation. UV-induced PAF also activates cell cycle arrest and disrupts DNA repair, in part by increasing p21 expression. Do epigenetic alterations play a role in p21 up-regulation? Here we show that PAF increases Acetyl-CREB-binding protein (CBP/p300) histone acetyltransferase expression in a time and dose-dependent fashion. Partial deletion of the HAT domain in the CBP gene, blocked these effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the p21 promoter. PAF-treatment had no effect on other acetylating enzymes (GCN5L2, PCAF) indicating it is not a global activator of histone acetylation. This study provides further evidence that PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms to affect important cellular processes, and we suggest this bioactive lipid can serve as a link between the environment and the epigenome. PMID:28157211

  3. Platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism targets neuroinflammation in experimental epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Samii, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with the inflammatory process related to the basic mechanisms that lead to seizure susceptibility and brain damage. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent, short-lived phospholipid mediator of inflammation participates in physiological signaling in the brain. However, after seizures PAF accumulates in the brain and activates intracellular signaling related with inflammation-mediated excitotoxicity and hippocampal hyperexcitability. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of PAF antagonism on hippocampal hyperexcitability, seizure susceptibility and neuroprotection using the kindling paradigm and pilocarpine-induced seizure damage models. Methods The PAF antagonist, LAU-0901 (60 mg/kg, i.p.), or vehicle was administrated each day of kindling or daily during the four weeks after status epilepticus (SE). We analyzed seizure severity, electrical activity, cellular damage and inflammation in the hippocampi of both treated groups. Results LAU-0901 limits the progression of kindling and attenuates seizure susceptibility one week after the kindling procedure. Also, under the seizure-damage conditions studied here, we observed that LAU-0901 induces hippocampal neuroprotection and limits somatostatin interneuronal cell loss and inflammation. Discussion Our results indicate that modulation of PAF over-activity attenuates seizure susceptibility, hippocampal hyperexcitability and neuroinflammation. PMID:21204830

  4. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor and genetically engineered PAF receptor mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Shimizu, T

    2000-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) is a biologically active phospholipid mediator. Although PAF was initially recognized for its potential to induce platelet aggregation and secretion, intense investigations have elucidated potent biological actions of PAF in a broad range of cell types and tissues, many of which also produce the molecule. PAF acts by binding to a unique G-protein-coupled seven transmembrane receptor. PAF receptor is linked to intracellular signal transduction pathways, including turnover of phosphatidylinositol, elevation in intracellular calcium concentration, and activation of kinases, resulting in versatile bioactions. On the basis of numerous pharmacological reports, PAF is thought to have many pathophysiological and physiological functions. Recently advanced molecular technics enable us not only to clone PAF receptor cDNAs and genes, but also generate PAF receptor mutant animals, i.e., PAF receptor-overexpressing mouse and PAF receptor-deficient mouse. These mutant mice gave us a novel and specific approach for identifying the pathophysiological and physiological functions of PAF. This review also describes the phenotypes of these mutant mice and discusses them by referring to previously reported pharmacological and genetical data.

  5. Impact of prostaglandin glaucoma drops on platelet-activating factor action: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Moschos, Marilita M; Nitoda, Eirini; Chatziralli, Irini P; Panos, Georgios D; Demopoulos, Constantinos A

    2016-01-01

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different prostaglandin analogs on platelet-activating factor (PAF) levels. Methods Three prostaglandin analogs were selected: bimatoprost 0.3 mg/mL, latanoprost 50 μg/mL, and tafluprost 15 μg/mL. Each drug sample was tested for its ability to cause platelet aggregation, which was measured as PAF-induced aggregation, before and after the addition of various concentrations of the examined sample, creating a linear curve of percentage inhibition (ranging from 0% to 100%) versus different concentrations of the sample. The concentration of the sample that inhibited 50% PAF-induced aggregation was calculated based on this curve, and this value was defined as IC50. In addition, the effect of eye drops on PAF metabolism was examined, through an in vitro analysis on PAF basic metabolic enzymes (PAF-cholinephosphotransferase, PAF-acetyl-CoA:1-O-alkyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine acetyltransferase, and PAF-acetylhydrolase). Results The IC50 values for Lumigan UD® (bimatoprost 0.3 mg/mL), Monoprost® (latanoprost 50 μg/mL), and Saflutan (tafluprost 15 μg/mL) were 8.7, 0.28, and 1.4 μg/mL, respectively. Discussion All three prostaglandin analogs suspended PAF, but bimatoprost induced the most potent inhibition, compared to tafluprost and to the weak effect of latanoprost. PMID:27994439

  6. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor as a promising target for cancer cell repopulation after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    da Silva-Jr, I A; Chammas, R; Lepique, A P; Jancar, S

    2017-01-01

    A major drawback of radiotherapy is the accelerated growth of the surviving tumor cells. Radiotherapy generates a variety of lipids that bind to the receptor for platelet-activating factor, expressed by cells in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, using the TC-1 tumor cell line, we found that irradiation induced a twofold increase in receptor expression and generated agonists of receptor. Irradiated cells induced a 20-fold increase in live TC-1 proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, subcutaneous co-injection of irradiated TC-1 cells with TC-1 expressing luciferase (TC-1 fluc+) markedly increased TC-1 fluc+ proliferation in a receptor-dependent way. Moreover we used a human carcinoma cell line not expressing the PAF receptor (KBM) and the same cell transfected with the receptor gene (KBP). Following co-injection of live KBP cells with irradiated KBM in RAG mice, the tumor growth was significantly increased compared with tumor formed following co-injection of live KBM with irradiated KBM. This tumor cell repopulation correlated with increased infiltration of tumor-promoting macrophages (CD206+). We propose that receptor represents a possible target for improving the efficacy of radiotherapy through inhibition of tumor repopulation. PMID:28134937

  7. Stimulation of Leishmania tropica protein kinase CK2 activities by platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    PubMed

    Dutra, Patricia M L; Vieira, Danielle P; Meyer-Fernandes, Jose R; Silva-Neto, Mario A C; Lopes, Angela H

    2009-09-01

    Leishmania tropica is one of the causative agents of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid mediator in diverse biological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that PAF promoted a three-fold increase on ecto-protein kinase and a three-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity of L. tropica live promastigotes. When casein was added to the reaction medium, along with PAF, there was a four-fold increase on the ecto-kinase activity. When live L. tropica promastigotes were pre-incubated for 30 min in the presence of PAF-plus casein, a six-fold increase on the secreted kinase activity was observed. Also, a protein released from L. tropica promastigotes reacted with polyclonal antibodies for the mammalian CK2 alpha catalytic subunit. Furthermore, in vitro mouse macrophage infection by L. tropica was doubled when promastigotes were pre-treated for 2 h with PAF. Similar results were obtained when the interaction was performed in the presence of purified CK2 or casein. TBB and DRB, CK2 inhibitors, reversed PAF enhancement of macrophage infection by L. tropica. WEB 2086, a competitive PAF antagonist, reversed all PAF effects here described. This study shows for the first time that PAF promotes the activation of two isoforms of CK2, secreted and membrane-bound, correlating these activities to infection of mouse macrophages.

  8. Platelets in the immune response: Revisiting platelet-activating factor in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Parwinder; Jindal, Nina Lakhani; Jagdis, Amanda; Vadas, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Anaphylaxis is an acute, severe, life-threatening multisystem allergic reaction resulting from the sudden systemic release of biochemical mediators and chemotactic substances. Release of both preformed granule-associated mediators and newly generated lipid-derived mediators contributes to the amplification and prolongation of anaphylaxis. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid-derived mediator the central role of which has been well established in experimental models of both immune-mediated and non-immune mediated anaphylaxis. It is produced and secreted by several types of cells, including mast cells, monocytes, tissue macrophages, platelets, eosinophils, endothelial cells, and neutrophils. PAF is implicated in platelet aggregation and activation through release of vasoactive amines in the inflammatory response, resulting in increased vascular permeability, circulatory collapse, decreased cardiac output, and various other biological effects. PAF is rapidly hydrolyzed and degraded to an inactive metabolite, lysoPAF, by the enzyme PAF acetylhydrolase, the activity of which has shown to correlate inversely with PAF levels and predispose to severe anaphylaxis. In addition to its role in anaphylaxis, PAF has also been implicated as a mediator in both allergic and nonallergic inflammatory diseases, including allergic rhinitis, sepsis, atherosclerotic disease, and malignancy, in which PAF signaling has an established role. The therapeutic role of PAF antagonism has been investigated for several diseases, with variable results thus far. Further investigation of its role in pathology and therapeutic modulation is highly anticipated because of the pressing need for more selective and targeted therapy for the management of severe anaphylaxis.

  9. Increased urinary excretion of platelet activating factor in mice with lupus nephritis

    SciTech Connect

    Macconi, D.; Noris, M.; Benfenati, E.; Quaglia, R.; Pagliarino, G. ); Remuzzi, G. Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo )

    1991-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is present in urine from humans and experimental animals in normal conditions. Very little is known about changes in PAF urinary excretion under pathologic conditions and no data are available about the origin of PAF in the urine. In the present study we explored the possibility that immunologic renal disease is associated with an increase in PAF urinary excretion using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. To clarify the renal or extrarenal origin of urinary PAF we evaluated whether exogenously administered PAF (1-(1{prime},2{prime}-{sup 3}H)alkyl) is filtered through the glomerulus and excreted in the urine. The results show that: (1) urine from mice with lupus nephritis in the early phase of the disease contained amounts of PAF comparable to those excreted in normal mouse urine, (2) PAF levels increased when animals started to develop high grade proteinuria, (3) after intravenous injection of ({sup 3}H) PAF In nephritic mice, a negligible amount of ({sup 3}H) ether lipid, corresponding to ({sup 3}H)1-alkyl -2-acyl-3-phosphocholine (alkyl-2-acyl-GPC), was recovered from the 24 h urine extract.

  10. Involvement of leukotriene B4 receptor 1 signaling in platelet-activating factor-mediated neutrophil degranulation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Gaudreault, Eric; Stankova, Jana; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator of inflammation that can act on human neutrophils. When neutrophils are stimulated with PAF at concentrations greater than 10 nM, a double peak of intracellular calcium mobilization is observed. The second calcium peak observed in PAF-treated neutrophils has already been suggested to come from the production of endogenous leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Here we demonstrate the involvement of endogenous LTB4 production and subsequent activation of the high affinity LTB4 receptor (BLT1) in this second calcium mobilization peak observed after stimulation with PAF. We also show that the second, but not the first peak, could be desensitized by prior exposure to LTB4. Moreover, when neutrophils were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors of LTB4 production or with the specific BLT1 antagonist, U75302, PAF-mediated neutrophil degranulation was inhibited by more than 50%. On the other hand, pre-treating neutrophils with the PAF receptor specific antagonist (WEB2086) did not prevent any LTB4-induced degranulation. Also, when human neutrophils were pre-treated with U75302, PAF-mediated chemotaxis was reduced by more than 60%. These data indicate the involvement of BLT1 signaling in PAF-mediated neutrophil activities.

  11. Mechanism of arachidonic acid liberation in platelet-activating factor-stimulated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, S.; Suganuma, A.; Sato, M.; Tohmatsu, T.; Nozawa, Y. )

    1989-08-15

    Upon stimulation of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with platelet-activating factor (PAF), arachidonic acid (AA) is released from membrane phospholipids. The mechanism for AA liberation, a key step in the synthesis of biologically active eicosanoids, was investigated. PAF was found to elicit an increase in the cytoplasmic level of free Ca2+ as monitored by fluorescent indicator fura 2. When (3H) AA-labeled neutrophils were exposed to PAF, the enhanced release of AA was observed with a concomitant decrease of radioactivity in phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine fractions. The inhibitors of phospholipase A2, mepacrine and 2-(p-amylcinnamoyl)-amino-4-chlorobenzoic acid, effectively suppressed the liberation of (3H)AA from phospholipids, indicating that liberation of AA is mainly catalyzed by the action of phospholipase A2. The extracellular Ca2+ is not required for AA release. However, intracellular Ca2+ antagonists, TMB-8 and high dose of quin 2/AM drastically reduced the liberation of AA induced by PAF, indicating that Ca2+ is an essential factor for phospholipase A2 activation. PAF raised the fluorescence of fura 2 at concentrations as low as 8 pM which reached a maximal level about 8 nM, whereas more than nM order concentrations of PAF was required for the detectable release of (3H)AA. Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin resulted in complete abolition of AA liberation in response to PAF. However, the fura 2 response to PAF was not effectively inhibited by toxin treatment. In human neutrophil homogenate and membrane preparations, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) stimulated AA release and potentiated the action of PAF. Guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) inhibited the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate).

  12. Potential angiogenic role of platelet-activating factor in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Montrucchio, G; Sapino, A; Bussolati, B; Ghisolfi, G; Rizea-Savu, S; Silvestro, L; Lupia, E; Camussi, G

    1998-11-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34-and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested.

  13. Cholesterol synthesis inhibitors protect against platelet-activating factor-induced neuronal damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Rumbold, Louis; Williams, Alun

    2007-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is implicated in the neuronal damage that accompanies ischemia, prion disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Since some epidemiological studies demonstrate that statins, drugs that reduce cholesterol synthesis, have a beneficial effect on mild AD, we examined the effects of two cholesterol synthesis inhibitors on neuronal responses to PAF. Methods Primary cortical neurons were treated with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors (simvastatin or squalestatin) prior to incubation with different neurotoxins. The effects of these drugs on neuronal cholesterol levels and neuronal survival were measured. Immunoblots were used to determine the effects of simvastatin or squalestatin on the distribution of the PAF receptor and an enzyme linked immunoassay was used to quantify the amounts of PAF receptor. Results PAF killed primary neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with simvastatin or squalestatin reduced neuronal cholesterol and increased the survival of PAF-treated neurons. Neuronal survival was increased 50% by 100 nM simvastatin, or 20 nM squalestatin. The addition of mevalonate restored cholesterol levels, and reversed the protective effect of simvastatin. Simvastatin or squalestatin did not affect the amounts of the PAF receptor but did cause it to disperse from within lipid rafts. Conclusion Treatment of neurons with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors including simvastatin and squalestatin protected neurons against PAF. Treatment caused a percentage of the PAF receptors to disperse from cholesterol-sensitive domains. These results raise the possibility that the effects of statins on neurodegenerative disease are, at least in part, due to desensitisation of neurons to PAF. PMID:17233902

  14. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase: selective inhibition by potent n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Fisher, Karl J; Owen, Sarah C; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-06-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent endogenous phospholipid modulator of diverse biological activities, including inflammation and shock. PAF levels are primarily regulated by PAF acetylhydrolases (PAF-AHs). These enzymes are candidate secondary targets of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and related toxicants. Previously known OP inhibitors of other serine hydrolases were tested with PAF-AH from mouse brain and testes of established functional importance compared with the structurally different human plasma enzyme. Several key OP pesticides and their oxon metabolites were very poor inhibitors of mouse brain and human plasma PAF-AH in vitro but moderately active for mouse brain and blood PAF-AH in vivo (e.g., tribufos defoliant and profenofos insecticide, presumably following oxidative bioactivation). OP compounds were then designed for maximum in vitro potency and selectivity for mouse brain PAF-AH vs. acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Lead compounds were found in a series of benzodioxaphosphorin 2-oxides. Ultrahigh potency and selectivity were achieved with n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridates (long-chain sarin analogs): mouse brain and testes IC50 < or = 5 nM for C(8)-C(18) analogs and 0.1-0.6 nM for C(13) and C(14) compounds; human plasma IC50 < or = 2 nM for C(13)-C(18) analogs. AChE inhibitory potency decreased as chain length increased with maximum brain PAF-AH/AChE selectivity (>3000-fold) for C(13)-C(18) compounds. The toxicity of i.p.-administered PAF (LD50 ca. 0.5 mg/kg) was increased less than 2-fold by pretreatment with tribufos or the C(13)n-alkyl methylphosphonofluoridate. These studies with a mouse model indicate that PAF-AH is not a major secondary target of OP pesticide poisoning. The optimized PAF-AH inhibitors may facilitate investigations on other aspects of PAF metabolism and action.

  15. Pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and safety profile of the new platelet-activating factor antagonist apafant in man.

    PubMed

    Brecht, H M; Adamus, W S; Heuer, H O; Birke, F W; Kempe, E R

    1991-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a unique phospholipid mediator with multifunctional properties. Evidence generated in experimental studies suggests that PAF plays a pathogenetic role in anaphylactic, inflammatory and immunogenic reactions. Apafant (WEB 2086, CAS 105219-56-5), a novel synthetic PAF receptor antagonist, was administered to a total of 101 healthy volunteers within 5 studies to investigate its pharmacologic activity, pharmacokinetic behaviour and safety profile. Pharmacologic activity was monitored by inhibition of 5 x 10(-8) mol/l PAF-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo. The following treatment schedules were studied: oral single dose 1.25 to 400 mg; oral multiple dose 100 mg t.i.d. over 7 days; i.v. infusion 0.5 to 50 mg (over 30 min); inhalative administration up to 1.0 mg. PAF induced platelet aggregation was virtually completely inhibited by single oral doses of 20 mg upwards, throughout during the multiple oral dose study, at all dose levels tested in the i.v. study and (significantly but not completely) at 0.5 and 1.0 mg in the inhalative study. Following oral administrations (capsules) apafant is absorbed rapidly (tmax 1 to 2 h), there is linear pharmacokinetics for the mean plasma concentrations of apafant measured by RIA as well as for the areas under the curve (AUCs). Approximately 60% of apafant is bound to plasma protein, the mean volume of distribution is 28 l, about 44% of an oral dose is excreted in the urine, the mean renal clearance is 192 ml/min. No accumulation of the drug occurred in volunteers with normal kidney function. No clinically relevant drug related adverse events or changes in laboratory or vital parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and ECG were observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Effects of platelet activating factor and related lipids on phase transition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Bratton, D L; Harris, R A; Clay, K L; Henson, P M

    1988-06-07

    Recent evidence localizing the inflammatory mediator, platelet activating factor, (PAF, 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) to the membranes of stimulated neutrophils raises the possibility that PAF may, in addition to its activities as a mediator, alter the physical properties of membranes. Accordingly, the effects of PAF and related alkyl ether and acyl analogs on phase transition thermodynamics of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) were studied using fluorescence polarization of the fluorescent probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). PAF, its ester analog (1-palmitoyl-2-acetylphosphatidylcholine) and both the corresponding alkyl and acyl lysophospholipid analogs (each at a concentration of 10 mol%) significantly decreased the phase transition temperature and broadened the phase transition of DPPC (P less than 0.05). The relative potency of the lipids in causing this effect was ester-PAF greater than or equal to PAF greater than or equal to lyso-PAF greater than lyso-PC suggesting that the fluidization of the synthetic membranes was attributable to both the 2-position acetyl group and the 1-position alkyl linkage. Furthermore, using various related compounds, increases in chain length and degree of unsaturation in the 2-position were shown to enhance the depression in transition temperature and broadening of the phase transition. Phase transition thermodynamics were also assessed using differential scanning calorimetry. Similar depression in the phase transition temperature was measured for PAF and both the alkyl and acyl lysophospholipids. Broadening of the phase transition for DPPC by the various analogs was assessed by calculation of transition peak width and cooperative unit. Data from fluorescence polarization and differential scanning calorimetry provide similar though not identical results and support the hypothesis that the unique features of PAF may alter membrane physical properties and could ultimately explain some of its biologic

  17. pA2 values for antagonists of platelet activating factor on aggregation of rabbit platelets.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, S. R.; Barnett, C. J.

    1988-01-01

    1. The relative potencies, and equilibrium dissociation constants, for nine antagonists of platelet activating factor (Paf) have been determined on rabbit platelets (in diluted platelet-rich plasma (PRP)) in experiments in which the aggregatory response to Paf was measured. 2. Log concentration-response (% maximum) curves to Paf were obtained in the absence (controls) and presence of different concentrations of each Paf antagonist drug. The antagonists shifted the Paf curves to a higher concentration range and the slopes of the Schild plots, constructed from these data, suggested that the drugs were competitive antagonists of Paf. The slopes of the Schild plots for CV-3988 and SRI 63-119 were greater than 1. 3. The pA2 values (pKB values in parentheses) were: WEB 2086 7.31 (7.63); SRI 63-119 6.95; L-652,731 6.71 (6.73); BN 52021 6.38 (6.47); SRI 63-072 6.36 (6.43); CV-3988 5.87; 48740 RP 4.97 (5.07); ketotifen 4.94 (4.95); thiazinamium 4.73 (4.76). 4. This study provides, for the first time, some functional response data for Paf antagonists (pKB values) which are in an appropriate form for use in classifying putative Paf receptors. The study also provides the comparative potencies of these Paf antagonists in inhibiting Paf-induced platelet aggregation. WEB 2086 was the most potent of the drugs examined. PMID:3293683

  18. Renal metabolism and urinary excretion of platelet-activating factor in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Noris, M.; Perico, N.; Macconi, D.; Nanni, V.; Dadan, J.; Peterlongo, F.; Remuzzi, G. )

    1990-11-15

    The origin of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the urine remains ill defined. The present study documents that (3H)PAF (3.5 mu Ci) injected into the renal artery of isolated control rat kidney preparations perfused at constant pressure with a cell-free medium containing 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA) was excreted in negligible amounts (0.034%) in the urine, whereas 6% was retained by the kidney. When kidneys were perfused with a BSA-free medium, 0.029 and 71% of the total radioactivity added to the perfusate was recovered in the urine and in the renal tissue, respectively. (3H)PAF urine excretion in proteinuric kidneys from adriamycin-treated rats was still negligible (0.015%). Analysis of the renal tissue-retained radioactivity in control and proteinuric kidneys perfused with 1% BSA indicated metabolism into long chain acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine species, lyso-PAF, glycerols, and intact PAF. Thin layer chromatography analysis of (3H)glycerol fraction in these renal extracts showed two major components comigrating with 1-O-alkylglycerol and 1-O-alkyl-2-fatty acylglycerol. Isolated proximal tubules, but not glomeruli from nephrotic rats exposed to increasing concentrations of BSA (0-4%), had a higher PAF uptake than control tubules for BSA concentrations ranging from 0 to 0.1%. Our findings in the isolated perfused kidneys indicate that, in normal conditions, circulating PAF is excreted in the urine in negligible amounts and that the altered glomerular permeability to proteins does not affect this excretion rate. Moreover, analysis of renal tissue radioactivity documented that the renal metabolism of PAF is comparable in control and nephrotic kidneys.

  19. Platelet activating factors alters calcium homeostasis in cultured vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, T.A.; Gimbrone, M.A. Jr.

    1986-06-01

    Platelet activating factor (1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine; PAF), a potent in vivo mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, induced a rapid (onset less than 30 s), concentration-dependent (threshold approximately 10(-11) M, half-maximal approximately 10(-10) M, maximal approximately 10(-8)-10(-7) M) efflux of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ from preloaded cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC). In contrast, deacetylated and other PAF analogues were essentially ineffective. PAF (10(-7) M) was also shown to increase cytosolic free calcium (49 +/- 5%) in suspensions of quin 2 (calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye)-loaded BAEC. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was not blocked by aspirin treatment (100 or 500 microM, 30 min). In the absence of external calcium, PAF was still highly effective in stimulating unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting that PAF mobilized a sequestered pool of intracellular calcium. CV-3988, a PAF antagonist, inhibited PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of BAEC with PAF (10(-8) M, 15 min), but not with other PAF analogues, resulted in a decrease in subsequent PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux, thus suggesting an agonist-specific desensitization. PAF also stimulated a 30% net decrease in the equilibrium /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ content of BAEC within 1 min, which gradually recovered to prestimulus levels in 10-15 min. PAF-stimulated /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux was also observed in endothelial cells cultured from human umbilical vein and baboon cephalic vein but not from cultured human dermal fibroblasts or bovine aortic smooth muscle. These studies provide direct evidence for agonist- and cell-specific effects of PAF on vascular endothelium.

  20. Potential Angiogenic Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Montrucchio, Giuseppe; Sapino, Anna; Bussolati, Benedetta; Ghisolfi, Gianpiero; Rizea-Savu, Simona; Silvestro, Luigi; Lupia, Enrico; Camussi, Giovanni

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the presence of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the lipid extracts of 18 primary breast carcinomas and 20 control breast tissues. The amount of PAF detected in breast carcinomas was significantly higher than in controls. The mass spectrometric analysis of PAF-bioactive lipid extract from breast carcinomas showed the presence of several molecular species of PAF, including C16-alkylPAF, C18-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), C16-LPC, lyso-PAF, and C16-acylPAF. The amount of bioactive PAF extracted from breast specimens significantly correlated with tumor vascularization revealed by the number of CD34- and CD31-positive cells. As C16-alkylPAF was previously shown to induce angiogenesis in vivo, we evaluated whether the thin layer chromatography-purified lipid extracts of breast specimens elicited neoangiogenesis in a murine model of subcutaneous Matrigel injection. The lipid extracts from specimens of breast carcinoma containing high levels of PAF bioactivity, but not from breast carcinomas containing low levels of PAF bioactivity or from normal breast tissue, induced a significant angiogenic response. This angiogenic response was significantly inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. T47D and MCF7 breast cancer cell lines, but not an immortalized nontumor breast cell line (MCF10), released PAF in the culture medium. A significant in vivo neoangiogenic response, inhibited by WEB 2170, was elicited by T47D and MCF7 but not by MCF10 culture medium. These results indicate that an increased concentration of PAF is present in tumors with high microvessel density and that PAF may account for the neoangiogenic activity induced in mice by the lipid extracts obtained from breast cancer. A contribution of PAF in the neovascularization of human breast cancer is suggested. PMID:9811351

  1. Intracellular Erythrocyte Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase I Inactivates Aspirin in Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Willard, Belinda; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) prophylaxis suppresses major adverse cardiovascular events, but its rapid turnover limits inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase activity and thrombosis. Despite its importance, the identity of the enzyme(s) that hydrolyzes the acetyl residue of circulating aspirin, which must be an existing enzyme, remains unknown. We find that circulating aspirin was extensively hydrolyzed within erythrocytes, and chromatography indicated these cells contained a single hydrolytic activity. Purification by over 1400-fold and sequencing identified the PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of type I platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase, a phospholipase A2 with selectivity for acetyl residues of PAF, as a candidate for aspirin acetylhydrolase. Western blotting showed that catalytic PAFAH1B2 and PAFAH1B3 subunits of the type I enzyme co-migrated with purified erythrocyte aspirin hydrolytic activity. Recombinant PAFAH1B2, but not its family member plasma PAF acetylhydrolase, hydrolyzed aspirin, and PAF competitively inhibited aspirin hydrolysis by purified or recombinant erythrocyte enzymes. Aspirin was hydrolyzed by HEK cells transfected with PAFAH1B2 or PAFAH1B3, and the competitive type I PAF acetylhydrolase inhibitor NaF reduced erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin. Exposing aspirin to erythrocytes blocked its ability to inhibit thromboxane A2 synthesis and platelet aggregation. Not all individuals or populations are equally protected by aspirin prophylaxis, the phenomenon of aspirin resistance, and erythrocyte hydrolysis of aspirin varied 3-fold among individuals, which correlated with PAFAH1B2 and not PAFAH1B3. We conclude that intracellular type I PAF acetylhydrolase is the major aspirin hydrolase of human blood. PMID:21844189

  2. Differential effects of interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 on immunomodulatory role of platelet-activating factor in human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Patke, C L; Green, C G; Shearer, W T

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a naturally occurring phospholipid cytokine, is a potent mediator of allergic and inflammatory reactions, as well as a modulator of immune responses. In the present study we showed that PAF is involved in early B-cell activation, as demonstrated by the increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) generation by PAF in a time- and dose-dependent manner in anti-mu antibody- plus B-cell growth factor-activated normal human peripheral blood B lymphocytes. PAF also regulated differentiation by causing a biphasic response on immunoglobulin M (IgM) production with an inhibitory signal generated at 10(-6) M and a stimulatory signal generated at 10(-8) to 10(-10) M. PAF enhanced IgA secretion. The regulation exerted by PAF was shown to be specific because the addition of the PAR antagonist CV-3988 abrogated these effects and the inactive form of PAF, lyso-PAF, induced neither cAMP generation nor immunoglobulin secretion in normal human B cells. Other cytokines, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4, potent mediators of the immune response, were unable to elicit a cAMP response in B cells. However, the addition of PAF (10(-6) M) with wither IL-2 or IL-4 enhanced cAMP production above the levels enhanced by the addition of PAF alone. IL-2 or IL-4, individually, stimulated IgM production, yet costimulation with PAF resulted in a differential effect between IL-2 and IL-4. PAF down-regulated the IL-4-induced IgM secretion, whereas the IL-2-induced IgM secretion was enhanced. The presence of CV-3988 returned all valued to those obtained with IL-2 or IL-4 alone, demonstrating the specificity of PAF. These data suggest that PAF is an important B-cell immunomodulator which can interact with other leukocyte cell mediators. PMID:8556480

  3. Characterization of streptococcal platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase variants that are involved in innate immune evasion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Mengyao; Xie, Gang; Lei, Benfang

    2013-09-01

    Human pathogen group A streptococcus (GAS) has developed mechanisms to subvert innate immunity. We recently reported that the secreted esterase produced by serotype M1 GAS (SsE(M1)) reduces neutrophil recruitment by targeting platelet-activating factor (PAF). SsE(M1) and SsE produced by serotype M28 GAS (SsE(M28)) have a 37% sequence difference. This study aims at determining whether SsE(M28) is also a PAF acetylhydrolase and participates in innate immune evasion. We also examined whether SsE evolved to target PAF by characterizing the PAF acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity and substrate specificity of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), SeE, the SsE homologue in Streptococcus equi, and human plasma PAF-AH (hpPAF-AH). PAF incubated with SsE(M28) or SeE was converted into lyso-PAF. SsE(M1) and SsE(M28) had kcat values of 373 s(-1) and 467 s(-1), respectively, that were ≥ 30-fold greater than that of hpPAF-AH (12 s(-1)). The comparison of SsE(M1), SsE(M28), and hpPAF-AH in kcat and Km in hydrolyzing triglycerides, acetyl esters, and PAF indicates that the SsE proteins are more potent hydrolases against PAF and have high affinity for PAF. SsE(M28) possesses much lower esterase activities against triglycerides and other esters than SsE(M1) but have similar potency with SsE(M1) in PAF hydrolysis. Deletion of sse(M28) in a covS deletion mutant of GAS increased neutrophil recruitment and reduced skin infection, whereas in trans expression of SsE(M28) in GAS reduced neutrophil infiltration and increased skin invasion in subcutaneous infection of mice. These results suggest that the SsE proteins evolved to target PAF for enhancing innate immune evasion and skin invasion.

  4. Platelet-activating factor in the enteric nervous system of the guinea pig small intestine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Fang, Xiu-Cai; Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Xia, Yun

    2006-11-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory mediator that may influence neuronal activity in the enteric nervous system (ENS). Electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, Western blot analysis, and RT-PCR were used to study the action of PAF and the expression of PAF receptor (PAFR) in the ENS. PAFR immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by 6.9% of the neurons in the myenteric plexus and 14.5% of the neurons in the submucosal plexus in all segments of the guinea pig intestinal tract as determined by double staining with anti-human neuronal protein antibody. PAFR IR was found in 6.1% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 35.8% of the neurons with IR for neuropeptide Y (NPY), 30.6% of the neurons with IR for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and 1.96% of the neurons with IR for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the submucosal plexus. PAFR IR was also found in 1.5% of the neurons with IR for calbindin, 51.1% of the neurons with IR for NPY, and 32.9% of the neurons with IR for ChAT in the myenteric plexus. In the submucosal plexus, exposure to PAF (200-600 nM) evoked depolarizing responses (8.2 +/- 3.8 mV) in 12.4% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.5% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology, whereas in the myenteric preparations, depolarizing responses were elicited by a similar concentration of PAF in 9.5% of the neurons with S-type electrophysiological behavior and uniaxonal morphology and in 12.0% of the neurons with AH-type electrophysiological behavior and Dogiel II morphology. The results suggest that subgroups of secreto- and musculomotor neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses express PAFR. Coexpression of PAFR IR with ChAT IR in the myenteric plexus and ChAT IR and VIP IR in the submucosal plexus suggests that PAF, after release in the inflamed bowel, might act to elevate the excitability of submucosal secretomotor and myenteric musculomotor

  5. Platelet Activating Factor-Induced Ceramide Micro-Domains Drive Endothelial NOS Activation and Contribute to Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Sanda; Knezevic, Ivana; Bardita, Cristina; Neamu, Radu Florin; Brovcovych, Viktor; Predescu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The spatial and functional relationship between platelet activating factor-receptor (PAF-R) and nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the lateral plane of the endothelial plasma membrane is poorly characterized. In this study, we used intact mouse pulmonary endothelial cells (ECs) as well as endothelial plasma membrane patches and subcellular fractions to define a new microdomain of plasmalemma proper where the two proteins colocalize and to demonstrate how PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production fine-tunes ECs function as gatekeepers of vascular permeability. Using fluorescence microscopy and immunogold labeling electron microscopy (EM) on membrane patches we demonstrate that PAF-R is organized as clusters and colocalizes with a subcellular pool of eNOS, outside recognizable vesicular profiles. Moreover, PAF-induced acid sphingomyelinase activation generates a ceramide-based microdomain on the external leaflet of plasma membrane, inside of which a signalosome containing eNOS shapes PAF-stimulated NO production. Real-time measurements of NO after PAF-R ligation indicated a rapid (5 to 15 min) increase in NO production followed by a > 45 min period of reduction to basal levels. Moreover, at the level of this new microdomain, PAF induces a dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr residues of eNOS that correlates with NO production. Altogether, our findings establish the existence of a functional partnership PAF-R/eNOS on EC plasma membrane, at the level of PAF-induced ceramide plasma membrane microdomains, outside recognized vesicular profiles. PMID:24086643

  6. Platelet activating factor: release from colonic mucosa in patients with ulcerative colitis and its effect on colonic secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Wardle, T D; Hall, L; Turnberg, L A

    1996-01-01

    Inflammatory mediators have been implicated in the pathophysiology of ulcerative colitis. They may stimulate intestinal secretion and contribute to the production of diarrhoea. Platelet activating factor (PAF) may be responsible for a high proportion of this secretory response. Biopsy specimens from inflamed and quiescent mucosa of patients with ulcerative colitis and normal human colonic mucosa were cultured or co-cultured. The release of PAF, prostaglandin E2, and leukotriene D4 into the culture medium was measured and the ability of this culture medium, from inflamed and normal tissues, to influence secretion in rat colonic mucosa was assessed. PAF was liberated by inflamed tissue. Its release from quiescent but not normal tissue was stimulated by medium in which inflamed mucosal biopsy tissues had been cultured and by exogenous bradykinin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, but not by histamine. PAF stimulated eicosanoid production. The rise in short circuit current produced in vitro by inflamed tissue culture medium was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist (CV 6209) (46%) (32.4 (2.9) v 17.5 (1.19) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005) and further by combined cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibition (indomethacin plus ICI 207968) (58%) (32.4 (2.9) v 13.6 (1.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.005). Mepacrine and hydrocortisone attenuated considerably the electrical response evoked by medium from inflamed mucosa to a similar extent (32.4 (2.9) v 6.3 (1.2) v 5.1 (0.9) muA.cm-2, p < 0.001). These data suggest that PAF accounted for 46% of the culture medium secretory effect. Thus, any attempt to block its release in patients with ulcerative colitis may have only a partial effect on their symptoms. PMID:8675086

  7. Effect of platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase on the formation and action of minimally oxidized low density lipoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Watson, A D; Navab, M; Hama, S Y; Sevanian, A; Prescott, S M; Stafforini, D M; McIntyre, T M; Du, B N; Fogelman, A M; Berliner, J A

    1995-01-01

    Mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein (MM-LDL) produced by oxidative enzymes or cocultures of human artery wall cells induces endothelial cells to produce monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and to bind monocytes. HDL prevents the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures of artery wall cells. Using albumin treatment and HPLC we have isolated and partially characterized bioactive oxidized phospholipids in MM-LDL. Platelet activating factor-acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), a serine esterase, hydrolyzes short chain acyl groups esterified to the sn-2 position of phospholipids such as PAF and particular oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. Treatment of MM-LDL with PAF-AH (2-4 x 10(-2) U/ml) eliminated the ability of MM-LDL to induce endothelial cells to bind monocytes. When HDL protected against the formation of MM-LDL by cocultures, lysophosphatidylcholine was detected in HDL; whereas when HDL was pretreated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate, HDL was no longer protective and lysophosphatidylcholine was undetectable. HPLC analysis also revealed that the active oxidized phospholipid species in MM-LDL had been destroyed after PAF-AH treatment. In addition, treatment of MM-LDL with albumin removed polar phospholipids that, when reisolated, induced monocyte binding to endothelial cells. These polar phospholipids, when treated with PAF-AH, lost biological activity and were no longer detected by HPLC. These results suggest that PAF-AH in HDL protects against the production and activity of MM-LDL by facilitating hydrolysis of active oxidized phospholipids to lysolipids, thereby destroying the biologically active lipids in MM-LDL. PMID:7860760

  8. Fish oil supplementation decreases oxidative stress but does not affect platelet-activating factor bioactivity in lungs of asthmatic rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, A L; Miranda, D T S Z; Dias, B C L; Campos, R M; Massaro, M C; Michelotto, P V; West, A L; Miles, E A; Calder, P C; Nishiyama, A

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fish oil supplementation increases the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cellular membranes. The highly unsaturated nature of n-3 PUFA could result in an enhanced lipid peroxidation in the oxidative environment characteristic of asthma. The oxidative reaction cascade culminates in an increased production of components associated to oxidative stress and of an important proinflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like lipid. We evaluated the effect of fish oil supplementation in asthmatic rats upon the PAF bioactivity and parameters related to oxidative stress in the lung. Fish oil supplementation of asthmatic rats resulted in lower concentrations of nitrite (1.719 ± 0.137 vs. 2.454 ± 0.163 nmol/mL) and lipid hydroperoxide (72.190 ± 7.327 vs. 120.200 ± 11.270 nmol/mg protein). In asthmatic animals, fish oil increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (33.910 ± 2.325 vs. 24.110 ± 0.618 U/mg protein) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) (164.100 ± 31.250 vs. 12.590 ± 5.234 U/mg protein). However, fish oil did not affect PAF bioactivity in lung tissue of asthmatic rats (0.545 ± 0.098 340/380 vs. 0.669 ± 0.101 340/380 nm ratio). Considering the two-step process--oxidative stress and PAF bioactivity--fish oil exhibited a divergent action on these aspects of asthmatic inflammation, since the supplement lowered oxidative stress in the lungs of asthmatic rats, presenting an antioxidant effect, but did not affect PAF bioactivity. This suggests a dual effect of fish oil on oxidative stress and inflammation in asthma.

  9. Attenuation of Folic Acid-Induced Renal Inflammatory Injury in Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kent; Okamoto, Koji; Negishi, Kousuke; Suzuki, Yoshifumi; Nakao, Akihide; Fujita, Toshiro; Toda, Akiko; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Satoshi; Shimizu, Takao; Noiri, Eisei

    2006-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator with various biological activities, plays an important role in inflammation by recruiting leukocytes. In this study we used platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR)-deficient mice to elucidate the role of PAF in inflammatory renal injury induced by folic acid administration. PAFR-deficient mice showed significant amelioration of renal dysfunction and pathological findings such as acute tubular damage with neutrophil infiltration, lipid peroxidation observed with antibody to 4-hydroxy-2-hexenal (day 2), and interstitial fibrosis with macrophage infiltration associated with expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the kidney (day 14). Acute tubular damage was attenuated by neutrophil depletion using a monoclonal antibody (RB6-8C5), demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to acute phase injury. Macrophage infiltration was also decreased when treatment with a PAF antagonist (WEB2086) was started after acute phase. In vitro chemotaxis assay using a Boyden chamber demonstrated that PAF exhibits a strong chemotactic activity for macrophages. These results indicate that PAF is involved in pathogenesis of folic acid-induced renal injury by activating neutrophils in acute phase and macrophages in chronic interstitial fibrosis. Inhibiting the PAF pathway might be therapeutic to kidney injury from inflammatory cells. PMID:16651609

  10. Coagulation factor XI promotes distal platelet activation and single platelet consumption in the bloodstream under shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Zilberman-Rudenko, Jevgenia; Itakura, Asako; Wiesenekker, Chantal P.; Vetter, Ralf; Maas, Coen; Gailani, David; Tucker, Erik I.; Gruber, András; Gerdes, Christoph; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Coagulation factor XI (FXI) has been shown to contribute to thrombus formation on collagen or tissue factor (TF)-coated surfaces in vitro and in vivo by enhancing thrombin generation. Whether the role of the intrinsic pathway of coagulation is restricted to the local site of thrombus formation is unknown. This study was aimed to determine whether FXI could promote both proximal and distal platelet activation and aggregate formation in the bloodstream. Approach and Results Pharmacological blockade of FXI activation or thrombin activity in blood did not affect local platelet adhesion, yet reduced local platelet aggregation, thrombin localization and fibrin formation on immobilized collagen and TF under shear flow, ex vivo. Downstream of the thrombus formed on immobilized collagen or collagen and 10 pM TF, platelet CD62P expression and microaggregate formation and progressive platelet consumption were significantly reduced in the presence of FXI-function blocking antibodies or a thrombin inhibitor in a shear rate- and time-dependent manner. In a non-human primate model of thrombus formation, we found that inhibition of FXI reduced single platelet consumption in the bloodstream distal to a site of thrombus formation. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the FXI-thrombin axis contributes to distal platelet activation and procoagulant microaggregate formation in the blood flow downstream of the site of thrombus formation. Our data highlights FXI as a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting distal thrombus formation without affecting proximal platelet adhesion. PMID:26769048

  11. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  12. Thrombin generation by activated factor VII on platelet activated by different agonists. Extending the cell-based model of hemostasis

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Raul; Scazziota, Alejandra Silvia; Herrera, Maria de Lourdes; Gonzalez, Claudio

    2006-01-01

    Background Platelet activation is crucial in normal hemostasis. Using a clotting system free of external tissue factor, we investigated whether activated Factor VII in combination with platelet agonists increased thrombin generation (TG) in vitro. Methods and results TG was quantified by time parameters: lag time (LT) and time to peak (TTP), and by amount of TG: peak of TG (PTG) and area under thrombin formation curve after 35 minutes (AUC→35min) in plasma from 29 healthy volunteers using the calibrated automated thrombography (CAT) technique. TG parameters were measured at basal conditions and after platelet stimulation by sodium arachidonate (AA), ADP, and collagen (Col). In addition, the effects of recombinant activated FVII (rFVIIa) alone or combined with the other platelet agonists on TG parameters were investigated. We found that LT and TTP were significantly decreased (p < 0.05) and PTG and AUC→35min were significantly increased (p < 0.05) in platelet rich plasma activated with AA, ADP, Col, and rFVIIa compared to non-activated platelet rich plasma from normal subjects (p = 0.01). Furthermore platelet rich plasma activated by the combined effects of rFVIIa plus AA, ADP or Col had significantly reduced LT and TTP and increased AUC→35min (but not PTG) when compared to platelet rich plasma activated with agonists in the absence of rFVIIa. Conclusion Platelets activated by AA, ADP, Col or rFVIIa triggered TG. This effect was increased by combining rFVIIa with other agonists. Our intrinsic coagulation system produced a burst in TG independent of external tissue factor activity an apparent hemostatic effect with little thrombotic capacity. Thus we suggest a modification in the cell-based model of hemostasis. PMID:16630353

  13. Dysfunctional epileptic neuronal circuits and dysmorphic dendritic spines are mitigated by platelet-activating factor receptor antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Musto, Alberto E.; Rosencrans, Robert F.; Walker, Chelsey P.; Bhattacharjee, Surjyadipta; Raulji, Chittalsinh M.; Belayev, Ludmila; Fang, Zhide; Gordon, William C.; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy or limbic epilepsy lacks effective therapies due to a void in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that set in motion aberrant neuronal network formations during the course of limbic epileptogenesis (LE). Here we show in in vivo rodent models of LE that the phospholipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) increases in LE and that PAF receptor (PAF-r) ablation mitigates its progression. Synthetic PAF-r antagonists, when administered intraperitoneally in LE, re-establish hippocampal dendritic spine density and prevent formation of dysmorphic dendritic spines. Concomitantly, hippocampal interictal spikes, aberrant oscillations, and neuronal hyper-excitability, evaluated 15–16 weeks after LE using multi-array silicon probe electrodes implanted in the dorsal hippocampus, are reduced in PAF-r antagonist-treated mice. We suggest that over-activation of PAF-r signaling induces aberrant neuronal plasticity in LE and leads to chronic dysfunctional neuronal circuitry that mediates epilepsy. PMID:27444269

  14. Antigen-and ionophore-stimulated synthesis of platelet-activating factor by the cloned mast cell line, MC9

    SciTech Connect

    Musch, M.W.; Billah, M.M.; Siegel, M.I.

    1987-05-14

    MC9 mast cells stimulated by a soluble (calcium ionophore A23187) or by an Fc epsilon-receptor agonist (IgE plus hapten) produce platelet activating factor (PAF). MC9 cells incorporate either exogenous (/sup 3/H)acetic acid or (/sup 3/H)lyso-PAF into PAF. PAF was identified by mobility on thin layer chromatography, platelet aggregatory activity inhibitable by known PAF antagonists, and by enzymatic modification. Quantified by aggregation of rabbit platelets, MC9 cells produce 6 pmoles PAF/10(6) cells. MC9 cells express acetyltransferase activity of 0.19 nmole/5 min-mg protein. Analysis of MC9 phospholipids by HPLC showed that MC9 cells contain large amounts of phosphatidylcholine (82 nmoles/10(7) cells) but contain little ether-linked phosphatidylcholine (4 nmoles/10(7) cells).

  15. Release of 1-O-alkylglyceryl 3-phosphorylcholine, O-deacetyl platelet-activating factor, from leukocytes: chemical ionization mass spectrometry of phospholipids.

    PubMed Central

    Polonsky, J; Tencé, M; Varenne, P; Das, B C; Lunel, J; Benveniste, J

    1980-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the simultaneous release of platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) and of its deacetylated derivative (lyso-PAF-acether) from hog leukocytes. On the basis of spectroscopy and chemical reactions, the structure of O-deacetyl-PAF is shown to be 1-O-alkylglyceryl 3-phosphorylcholine, an alkyl ether analog of lyso-phosphatidylcholine. Acetylation of lyso-PAF yields a compound with biological activity and chromatographical behavior indistinguishable from those of native PAF. Lyso-PAF may be considered to be either the precursor or the enzymatic degradation product of PAF. The usefulness of chemical ionization mass spectrometry for structural determination of phospholipids is also demonstrated. PMID:6938950

  16. Inhibition of platelet activation by lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS)-silenced (tearless) onion juice.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Susan J; Rippon, Paula; Butts, Chrissie; Olsen, Sarah; Shaw, Martin; Joyce, Nigel I; Eady, Colin C

    2013-11-06

    Onion and garlic are renowned for their roles as functional foods. The health benefits of garlic are attributed to di-2-propenyl thiosulfinate (allicin), a sulfur compound found in disrupted garlic but not found in disrupted onion. Recently, onions have been grown with repressed lachrymatory factor synthase (LFS) activity, which causes these onions to produce increased amounts of di-1-propenyl thiosulfinate, an isomer of allicin. This investigation into the key health attributes of LFS-silenced (tearless) onions demonstrates that they have some attributes more similar to garlic and that this is likely due to the production of novel thiosulfinate or metabolites. The key finding was that collagen-induced in vitro platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by tearless onion extract over normal onion extract. Thiosulfinate or derived compounds were shown not to be responsible for the observed changes in the inflammatory response of AGS (stomach adenocarcinoma) cells to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) when pretreated with model onion juices. A preliminary rat feeding trial indicated that the tearless onions may also play a key role in reducing weight gain.

  17. Prevotella intermedia induces severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in mice with upregulated platelet-activating factor receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Nakamura, Shigeki; Harada, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Izumikawa, Koichi; Ishimatsu, Yuji; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Masaharu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of respiratory infection worldwide. Although oral hygiene has been considered a risk factor for developing pneumonia, the relationship between oral bacteria and pneumococcal infection is unknown. In this study, we examined the synergic effects of Prevotella intermedia, a major periodontopathic bacterium, on pneumococcal pneumonia. The synergic effects of the supernatant of P. intermedia (PiSup) on pneumococcal pneumonia were investigated in mice, and the stimulation of pneumococcal adhesion to human alveolar (A549) cells by PiSup was assessed. The effects of PiSup on platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) transcript levels in vitro and in vivo were analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the differences between the effects of pneumococcal infection induced by various periodontopathic bacterial species were verified in mice. Mice inoculated with S. pneumoniae plus PiSup exhibited a significantly lower survival rate, higher bacterial loads in the lungs, spleen, and blood, and higher inflammatory cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (macrophage inflammatory protein 2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha) than those infected without PiSup. In A549 cells, PiSup increased pneumococcal adhesion and PAFR transcript levels. PiSup also increased lung PAFR transcript levels in mice. Similar effects were not observed in the supernatants of Porphyromonas gingivalis or Fusobacterium nucleatum. Thus, P. intermedia has the potential to induce severe bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia with enhanced pneumococcal adhesion to lower airway cells.

  18. Influence of platelet-activating factor, lyso-platelet-activating factor and edelfosine on Langmuir monolayers imitating plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to anti-cancer treatment: the effect of plasmalogen level.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Hąc-Wydro, Katarzyna; Wydro, Paweł; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2014-06-06

    Three structurally related but differing in biological activities single-chained ether phospholipids (PAF (platelet-activating factor) and lyso-PAF) and an anti-cancer drug (edelfosine (ED)) were investigated in Langmuir monolayers imitating natural membranes. The aim of the undertaken experiments was to study the influence of these lipids on monolayers mimicking plasma membranes of cell lines differing in susceptibility to the anti-cancer activity of ED, i.e. promyelocytic leukaemia cells (HL-60) and promyeloblastic leukaemia cells (K-562). As these cells differ essentially in the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio and plasmalogen concentration in the membrane, we have carried out systematic investigations in artificial systems of various compositions. The results for model leukaemia cell membrane were compared with data acquired for systems imitating normal leucocytes. Our results show that the level of plasmalogens significantly modulates the influence of the single-chained phospholipids on the investigated systems. The experiments confirmed also that the interactions of ether lipids with a model membrane of HL-60 cells (in biological tests sensitive to ED) have opposite character when compared with K-562, being resistant to ED. Moreover, the values of the parameters characterizing monolayers serving as membrane models (strength of interactions, monolayers fluidity and morphology) proved both sensitivity of these cells to ED and lack of their susceptibility towards PAF. Interestingly, it has been found that lyso-PAF, which is usually described as an inactive precursor of PAF, displays a stronger effect on HL-60 model membranes than ED.

  19. Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase deficiency. A missense mutation near the active site of an anti-inflammatory phospholipase.

    PubMed Central

    Stafforini, D M; Satoh, K; Atkinson, D L; Tjoelker, L W; Eberhardt, C; Yoshida, H; Imaizumi, T; Takamatsu, S; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Gray, P W; Prescott, S M

    1996-01-01

    Deficiency of plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase is an autosomal recessive syndrome that has been associated with severe asthma in Japanese children. Acquired deficiency has been described in several human diseases usually associated with severe inflammation. PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the degradation of PAF and related phospholipids, which have proinflammatory, allergic, and prothrombotic properties. Thus, a deficiency in the degradation of these lipids should increase the susceptibility to inflammatory and allergic disorders. Miwa et al. reported that PAF acetylhydrolase activity is absent in 4% of the Japanese population, which suggests that it could be a common factor in such disorders, but the molecular basis of the defect is unknown. We show that inherited deficiency of PAF acetylhydrolase is the result of a point mutation in exon 9 and that this mutation completely abolishes enzymatic activity. This mutation is the cause of the lack of enzymatic activity as expression in E. coli of a construct harboring the mutation results in an inactive protein. This mutation as a heterozygous trait is present in 27% in the Japanese population. This finding will allow rapid identification of subjects predisposed to severe asthma and other PAF-mediated disorders. PMID:8675689

  20. The role of complement, platelet-activating factor and leukotriene B4 in a reversed passive Arthus reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Donigi-Gale, D.; Shoupe, T. S.; Edwards, R.; Williams, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanisms underlying oedema formation induced in a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction and, for comparison, in response to zymosan in rabbit skin were investigated. 2. Oedema formation at skin sites was quantified by the accumulation of intravenously-injected 125I-labelled human serum albumin. 3. Recombinant soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1), administered locally in rabbit skin, suppressed oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by zymosan. 4. The platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonists, WEB 2086 and PF10040 administered locally, inhibited oedema formation induced in the RPA reaction and by PAF but not by zymosan. 5. A locally administered leukotriene B4 (LTB4) antagonist, LY-255283, inhibited oedema formation induced by LTB4 but did not inhibit oedema responses to PAF, zymosan or the RPA reaction. 6. The results demonstrate a role for complement in oedema formation in both the RPA reaction and in response to zymosan. An important contribution by PAF is indicated in the RPA reaction but not in response to zymosan whereas no evidence was obtained to suggest a role for LTB4 in either inflammatory response. PMID:1330163

  1. Neutrophil migration across monolayers of cytokine-prestimulated endothelial cells: a role for platelet-activating factor and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that neutrophils respond with a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i during adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells (EC), caused by EC membrane-associated platelet-activating factor (PAF). In the present study, we investigated whether this form of PAF was important in neutrophil adherence and migration across monolayers of rIL-1 beta- or rTNF alpha-prestimulated EC. PAF receptor antagonists prevented neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated EC by approximately 60% (P less than 0.005) without interfering with the process of adherence. The antagonists WEB 2086 and L-652,731 had no effect on neutrophil migration across resting EC induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). A murine anti-IL-8 antiserum was found to also partially inhibit the neutrophil transmigration across cytokine-activated EC. When the anti-IL-8 antiserum was used in combination with a PAF receptor antagonist, neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated monolayers of EC was completely prevented. During transmigration, LAM-1 and CD44 on the neutrophils were down-modulated; both WEB 2086 and anti-IL-8 antiserum partially prevented this down-modulation caused by cytokine- prestimulated EC. Our results indicate that human neutrophils are activated and guided by EC-associated PAF and EC-derived IL-8 during the in vitro diapedesis in between cytokine-stimulated EC. PMID:1315317

  2. Protective effect of platelet activating factor antagonists on cultured endothelial cell lysis induced by elastase or activated neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Renesto, P.; Vicart, P.; Paulin, D.; Chignard, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The mechanism(s) responsible for injury of endothelial cells induced by human leukocyte elastase (HLE) was investigated in an immortalized venous human endothelial cell line (IVEC). 2. First, the proteinase concentrations and incubation delays necessary to trigger a significant IVEC cytotoxicity were determined by chromium assays. Thus, exposure of IVEC for 6 h to 10 micrograms ml-1 HLE resulted in 22 +/- 2.8% lysis and 36.4 +/- 5.4% detachment (mean +/- s.e. mean; n = 4; P < 0.05). 3. WEB 2086, a specific platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist, induced a significant concentration-dependent decrease of such a lysis (39.6 +/- 7.7% protection at 100 microM; n = 4). This potential role for PAF was confirmed with two other antagonists of this lipid mediator, i.e., BN 52021 and RP 48740. 4. Finally, we demonstrated that pretreatment of IVEC with WEB 2086 protected significantly against cell lysis induced by stimulated human neutrophils, an experimental model in which HLE participates. PMID:8851508

  3. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) biosynthesis is inhibited by phenolic compounds in U-937 cells under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Vlachogianni, Ioanna C; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Stamatakis, George M; Kostakis, Ioannis K; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2015-09-01

    Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β) induced platelet activating factor (PAF) synthesis in U-937 cells through stimulation of acetyl-CoA:lysoPAF-acetyltransferase (lyso PAF-AT) at 3 h and DTT-independentCDP-choline-1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol cholinophosphotransferase (PAF-CPT) at 0.5 h. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tyrosol (T), resveratrol (R) and their acetylated derivatives(AcDs) which exhibit enhanced bioavailability, on PAF synthesis in U-937 after IL-1β stimulation. The specific activity of PAF enzymes and intracellular levels were measured in cell homogenates. T and R concentration capable of inducing 50% inhibition in IL-1β effect on lyso PAF-AT was 48 μΜ ± 11 and 157 μΜ ± 77, for PAF-CPT 246 μΜ ± 61 and 294 μΜ ± 102, respectively. The same order of concentration was also observed on inhibiting PAF levels produced by IL-1β. T was more potent inhibitor than R (p<0.05). AcDs of T retain parent compound inhibitory activity, while in the case of R only two AcDs retain the activity. The observed inhibitory effect by T,R and their AcDs, may partly explain their already reported beneficial role.

  4. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  5. Identification and functional characterization of platelet-activating factor receptors in human leukocyte populations using polyclonal anti-peptide antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, E; Dagenais, P; Alami, N; Rola-Pleszczynski, M

    1993-01-01

    Recently, the successful cloning of a receptor for platelet-activating factor (PAF), a lipid mediator of inflammation, was reported. Here we investigated the distribution and potential diversity of human PAF receptors (hPAF-Rs) among individual leukocyte populations by (i) hPAF-R mRNA transcription studies and (ii) analysis of cell surface expression of hPAF-R protein using a polyclonal anti-peptide antibody (anti-hPAF-R164-173). Northern blot analysis, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting with anti-hPAF-R antibody indicated that monocytic, neutrophilic, and B-lymphocytic cell lines all shared a similar hPAF-R species, whereas resting T-cell and natural killer cell lines failed to express detectable levels of either hPAF-R protein or mRNA. Peripheral blood leukocyte populations showed a distribution of hPAF-R cell surface expression similar to that of the corresponding cell lines. Furthermore, binding of anti-hPAF-R164-173 antiserum, purified IgG, or Fab and F(ab')2 fragments to the receptor of all investigated PAF-R-positive cell lines induced an increase in intracellular free calcium concentration. The characterization of the expression of a lipid ligand receptor using antibodies against an intrinsic portion of the receptor protein has, to our knowledge, never been reported previously. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 PMID:8390683

  6. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  7. Short term effects of indomethacin on rat small intestinal permeability. Role of eicosanoids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Mion, F; Cuber, J C; Minaire, Y; Chayvialle, J A

    1994-01-01

    Short term effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability were studied on a model of rat isolated vascularly perfused terminal ileum. The objectives of this study were (a) to assess the effects of indomethacin on intestinal permeability and histology; (b) to assess the effects of prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and platelet activating factor (PAF) on the same parameters; (c) to evaluate the role of these inflammation mediators on indomethacin induced permeability modifications. Intravascular administration of 1.25 and 2.5 mM indomethacin induced a significant increase of 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate. Histological analysis showed only mucosal oedema. Pretreatment with 16,16 dimethyl-prostaglandin E2 did not reverse these changes. Intravascular administration of PAF, leukotrienes B4 and D4 provoked a significant rise in 51Cr-EDTA transfer rate and intraluminal protein leakage, with an intense vascocongestion of the mucosal capillaries. These changes were completely prevented by perfusion of the respective specific antagonists (BN52021 for PAF, LY255,583 for leukotriene B4 and MK571 for leukotriene D4). None of these three antagonists, however, or MK886, a selective 5'-lipo-oxygenase inhibitor, could reverse the indomethacin induced permeability changes. Indomethacin induced increased intestinal permeability at these high concentrations does not seem to be a result of changed prostanoid or PAF metabolism. Alternative mechanisms of the initial damage of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs should be sought. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8174986

  8. Sequential expression of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor in rat hippocampal neurons after fluid percussion injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqiang; Shu, Qingming; Li, Lingzhi; Ge, Maolin; Zhang, Yongliang

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury causes gene expression changes in different brain regions. Occurrence and development of traumatic brain injury are closely related, involving expression of three factors, namely cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. However, little is known about the correlation of these three factors and brain neuronal injury. In this study, primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons were subjected to fluid percussion injury according to Scott's method, with some modifications. RT-PCR and semi-quantitative immunocytochemical staining was used to measure the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2, glutamate receptor-2, and platelet activating factor receptor. Our results found that cyclooxygenase-2 expression were firstly increased post-injury, and then decreased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached peaks at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Similar sequential changes in glutamate receptor 2 were observed, with highest levels mRNA and protein expression at 8 and 12 hours post-injury respectively. On the contrary, the expressions of platelet activating factor receptor were firstly decreased post-injury, and then increased. Both mRNA and protein expression levels reached the lowest levels at 8 and 12 hours post-injury, respectively. Totally, our findings suggest that these three factors are involved in occurrence and development of hippocampal neuronal injury. PMID:25206921

  9. Semi-synthetic preparation of 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) using plant cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, N.; Mangold, H.K.

    1985-04-01

    Incubation of photomixotrophic cell suspension cultures of rape (Brassica napus) and heterotrophic cell suspension cultures of soya (Glycine max) with 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycerol or rac-1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecylglycerol leads in high yield (up to 78%) to labeled 1-O-hexadecyl-2-acyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines. Alkaline hydrolysis of the choline glycerophospholipids yields pure 1-O-(1'-/sup 14/C)hexadecyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. 1-O-(1'-14C)Hexadecyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (platelet activating factor) is obtained by acetylating the lyso compound. The semi-synthetic preparation described leads to labeled platelet activating factor in an overall yield of 50-60% without loss of specific activity.

  10. An essential role for platelet-activating factor in activating mast cell migration following ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Chen, Limo; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D.; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y.; Ma, Ying; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The UVB (290–320 nm) radiation in sunlight is responsible for inducing skin cancer. Exposure to UV radiation is also immunosuppressive, and the systemic immune suppression induced by UV is a well-recognized risk factor for cancer induction. As UVB radiation is absorbed within the upper layers of the skin, indirect mechanisms must play a role in activating systemic immune suppression. One prominent example is mast cell migration, which from the skin to the draining LN is an essential step in the cascade of events leading to immune suppression. What triggers mast cell migration is not entirely clear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAF, a lipid mediator of inflammation produced by the skin in response to UV exposure, is involved. Mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh/W-sh) are resistant to the suppressive effect of UV radiation, and reconstituting mast cell-deficient mice with normal bone marrow-derived mast cells restores susceptibility to immunosuppression. However, when mast cells from PAFR−/− mice were used, the reconstituted mice were not susceptible to the suppressive effects of UV. Furthermore, PAFR−/− mice showed impaired UV-induced mast cell migration when compared with WT mice. Finally, injecting PAF into WT mice mimicked the effect of UV irradiation and induced mast cell migration but not in PAFR−/− mice. Our findings indicate that PAFR binding induces mast cells to migrate from the skin to the LNs, where they mediate immune suppression. PMID:24009177

  11. An oxidized derivative of phosphatidylcholine is a substrate for the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Stremler, K E; Stafforini, D M; Prescott, S M; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M

    1989-04-05

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a glycerophospholipid that has diverse potent biological actions. A plasma enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of the sn-2 acetoyl group of PAF and thereby abolishes its bioactivity. This PAF acetylhydrolase is specific for phospholipids, such as PAF, with a short acyl group at the sn-2 position. The majority of it (60-70%) is associated with low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the remainder is with high density lipoprotein (HDL). LDL also has a phospholipase A2 activity that is specific for oxidized polyunsaturated fatty acids, which may be important in determining how LDL is recognized by cellular receptors. We previously have purified and characterized the PAF acetylhydrolase from human plasma. We now have found that the purified PAF acetylhydrolase catalyzes the hydrolysis of the oxidized fragments of arachidonic acid from the sn-2 position of phosphatidylcholine. One of the preferred substrates appeared by mass spectrometry to have 5-oxovalerate at the sn-2 position. We synthesized 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and found that the PAF acetylhydrolase had the same apparent Km for it (11.3 microM) as for PAF (12.5 microM), with Vmax values of 100 and 167 mumol/h/mg of protein, respectively. We also conclude that the PAF acetylhydrolase is the sole activity in LDL that degrades oxidized phospholipids since we found co-localization of the activity against both substrates to LDL and HDL, and precipitation of enzyme activity with an antibody to the PAF acetylhydrolase. Thus, the PAF acetylhydrolase in human plasma degrades oxidized phospholipids, which may be involved in the modification of apolipoprotein B100 and other pathological processes.

  12. Characterization of the platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase from human plasma by heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y; Stafforini, D M; Imaizumi, T; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1994-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been implicated as a mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. A specific degradative enzyme found in plasma, PAF acetylhydrolase, plays important roles in various pathophysiological events induced by PAF. Human macrophages and Hep G2 cells secrete PAF acetylhydrolase with characteristics identical to the plasma activity. Other investigators reported that apolipoprotein B may possess phospholipase A2 activity, which suggested that apolipoprotein B might be a zymogen for PAF acetylhydrolase. However, while macrophages express PAF acetylhydrolase activity, we did not detect cDNAs for apolipoprotein B in a cDNA library from these cells, indicating that macrophages do not express this protein. In contrast, Hep G2 cells had high levels of cDNA for apolipoprotein B, as expected. We next injected Xenopus laevis oocytes with poly(A)+ RNA extracted from cultured human macrophages and Hep G2 cells. Twenty-five to 50% of Xenopus oocytes injected with poly(A)+ RNA from macrophages or Hep G2 cells secreted a PAF acetylhydrolase activity (1.0-7.8 nmol/ml per h) that also utilized a synthetic oxidized phospholipid as substrate. The activity secreted by poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes associated with lipoproteins and transferred between the particles in a pH-dependent manner, much like the plasma activity. These experiments establish that the properties of the enzyme released from poly(A)+ RNA-injected oocytes are identical to those of the plasma form of PAF acetylhydrolase and that the activity detected is not the expression of a domain in apolipoprotein B. Images PMID:7937948

  13. Evidence for Lipid Packaging in the Crystal Structure of the GM2-Activator Complex with Platelet Activating Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Christine S.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2010-11-16

    GM2-activator protein (GM2-AP) is a lipid transfer protein that has the ability to stimulate the enzymatic processing of gangliosides as well as T-cell activation through lipid presentation. Our previous X-ray crystallographic studies of GM2-AP have revealed a large lipid binding pocket as the central overall feature of the structure with non-protein electron density within this pocket suggesting bound lipid. To extend these studies, we present here the 2 {angstrom} crystal structure of GM2-AP complexed with platelet activating factor (PAF). PAF is a potent phosphoacylglycerol whose toxic patho-physiological effects can be inhibited by GM2-AP. The structure shows an ordered arrangement of two bound lipids and a fatty acid molecule. One PAF molecule binds in an extended conformation within the hydrophobic channel that has an open and closed conformation, and was seen to contain bound phospholipid in the low pH apo structure. The second molecule is submerged inside the pocket in a U-shaped conformation with its head group near the single polar residue S141. It was refined as lyso-PAF as it lacks electron density for the sn-2 acetate group. The alkyl chains of PAF interact through van der Waals contacts, while the head groups bind in different environments with their phosphocholine moieties in contact with aromatic rings (Y137, F80). The structure has revealed further insights into the lipid binding properties of GM2-AP, suggesting an unexpected unique mode of lipid packaging that may explain the efficiency of GM2-AP in inhibiting the detrimental biological effects of PAF.

  14. Platelet-activating factor stimulates metabolism of phosphoinositides via phospholipase A2 in primary cultured rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Okayasu, T.; Hasegawa, K.; Ishibashi, T.

    1987-07-01

    Addition of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to cells doubly labeled with (/sup 14/C)glycerol plus (/sup 3/H)arachidonic acid resulted in a transient decrease of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI) and a transient increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI). (/sup 3/H)Arachidonate-labeled PI, on the other hand, decreased in a time-dependent manner. The radioactivity in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylserine did not change significantly. The /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio decreased in PI in a time-dependent manner, suggesting the involvement of a phospholipase A2 activity. Although PAF also induced a gradual increase of diacylglycerol (DG), the increase of (/sup 14/C)glycerol-labeled DG paralleled the loss of triacyl (/sup 14/C)glycerol and the /sup 3/H//sup 14/C ratio of DG was 16 times smaller than that of PI. Thus, DG seemed not to be derived from PI. In myo- (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled cells, PAF induced a transient decrease of (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bis-phosphate (TPI) and (/sup 3/H)phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (DPI) at 1 min. PAF stimulation of cultured hepatocytes prelabeled with /sup 32/Pi induced a transient decrease of (/sup 32/P)polyphosphoinositides at 20 sec to 1 min. (/sup 32/P)LPI appeared within 10 sec after stimulation and paralleled the loss of (/sup 32/P)PI. (/sup 3/H)Inositol triphosphate, (/sup 3/H)inositol diphosphate, and (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate, which increased in a time-dependent manner upon stimulation with adrenaline, did not accumulate with the stimulation due to PAF. These observations indicate that PAF causes degradation of inositol phospholipids via phospholipase A2 and induces a subsequent resynthesis of these phospholipids.

  15. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase: Structural Implication to Liporprotein Binding and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, Uttamkumar; Bahnson, Brian J.

    2009-02-23

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5 angstroms. It has a classic lipase alpha/beta-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser273, His351, and Asp296. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser273. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  16. Memory enhancement by intrahippocampal, intraamygdala, or intraentorhinal infusion of platelet-activating factor measured in an inhibitory avoidance task.

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, I; Fin, C; Schmitz, P K; Da Silva, R C; Jerusalinsky, D; Quillfeldt, J A; Ferreira, M B; Medina, J H; Bazan, N G

    1995-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), which is thought to be a retrograde messenger in long-term potentiation (LTP), enhances glutamate release and LTP through an action on presynaptic nerve endings. The PAF antagonist BN 52021 blocks CA1 LTP in hippocampal slices, and, when infused into rat dorsal hippocampus pre- or posttraining, blocks retention of inhibitory avoidance. Here we report that memory is affected by pre- or posttraining infusion of the PAF analog 1-O-hexadecyl-2-N-methylcarbamoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (mc-PAF) into either rat dorsal hippocampus, amygdala, or entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were implanted bilaterally with cannulae in these brain regions. After recovery from surgery, the animals were trained in step-down inhibitory avoidance or in a spatial habituation task and tested for retention 24 h later. mc-PAF (1.0 microgram per side) enhanced retention test performance of the two tasks when infused into the hippocampus before training without altering training session performance. In addition, mc-PAF enhanced retention test performance of the avoidance task when infused into (i) the hippocampus 0 but not 60 min after training; (ii) the amygdala immediately after training; and (iii) the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. In confirmation of previous findings, BN 52021 (0.5 microgram per side) was found to be amnestic for the avoidance task when infused into the hippocampus or the amygdala immediately but not 30 or more minutes after training or into the entorhinal cortex 100 but not 0 or 300 min after training. These findings support the hypothesis that memory involves PAF-regulated events, possibly LTP, generated at the time of training in hippocampus and amygdala and 100 min later in the entorhinal cortex. PMID:7761446

  17. Understanding the connection between platelet-activating factor, a UV-induced lipid mediator of inflammation, immune suppression and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2016-07-01

    Lipid mediators of inflammation play important roles in several diseases including skin cancer, the most prevalent type of cancer found in the industrialized world. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen and is the primary cause of skin cancer. UV radiation is also a potent immunosuppressive agent, and UV-induced immunosuppression is a well-known risk factor for skin cancer induction. An essential mediator in this process is the glyercophosphocholine 1-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine commonly referred to as platelet-activating factor (PAF). PAF is produced by keratinocytes in response to diverse stimuli and exerts its biological effects by binding to a single specific G-protein-coupled receptor (PAF-R) expressed on a variety of cells. This review will attempt to describe how this lipid mediator is involved in transmitting the immunosuppressive signal from the skin to the immune system, starting from its production by keratinocytes, to its role in activating mast cell migration in vivo, and to the mechanisms involved that ultimately lead to immune suppression. Recent findings related to its role in regulating DNA repair and activating epigenetic mechanisms, further pinpoint the importance of this bioactive lipid, which may serve as a critical molecular mediator that links the environment (UVB radiation) to the immune system and the epigenome.

  18. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2: modulation by cytosolic phospholipase A2, platelet-activating factor, and cyclooxygenase-2 in neuronal cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Kolko, Miriam; Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2003-02-27

    Activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) is an early event in brain injury, which leads to the formation and accumulation of bioactive lipids: platelet-activating factor (PAF), free arachidonic acid, and eicosanoids. A cross-talk between secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) and cPLA(2) in neural signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment of neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates a neuronal signaling cascade that includes activation of cPLA(2), arachidonic acid release, PAF production, and induction of COX-2.

  19. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: Demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Block, L.H.; Abraham, W.M.; Groscurth, P.; Qiao, B.Y.; Perruchoud, A.P. )

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  20. Platelet-activating factor (PAF)-dependent biochemical, morphologic, and physiologic responses of human platelets: demonstration of translocation of protein kinase C associated with protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Block, L H; Abraham, W M; Groscurth, P; Qiao, B Y; Perruchoud, A P

    1989-10-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent stimulus for platelet aggregation and secretion. PAF has been shown to stimulate the phosphatidylinositol (PI) pathway in platelets, which implies that PAF should activate protein kinase C. In this study, measurements of PI metabolites, the elevation of intracellular free calcium concentration, (Ca2+)i, the activation of protein kinase C, and the phosphorylation of platelet proteins (using a two-dimensional gel electrophoretic technique) were performed before and after the addition of 10(-8) M PAF to human platelets. These findings were correlated with morphologic changes in the platelets as determined by immunoelectron microscopic studies on the cytoskeleton and by X-ray analysis of dense bodies. The results show that PAF stimulates the production of PI metabolites and causes an increase in the membrane-associated activity of protein kinase C. These changes are accompanied by a rise in the (Ca2+)i and protein phosphorylation. The increase in protein kinase C activity reaches a maximum at approximately 60 s, a time frame that is consistent with the protein phosphorylation and the subsequent morphologic and secretory events. X-ray analysis revealed two types of dense bodies containing various amounts of calcium which appeared to be released sequentially after PAF activation. These results suggest that the protein phosphorylation that controls the physiologic events resulting from PAF activation of human platelets is catalyzed by protein kinase C.

  1. Stimulus-response coupling in human platelets. Changes evoked by platelet-activating factor in cytoplasmic free calcium monitored with the fluorescent calcium indicator quin2.

    PubMed Central

    Hallam, T J; Sanchez, A; Rink, T J

    1984-01-01

    The role of changes in cytoplasmic free calcium, [Ca2+]i, in the responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF) was studied in human platelets loaded with the fluorescent calcium indicator, quin2. In the presence of 1 mM external calcium, PAF raised [Ca2+]i 8-10-fold in a few seconds to peak near 1 microM. [Ca2+]i then declined over several minutes towards the basal level. In the absence of external calcium there was a much smaller increase in [Ca2+]i of similar pattern. These findings suggest that PAF increases [Ca2+]i partly by discharge of internal Ca2+, but mainly by stimulated influx. Blockade of cyclo-oxygenase with aspirin only slightly reduced the [Ca2+]i changes, indicating that thromboxane A2 is not a major mediator of the calcium movements. In control conditions PAF could stimulate shape-change, aggregation and secretion. Aggregation and secretion were roughly halved by blockade of cyclo-oxygenase. Shape-change and secretion still occurred under conditions where the [Ca2+]i rise was small or suppressed, indicating a role for intracellular activators other than Ca2+. The possible involvement of products of phosphoinositide breakdown is discussed. PMID:6426464

  2. Vasoactive side effects of intravenous immunoglobulin preparations in a rat model and their treatment with recombinant platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, W K; Teeling, J L; Verhoeven, A J; Rigter, G M; Agterberg, J; Tool, A T; Koenderman, A H; Kuijpers, T W; Hack, C E

    2000-03-01

    Previously, we observed in a rat model that intravenous administration of intramuscular immunoglobulin preparations induced a long-lasting hypotension, which appeared to be associated with the presence of IgG polymers and dimers in the preparations, but unrelated to complement activation. We found evidence that this hypotensive response is mediated by platelet-activating factor (PAF) produced by macrophages. In this study, we compared the vasoactive effects of 16 intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products from 10 different manufacturers, in anesthetized rats. Eight of the IVIG preparations showed no hypotensive effects (less than 15% decrease), whereas the other 8 had relatively strong effects (15%-50% decrease). The hypotensive effects correlated with the IgG dimer content of the preparations. Pretreatment of the rats with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase completely prevented the hypotensive reaction on IVIG infusion, and administration after the onset of hypotension resulted in normalization of the blood pressure. We also observed PAF production on in vitro incubation of human neutrophils with IVIG, which could be blocked by anti-Fcgamma receptor antibodies. This indicates that induction of PAF generation may also occur in a human system. Our findings support the hypothesis that the clinical side effects of IVIG in patients may be caused by macrophage and neutrophil activation through interaction of IgG dimers with Fcgamma receptors. Because phagocyte activation may also lead to the release of other inflammatory mediators, recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) provides a useful tool to determine whether PAF plays a role in the clinical side effects of IVIG. If so, rPAF-AH can be used for the treatment of those adverse reactions. (Blood. 2000;95:1856-1861)

  3. Identification of selective covalent inhibitors of platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 from the screening of an oxadiazolone-capped peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bani Kanta; Liu, Xiaodan; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A potent and selective inhibitor of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase 1B2 (PAFAH1B2) is described. The compound was derived by improvement of a modest affinity primary hit isolated from the screening of a bead-displayed peptoid-azapeptoid hybrid library tethered to an oxadiazolone 'warhead'. The oxadiazolone moiety of the inhibitors was found to react covalently with the active site serine residue of PAFAH1B2. This screening strategy may be useful for the identification of many selective, covalent inhibitors of serine hydrolases.

  4. The impact of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like mediators on the functional activity of neutrophils: anti-inflammatory effects of human PAF-acetylhydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, T W; Van Den Berg1, J M; Tool, A T J; Roos, D

    2001-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a proinflammatory agent in infectious and inflammatory diseases, partly due to the activation of infiltrating phagocytes. PAF exerts its actions after binding to a monospecific PAF receptor (PAFR). The potent bioactivity is reflected by its ability to activate neutrophils at picomolar concentrations, as defined by changes in levels of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), and induction of chemotaxis and actin polymerization at nanomolar concentration. The role of PAF in neutrophil survival is, however, less well appreciated. In this study, the inhibitory effects of synthetic PAFR-antagonists on various neutrophil functions were compared with the effect of recombinant human plasma-derived PAF-acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH), as an important enzyme for PAF degradation in blood and extracellular fluids. We found that endogenously produced PAF (–like) substances were involved in the spontaneous apoptosis of neutrophils. At concentrations of 8 µg/ml or higher than normal plasma levels, rPAF-AH prevented spontaneous neutrophil apoptosis (21 ± 4% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; control) versus 62 ± 12% of surviving cells (mean ± SD; rPAF-AH 20 µg/ml); P < 0·01), during overnight cultures of 15 h. This effect depended on intact enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH and was not due to the resulting product lyso-PAF. The anti-inflammatory activity of rPAF-AH toward neutrophils was substantiated by its inhibition of PAF-induced chemotaxis and changes in [Ca2+]i. In conclusion, the efficient and stable enzymatic activity of rPAF-AH over so many hours of coculture with neutrophils demonstrates the potential for its use in the many inflammatory processes in which PAF (–like) substances are believed to be involved. PMID:11298128

  5. Vascular endothelial (VEGF) and epithelial growth factor (EGF) as well as platelet-activating factor (PAF) and receptors are expressed in the early pregnant canine uterus.

    PubMed

    Schäfer-Somi, S; Sabitzer, S; Klein, D; Reinbacher, E; Kanca, H; Beceriklisoy, H B; Aksoy, O A; Kucukaslan, I; Macun, H C; Aslan, S

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the course of expression of platelet-activating factor (PAF), PAF-receptor (PAF-R), epidermal growth factor (EGF), EGF-R, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF-R1 and VEGF-R2 in uterine tissue during canine pregnancy. For this purpose, 20 bitches were ovariohysterectomized at days 10-12 (n = 10), 18-25 (n = 5) and 28-45 (n = 5) days after mating, respectively. The pre-implantation group was proven pregnant by embryo flushing of the uterus after the operation, the others by sonography. Five embryo negative, that is, non-pregnant, bitches in diestrus (day 10-12) served as controls. Tissue samples from the uterus (placentation sites and horn width, respectively) were excised and snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen after embedding in Tissue Tec(®). Extraction of mRNA for RT-PCR was performed with Tri-Reagent. In the embryos, mRNA from all factors except VEGF was detected. In the course of pregnancy, significantly higher expression of PAF and PAFR as well as VEGF and VEGFR2 during the pre-implantation stage than in all other stages and a strong upregulation of EGF during implantation were characteristic. The course of EGF was in diametrical opposition to the course of the receptor. These results point towards an increased demand for VEGF, EGF and PAF during the earliest stages of canine pregnancy.

  6. Equine platelets inhibit E. coli growth and can be activated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid although superoxide anion production does not occur and platelet activation is not associated with enhanced production by neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Aktan, I; Dunkel, B; Cunningham, F M

    2013-04-15

    Activated platelets can contribute to host defense through release of products with bactericidal actions such as antimicrobial peptides and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as by forming heterotypic aggregates with neutrophils and enhancing their antimicrobial properties. Whilst release of vasoactive mediators from equine platelets in response to stimuli including bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been documented, neither ROS production, nor the effects of activated platelets on equine neutrophil ROS production, have been reported. This study first sought evidence that activated equine platelets inhibit bacterial growth. Platelet superoxide production in response to stimuli including Escherichia coli-derived LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Staphylococcus aureus was then determined. The ability of LPS and LTA to up-regulate platelet P-selectin expression and induce platelet-neutrophil aggregate formation was investigated and the effect of co-incubating activated platelets with neutrophils on superoxide production measured. Growth of E. coli was inhibited in a time-dependent manner, and to a similar extent, by addition of platelet rich plasma (PRP) or platelet poor plasma (PPP) obtained by centrifugation of PRP. Activation of platelets in PRP by addition of thrombin led to a significant increase in the inhibitory action between 0.5 and 2h. Although phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) caused superoxide production by equine platelets in a protein kinase C-dependent manner, thrombin, platelet activating factor (PAF), LPS, LTA and formyl-methionyl-leucyl phenylalanine (FMLP) were without effect. LPS and LTA did induce platelet activation, measured as an increase in P-selectin expression (% positive cells: 17±3 (un-stimulated); 63±6 (1μg/ml LPS); 64±6 (1μg/ml LTA); n=5) but not platelet superoxide production or heterotypic aggregate formation. Co-incubation of activated platelets with neutrophils did not increase neutrophil superoxide production. This

  7. Relative sensitivities of plasma lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, and paraoxonase to in vitro gas-phase cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Bielicki, J K; Knoff, L J; Tribble, D L; Forte, T M

    2001-03-01

    In order to identify potential atherogenic properties of gas-phase cigarette smoke, we utilized an in vitro exposure model to determine whether the activities of several putative anti-atherogenic enzymes associated with plasma lipoproteins were compromised. Exposure of heparinized human plasma to gas-phase cigarette smoke produced a dose-dependent reduction in the activity of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH). Reductions of nearly 50% in PAF-AH activity were observed following exposure to gas-phase smoke from four cigarettes over an 8-h period. During this time of exposure, lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) was rendered almost completely inactive (>80%). In contrast, paraoxonase was totally unaffected by cigarette smoke. Supplementation of plasma with 1 mM reduced glutathione was found to protect both PAF-AH and LCAT from cigarette smoke, suggesting that cysteine modifications may have contributed to the inhibition of these two enzymes. To evaluate this possibility, we blocked the free cysteine residues of these enzymes with the reversible thiol-modifying reagent dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid (DTNB). Reversal of the DTNB-cysteine adducts following cigarette smoke exposures revealed that LCAT, but not PAF-AH, was protected. Moreover, high doses (1.0-10 mM) of acrolein and 4-hydroxynonenal, reactive aldehydic species associated with cigarette smoke, completely inhibited plasma LCAT activity, whereas PAF-AH was resistant to such exposures. Taken together, these results indicate a divergence regarding the underlying mechanism of PAF-AH and LCAT inhibition upon exposure to gas-phase cigarette smoke. While LCAT was sensitive to exposure to volatile aldehydic products involving, in part, cysteine and/or active site modifications, the enzyme PAF-AH exhibited an apparent resistance. The latter suggests that the active site of PAF-AH is in a microenvironment that lacks free cysteine residues and/or is shielded from volatile aldehydic combustion

  8. Platelet activation risk index as a prognostic thrombosis indicator

    PubMed Central

    Zlobina, K. E.; Guria, G. Th.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation in blood flow under high, overcritical shear rates is initiated by Von Willebrand factor. Despite the large amount of experimental data that have been obtained, the value of the critical shear rate, above which von Willebrand factor starts to activate platelets, is still controversial. Here, we recommend a theoretical approach to elucidate how the critical blood shear rate is dependent on von Willebrand factor size. We derived a diagram of platelet activation according to the shear rate and von Willebrand factor multimer size. We succeeded in deriving an explicit formula for the dependence of the critical shear rate on von Willebrand factor molecule size. The platelet activation risk index was introduced. This index is dependent on the flow conditions, number of monomers in von Willebrand factor, and platelet sensitivity. Probable medical applications of the platelet activation risk index as a universal prognostic index are discussed. PMID:27461235

  9. Factors associated with hyperdynamic or hypodynamic circulation and role of platelet-activating factor in hemodynamic alterations in bacterial peritonitis in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Novo, C; Ais, G; López-Farré, A; Romeo, J M; Pérez-Barriocanal, F; López-Novoa, J M

    1995-12-01

    Male Wistar rats injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with 10(9) U Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 developed acute bacterial peritonitis. Hemodynamic studies, with microspheres labeled with 103Ru 57Co, and 113Sn, were performed before, 30 min after bacterial injection, and 30 min after administration of either the platelet-activating factor (PAF) antagonist BN-52021 (5 mg/kg body weight) or isotonic saline. A blood sample of 0.3 ml was obtained for bacterial culture and endotoxemia measurements. Plasma PAF levels were measured in a different group of 10 control rats and 20 animals with experimental peritonitis. One group of rats injected with E. coli (n = 13) displayed hyperdynamic circulation, with an increase in cardiac output (CO) from 15.1 +/- 1.2 to 19.4 +/- 1.1 ml/min/100 g body weight and a decrease in total peripheral resistance (TPR) from 19.5 +/- 2.4 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 dynes.s.cm-5 10(-4). Furthermore, these rats showed high endotoxin blood concentrations and low hemoculture levels. The remaining 7 peritonitic rats showed a significant decrease in CO from 16.3 +/- 1.6 to 12.7 +/- 1.2 ml/min/100 g body weight and an increase in TPR from 17.3 +/- 1.8 to 22.6 +/- 2.8 dynes.s.cm-5 10(-4). In addition, these rats showed low endotoxin blood concentrations and high hemoculture levels. Endotoxin blood concentrations were positively correlated with the change in CO (r = 0.87, p < 0.05), and cell hemocultures were positively correlated with CO (r = 0.89, p < 0.05). Rats with high endotoxin blood levels showed higher PAF plasma levels than control rats or peritonitic rats with low endotoxin blood levels. When peritonitic rats were injected with the specific PAF-receptor blocker BN-52021 (5 mg/kg body weight) as a bolus, CO and TPR returned to baseline values in both groups of animals. These data suggest that the hemodynamic changes induced by bacterial peritonitis depend on endotoxemia and bacteremia in opposite ways. In addition, PAF appears to be involved in both the

  10. Inhibition of platelet-activating factor- and zymosan-activated serum-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils by nedocromil sodium, BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Bruijnzeel, P. L.; Warringa, R. A.; Kok, P. T.

    1989-01-01

    1. Inflammatory cells such as eosinophils and neutrophils are thought to contribute actively to the pathogenesis of asthma since they infiltrate into the lung tissue. These cells are mobilized by lipid-like and protein-like chemotactic factors. As illustrative examples of both groups, platelet-activating-factor (Paf) and zymosan-activated-serum (ZAS) were used in this study. The inhibitory effects of nedocromil sodium, the Paf antagonist BN 52021 and sodium cromoglycate on Paf- and ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis were evaluated. 2. All tested drugs inhibited Paf-induced neutrophil chemotaxis with approximately the same potency (IC50 approximately 1 nM). 3. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were equally potent in inhibiting ZAS-induced neutrophil chemotaxis (IC50 = 0.1-1 microM), whereas BN 52021 was considerably less potent (IC30 = 10 microM). 4. To find out whether the drugs tested could inhibit early events in cell activation, their capacity to inhibit Paf- and ZAS-induced cytosolic free Ca2+-mobilization was investigated. BN 52021, at a concentration of 100 microM, completely inhibited Paf-induced Ca2+-mobilization and inhibited ZAS-induced Ca2+-mobilization by about 50%. Nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate were ineffective. PMID:2551444

  11. Effect of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutarylcoenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) on tissue paraoxonase 1 and plasma platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase activities.

    PubMed

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Jamroz, Anna

    2004-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of pravastatin and fluvastatin on paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity in plasma, liver, heart, and kidney, as well as on plasma platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in the rat. The animals received pravastatin at doses of 4 and 40 mg/kg/d or fluvastatin at doses of 2 or 20 mg/kg/d for 3 weeks. Fluvastatin (20 mg/kg/d) reduced plasma PON1 activity toward paraoxon and phenyl acetate by 23.6% and 17.4%, respectively. The lower dose of this drug as well as both doses of pravastatin had no effect on plasma PON1. PON1 activity toward paraoxon in the liver of rats treated with 20 mg/kg/d fluvastatin was 27.5% lower than in the control group, and the activity toward phenyl acetate was reduced by 25.4% and 35.9% in rats receiving 2 and 20 mg/kg/d of this drug, respectively. Fluvastatin at 2 and 20 mg/kg/d also decreased cardiac PON1 by 31.3% and 27.3%, respectively. Both statins reduced PON1 activity in the renal cortex and medulla. Statins had no effect on plasma PAF-AH. It is concluded that fluvastatin reduces PON1 activity more efficiently than does pravastatin. Reducing effect on PON1 may negatively modulate atheroprotective potential of statins and may contribute to differences in antiatherosclerotic properties of different drugs in this group.

  12. Platelet-activating factor in Iberian pig spermatozoa: receptor expression and role as enhancer of the calcium-induced acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Bragado, M J; Gil, M C; Garcia-Marin, L J

    2011-12-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid involved in reproductive physiology. PAF receptor is expressed in some mammalian spermatozoa species where it plays a role in these germ-cell-specific processes. The aim of this study is to identify PAF receptor in Iberian pig spermatozoa and to evaluate PAF's effects on motility, viability and acrosome reaction. Semen samples from Iberian boars were used. PAF receptor identification was performed by Western blotting. Spermatozoa motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, whereas spermatozoa viability and acrosome reaction were evaluated by flow cytometry. Different PAF concentrations added to non-capacitating medium during 60 min have no effect on any spermatozoa motility parameter measured. Acrosome reaction was rapid and potently induced by 1 μm calcium ionophore A23187 showing an effect at 60 min and maximum at 240 min. PAF added to a capacitating medium is not able to induce spermatozoa acrosome reaction at any time studied. However, PAF, in the presence of A23187, significantly accelerates and enhances the calcium-induced acrosome reaction in a concentration-dependent manner in Iberian boar spermatozoa. Exogenous PAF does not affect at all spermatozoa viability, whereas slightly exacerbated the A23187-induced loss in viability. This work demonstrates that PAF receptor is expressed in Iberian pig spermatozoa and that its stimulation by PAF regulates the calcium-induced acrosome reaction. This work contributes to further elucidate the physiological regulation of the most relevant spermatozoa functions for successful fertilization: acrosome reaction.

  13. Platelet-activating factor-mediated transmembrane signaling in human B lymphocytes is regulated through a pertussis- and cholera toxin-sensitive pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Mazer, B D; Sawami, H; Tordai, A; Gelfand, E W

    1992-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) stimulates human B cells, resulting in elevation of intracellular calcium and the release of inositol phosphates. This signaling pathway is inhibited in the presence of pertussis (PT) or cholera toxin (CT). Preincubation of human B cells with either toxin, but not their inactive subunits, for 3 h blocked these PAF-induced responses in two B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. This effect was time dependent, with some inhibition noted at 30 min, but only after preincubation for 2-3 h was maximum inhibition achieved. This inhibitory activity was also dose dependent. The toxins blocked both PAF-induced transmembrane uptake of Ca2+ as well as release of Ca2+ from internal stores, and were selective in that activation events after cross-linking of surface IgM were not affected. Further, the toxins did not appear to act through elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP. These data, coupled with previous observations on the absence of heterologous desensitization between PAF and sIgM receptors, may delineate distinct signaling pathways in human B cells. This may reflect different roles for GTP-binding proteins in the activation of human B cells. PMID:1325997

  14. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. PMID:28049146

  15. Contribution of the platelet activating factor signaling pathway to cerebral microcirculatory dysfunction during experimental sepsis by ExoU producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Plotkowski, Maria Cristina; Estato, Vanessa; Santos, Sabrina Alves; da Silva, Mauricio Costa Alves; Miranda, Aline Silva; de Miranda, Pedro Elias; Pinho, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo; Morandi, Verônica; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Vianna, Albanita; Saliba, Alessandra Mattos

    2015-01-01

    Intravital microscopy was used to assess the involvement of ExoU, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytotoxin with phospholipase A2 activity, in dysfunction of cerebral microcirculation during experimental pneumosepsis. Cortical vessels from mice intratracheally infected with low density of the ExoU-producing PA103 P. aeruginosa strain exhibited increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion to venule endothelium, decreased capillar density and impaired arteriolar response to vasoactive acetylcholine. These phenomena were mediated by the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR) pathway because they were reversed in mice treated with a PAFR antagonist prior to infection. Brains from PA103-infected animals exhibited a perivascular inflammatory infiltration that was not detected in animals infected with an exoU deficient mutant or in mice treated with the PAFR antagonist and infected with the wild type bacteria. No effect on brain capillary density was detected in mice infected with the PAO1 P. aeruginosa strain, which do not produce ExoU. Finally, after PA103 infection, mice with a targeted deletion of the PAFR gene exhibited higher brain capillary density and lower leukocyte adhesion to venule endothelium, as well as lower increase of systemic inflammatory cytokines, when compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, our results establish a role for PAFR in mediating ExoU-induced cerebral microvascular failure in a murine model of sepsis. PMID:26187894

  16. The platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase gene derived from Trichoderma harzianum induces maize resistance to Curvularia lunata through the jasmonic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Gao, Jinxin; Wang, Meng; Wu, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum was upregulated by the interaction of T. harzianum with maize roots or the foliar pathogen Curvularia lunata. PAF-AH was associated with chitinase and cellulase expressions, but especially with chitinase, because its activity in the KO40 transformant (PAF-AH disruption transformant) was lower, compared with the wild-type strain T28. The result demonstrated that the colonization of maize roots by T. harzianum induced systemic protection of leaves inoculated with C. lunata. Such protection was associated with the expression of inducible jasmonic acid pathway-related genes. Moreover, the data from liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed that the concentration of jasmonic acid in maize leaves was associated with the expression level of defense-related genes, suggesting that PAF-AH induced resistance to the foliar pathogen. Our findings showed that PAF-AH had an important function in inducing systemic resistance to maize leaf spot pathogen.

  17. Platelet-activating factor levels of serum and gingival crevicular fluid in nonsmoking patients with periodontitis and/or coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zheng, Pei; Zhu, Haihua; Zhu, Jianhua; Zhao, Lili; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Eberhard, Jörg; Lins, Markus; Jepsen, Søren

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate systemic and local levels of platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent proinflammatory mediator implicated in cardiovascular pathophysiology in adult nonsmoking patients with periodontitis with or without coronary heart disease (CHD). Eighty-seven volunteers, 25 periodontitis patients, 19 periodontitis with CHD patients, 19 CHD patients, and 24 healthy controls were included, and periodontal conditions were assessed. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and venous blood were collected, and PAF levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PAF levels in serum (303.3 ± 204 pg/ml) and in GCF (26.3 ± 6 pg/μl) of the periodontitis group with CHD, the periodontitis group (serum, 302.4 ± 241 pg/ml and GCF, 26.3 ± 8 pg/μl) and the CHD group (serum, 284.7 ± 192 pg/ml and GCF, 20.8 ± 6 pg/μl) were significantly higher than the healthy control group (serum, 65.4 ± 35 pg/ml and GCF, 7.7 ± 3 pg/μl; p < 0.05). In summary, the present study could demonstrate that in patients with periodontitis, the inflammatory mediator PAF is released into serum at least in the same range as for patients with coronary heart disease. However, no additive effects were seen when both conditions were present.

  18. CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) is required for degranulation of human eosinophils induced by human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    Horie, S; Kita, H

    1994-06-01

    Recent evidence suggests adhesion molecules play an important role in the function of leukocytes. Because human eosinophils are known to express beta 2 integrins, we hypothesized that these adhesion molecules mediate the effector function of eosinophils. Normal human eosinophils incubated in albumin-coated polystyrene plates released granule protein and produced superoxide anion when stimulated with human recombinant granulocyte-macrophage CSF (rGM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), or PMA. Simultaneous monitoring of eosinophil adhesion and degranulation showed that degranulation was always preceded by cellular adhesion regardless of stimuli. Furthermore, eosinophil degranulation induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was abolished in suspension culture of the cells when the cell suspensions were gently stirred. To identify the molecules involved in this adhesion-dependent degranulation, we have investigated the effects of mAbs (mAb) against beta 2 integrins. mAb reactive with CD18 markedly inhibited the eosinophil adhesion and degranulation induced by PAF and human rGM-CSF. mAb reactive with CD11b also moderately inhibited the adhesion and degranulation. In contrast, mAb reactive with CD11a slightly enhanced or showed no effect on the adhesion and degranulation by human rGM-CSF or PAF. Superoxide production induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF was also abolished by the treatment of cells with anti-CD18 mAb. mAb against CD11b and CD18 had little effect on degranulation and superoxide production induced by PMA. These results indicate that CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1)-dependent cellular adhesion plays an important role in the degranulation and superoxide production of eosinophils induced by human rGM-CSF and PAF, and that these mechanisms may be employed in vivo where eosinophils contact with stromal cells and/or proteins.

  19. Roles of tumor necrosis factor alpha, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, platelet-activating factor, and arachidonic acid metabolites in interleukin-1-induced resistance to infection in neutropenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Vogels, M T; Hermsen, C C; Huys, H L; Eling, W M; van der Meer, J W

    1994-01-01

    Treatment with a single low dose (80 to 800 ng) of interleukin-1 (IL-1) 24 h before a lethal bacterial challenge in granulocytopenic and in normal mice enhances nonspecific resistance. The mechanism behind this protection has only partially been elucidated. Since IL-1 induces production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), platelet-activating factor (PAF), and arachidonic acid metabolites, we investigated the potential role of these substances in IL-1-induced protection. Low doses of murine TNF-alpha but not of human TNF-alpha enhanced survival, suggesting an effect via the type II TNF receptor rather than the type I TNF receptor, which has little species specificity. In line with this TNF-alpha-induced protection from infection, pretreatment with a low dose of a rat anti-murine TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody tended to inhibit IL-1-induced protection, suggesting a role of TNF-alpha as a mediator of IL-1-induced enhanced resistance to infection. Pretreatment with higher doses of anti-TNF-alpha, however, showed a dose-related protective effect per se, which could be further enhanced by a suboptimal dose of IL-1. A combination of optimal doses of anti-TNF-alpha and IL-1 produced an increase in survival similar to that produced by separate pretreatments. This lack of further enhancement of survival by combined optimal pretreatments suggests a similar mechanism of protection, most likely attenuation of deleterious effects of overproduced proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-alpha during lethal infection. Pretreatment with different doses of GM-CSF before a lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa challenge in neutropenic mice did not enhance survival. Different doses of WEB 2170, a selective PAF receptor antagonist, of MK-886, a selective inhibitor of leukotriene biosynthesis, or of several cyclooxygenase inhibitors did not reduce the protective effect of IL-1 pretreatment. We conclude that IL-1-induced nonspecific

  20. The effect of platelet activating factor antagonist BN 52021 on bacterial translocation and ICAM-I expression in experimental obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Akyürek, Nusret; Salman, Bülent; Irkörücü, Oktay; Tezcaner, Tugan; Azili, Cem; Erdem, Ozlem; Akca, Gülçin; Akin, Okan; Tatlicioglu, Ertan

    2005-01-01

    Expression of intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in an obstructive jaundice model and the potential protective role of platelet activating factor antagonist over small intestine and liver together with its effects on bacterial translocation are examined in this study. Forty-eight male Wistar albino rats were assigned into four equal groups of 12. In groups I and II, animals were sham operated. In groups III and IV, common bile duct ligation and division were performed. In group I and group III, 0.5 ml/day normal saline was applied intraperitoneally daily from day 2 to 6 of the study; in group II and group IV, 1 mg/kg/day BN 52021 was applied intraperitoneally daily from day 2 to 6 of the study. All animals were sacrificed on postoperative day 7. ICAM-1 expression (CD54 positivity) was analyzed in the liver and ileum tissue by immunohistochemical method. Samples from blood, liver mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen were cultured under aerobic conditions. It is revealed that ICAM-1 expression was statistically higher in group III, with highest bacterial translocation and liver and spleen injury when compared to other groups. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT), bilirubin, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), and interleukin 1beta(IL-1beta) values were at the highest level in group III, and there was a statistical decrease in group IV compared to group III. The administration of BN52021 in experimental obstructive jaundice is a useful way to reduce liver and intestinal mucosal villi damage by inhibiting bacterial translocation and systemic inflammatory response.

  1. Increased von Willebrand factor levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus reflect inflammation rather than increased propensity for platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Warren D; Eilertsen, Gro Østli

    2016-01-01

    Background von Willebrand factor (VWF) is involved in platelet plug formation and protein transport. Increased VWF levels in systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) are considered risk factors for vascular events. VWF protein levels, however, do not accurately reflect its platelet-aggregating function, which has not been examined in SLE. Methods Cross-sectional study with clinical and laboratory data obtained in patients with SLE (n=92) from a regional lupus registry. VWF function was determined by ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (VWF ristocetin cofactor, VWF:RCo) and VWF levels by turbidimetric assay (VWF antigen, VWF:Ag). The platelet-aggregating activity per VWF unit was estimated by the VWF RCo/Ag ratio. Healthy controls served as comparators and associations were evaluated by non-parametric methods. Results VWF:Ag (142% vs 107%, p=0.001) and VWF:RCo levels (123% vs 78%, p<0.041) were increased in patients with SLE, but VWF RCo/Ag ratio was similar as in controls (0.83 vs 0.82, p=0.8). VWF:Ag levels were higher in patients experiencing serositis but unrelated to other manifestations, thrombotic disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematous Disease Activity Index 2000 or Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics-Damage Index. VWF:Ag levels correlated significantly with VWF:RCo levels (Rs 0.8, p<0.001), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (Rs 0.32, p<0.01), anti-dsDNA Ab (Rs 0.27, p<0.01), total IgG (Rs 0.33 p<0.01), fibrinogen (Rs 0.28, p<0.01) and ceruloplasmin (Rs 0.367, p<0.01) levels. VWF:RCo levels were not related to clinical findings but were correlated with ESR, anti-dsDNA and transferrin levels. No serological associations existed for VWF RCo/Ag ratio (all p>0.2). Conclusions In this SLE cohort, VWF:Ag behaved similarly to acute-phase reactants, but VWF:Ag increases were not matched by increases in functional activity per unit of VWF. Thus, more VWF did not increase the propensity for platelet aggregation in SLE. PMID:27651919

  2. Expression, purification and characterization of a human serine-dependent phospholipase A2 with high specificity for oxidized phospholipids and platelet activating factor.

    PubMed Central

    Rice, S Q; Southan, C; Boyd, H F; Terrett, J A; MacPhee, C H; Moores, K; Gloger, I S; Tew, D G

    1998-01-01

    Using expressed sequence tag (EST) homology screening, a new human serine dependent phospholipase A2 (HSD-PLA2) was identified that has 40% amino acid identity with human low density lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (LDL-PLA2). HSD-PLA2 has very recently been purified and cloned from brain tissue but named PAF-AH II. However, because the homology with LDL-PLA2 suggested a broader substrate specificity than simply platelet activating factor (PAF), we have further characterized this enzyme using baculovirus-expressed protein. The recombinant enzyme, which was purified 21-fold to homogeneity, had a molecular mass of 44kDa and possessed a specific activity of 35 micromol min-1 mg-1 when assayed against PAF. Activity could also be measured using 1-decanoyl-2-(4-nitrophenylglutaryl) phosphate (DNGP) as substrate. Like LDL-PLA2, HSD-PLA2 was able to hydrolyse oxidatively modified phosphatidylcholines when supplemented to human LDL prior to copper-stimulated oxidation. A GXSXG motif evident from sequence information and inhibition of its activity by 3,4, dichloroisocoumarin, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) and diethyl p-nitrophenyl phosphate (DENP) confirm that the enzyme is serine dependent. Moreover, sequence comparison indicates the HSD-PLA2 probable active site triad positions are shared with LDL-PLA2 and a C. elegans homologue, suggesting that these sequences comprise members of a new enzyme family. Although clearly structurally related with similar substrate specificities further work reported here shows HSD-PLA2 and LDL-PLA2 to be different with respect to chromosomal localization and tissue distribution. PMID:9494101

  3. Oxidatively modified LDL contains phospholipids with platelet-activating factor-like activity and stimulates the growth of smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heery, J M; Kozak, M; Stafforini, D M; Jones, D A; Zimmerman, G A; McIntyre, T M; Prescott, S M

    1995-01-01

    Oxidative modification of lipoproteins is believed to be important in the genesis of atherosclerosis. We established cultures of smooth muscle cells (SMC) and exposed them to native LDL or oxidized LDL. Oxidized LDL, but not native LDL, was mitogenic as measured by incorporation of [3H]-thymidine into DNA. This effect was concentration dependent, averaged 288% of control, and was blocked by a platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist. We hypothesized that phospholipids with PAF-like activity were generated during the oxidation of LDL. To test this hypothesis we extracted phospholipids from copper-oxidized LDL and assayed for PAF-like activity. Phospholipids extracted from oxidized LDL and purified by HPLC induced neutrophil adhesion equivalent to PAF (10 nM) and were mitogenic for smooth muscle cells. These effects were not seen with phospholipids extracted from native LDL and were blocked by two structurally different, competitive antagonists of the PAF receptor. The effects of these lipids were also abolished by pretreating them with PAF acetylhydrolase. Finally, we used Chinese hamster ovary cells that had seen stably transfected with a cDNA for the PAF receptor to confirm that phospholipids from oxidized LDL act via this receptor. We found that PAF (control) and the oxidized phospholipids each induced release of arachidonic acid from the transfected cells, but had no effect on wildtype Chinese hamster ovary cells, which lack the PAF receptor. This effect was also blocked by a PAF receptor antagonist. Thus, phospholipids generated during oxidative modification of LDL may participate in atherosclerosis by stimulating SMC proliferation and leukocyte activation. Images PMID:7593619

  4. Effect of bovine serum albumin on the synthesis of prostaglandin and incorporation of (/sup 3/H)acetate into platelet-activating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Heinsohn, C.; Polgar, P.; Fishman, J.; Taylor, L.

    1987-09-01

    The binding of fatty acids by bovine serum albumin (BSA) is well documented. However, the interaction between the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) and the trapping of arachidonate released from cellular lipid stores is not as well understood. In this communication, we relate the trapping of fatty acids to the synthesis of PGs and the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)acetate into platelet-activating factor (PAF). Our results show that, as determined by radioimmunoassay, BSA inhibits bradykinin (BK) (5 ng/ml) and ionophore A23187 (10 microM)-stimulated synthesis of PGs in human embryo lung fibroblasts (IMR-90) in a concentration-dependent manner. Experiments using prelabel with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate followed by extraction and thin-layer chromatography show that, in the presence of 2 mg/ml BSA, IMR-90 release essentially only fatty acid following stimulation with bradykinin. Little if any prostaglandin and no endoperoxide are detected. In the same experiment, in absence of BSA, about 70% of the released label is detected as prostaglandin. alpha-Cyclodextrin, another trapper of fatty acid, inhibits PG synthesis in much the same way. BSA and alpha-cyclodextrin also inhibit prostacyclin synthesis in endothelial cells derived from the calf pulmonary artery. However, the inhibition of PG synthesis in these cells is not as complete as that in the IMR-90. In contrast to the effect of the trappers on PG synthesis, BSA and alpha-cyclodextrin are observed to potentiate BK- and ionophore-stimulated incorporation of (3H)acetate into PAF in the endothelial cells. The labeled PAF is not released from the cells in either the presence or absence of the trappers, leading us to conclude that BSA causes an increase in acetate-labeled cellular PAF by trapping released fatty acid.

  5. Response to platelet-activating factor in human platelets stored and aged in plasma. Decrease in aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and receptor affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, S.D.; Morrison, W.J.; Klachko, D.M.

    1989-07-01

    Human platelet concentrates were stored in polyolefin bags at 22 to 24 degrees C on a horizontal shaker for up to 8 days. At different intervals, aliquots of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) were removed aseptically and five variables, i.e., platelet counts, morphology, platelet-activating factor (PAF)-stimulated aggregation, phosphoinositide turnover, and (3H)PAF binding to platelet receptors, were studied. The number of platelets did not change during the 8 days of storage. Scanning electron microscopy of the platelets revealed a gradual morphologic change from biconcave flat discs to irregular, crenated forms. The PAF-induced aggregation of platelets declined with time of storage. A decrease to 50 percent of the Day 1 aggregatory response to PAF was evident on Day 2, and there was a further decline to about 20 percent by Day 6. Similarly, PAF receptor-coupled phosphoinositide turnover, as monitored by 32P incorporation into individual phosphoinositides, decreased dramatically with storage. After 2 to 3 days of storage, the phosphoinositide turnover was reduced to 50 percent of the original response, and it continued to decline to about 25 percent of original response by Day 5 or 6. The binding of (3H)PAF to washed human platelets indicated subtle changes between Days 2 and 4, which became more noticeable by Day 6. These results have raised the possibility of changes in the number of the receptors and/or their affinity for the ligand during storage. We conclude that although the number of platelets was maintained during storage for 8 days, a general deterioration of their responses to PAF occurred at the levels of cell surface receptor, transmembrane signaling (phosphoinositide turnover), and response (aggregation).

  6. Higher plasma platelet-activating factor levels are associated with increased risk of vertebral fracture and lower bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeonmok; Kim, Beom-Jun; Ahn, Seong Hee; Lee, Seung Hun; Koh, Jung-Min

    2015-11-01

    Despite experimental and animal evidence showing the detrimental effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) on bone metabolism, there are no clinical studies relating PAF to osteoporosis-related phenotypes. This case-control study investigates the association between plasma PAF, osteoporotic vertebral fracture (VF), and bone mineral density (BMD) in postmenopausal Korean women. Among 474 eligible women not taking any drug or having any disease that could affect bone metabolism, we identified 73 cases defined as subjects with radiological VF. The controls were randomly selected from the remaining 401 subjects and matched 1:1 to cases in terms of both age and body mass index (BMI). Lateral thoracolumbar radiographs, BMD, and plasma PAF levels were determined for all subjects. Postmenopausal women with VF demonstrated 34.6 % higher plasma PAF levels than subjects without VF after adjusting for age, BMI, smoking habits, alcohol intake, regular exercise, and parental history of osteoporotic fractures (P = 0.021). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that the odds ratio for VF linearly increased across increasing PAF quartiles (P for trend = 0.040) and the odds for VF were 2.88-fold higher in subjects in the highest quartile in comparison with those in the lowest quartile (95 % CI 1.04-8.01). Plasma PAF levels were inversely correlated with BMD at various sites (γ = -0.253 to -0.176, P = 0.003-0.041). These findings suggest that plasma PAF may be a potential biomarker for predicting poor bone health in postmenopausal women.

  7. Topical application of a platelet activating factor receptor agonist suppresses phorbol ester-induced acute and chronic inflammation and has cancer chemopreventive activity in mouse skin.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Ravi P; Rezania, Samin; Ocana, Jesus A; DaSilva-Arnold, Sonia C; Bradish, Joshua R; Richey, Justin D; Warren, Simon J; Rashid, Badri; Travers, Jeffrey B; Konger, Raymond L

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) has long been associated with acute edema and inflammatory responses. PAF acts by binding to a specific G-protein coupled receptor (PAF-R, Ptafr). However, the role of chronic PAF-R activation on sustained inflammatory responses has been largely ignored. We recently demonstrated that mice lacking the PAF-R (Ptafr-/- mice) exhibit increased cutaneous tumorigenesis in response to a two-stage chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Ptafr-/- mice also exhibited increased chronic inflammation in response to phorbol ester application. In this present study, we demonstrate that topical application of the non-hydrolysable PAF mimetic (carbamoyl-PAF (CPAF)), exerts a potent, dose-dependent, and short-lived edema response in WT mice, but not Ptafr -/- mice or mice deficient in c-Kit (c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice). Using an ear inflammation model, co-administration of topical CPAF treatment resulted in a paradoxical decrease in both acute ear thickness changes associated with a single PMA application, as well as the sustained inflammation associated with chronic repetitive PMA applications. Moreover, mice treated topically with CPAF also exhibited a significant reduction in chemical carcinogenesis. The ability of CPAF to suppress acute and chronic inflammatory changes in response to PMA application(s) was PAF-R dependent, as CPAF had no effect on basal or PMA-induced inflammation in Ptafr-/- mice. Moreover, c-Kit appears to be necessary for the anti-inflammatory effects of CPAF, as CPAF had no observable effect in c-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These data provide additional evidence that PAF-R activation exerts complex immunomodulatory effects in a model of chronic inflammation that is relevant to neoplastic development.

  8. Aspirin Hydrolysis in Plasma Is a Variable Function of Butyrylcholinesterase and Platelet-activating Factor Acetylhydrolase 1b2 (PAFAH1b2)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Gang; Marathe, Gopal K.; Hartiala, Jaana; Hazen, Stanley L.; Allayee, Hooman; Tang, W. H. Wilson; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspirin is rapidly hydrolyzed within erythrocytes by a heterodimer of PAFAH1b2/PAFAH1b3 but also in plasma by an unidentified activity. Hydrolysis in both compartments was variable, with a 12-fold variation in plasma among 2226 Cleveland Clinic GeneBank patients. Platelet inhibition by aspirin was suppressed in plasma that rapidly hydrolyzed aspirin. Plasma aspirin hydrolysis was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery disease compared with control subjects (16.5 ± 4.4 versus 15.1 ± 3.7 nmol/ml/min; p = 3.4 × 10−8). A genome-wide association study of 2054 GeneBank subjects identified a single locus immediately adjacent to the BCHE (butyrylcholinesterase) gene associated with plasma aspirin hydrolytic activity (lead SNP, rs6445035; p = 9.1 × 10−17). However, its penetrance was low, and plasma from an individual with an inactivating mutation in BCHE still effectively hydrolyzed aspirin. A second aspirin hydrolase was identified in plasma, the purification of which showed it to be homomeric PAFAH1b2. This is distinct from the erythrocyte PAFAH1b2/PAFAH1b3 heterodimer. Inhibitors showed that both butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and PAFAH1b2 contribute to aspirin hydrolysis in plasma, with variation primarily reflecting non-genetic variation of BChE activity. Therefore, aspirin is hydrolyzed in plasma by two enzymes, BChE and a new extracellular form of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, PAFAH1b2. Hydrolytic effectiveness varies widely primarily from non-genetic variation of BChE activity that affects aspirin bioavailability in blood and the ability of aspirin to inhibit platelet aggregation. PMID:23508960

  9. Lipoteichoic acid from Lactobacillus plantarum inhibits the expression of platelet-activating factor receptor induced by Staphylococcus aureus lipoteichoic acid or Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide in human monocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hangeun; Jung, Bong Jun; Jeong, Jihye; Chun, Honam; Chung, Dae Kyun

    2014-08-01

    Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) plays an important role in bacterial infection and inflammation. We examined the effect of the bacterial cell wall components lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) from Lactobacillus plantarum (pLTA) and Staphylococcus aureus (aLTA) on PAFR expression in THP-1, a monocyte-like cell line. LPS and aLTA, but not pLTA, significantly increased PAFR expression, whereas priming with pLTA inhibited LPSmediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. Expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and 4, and CD14 increased with LPS and aLTA treatments, but was inhibited by pLTA pretreatment. Neutralizing antibodies against TLR2, TLR4, and CD14 showed that these receptors were important in LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAFR expression. PAFR expression is mainly regulated by the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway. Blocking PAF binding to PAFR using a PAFR inhibitor indicated that LPS-mediated or aLTA-mediated PAF expression affected TNF-α production. In the mouse small intestine, pLTA inhibited PAFR, TLR2, and TLR4 expression that was induced by heat-labile toxin. Our data suggested that pLTA has an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting the expression of PAFR that was induced by pathogenic ligands.

  10. Platelet activation determines the severity of thrombocytopenia in dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Ojha, Amrita; Nandi, Dipika; Batra, Harish; Singhal, Rashi; Annarapu, Gowtham K.; Bhattacharyya, Sankar; Seth, Tulika; Dar, Lalit; Medigeshi, Guruprasad R.; Vrati, Sudhanshu; Vikram, Naval K.; Guchhait, Prasenjit

    2017-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is common in patients with dengue virus (DENV) infections. With a focus on understanding the possible mechanism of thrombocytopenia in DENV infections we described a direct correlation between activation and depletion of platelets in patients. Our data showed a sharp decrease in platelet counts at day 4 of fever in patients. The high DENV genome copies in platelets correlated directly with the elevated platelet activation along with increased binding of complement factor C3 and IgG on their surface at day 4. Recovery in platelet count was observed on day 10 through day 6 and 8 with simultaneous decrease in platelet activation markers. Further, our in vitro data supported the above observations describing a concentration-dependent increase in platelet activation by DENV serotype-2. The high copy number of DENV2 genome in the platelet pellet correlated directly with platelet activation, microparticle generation and clot formation. Furthermore the DENV2-activated platelets were phagocytosed in large numbers by the monocytes. The DENV2-mediated lysis and clearance of platelets were abrogated in presence of platelet activation inhibitor, prostacyclin. These observations collectively suggest that platelet activation status is an important determinant of thrombocytopenia in dengue infections. A careful strategy of inactivation of platelets may rescue them from rapid destruction during DENV infections. PMID:28139770

  11. Cisplatin triggers platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Franconi, M; Caprino, L

    2000-09-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anticancer drugs could contribute to the thrombotic complications of malignancy in treated patients. Thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular thrombotic events have been reported for cisplatin, a drug widely used in the treatment of many solid tumours. The aim of this study is to explore in vitro cisplatin effect on human platelet reactivity in order to define the potentially active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced thrombotic complications. Our results demonstrate that cisplatin increases human platelet reactivity (onset of platelet aggregation wave and thromboxane production) to non-aggregating concentrations of the agonists involving arachidonic acid metabolism. Direct or indirect activation of platelet phospholipase A(2) appears to be implicated. This finding contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombotic complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  12. Activation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release via protein kinase C-alpha in HEC-1B human endometrial epithelial cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Dearn, S.; Rahman, M.; Lewis, A.; Ahmed, Z.; Eggo, M. C.; Ahmed, A.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impairment of the fertility in the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor transgenic female mice suggests changes in PAF functions can influence uterine receptivity. We hypothesized that vasodilatory actions of PAF in the uterus was exerted by PAF-mediated nitric oxide (NO) release via activation of isoenzyme-specific protein kinase C (PKC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Inducible and endothelial NOS was shown by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction RT-PCR in cDNA synthesized from RNA extract of proliferative and secretory endometrium as well endometrial epithelial cell lines HEC-1B. The effect of WEB2170, N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) and Ro31-8220 on PAF mediated NO release by HEC-1B cell was determined. PAF induced translocation of PKCalpha in HEC-1B cell and its antagonist effect by Ro 31-8220 was studied by Western immunoblot analysis. PKC isoenzyme regulated by PAF was determined in HEC-1B cell lysate by immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: PAF-evoked a rapid and concentration-dependent biphasic increase in total NO in human HEC-1B endometrial epithelial cell line [as measured by a Sievers NOA 280A NO Chemiluminescent Analyser.] This increase in NO release was attenuated by the PAF receptor antagonist, WEB2170. Inhibition of NO synthesis by N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine produced marked dose-dependent attenuation of PAF-mediated NO release, indicating nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation. PAF-mediated NO release was also inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 and by the removal of extracellular calcium, suggesting a dependency on PKC and calcium, respectively. RT-PCR analysis showed expression of inducible NOS and endothelial NOS in human endometrium, myometrium and HEC-1B cells. Western immunoblot analysis showed PKCalpha, betaII and iota were the principal isozymes present in the HEC-1B cell line and normal endometrium, suggesting that both HEC-1B cells and normal endometrium have similar PKC isozymes. PAF induced the translocation of

  13. Release of platelet activating factor in rabbits with antibody-mediated injury of the lung: the role of leukocytes and of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Camussi, G; Pawlowski, I; Bussolino, F; Caldwell, P R; Brentjens, J; Andres, G

    1983-10-01

    This paper describes the release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) into the circulation of rabbits with acute pulmonary injury induced by antibody reacting with pulmonary endothelium. Eight rabbits were injected i.v. with 2 mg/kg of body weight of goat anti-rabbit lung angiotensin-converting enzyme gamma-globulin (GtARbACE). All animals developed acute pneumonitis, characterized by severe endothelial damage, accumulation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and platelets (Plt) in the lumina of alveolar capillaries, and deposits of goat IgG and rabbit C3 along alveolar capillary walls. Six of the rabbits died from acute pulmonary edema. PAF was detected in the plasma of all animals within 5 min after injection of GtARbACE. Five other rabbits were depleted of leukocytes by nitrogen mustard and then injected with 2 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE. In three of these rabbits release of PAF was demonstrated, though in amounts smaller than in non-leukocyte-depleted rabbits; all three animals died from pulmonary edema. After injection of 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of GtARbACE in six additional rabbits, three of them leukocyte-depleted, small amounts of PAF were detected in the circulation. None of these six rabbits died of pulmonary edema. PAF release was not observed in ten rabbits injected i.v. with 2 or 0.03 mg/kg of body weight of normal goat gamma-globulin. In separate experiments in vitro, incubation of isolated lung or thoracic aorta with GtARbACE resulted in deposits of goat IgG along endothelia and significant release of PAF. PAF was also released from endothelial cells removed from thoracic aorta by cellulose acetate paper and then incubated with GtARbACE. When segments of thoracic aorta were stripped of endothelium and then incubated with GtARbACE, PAF release could not be shown. The data obtained are consistent with the interpretation that PAF released into the circulation after binding of GtARbACE to the endothelia of lung and aorta originates from

  14. Prolonged activation of phospholipase D in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing platelet-activating-factor receptor lacking cytoplasmic C-terminal tail.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, B; Nakashima, S; Adachi, T; Ito, Y; Takano, T; Shimizu, T; Nozawa, Y

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism and role of phospholipase D (PLD) activation by platelet-activating factor (PAF) were examined with Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing wild-type PAF receptor (WT-H cells) and truncated PAF receptor lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail (D-H cells). Treatment of D-H cells with PAF resulted in the rapid formation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, which was followed by a sustained phase for more than 10 min. In these cells, PAF-induced PLD activation lasted for more than 20 min. In contrast, PLD activation in WT-H cells was transient. PAF stimulation caused the biphasic formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) in both types of cell. The first phase was rapid and transient, coinciding with the Ins(1,4,5)P3 peak. The second sustained phase of DG formation was attenuated by butanol, which produces phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA) by transphosphatidylation activity of PLD, and by propranolol, a selective inhibitor for PA phosphohydrolase catalysing the conversion of PA into DG. The DG level returned nearly to basal at 20 min after PAF stimulation in WT-H cells, whereas in D-H cells the elevated DG level was sustained for more than 20 min. The profile of translocation of protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) to membrane was similar to that of DG formation. In WT-H cells, PKCalpha was transiently associated with membranes and then returned to the cytosol. However, in D-H cells PKCalpha was rapidly translocated to and remained in membranes for more than 20 min. Butanol suppressed this sustained translocation of PKCalpha. Furthermore the mRNA levels of c-fos and c-jun by PAF in WT-H cells were much lower than those in D-H cells. Propranolol and butanol at concentrations that inhibited the formation of DG suppressed the PAF-induced mRNA expression of c-fos and c-jun. Taken together, the prolonged PLD activation in D-H cells confirmed a primary role for phospholipase C/PKC in PLD activation by PAF. Furthermore the results obtained here suggest that

  15. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) activity, platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) in leukocytes and body composition in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Detopoulou, Paraskevi; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Panagiotakos, Demosthenis B; Pitsavos, Christos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2009-01-01

    Background Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) also known as serum platelet activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) activity constitutes a novel risk marker for cardiovascular disease. Leukocytes constitute one main cellular source of circulating Lp-PLA2. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association of both serum and leukocyte PAF-AH activities with fat distribution and lean tissue. One hundred healthy volunteers without cardiovascular disease history participated in this study (n = 52 men, 44 ± 13 years and n = 48 women, 43 ± 13 years). Body composition was assessed with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, while anthropometrical indices were also measured. The activity of Lp-PLA2 and levels of lipid and glycemic parameters were determined in fasting samples. Results Mean Lp-PLA2 activity was 24.8 ± 4.5 and 19.6 ± 5.0 nmol/min/mL in men and women, respectively (P < 0.001). Mean activity of PAF-AH in leukocyte homogenates was 386 ± 127 pmol/min/mg and 292 ± 92 pmol/min/mg in men and women, correspondingly (P < 0.001). In multiple regression models upper and total adiposity measures were positively associated with Lp-PLA2 activity in men after adjusting for LDL-cholesterol, age, smoking, hs-CRP and physical activity, whereas no associations were found with PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity. Hierarchical analysis revealed that the variables with the highest explanatory ability of Lp-PLA2 activity in men, were DXA deriving L1–L4 region of interest and arms fat (increase in R2 = 0.136, P = 0.005 and increase in R2 = 0.118, P = 0.009, respectively), followed by trunk fat and total fat. In women, no association of body composition variables with Lp-PLA2 nor PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity was found. Conclusion Lp-PLA2 activity is differentiated across levels of adiposity and topology of adipose tissue, whereas no association was found regarding PAF-AH leukocyte homogenates activity. Our findings suggest that Lp-PLA2 may

  16. Role of multiligand/RAGE axis in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-03-01

    In the context of plaque progression, platelet hyperactivity associated with hyperlipidemia contributes to the development of a pro-thrombotic state. In this context, it has been demonstrated that advanced glycation end products (AGEs) significantly increases platelet activation and receptor for AGEs (RAGE) expression at the platelet surface membrane. In addition to AGEs, other ligands (S100, HMGB1 and amyloid β, among others) of RAGE have raised particular attention in platelet activation. Therefore, in this article we describe platelet hyperactivity by AGEs via RAGE-independent and RAGE-dependent pathways.

  17. Platelet Activation: The Mechanisms and Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seong-Hoon; Sim, Eun-Hye; Goh, Ri-Young; Park, Joo-In

    2016-01-01

    Beyond hemostasis and thrombosis, an increasing number of studies indicate that platelets play an integral role in intercellular communication, mediating inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Our knowledge about how platelets modulate inflammatory and immunity has greatly improved in recent years. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the pathways of platelet activation and potential application of platelet activation biomarkers to diagnosis and prediction of disease states. PMID:27403440

  18. Platelet activation, adhesion, inflammation, and aggregation potential are altered in the presence of electronic cigarette extracts of variable nicotine concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hom, Sarah; Chen, Li; Wang, Tony; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane; Yin, Wei; Rubenstein, David A

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoke extracts prepared from both mainstream and sidestream smoking have been associated with heightened platelet activation, aggregation, adhesion, and inflammation. Conversely, it has been shown that pure nicotine inhibits similar platelet functions. In this work, we 1) evaluated the effects of e-cigarette extracts on platelet activities and 2) elucidated the differences between the nicotine-dependent and non-nicotine dependent (e.g. fine particulate matter or toxic compounds) effects of tobacco and e-cigarette products on platelet activities. To accomplish these goals, platelets from healthy volunteers (n = 50) were exposed to tobacco smoke extracts, e-cigarette vapor extracts, and pure nicotine and changes in platelet activation, adhesion, aggregation, and inflammation were evaluated, using optical aggregation, flow cytometry, and ELISA methods. Interestingly, the exposure of platelets to e-vapor extracts induced a significant up-regulation in the expression of the pro-inflammatory gC1qR and cC1qR and induced a marked increase in the deposition of C3b as compared with traditional tobacco smoke extracts. Similarly, platelet activation, as measured by a prothrombinase based assay, and platelet aggregation were also significantly enhanced after exposure to e-vapor extracts. Finally, platelet adhesion potential toward fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, and other platelets was also enhanced after exposure to e-cigarette vapor extracts. In the presence of pure nicotine, platelet functions were observed to be inhibited, which further suggests that other constituents of tobacco smoke and electronic vapor can antagonize platelet functions, however, the presence of nicotine in extracts somewhat perpetuated the platelet functional changes in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Relationship between potential platelet activation and LCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadden, Shawn

    2010-11-01

    In the study of blood flow, emphasis is often directed at understanding shear stress at the vessel wall due to its potentially disruptive influence on the endothelium. However, it is also known that shear stress has a potent effect on platelet activation. Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which in turn is the cause of most forms of death. Since most platelets are contained in the flow domain, it is important to consider stresses acting on the platelet as they are convected. Locations of high stress can correspond to boundaries between different dynamic regions and locations of hyperbolic points in the Eulerian sense. In the computation of LCS, strain in typically considered in the Lagrangian sense. In this talk we discuss the relationship between locations of potential platelet activation due to increased stress and locations of LCS marking increase Lagrangian deformation.

  20. Regulation of platelet activating factor synthesis: modulation of 1-alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in rat spleen microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lenihan, D.J.; Lee, T.C.

    1984-05-16

    1-Alkyl-2-lyso-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine:acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase plays an important regulatory role in the biosynthesis of platelet activating factor, a potent bioactive mediator. The authors tested the hypothesis that the activity of acetyltransferase may be modulated by enzymatic phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The results showed that acetyltransferase activity in rat spleens was 2- to 3-fold higher in microsomes isolated in the presence of F/sup -/ than in those isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/. The microsomal acetyltransferase could be activated by preincubation of microsomes, isolated in the presence of Cl/sup -/, with ATP, Mg/sup 2 +/, and the soluble fraction from rat spleen. Addition of phosphatidylserine, diacylglycerols, plus Ca/sup 2 +/ further enhanced the activity. The increase in the activity of acetyltranferase was abolished by treatment of the activated microsomes with alkaline phosphatase. Conversely, the activity of acetyltransferase can be reactivated in the alkaline phosphatase-treated microsomes with incubation conditions that favor phosphorylation. Therefore, the findings suggest that acetyltransferase activity is regulated by reversible activation/inactivation through phosphorylation/dephosphorylation.

  1. Evidence of platelet activation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheremata, William A; Jy, Wenche; Horstman, Lawrence L; Ahn, Yeon S; Alexander, J Steven; Minagar, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    Objective A fatality in one multiple sclerosis (MS) patient due to acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and a near fatality in another stimulated our interest in platelet function abnormalities in MS. Previously, we presented evidence of platelet activation in a small cohort of treatment-naive MS patients. Methods In this report, 92 normal controls and 33 stable, untreated MS patients were studied. Platelet counts, measures of platelet activation [plasma platelet microparticles (PMP), P-selectin expression (CD62p), circulating platelet microaggragtes (PAg)], as well as platelet-associated IgG/IgM, were carried out. In addition, plasma protein S activity was measured. Results Compared to controls, PMP were significantly elevated in MS (p < 0.001) and CD62p expression was also markedly elevated (p < 0.001). Both are markers of platelet activation. Platelet-associated IgM, but not IgG, was marginally elevated in MS (p = 0.01). Protein S in MS patients did not differ significantly from normal values. Conclusion Platelets are significantly activated in MS patients. The mechanisms underlying this activation and its significance to MS are unknown. Additional study of platelet activation and function in MS patients is warranted. PMID:18588683

  2. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (CD147) is a novel receptor on platelets, activates platelets, and augments nuclear factor kappaB-dependent inflammation in monocytes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Roland; Bültmann, Andreas; Fischel, Sina; Gillitzer, Angelika; Cullen, Paul; Walch, Axel; Jost, Philipp; Ungerer, Martin; Tolley, Neal D; Lindemann, Stephan; Gawaz, Meinrad; Schömig, Albert; May, Andreas E

    2008-02-15

    In atherosclerosis, circulating platelets interact with endothelial cells and monocytes, leading to cell activation and enhanced recruitment of leukocytes into the vascular wall. The invasion of monocytes is accompanied by overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which are thought to promote atherosclerosis and trigger plaque rupture. Following interaction with itself, the extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) induces MMP synthesis via a little-known intracellular pathway. Recently, we showed upregulation of EMMPRIN on monocytes during acute myocardial infarction. EMMPRIN also stimulates secretion of MMP-9 by monocytes and of MMP-2 by smooth muscle cells, indicating that it may be an important regulator of MMP activity. Expression of EMMPRIN on platelets has not been described until now. Here, we demonstrate that resting platelets show low surface expression of EMMPRIN, which is upregulated by various platelet stimulators (flow cytometry). EMMPRIN is located in the open canalicular system and in alpha granules of platelets (according to electron microscopy and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation). Platelet stimulation with recombinant EMMPRIN-Fc induced surface expression of CD40L and P-selectin (according to flow cytometry), suggesting that EMMPRIN-EMMPRIN interaction activates platelets. Coincubation of platelets with monocytes induced EMMPRIN-mediated nuclear factor kappaB activation (according to Western blot) in monocytes with increased MMP-9 (zymography), interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha secretion (according to ELISA) by monocytes. In conclusion, EMMPRIN displays a new platelet receptor that is upregulated on activated platelets. Binding of EMMPRIN to platelets fosters platelet degranulation. Platelet-monocyte interactions via EMMPRIN stimulate nuclear factor kappaB-driven inflammatory pathways in monocytes, such as MMP and cytokine induction. Thus, EMMPRIN may represent a novel target to diminish the burden of

  3. Platelet-Activating Factor Blockade Inhibits the T-Helper Type 17 Cell Pathway and Suppresses Psoriasis-Like Skin Disease in K5.hTGF-β1 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tej Pratap; Huettner, Barbara; Koefeler, Harald; Mayer, Gerlinde; Bambach, Isabella; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Michael P.; Wolf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent biolipid mediator, is involved in a variety of cellular transduction pathways and plays a prominent role in inducing inflammation in different organs. We used K5.hTGF-β1 transgenic mice, which exhibit an inflammatory skin disorder and molecular and cytokine abnormalities with strong similarities to human psoriasis, to study the pathogenic role of PAF. We found that injecting PAF into the skin of transgenic mice led to inflammation and accelerated manifestation of the psoriatic phenotype by a local effect. In contrast, injecting mice with PAF receptor antagonist PCA-4248 lowered the PAF level (most likely by depressing an autocrine loop) and neutrophil, CD68+ cell (monocyte/macrophage), and CD3+ T-cell accumulation in the skin and blocked progression of the psoriasis-like phenotype. This effect of PAF blockade was specific and similar to that of psoralen–UV-A and was paralleled by a decrease in abnormally elevated mRNA and/or protein levels of T-helper type 17 cell–related cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-23, IL-12A, and IL-6 and its transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. In contrast, PCA-4248 treatment up-regulated mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-10 in dorsal skin and release of IL-10 in serum and skin. Interfering with PAF may offer the opportunity to develop novel therapeutic strategies for inflammatory psoriasis and associated comorbidities, including metabolic syndrome and atherosclerosis, in which the IL-17 axis may be involved. PMID:21281802

  4. An antagonist of the platelet-activating factor receptor inhibits adherence of both nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae to cultured human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shakti D; Fairbairn, Rory L; Gell, David A; Latham, Roger D; Sohal, Sukhwinder S; Walters, Eugene H; O’Toole, Ronan F

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD is emerging as the third largest cause of human mortality worldwide after heart disease and stroke. Tobacco smoking, the primary risk factor for the development of COPD, induces increased expression of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr) in the lung epithelium. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae adhere to PAFr on the luminal surface of human respiratory tract epithelial cells. Objective To investigate PAFr as a potential drug target for the prevention of infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of acute exacerbations in COPD patients, NTHi and S. pneumoniae. Methods Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells were exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PAFr expression levels were determined using immunocytochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The epithelial cells were challenged with either NTHi or S. pneumoniae labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, and bacterial adhesion was measured using immunofluorescence. The effect of a well-evaluated antagonist of PAFr, WEB-2086, on binding of the bacterial pathogens to BEAS-2B cells was then assessed. In silico studies of the tertiary structure of PAFr and the binding pocket for PAF and its antagonist WEB-2086 were undertaken. Results PAFr expression by bronchial epithelial cells was upregulated by CSE, and significantly associated with increased bacterial adhesion. WEB-2086 reduced the epithelial adhesion by both NTHi and S. pneumoniae to levels observed for non-CSE-exposed cells. Furthermore, it was nontoxic toward the bronchial epithelial cells. In silico analyses identified a binding pocket for PAF/WEB-2086 in the predicted PAFr structure. Conclusion WEB-2086 represents an innovative class of candidate drugs for inhibiting PAFr-dependent lung infections caused by the main bacterial drivers of smoking-related COPD. PMID:27524890

  5. Potential fluid mechanic pathways of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Shadden, Shawn C; Hendabadi, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    Platelet activation is a precursor for blood clotting, which plays leading roles in many vascular complications and causes of death. Platelets can be activated by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Mechanically, platelet activation has been shown to be a function of elevated shear stress and exposure time. These contributions can be combined by considering the cumulative stress or strain on a platelet as it is transported. Here, we develop a framework for computing a hemodynamic-based activation potential that is derived from a Lagrangian integral of strain rate magnitude. We demonstrate that such a measure is generally maximized along, and near to, distinguished material surfaces in the flow. The connections between activation potential and these structures are illustrated through stenotic flow computations. We uncover two distinct structures that may explain observed thrombus formation at the apex and downstream of stenoses. More broadly, these findings suggest fundamental relationships may exist between potential fluid mechanic pathways for mechanical platelet activation and the mechanisms governing their transport.

  6. Rapid intracellular calcium changes in U937 monocyte cell line: transient increases in response to platelet-activating factor and chemotactic peptide but not interferon-gamma or lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Maudsley, D J; Morris, A G

    1987-01-01

    The dye fura-2, a potentially more sensitive successor to quin2 for measuring intracellular free calcium ion concentrations [(Ca2+]i), has been applied here to investigate the possible involvement of early changes in [Ca2+]i in the stimulation of the human monocyte-macrophage-like cell line U937. The calcium ionophores A23187 and ionomycin, known pharmacological stimuli for macrophages, were found to cause sharp rises in [Ca2+]i as expected. Responses analogous to those reported for a murine macrophage cell (J774) were obtained on stimulation of U937 cells with ATP which caused rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 200 mM). In addition to ATP, several agents known to activate macrophages were used as stimuli. In particular, platelet-activating factor (PAF; 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) was found to cause rapid, but transient, increases in [Ca2+]i (from resting levels of about 70 nM to peaks of about 400 nM) even at concentrations as low as 10(-10) M. This contrasts with responses to ATP that were markedly reduced at 10(-6) M compared with 10(-5) M or above, suggesting that PAF is a highly potent stimulus for intracellular calcium mobilization in macrophages. Similar responses were obtained with chemotactic peptide (N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine). On the other hand, two agents known to be potent activators of macrophages, interferon gamma and lipopolysaccharide, had no rapid effect on [Ca2+]i. This may reflect differences in the kinetics of signal-response coupling or alternatively a different mechanism of action by-passing the need for rapid elevation of [Ca2+]i. PMID:3110054

  7. Platelet activation during exercise induced asthma: effect of prophylaxis with cromoglycate and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C E; Belfield, P W; Davis, S; Cooke, N J; Spencer, A; Davies, J A

    1986-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin were measured before and after exercise in nine asthmatic patients and 12 non-asthmatic volunteers. Exercise was preceded by administration in random order of either placebo, salbutamol 200 micrograms, or sodium cromoglycate 2 mg from a pressurised inhaler. In control subjects there were minimal changes in PEF and plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin. In the asthmatic patients the typical changes in PEF were seen on exercise; plasma concentrations of platelet factor 4 and beta thromboglobulin rose significantly in parallel, the rise preceding the fall in PEF. The changes in peak flow and platelet activation induced by exercise were attenuated by prior administration of salbutamol or cromoglycate. These results indicate that exercise induced asthma is associated with a rise in platelet release products similar to that observed in antigen induced asthma. PMID:2943049

  8. Echicetin coated polystyrene beads: a novel tool to investigate GPIb-specific platelet activation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Navdaev, Alexey; Subramanian, Hariharan; Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways.

  9. Decreased organ failure in patients with severe SIRS and septic shock treated with the platelet-activating factor antagonist TCV-309: a prospective, multicenter, double-blind, randomized phase II trial. TCV-309 Septic Shock Study Group.

    PubMed

    Poeze, M; Froon, A H; Ramsay, G; Buurman, W A; Greve, J W

    2000-10-01

    Sepsis and organ failure remain the main cause of death on the ICU. Sepsis is characterized by a severe inflammatory response, in which platelet-activating factor (PAF) is considered to play an important role. This study investigated whether treatment with the PAF-antagonist TCV-309 reduces morbidity and mortality in patients with septic shock. The study was conducted as a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled multicenter study. The included patients had to fulfill the SIRS criteria with a clinical suspicion of infection, an admission APACHE II score greater than 15, and shock, defined as a mean arterial pressure <70 mmHg and/or a decrease > or =40 mmHg despite adequate fluid resuscitation. Patients received 1.0 mg/kg TCV-309 or placebo, twice daily, intravenously during 14 days. The prospectively set goals were MOF score, recovery from shock, mortality, and assessment of the safety of the medication. A total of 98 patients were included of which 97 were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The overall survival at day 56 of TCV-309 treated patients was similar compared to placebo treated patients (51.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.47). In contrast, the mean percentage of failed organs per patient present after 14 days in the TCV-309 treated patients was significantly lower compared to the placebo treated patients (11.9% vs. 25.1%, P = 0.04), leading to a reduced need for vasopressors, dialysis, and ventilatory support. Furthermore, the mean APACHE-II score during treatment with TCV-309 was significantly lower and the number of patients recovered from shock after day 14 was significantly higher in the TCV-309 treated patient group (2/32 vs. 9/29, P = 0.01). The number of adverse events was not significantly different between the TCV-309 and placebo treated patients. TCV-309 did not change overall mortality of septic shock, however a substantial reduction in organ dysfunction and morbidity, frequently associated with septic shock was achieved, without significant

  10. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge.

  11. Platelet activation as a marker of heart attack.

    PubMed

    Blann, Andrew D; Draper, Zoe

    2011-05-12

    A key component of the pathology of myocardial infarction (i.e. heart attack) is platelet-rich thrombosis within the coronary arteries. In many cases this occurs despite the use of anti-platelet drugs such as aspirin, and this, alongside other evidence, prompts the search for novel markers of platelet activity, such as levels of platelet product soluble P selectin in the plasma. However, by themselves, high levels of soluble P-selectin are of insufficient sensitivity and specificity to contribute to the management of the chest pain that may be a heart attack. Conversely, the current report shows that low levels of soluble P selectin contribute to the diagnosis of myocardial infarction because, as low levels are so rarely found in this condition, heart attack can be ruled out. If confirmed, this will be a major step forward in the management of acute chest pain.

  12. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  13. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  14. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  15. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5ppm for 6h) or sub-chronic (1ppm, 6h/day for 4days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  16. Platelet activation of mechanical versus bioprosthetic heart valves during systole.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2017-03-11

    Thrombus formation is a major concern for recipients of mechanical heart valves (MHVs), which requires them to take anticoagulant drugs for the rest of their lives. Bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs) do not require life-long anticoagulant therapy but deteriorate after 10-15years. The thrombus formation is initiated by the platelet activation which is thought to be mainly generated in MHVs by the flow through the hinge and the leakage flow during the diastole. However, our results show that the activation in the bulk flow during the systole phase might play an essential role as well. This is based on our results obtained by comparing the thrombogenic performance of a MHV and a BHV (as control) in terms of shear induced platelet activation under exactly the same conditions. Three different mathematical activation models including linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model are tested to quantify the platelet activation during systole using the previous simulations of the flow through MHV and BHV in a straight aorta under the same physiologic flow conditions. Results indicate that the platelet activation in the MHV at the beginning of the systole phase is slightly less than the BHV. However, at the end of the systole phase the platelet activation by the bulk flow for the MHV is several folds (1.41, 5.12, and 2.81 for linear level of activation, damage accumulation, and Soares model, respectively) higher than the BHV for all tested platelet activation models.

  17. Formation of a highly stable complex between BN 50730 [tetrahydro-4,7,8,10 methyl-1(chloro-2 phenyl)-6 (methoxy-4 phenyl-carbamoyl)-9 pyrido [4',3'-4,5] thieno [3,2-f] triazolo-1,2,4 [4,3-a] diazepine-1,4] and the platelet-activating factor receptor in rabbit platelet membranes.

    PubMed

    Silva, C L; Cruz, H N; Violante, F A; Cordeiro, R S; Martins, M A; Noël, F

    1996-01-26

    BN 50730 [tetrahydro-4,7,8,10 methyl-1(chloro-2 phenyl)-6 (methoxy-4 phenyl-carbamoyl)-9 pyrido [4',3'-4,5] thieno [3,2-f] triazolo-1,2,4 [4,3-alpha] diazepine-1,4], a novel platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist with a hetrazepine structure, decreased the maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of [3H]PAF in rabbit platelet membranes without altering its dissociation constant. Platelet aggregation induced by 1 microM PAF was prevented by preincubation with 1 microM BN 50730. The washing of the platelets preincubated with BN 50730 failed to revert its inhibitory effects. We conclude that BN 50730 acts as a non-competitive antagonist of the PAF receptor, due to the formation of a highly stable drug-receptor complex.

  18. Platelet activation through a Bi-leaflet mechanical heart valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Borazjani, Iman

    2016-11-01

    Platelet activation is one of the major drawbacks of the Mechanical Heart Valves (MHVs) which can increase the risk of thrombus formation in patients. The platelet activation in MHVs can be due to the abnormal shear stress during the systole, the backward leakage flow during the diastole, and the flow through the hinge region. We investigate the contribution of each of the above mechanism to the activation of platelets in MHVs by performing simulations of the flow through the MHV and in the hinge region. The large scale heart valve simulations are performed in a straight aorta using a sharp interface curvilinear immersed boundary method along with a strong-coupling algorithm under physiological flow conditions. In addition, in order to perform the simulation of hinge region the flow field boundary conditions are obtained from the largescale simulations during a whole cardiac cycle. In order to investigate the role of hinge flow on platelet activation in MHVs, a 23mm St. Jude Medical Regent valve hinge with three different gap sizes is tested along with different platelet activation models to ensure the consistency of our results with different activation models. We compare the platelet activation of the hinge region against the bulk of the flow during one cardiac cycle. This work is supported by the American Heart Association Grant 13SDG17220022, and the computational resources were partly provided by Center for Computational Research (CCR) at University at Buffalo.

  19. Platelets: active players in the pathogenesis of arthritis and SLE.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Blanco, Patrick; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2012-09-01

    Nearly one trillion platelets circulate in the blood to monitor and preserve the integrity of the vasculature. However, haemostasis is not their only function. Platelets are also potent immune cells capable of a range of effector responses. Studies have shown that platelets can have unexpected roles in rheumatic diseases. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), IL-1-containing platelet-derived vesicles called microparticles are abundant in arthritic joint fluid. These microparticles can elicit production of inflammatory mediators from resident synovial fibroblasts, which have an integral role in the development of arthritis. Platelets also serve as a source of prostaglandins that contribute to synovial inflammation. Furthermore, serotonin released by platelets helps drive the persistent vascular permeability that characterizes the microvasculature of the inflamed synovium, an unexpected function for a cell that more typically serves as a guardian of vascular integrity. Beyond RA, platelet activation has been observed in systemic lupus erythematosus, mediated at least in part through the interaction of circulating immune complexes with platelet Fc receptors and by promotion of interferon release from plasmacytoid dendritic cells. These findings point to a distinct role for platelets in autoimmunity and support the possibility that platelets are an attractive target in rheumatic disease.

  20. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  1. Effects of Outdoor Air Pollutants on Platelet Activation in People with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, Mark W.; Bausch, Jan; Chalupa, David; Hopke, Philip K.; Little, Erika L.; Oakes, David; Stewart, Judith C.; Utell, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that increases in exposure to ambient air pollution are associated with platelet activation and formation of circulating tissue-factor-expressing microparticles. We studied 19 subjects with type 2 diabetes, without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease, who had previously participated in a human clinical study of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Blood was obtained for measurements of platelet activation following an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Center, prior to each of their two pre-exposure visits. Air pollution and meteorological data, including UFP counts, were analyzed for the 5 days prior to the subjects’ arrival at the Clinical Research Center. Contrary to expectations, increases in UFP were associated with decreases in surface expression of platelet activation markers. The number of platelet-leukocyte conjugates decreased by −80 (95% confidence interval (CI) −123 to −37, p=0.001) on the first lag day (20–44 hours prior to the blood draw) and by −85 (CI −139 to −31, p=0.005) on combined lag days 1 to 5, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in UFP particle number (2482). However, levels of soluble CD40L increased 104 (CI 3 to 205, p=0.04) pg/ml per IQR increase in UFP on lag day 1, a finding consistent with prior platelet activation. We speculate that, in people with diabetes, exposure to UFP activates circulating platelets within hours of exposure, followed by an increase in soluble CD40L and a rebound reduction in circulating platelet surface markers. PMID:23033996

  2. Effects of outdoor air pollutants on platelet activation in people with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frampton, Mark W; Bausch, Jan; Chalupa, David; Hopke, Philip K; Little, Erika L; Oakes, David; Stewart, Judith C; Utell, Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Exposure to air pollution is associated with increased morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that increases in exposure to ambient air pollution are associated with platelet activation and formation of circulating tissue factor-expressing microparticles. We studied 19 subjects with type 2 diabetes, without clinical evidence of cardiovascular disease, who had previously participated in a human clinical study of exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP). Blood was obtained for measurements of platelet activation following an overnight stay in the Clinical Research Center, prior to each of their two pre-exposure visits. Air pollution and meteorological data, including UFP counts, were analyzed for the 5 days prior to the subjects' arrival at the Clinical Research Center. Contrary to expectations, increases in UFP were associated with decreases in surface expression of platelet activation markers. The number of platelet-leukocyte conjugates decreased by -80 (95% confidence interval (CI) -123 to -37, p = 0.001) on the first lag day (20-44 h prior to the blood draw) and by -85 (CI -139 to -31, p = 0.005) on combined lag days 1 to 5, per interquartile range (IQR) increase in UFP particle number (2482). However, levels of soluble CD40L increased 104 (CI 3 to 205, p = 0.04) pg/ml per IQR increase in UFP on lag day 1, a finding consistent with prior platelet activation. We speculate that, in people with diabetes, exposure to UFP activates circulating platelets within hours of exposure, followed by an increase in soluble CD40L and a rebound reduction in circulating platelet surface markers.

  3. Streamlining the design of promising clinical trials: in-vitro testing of antithrombotic regimens and multiple agonists of platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David J; Sobel, Burton E

    2009-03-01

    Platelets are activated in vivo by multiple agonists; however, platelet function testing in vitro has been performed predominantly with only one or two agonists of platelet activation. Greater insight into anticipated effects of antithrombotic regimens should enhance the design of successful clinical trials. To test this concept, we assessed platelet activation induced by multiple agonists and two antithrombotic regimens, unfractionated heparin (UFH) and eptifibatide compared with bivalirudin and cangrelor. Blood samples from 10 patients with coronary artery disease were spiked with pharmacologic concentrations achieved in vivo of either UFH (1.2 U/ml) and eptifibatide (1.7 microg/ml), or with bivalirudin (8 microg/ml) and cangrelor (500 nmol/l). Platelet function was assessed with the use of flow cytometry. Agonists included thrombin (50 nmol/l), adenosine diphosphate (1 micromol/l), the collagen-mimetic convulxin (5 ng/ml), and platelet-activating factor (10 nmol/l). When platelet activation was identified by the surface expression of P-selectin in response to multiple agonists, the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed activation more than UFH and eptifibatide. When platelet activation was identified by the activation of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (PAC-1 binding), the combination of bivalirudin and cangrelor was more effective in suppressing activation in response to thrombin and adenosine diphosphate, whereas UFH and eptifibatide more effectively prevented binding of PAC-1 when platelets were activated with the collagen-mimetic convulxin. In conclusion, bivalirudin and cangrelor suppressed platelet activation in response to diverse agonists in vitro more than UFH and eptifibatide. These results and this approach to selection of promising interventions should be helpful in streamlining the design of clinical trials.

  4. Phage-Derived Protein Induces Increased Platelet Activation and Is Associated with Mortality in Patients with Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Amelieke J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Meis, Jacques F.; Roeleveld, Nel; Bentley, Stephen D.; Pastura, Alexander S.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; van der Ven, Andre J.; de Mast, Quirijn; Zomer, Aldert

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding about the severity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), we investigated the association between the genotype of Streptococcus pneumoniae and disease outcomes for 349 bacteremic patients. A pneumococcal genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated a strong correlation between 30-day mortality and the presence of the phage-derived gene pblB, encoding a platelet-binding protein whose effects on platelet activation were previously unknown. Platelets are increasingly recognized as key players of the innate immune system, and in sepsis, excessive platelet activation contributes to microvascular obstruction, tissue hypoperfusion, and finally multiorgan failure, leading to mortality. Our in vitro studies revealed that pblB expression was induced by fluoroquinolones but not by the beta-lactam antibiotic penicillin G. Subsequently, we determined pblB induction and platelet activation by incubating whole blood with the wild type or a pblB knockout mutant in the presence or absence of antibiotics commonly administered to our patient cohort. pblB-dependent enhancement of platelet activation, as measured by increased expression of the α-granule protein P-selectin, the binding of fibrinogen to the activated αIIbβ3 receptor, and the formation of platelet-monocyte complex occurred irrespective of antibiotic exposure. In conclusion, the presence of pblB on the pneumococcal chromosome potentially leads to increased mortality in patients with an invasive S. pneumoniae infection, which may be explained by enhanced platelet activation. This study highlights the clinical utility of a bacterial GWAS, followed by functional characterization, to identify bacterial factors involved in disease severity. PMID:28096486

  5. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  6. Comparison of diverse platelet activation markers as indicators for left atrial thrombus in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Tarnowski, Daniel; Poitz, David M; Plichta, Lina; Heidrich, Felix M; Wiedemann, Stephan; Ruf, Tobias; Mierke, Johannes; Löhn, Tobias; Jellinghaus, Stefanie; Strasser, Ruth H; Ibrahim, Karim; Pfluecke, Christian

    2017-03-13

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is well known for being a major risk factor of thromboembolic stroke. We could recently demonstrate an association of monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs) with the degree of thrombogenicity in patients with AF. This study investigated platelet activation markers, as potential biomarkers for the presence of left atrial (LA) thrombus in patients with AF. One hundred and eight patients with symptomatic AF underwent transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) before scheduled cardioversion or pulmonary vein isolation. In order to determine the content of MPAs by flow-cytometric quantification analyses, blood was drawn on the day of TEE. The soluble CD40 Ligand (sCD40L) and soluble P-selectin (sP-selectin) were obtained by Cytometric Bead Arrays (CBA). D-dimer levels were detected by quantitative immunological determination of fibrin degradation products. Clinical, laboratory, and echocardiographic standard parameters were obtained from all patients, including the determination of the flow in the left atrial appendage (LAA). Patients with detected LA thrombus (n = 28) compared with patients without thrombus (n = 80) showed an increased number of common risk factors, such as age, diabetes, heart failure, and coronary artery disease (CAD). The presence of LA thrombus was associated with significantly increased levels of MPAs (147 ± 12 vs. 304 ± 29 per µl; p < 0.00), sCD40L (106.3 ± 31.0 vs. 33.5 ± 2.1 pg/ml, p = 0.027), and D-dimer (0.13 ± 0.02 vs. 0.69 ± 0.21 mg FEU/l, p = 0.015). In contrast, sP-selectin showed no association with LA thrombus. A multivariate regression analysis showed that MPAs, sCD40L as well as D-dimers were independent indicators for the existence of LA thrombus. MPAs above 170 cells/µl indicated LA thrombus with a high sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 73% (OR 62, 95% CI. 6.9-557.2, p < 0.001) in patients with AF, whereas the D-dimer lost their quality as independent indicator by using the conventional cut-off of 0

  7. Plasma concentrations of endotoxin and platelet activation in the developmental stage of oligofructose-induced laminitis.

    PubMed

    Bailey, S R; Adair, H S; Reinemeyer, C R; Morgan, S J; Brooks, A C; Longhofer, S L; Elliott, J

    2009-06-15

    The link between the fermentation of carbohydrate in the equine large intestine and the development of acute laminitis is poorly understood. Absorption of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) into the plasma has been observed in one experimental model of laminitis, but does not cause laminitis when administered alone. Thus, the potential role of endotoxin is unclear. Platelet activation has previously been demonstrated in the developmental stage of laminitis. Equine platelets are more sensitive than leukocytes to activation by endotoxin, and can be activated directly by LPS in the low pg/ml range, activating p38 MAP kinase and releasing serotonin (5-HT) and thromboxane. The objectives of this study were firstly to determine whether endotoxin and platelet activation could be measured in the plasma of horses in the developmental phase of laminitis induced with oligofructose. Secondly, the time course of events involving platelet activation and platelet-derived vasoactive mediator production was investigated. Laminitis was induced in six Standardbred horses by the administration of 10 g/kg bwt of oligofructose. Plasma samples were obtained every 4h, and platelet pellets were obtained by centrifugation. LPS was measured using a kinetic limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and platelet activation was assessed by Western blotting for the phosphorylated form of p38 MAP kinase. Plasma 5-HT was assayed by HPLC with electrochemical detection and thromboxane B(2) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Clinical signs of laminitis and histopathologic changes were observed in lamellar sections from five of the six horses. Onset of lameness was between 20 and 30 h after the administration of oligofructose. LPS increased above the limit of detection (0.6 pg/ml) to reach a peak of 2.4+/-1.0 pg/ml at 8 h. TNFalpha was also detectable in the plasma from 12 to 24 h. There was a time-dependent increase in platelet p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which peaked at approximately 12 h (3.8+/-1.3 fold

  8. Effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on coagulation and platelet activity

    SciTech Connect

    Imbriani, M.; Ghittori, S.; Prestinoni, A.; Longoni, P.; Cascone, G.; Gamba, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of dimethylformamide (DMF) on hemostatic functions, especially on platelet activity, were examined both in vitro and in vivo in 15 workers exposed to DMF (27 mg/m3, median value). Twenty-eight control subjects who were not exposed to DMF, but comparable for age, anthropometric data, and smoking habits, were also studied. Workers exposed to DMF showed a decrease in the number of platelets and had longer coagulation times, probably due to a change caused by DMF on the membrane receptor of platelets and on the phospholipid components of the clotting system.

  9. Inositoylated platelet-activating factor (Ino-C2-PAF) modulates dynamic lymphocyte-endothelial cell interactions and alleviates psoriasis-like skin inflammation in two complementary mouse models.

    PubMed

    Forkel, Susann; Schön, Margarete; Hildmann, Annette; Claßen, Anna; John, Swen-Malte; Danker, Kerstin; Schön, Michael P

    2014-10-01

    Psoriasis, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)-governed inflammatory disorder with prominent dysregulation of cutaneous vascular functions, has evolved into a model disorder for studying anti-inflammatory therapies. We present experimental in vitro and in vivo data on 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-(2-(myo-inositolyl)-ethyl)-sn-glycero-3-(R/S)-phosphatidyl-choline (Ino-C2-PAF), the lead compound of a class of synthetic glycosylated phospholipids, in anti-inflammatory therapy. Ino-C2-PAF strongly induced apoptosis only in TNFα-stimulated, but not in untreated human vascular endothelial cells. Moreover, TNFα-induced endothelial adhesion molecules that mediated the rolling and firm adhesion of leukocytes (vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1), E-selectin, and ICAM-1) were selectively downregulated by Ino-C2-PAF. Similarly, expression of L-selectin, VCAM-1 receptor α4β1 integrin , and lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was reduced without induction of apoptosis. Functionally, these changes were accompanied by significant impairment of rolling and adhesion of human peripheral blood lymphocytes on TNFα-activated endothelial cells in a dynamic flow chamber system. When the therapeutic potential of Ino-C2-PAF was assessed in two complementary mouse models of psoriasis, K5.hTGFβ1 transgenic and JunB/c-Jun-deficient mice, Ino-C2-PAF led to significant alleviation of the clinical symptoms and normalized the pathological cutaneous changes including vascularization. There were no overt adverse effects. These findings suggested that Ino-C2-PAF is a potential candidate in the therapy of inflammatory skin diseases that include abnormal vascular functions.

  10. Assessment of platelet activation in myeloproliferative disorders with complementary techniques.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Emilse; Alberto, Maria F; Meschengieser, Susana S; Lazzari, Maria A

    2004-04-01

    Bleeding and thrombosis in myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) are common events, sometimes both are present in the same patient during the course of the disease. Platelet activation in patients with MPD is often suggested. The present study analyses the presence of circulating activated platelets, using simultaneously flow cytometry and aggregometric studies in MPD. We studied 28 patients: 13 with polycythaemia vera, seven with essential thrombocythaemia, and eight chronic myeloid leukaemia. We performed functional tests, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and flow cytometric assays (mepacrine staining and platelet activation markers CD62, CD63 and fibrinogen binding (B-FG)). Twenty-one MPD samples (75%) had reduced aggregation and ATP release. Acquired delta-SPD was detected in 11 of 28 MPD patients (39%), and we found no association between reduced mepacrine labelling and abnormal ATP release. High levels of activation markers were obtained: CD62 in 19 of 28 patients (68%), CD63 in 13 of 28 patients (46%) and B-FG in 19 of 28 patients (68%). The most prevalent abnormality was a reduced aggregation and ATP release. The lack of association between ATP release and mepacrine labelling suggests that other mechanisms, besides the deficit of intraplatelet ATP/adenosine diphosphate, might occur. High levels of activation markers were also observed. We conclude that both tests are complementary and necessary to understand the functional status of platelets in MPD.

  11. RGS10 Negatively Regulates Platelet Activation and Thrombogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Druey, Kirk M.; Tansey, Malú G.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2016-01-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins act as GTPase activating proteins to negatively regulate G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. Although several RGS proteins including RGS2, RGS16, RGS10, and RGS18 are expressed in human and mouse platelets, the respective unique function(s) of each have not been fully delineated. RGS10 is a member of the D/R12 subfamily of RGS proteins and is expressed in microglia, macrophages, megakaryocytes, and platelets. We used a genetic approach to examine the role(s) of RGS10 in platelet activation in vitro and hemostasis and thrombosis in vivo. GPCR-induced aggregation, secretion, and integrin activation was much more pronounced in platelets from Rgs10-/- mice relative to wild type (WT). Accordingly, these mice had markedly reduced bleeding times and were more susceptible to vascular injury-associated thrombus formation than control mice. These findings suggest a unique, non-redundant role of RGS10 in modulating the hemostatic and thrombotic functions of platelets in mice. RGS10 thus represents a potential therapeutic target to control platelet activity and/or hypercoagulable states. PMID:27829061

  12. Shear-mediated platelet activation in patients implanted with continuous flow LVADs: A preliminary study utilizing the platelet activity state (PAS) assay.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Consolo, Filippo; Bluestein, Danny; Tran, Phat; Slepian, Marvin; Redaelli, Alberto; Pappalardo, Federico

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have emerged as vital life-saving therapeutic systems for patients with advanced and end-stage heart failure (HF). Despite their efficacy, VAD systems remain limited by post-implantation thrombotic complications. Shear-mediated platelet activation is the major driver of such complications in these devices. Nowadays few platelet function assays are routinely utilized in assessing the degree of platelet activation in VAD implanted patients. No assays exist that specifically target shear-mediated platelet activation. The platelet activity state (PAS) is a novel assay that has been well validated in vitro, measuring thrombin release as a surrogate for shear-mediated platelet activation. To date limited data exist as to the utility of this assay in the clinical setting. In the present study we evaluated eight LVAD patients' platelet activation level using the PAS assay. Simultaneous measurements of conventional prothrombotic and hemolysis markers, - i.e. fibrinogen and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) - were also performed. Trends as to alteration from baseline were studied. We observed that the PAS assay allowed detection of an abnormal level of platelet activation in one patient in our series who suffered from an overt thrombosis. Interestingly in the same patient no signal of major abnormality in fibrinogen or LDH was detected. Further for 7/8 patients who were free of thrombosis, no significant level of platelet activation was detected via PAS assay, while elevation in fibrinogen and LDH were observed. As such, from our observational series it appears that the PAS assay is a sensitive and specific indicator of shear-mediated platelet activation. Further patients' experience will help elucidate the role of this promising assay in the management of LVAD implanted patients.

  13. Salivary Platelet Activating Factor Levels in Periodontal Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    multifarious and is activated through multiple mediators. The inflammatory process can be subdivided into acute and chronic inflammation. Stedman’s Medical...Just recently, inflammed human gingival tissues were analyzed and found to contain PAF (Noguchi, et al, 1989). Thus, multiple components of the...17.9% release of peroxidase, 20.6% release of P-glucuronidase, 22.4% release of alkaline phosphatase and 28.8% release of aryl sulfatase . At higher

  14. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-01-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s−1, regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates. PMID:28058084

  15. A simple method for activating the platelets used in microfluidic platelet aggregation tests: Stirring-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hoyoon; Kim, Gyehyu; Lim, Chaeseung; Lee, ByoungKwon; Shin, Sehyun

    2016-11-01

    High-shear stimulation is well known as one of the key factors affecting platelet activation and aggregation, which can lead to the formation of a thrombus. In one of our previous studies, we introduced migration distance-based platelet function analysis in a microfluidic system. In this study, we set out to examine the effects of stirring on shear-induced platelet activation and aggregation in a chamber system by using a rotating stirrer. We found that the rotating stirrer caused not only rotational shear flow but also a strong radial secondary flow. The latter flow led to efficient mixing in the chamber. Moreover, the rotational flow led to the generation of shear stress, the magnitude of which can be controlled to activate the platelets. Activated platelets tend to aggregate themselves. The maximum platelet aggregation was observed at a critical shear rate of 3100 s(-1), regardless of the stirrer shape. Furthermore, the time taken to attain maximum aggregation was significantly shortened when using a wide stirrer (30 s) instead of a narrow one (180 s). When using a flat stirrer, the non-uniform shear field in the chamber system was resolved with the radial secondary flow-induced mixing; thus, most of the platelets were homogenously activated. The stirring-induced platelet activation mechanism was experimentally confirmed in a microfluidic system for a platelet aggregation test while monitoring the migration distance until the microfluidic channel is occluded. Our findings indicate that the present system, consisting of a rotating stirrer and a confined chamber, provides effective shear stimulation for activating platelets and inducing platelet aggregates.

  16. Bioassay-guided isolation and identification of anti-platelet-active compounds from the root of Ashitaba (Angelica keiskei Koidz.).

    PubMed

    Son, Dong Ju; Park, Ye Oak; Yu, Chengguang; Lee, Sung Eun; Park, Young Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is fundamental to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes, including the induction of thrombosis and arteriosclerosis. Anti-platelet activity of a crude methanol extract and solvent fractions of Ashitaba roots (Angelica keiskei Koidz.) was evaluated using a turbidimetric method using washed rabbit platelets. We identified the anti-platelet activities of two chalcones, 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol, isolated from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction of Ashitaba roots by using a bioassay-guided isolation method. 4-Hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol effectively inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (IC50 of 41.9 and 35.9 μM, respectively), platelet-activating factor (IC50 of 46.1 and 42.3 μM, respectively) and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (IC50 of 16.5 and 45.9 μM, respectively). These compounds did not inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation (IC50 of>80 μM). The results suggest that the chalcones 4-hydroxyderricin and xanthoangelol may be potent anti-thrombotic components of A. keiskei Koidz.

  17. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  18. Application of an optimized flow cytometry-based quantification of Platelet Activation (PACT): Monitoring platelet activation in platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; Henskens, Yvonne M. C.; de Laat, Bas; Huskens, Dana

    2017-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that flow cytometry is a reliable test to quantify platelet function in stored platelet concentrates (PC). It is thought that flow cytometry is laborious and hence expensive. We have optimized the flow cytometry-based quantification of agonist induced platelet activation (PACT) to a labor, time and more cost-efficient test. Currently the quality of PCs is only monitored by visual inspection, because available assays are unreliable or too laborious for use in a clinical transfusion laboratory. Therefore, the PACT was applied to monitor PC activation during storage. Study design and methods The optimized PACT was used to monitor 5 PCs during 10 days of storage. In brief, optimized PACT uses a ready-to-use reaction mix, which is stable at -20°C. When needed, a test strip is thawed and platelet activation is initiated by mixing PC with PACT. PACT was based on the following agonists: adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen-related peptide (CRP) and thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP-6). Platelet activation was measured as P-selectin expression. Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) was performed as a reference. Results Both PACT and LTA showed platelet function decline during 10-day storage after stimulation with ADP and collagen/CRP; furthermore, PACT showed decreasing TRAP-induced activation. Major differences between the two tests are that PACT is able to measure the status of platelets in the absence of agonists, and it can differentiate between the number of activated platelets and the amount of activation, whereas LTA only measures aggregation in response to an agonist. Also, PACT is more time-efficient compared to LTA and allows high-throughput analysis. Conclusion PACT is an optimized platelet function test that can be used to monitor the activation of PCs. PACT has the same accuracy as LTA with regard to monitoring PCs, but it is superior to both LTA and conventional flow cytometry based tests with regard to labor

  19. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  20. Influence of red algal sulfated polysaccharides on blood coagulation and platelets activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sokolova, Ekaterina V; Byankina, Anna O; Kalitnik, Alexandra A; Kim, Yong H; Bogdanovich, Larisa N; Solov'eva, Tamara F; Yermak, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The influence of sulfated polysaccharides (λ-, κ-, and κ/β-carrageenan and porphyran) - on platelet activation was studied. Carrageenans were much weaker inhibitors of a coagulation process than heparin, while porphyran had not that effect. Results of the aPTT and PT assays suppose that carrageenans affected mostly intrinsic pathway of coagulation, while their effect on the extrinsic pathway is extremely low (λ and κ/β) or absent (κ, LMW derivative of κ-carrageenan). λ-Carrageenan was the most potent anticoagulant agent in TT, aPTT, PT, and anti-factor Xa activity. This sample was also the strongest inhibitor of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in PRP. Generally, the correlation of anticoagulant and antithrombotic action in PRP is preserved for carrageenans but not for heparin. Carrageenans and porphyran affected platelet adhesion to collagen by influencing glycoprotein VI. Low molecular weight κ-carrageenan had a similar effect on platelet adhesion mediated with both major collagen receptors: integrin α2 β1 and glycoprotein VI as native polysaccharide had. Carrageenans resulted in activation of platelets under platelet adhesion mediated by integrin αIIb β3 with less degree than heparin. The least sulfated κ/β-carrageenan that possessed an inhibiting effect on thrombin- and collagen-induced aggregation of washed platelets and on the PT test but it had no significant effect on TT was the weakest promoter of integrin αIIb β3 mediated platelet activation. In summary, our study showed that the polysaccharide action was complex, since it depended on its molecular mass, sulfation degree, and monosaccharide contents (3,6-anhydrogalactose).

  1. Kaempferol suppresses collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting NADPH oxidase and protecting SHP-2 from oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Su Bin; Jang, Ji Yong; Chae, Yun Hee; Min, Ji Hyun; Baek, Jin Young; Kim, Myunghee; Park, Yunjeong; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Ryu, Jae-Sang; Chang, Tong-Shin

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated upon collagen stimulation act as second messengers to propagate various platelet-activating events. Among the ROS-generating enzymes, NADPH oxidase (NOX) plays a prominent role in platelet activation. Thus, NOX has been suggested as a novel target for anti-platelet drug development. Although kaempferol has been identified as a NOX inhibitor, the influence of kaempferol on the activation of platelets and the underlying mechanism have never been investigated. Here, we studied the effects of kaempferol on NOX activation, ROS-dependent signaling pathways, and functional responses in collagen-stimulated platelets. Superoxide anion generation stimulated by collagen was significantly inhibited by kaempferol in a concentration-dependent manner. More importantly, kaempferol directly bound p47(phox), a major regulatory subunit of NOX, and significantly inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of p47(phox) and NOX activation. In accordance with the inhibition of NOX, ROS-dependent inactivation of SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase-2 (SHP-2) was potently protected by kaempferol. Subsequently, the specific tyrosine phosphorylation of key components (Syk, Vav1, Btk, and PLCγ2) of collagen receptor signaling pathways was suppressed by kaempferol. Kaempferol also attenuated downstream responses, including cytosolic calcium elevation, P-selectin surface exposure, and integrin-αIIbβ3 activation. Ultimately, kaempferol inhibited platelet aggregation and adhesion in response to collagen in vitro and prolonged in vivo thrombotic response in carotid arteries of mice. This study shows that kaempferol impairs collagen-induced platelet activation through inhibition of NOX-derived ROS production and subsequent oxidative inactivation of SHP-2. This effect suggests that kaempferol has therapeutic potential for the prevention and treatment of thrombovascular diseases.

  2. Unfractionated and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin and the Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors, IBMX and Cilostazol, Block Ex Vivo Equid Herpesvirus Type-1-Induced Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Stokol, Tracy; Serpa, Priscila Beatriz da Silva; Zahid, Muhammad N; Brooks, Marjory B

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpes virus type-1 (EHV-1) is a major pathogen of horses, causing abortion storms and outbreaks of herpes virus myeloencephalopathy. These clinical syndromes are partly attributed to ischemic injury from thrombosis in placental and spinal vessels. The mechanism of thrombosis in affected horses is unknown. We have previously shown that EHV-1 activates platelets through virus-associated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation. Activated platelets participate in thrombus formation by providing a surface to localize coagulation factor complexes that amplify and propagate thrombin generation. We hypothesized that coagulation inhibitors that suppress thrombin generation (heparins) or platelet inhibitors that impede post-receptor thrombin signaling [phosphodiesterase (PDE) antagonists] would inhibit EHV-1-induced platelet activation ex vivo. We exposed platelet-rich plasma (PRP) collected from healthy horses to the RacL11 abortigenic and Ab4 neuropathogenic strains of EHV-1 at 1 plaque-forming unit/cell in the presence or absence of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or the PDE inhibitors, 3-isobutyl-1methylxanthine (IBMX), and cilostazol. We assessed platelet activation status in flow cytometric assays by measuring P-selectin expression. We found that all of the inhibitors blocked EHV-1- and thrombin-induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner. Platelet activation in PRP was maximally inhibited at concentrations of 0.05 U/mL UFH and 2.5 μg/mL LMWH. These concentrations represented 0.1-0.2 U/mL anti-factor Xa activity measured in chromogenic assays. Both IBMX and cilostazol showed maximal inhibition of platelet activation at the highest tested concentration of 50 μM, but inhibition was lower than that seen with UFH and LMWH. Our results indicate that heparin anticoagulants and strong non-selective (IBMX) or isoenzyme-3 selective (cilostazol) PDE antagonists inhibit ex vivo EHV-1-induced platelet activation

  3. Unfractionated and Low-Molecular-Weight Heparin and the Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors, IBMX and Cilostazol, Block Ex Vivo Equid Herpesvirus Type-1-Induced Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stokol, Tracy; Serpa, Priscila B. S.; Zahid, Muhammad N.; Brooks, Marjory B.

    2016-01-01

    Equid herpes virus type-1 (EHV-1) is a major pathogen of horses, causing abortion storms and outbreaks of herpes virus myeloencephalopathy. These clinical syndromes are partly attributed to ischemic injury from thrombosis in placental and spinal vessels. The mechanism of thrombosis in affected horses is unknown. We have previously shown that EHV-1 activates platelets through virus-associated tissue factor-initiated thrombin generation. Activated platelets participate in thrombus formation by providing a surface to localize coagulation factor complexes that amplify and propagate thrombin generation. We hypothesized that coagulation inhibitors that suppress thrombin generation (heparins) or platelet inhibitors that impede post-receptor thrombin signaling [phosphodiesterase (PDE) antagonists] would inhibit EHV-1-induced platelet activation ex vivo. We exposed platelet-rich plasma (PRP) collected from healthy horses to the RacL11 abortigenic and Ab4 neuropathogenic strains of EHV-1 at 1 plaque-forming unit/cell in the presence or absence of unfractionated heparin (UFH), low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) or the PDE inhibitors, 3-isobutyl-1methylxanthine (IBMX), and cilostazol. We assessed platelet activation status in flow cytometric assays by measuring P-selectin expression. We found that all of the inhibitors blocked EHV-1- and thrombin-induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner. Platelet activation in PRP was maximally inhibited at concentrations of 0.05 U/mL UFH and 2.5 μg/mL LMWH. These concentrations represented 0.1–0.2 U/mL anti-factor Xa activity measured in chromogenic assays. Both IBMX and cilostazol showed maximal inhibition of platelet activation at the highest tested concentration of 50 μM, but inhibition was lower than that seen with UFH and LMWH. Our results indicate that heparin anticoagulants and strong non-selective (IBMX) or isoenzyme-3 selective (cilostazol) PDE antagonists inhibit ex vivo EHV-1-induced platelet activation

  4. Platelet activation of platelet concentrates derived from buffy coat and apheresis methods.

    PubMed

    Ali, Soleimany Ferizhandy

    2011-02-01

    Preparation for storage may cause platelet activation. The quality of platelet concentrates plays an important role in transfusion therapy. Platelet concentrates are produced by different centrifugation methods; buffy coat (buffy coat-derived platelet concentrates-BC) and plateletpheresis (apheresis-derived platelet concentrates-APC). Their quality was assessed using the following parameters: platelet, WBC and RBC counts pH, volume, platelet factor 4 (PF4) and Annexin V. The present paper compares the quality of both platelet preparations in vitro. In this experimental study, 30 platelet concentrates were harvested with the Haemonetics MCS plus and 30 units via the buffy coat (BC) method. The percentages of Annexin V expression, PF4 levels, platelet, WBC and RBC counts, pH and volume were measure immediately after collection and after 3 days of storage. During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed, no significant pH or RBC, difference in comparison with apheresis preparations (p>0.05). During storage for up to 3 days, BC units displayed a significant increase in the PF4 and Annexin V expression, compared to the apheresis preparations on day three (p<0.05). The kinetics of PF4 and Annexin V levels are influenced by the method used to prepare platelets for storage. The different levels of PF4 and Annexin V in BCs and APCs clearly demonstrates a progressive activation of BC platelets exceeding that of APC. However, in vivo studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  5. Association of platelet activation markers with recurrence of atrial fibrillation after pulmonary vein isolation.

    PubMed

    Pfluecke, Christian; Plichta, Lina; Tarnowski, Daniel; Forkmann, Mathias; Ulbrich, Stefan; Quick, Silvio; Heidrich, Felix M; Wiedemann, Stephan; Christoph, Marian; Poitz, David M; Wunderlich, Carsten; Strasser, Ruth H; Ibrahim, Karim

    2016-10-13

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is known to cause platelet activation. AF and its degree of thrombogenesis could be associated with monocyte-platelet aggregates (MPAs). We investigated on whether the content of MPAs or other platelet activation markers is associated with the recurrence of AF after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI). A total of 73 patients with symptomatic AF underwent PVI. After 6 months, all patients were evaluated for episodes of AF recurrence. At the same time, flow-cytometric quantification analyses were performed to determine the content of MPAs. Further platelet activation parameters were detected by using either cytometric bead arrays or quantitative immunological determination. Patients with recurrent AF (n = 20) compared to individuals without AF relapse (n = 53) were associated with an increased content of MPAs (43 ± 3% vs. 33 ± 2%, p = 0.004), as well as an increased CD41 expression on monocytes (191 ± 20 vs. 113 ± 6, p = 0.001). The level of the soluble platelet activation markers such as D-dimer, sCD40L, and sP-selectin did not differ between these groups. The content of MPAs correlated weakly with the level of sCD40L (r = 0.26, p = 0.03), but not with sP-selectin and D-dimer, whereas sP-selectin and sCD40L correlated with each other (r = 0.38, p = 0.001). Only the cellular marker of platelet activation, the content of MPAs, was increased in patients with recurrent AF after PVI. In contrast, soluble markers remained unaltered. These data indicate a distinct mechanism and level of platelet activation in AF. The clinical relevance of MPAs in identifying AF recurrence or in guiding the therapy with anticoagulants remains to be elucidated.

  6. Atherosclerosis proceeds independently of thrombin-induced platelet activation in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, J.R.; Cornelissen, I.; Mountford, J.K.; Coughlin, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    Platelet activation has long been postulated to contribute to the development of atherosclerotic plaques, although the mechanism by which this might occur remains unknown. Thrombin is a potent platelet activator and transfusion of thrombin-activated platelets into mice increases plaque formation, suggesting that thrombin-induced platelet activation might contribute to platelet-dependent atherosclerosis. Platelets from protease-activated receptor 4-deficient (Par4-/-) mice fail to respond to thrombin. To determine whether thrombin-activated platelets play a necessary role in a model of atherogenesis, we compared plaque formation and progression in Par4+/+ and Par4-/- mice in the atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE-/-) background. Littermate Par4+/+ and Par4-/- mice, all ApoE-/-, were placed on a Western diet (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) for 5 or 10 weeks. The percent of aortic lumenal surface covered by plaques in Par4+/+ and Par4-/- mice was not different at either time point (2.2 ± 0.3% vs. 2.5 ± 0.2% and 5.1 ± 0.4% vs. 5.6 ± 0.4% after 5 and 10 weeks, respectively). Further, no differences were detected in the cross-sectional area of plaques measured at the aortic root (1.53 ± 0.17 vs. 1.66 ± 0.16 × 105 μm2 and 12.56 ± 1.23 vs. 13.03 ± 0.55 × 105 μm2 after 5 and10 weeks, respectively). These findings indicate that thrombin-mediated platelet activation is not required for the early development of atherosclerotic plaques in the ApoE-/- mouse model and suggest that, if platelet activation is required for plaque formation under these experimental conditions, platelet activators other than thrombin suffice. PMID:19217621

  7. Anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan from Myristica fragrans.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jung Won; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Platelets play a critical role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders and strokes. The inhibition of platelet function is beneficial for the treatment and prevention of these diseases. In this study, we investigated the anti-platelet activity of erythro-(7S,8R)-7-acetoxy-3,4,3',5'-tetramethoxy-8-O-4'-neolignan (EATN), a neolignan isolated from Myristica fragrans, using human platelets. EATN preferentially inhibited thrombin- and platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced platelet aggregation without affecting platelet damage in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values of 3.2 ± 0.4 and 3.4 ± 0.3 μM, respectively. However, much higher concentrations of EATN were required to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by arachidonic acid. EATN also inhibited thrombin-induced serotonin and ATP release, and thromboxane B2 formation in human platelets. Moreover, EATN caused an increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and attenuated intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in thrombin-activated human platelets. Therefore, we conclude that the inhibitory mechanism of EATN on platelet aggregation may increase cAMP levels and subsequently inhibit intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization by interfering with a common signaling pathway rather than by directly inhibiting the binding of thrombin or PAF to their receptors. This is the first report of the anti-platelet activity of EATN isolated from M. fragrans.

  8. Synthesis and Anti-Platelet Activity of Thiosulfonate Derivatives Containing a Quinone Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Bolibrukh, Khrystyna; Polovkovych, Svyatoslav; Khoumeri, Omar; Halenova, Tetyana; Nikolaeva, Irina; Savchuk, Olexiy; Terme, Thierry; Vanelle, Patrice; Lubenets, Vira; Novikov, Volodymyr

    2015-01-01

    Thiosulfonate derivatives based on quinones were synthesized for studying “structure-activity relationship” compounds with an acylated and a free amino-group. Anti-platelet activity of the synthesized compounds was determined and the influence of substituents on the activity of the derivatives was assessed. PMID:26839819

  9. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  10. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  11. Metformin Uniquely Prevents Thrombosis by Inhibiting Platelet Activation and mtDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Guang; Wei, Zeliang; Ji, Chengjie; Zheng, Huajie; Gu, Jun; Ma, Limei; Huang, Wenfang; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Zhang, Rui; Qin, Chaoyi; Wen, Li; Xing, Zhihua; Cao, Yu; Xia, Qing; Lu, Yanrong; Li, Ke; Niu, Hai; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung; Huang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis and its complications are the leading cause of death in patients with diabetes. Metformin, a first-line therapy for type 2 diabetes, is the only drug demonstrated to reduce cardiovascular complications in diabetic patients. However, whether metformin can effectively prevent thrombosis and its potential mechanism of action is unknown. Here we show, metformin prevents both venous and arterial thrombosis with no significant prolonged bleeding time by inhibiting platelet activation and extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) release. Specifically, metformin inhibits mitochondrial complex I and thereby protects mitochondrial function, reduces activated platelet-induced mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen species overload and associated membrane damage. In mitochondrial function assays designed to detect amounts of extracellular mtDNA, we found that metformin prevents mtDNA release. This study also demonstrated that mtDNA induces platelet activation through a DC-SIGN dependent pathway. Metformin exemplifies a promising new class of antiplatelet agents that are highly effective at inhibiting platelet activation by decreasing the release of free mtDNA, which induces platelet activation in a DC-SIGN-dependent manner. This study has established a novel therapeutic strategy and molecular target for thrombotic diseases, especially for thrombotic complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:27805009

  12. Platelet activation biomarkers in Berkeley sickle cell mice and the response to prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Kousaku; Tanaka, Hisako; Samata, Naozumi; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Tomizawa, Atsuyuki; Mizuno, Makoto; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro

    2014-10-01

    Vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) is a common complication that occurs in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Although underlying mechanisms of VOC remain unclear, platelet activation has been associated with VOC. In the present study, plasma adenine nucleotide measurements using LC-ESI-MS/MS showed that plasma ADP in the Berkeley murine model of SCD was significantly higher (applox. 2.7-fold increase) compared with control mice. Assessment of platelet activation markers using flow cytometry indicated that in SCD mice at steady state (8 weeks old), circulating platelets were partially activated and this tended to increase with age (15 weeks old). The administration of prasugrel, a thienopiridyl P2Y12 antagonist, did not affect the activation state of circulating platelets suggesting P2Y12 independent mechanism of activation. In this murine SCD model, ex vivo addition of ADP or PAR4 TRAP resulted in further platelet activation as assessed by expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa and P-selectin both at 8 and 15 weeks. In 15 weeks old SCD mice, agonist-induced increases in activation markers were enhanced compared to control mice. Oral administration of prasugrel effectively inhibited ex vivo platelet activation consistent with clinical data in patients with SCD. In conclusion, in the Berkeley murine model of SCD, we found evidence of basal and agonist-stimulated platelet activation which could in part be attenuated by prasugrel. These data are consistent with observations made in patients with SCD and suggest possible utility of this murine model and prasugrel therapy in exploring treatment options for patients with SCD.

  13. Temporal quantitative phosphoproteomics of ADP stimulation reveals novel central nodes in platelet activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Geiger, Jörg; Gambaryan, Stepan; Solari, Fiorella A.; Dell’Aica, Margherita; Loroch, Stefan; Mattheij, Nadine J.; Mindukshev, Igor; Pötz, Oliver; Jurk, Kerstin; Burkhart, Julia M.; Fufezan, Christian; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Walter, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) enhances platelet activation by virtually any other stimulant to complete aggregation. It binds specifically to the G-protein–coupled membrane receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12, stimulating intracellular signaling cascades, leading to integrin αIIbβ3 activation, a process antagonized by endothelial prostacyclin. P2Y12 inhibitors are among the most successful antiplatelet drugs, however, show remarkable variability in efficacy. We reasoned whether a more detailed molecular understanding of ADP-induced protein phosphorylation could identify (1) critical hubs in platelet signaling toward aggregation and (2) novel molecular targets for antiplatelet treatment strategies. We applied quantitative temporal phosphoproteomics to study ADP-mediated signaling at unprecedented molecular resolution. Furthermore, to mimic the antagonistic efficacy of endothelial-derived prostacyclin, we determined how Iloprost reverses ADP-mediated signaling events. We provide temporal profiles of 4797 phosphopeptides, 608 of which showed significant regulation. Regulated proteins are implicated in well-known activating functions such as degranulation and cytoskeletal reorganization, but also in less well-understood pathways, involving ubiquitin ligases and GTPase exchange factors/GTPase-activating proteins (GEF/GAP). Our data demonstrate that ADP-triggered phosphorylation occurs predominantly within the first 10 seconds, with many short rather than sustained changes. For a set of phosphorylation sites (eg, PDE3ASer312, CALDAG-GEFISer587, ENSASer109), we demonstrate an inverse regulation by ADP and Iloprost, suggesting that these are central modulators of platelet homeostasis. This study demonstrates an extensive spectrum of human platelet protein phosphorylation in response to ADP and Iloprost, which inversely overlap and represent major activating and inhibitory pathways. PMID:28060719

  14. Effects of plasma nitric oxide levels on platelet activation in single donor apheresis and random donor concentrates.

    PubMed

    Büyükkağnici, Demet Iren; Ilhan, Osman; Kavas, Güzin Ozelçi; Arslan, Onder; Arat, Mutlu; Dalva, Klara; Ayyildiz, Erol

    2007-02-01

    P-selectin is an useful marker to determine platelet activation and nitric oxide inhibits platelet activation, secretion, adhesion and aggregation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between nitric oxide and P-selectin values in both single donor apheresis and random donor platelet concentrates. According to the results of this study, we found that the best platelet concentrate is freshly prepared single donor apheresis concentrate and it is important to prevent activation at the beginning of the donation. Nitric oxide, which is synthesized from platelets during the storage period, is not sufficient to prevent platelet activation.

  15. The effect of exercise and training status on platelet activation: do cocoa polyphenols play a role?

    PubMed

    Singh, I; Quinn, H; Mok, M; Southgate, R J; Turner, A H; Li, D; Sinclair, A J; Hawley, J A

    2006-09-01

    Sedentary and trained men respond differently to the same intensity of exercise, this is probably related to their platelet reactivity and antioxidant capacity. There is growing interest in the utilization of antioxidant-rich plant extracts as dietary food supplements. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute bout of sub maximal exercise on platelet count and differential response of platelet activation in trained and sedentary subjects and to observe if cocoa polyphenols reverse the effect of exercise on platelet function. The practical significance of this study was that many sedentary people engage in occasional strenuous exercise that may predispose them to risk of heart disease. Fasting blood samples were collected from 16 male subjects, pre and post 1-h cycling exercise at 70% of maximal aerobic power (VO2max) before and after consumption of cocoa or placebo. Agonist stimulated citrated whole blood was utilized for measuring platelet aggregation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and platelet activation. Baseline platelet count (221 +/- 33 x 10(9)/L) and ATP release (1.4 +/- 0.6 nmol) increased significantly (P < 0.05) after exercise in all subjects. Baseline platelet numbers in the trained were higher (P < 0.05) than in the sedentary (235 +/- 37 vs. 208 +/- 34 x 10(9)/L), where as platelet activation in trained was lower (P < 0.05) than sedentary (51 +/- 6 vs. 59 +/- 5%). Seven days of cocoa polyphenol supplementation had little effect on any of the parameters measured. We conclude that trained subjects show decreased activation of stimulated platelets when compared to the sedentary subjects and short-term cocoa polyphenol supplementation did not decrease platelet activity in response to exercise independent of prior training status.

  16. Platelet Activation after Presyncope by Lower Body Negative Pressure in Humans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-29

    during lower body negative pressure. Clin Physiol Funct Imaging 29: 427–430. 5. Masoud M, Sarig G, Brenner B, Jacob G (2008) Orthostatic...RESEARCH ARTICLE Platelet Activation after Presyncope by Lower Body Negative Pressure in Humans Morten Zaar1*., Chriselda G. Fedyk2., Heather F...induced by lower body negative pressure (LBNP) activates platelets. Eight healthy subjects were exposed to progressive central hypovolemia by LBNP

  17. Glaucocalyxin A Inhibits Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation Preferentially via GPVI Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Ren, Lijie; Liu, Xiaohui; Chu, Chunjun; Ozaki, Yukio; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA), an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01μg/ml, 0.1μg/ml) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001) and CRP (P<0.01), a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent. PMID:24386454

  18. Platelet Activation and Biofilm Formation by Aerococcus urinae, an Endocarditis-Causing Pathogen▿

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Oonagh; Mörgelin, Matthias; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Aerococcus urinae can cause infectious endocarditis (IE) in older persons. Biofilm formation and platelet aggregation are believed to contribute to bacterial virulence in IE. Five A. urinae isolates from human blood were shown to form biofilms in vitro, and biofilm formation was enhanced by the presence of human plasma. Four of the A. urinae isolates caused platelet aggregation in platelet-rich plasma from healthy donors. The Au3 isolate, which induced platelet aggregation in all donors, also activated platelets, as determined by flow cytometry. Platelet aggregation was dependent on bacterial protein structures and on platelet activation since it was sensitive to both trypsin and prostaglandin E1. Plasma proteins at the bacterial surface were needed for platelet aggregation; and roles of the complement system, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G were demonstrated. Complement-depleted serum was unable to support platelet aggregation by Au3 and complement blockade using compstatin-inhibited platelet activation. Platelet activation by Au3 was inhibited by blocking of the platelet fibrinogen receptor, and this isolate was also shown to bind to radiolabeled fibrinogen. Removal of IgG from platelet-rich plasma by a specific protease inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by A. urinae, and blockade of the platelet FcRγIIa hindered platelet activation induced by Au3. Convalescent-phase serum from a patient with A. urinae IE transferred the ability of the bacterium to aggregate platelets in an otherwise nonresponsive donor. Our results show that A. urinae exhibits virulence strategies of importance for IE. PMID:20696834

  19. Platelet Activation by Low Concentrations of Intact Oxidized LDL Particles Involves the PAF Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Chen, Xi; Salomon, Robert G.; McIntyre, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial depolarization aids platelet activation. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) contains the medium length oxidatively truncated phospholipid hexadecyl azelaoyl-lysoPAF (HAz-LPAF) that disrupts mitochondrial function in nucleated cells, so oxLDL may augment platelet activation. Methods and Results Flow cytometry showed intact oxLDL particles synergized with sub-threshold amounts of soluble agonists to increase intracellular Ca++, and initiate platelet aggregation and surface expression of activated gpIIb/IIIa and P-selectin. oxLDL also induced aggregation and increased intracellular Ca++ in FURA2-labeled cells by itself at low, although not higher, concentrations. HAz-LPAF, alone and in combination with sub-stimulatory amounts of thrombin, rapidly increased cytoplasmic Ca++ and initiated aggregation. HAz-LPAF depolarized mitochondria in intact platelets, but this required concentrations beyond those that directly activated platelets. An unexpectedly large series of chemically pure truncated phospholipids generated by oxidative fragmentation of arachidonoyl-, docosahexaneoyl-, or linoleoyl alkyl phospholipids were platelet agonists. The PAF receptor, thought to effectively recognize only phospholipids with very short sn-2 residues, was essential for platelet activation because PAF receptor agonists blocked signaling by all these medium length phospholipids and oxLDL. Conclusions Intact oxLDL particles activate platelets through the PAF receptor, and the PAF receptor responds to a far wider range of oxidized phospholipids in oxLDL than anticipated. PMID:19112165

  20. In vitro shear stress-induced platelet activation: sensitivity of human and bovine blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Hofferbert, Bryan V; Koo, Grace; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2013-10-01

    As platelet activation plays a critical role in physiological hemostasis and pathological thrombosis, it is important in the overall hemocompatibility evaluation of new medical devices and biomaterials to assess their effects on platelet function. However, there are currently no widely accepted in vitro test methods to perform this assessment. In an effort to develop effective platelet tests for potential use in medical device evaluation, this study compared the sensitivity of platelet responses to shear stress stimulation of human and bovine blood using multiple platelet activation markers. Fresh whole blood samples anticoagulated with heparin or anticoagulant citrate dextrose, solution A (ACDA) were exposed to shear stresses up to 40 Pa for 2 min using a cone-and-plate rheometer model. Platelet activation was characterized by platelet counts, platelet surface P-selectin expression, and serotonin release into blood plasma. The results indicated that exposure to shear stresses above 20 Pa caused significant changes in all three of the platelet markers for human blood and that the changes were usually greater with ACDA anticoagulation than with heparin. In contrast, for bovine blood, the markers did not change with shear stress stimulation except for plasma serotonin in heparin anticoagulated blood. The differences observed between human and bovine platelet responses suggest that the value of using bovine blood for in vitro platelet testing to evaluate devices may be limited.

  1. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Platelets Activated by Pro-Thrombotic Oxidized Phospholipids and Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Titz, Bjoern; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Biswas, Sudipta; Graeber, Thomas G.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36) promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s) induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites) and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites) respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (de)phosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36. PMID:24400094

  2. Aspirin Has Limited Ability to Modulate Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation Associated with Elevated Shear Stress of Ventricular Assist Devices

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Lorenzo; Tran, Phat L.; Sheriff, Jawaad; Brengle, William; Ghosh, Ram; Chiu, Wei-Che; Redaelli, Alberto; Fiore, Gianfranco B.; Pappalardo, Federico; Bluestein, Danny; Slepian, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous flow ventricular assist devices (cfVADs) while effective in advanced heart failure, remain plagued by thrombosis related to abnormal flows and elevated shear stress. To limit cfVAD thrombosis, patients utilize complex anti-thrombotic regimens built upon a foundation of aspirin (ASA). While much data exists on ASA as a modulator of biochemically-mediated platelet activation, limited data exists as to the efficacy of ASA as a means of limiting shear-mediated platelet activation, particularly under elevated shear stress common within cfVADs. We investigated the ability of ASA (20, 25 and 125 μM) to limit shear-mediated platelet activation under conditions of: 1) constant shear stress (30 dyne/cm2 and 70 dyne/cm2); 2) dynamic shear stress, and 3) initial high shear exposure (70 dyne/cm2) followed by low shear exposure – i.e. a platelet sensitization protocol, utilizing a hemodynamic shearing device providing uniform shear stress in vitro. The efficacy of ASA to limit platelet activation mediated via passage through a clinical cfVAD system (DeBakey Micromed) in vitro was also studied. ASA reduced platelet activation only under conditions of low shear stress (38% reduction compared to control, n = 10, p < 0.004), with minimal protection at higher shear stress and under dynamic conditions (n = 10, p > 0.5) with no limitation of platelet sensitization. ASA had limited ability (25.6% reduction in platelet activation rate) to modulate shear-mediated platelet activation induced via cfVAD passage. These findings, while performed under “deconstructed” non-clinical conditions by utilizing purified platelets alone in vitro, provide a potential contributory mechanistic explanation for the persistent thrombosis rates experienced clinically in cfVAD patients despite ASA therapy. An opportunity exists to develop enhanced pharmacologic strategies to limit shear-mediated platelet activation at elevated shear levels associated with mechanical circulatory support

  3. Platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C involves phosphoinositide turnover and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton but not 20,000 dalton protein

    SciTech Connect

    Huzoor-Akbar; Anwer, K.

    1986-05-01

    This study was conducted to examine the role of phosphoinositides (PIns) and phosphorylation of 47,000 dalton (P47) and 20,000 dalton (P20) proteins in platelet activation by bacterial phospholipase C (PLC). PLC induced serotonin secretion (SS) and platelet aggregation (PA) in a concentration dependent manner. PLC (0.02 U/ml) caused phosphorylation of P47 in a time dependent manner (27% at 0.5 min to 378% at 7 min). PLC did not induce more than 15% phosphorylation of P20 by 7 min. Aspirin (500 ..mu..M) blocked phosphorylation of P20 but did not inhibit SS, PA or phosphorylation of P47. PLC (0.04 U/ml) decreased radioactivity (cpm) in /sup 32/P labeled phosphatidylinositol (PI), PI-4,5-bis-PO4 (PIP2) and PI-4-PO4 (PIP) by 20%, 12% and 7.5% respectively at 15 sec. The level of PI but not that of PIP2 returned to base line in 3 min. PIP level increased above control values within one min. PLC increased phosphatidic acid level (75% at 0.5 min. to 1545% at 3 min). In other experiments PLC produced diacylglycerol (DAG) in a time and concentration dependent manner. However, no DAG was detectable in the first 60 sec. These data suggest that: (a) PIns turnover and phosphorylation of P47 but not that of P20 is involved in platelet activation by PLC; and (b) DAG production from outer membrane phospholipids is not a prerequisite for platelet activation by PLC.

  4. The Nitric Oxide Donor Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Reduces Platelet Activation in Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Flierl, Ulrike; Fraccarollo, Daniela; Widder, Julian D.; Micka, Jan; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Schäfer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Background Platelet activation associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired endogenous platelet inhibition is part of the cardiovascular phenotype of congestive heart failure (CHF) and contributes to the increased risk for thromboembolic complications. Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) has been shown to release nitric oxide without development of nitrate tolerance. We investigated the effect of chronic PETN treatment on platelet activation and aggregation in an experimental CHF model. Methods and Results Chronic ischemic heart failure was induced in male Wistar rats by coronary artery ligation. Starting 7 days thereafter, rats were randomised to placebo or PETN (80 mg/kg twice daily). After 9 weeks, activation of circulating platelets was determined measuring platelet bound fibrinogen, which requires activated glycoprotein IIb/IIIa on the platelet surface. Binding was quantified by flow-cytometry using a FITC-labelled anti-fibrinogen antibody. Platelet-bound fibrinogen was significantly increased in CHF-Placebo (mean fluorescence intensity: Sham 88±4, CHF-Placebo 104±6, p<0.05) and reduced following treatment with PETN (89±7, p<0.05 vs. CHF-Placebo). Maximal and final ADP-induced aggregation was significantly enhanced in CHF-Placebo vs. Sham-operated animals and normalized / decreased following chronic PETN treatment. Moreover, platelet adhesion was significantly reduced (number of adherent platelets: control: 85.6±5.5, PETN: 40±3.3; p<0.001) and VASP phosphorylation significantly enhanced following in vitro PETN treatment. Conclusion Chronic NO supplementation using PETN reduces platelet activation in CHF rats. Thus, PETN may constitute a useful approach to prevent thromboembolic complications in CHF. PMID:25928879

  5. Impact of commonly prescribed exercise interventions on platelet activation in physically inactive and overweight men.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Andrew; Linden, Matthew D; Robey, Elisa; Watts, Gerald F; Barrett, Hugh; Naylor, Louise H; Green, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    The exercise paradox infers that, despite the well-established cardioprotective effects of repeated episodic exercise (training), the risk of acute atherothrombotic events may be transiently increased during and soon after an exercise bout. However, the acute impact of different exercise modalities on platelet function has not previously been addressed. We hypothesized that distinct modalities of exercise would have differing effects on in vivo platelet activation and reactivity to agonists which induce monocyte-platelet aggregate (MPA) formation. Eight middle-aged (53.5 ± 1.6 years) male participants took part in four 30 min experimental interventions (aerobic AE, resistance RE, combined aerobic/resistance exercise CARE, or no-exercise NE), in random order. Blood samples were collected before, immediately after, and 1 h after each intervention, and incubated with one of three agonists of physiologically/clinically relevant pathways of platelet activation (thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 TRAP, arachidonic acid AA, and cross-linked collagen-related peptide xCRP). In the presence of AA, TRAP, and xCRP, both RE and CARE evoked increases in MPAs immediately post-exercise (P < 0.01), whereas only AA significantly increased MPAs immediately after AE (P < 0.01). These increases in platelet activation post-exercise were transient, as responses approached pre-exercise levels by 1 h. These are the first data to suggest that exercise involving a resistance component in humans may transiently increase platelet-mediated thrombotic risk more than aerobic modalities.

  6. Effect of Red Blood Cells on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation in Tortuous Arterioles.

    PubMed

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K W; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-01-01

    Thrombosis is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, which can lead to myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombosis may form in tortuous microvessels, which are often seen throughout the human body, but the microscale mechanisms and processes are not well understood. In straight vessels, the presence of red blood cells (RBCs) is known to push platelets toward walls, which may affect platelet aggregation and thrombus formation. However in tortuous vessels, the effects of RBC interactions with platelets in thrombosis are largely unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this work was to determine the physical effects of RBCs, platelet size, and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A discrete element computational model was used to simulate the transport, collision, adhesion, aggregation, and shear-induced platelet activation of hundreds of individual platelets and RBCs in thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Results showed that high shear stress near the inner sides of curved arteriole walls activated platelets to initiate thrombosis. RBCs initially promoted platelet activation, but then collisions of RBCs with mural thrombi reduced the amount of mural thrombus and the size of emboli. In the absence of RBCs, mural thrombus mass was smaller in a highly tortuous arteriole compared to a less tortuous arteriole. In the presence of RBCs however, mural thrombus mass was larger in the highly tortuous arteriole compared to the less tortuous arteriole. As well, smaller platelet size yielded less mural thrombus mass and smaller emboli, either with or without RBCs. This study shed light on microscopic interactions of RBCs and platelets in tortuous microvessels, which have implications in various pathologies associated with thrombosis and bleeding.

  7. Mechanism of platelet activation induced by endocannabinoids in blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Brantl, S Annette; Khandoga, Anna L; Siess, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets play a central role in atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis, and circulating endocannabinoids might modulate platelet function. Previous studies concerning effects of anandamide (N-arachidonylethanolamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) on platelets, mainly performed on isolated cells, provided conflicting results. We therefore investigated the action of three main endocannabinoids [anandamide, 2-AG and virodhamine (arachidonoylethanolamine)] on human platelets in blood and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). 2-AG and virodhamine induced platelet aggregation in blood, and shape change, aggregation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) secretion in PRP. The EC50 of 2-AG and virodhamine for platelet aggregation in blood was 97 and 160 µM, respectively. Lower concentrations of 2-AG (20 µM) and virodhamine (50 µM) synergistically induced aggregation with other platelet stimuli. Platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine resembled arachidonic acid (AA)-induced aggregation: shape change, the first platelet response, ATP secretion and aggregation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine were all blocked by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) or the specific thromboxane A2 (TXA2) antagonist daltroban. In addition, platelet activation induced by 2-AG and virodhamine in blood and PRP were inhibited by JZL184, a selective inhibitor of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). In contrast to 2-AG and virodhamine, anandamide, a substrate of fatty acid amidohydrolase, was inactive. Synthetic cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) agonists lacked stimulatory as well as inhibitory platelet activity. We conclude that 2-AG and virodhamine stimulate platelets in blood and PRP by a MAGL-triggered mechanism leading to free AA and its metabolism by platelet cyclooxygenase-1/thromboxane synthase to TXA2. CB1, CB2 or non-CB1/CB2 receptors are not involved. Our results imply that ASA and MAGL inhibitors will protect platelets from activation by high endocannabinoid levels, and that

  8. Endothelial cells microparticle-associated protein disulfide isomerase promotes platelet activation in metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-hui; Song, Dai-jun; Chen, Tong-shuai; Zhang, Wei; Zhong, Ming; Zhang, Yun; Xing, Yan-qiu; Wang, Zhi-hao

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a common challenge in the world, and the platelet activation is enhanced in MetS patients. However, the fundamental mechanism that underlies platelet activation in MetS remains incompletely understood. Endothelial cells are damaged seriously in MetS patients, then they release more endothelial microparticles (EMPs). After all, whether the EMPs participate in platelet activation is still obscure. If they were, how did they work? Results We demonstrated that the levels of EMPs, PMPs (platelet derived microparticles) and microparticle-carried-PDI activity increased in MetS patients. IR endothelial cells released more EMPs, the EMP-PDI was more activated. EMPs can enhance the activation of CD62P, GPIIb/IIIa and platelet aggregation and this process can be partly inhibited by PDI inhibitor such as RL90 and rutin. Activated platelets stimulated by EMPs expressed more PDI on cytoplasm and released more PMPs. Materials and Methods We obtained plasma from 23 MetS patients and 8 normal healthy controls. First we built insulin resistance (IR) model of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), and then we separated EMPs from HUVECs culture medium and used these EMPs to stimulate platelets. Levels of microparticles, P-selectin(CD62P), Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (GPIIb/IIIa) were detected by flow cytometry and levels of EMPs were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity was detected by insulin transhydrogenase assay. Platelet aggregation was assessed by turbidimetry. Conclusion EMPs can promote the activation of GPIIb/IIIa in platelets and platelet aggregation by the PDI which is carried on the surface of EMPs. PMID:27825126

  9. The Influence of Intermittent Hypoxemia on Platelet Activation in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Rahangdale, Shilpa; Yeh, Susie Yim; Novack, Victor; Stevenson, Karen; Barnard, Marc R.; Furman, Mark I.; Frelinger, Andrew L.; Michelson, Alan D.; Malhotra, Atul

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Literature regarding platelet function in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has considerable limitations. Given the central role of platelets in atherothrombosis and the known cardiovascular risk of OSA, we hypothesized that OSA severity is predictive of platelet function, independent of known comorbidities. Design: Obese subjects, without comorbidities, underwent overnight, in-lab polysomnography. The following morning, 5 biomarkers of platelet activation were measured by whole-blood flow cytometry at baseline and in response to agonists (no stimulation, stimulation with 5 μM ADP agonist, and stimulation with 20 μM ADP agonist): platelet surface P-selectin, activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, and GPIb receptor expression, platelet-monocyte aggregation (PMA) and platelet-neutrophil aggregation (PNA). Results: Of the 77 subjects, 47 were diagnosed with OSA (median apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] of 24.7 ± 28.1/h in subjects with OSA and 3.0 ± 3.9/h in subjects without OSA, p < 0.001). The groups were matched for body mass index, with a mean body mass index of 40.3 ± 9.6 kg/m2 in subjects with OSA and 38.9 ± 6.0 kg/m2 in subjects without OSA (p = 0.48). A comparison of time spent with an oxygen saturation of less than 90% showed that subjects who had 1 minute or more of desaturation time per hour of sleep had lower GPIb fluorescence in circulating platelets, as compared with those subjects who had less than 1 minute of desaturation time per hour of sleep; similar findings were observed following 5 μM and 20 μM of ADP stimulation, as compared with control vehicle, suggesting higher levels of circulating platelet activity. In multivariate analyses, only nocturnal hypoxemia and female sex predicted agonist response. Platelet surface P-selectin, platelet surface-activated GPIIb/IIIa, PMA, and PNA were not significantly correlated with markers of OSA. Conclusions: In obese patients with OSA, platelet activation is associated with greater levels of oxygen

  10. Dynamic redistribution of major platelet surface receptors after contact-induced platelet activation and spreading. An immunoelectron microscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, N.; Guichard, J.; Breton-Gorius, J.

    1992-01-01

    The authors used an immunogold labeling procedure to investigate the redistribution of platelet receptors and their ligands on the surface of contact-activated adherent platelets before and after thrombin stimulation. During the initial stage of platelet adhesion, a typical segregation of receptors occurred. Gold particles identifying glycoprotein (GP) Ib (CD42b) and GPIIb-IIIa (CD41a) remained distributed over the entire platelet surface, whereas gold particles identifying GPIa-IIa (CDw 49b) and GPIV (CD36) were found essentially overlying the granulomere; p24 (CD9) was present at the peripheral platelet rim and over the cell body. An increased labeling of GPIIb-IIIa, GPIV and p24 was also observed on pseudopods, with GPIIb-IIIa and GPIV concentrated at the enlarged extremities and at sites of contact between two platelets, whereas GPIb was absent from pseudopods. After thrombin stimulation of adherent platelets, GPIb underwent a relocation to the cell center, in contrast to GPIIb-IIIa which still remained randomly distributed over the cell body. To investigate whether ligand distribution paralleled this receptor segregation, platelet released von Willebrand factor (vWF), fibrinogen (Fg) and thrombospondin (TSP) were visualized. During the early stages of platelet activation, surface labeling for all three adhesive proteins was minimal and almost undetectable. Occasionally, intragranular Fg and vWF was accessible to gold-coupled antibodies, with vWF exhibiting the typical eccentric alpha-granular localization. At later stages of activation and especially after thrombin stimulation, no surface labeling for vWF was observed, whereas immunogold particles identifying vWF were still present inside enlarged clear vacuoles. In contrast, labeling of Fg and TSP was increased over the granulomere and extended to the cell periphery and the pseudopods, but was absent from the hyalomere, despite the presence of GPIIb-IIIa molecules. Double labeling experiments showed

  11. Spontaneous heparin-induced thrombocytopenia syndrome without any proximate heparin exposure, infection, or inflammatory condition: Atypical clinical features with heparin-dependent platelet activating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Okata, Takuya; Miyata, Shigeki; Miyashita, Fumio; Maeda, Takuma; Toyoda, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that a thromboembolic disorder resembling heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), so-called spontaneous HIT syndrome, can occur in patients without any history of heparin exposure. It is likely due to anti-platelet factor 4 (PF4)/polyanion antibodies induced by other polyanions, such as bacterial surfaces and nucleic acids. We describe an atypical case of spontaneous HIT syndrome. A 70-year-old man suddenly presented with acute cerebral sinus thrombosis (CST). Soon after the initiation of unfractionated heparin (UFH) for the treatment of CST, his platelet count fell precipitously and he developed deep vein thrombosis, a clinical picture consistent with rapid-onset HIT but without any proximate episodes of heparin exposure, infection, trauma, surgery, or other acute illness. Antigen assays and a washed platelet activation assay indicated that the patient already possessed anti-PF4/heparin IgG antibodies with heparin-dependent platelet activation properties on admission. Cessation of UFH and initiation of argatroban resulted in prompt recovery of his platelet count without further thromboembolic events. We identified two similar cases in the literature. However, these patients do not meet the recently proposed criteria for spontaneous HIT syndrome. Even in atypical cases, however, inappropriate or delayed diagnosis of HIT appears to be associated with worse outcomes. We propose that these atypical cases should be included in the category of spontaneous HIT syndrome.

  12. Mechanism study of endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation of low molecular weight fucoidan from Laminaria japonica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Anjin; Zhang, Fang; Shi, Jie; Zhao, Xue; Yan, Meixing

    2016-10-01

    Several studies have indicated that fucoidan fractions with low molecular weight and different sulfate content from Laminaria japonica could inhibit the activation of platelets directly by reducing the platelet aggregation. To explore the direct effect of LMW fucoidan on the platelet system furthermore and examine the possible mechanism, the endothelial protection and inhibits platelet activation effects of two LMW fucoidan were investigated. In the present study, Endothelial injury model of rats was made by injection of adrenaline (0.4 mg kg-1) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured. vWF level was be investigated in vivo and in vitro as an important index of endothelial injury. LMW fucoidan could significantly reduce vWF level in vascular endothelial injury rats and also significantly reduce vWF level in vitro. The number of EMPs was be detected as another important index of endothelial injury. The results showed that LMW fucoidan reduced EMPs stimulated by tumor necrosis factor. In this study, it was found that by inhibiting platelet adhesion, LMW fucoidan played a role in anti-thrombosis and the specific mechanism of action is to inhibit the flow of extracellular Ca2+. All in a word, LMW fucoidan could inhibit the activation of platelets indirectly by reducing the concentration of EMPs and vWF, at the same time; LMW fucoidan inhibited the activation of platelets directly by inhibiting the flow of extracellular Ca2+.

  13. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization, thromboxane A(2) formation, hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A(2) formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca(2+)](i) and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  15. DPIV prediction of flow induced platelet activation-comparison to numerical predictions.

    PubMed

    Raz, Sagi; Einav, Shmuel; Alemu, Yared; Bluestein, Danny

    2007-04-01

    Flow induced platelet activation (PA) can lead to platelet aggregation, deposition onto the blood vessel wall, and thrombus formation. PA was thoroughly studied under unidirectional flow conditions. However, in regions of complex flow, where the platelet is exposed to varying levels of shear stress for varying durations, the relationship between flow and PA is not well understood. Numerical models were developed for studying flow induced PA resulting from stress histories along Lagrangian trajectories in the flow field. However, experimental validation techniques such as Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV) were not extended to include such models. In this study, a general experimental tool for PA analysis by means of continuous DPIV was utilized and compared to numerical simulation in a model of coronary stenosis. A scaled up (5:1) 84% eccentric and axisymetric coronary stenosis model was used for analysis of shear stress and exposure time along particle trajectories. Flow induced PA was measured using the PA State (PAS) assay. An algorithm for computing the PA level in pertinent trajectories was developed as a tool for extracting information from DPIV measurements for predicting the flow induced thrombogenic potential. CFD, DPIV and PAS assay results agreed well in predicting the level of PA. In addition, the same trend predicted by the DPIV was measured in vitro using the Platelet Activity State (PAS) assay, namely, that the symmetric stenosis activated the platelets more as compared to the eccentric stenosis.

  16. Anti-β2 glycoprotein I antibodies in complex with β2 glycoprotein I induce platelet activation via two receptors: apolipoprotein E receptor 2' and glycoprotein I bα.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenjing; Gao, Fei; Lu, Donghe; Sun, Na; Yin, Xiaoxue; Jin, Meili; Liu, Yanhong

    2016-03-01

    Anti-β2 glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI ) antibodies are important contributors to thrombosis, especially in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). However, the mechanism by which anti-β2GPI antibodies are involved in the pathogenesis of thrombosis is not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the role of anti- β2GPI antibodies in complexes with β2GPI as mediators of platelet activation, which can serve as a potential source contributing to thrombosis. We examined the involvement of the apolipoprotein E receptor 2' (apoER2') and glycoprotein I ba (GP I ba) in platelet activation induced by the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex. The interaction between the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex and platelets was examined using in vitro methods, in which the Fc portion of the antibody was immobilized using protein A coated onto a microtiter plate. Platelet activation was assessed by measuring GPII b/III a activation and P-selectin expression and thromboxane B2 production as well as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Our results revealed that the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex was able to activate platelets, and this activation was inhibited by either the anti-GP I bα antibody or the apoER2' inhibitor. Results showed that the anti-β2GPI /β2GPI complex induced platelet activation via GPI ba and apoER2', which may then contribute to the prothrombotic tendency in APS patients.

  17. Increased soluble GPVI levels in cirrhosis: evidence for early in vivo platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Egan, Karl; Dillon, Audrey; Dunne, Eimear; Kevane, Barry; Galvin, Zita; Maguire, Patricia; Kenny, Dermot; Stewart, Stephen; Ainle, Fionnuala Ni

    2017-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a consequence of prolonged liver injury and is characterised by extensive tissue fibrosis: the deposition of collagen-rich extracellular matrix. The haemostatic balance is disordered in cirrhosis and coagulation activation appears to promote fibrosis. In spite of recent studies demonstrating a role for anticoagulant therapy in preventing cirrhosis progression, there has not been a change in clinical practice, suggesting that physicians are reluctant to anticoagulate patients with cirrhosis due to bleeding risks. Platelets play an important role in facilitating coagulation. Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) is a platelet-specific collagen receptor that is shed from the platelet surface in a metalloproteinase-dependent manner in response to GPVI ligation and coagulation activation. Our aim was to use soluble GPVI levels to determine whether there was evidence for collagen and coagulation-induced platelet activation in early, well-compensated cirrhosis. Plasma soluble GPVI levels were quantified in 46 patients with mixed aetiology cirrhosis and 55 healthy controls using an immunoassay. In the cirrhosis group, soluble GPVI levels were significantly increased (5.8 ± 4.4 ng/ml, n = 46) compared to healthy controls (3.3 ± 3.4 ng/ml, n = 55, p < 0.05). This increase in soluble GPVI levels was still evident when levels were adjusted for platelet count (Healthy controls; 0.015 ± 0.018 ng/10(6) platelets/ml vs. cirrhosis; 0.048 ± 0.04 ng/10(6) platelets/ml, p < 0.0001). This study provides evidence for early platelet activation in patients with well-compensated cirrhosis. This may have translational implications for prognosis, treatment, and risk stratification.

  18. The critical roles of platelet activation and reduced NO bioavailability in fatal pulmonary arterial hypertension in a murine hemolysis model

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Weiguo; Jin, Richard; Zhang, Jinyan; You, Tao; Peng, Zhihai; Ge, Xiaowen; Bronson, Roderick T.; Halperin, Jose A.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is suspected to be a strong mortality determinant of hemolytic disorders. However, direct contribution of acute intravascular hemolysis to fatal PAH has not been investigated. The roles of nitric oxide (NO) insufficiency and platelet activation in hemolysis-associated fatal PAH have been suspected but not been experimentally studied. We recently generated a unique intravascular hemolysis mouse model in which the membrane toxin, intermedilysin (ILY), exclusively lyses the erythrocytes of transgenically expressing human CD59 mice (ThCD59RBC), thereby inducing ILY-dose–dependent massive hemolysis. Using this murine hemolysis model, we found that the acute increase in pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right ventricle failure caused sudden death. Reduced NO bioavailability and massive platelet activation/aggregation leading to the formation of massive thrombosis specifically in the pulmonary microvasculature played the critical roles in pathogenesis of acute hemolysis-associated fatal PAH. Therapeutic interventions enhancing NO bioactivity or inhibiting platelet activation prevented sudden death or prolonged survival time via the suppression of the acute increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and improvement of right ventricle function. These findings further highlight the importance of the inhibition of platelet activation and the enhancement of NO bioavailability for the treatment and prevention of hemolysis-associated (fatal) PAH. PMID:20511540

  19. Effect of Antrodia camphorata on inflammatory arterial thrombosis-mediated platelet activation: the pivotal role of protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wan-Jung; Lin, Shih-Chang; Lan, Chang-Chou; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Hsia, Chih-Hsuan; Huang, Yung-Kai; Lee, Hsiu-Chuan; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a rare Taiwanese medicinal mushroom. Antrodia camphorata extract has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammation, antimetastasis, and anticancer activities and plays a role in liver fibrosis, vasorelaxation, and immunomodulation. Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in intravascular thrombosis, which is involved in a wide variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation remains unclear. We examined the effects of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation. In the present study, Antrodia camphorata treatment (56-224 μg/mL) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not U46619, an analogue of thromboxane A2, thrombin, and arachidonic acid. Antrodia camphorata inhibited collagen-induced calcium (Ca(2+)) mobilization and phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) and Akt. In addition, Antrodia camphorata significantly reduced the aggregation and phosphorylation of PKC in phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activated platelets. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting of Ca(2+) and PKC cascade and the Akt pathway. Our study suggests that Antrodia camphorata may be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders.

  20. Effect of Antrodia camphorata on Inflammatory Arterial Thrombosis-Mediated Platelet Activation: The Pivotal Role of Protein Kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wan-Jung; Lan, Chang-Chou; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Hsia, Chih-Hsuan; Lee, Hsiu-Chuan; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a rare Taiwanese medicinal mushroom. Antrodia camphorata extract has been reported to exhibit antioxidant, anti-inflammation, antimetastasis, and anticancer activities and plays a role in liver fibrosis, vasorelaxation, and immunomodulation. Critical vascular inflammation leads to vascular dysfunction and cardiovascular diseases, including abdominal aortic aneurysms, hypertension, and atherosclerosis. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in intravascular thrombosis, which is involved in a wide variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the effect of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation remains unclear. We examined the effects of Antrodia camphorata on platelet activation. In the present study, Antrodia camphorata treatment (56–224 μg/mL) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not U46619, an analogue of thromboxane A2, thrombin, and arachidonic acid. Antrodia camphorata inhibited collagen-induced calcium (Ca2+) mobilization and phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) and Akt. In addition, Antrodia camphorata significantly reduced the aggregation and phosphorylation of PKC in phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activated platelets. In conclusion, Antrodia camphorata may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting of Ca2+ and PKC cascade and the Akt pathway. Our study suggests that Antrodia camphorata may be a potential therapeutic agent for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders. PMID:25541625

  1. Systemic platelet dysfunction is the result of local dysregulated coagulation and platelet activation in the brain in a rat model of isolated traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ploplis, Victoria A; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; MorenoCaffaro, Maria; Sheets, Patrick; Thomas, Scott G; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Coagulopathy after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been extensively reported. Clinical studies have identified a strong relationship between diminished platelet-rich thrombus formation, responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate agonism, and severity of TBI. The mechanisms that lead to platelet dysfunction in the acute response to TBI are poorly understood. The development of a rodent model of TBI that mimics the coagulopathy observed clinically has recently been reported. Using immunohistochemical techniques and thromboelastography platelet mapping, the current study demonstrated that the expression of coagulation (tissue factor and fibrin) and platelet activation (P-selectin) markers in the injured brain paralleled the alteration in systemic platelet responsiveness to the agonists, adenosine diphosphate and arachodonic acid. Results of this study demonstrate that local procoagulant changes in the injured brain have profound effects on systemic platelet function.

  2. The changes of blood platelet activation in breast cancer patients before surgery, after surgery, and in various phases of the chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Czernek, Urszula; Szydłowska-Pazera, Katarzyna; Potemski, Piotr; Piekarski, Janusz; Jeziorski, Arkadiusz; Olas, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Blood platelets from patients with cancer (before or after the surgery) exhibit a variety of qualitative abnormalities. Different anti-cancer drugs may also induce the oxidative/nitrative stress in blood platelets and change their hemostatic properties. The aim of our study was to explain the effect of superoxide anion radicals ([Formula: see text]) production on hemostatic properties of blood platelets (activated by a strong physiological agonist - thrombin) from breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases (I-IV) of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide). Patients were hospitalized in the Department of Oncological Surgery and at the Department of Chemotherapy, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. We measured the platelet aggregation as the marker of hemostatic activity of blood platelets. We observed an increase of [Formula: see text] in thrombin-activated blood platelets from patients with breast cancer (before or after the surgery and after various phases of the chemotherapy) compared to the healthy group. Our other experiments demonstrated that aggregation (induced by thrombin) of blood platelets from patients with breast cancer before the surgery, after the surgery, and after various phases of the chemotherapy differs from aggregation of platelets obtained from healthy volunteers. Moreover, our results showed the correlation between the [Formula: see text] generation and changes of platelet aggregation in breast cancer patients before the surgery, after the surgery, and after the chemotherapy (I and IV phases). Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the production of [Formula: see text] in blood platelets (activated by thrombin) obtained from breast cancer patients may induce the changes of platelet aggregation, which may contribute in thrombosis in these patients.

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin stimulates eosinophil oxidant production and toxicity towards human endothelium

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Eosinophils (EOs) participate in a variety of inflammatory states characterized by endothelial cell damage, such as vasculitis, pneumonitis, and endocarditis. We find that 100 U/ml TNF- alpha/cachectin (TNF), a concentration attainable in the blood of humans with parasitic infestations, stimulates highly purified populations of EOs to damage human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a model of human endothelium. This TNF-dependent EO cytotoxicity is strongly inhibited by heparin and methyprednisolone but unaffected by the platelet-activating factor antagonist BN52012 or scavengers of superoxide anion and H2O2, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Br- (100 microM) enhances EO/TNF damage to HUVEC, implicating the possible participation of EO peroxidase (EPO) in the killing mechanism. EOs adherent to FCS-coated plastic wells more than double their production of superoxide anion and the cytotoxic EPO-derived oxidant HOBr when exposed to TNF, showing that TNF activates the respiratory burst of EOs attached to a "physiologic" surface. Unlike PMNs, EOs were not irreversibly activated to kill unopsonized endothelium by previous exposure to TNF, and did not degranulate or upregulate CR3 expression as detected by Mo1 in the presence of 100 U/ml TNF. HUVEC exposed 18 h to TNF were considerably more susceptible to lysis by PMA-activated EOs and reagent H2O2, demonstrating a direct effect of TNF upon endothelium, perhaps through inhibition of antioxidant defenses. These findings suggest that abnormally elevated serum levels of TNF may provoke EOs to damage endothelial cells and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in hypereosinophilic states. PMID:1972179

  4. Tumor necrosis factor alpha/cachectin stimulates eosinophil oxidant production and toxicity towards human endothelium.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Vercellotti, G M; Walker, G; Nelson, R D; Jacob, H S

    1990-06-01

    Eosinophils (EOs) participate in a variety of inflammatory states characterized by endothelial cell damage, such as vasculitis, pneumonitis, and endocarditis. We find that 100 U/ml TNF-alpha/cachectin (TNF), a concentration attainable in the blood of humans with parasitic infestations, stimulates highly purified populations of EOs to damage human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), a model of human endothelium. This TNF-dependent EO cytotoxicity is strongly inhibited by heparin and methyprednisolone but unaffected by the platelet-activating factor antagonist BN52012 or scavengers of superoxide anion and H2O2, superoxide dismutase and catalase. However, addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Br- (100 microM) enhances EO/TNF damage to HUVEC, implicating the possible participation of EO peroxidase (EPO) in the killing mechanism. EOs adherent to FCS-coated plastic wells more than double their production of superoxide anion and the cytotoxic EPO-derived oxidant HOBr when exposed to TNF, showing that TNF activates the respiratory burst of EOs attached to a "physiologic" surface. Unlike PMNs, EOs were not irreversibly activated to kill unopsonized endothelium by previous exposure to TNF, and did not degranulate or upregulate CR3 expression as detected by Mo1 in the presence of 100 U/ml TNF. HUVEC exposed 18 h to TNF were considerably more susceptible to lysis by PMA-activated EOs and reagent H2O2, demonstrating a direct effect of TNF upon endothelium, perhaps through inhibition of antioxidant defenses. These findings suggest that abnormally elevated serum levels of TNF may provoke EOs to damage endothelial cells and thereby play a role in the pathogenesis of tissue damage in hypereosinophilic states.

  5. Differential effect of the inhibition of Grb2-SH3 interactions in platelet activation induced by thrombin and by Fc receptor engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saci, Abdelhafid; Liu, Wang-Qing; Vidal, Michel; Garbay, Christiane; Rendu, Francine; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla

    2002-01-01

    The adaptor protein Grb2 (growth factor receptor-bound protein 2) is involved in cell proliferation via the Ras signalling pathway. In order to study the role of Grb2 in blood platelet responses, we used a peptide containing two proline-rich sequences derived from Sos (peptidimer), which binds to Grb2-Src homology 3 domain (SH3) with a high affinity, and hence inhibits Grb2-SH3-mediated protein interactions. Platelet aggregation and 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) release measured in the presence of the peptidimer were: (i) significantly decreased when induced by thrombin; and (ii) potentiated when induced by the engagement of the Fc receptor. In thrombin-activated platelets, the Grb2-SH2 domain formed an association with the beta3 subunit of the alphaIIb-beta3 integrin (GPIIb-IIIa), Shc, Syk, Src and SHP1 (SH2-containing phosphotyrosine phosphatase 1), whereas these associations did not occur after the engagement of the receptor for the Fc domain of IgG (FcgammaRIIa) or in resting platelets. Grb2-SH3 domains formed an association with the proline-rich sequences of Sos and Cbl in both resting and activated platelets, since the peptidimer abolished these associations. Inhibition of both fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation by the peptide RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser) had no effect on thrombin-induced Grb2-SH2 domain association with the aforementioned signalling molecules, indicating that these associations occurred during thrombin-induced 'inside-out' signalling. Platelet aggregation induced by direct activation via alphaIIb-beta3 ('outside-in' signalling) was potentiated by the peptidimer. The results show that inhibition of Grb2-SH3 interactions with signal-transduction proteins down-regulates thrombin-induced platelet activation, but also potentiates Fc receptor- and alphaIIb-beta3-mediated platelet activation. PMID:11964172

  6. Microfluidic Emulation of Mechanical Circulatory Support Device Shear-Mediated Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Dimasi, A.; Rasponi, M.; Sheriff, J.; Chiu, W.-C.; Bluestein, D.; Tran, P.L.; Slepian, M. J.; Redaelli, A.

    2016-01-01

    Thrombosis of ventricular assist devices (VADs) compromises their performance, with associated risks of systemic embolization, stroke, pump stop and possible death. Anti-thrombotic (AT) drugs, utilized to limit thrombosis, are largely dosed empirically, with limited testing of their efficacy. Further, such testing, if performed, typically examines efficacy under static conditions, which is not reflective of actual shear-mediated flow. Here we adopted our previously developed Device Thrombogenicity Emulation methodology to design microfluidic platforms able to emulate representative shear stress profiles of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. Our long-term goal is to utilize these systems for point-of-care (POC) personalized testing of AT efficacy under specific, individual shear profiles. First, we designed different types of microfluidic channels able to replicate sample shear stress patterns observed in MCS devices. Second, we explored the flexibility of microfluidic technology in generating dynamic shear stress profiles by modulating the geometrical features of the channels. Finally, we designed microfluidic channel systems able to emulate the shear stress profiles of two commercial VADs. From CFD analyses, the VAD-emulating microfluidic systems were able to replicate the main characteristics of the shear stress waveforms of the macroscale VADs (i.e. shear stress peaks and duration). Our results establish the basis for development of a lab-on-chip POC system able to perform device-specific and patient-specific platelet activation state assays. PMID:26578003

  7. The tyrosine phosphatase CD148 is an essential positive regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Senis, Yotis A; Tomlinson, Michael G; Ellison, Stuart; Mazharian, Alexandra; Lim, Jenson; Zhao, Yan; Kornerup, Kristin N; Auger, Jocelyn M; Thomas, Steve G; Dhanjal, Tarvinder; Kalia, Neena; Zhu, Jing W; Weiss, Arthur; Watson, Steve P

    2009-05-14

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are also involved in pathologic conditions resulting from blocked blood vessels, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at sites of vascular injury are regulated by a diverse repertoire of tyrosine kinase-linked and G protein-coupled receptors. Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in initiating and propagating signaling from several platelet surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanism of how SFK activity is regulated in platelets remains unclear. CD148 is the only receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase identified in platelets to date. In the present study, we show that mutant mice lacking CD148 exhibited a bleeding tendency and defective arterial thrombosis. Basal SFK activity was found to be markedly reduced in CD148-deficient platelets, resulting in a global hyporesponsiveness to agonists that signal through SFKs, including collagen and fibrinogen. G protein-coupled receptor responses to thrombin and other agonists were also marginally reduced. These results highlight CD148 as a global regulator of platelet activation and a novel antithrombotic drug target.

  8. The tyrosine phosphatase CD148 is an essential positive regulator of platelet activation and thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Michael G.; Ellison, Stuart; Mazharian, Alexandra; Lim, Jenson; Zhao, Yan; Kornerup, Kristin N.; Auger, Jocelyn M.; Thomas, Steve G.; Dhanjal, Tarvinder; Kalia, Neena; Zhu, Jing W.; Weiss, Arthur; Watson, Steve P.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis and thrombosis. They are also involved in pathologic conditions resulting from blocked blood vessels, including myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke. Platelet adhesion, activation, and aggregation at sites of vascular injury are regulated by a diverse repertoire of tyrosine kinase–linked and G protein–coupled receptors. Src family kinases (SFKs) play a central role in initiating and propagating signaling from several platelet surface receptors; however, the underlying mechanism of how SFK activity is regulated in platelets remains unclear. CD148 is the only receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase identified in platelets to date. In the present study, we show that mutant mice lacking CD148 exhibited a bleeding tendency and defective arterial thrombosis. Basal SFK activity was found to be markedly reduced in CD148-deficient platelets, resulting in a global hyporesponsiveness to agonists that signal through SFKs, including collagen and fibrinogen. G protein–coupled receptor responses to thrombin and other agonists were also marginally reduced. These results highlight CD148 as a global regulator of platelet activation and a novel antithrombotic drug target. PMID:19246339

  9. [Polyserositic syndromes and/or sectorial dysventilation with platelet activation induced by immunoallergic etiopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    De Luca, L

    1989-01-01

    The author from a study of 5 dysventilatorial syndromes (bronchiolitis-PNX, pneumomediastinal aerial cystis of lung) and 5 polysierositic syndromes pleuritis and peritonitis) evices that all these syndromes show in the anamnesis or in present a viral infection from influenzal virus or rubeola. In addition to that, the Authors shows the presence of a food allergy asserted by RAST and/or Skin Prick Tests or FBST (Food Bronchostimulation test) and the introduction of a food allergen during the viral infection, and a great platelet's activation. The Author, besides, shows the association normal VES and normal neutrophil cells in the dysventilatorial syndrome and high VES, and high neutrophil cells in the polysierositic syndromes; in all cases the negativity of culture exams. Starting from these points she worked out a new etiopathogenetic theory: the viral localization on the Peyer's plates cause the expression on the epithelial surface of the gut's cells of SELF HLA II type recognition. The food allergens' introduction causes a great reaction of II, III, IV, VI type which involves the bronchus, alveolus, and the serous epithelium by PAF activation, in all cases and in the polisierositic syndrome a neutrophil activation as well. The author advices to prize the importance of cortisone therapy and of exclusion of food allergen by diet, besides advices the antibiotic therapy for covering only.

  10. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 promotes platelet activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiwen; Zhang, Jian; Yan, Rong; Tian, Jingluan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Mengxing; Cui, Qingya; Zhao, Lili; Hu, Renping; Jiang, Miao; Li, Zhenyu; Ruan, Changgeng; He, Sudan; Dai, Kesheng

    2017-03-14

    Previous studies have shown that receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) is involved in many important biological processes, including necroptosis, apoptosis, and inflammation. Here we show that RIP3 plays a critical role in regulating platelet functions and in vivo thrombosis and hemostasis. Tail bleeding times were significantly longer in RIP3-knockout (RIP3(-/-)) mice compared with their wild-type (WT) littermates. In an in vivo model of arteriole thrombosis, mice lacking RIP3 exhibited prolonged occlusion times. WT mice repopulated with RIP3(-/-) bone marrow-derived cells had longer occlusion times than RIP3(-/-) mice repopulated with WT bone marrow-derived cells, suggesting a role for RIP3-deficient platelets in arterial thrombosis. Consistent with these findings, we observed that RIP3 was expressed in both human and mice platelets. Deletion of RIP3 in mouse platelets caused a marked defect in aggregation and attenuated dense granule secretion in response to low doses of thrombin or a thromboxane A2 analog, U46619. Phosphorylation of Akt induced by U46619 or thrombin was diminished in RIP3(-/-) platelets. Moreover, RIP3 interacted with Gα13 Platelet spreading on fibrinogen and clot retraction were impaired in the absence of RIP3. RIP3 inhibitor dose-dependently inhibited platelet aggregation in vitro and prevented arterial thrombus formation in vivo. These data demonstrate a role for RIP3 in promoting in vivo thrombosis and hemostasis by amplifying platelet activation. RIP3 may represent a novel promising therapeutic target for thrombotic diseases.

  11. MALT1-ubiquitination triggers non-genomic NF-κB/IKK signaling upon platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Karim, Zubair A; Vemana, Hari Priya; Khasawneh, Fadi T

    2015-01-01

    We have recently shown that IKK complex plays an important non-genomic role in platelet function, i.e., regulates SNARE machinery-dependent membrane fusion. In this connection, it is well known that MALT1, whose activity is modulated by proteasome, plays an important role in the regulation of IKK complex. Therefore, the present studies investigated the mechanism by which IKK signaling is regulated in the context of the platelet proteasome. It was found that platelets express a functional proteasome, and form CARMA/MALT1/Bcl10 (CBM) complex when activated. Using a pharmacological inhibitor, the proteasome was found to regulate platelet function (aggregation, integrin activation, secretion, phosphatidylserine exposure and changes in intracellular calcium). It was also found to regulate thrombogenesis and physiologic hemostasis. We also observed, upon platelet activation, that MALT1 is ubiquitinated, and this coincides with the activation of the IKK/NF-κB-signaling pathway. Finally, we observed that the proteasome inhibitor blocks CBM complex formation and the interaction of IKKγ and MALT1; abrogates SNARE formation, and the association of MALT1 with TAK1 and TAB2, which are upstream of the CBM complex. Thus, our data demonstrate that MALT1 ubiquitination is critical for the engagement of CBM and IKK complexes, thereby directing platelet signals to the NF-κB pathway.

  12. Micro-structuring of polycarbonate-urethane surfaces in order to reduce platelet activation and adhesion.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Johanna; Gester, Kathrin; Roggenkamp, Jan; Mager, Ilona; Maas, Judith; Jansen, Sebastian V; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    In the development of new hemocompatible biomaterials, surface modification appears to be a suitable method in order to reduce the thrombogenetic potential of such materials. In this study, polycarbonate-urethane (PCU) tubes with different surface microstructures to be used for aortic heart valve models were investigated with regard to the thrombogenicity. The surface structures were produced by using a centrifugal casting process for manufacturing PCU tubes with defined casting mold surfaces which are conferred to the PCU surface during the process. Tubes with different structures defined by altering groove widths were cut into films and investigated under dynamic flow conditions in contact with porcine blood. The analysis was carried out by laser scanning microscopy which allowed for counting various morphological types of platelets with regard to the grade of activation. The comparison between plain and shaped PCU samples showed that the surface topography led to a decline of the activation of the coagulation cascade and thus to the reduction of the fibrin synthesis. Comparing different types of structures revealed that smooth structures with a small groove width (d ~ 3 μm) showed less platelet activation as well as less adhesion in contrast to a distinct wave structure (d ~ 90 μm). These results prove surface modification of polymer biomaterials to be a suitable method for reducing thrombogenicity and hence give reason for further alterations and improvements.

  13. Platelets aggregation in pathological conditions: role of local shear rates and platelet activation delay time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, He; Zarif Khalili Yazdani, Alireza; Karniadakis, George

    2015-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in the initiation and formation of a thrombus, however their detailed motion in blood vessels with complex geometries, such as in the aneurysmal vessel or stenotic vessel in atherosclerosis, has not been studied systematically. Here, we perform spectral element simulations (NEKTAR code) to obtain the 3D flow field in blood vessel with cavities, and we apply the force coupling method (FCM) to simulate the motion of platelets in blood flow. Specifically, simulations of platelets are performed in a 0.25 mm diameter circular blood vessel with 1 mm length. Corresponding coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are employed to provide input to the NEKTAR-FCM code. Simulations are conducted at several different Reynolds numbers (Re). An ellipsoid-shaped cavity is selected to intersect with the middle part of the circular vessel to represent the aneurysmal part of the blood vessel. Based on the simulation results, we quantify how the platelets motion and aggregation in the blood vessel cavities depend on Re, platelet activation delay time, and the geometry of the cavities.

  14. Redox Proteomics and Platelet Activation: Understanding the Redox Proteome to Improve Platelet Quality for Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sonego, Giona; Abonnenc, Mélanie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Prudent, Michel; Lion, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Blood banks use pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies to increase the safety of platelet concentrates (PCs). The characteristics of PI-treated PCs slightly differ from those of untreated PCs, but the underlying reasons are not well understood. One possible cause is the generation of oxidative stress during the PI process. This is of great interest since reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as second messengers in platelet functions. Furthermore, there are links between protein oxidation and phosphorylation, another mechanism that is critical for cell regulation. Current research efforts focus on understanding the underlying mechanisms and identifying new target proteins. Proteomics technologies represent powerful tools for investigating signaling pathways involving ROS and post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation, while quantitative techniques enable the comparison of the platelet resting state versus the stimulated state. In particular, redox cysteine is a key player in platelet activation upon stimulation by different agonists. This review highlights the experiments that have provided insights into the roles of ROS in platelet function and the implications for platelet transfusion, and potentially in diseases such as inflammation and platelet hyperactivity. The review also describes the implication of redox mechanism in platelet storage considerations. PMID:28208668

  15. Metabolic syndrome, platelet activation and the development of transient ischemic attack or thromboembolic stroke.

    PubMed

    van Rooy, Mia-Jeanne; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2015-03-01

    Stroke is the second most common cause of mortality in the world today, where transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a period of focal ischemia, the symptoms of which resemble a thromboembolic stroke. Contrary to stroke, TIA symptoms typically last less than one hour and necrosis is absent. Stroke is often preceded by TIA, making it an important predictor of future ischemic events. The causal role of atherosclerosis in the development of TIA is well established, however, research indicates that the atherosclerotic process begins years earlier with the development of metabolic syndrome, which affects approximately 45% of the adult population worldwide. Metabolic syndrome is present if three or more of the following is present: increased waist circumference, increased triglycerides, decreased HDL, increased fasting glucose and hypertension. This syndrome causes systemic inflammation that activates the coagulation system and may cause the formation of pathological thrombi. The role of platelets in stroke has been studied and platelet activation pathways identified. ADP and thromboxane A(2) are the most common activators of platelets in normal physiology. Several pharmacological treatments have been employed to prevent the activation of platelets, the most common of which include aspirin and P2Y(12)-inhibitors. Although treatment is administered strokes and subsequent TIAs are very common in individuals that suffered an initial event. This indicates that research needs to be done in order to elucidate new therapeutic targets, but also to better treat ischemic events to not only decrease the amount of recurring events but also decrease stroke mortality worldwide.

  16. Factors Influencing Productivity Change in the Forest Products Industry,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    substitution together with nonneutral technical progress" (p.179) Solow (1957) in a landmark study developed a method for estimating * technological change... Solow approach to measuring total factor productivity is the impli- 30 cit assumption of neutral technological change. In the case of the forest products...Three Mississippi Counties. Mississippi Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin No. 713. Solow , R. M. 1959. Investment and Economic Growth: Some

  17. Comparison of two platelet activation markers using flow cytometry after in vitro shear stress exposure of whole human blood.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qijin; Malinauskas, Richard A

    2011-02-01

    Platelet activation is the initiating step to thromboembolic complications in blood-contacting medical devices. Currently, there are no widely accepted testing protocols or relevant metrics to assess platelet activation during the in vitro evaluation of new medical devices. In this article, two commonly used platelet activation marker antibodies, CD62P (platelet surface P-selectin) and PAC1 (activated GP IIb/IIIa), were evaluated using flow cytometry. Anticoagulant citrate dextrose solution A (ACDA) and heparin anticoagulated human blood from healthy donors were separately exposed to shear stresses of 0, 10, 15, and 20 Pa for 120 s using a cone-plate rheometer model, and immediately mixed with the platelet marker antibodies for analysis. To monitor for changes in platelet reactivity between donors and over time, blood samples were also evaluated after exposure to 0, 2, and 20 µM of adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Following ADP stimulation, the percentage of both CD62P and PAC1 positive platelets increased in a dose dependent fashion, even 8 h after the blood was collected. After shear stress stimulation, both CD62P and PAC1 positive platelets increased significantly at shear stress levels of 15 and 20 Pa when ACDA was used as the anticoagulant. However, for heparinized blood, the PAC1 positive platelets decreased with increasing shear stress, while the CD62P positive platelets increased. Besides the anticoagulant effect, the platelet staining buffer also impacted PAC1 response, but had little effect on CD62P positive platelets. These data suggest that CD62P is a more reliable marker compared with PAC1 for measuring shear-dependent platelet activation and it has the potential for use during in vitro medical device testing.

  18. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood.

  19. A whole blood flow cytometric determination of platelet activation by unfractionated and low molecular weight heparin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Klein, Bernd; Faridi, Andreé; von Tempelhoff, G F; Heilmann, Lothar; Mittermayer, Christian; Rath, Werner

    2002-12-15

    The influence of unfractionated (Heparin-Natrium) and low-molecular heparin (Fragmin(R)) on platelet activation in whole blood was investigated by FACS analysis in vitro using antibodies against glycoprotein (gp) IIb/IIIa (CD 41), GMP 140 (CD 62P), gp 53 (CD 63) and fibrinogen. Samples were also labeled with anti-gp Ib (CD 42b). Neither unfractionated heparin (UFH) nor low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) led to significant (i.e., p<0.05) changes in fluorescence intensities of platelets labeled with anti-gp IIb/IIIa or anti-gp 53. Significant platelet activation due to unfractionated heparin could be observed by labeling with anti-GMP 140 (UFH: p=0.009; LMWH: p=0.16). The proportion of platelets with surface-bound fibrinogen was significantly increased (UFH: p=0.00006; LMWH: p=0.008). After incubation with heparins, activation ability of platelets by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was significantly increased. The potentiating action of unfractionated heparin was larger. Therefore, flow cytometric results of platelet activation in patients receiving heparin should be interpreted carefully.

  20. New organic nitrate-containing benzyloxy isonipecotanilide derivatives with vasodilatory and anti-platelet activity.

    PubMed

    de Candia, Modesto; Marini, Elisabetta; Zaetta, Giorgia; Cellamare, Saverio; Di Stilo, Antonella; Altomare, Cosimo D

    2015-05-25

    A number of new nitric oxide (NO)-precursors were synthesized by grafting nitrate-containing moieties on the structures of the benzyloxy isonipecotanilide derivatives 1 and 2 already reported as moderately potent antiplatelet agents. Various nitrooxy (ONO2)-alkyl side chains were covalently linked to the piperidine nitrogen of the parent compounds through carbamate and amide linkage, and the synthesis of a benzyl nitrate analog (15) of compound 1 was also achieved. The in vitro vasodilatory activities, as well as platelet anti-aggregatory effects, of the newly synthesized organic nitrates were assessed. The (ONO2)methyl carbamate-based derivative 5a and the benzyl nitrate analog 15, which on the other hand retain activity as inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, exhibited strong NO-mediated vasodilatory effects on pre-contracted rat aorta strips, with EC50 values in the low nanomolar range (13 and 29 nM, respectively). Experiments carried out with the selectively inhibited soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), which is the key enzyme of the NO-mediated pathway leading to vascular smooth muscle relaxation, confirmed the involvement of NO in the observed vasodilation. The nitrate derivatives proved to be stable in acidic aqueous solution and at pH 7.4. In human serum, unlike 5a, which showed not to undergo enzyme-catalyzed decomposition, the other tested (ONO2)-alkyl carbamate-based compounds (5b and 5e) and benzyl nitrate 15 underwent a faster degradation. However, their decomposition rates in serum were quite slow (t½>2.6 h), which suggests that nitrate moiety is poorly metabolized in blood plasma and that much of the in vitro anti-platelet activity has to be attributed to the intact (ONO2)-containing molecules.

  1. Effect of resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound, on platelet activation induced by endotoxin or thrombin.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Zieliński, Tomasz

    2002-08-15

    Resveratrol (3, 4', 5-trihydroxystilbene), a natural polyphenol, is found in some plants that are used in human nutrition. Grapes are a major source for resveratrol, and a significant amount can also be found in red wine. Several experimental studies have demonstrated biological properties of resveratrol, especially its anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-platelet and antitumor effects. In the present study, we investigated the first step of platelet activation-platelet adhesion stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Proteus mirabilis (weak stimulator) and thrombin (strong activator) in the presence of resveratrol. Our studies show that endotoxin (0.3 microg/10(8) platelets), like thrombin (0.2 U/10(8) platelets), induced the adhesion of platelets (expressed as absorbance of cell attached proteins) to collagen and fibrinogen. Preincubation of washed platelets with resveratrol at physiological plasma concentrations (25-100 microg/ml, 30 min, 37 degrees C) had an inhibitory effect on adhesion of platelets to collagen after activation by LPS alone or LPS with thrombin. The strongest effect on this process was caused by resveratrol at the concentration of 100 microg/ml. Pretreatment of platelets with resveratrol (25-100 microg/ml, 30 min, 37 degrees C) had also inhibitory effects on adhesion of platelets to fibrinogen after stimulation of these cells by LPS alone or by LPS with thrombin at the same concentration. In conclusion, we suggest that resveratrol present in human diet may be an important compound responsible for the reduction of platelet adhesion and changed reactivity of blood platelets in inflammatory process.

  2. The space station: Human factors and productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillan, D. J.; Burns, M. J.; Nicodemus, C. L.; Smith, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Human factor researchers and engineers are making inputs into the early stages of the design of the Space Station to improve both the quality of life and work on-orbit. Effective integration of the human factors information related to various Intravehicular Activity (IVA), Extravehicular Activity (EVA), and teletobotics systems during the Space Station design will result in increased productivity, increased flexibility of the Space Stations systems, lower cost of operations, improved reliability, and increased safety for the crew onboard the Space Station. The major features of productivity examined include the cognitive and physical effort involved in work, the accuracy of worker output and ability to maintain performance at a high level of accuracy, the speed and temporal efficiency with which a worker performs, crewmember satisfaction with their work environment, and the relation between performance and cost.

  3. Collagen-induced platelet activation mainly involves the protein kinase C pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Karniguian, A; Grelac, F; Levy-Toledano, S; Legrand, Y J; Rendu, F

    1990-01-01

    This study analyses early biochemical events in collagen-induced platelet activation. An early metabolic event occurring during the lag phase was the activation of PtdIns(4,5)P2-specific phospholipase C. Phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) formation, phosphorylation of P43 and P20, thromboxane B2 (TXB2) synthesis and platelet secretion began after the lag phase, and were similarly time-dependent, except for TXB2 synthesis, which was delayed. Collagen induced extensive P43 phosphorylation, whereas P20 phosphorylation was weak and always lower than with thrombin. The dose-response curves of P43 phosphorylation and granule secretion were similar, and both reached a peak at 7.5 micrograms of collagen/ml, a dose which induced half-maximal PtdOH and TXB2 formation. Sphingosine, assumed to inhibit protein kinase C, inhibited P43 phosphorylation and secretion in parallel. However, sphingosine was not specific for protein kinase C, since a 15 microM concentration, which did not inhibit P43 phosphorylation, blocked TXB2 synthesis by 50%. Sphingosine did not affect PtdOH formation at all, even at 100 microM, suggesting that collagen itself induced this PtdOH formation, independently of TXB2 generation. The absence of external Ca2+ allowed the cleavage of polyphosphoinositides and the accumulation of InsP3 to occur, but impaired P43 phosphorylation, PtdOH and TXB2 formation, and secretion; these were only restored by adding 0.11 microM-Ca2+. In conclusion, stimulation of platelet membrane receptors for collagen initiates a PtdInsP2-specific phospholipase C activation, which is independent of external Ca2+, and might be the immediate receptor-linked response. A Ca2+ influx is indispensable to the triggering of subsequent platelet responses. This stimulation predominantly involves the protein kinase C pathway associated with secretion, and appears not to be mediated by TXB2, at least during its initial stage. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2163606

  4. Human platelet activation by Escherichia coli: roles for FcγRIIA and integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Callum N.; Kerrigan, Steven W.; Cox, Dermot; Henderson, Ian R.; Watson, Steve P.; Arman, Mònica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gram-negative Escherichia coli cause diseases such as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in which thrombotic disorders can be found. Direct platelet–bacterium interactions might contribute to some of these conditions; however, mechanisms of human platelet activation by E. coli leading to thrombus formation are poorly understood. While the IgG receptor FcγRIIA has a key role in platelet response to various Gram-positive species, its role in activation to Gram-negative bacteria is poorly defined. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of human platelet activation by E. coli, including the potential role of FcγRIIA. Using light-transmission aggregometry, measurements of ATP release and tyrosine-phosphorylation, we investigated the ability of two E. coli clinical isolates to activate platelets in plasma, in the presence or absence of specific receptors and signaling inhibitors. Aggregation assays with washed platelets supplemented with IgGs were performed to evaluate the requirement of this plasma component in activation. We found a critical role for the immune receptor FcγRIIA, αIIbβ3, and Src and Syk tyrosine kinases in platelet activation in response to E. coli. IgG and αIIbβ3 engagement was required for FcγRIIA activation. Moreover, feedback mediators adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) were essential for platelet aggregation. These findings suggest that human platelet responses to E. coli isolates are similar to those induced by Gram-positive organisms. Our observations support the existence of a central FcγRIIA-mediated pathway by which human platelets respond to both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27025455

  5. Associations of MDR1, TBXA2R, PLA2G7, and PEAR1 genetic polymorphisms with the platelet activity in Chinese ischemic stroke patients receiving aspirin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ling-ling; Zhao, Yuan-qi; Zhou, Zi-yi; Jin, Jing; Zhao, Min; Chen, Xin-meng; Chen, Ling-yan; Cai, Ye-feng; Li, Jia-li; Huang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Aspirin resistance has an incidence of 5%–65% in patients with ischemic stroke, who receive the standard dose of aspirin, but the platelet function is inadequately inhibited, thereby leading to thrombotic events. Numerous evidence shows that thromboxane A2 receptor (TXA2 receptor, encoded by TBXA2R), lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2, encoded by PLA2G7) and platelet endothelial aggregation receptor-1 (PEAR1, encoded by PEAR1) are crucial in regulating platelet activation, and P-glycoprotein (P-gp, encoded by MDR1) influences the absorption of aspirin in the intestine. In this study we examined the correlation between MDR1, TBXA2R, PLA2G7, PEAR1 genetic polymorphisms and platelet activity in Chinese ischemic stroke patients receiving aspirin therapy. Methods: A total of 283 ischemic stroke patients receiving 100 mg aspirin for 7 d were genotyped for polymorphisms in MDR1 C3435T, TBXA2R (rs1131882), PLA2G7 (rs1051931, rs7756935), and PEAR1 (rs12566888, rs12041331). The platelet aggregation response was measured using an automatic platelet aggregation analyzer and a commercially available TXB2 ELISA kit. Results: Thirty-three patients (11.66%) were insensitive to aspirin treatment. MDR1 3435TT genotype carriers, whose arachidonic acid (AA) or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was lower than that of CC+CT genotype carriers, were less likely to suffer from aspirin resistance (odds ratio=0.421, 95% CI: 0.233–0.759). The TBXA2R rs1131882 CC genotype, which was found more frequently in the aspirin-insensitive group (81.8% vs 62.4%) than in the sensitive group, was identified as a risk factor for aspirin resistance (odds ratio=2.712, 95% CI: 1.080–6.810) with a higher level of AA-induced platelet aggregation. Due to the combined effects of PLA2G7 rs1051931 and rs7756935, carriers of the AA-CC haplotype had a higher level of ADP-induced platelet aggregation, and were at considerably higher risk of aspirin resistance than

  6. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta modulate the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production induced by Fc gamma-receptor stimulation in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Winston, B W; Chan, E D; Riches, D W; Henson, P M

    1997-09-08

    Engagement of receptors for the Fc region of IgG (Fc gamma R) can activate a variety of biological responses in macrophages, and these responses can be modulated either positively or negatively by co-stimulation with a variety of agents including cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have previously demonstrated that Fc gamma R crosslinking activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members p42MAPK, p38, and JNK. Herein, we examined the modulatory effect of IFN-gamma, TGF-beta, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on Fc gamma R-induced MAPK activation in murine macrophages. Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK and JNK was augmented nearly two-fold by pretreatment with IFN-gamma. Conversely, TGF-beta pretreatment suppressed Fc gamma R-induced activation of p42MAPK, JNK, and p38. These modulatory effects of IFN-gamma and TGF-beta on MAPK activation correlated with changes in Fc gamma R-stimulated TNF-alpha production by these two cytokines.

  7. Cystamine immobilization on TiO 2 film surfaces and the influence on inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yujuan; Weng, Yajun; Zhang, Liping; Jing, Fengjuan; Huang, Nan; Chen, Junying

    2011-12-01

    Poor haemocompatibility is a main issue of artificial cardiovascular materials in clinical application. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by vascular endothelial cells, is a well known inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation. Thus, NO-releasing biomaterials are beneficial for improving haemocompatibility of blood-contacting biomedical devices. In this paper, a novel method was developed for enhancement of haemocompatibility by exploiting endogenous NO donors. TiO 2 films were firstly synthesized on Si (1 0 0) wafers via unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology, and then polydopamine was grafted on TiO 2 films and used as a linker for further immobilization of cystamine. The obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. NO generation is evaluated by saville-griess reagents, and it shows that cystamine immobilized samples are able to catalytically generate NO by decomposing endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). In vitro platelet adhesion results reveal that cystamine modified surfaces can inhibit collagen-induced platelet activation. ELISA analysis reveals that cGMP in platelets obviously increases on cystamine immobilized surface, which suggests the reducing of platelet activation is through NO/cGMP signal channel. It can be concluded that cystamine immobilized surface shows better blood compatibility by catalyzing NO release from the endogenous NO donor. It may be a promising method for improvement of haemocompatibility of blood-contacting implants.

  8. International factor mobility and production technology.

    PubMed

    Kondo, H

    1989-12-01

    This paper systematically investigates the pattern and effect of international factor mobility caused by international differences of production technology in an endogenous-population-growth and overlapping-generations model. It is shown here that if the autarkic steady state in each country is characterized by under-investment relative to the Golden Rule, international labor migration will take place to the country with a more capital-saving or neutrally superior technology, and then the capital-labor ratio and the demand for children per family in that country will be lower. On the other hand, international capital will move to the country with a more labor-saving or a neutrally superior technology and will decrease the per worker domestic capital stock in that country.

  9. High levels of LDL-C combined with low levels of HDL-C further increase platelet activation in hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, L W; Luo, X P; Ni, H C; Shi, H M; Liu, L; Wen, Z C; Gu, X Y; Qiao, J; Li, J

    2015-02-01

    High levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) enhance platelet activation, whereas high levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) exert a cardioprotective effect. However, the effects on platelet activation of high levels of LDL-C combined with low levels of HDL-C (HLC) have not yet been reported. We aimed to evaluate the platelet activation marker of HLC patients and investigate the antiplatelet effect of atorvastatin on this population. Forty-eight patients with high levels of LDL-C were enrolled. Among these, 23 had HLC and the other 25 had high levels of LDL-C combined with normal levels of HDL-C (HNC). A total of 35 normocholesterolemic (NOMC) volunteers were included as controls. Whole blood flow cytometry and platelet aggregation measurements were performed on all participants to detect the following platelet activation markers: CD62p (P-selectin), PAC-1 (GPIIb/IIIa), and maximal platelet aggregation (MPAG). A daily dose of 20 mg atorvastatin was administered to patients with high levels of LDL-C, and the above assessments were obtained at baseline and after 1 and 2 months of treatment. The expression of platelets CD62p and PAC-1 was increased in HNC patients compared to NOMC volunteers (P<0.01 and P<0.05). Furthermore, the surface expression of platelets CD62p and PAC-1 was greater among HLC patients than among HNC patients (P<0.01 and P<0.05). Although the expression of CD62p and PAC-1 decreased significantly after atorvastatin treatment, it remained higher in the HLC group than in the HNC group (P<0.05 and P=0.116). The reduction of HDL-C further increased platelet activation in patients with high levels of LDL-C. Platelet activation remained higher among HLC patients regardless of atorvastatin treatment.

  10. [Dynamics of violations of intravascular platelet activity in rats during the formation of metabolic syndrome using fructose models].

    PubMed

    Medvedev, I N

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To trace the development of disorders intravascular platelet activity in experimental form of the metabolic syndrome. The study included 61 rat male Wistar rats at the age of 2.5-3 months. Animals were divided into 2 groups: 32 rats were given free access to drink 10% solution of fructose for 8 weeks and 29 rats were the control group. The level of the total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLD cholesterol) and triglycerides were determined using colorimetric enzymatic method. The blood plasma content of endothelin-1 was determined by radioimmunoassay, thromboxane B2 and 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1α)--by ELISA. The total content of nitrogen oxide metabolites was revealed in blood. Intravascular platelet activity was assessed using phase contrast microscopy. In terms of fructose load in rats simultaneously with the increase of body weight and the development of biochemical disorders that are characteristic for the metabolic syndrome, there comes a marked progressive increase in intravascular platelet activity [reduction of the number of discocytes from 81.0 ± 0.1 to 61.3 ± 0.2%, increase in the number of reactive platelets from 19.0 ± 0.1 to 38.7 ± 0.2%, an increase in the number of freely moving in the blood of small units from 2.4 ± 0.0 to 14.6 ± 0.1 per 100 free platelets, and of medium and large units (from 4 or more cells) from 0.1 ± 0.03 to 2.3 ± 0.06 per 100 free platelets], largely due to the increase (p < 0.01) of the synthesis of thromboxane B2 (from 145.9 ± 0.2 to 232.6 ± 0.7 pg/ml), endothelin-4 (from 6.9 ± 0.2 to 12.5 ± 0.4 pg/ml) and reduction (p < 0.01) of the generation of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (from 75.9 ± 0.2 to 62.3 ± 0.4 pg/ml), and the total amount of nitric oxide metabolites (from 27.9 ± 0.3 to 23.2 ± 0.1 mmol/l).

  11. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  12. Polyethylene glycol modification of adenovirus reduces platelet activation, endothelial cell activation, and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Hofherr, Sean E; Mok, Hoyin; Gushiken, Francisca C; Lopez, Jose A; Barry, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    Thrombocytopenia is one of the complications for in vivo administration of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors after intravenous injection. In this paper, we investigated the mechanism of Ad5-induced thrombocytopenia and how these effects are attenuated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) modification of Ad5 (Ad-PEG). After intravenous injection, accelerated platelet loss was observed in Ad-injected mice but not in their Ad-PEG-injected counterparts. This platelet loss induced by Ad5 corresponded with increases in coagulation D-dimer levels, splenomegaly, and, later, production of megakaryocytes in the bone marrow. In contrast, these responses were blunted or ablated after injection of Ad-PEG. Ad5 activated both platelets and endothelial cells directly in vitro as evidenced by induction of P-selectin and the formation of von Willebrand factor-platelet strings and in vivo as evidenced by the induction of E-selectin messenger RNA. PEGylation blunted these observed activations. These data suggest that Ad5 may induce thrombocytopenia by direct activation of endothelial cells in addition to its direct effects on platelets. This link provides an important clue for the understanding of the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia associated with Ad5. Given that PEGylation blunted interactions of Ad with platelets and endothelial cells, reduced D-dimer formation, reduced thrombocytopenia, and reduced splenomegaly, these data suggest that this simple vector modification may have utility to improve the safety of Ad vectors for human gene therapy.

  13. Effect of the hydrogen sulfide donor GYY4137 on platelet activation and microvascular thrombus formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Grambow, Eberhard; Mueller-Graf, Fabian; Delyagina, Evgenya; Frank, Marcus; Kuhla, Angela; Vollmar, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of the H2S donor GYY4137 (GYY) on adhesion molecule expression, protein S-sulfhydration and morphology of platelets in vitro and on kinetics of microvascular thrombus formation in vivo. Using flowcytometry, untreated resting, TRAP-activated, or TRAP-activated and GYY-exposed human platelets were studied for expression of P-selectin, GPIb and GPIIb/IIIa as well as for fibrinogen binding. By means of electron microscopy, platelet morphology and intracellular granule numbers were assessed. Platelet shape change was studied using immunohistochemistry for P-selectin, NSF and F-actin by SR-SIM. Biotin switch assay served for the analysis of platelet protein S-sulfhydration by GYY. Using the FeCl3 and the light/dye model in dorsal skinfold chamber-equipped mice, the effect of GYY and its vehicle DMSO was studied on venular thrombus formation and tail-vein bleeding time. Soluble (s)P-selectin plasma concentrations were measured in GYY- or DMSO-treated animals. Exposure to GYY increased the S-sulfhydration of platelet proteins. GYY reduced dose-dependently the TRAP-induced adhesion molecule expression and attenuated the morphological signs of TRAP-associated platelet activation. In mice, GYY caused a significant prolongation of venular thrombus formation and tail-vein bleeding time. Application of an anti-P-selectin antibody in DMSO-exposed animals prolonged thrombosis formation comparably as GYY did. GYY reversed the TRAP-induced distribution of P-selectin at the plasma membrane of platelets. This indicates reduced exocytosis and shedding of P-selectin, which is supported by significantly lower sP-selectin concentrations in GYY- vs. DMSO-treated mice. H2S acts anti-thrombotic and seems to regulate thrombogenesis by interference with platelet activation and adhesion molecule-mediated aggregation.

  14. Whole blood coagulation and platelet activation in the athlete: A comparison of marathon, triathlon and long distance cycling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Serious thrombembolic events occur in otherwise healthy marathon athletes during competition. We tested the hypothesis that during heavy endurance sports coagulation and platelets are activated depending on the type of endurance sport with respect to its running fraction. Materials and Methods 68 healthy athletes participating in marathon (MAR, running 42 km, n = 24), triathlon (TRI, swimming 2.5 km + cycling 90 km + running 21 km, n = 22), and long distance cycling (CYC, 151 km, n = 22) were included in the study. Blood samples were taken before and immediately after completion of competition to perform rotational thrombelastometry. We assessed coagulation time (CT), maximum clot firmness (MCF) after intrinsically activation and fibrin polymerization (FIBTEM). Furthermore, platelet aggregation was tested after activation with ADP and thrombin activating peptide 6 (TRAP) by using multiple platelet function analyzer. Results Complete data sets were obtained in 58 athletes (MAR: n = 20, TRI: n = 19, CYC: n = 19). CT significantly decreased in all groups (MAR -9.9%, TRI -8.3%, CYC -7.4%) without differences between groups. In parallel, MCF (MAR +7.4%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) and fibrin polymerization (MAR +14.7%, TRI +6.1%, CYC +8.3%) were significantly increased in all groups. However, platelets were only activated during MAR and TRI as indicated by increased AUC during TRAP-activation (MAR +15.8%) and increased AUC during ADP-activation in MAR (+50.3%) and TRI (+57.5%). Discussion While coagulation is activated during physical activity irrespective of type we observed significant platelet activation only during marathon and to a lesser extent during triathlon. We speculate that prolonged running may increase platelet activity, possibly, due to mechanical alteration. Thus, particularly prolonged running may increase the risk of thrombembolic incidents in running athletes. PMID:20452885

  15. Duration of exposure to high fluid shear stress is critical in shear-induced platelet activation-aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-ning; Bergeron, Angela L; Yu, Qinghua; Sun, Carol; McBride, Latresha; Bray, Paul F; Dong, Jing-fei

    2003-10-01

    Platelet functions are increasingly measured under flow conditions to account for blood hydrodynamic effects. Typically, these studies involve exposing platelets to high shear stress for periods significantly longer than would occur in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrate that the platelet response to high shear depends on the duration of shear exposure. In response to a 100 dyn/cm2 shear stress for periods less than 10-20 sec, platelets in PRP or washed platelets were aggregated, but minimally activated as demonstrated by P-selectin expression and binding of the activation-dependent alphaIIbbeta3 antibody PAC-1 to sheared platelets. Furthermore, platelet aggregation under such short pulses of high shear was subjected to rapid disaggregation. The disaggregated platelets could be re-aggregated by ADP in a pattern similar to unsheared platelets. In comparison, platelets that are exposed to high shear for longer than 20 sec are activated and aggregated irreversibly. In contrast, platelet activation and aggregation were significantly greater in whole blood with significantly less disaggregation. The enhancement is likely via increased collision frequency of platelet-platelet interaction and duration of platelet-platelet association due to high cell density. It may also be attributed to the ADP release from other cells such as red blood cells because increased platelet aggregation in whole blood was partially inhibited by ADP blockage. These studies demonstrate that platelets have a higher threshold for shear stress than previously believed. In a pathologically relevant timeframe, high shear alone is likely to be insufficient in inducing platelet activation and aggregation, but acts synergistically with other stimuli.

  16. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  17. Inflammation, oxidative stress and platelet activation in aspirin-treated critical limb ischaemia: beneficial effects of iloprost.

    PubMed

    Lessiani, Gianfranco; Vazzana, Natale; Cuccurullo, Chiara; Di Michele, Dario; Laurora, Giuseppe; Sgrò, Giuseppe; Di Ruscio, Paolo; Simeone, Emilio; Di Iorio, Pierangelo; Lattanzio, Stefano; Liani, Rossella; Ferrante, Elisabetta; Davì, Giovanni

    2011-02-01

    Platelets critically contribute to atherothrombosis and worsening ischaemia in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), eventually leading to critical limb ischaemia (CLI). Furthermore, persistent platelet activation despite antiplatelet therapy has been reported in this setting. The prostacyclin analogue iloprost is currently recommended in CLI patients for its effects in relieving symptoms by promoting local perfusion. In this study, we investigated the effects of iloprost infusion on urinary 11-dehydro-TXB₂ and 8-iso-PGF(₂α) excretion rate, as in vivo indexes of thromboxane-dependent platelet activation and lipid peroxidation, respectively, and on platelet-derived proinflammatory sCD40L and nitric oxide bioavailability in 44 patients with CLI while on chronic treatment with low-dose aspirin. Daily iloprost infusion for one-week significantly decreased urinary 11-dehydro-TXB₂ [499 (277-807) vs. 380 (189-560) pg/mg creatinine, p < 0.0001] and 8-iso-PGF(₂α) [533 (316-842) vs. 334 (196-540) pg/mg creatinine, p < 0.0001] as well as plasma sCD40L [1540 (1005-3015) vs. 948 (845-2030) pg/ml, p < 0.0001]. Furthermore, a significant increase in plasma nitrate plus nitrite levels has been observed [26.8 (18.8-35.9) vs. 43.7 (33.0-75.5) μM, p < 0.0001]. A significant direct correlation was also found between urinary 8-iso-PGF(₂α) and 11-dehydro-TXB2 before and after iloprost treatment (Rho = 0.695, p < 0.0001). In conclusion, we report that a short-term course of iloprost is able to significantly reduce residual thromboxane biosynthesis, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction and platelet-derived inflammation in low-dose aspirin treated patients with CLI.

  18. Production of Tuber-Inducing Factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Yorio, Neil C.

    2006-01-01

    A process for making a substance that regulates the growth of potatoes and some other economically important plants has been developed. The process also yields an economically important by-product: potatoes. The particular growth-regulating substance, denoted tuber-inducing factor (TIF), is made naturally by, and acts naturally on, potato plants. The primary effects of TIF on potato plants are reducing the lengths of the main shoots, reducing the numbers of nodes on the main stems, reducing the total biomass, accelerating the initiation of potatoes, and increasing the edible fraction (potatoes) of the overall biomass. To some extent, these effects of TIF can override environmental effects that typically inhibit the formation of tubers. TIF can be used in the potato industry to reduce growth time and increase harvest efficiency. Other plants that have been observed to be affected by TIF include tomatoes, peppers, radishes, eggplants, marigolds, and morning glories. In the present process, potatoes are grown with their roots and stolons immersed in a nutrient solution in a recirculating hydroponic system. From time to time, a nutrient replenishment solution is added to the recirculating nutrient solution to maintain the required nutrient concentration, water is added to replace water lost from the recirculating solution through transpiration, and an acid or base is added, as needed, to maintain the recirculating solution at a desired pH level. The growing potato plants secrete TIF into the recirculating solution. The concentration of TIF in the solution gradually increases to a range in which the TIF regulates the growth of the plants.

  19. Factors Explaining Faculty Technology Use and Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Yonghong; Meyer, Katrina A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines factors related to technology use in teaching by university faculty. An EFA analysis of multiple questions of technology use in the classroom found two factors: one loaded with Web use and the second with email use. Therefore, three research questions were asked: What factors explain faculty use of the Web or email? Are these…

  20. Effects of polyphenol-rich extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa on the markers of oxidative stress and blood platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kedzierska, Magdalena; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive substances found in numerous foods can be successfully and safely used to modify various cellular functions and affect the oxidative stress. Aronia melanocarpa fruits (Rosaceae) are one of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances shown to have anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidative and antiplatelet activities. We investigated antioxidant properties of the extract from berries of A. melanocarpa by the estimation of the selected and other biomarkers of oxidative stress, i.e. the level of 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2) (8-EPI) (by immunoassay kit) and the amount of glutathione (by HPLC method) in control platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2). The expression of alpha(IIb)beta(3) (a marker of platelet activation) was measured by flow cytometer. The antioxidative and antiplatelet properties of the tested extract were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative and antiplatelet commercial monomeric polyphenol-resveratrol. The extract from berries of A. melanocarpa (at the highest tested concentration -100 microg/ml) decreased the production of 8-EPI (a marker of lipid peroxidation) in control blood platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2) (2 mM). A combined action of the tested plant extract and H(2)O(2) evoked a significant increase of reduced form of glutathione in platelets compared with cells treated with H(2)O(2) only. Moreover, the tested plant extract (at the highest used concentration -100 microg/ml) reduced the expression of alpha(IIb)beta(3) on blood platelets. Comparative studies indicate that the tested plant extract was found to be more reactive in blood platelets than the solution of pure resveratrol.

  1. Multi-omics Analysis of Serum Samples Demonstrates Reprogramming of Organ Functions Via Systemic Calcium Mobilization and Platelet Activation in Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Muqaku, Besnik; Eisinger, Martin; Meier, Samuel M; Tahir, Ammar; Pukrop, Tobias; Haferkamp, Sebastian; Slany, Astrid; Reichle, Albrecht; Gerner, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Pathophysiologies of cancer-associated syndromes such as cachexia are poorly understood and no routine biomarkers have been established, yet. Using shotgun proteomics, known marker molecules including PMEL, CRP, SAA, and CSPG4 were found deregulated in patients with metastatic melanoma. Targeted analysis of 58 selected proteins with multiple reaction monitoring was applied for independent data verification. In three patients, two of which suffered from cachexia, a tissue damage signature was determined, consisting of nine proteins, PLTP, CD14, TIMP1, S10A8, S10A9, GP1BA, PTPRJ, CD44, and C4A, as well as increased levels of glycine and asparagine, and decreased levels of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine concentrations, as determined by targeted metabolomics. Remarkably, these molecules are known to be involved in key processes of cancer cachexia. Based on these results, we propose a model how metastatic melanoma may lead to reprogramming of organ functions via formation of platelet activating factors from long-chain polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines under oxidative conditions and via systemic induction of intracellular calcium mobilization. Calcium mobilization in platelets was demonstrated to alter levels of several of these marker molecules. Additionally, platelets from melanoma patients proved to be in a rather exhausted state, and platelet-derived eicosanoids implicated in tumor growth were found massively increased in blood from three melanoma patients. Platelets were thus identified as important source of serum protein and lipid alterations in late stage melanoma patients. As a result, the proposed model describes the crosstalk between lipolysis of fat tissue and muscle wasting mediated by oxidative stress, resulting in the metabolic deregulations characteristic for cachexia.

  2. Factors Related to Faculty Publishing Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Carol Ann

    This paper reports the results of a study that used Confirmatory Factor Analysis techniques to analyze data collected using the "Faculty at Work" (Robert T. Blackburn and Janet H. Lawrence) survey instrument in an effort to untangle effects and confirm the factor composition of theoretical constructs used as the basis for this…

  3. Distinct determinants on collagen support alpha 2 beta 1 integrin-mediated platelet adhesion and platelet activation.

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, S A; Walsh, J J; Staatz, W D; Baranski, K J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that the sequence of amino acids asp-gly-glu-ala represents an essential determinant of the site within the alpha 1(I)-CB3 fragment of collagen recognized by the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin cell surface collagen receptor (Staatz et al., 1991). Studies employing chemical modifications of collagen amino acid side chains confirm both the essential nature of the acidic side chains of aspartic acid and glutamic acid residues and the nonessentiality of lysine epsilon-amino groups in supporting adhesion mediated by the alpha 2 beta 1 integrin. The approach also indicates the presence of a distinct determinant on collagen separate from the alpha 2 beta 1 recognition site that contains essential lysine side chains and that is necessary for subsequent interactions with the platelet surface that give rise to collagen-induced platelet activation and secretion. The two-step, two-site model for cellular signaling involving both an integrin and a signal-transducing coreceptor suggested by these data may be common to other integrin-mediated processes. PMID:1809397

  4. Hypoxic mitophagy regulates mitochondrial quality and platelet activation and determines severity of I/R heart injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weilin; Ren, He; Xu, Chunling; Zhu, Chongzhuo; Wu, Hao; Liu, Dong; Wang, Jun; Liu, Lei; Li, Wei; Ma, Qi; Du, Lei; Zheng, Ming; Zhang, Chuanmao; Liu, Junling; Chen, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction underlies many prevalent diseases including heart disease arising from acute ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Here, we demonstrate that mitophagy, which selectively removes damaged or unwanted mitochondria, regulated mitochondrial quality and quantity in vivo. Hypoxia induced extensive mitochondrial degradation in a FUNDC1-dependent manner in platelets, and this was blocked by in vivo administration of a cell-penetrating peptide encompassing the LIR motif of FUNDC1 only in wild-type mice. Genetic ablation of Fundc1 impaired mitochondrial quality and increased mitochondrial mass in platelets and rendered the platelets insensitive to hypoxia and the peptide. Moreover, hypoxic mitophagy in platelets protected the heart from worsening of I/R injury. This represents a new mechanism of the hypoxic preconditioning effect which reduces I/R injury. Our results demonstrate a critical role of mitophagy in mitochondrial quality control and platelet activation, and suggest that manipulation of mitophagy by hypoxia or pharmacological approaches may be a novel strategy for cardioprotection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21407.001 PMID:27995894

  5. Anodic oxidation of a Co–Ni–Cr–Mo alloy and its inhibitory effect on platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Akiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Nozaki, Kosuke; Wada, Norio; Katayama, Keiichi; Hanawa, Takao; Yamashit, Kimihiro

    2014-05-01

    In this study, surface treatment of a Co–Ni–Cr–Mo alloy (MP35N) was attempted to attain biocompatibility using an anodic oxidation technique. To determine the optimal condition of the anodic oxidation treatment for stent applications, anodic polarization of the alloy was first conducted. After anodic oxidation, the surface topology and wettability were examined, and the composition and chemical states of the surface oxide were characterized. For biocompatibility, stent surfaces must have both cell adhesion and antithrombogenic properties. Therefore, the anodically oxidized surface was assessed with an endothelial cell attachment test and an in vitro platelet adhesion test. The results indicated that the topography, wettability, and composition of the surface oxide film on the alloy were changed by anodic oxidation at a voltage near the passive and transpassive region. The surface roughness and wettability increased after anodic oxidation. The major content of the oxide layer after anodic oxidation was Cr containing a small amount of Mo, and Ni and Co were almost eliminated from the layer. Platelet activation of the alloy decreased significantly after anodic oxidation at an optimal potential, whereas the cytocompatibility remained constant. Therefore, the anodic oxidation is an effective process for treating this alloy for stent applications.

  6. Hydroxytyrosyl alkyl ether derivatives inhibit platelet activation after oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Marín, Javier; De la Cruz, José Pedro; Reyes, José Julio; López-Villodres, Juan Antonio; Guerrero, Ana; López-Leiva, Inmaculada; Espartero, José Luis; Labajos, María Teresa; González-Correa, José Antonio

    2013-08-01

    The low lipophilicity of hydroxytyrosol (HT) has motivated efforts to synthesize homologous series with better lipid solubility, such as the ethers, which are more lipophilic than HT. Because HT inhibits platelet aggregation, the aim of the study was to assess the possible anti-platelet effect of five HT ether derivatives (ethyl, butyl, hexyl, octyl and dodecyl) after oral administration to rats. Whole blood collagen-induced platelet aggregation and calcium-induced thromboxane B2 (TxB2), aortic 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α) and nitrites+nitrates, plasma concentration of lipid peroxides (TBARS) and red blood cell content of reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured. The administration of 20 mg/kg/day inhibited platelet aggregation, TxB2 and TBARS in a non-linear manner related to the length of the carbon chain, with a cut-off effect in the hexyl derivative. Aortic nitrite and red blood cell GSH production were also increased. The aortic production of 6-keto-PGF1α was unaltered except in the group treated with the dodecyl derivative. The administration of 50 mg/kg/day showed a similar pharmacodynamic profile but without the non-linear effect. In conclusion, HT ethers, especially the hexyl derivative, are a potential alternative to hydroxytyrosol, and their effect merits additional research to determine their role in the prophylaxis of vascular disease.

  7. Rapidly regulating platelet activity in vivo with an antidote controlled platelet inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nimjee, Shahid M; Lohrmann, Jens D; Wang, Haichen; Snyder, David J; Cummings, Thomas J; Becker, Richard C; Oney, Sabah; Sullenger, Bruce A

    2012-02-01

    Millions of individuals are prescribed platelet inhibitors, such as aspirin and clopidogrel, to reduce their risk of thrombosis-related clinical events. Unfortunately many platelet inhibitors are contraindicated in surgical settings because of their inherent bleeding risk complicating the treatment of patients who require surgery. We describe the development of a potent antiplatelet agent, an RNA aptamer-termed Ch-9.14-T10 that binds von Willebrand factor (VWF) with high affinity and inhibits thrombosis in a murine carotid artery damage model. As expected, when this potent antiplatelet agent is administered, it greatly increases bleeding from animals that are surgically challenged. To improve this antiplatelet agent's safety profile, we describe the generation of antidotes that can rapidly reverse the activity of Ch-9.14-T10 and limit blood loss from surgically challenged animals. Our work represents the first antidote controllable antiplatelet agent, which could conceivably lead to improved medical management of patients requiring antiplatelet medication who also need surgery.

  8. Factors associated with increased milk production for automatic milking systems.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Marlène; Hess, Justin P; Christenson, Brock M; McIntyre, Kolby K; Smink, Ben; van der Kamp, Arjen J; de Jong, Lisanne G; Döpfer, Dörte

    2016-05-01

    Automatic milking systems (AMS) are increasingly popular throughout the world. Our objective was to analyze 635 North American dairy farms with AMS for (risk) factors associated with increased milk production per cow per day and milk production per robot per day. We used multivariable generalized mixed linear regressions, which identified several significant risk factors and interactions of risk factors associated with milk production. Free traffic was associated with increased production per cow and per robot per day compared with forced systems, and the presence of a single robot per pen was associated with decreased production per robot per day compared with pens using 2 robots. Retrofitted farms had significantly less production in the first 4 yr since installation compared with production after 4 yr of installation. In contrast, newly built farms did not see a significant change in production over time since installation. Overall, retrofitted farms did not produce significantly more or less milk than newly constructed farms. Detailed knowledge of factors associated with increased production of AMS will help guide future recommendations to producers looking to transition to an AMS and maximize their production.

  9. Establishment of Epithelial Attachment on Titanium Surface Coated with Platelet Activating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Shiho; Maeno, Masahiko; Lee, Cliff; Nagai, Shigemi; Kim, David M.; Da Silva, John; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to produce epithelial attachment on a typical implant abutment surface of smooth titanium. A challenging complication that hinders the success of dental implants is peri-implantitis. A common cause of peri-implantitis may results from the lack of epithelial sealing at the peri-implant collar. Histologically, epithelial sealing is recognized as the attachment of the basement membrane (BM). BM-attachment is promoted by activated platelet aggregates at surgical wound sites. On the other hand, platelets did not aggregate on smooth titanium, the surface typical of the implant abutment. We then hypothesized that epithelial BM-attachment was produced when titanium surface was modified to allow platelet aggregation. Titanium surfaces were coated with a protease activated receptor 4-activating peptide (PAR4-AP). PAR4-AP coating yielded rapid aggregation of platelets on the titanium surface. Platelet aggregates released robust amount of epithelial chemoattractants (IGF-I, TGF-β) and growth factors (EGF, VEGF) on the titanium surface. Human gingival epithelial cells, when they were co-cultured on the platelet aggregates, successfully attached to the PAR4-AP coated titanium surface with spread laminin5 positive BM and consecutive staining of the epithelial tight junction component ZO1, indicating the formation of complete epithelial sheet. These in-vitro results indicate the establishment of epithelial BM-attachment to the titanium surface. PMID:27741287

  10. Nanosecond pulse electric field (nanopulse): a novel non-ligand agonist for platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jue; Blackmore, Peter F; Hargrave, Barbara Y; Xiao, Shu; Beebe, Stephen J; Schoenbach, Karl H

    2008-03-15

    Nanosecond pulse stimulation of a variety of cells produces a wide range of physiological responses (e.g., apoptosis, stimulation of calcium (Ca2+) fluxes, changes in membrane potential). In this study, we investigated the effect of nanosecond pulses, which generate intense electric fields (nsPEFs), on human platelet aggregation, intracellular free Ca2+ ion concentration ([Ca2+]i) and platelet-derived growth factor release. When platelet rich plasma was pulsed with one 300ns pulse with an electric field of 30kV/cm, platelets aggregated and a platelet gel was produced. Platelet aggregation was observed with pulses as low as 7kV/cm with maximum effects seen with approximately 30kV/cm. The increases in intracellular Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx were dose dependent on the electrical energy density and were maximally stimulated with approximately 30kV/cm. The increases in [Ca2+]i induced by nsPEF were similar to those seen with thapsigargin but not thrombin. We postulate that nsPEF caused Ca2+ to leak out of intracellular Ca2+ stores by a process involving the formation of nanopores in organelle membranes and also caused Ca2+ influx through plasma membrane nanopores. We conclude that nsPEFs dose-dependently cause platelets to rapidly aggregate, like other platelet agonists, and this is most likely initiated by the nsPEFs increasing [Ca2+]i, however by a different mechanism.

  11. Impact of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway on ITAM and hemITAM receptors: haemostasis, platelet activation and antithrombotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Moroi, Alyssa J; Watson, Steve P

    2015-04-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of lipid kinases that are activated in response to various stimulants, and they regulate many processes including inflammation; the stress response; gene transcription; and cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. Increasing reports have shown that the PI3Ks and their downstream effector Akt are activated by several platelet receptors that regulate platelet activation and haemostasis. Platelets express two immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif (ITAM) receptors, collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and Fcγ receptor IIA (FcγRIIA), which are characterized by two YxxL sequences separated by 6-12 amino acids. Activation of an ITAM receptor initiates a reaction cascade via its YxxL sequence in which signaling molecules such as spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and phospholipase C γ2 (PLCγ2) become activated, leading to platelet activation. Platelets also express another receptor, C-type lectin 2 (CLEC-2), which has a single YxxL sequence, so it is appropriately called a hemITAM receptor. ITAM receptors and the hemITAM receptor share many signaling features. Here we will summarize our current knowledge about how the PI3K/Akt pathway regulates (hem)ITAM receptor-mediated platelet activation and haemostasis and discuss the possible benefits of targeting PI3K/Akt as an antithrombotic therapy.

  12. Effects of tirofiban on platelet activation and endothelial function in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuan; Zuo, Guoxing; Zheng, Liuying; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Dong; Cao, Zhongnan; Hu, Sheng; Du, Xinping

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study examined, for the first time, the effect of intracoronary administration of tirofiban, an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, on platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction in patients with ST-segment-elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A total of 119 STEMI patients were randomized into either tirofiban group (n = 72, intracoronary injection of 10 μg/kg tirofiban prior to PCI, followed by intravenous infusion at 0.15 μg/kg min) or a control group (n = 47), which did not receive tirofiban. Periprocedural administration of tirofiban was associated with significantly reduced levels of platelet activation (lower levels of CD62P and PAC-1) and endothelial dysfunction (reduced levels of endothelial microparticles, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1) 48 h after PCI. At 10 days after PCI, patients in the tirofiban group had a higher incidence of complete STR (78.7 vs. 65.0%) and higher left ventricular ejection fractions (47.8 vs. 44.2) compared to those in the control group. The clinical outcomes between two groups did not differ significantly two weeks after treatment. The results demonstrated that periprocedural administration of tirofiban is associated with significantly attenuated platelet activation and endothelial dysfunction in STEMI patients undergoing PCI. This may have contributed to the improved myocardial reperfusion and preservation of left ventricular systolic function in these patients.

  13. Evaluating the Effect of Intracoronary N-Acetylcysteine on Platelet Activation Markers After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Azadeh; Talasaz, Azita Hajhossein; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Pourhosseini, Hamidreza; Nozari, Yones; Bahremand, Mostafa; Jalali, Arash; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    During percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), trauma occurs in the arterial endothelium, resulting in platelet activation and aggregation. As platelet aggregation may lead to coronary thrombosis, antiplatelet agents are essential adjunctive therapies in patients undergoing PCI. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the intracoronary administration of high-dose N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for the evaluation of its antiplatelet effects in human subjects. In this triple-blind trial, 147 patients undergoing primary PCI were enrolled. Finally, 100 patients were randomized to receive high-dose intracoronary NAC (100 mg/kg bolus, followed by 10 mg·kg⁻¹·h⁻¹ intracoronary continued intravenously for 12 hours) (n = 50) or dextrose solution (n = 50). Platelet activation biomarkers were measured before and 24 hours after the procedure. Secondary end points, comprising all-cause death, reinfarction, and target-vessel revascularization, were assessed at 30 days and 2 years. In comparison with the placebo, NAC could not reduce the level of platelet activation biomarkers within a 24-hour period after its prescription. Major adverse clinical events at 30 days and 2 years were infrequent and not statistically different between the 2 groups. Our results revealed that NAC, compared with the placebo, did not provide an additional clinical benefit as an effective antiplatelet agent after PCI.

  14. GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS GOVERNING METHYL MERCURY PRODUCTION IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of aquatic mercury transformation processes (biotic and abiotic), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) in sedimentary environments. The greatest cause for concern regar...

  15. The influence of Erythropoietin on platelet activation, thrombin generation and FVII/active FVII in patients with AMI

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Erythropoietin (Epo) has been shown to improve myocardial function in models of experimental myocardial infarction, but has also been associated with a rise in thromboembolic events. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of Epo on platelet activation and coagulation in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods The study was designed as a substudy of the randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled REVIVAL-3 (REgeneration of VItal Myocardium in ST-Segment EleVation MyocardiAL Infarction by Erythropoietin) study that investigated the effects of recombinant human Epo in AMI. Serial venous blood samples were collected before and after study medication. Circulating prothrombin fragment F1 + 2, FVII, active FVII, beta thromboglobulin (TG) and P-Selectin were measured before and 60 hours after randomization by immunoassay (n = 94). In a randomly selected subgroup platelet aggregation was measured using whole blood aggregometry (Multiplate Analyzer, n = 45). Results After 5 days an increase in FVII was observed after Epo as compared to placebo (P = 0.02), yet active FVII and prothrombin fragment F1 + 2 remained unchanged. Moreover, no statistically significant differences in circulating TG or P-selectin were observed between the groups. As an expected response to peri-interventional therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin, platelet aggregation after stimulation with ADP, TRAP, ASPI or collagen decreased 12 hours and 2 days after PCI. However, no difference between the Epo and the placebo group was observed. Conclusion After treatment with Epo in patients with AMI a slight increase in circulating FVII after Epo was not associated with an increase in active FVII, prothrombin fragment F1 + 2, TG or P-selectin. Moreover, platelet aggregation was not altered after treatment with Epo as compared to placebo. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01761435 PMID:25228850

  16. Total-factor productivity from the customer's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kjellerup, D.

    1984-02-16

    What is the most meaningful measurement of a utility's total productivity. Efforts by regulators and utility management to develop a measurement which considers the contributions made by various factors of production to gains or losses in productivity have met with varying degrees of success. A formula approach is proposed which more clearly identifies and quantifies input and output. The author outlines the suggested methodology, discusses its limitations, and explores the potential for widespread application. 1 table

  17. Platelet-rich preparations to improve healing. Part II: platelet activation and enrichment, leukocyte inclusion, and other selection criteria.

    PubMed

    Davis, Vicki L; Abukabda, Alaeddin B; Radio, Nicholas M; Witt-Enderby, Paula A; Clafshenkel, William P; Cairone, J Vito; Rutkowski, James L

    2014-08-01

    Multiple platelet-rich preparations have been reported to improve wound and bone healing, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). The different methods employed during their preparation are important, as they influence the quality of the product applied to a wound or surgical site. Besides the general protocol for preparing the platelet-rich product (discussed in Part 1 of this review), multiple choices need to be considered during its preparation. For example, activation of the platelets is required for the release and enmeshment of growth factors, but the method of activation may influence the resulting matrix, growth factor availability, and healing. Additionally, some methods enrich leukocytes as well as platelets, but others are designed to be leukocyte-poor. Leukocytes have many important roles in healing and their inclusion in PRP results in increased platelet concentrations. Platelet and growth factor enrichment reported for the different types of platelet-rich preparations are also compared. Generally, TGF-β1 and PDGF levels were higher in preparations that contain leukocytes compared to leukocyte-poor PRP. However, platelet concentration may be the most reliable criterion for comparing different preparations. These and other criteria are described to help guide dental and medical professionals, in large and small practices, in selecting the best procedures for their patients. The healing benefits of platelet-rich preparations along with the low risk and availability of simple preparation procedures should encourage more clinicians to incorporate platelet-rich products in their practice to accelerate healing, reduce adverse events, and improve patient outcomes.

  18. A critical review on factors influencing fermentative hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Richa; Kumar, Virendra; Pathak, Vinayak V; Ahmad, Shamshad; Aoyi, Ochieng; Tyagi, V V

    2017-03-01

    Biohydrogen production by dark fermentation of different waste materials is a promising approach to produce bio-energy in terms of renewable energy exploration. This communication has reviewed various influencing factors of dark fermentation process with detailed account of determinants in biohydrogen production. It has also focused on different factors such as improved bacterial strain, reactor design, metabolic engineering and two stage processes to enhance the bioenergy productivity from substrate. The study also suggest that complete utilization of substrates for biological hydrogen production requires the concentrated research and development for efficient functioning of microorganism with integrated application for energy production and bioremediation. Various studies have been taken into account here, to show the comparative efficiency of different substrates and operating conditions with inhibitory factors and pretreatment option for biohydrogen production. The study reveals that an extensive research is needed to observe field efficiency of process using low cost substrates and integration of dark and photo fermentation process. Integrated approach of fermentation process will surely compete with conventional hydrogen process and replace it completely in future.

  19. Shear-mediated platelet activation in the free flow: Perspectives on the emerging spectrum of cell mechanobiological mechanisms mediating cardiovascular implant thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Slepian, Marvin J; Sheriff, Jawaad; Hutchinson, Marcus; Tran, Phat; Bajaj, Naing; Garcia, Joe G N; Scott Saavedra, S; Bluestein, Danny

    2017-01-04

    Shear-mediated platelet activation (SMPA) is central in thrombosis of implantable cardiovascular therapeutic devices. Despite the morbidity and mortality associated with thrombosis of these devices, our understanding of mechanisms operative in SMPA, particularly in free flowing blood, remains limited. Herein we present and discuss a range of emerging mechanisms for consideration for "free flow" activation under supraphysiologic shear. Further definition and manipulation of these mechanisms will afford opportunities for novel pharmacologic and mechanical strategies to limit SMPA and enhance overall implant device safety.

  20. Impact factor for exclusive diffractive dijet production with NLO accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A. V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2017-03-01

    Relying on the shockwave approach, we present the main steps of the computation of the impact factor for the exclusive diffractive photo- or electro- production of a forward dijet with NLO accuracy. We provide details of the cancellation mechanisms for all the divergences which appear in the intermediate results.

  1. [Hygienic evaluation of risk factors on powder metallurgy production].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Complex hygienic, clinical, sociologic and epidemiologic studies revealed reliable relationship between work conditions and arterial hypertension, locomotory system disorders, monocytosis in powder metallurgy production workers. Findings are more probable cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, digestive tract diseases due to influence of lifestyle factors.

  2. Antibody production in early life supported by maternal lymphocyte factors.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Michio; Huang, Yi-Ying; Goji, Hiroshi

    2003-01-20

    To examine the influence of maternal lymphocyte factors on the immune responses in offspring in early life, antibody production in neonates born to either normal or lymphocyte-deficient mothers was analyzed. Recombination activating gene (Rag)-2(+/-) mouse neonates born to Rag-2(+/+), Rag-2(+/-)or Rag-2(-/-)mothers were injected with goat anti-mouse IgD antiserum, and IgE and IgG(1) production was evaluated. The levels of IgE and IgG(1) were higher in the pups born to Rag-2(+/+)and Rag-2(+/-) dams than to lymphocyte-deficient Rag-2(-/-) dams. The enhanced antibody production in the former compared with the latter neonates was also found following immunization with ovalbumin or TNP-Ficoll. Thus, the presence of maternal lymphocyte factors was suggested in neonates that augmented antigen-specific antibody production in both T cell-dependent and -independent pathways. A reduction in antibody production was observed in normal neonates when they were foster-nursed by Rag-2(-/-) mothers. Thus, the maternal lymphocyte factors enhancing the immune responses in newborns were shown to be present in breast-milk.

  3. Factors for consumer choice of dairy products in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahnama, Hassan; Rajabpour, Shayan

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about consumers' behavior especially their choice behavior toward purchasing and consuming dairy products in developing countries. Hence, the aim of the present work is understanding the factors that affect on consumers' choice behavior toward dairy products in Iran. The study applies the theory of consumption values, which includes the functional values (taste, price, health, and body weight), social value, emotional value, conditional value and epistemic value. The sample were 1420 people (men and women). The data was collected using face to face survey in summer and fall 2015. Chi-square, confirmatory factor analysis, and structural equation modelling is used to assess data collected. The results indicate that functional values, social value, emotional value and epistemic value have a positive impact on choosing dairy products and conditional value didn't have a positive impact. It was concluded that the main influential factors for consumers' choice behavior toward dairy products included consumers experience positive emotion (e.g. enjoyment, pleasure, comfort and feeling relaxed) and functional value-health. This study emphasized the proper pricing of dairy products by producers and sellers.

  4. Shoreline as a controlling factor in commercial shrimp production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An ecological model was developed that relates marsh detritus export and shrimp production. It was based on the hypothesis that the shoreline is a controlling factor in the production of shrimp through regulation of detritus export from the marsh. LANDSAT data were used to develop measurement of shoreline length and areas of marsh having more than 5.0 kilometers of shoreline per square kilometer of area for the Louisiana coast, demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to provide important geographic information. These factors were combined with published tidal ranges and salinities to develop a mathematical model that predicted shrimp production for nine geographic units of the Louisiana coast, as indicated by the long term average commercial shrimp yield.

  5. The Productivity Factor. Comparing Japanese and American Modes of Production. A Resource for Teachers of Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copley, Paul

    Focusing on the human element through a cross-cultural comparison of U.S. and Japanese modes of production, this resource guide features an assessment of the major factors that affect productivity performance. Each section contains a goal statement and an overview outline of the featured topics. The text includes primary sources, such as documents…

  6. Factors affecting methane production and mitigation in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masaki; Terada, Fuminori

    2010-02-01

    Methane (CH(4)) is the second most important greenhouse gas (GHG) and that emitted from enteric fermentation in livestock is the single largest source of emissions in Japan. Many factors influence ruminant CH(4) production, including level of intake, type and quality of feeds and environmental temperature. The objectives of this review are to identify the factors affecting CH(4) production in ruminants, to examine technologies for the mitigation of CH(4) emissions from ruminants, and to identify areas requiring further research. The following equation for CH(4) prediction was formulated using only dry matter intake (DMI) and has been adopted in Japan to estimate emissions from ruminant livestock for the National GHG Inventory Report: Y = -17.766 + 42.793X - 0.849X(2), where Y is CH(4) production (L/day) and X is DMI (kg/day). Technologies for the mitigation of CH(4) emissions from ruminants include increasing productivity by improving nutritional management, the manipulation of ruminal fermentation by changing feed composition, the addition of CH(4) inhibitors, and defaunation. Considering the importance of ruminant livestock, it is essential to establish economically feasible ways of reducing ruminant CH(4) production while improving productivity; it is therefore critical to conduct a full system analysis to select the best combination of approaches or new technologies to be applied under long-term field conditions.

  7. The colonic metabolites dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid are more effective inhibitors of in vitro platelet activation than their phenolic precursors.

    PubMed

    Baeza, Gema; Bachmair, Eva-Maria; Wood, Sharon; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; de Roos, Baukje

    2017-03-22

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The consumption of a healthy diet rich in polyphenols has been inversely associated with the development of CVD. This study evaluated the effects of green coffee bean extract (GCBE) and yerba mate phenolic extract (YMPE), the main phenolic and methylxanthine constituents (5-caffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid, caffeine, and theobromine), and their main metabolites (caffeic acid, ferulic acid, dihydrocaffeic acid (DHCA) and dihydroferulic acid (DHFA)) on platelet activation in vitro. Upon incubation with different doses (0.01-100 μg mL(-1) or μM) of each compound, adenosine 5'-diphosphate-induced P-selectin expression and fibrinogen binding were determined using whole blood flow cytometry. Platelet P-selectin expression was significantly decreased by YMPE and all phenolic and methylxanthine constituents at physiological concentrations, compared with control, whereas fibrinogen binding on platelets was significantly increased. The colonic metabolites (DHCA and DHFA) had stronger inhibitory effects on P-selectin expression than their phenolic precursors, suggesting an increase in the efficacy to modulate platelet activation with the metabolism of the phenolic compounds.

  8. A Compendium of Transfer Factors for Agricultural and Animal Products

    SciTech Connect

    Staven, Lissa H.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rhoads, Kathleen; Strenge, Dennis L.

    2003-06-02

    Transfer factors are used in radiological risk assessments to estimate the amount of radioactivity that could be present in a food crop or organism based on the calculated concentration in the source medium (i.e., soil or animal feed). By calculating the concentration in the food, the total intake can be estimated and a dose calculated as a result of the annual intake. This report compiles transfer factors for radiological risk assessments, using common food products, including meats, eggs, and plants. Transfer factors used were most often selected from recommended values listed by national or international organizations for use in radiological food chain transport calculations. Several methods of estimation and extrapolation were used for radionuclides not listed in the primary information sources. Tables of transfer factors are listed by element and information source for beef, eggs, fish, fruit, grain, leafy vegetation, milk, poultry, and root vegetables.

  9. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections.

  10. Factors influencing the dielectric properties of agricultural and food products.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Stuart O; Trabelsi, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Dielectric properties of materials are defined, and the major factors that influence these properties of agricultural and food materials, namely, frequency of the applied radiofrequency or microwave electric fields, and water content, temperature, and density of the materials, are discussed on the basis of fundamental concepts. The dependence of measured dielectric properties on these factors is illustrated graphically and discussed for a number of agricultural and food products, including examples of grain, peanuts, fruit, eggs, fresh chicken meat, whey protein gel, and a macaroni and cheese preparation. General observations are provided on the nature of the variation of the dielectric properties with the major variables.

  11. Recent technology products from Space Human Factors research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, James P.

    1991-01-01

    The goals of the NASA Space Human Factors program and the research carried out concerning human factors are discussed with emphasis given to the development of human performance models, data, and tools. The major products from this program are described, which include the Laser Anthropometric Mapping System; a model of the human body for evaluating the kinematics and dynamics of human motion and strength in microgravity environment; an operational experience data base for verifying and validating the data repository of manned space flights; the Operational Experience Database Taxonomy; and a human-computer interaction laboratory whose products are the display softaware and requirements and the guideline documents and standards for applications on human-computer interaction. Special attention is given to the 'Convoltron', a prototype version of a signal processor for synthesizing the head-related transfer functions.

  12. Smallholder pig production: prevalence and risk factors of ectoparasites.

    PubMed

    Braae, U C; Ngowi, H A; Johansen, M V

    2013-09-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in the Mbeya Region, Tanzania, with the aim of describing the distribution and diversity of ectoparasites on pigs, within confinement and free-range production systems of smallholder farms. A total of 128 farms were surveyed, with 96 practising confinement and 32 practising free-range production systems. The prevalence of ectoparasites on pigs within confinement and free-range production systems was 24% and 84%, respectively. Logistic regression analyses revealed that keeping pigs in a free-range system and the presence of neighbouring pigs were risk factors for ectoparasites. Within the confinement system, contact with neighbouring pigs and the time interval (in months) since last ectoparasitic treatment were additionally identified as risk factors. The prevalence of Haematopinus suis was 20% in confined pigs and 63% among free-range pigs. Free-ranging of pigs and presence of neighbouring pigs were also identified as risk factors for the presence of lice. Three species of fleas were identified; Tunga penetrans, Echidnophaga gallinacea and Ctenocephalides canis. The prevalence of fleas was 5% and 13% within confined and free-range, respectively. Two pigs (2%) were found infested with Sarcoptes scabiei var. suis. Ticks found belonged to four genera; Amblyomma spp., Rhipicephalus spp., Haemaphysalis spp., and Boophilus spp. The prevalence of hard ticks among the free-range pigs was 50%. Ectoparasites were more prevalent in the free-range system although highly prevalent within both production systems. Keeping pigs in a free-range system and contact with neighbouring pigs were main risk factors for the presence of ectoparasites. Confinement was highly effective as a preventive tool against hard ticks.

  13. Space crew productivity: A driving factor in space station design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolbers, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The criteria of performance, cost, and mission success probability (program confidence) are the principal factors that program or project managers and system engineers use in selecting the optimum design approach for meeting mission objectives. A frame of reference is discussed in which the interrelationships of these pertinent parameters can be made visible, and from which rational or informed decisions can be derived regarding the potential impact of adjustments in crew productivity on total Space Station System effectiveness.

  14. Shoreline as a controlling factor in commercial shrimp production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, K. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    An ecological model was developed that relates marsh detritus export and shrimp production, based on the hypothesis that the shoreline is a controlling factor in the production of shrimp through regulation of detritus export from the marsh. LANDSAT data were used to develop measurements of shoreline length and area of marsh having more than 5.0 km shoreline/sq km for the coast of Louisiana, demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to provide important geographic information. These factors were combined with published tidal ranges and salinities to develop a mathematical model that predicted shrimp production for nine geographic units of the Louisiana coast, as indicated by the long term average commercial shrimp yield. The mathematical model relating these parameters and the shrimp production is consistent with an energy flow model describing the interaction of detritus producing marshlands with shrimp nursery grounds and inshore shrimping areas. The analysis supports the basic hypothesis and further raises the possibility of applications to coastal zone management requirements.

  15. Demand Side Management in Pellet Production: Internal and External Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigants, Haralds; Blumberga, Dagnija; Veidenbergs, Ivars

    2014-12-01

    This paper demonstrates a demand side management case study: how to save energy and how research and data analysis help to create an energy management system in a pellet production facility; and shows ways to implement the EU energy efficiency directive in production facilities. The study carried out in this research serves as a far-reaching step that can be taken to improve energy efficiency during the operation mode of technological equipment. The benchmarking methodology is used for analysis of results. Internal and external factors and indicators, which affect energy management potential in pellet production are analysed. Analysis of external factors is based on the state legal framework regulating the development of the energy sector. Methodology on the analysis of energy demand includes the internal energy management of an enterprise. The experimental results discussed in this paper show that particular steps, which are oriented to specific use of technological equipment, could play significant role in energy efficiency improvement in industry which is illustrated by the pre-milling process in the pellet production system using power.

  16. Temperature can interact with landscape factors to affect songbird productivity.

    PubMed

    Cox, W Andrew; Thompson, Frank R; Reidy, Jennifer L; Faaborg, John

    2013-04-01

    Increased temperatures and more extreme weather patterns associated with global climate change can interact with other factors that regulate animal populations, but many climate change studies do not incorporate other threats to wildlife in their analyses. We used 20 years of nest-monitoring data from study sites across a gradient of habitat fragmentation in Missouri, USA, to investigate the relative influence of weather variables (temperature and precipitation) and landscape factors (forest cover and edge density) on the number of young produced per nest attempt (i.e., productivity) for three species of songbirds. We detected a strong forest cover × temperature interaction for the Acadian Flycatcher (Empidonax virescens) on productivity. Greater forest cover resulted in greater productivity because of reduced brood parasitism and increased nest survival, whereas greater temperatures reduced productivity in highly forested landscapes because of increased nest predation but had no effect in less forested landscapes. The Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) exhibited a similar pattern, albeit with a marginal forest cover × temperature interaction. By contrast, productivity of the Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) was not influenced by landscape effects or temperature. Our results highlight a potential difficulty of managing wildlife in response to global change such as habitat fragmentation and climate warming, as the habitat associated with the greatest productivity for flycatchers was also that most negatively influenced by high temperatures. The influence of high temperatures on nest predation (and therefore, nest predators) underscores the need to acknowledge the potential complexity of species' responses to climate change by incorporating a more thorough consideration of community ecology in the development of models of climate impacts on wildlife.

  17. Factors limiting traditional household duck production in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Hoque, M A; Skerratt, L F; Rahman, M A; Beg, A B M Rabiul Alam; Debnath, N C

    2010-10-01

    A cross sectional survey of duck production was carried out in 2002 on 771 traditional, semiscavenging household duck farms on the coastal Island of Hatia. We determined the socioeconomic characteristics of duck farmers and their management systems, identified the factors associated with egg production, and measured the level of selected duck diseases and current preventive strategies. Household family size varied from 1 to 14 individuals and women were the main caretakers of ducks. Around 34% of keepers were illiterate. Most duck products (eggs and meat; 85%) were sold at the local market. Duck houses were poorly ventilated and a variety of bedding materials were used. Feed was available in nearby scavenging areas; however, additional feed was frequently supplied by farmers. Almost all farmers (96%) ranked the rainy season as the best time for rearing ducks due to greater feed availability. The annual egg production was 79 eggs per layer with a weight of 48 g and a hatchability rate of 87%. Egg production varied by zone (p < 0.05). The odds of suboptimal egg production was 0.5 times lower in educated farmers (p = 0.001). The odds of suboptimal egg production was 2.5 times more likely in ducks that attained sexual maturity at >22 weeks (p<0.001). Most farmers ranked duck plague as the most important disease, followed by duck cholera, botulism, and duck viral hepatitis. Preventive vaccination was sporadic and used by few farmers (28%). There are significant opportunities for improved duck production on the Island of Hatia and in Bangladesh generally.

  18. Factors affecting the estimate of primary production from space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, W. M.; Byrne, C. F.

    1994-01-01

    Remote sensing of primary production in the euphotic zone has been based mostly on visible-band and water-leaving radiance measured with the coastal zone color scanner. There are some robust, simple relationships for calculating integral production based on surface measurements, but they also require knowledge for photoadaptive parameters such as maximum photosynthesis which currently cannot be obtained from spave. A 17,000-station data set is used to show that space-based estimates of maximum photosynthesis could improve predictions of psi, the water column light utiliztion index, which is an important term in many primary productivity models. Temperature is also examined as a factor for predicting hydrographic structure and primary production. A simple model is used to relate temperature and maximum photosynthesis; the model incorporates (1) the positive relationship between maximum photosynthesis and temperature and (2) the strongly negative relationship between temperature and nitrate in the ocean (which directly affects maximum growth rates via nitrogen limitation). Since these two factors relate to carbon and nitrogen, 'balanced carbon/nitrogen assimilation' was calculated using the Redfield ratio, It is expected that the relationship between maximum balanced carbon assimilation versus temperature is concave-down, with the peak dependent on nitrate uptake kinetics, temperature-nitrate relationships,a nd the carbon chlorophyll ration. These predictions were compared with the sea truth data. The minimum turnover time for nitrate was also calculated using this approach. Lastly, sea surface temperature gradients were used to predict the slope of isotherms (a proxy for the slope of isopycnals in many waters). Sea truth data show that at size scales of several hundred kilometers, surface temperature gradients can provide information on the slope of isotherms in the top 200 m of the water column. This is directly relevant to the supply of nutrients into the surface

  19. Factors Influencing Biogenic Amines Accumulation in Dairy Products

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Daniel M.; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Martínez, Noelia; Fernández, María; Martín, María Cruz; Álvarez, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Fermented foods are among the food products more often complained of having caused episodes of biogenic amines (BA) poisoning. Concerning milk-based fermented foods, cheese is the main product likely to contain potentially harmful levels of BA, specially tyramine, histamine, and putrescine. Prompted by the increasing awareness of the risks related to dietary uptake of high biogenic amine loads, in this review we report all those elaboration and processing technological aspects affecting BA biosynthesis and accumulation in dairy foods. Improved knowledge of the factors involved in the synthesis and accumulation of BA should lead to a reduction in their incidence in milk products. Synthesis of BA is possible only when three conditions converge: (i) availability of the substrate amino acids; (ii) presence of microorganisms with the appropriate catabolic pathway activated; and (iii) environmental conditions favorable to the decarboxylation activity. These conditions depend on several factors such as milk treatment (pasteurization), use of starter cultures, NaCl concentration, time, and temperature of ripening and preservation, pH, temperature, or post-ripening technological processes, which will be discussed in this chapter. PMID:22783233

  20. Limiting factors in the production of deep microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolfree, David W. L.; O'Neill, William; Tunna, Leslie; Sutcliffe, Christopher

    1999-10-01

    Microsystems increasingly require precision deep microstructures that can be cost-effectively designed and manufactured. New products must be able to meet the demands of the rapidly growing markets for microfluidic, micro- optical and micromechanical devices in industrial sectors which include chemicals, pharmaceuticals, biosciences, medicine and food. The realization of such products, first requires an effective process to design and manufacture prototypes. Two process methods used for the fabrication of high aspect-ratio microstructures are based on X-ray beam lithography with electroforming processes and direct micromachining with a frequency multiplied Nd:YAG laser using nanosecond pulse widths. Factors which limit the efficiency and precision obtainable using such processes are important parameters when deciding on the best fabrication method to use. A basic microstructure with narrow channels suitable for a microfluidic mixer have been fabricated using both these techniques and comparisons made of the limitations and suitability of the processes in respect of fast prototyping and manufacture or working devices.

  1. Medical waste production at hospitals and associated factors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y W; Sung, F C; Yang, Y; Lo, Y H; Chung, Y T; Li, K-C

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the quantities of medical waste generated and the factors associated with the generation rate at medical establishments in Taiwan. Data on medical waste generation at 150 health care establishments were collected for analysis in 2003. General medical waste and infectious waste production at these establishments were examined statistically with the potential associated factors. These factors included the types of hospital and clinic, reimbursement payment by National Health Insurance, total number of beds, bed occupancy, number of infectious disease beds and outpatients per day. The average waste generation rates ranged from 2.41 to 3.26kg/bed/day for general medical wastes, and 0.19-0.88kg/bed/day for infectious wastes. The total average quantity of infectious wastes generated was the highest from medical centers, or 3.8 times higher than that from regional hospitals (267.8 vs. 70.3Tons/yr). The multivariate regression analysis was able to explain 92% of infectious wastes and 64% of general medical wastes, with the amount of insurance reimbursement and number of beds as significant prediction factors. This study suggests that large hospitals are the major source of medical waste in Taiwan. The fractions of medical waste treated as infectious at all levels of healthcare establishments are much greater than that recommended by the USCDC guidelines.

  2. Talking about Relations: Factors Influencing the Production of Relational Descriptions

    PubMed Central

    Baltaretu, Adriana; Krahmer, Emiel J.; van Wijk, Carel; Maes, Alfons

    2016-01-01

    In a production experiment (Experiment 1) and an acceptability rating one (Experiment 2), we assessed two factors, spatial position and salience, which may influence the production of relational descriptions (such as “the ball between the man and the drawer”). In Experiment 1, speakers were asked to refer unambiguously to a target object (a ball). In Experiment 1a, we addressed the role of spatial position, more specifically if speakers mention the entity positioned leftmost in the scene as (first) relatum. The results showed a small preference to start with the left entity, which leaves room for other factors that could influence spatial reference. Thus, in the following studies, we varied salience systematically, by making one of the relatum candidates animate (Experiment 1b), and by adding attention capture cues, first subliminally by priming one relatum candidate with a flash (Experiment 1c), then explicitly by using salient colors for objects (Experiment 1d). Results indicate that spatial position played a dominant role. Entities on the left were mentioned more often as (first) relatum than those on the right (Experiments 1a–d). Animacy affected reference production in one out of three studies (in Experiment 1d). When salience was manipulated by priming visual attention or by using salient colors, there were no significant effects (Experiments 1c, d). In the acceptability rating study (Experiment 2), participants expressed their preference for specific relata, by ranking descriptions on the basis of how good they thought the descriptions fitted the scene. Results show that participants preferred most the description that had an animate entity as the first mentioned relatum. The relevance of these results for models of reference production is discussed. PMID:26903911

  3. A platelet alpha granule membrane protein that is associated with the plasma membrane after activation. Characterization and subcellular localization of platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, C L; Yeo, E L; Wencel-Drake, J D; Furie, B C; Ginsberg, M H; Furie, B

    1986-01-01

    We have identified and purified a platelet integral membrane protein (140,000 mol wt), using the KC4 monoclonal antibody specific for activated platelets, that is internal in resting platelets but exposed on activated platelets (Hsu-Lin S.-C., C.L. Berman, B.C. Furie, D. August, and B. Furie, 1984, J. Biol. Chem. 259: 9121-9126.). The expression of the protein on the platelet surface is secretion-dependent. This protein has been named platelet activation-dependent granule-external membrane (PADGEM) protein. PADGEM protein is distinct from the surface glycoproteins of resting platelets, but identical to the S12 antigen, GMP-140. Using immunofluorescent staining, resting platelets failed to stain for PADGEM protein with the KC4 antibody, but after permeabilization showed a punctate staining of the cell interior. Thrombin-stimulated intact platelets stained with a peripheral rim pattern thus demonstrating the translocation of PADGEM protein from an internal location to the cell surface. PADGEM protein expression on the platelet surface at varying thrombin concentrations correlated with alpha granule release, as measured by the secretion of platelet factor 4. Further evidence for an alpha granule localization of PADGEM protein was provided by nitrogen cavitation of resting platelets followed by metrizamide density gradient centrifugation; PADGEM protein codistributed with platelet factor 4. Using immunoelectron microscopy, the protein was localized to the alpha granule in frozen ultrathin sections of resting platelets labeled using rabbit anti-PADGEM protein antibodies, whereas in thrombin-activated platelets, the plasma membrane was labeled. These studies indicate that PADGEM protein is a component of the alpha granule membrane of resting platelets and is incorporated into the plasma membrane upon activation and secretion. Images PMID:2941452

  4. Factors affecting the bioaccessibility of fluoride from seafood products.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R A; de la Fuente, B; Clemente, M J; Ruiz, A; Vélez, D; Devesa, V

    2013-09-01

    Fluoride is considered important for health because of its beneficial effect on the prevention of dental caries and on bone development in the child population. However, excessive intake has negative effects. The main pathway for exposure is oral, through consumption of drinking water, and some food products. Therefore its bioaccessibility (quantity of the element solubilized during the digestive process) is a parameter to be considered when estimating the risk/benefit associated with this element. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of the digestion phase, gastrointestinal digestion factors (pH, pepsin and bile salt concentrations) and the presence of cations on the bioaccessibility of fluoride from seafood products. The results show that the solubilization of fluoride takes place entirely during the gastric phase. Its bioaccessibility is strongly influenced by conditions that favor the formation of insoluble complexes of fluoride with other elements present in the matrix. The factors that are most influential in reducing its bioaccessibility are the increase in pH in the gastric phase, the presence of cations, especially in the intestinal phase, and a low concentration of bile salts.

  5. Production of human epidermal growth factor using adenoviral based system

    PubMed Central

    Negahdari, Babak; Shahosseini, Zahra; Baniasadi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), a growth factor involved in cell growth and differentiation, is a small polypeptide with molecular weight of approximately 6 kDa known to be present in a number of different mammalian species. Experimental studies in animals and humans have demonstrated that the topical application of EGF accelerates the rate of epidermal regeneration of partial-thickness wounds and second-degree burns. Due to its commercial applications, Human EGF (hEGF) has been cloned in several forms. In the present study, adenoviral based expression system was used to produce biologically active recombinant hEGF. The presence of secreted recombinant hEGF was confirmed by a dot blot and its expression level was determined by enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay. Moreover, biological activity of secreted hEGF was evaluated by a proliferation assay performed on A549 cells. For production of hEGF in a secretory form, a chimeric gene coding for the hEGF fused to the signal peptide was expressed using adenoviral based method. This method enables the production of hEGF at the site of interest and moreover it could be used for cell proliferation and differentiation assays in tissue engineering research experiments instead of using commercially available EGF. PMID:27051431

  6. Tumor necrosis factor alpha and lymphotoxin production in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, C; Jones, D B; Morrison, K; Schlüter, C; Feist, W; Ulmer, A J; Arnoldi, J; Matthes, J; Diamantstein, T; Flad, H D

    1990-08-01

    It is likely that the characteristic histologic features of Hodgkin's disease reflect cytokine production by the tumor cell population. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor beta [TNF-beta]) are important inflammatory mediators with wide-ranging effects within the lymphoreticular system. The aim of the present study was to investigate TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin production in the Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines L428 and L540. At the product level, both cytokines could be demonstrated by immunostaining with specific monoclonal antibodies. TNF-alpha could be demonstrated by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in culture supernatants from both cell lines as well as in cell lysates of L428 and L540 cells. Cytotoxic activity could be achieved only in L428 supernatants. This cytotoxic activity could not be blocked by the addition of a polyclonal antibody against TNF-alpha, but was partially inhibited with the monoclonal antibody against lymphotoxin. Synthesis of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin in both L428 and L540 was confirmed by demonstrating the intracellular-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) using specific cDNA clones in Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization studies with the TNF-alpha cDNA probe gave positive hybridization signals in L428 and in L540. These results demonstrate the transcription, translation, and export of TNF-alpha and lymphotoxin in cultured Hodgkin's disease-derived cell lines. In addition, results of preliminary experiments are presented in which we demonstrate Reed-Sternberg cells positive for TNF-alpha protein and mRNA in different Hodgkin's disease tissue biopsies, indicating that, at least for TNF-alpha, our cell line data are relevant to the neoplastic population present in Hodgkin's disease tissue.

  7. Tissue factor-dependent chemokine production aggravates experimental colitis.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Karla C S; Van 't Veer, Cornelis; Van Den Berg, Yascha; Duitman, Janwillem; Versteeg, Henri H; Aberson, Hella L; Groot, Angelique P; Verstege, Marleen I; Roelofs, Joris J T H; Te Velde, Anje A; Spek, C Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is traditionally known as the initiator of blood coagulation, but TF also plays an important role in inflammatory processes. Considering the pivotal role of coagulation in inflammatory bowel disease, we assessed whether genetic ablation of TF limits experimental colitis. To this end, wild-type and TF-deficient (TFlow) mice were treated with 1.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) for 7 d, and effects on disease severity, cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment were examined. Clinical and histological parameters showed that the severity of colitis was reduced in both heterozygous and homozygous TFlow mice compared with controls. Most notably, edema, granulocyte numbers at the site of inflammation and cytokine levels were reduced in TFlow mice. Although anticoagulant treatment with dalteparin of wild-type mice reduced local fibrin production and cytokine levels to a similar extent as in TFlow mice, it did not affect clinical and histological parameters of experimental colitis. Mechanistic studies revealed that TF expression did not influence the intrinsic capacity of granulocytes to migrate. Instead, TF enhanced granulocyte migration into the colon by inducing high levels of the granulocyte chemoattractant keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC). Taken together, our data indicate that TF plays a detrimental role in experimental colitis by signal transduction-dependent KC production in colon epithelial cells, thereby provoking granulocyte influx with subsequent inflammation and organ damage.

  8. Factors Influencing Production of Fusaristatin A in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Hegge, Anne; Lønborg, Rikke; Nielsen, Ditte Møller; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a ubiquitous plant pathogen, which is able to produce several bioactive secondary metabolites. Recently, the cyclic lipopeptide fusaristatin A was isolated from this species and the biosynthetic gene cluster identified. Fusaristatin A consists of a C24 reduced polyketide and the three amino acids dehydroalanine, β-aminoisobutyric acid and glutamine and is biosynthesized by a collaboration of a polyketide synthase and a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. To gain insight into the environmental factors, which controls the production of fusaristatin A, we cultivated F. graminearum under various conditions. We developed an LC-MS/MS method to quantify fusaristatin A in F. graminearum extracts. The results showed that yeast extract sucrose (YES) medium was the best medium for fusaristatin A production and that the optimal pH was 7.5 and temperature 25–30 °C. Furthermore, production of fusaristatin A was more than four times higher in stationary cultures than in agitated cultures when F. graminearum was grown in liquid YES medium. The results also showed that fusaristatin A was only present in the mycelium and not in the liquid, which suggests that fusaristatin A is stored intracellulally and not exported to the extracellular environment. PMID:25838075

  9. Factors Influencing Production of Fusaristatin A in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Hegge, Anne; Lønborg, Rikke; Nielsen, Ditte Møller; Sørensen, Jens Laurids

    2015-04-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a ubiquitous plant pathogen, which is able to produce several bioactive secondary metabolites. Recently, the cyclic lipopeptide fusaristatin A was isolated from this species and the biosynthetic gene cluster identified. Fusaristatin A consists of a C24 reduced polyketide and the three amino acids dehydroalanine, β-aminoisobutyric acid and glutamine and is biosynthesized by a collaboration of a polyketide synthase and a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. To gain insight into the environmental factors, which controls the production of fusaristatin A, we cultivated F. graminearum under various conditions. We developed an LC-MS/MS method to quantify fusaristatin A in F. graminearum extracts. The results showed that yeast extract sucrose (YES) medium was the best medium for fusaristatin A production and that the optimal pH was 7.5 and temperature 25-30 °C. Furthermore, production of fusaristatin A was more than four times higher in stationary cultures than in agitated cultures when F. graminearum was grown in liquid YES medium. The results also showed that fusaristatin A was only present in the mycelium and not in the liquid, which suggests that fusaristatin A is stored intracellulally and not exported to the extracellular environment.

  10. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W.; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y.; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as “complex I bypass.” In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology. PMID:27622560

  11. Natural Product Screening Reveals Naphthoquinone Complex I Bypass Factors.

    PubMed

    Vafai, Scott B; Mevers, Emily; Higgins, Kathleen W; Fomina, Yevgenia; Zhang, Jianming; Mandinova, Anna; Newman, David; Shaw, Stanley Y; Clardy, Jon; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-01-01

    Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors. We screened a library of ~40,000 natural product extracts and performed bioassay-guided fractionation on a subset of the top scoring hits. We isolated four plant-derived 1,4-naphthoquinone complex I bypass factors with structural similarity to menadione: chimaphilin and 3-chloro-chimaphilin from Chimaphila umbellata and dehydro-α-lapachone and dehydroiso-α-lapachone from Stereospermum euphoroides. We also tested a small number of structurally related naphthoquinones from commercial sources and identified two additional compounds with complex I bypass activity: 2-methoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone and 2-methoxy-3-methyl-1,4,-naphthoquinone. The six novel complex I bypass factors reported here expand this class of molecules and will be useful as tool compounds for investigating complex I disease biology.

  12. Reversible Hypothermia-Induced Inhibition of Human Platelet Activation in Whole Blood in Vitro and in Vivo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    IX complex (the von Willebrand factor receptor) (12), thromboxane Bj generation (the stable metabolite of thromboxane A2) (13), platelet aggregate...6D1 (provided by Dr. Barry S. Coller, SUNY, Stony Brook) is directed against the von Willebrand factor receptor on the glycocalicin portion of the a...Fig 1, panel A) and, after a delay of approximately 20 seconds, downregulation of the platelet surface expression of GPIb (the von Willebrand factor

  13. Neuroprotective effect of salvianolic acid B against cerebral ischemic injury in rats via the CD40/NF-κB pathway associated with suppression of platelets activation and neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shixin; Zhong, Aiqin; Ma, Huining; Li, Dan; Hu, Yue; Xu, Yingzhi; Zhang, Junping

    2017-04-15

    Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Activated platelets are increasingly regarded as initiators and/or amplifiers of inflammatory processes in cerebral I/R injury. Salvianolic acid B (SAB) is the most abundant bioactive compound of Salviae miltiorrhizae, a well-known Chinese herb used to promote blood circulation and eliminating blood stasis. S. miltiorrhizae has been used clinically in Asia for the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. In the present study, a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) was established to investigate the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of SAB treatment against focal cerebral I/R insult. The results showed that SAB treatment (3mg/kg, 6mg/kg and 12mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently decreased I/R-induced neurological deficits at 24, 48, and 72h after reperfusion and decreased plasma-soluble P-selectin and soluble CD40 ligand as early as 6h after onset of I/R insult. At 24h after reperfusion, SAB treatment significantly reduced neuronal and DNA damage in the hippocampal CA1 region and decreased neural cell loss in the ischemic core. The I/R-induced pro-inflammatory mediator mRNA and protein overexpression in the penumbra cortex, including ICAM-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1, were significantly inhibited by SAB in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies suggested SAB treatment attenuated CD40 expression and NF-κB activation, which involved NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation and IκBα phosphorylation and degradation. In conclusion, our findings indicated that the neuroprotective effects of SAB post cerebral I/R injury are associated with the inhibition of both platelets activation and production of pro-inflammatory mediators and the downregulation of the CD40/NF-κB pathway.

  14. Factors influencing research productivity among health sciences librarians.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, R E; Dalrymple, P W

    1992-01-01

    Secondary analysis was performed of data collected in 1989 from a random sample of members of the Medical Library Association. Results show that about half the sample had at least one publication; academic health sciences librarians were much more likely than hospital librarians to have published. Almost half the sample had taken formal courses in research, but only a small percentage had taken continuing education (CE) courses in research. Institutional support services for research were most available in academic settings. The combination of institutional support, CE training, and research courses explained 31.1% of the variation in research productivity among academic librarians; these factors were less important in hospitals and other institutional settings. The authors suggest that health sciences librarians working outside academia should seek support for research from sources outside the employing institution. PMID:1422506

  15. Glycerol monolaurate inhibits virulence factor production in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Sara M; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2005-04-01

    Anthrax, caused by Bacillus anthracis, has been brought to the public's attention because of the 2001 bioterrorism attacks. However, anthrax is a disease that poses agricultural threats in the United States as well as human populations in Europe, China, Africa, and Australia. Glycerol monolaurate (GML) is a compound that has been shown to inhibit exotoxin production by Staphylococcus aureus and other gram-positive bacteria. Here, we study the effects of GML on growth and toxin production in B. anthracis. The Sterne strain of B. anthracis was grown to post-exponential phase with 0-, 10-, 15-, or 20-microg/ml concentrations of GML and then assayed quantitatively for protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor (LF). After 8 h, GML at concentrations greater than 20 microg/ml was bacteriostatic to growth of the organism. However, a 10-microg/ml concentration of GML was not growth inhibitory, but amounts of PA and LF made were greatly reduced. This effect was not global for all proteins when total secreted protein from culture fluids was examined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Through quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays, this toxin-inhibitory effect was shown to occur at the transcriptional level, since amounts of mRNA for pagA (PA), lef (LF), and cya (edema factor) were reduced. Surprisingly, mRNA levels of atxA, a regulator of exotoxin gene expression, rose in the presence of GML. These data will be useful in developing therapeutic tools to treat anthrax disease, whether in animals or humans. These results also suggest that mechanisms of virulence regulation exist independent of atxA.

  16. Critical factors in chitin production by fermentation of shrimp biowaste.

    PubMed

    Rao, M S; Muñoz, J; Stevens, W F

    2000-12-01

    Factors affecting Lactobacillus fermentation of shrimp waste for chitin and protein liquor production were determined. The objective of the fermentation is medium conditioning by Lactobacillus through production of proteases and lowering of the pH. The efficiency was tested by conducting fermentation of biowaste in 1-1 beakers with or without pH adjustment using different acids. Addition of 5% glucose to the biowaste supported the growth of lactic acid bacteria and led to better fermentation. Among four acids tested to control pH at the start and during fermentation, acetic acid and citric acid proved to be the most effective. In biowaste fermented with 6.7% L. plantarum inoculum, 5% glucose, and pH 6.0 adjusted with acetic acid, 75% deproteination and 86% demineralization was achieved. Replacement of acetic acid by citric acid gave 88% deproteination and 90% demineralization. The fermentation carried out in the presence of acetic acid resulted in a protein fraction that smelled good and a clean chitin fraction.

  17. Terminal platelet production is regulated by von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Nguyen, Kim Anh; Pietrzyk, Audrey; Casari, Caterina; Veyradier, Agnes; Denis, Cecile V; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    It is established that proplatelets are formed from mature megakaryocytes (MK) as intermediates before platelet production. Recently, the presence of proplatelets was described in blood incubated in static conditions. We have previously demonstrated that platelet and proplatelet formation is upregulated by MK exposure to high shear rates (1800 s(-1)) on immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether VWF is involved in the regulation of terminal platelet production in blood. To this end, Vwf (-/-) mice, a model of severe von Willebrand disease, were used to create a situation in which blood cells circulate in a vascular tree that is completely devoid of VWF. Murine platelets were isolated from Vwf (-/-) and Vwf (+/+) blood, exposed to VWF at 1800 s(-1) in a microfluidic platform, and examined by means of videomicroscopy, as well as fluorescence and activation studies. Proplatelets became visible within 5 minutes, representing 38% of all platelets after 12 minutes and 46% after 28 min. The proportion of proplatelets was 1.8-fold higher in blood from Vwf(-/-) mice than from Vwf(+/+) mice, suggesting a role of VWF in vivo. Fragmentation of these proplatelets into smaller discoid platelets was also observed in real-time. Platelets remained fully activatable by thrombin. Compensation of plasmatic VWF following hydrodynamic gene transfer in Vwf(-/-) mice reduced the percentage of proplatelets to wild-type levels. A thrombocytopenic mouse model was studied in the flow system, 7 days after a single 5-FU injection. Compared to untreated mouse blood, a 2-fold increase in the percentage of proplatelets was detected following exposure to 1800 s(-1) on VWF of samples from mice treated with 5-FU. In conclusion, VWF and shear stress together appear to upregulate proplatelet reorganization and platelet formation. This suggests a new function for VWF in vivo as regulator of bloodstream thrombopoiesis.

  18. New horizon of HUTOP production technologies: human sensory factors in total production life cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koshimizu, Hiroyasu; Hata, Seiji; Anezaki, Takashi

    2004-10-01

    The goal of HUTOP project is to rearrange the technical subjects inherent in the Total Production Life Cycle (TPLC) and to model a new human-centered TPLC by introducing new information technologies (IT) which could support and enhance the KANSEI human sensory factors. HUTOP concept will be described again in this paper through the analysis of the basic research sub-themes in order to investigate the next international activities. Second phase of HUTOP was designed as HUTOP-II, and HUTOP-II research activities are now on going.

  19. Production of element correction factors for thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Plato, P.; Miklos, J.

    1985-11-01

    Approximately 80 processors of personal dosimetry in the United States use thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). Recent demands that dosimetry processors be able to measure radiation doses to within +/- 50% of the correct value have focused attention on the reproducibility of the TL elements within each TLD. The phosphors for these TLDs are manufactured by three companies. A dosimetry processor faces three options concerning the quality of the TL elements purchased; trust the supplier's quality control program, screen new TL elements and discard those that are extremely bad, or use element correction factors (ECFs). The first option results in dosimetry processors failing the +/- 50% accuracy requirement due to excessive variability among the TL elements. The second option still permits large precision errors that come close to the +/- 50% accuracy requirement. This paper advocates the third option and presents a 10-step procedure to produce ECFs. The procedure ensures that the ECFs represent only variations among the TL elements and not variations caused by stability problems with the TLD reader. Following is an example of ECF production for 3000 TLDs.

  20. Isolation of Phorbol Esters from Euphorbia grandicornis and Evaluation of Protein Kinase C- and Human Platelet-Activating Effects of Euphorbiaceae Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Rédei, Dóra; Forgo, Peter; Li, Yu; Vasas, Andrea; Hohmann, Judit; Wu, Chin-Chung

    2016-10-28

    Human platelets contain conventional (α and β) and novel isoforms of PKC (δ and θ), and PKC activation can result in platelet aggregation and secretion reaction that are important for thrombus formation. Several tumor-promoting Euphorbiaceae diterpenes are known to act as direct activators of PKC, but many types of such diterpenes have not been studied as platelet stimulators. In the present study, two new and five known phorbol esters were isolated from Euphorbia grandicornis. Two of the isolated phorbol esters together with compounds representing ingenane, jatrophane, and myrsinane structural types were studied on PKC activation and platelet stimulation. The investigated phorbol esters and ingenane esters induced blood platelet aggregation and ATP secretion. PKC activation was demonstrated by inducing membrane translocation of PKCs, phosphorylation of PKC substrates, and activation of PKC signaling pathways. The PKC-activating effect of the compounds correlated well with their efficacy to cause platelet stimulation. Moreover, by using an isoform-specific PKC inhibitor, it was found that besides conventional PKCs novel PKCs also play a positive role in platelet activation caused by phorbol/ingenane esters, especially in regulating platelet aggregation. The present results suggest that platelets afford a useful model for studying PKC activators of natural origin or their chemical derivatives.

  1. Exogenous L-arginine and HDL can alter LDL and ox-LDL-mediated platelet activation: using platelet P-selectin receptor numbers.

    PubMed

    Sener, Azize; Enc, Elif; Ozsavci, Derya; Vanizor-Kural, Birgul; Yanikkaya-Demirel, Gulderen; Oba, Rabia; Uras, Fikriye; Demir, Muzaffer

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of exogenous L-arginine and HDL on LDL and oxidized LDL (ox-LDL)-mediated platelet activation. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-activated platelets have been incubated with lipoproteins with or without L-arginine. P-selectin receptor numbers per platelet have been measured by flow cytometry. After incubation with only L-arginine (without lipoproteins), platelet nitric oxide (NO) levels and P-selectin receptor numbers significantly increased compared to the controls (P < .05). After incubation with LDL or ox-LDL, receptor numbers of P-selectin significantly increased (P < .001). However, P-selectin receptor numbers in platelets treated with L-arginine + LDL or L-arginine + ox-LDL decreased compared to the levels in platelets treated with only LDL or ox-LDL (P < .01, P < .001, respectively). Addition of HDL to L-arginine + ox-LDL caused significant reduction in P-selectin receptor numbers as in the control values (P < .001).We have concluded that L-arginine causes enhanced platelet NO levels and blocks the effects of LDL or ox-LDL on platelet P-selectin receptor numbers and HDL also strengthens this effect of L-arginine.

  2. Protective Mechanisms of S. lycopersicum Aqueous Fraction (Nucleosides and Flavonoids) on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation: In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Valenzuela, Claudio; Pérez, Pablo; Astudillo, Luis; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms of antiplatelet action of bioactive principle from S. lycopersicum. Aqueous fraction had a high content of nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, and adenosine 5′-monophosphate) by HPLC analysis. Also aqueous fraction presented flavonoids content. Aqueous fraction inhibited platelet activation by 15 ± 6% (P < 0.05). Fully spread of human platelets on collagen in the presence of aqueous fraction was inhibited from 15 ± 1 to 9 ± 1 μm2 (P < 0.001). After incubation of whole blood with aqueous fraction, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 55 ± 12% (P < 0.001). Platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by the aqueous fraction. At the same concentrations that aqueous fraction inhibits platelet aggregation, levels of sCD40L significantly decreased and the intraplatelet cAMP levels increased. In addition, SQ22536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, attenuated the effect of aqueous fraction toward ADP-induced platelet aggregation and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Platelet aggregation ex vivo (human study) and thrombosis formation in vivo (murine model) were inhibited by aqueous fraction. Finally, aqueous fraction may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities (nucleosides and flavonoids) to processed foods. PMID:24159349

  3. Protective Mechanisms of S. lycopersicum Aqueous Fraction (Nucleosides and Flavonoids) on Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation: In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Studies.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Pereira, Jaime; Alarcón, Marcelo; Valenzuela, Claudio; Pérez, Pablo; Astudillo, Luis; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate mechanisms of antiplatelet action of bioactive principle from S. lycopersicum. Aqueous fraction had a high content of nucleosides (adenosine, guanosine, and adenosine 5'-monophosphate) by HPLC analysis. Also aqueous fraction presented flavonoids content. Aqueous fraction inhibited platelet activation by 15 ± 6% (P < 0.05). Fully spread of human platelets on collagen in the presence of aqueous fraction was inhibited from 15 ± 1 to 9 ± 1  μ m(2) (P < 0.001). After incubation of whole blood with aqueous fraction, the platelet coverage was inhibited by 55 ± 12% (P < 0.001). Platelet ATP secretion and aggregation were significantly inhibited by the aqueous fraction. At the same concentrations that aqueous fraction inhibits platelet aggregation, levels of sCD40L significantly decreased and the intraplatelet cAMP levels increased. In addition, SQ22536, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor, attenuated the effect of aqueous fraction toward ADP-induced platelet aggregation and intraplatelet level of cAMP. Platelet aggregation ex vivo (human study) and thrombosis formation in vivo (murine model) were inhibited by aqueous fraction. Finally, aqueous fraction may be used as a functional ingredient adding antiplatelet activities (nucleosides and flavonoids) to processed foods.

  4. Comparison of the centrifugal and roller pump in elective coronary artery bypass surgery--a prospective, randomized study with special emphasis upon platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Knut S; Nygreen, Else L; Grong, Ketil; Leirvaag, Beryl; Holmsen, Holm

    2003-12-01

    Objective--Evaluation of the centrifugal pump vs roller pump concerning effects upon platelet function, hemolysis and clinical outcome in elective coronary artery bypass surgery. Design--Thirty-four patients were randomized to centrifugal or roller pump. Platelet activation was studied by flow cytometry before, during and up to 3 days after bypass. Results--Duration of bypass, ischemic period, peripheral anastomoses, hospital stay and mortality did not differ. In roller pump patients, platelet aggregates increased by 250% between end of bypass and 3 h postoperatively (p < 0.001). A secondary, fivefold increase in number of platelet aggregates was found on the 3rd postoperative day (p < 0.001). In the centrifugal pump group, these changes were not significant. Hemolysis increased (20%) at end of bypass and 3 h postoperatively (p < 0.005), and decreased to preoperative levels the next day without group difference. Conclusion--Platelet aggregation was significantly increased in roller compared with centrifugal pump patients, indicating higher susceptibility to postoperative thrombotic complications with the roller pump. Otherwise, there was no clinical evidence for superiority of the centrifugal pump.

  5. P2Y12 receptor blockade synergizes strongly with nitric oxide and prostacyclin to inhibit platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Melissa V.; Knowles, Rebecca B. M.; Lundberg, Martina H.; Tucker, Arthur T.; Mohamed, Nura A.; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Armstrong, Paul C. J.; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Aims In vivo platelet function is a product of intrinsic platelet reactivity, modifiable by dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), and the extrinsic inhibitory endothelial mediators, nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI2), that are powerfully potentiated by P2Y12 receptor blockade. This implies that for individual patients endothelial mediator production is an important determinant of DAPT effectiveness. Here, we have investigated this idea using platelets taken from healthy volunteers treated with anti‐platelet drugs. Methods Three groups of male volunteers (n = 8) received either prasugrel (10 mg), aspirin (75 mg) or DAPT (prasugrel + aspirin) once daily for 7 days. Platelet reactivity in the presence of diethylammonium (Z)‐1‐(N,N‐diethylamino)diazen‐1‐ium‐1,2‐diolate (DEA/NONOate) and PGI2 was studied before and following treatment. Results Ex vivo, PGI2 and/or DEA/NONOate had little inhibitory effect on TRAP‐6‐induced platelet reactivity in control conditions. However, in the presence of DAPT, combination of DEA/NONOate + PGI2 reduced platelet aggregation (74 ± 3% to 19 ± 6%, P < 0.05). In vitro studies showed even partial (25%) P2Y12 receptor blockade produced a significant (67 ± 2% to 39 ± 10%, P < 0.05) inhibition when DEA/NONOate + PGI2 was present. Conclusions We have demonstrated that PGI2 and NO synergize with P2Y12 receptor antagonists to produce powerful platelet inhibition. Furthermore, even with submaximal P2Y12 blockade the presence of PGI2 and NO greatly enhances platelet inhibition. Our findings highlight the importance of endothelial mediator in vivo modulation of P2Y12 inhibition and introduces the concept of refining ex vivo platelet function testing by incorporating an assessment of endothelial function to predict thrombotic outcomes better and adjust therapy to prevent adverse outcomes in individual patients. PMID:26561399

  6. Liposome production by microfluidics: potential and limiting factors

    PubMed Central

    Carugo, Dario; Bottaro, Elisabetta; Owen, Joshua; Stride, Eleanor; Nastruzzi, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of microfluidic techniques for the production of nanoscale lipid-based vesicular systems. In particular we focus on the key issues associated with the microfluidic production of liposomes. These include, but are not limited to, the role of lipid formulation, lipid concentration, residual amount of solvent, production method (including microchannel architecture), and drug loading in determining liposome characteristics. Furthermore, we propose microfluidic architectures for the mass production of liposomes with a view to potential industrial translation of this technology. PMID:27194474

  7. Terminal Area Productivity Program: Dynamic Spacing Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanki, Barbara G.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic spacing human factors deals with the following human factors issues: define controller limits to incorporating dynamic changes in separation standards; identify timing, planning, and coordination strategies; and consider consistency with current practices, policies, and regulations. The AVOSS technologies will make it possible to reduce separation standards in the terminal area under certain meteorological conditions. This paper contains the following sections: Dynamic space human factors overview, Preliminary tests, and current research status & plans.

  8. Hydroxysafflor yellow A of Carthamus tinctorius attenuates lung injury of aged rats exposed to gasoline engine exhaust by down-regulating platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoyun; Wang, Chunhua; Ma, Chunlei; Huang, Qingxian; Sun, Hongliu; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bai, Xianyong

    2014-02-15

    Long-term inhalation of gasoline engine exhaust (GEE) increases the risk of respiratory disease. Studies have suggested involvement of platelets in the development of some lung diseases. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a flavonoid compound, prevents hemostasis. Therefore, we investigated its effects on GEE-induced lung injury, and role of platelets in injury. Sixty-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to GEE for 4h/day for 6 weeks, and then grouped as follows: control, GEE, GEE+HSYA, GEE+HSYA+GW9662, and GEE+GW9662. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), pH, and the PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. Wet/dry lung weight ratio, total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and cytokine concentrations in serum and BALF were determined. Furthermore, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level and expression levels of target proteins were analyzed. Platelets were counted and their state was evaluated. HSYA attenuated GEE-mediated decreases in PaO2, PaO2/FiO2, platelet cAMP level, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) expression. HSYA also attenuated GEE-mediated increases in lung permeability, cytokine levels in serum and BALF, plasma platelet count, and ADP-mediated platelet aggregation. Moreover, it suppressed GEE-induced increases in the expression of adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines in platelets and lung tissue. Therefore, HSYA is therapeutically effective for GEE-mediated lung injury and acts by enhancing PKA activity and inhibiting platelet activation.

  9. Platelet activating factor antagonist design: structure of methyl trans-5-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-2-oxo-4- furancarboxylate.

    PubMed

    Peterson, J R; Smillie, T J; Rogers, R D

    1989-02-15

    C14H16O6, Mr = 280.28, monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a = 6.070 (2), b = 9.526 (5), c = 22.418 (5) A, beta = 94.32 (2) degrees, V = 1293 A3, Z = 4, Dx = 1.44 g cm-3, lambda(Mo K alpha) = 0.71073 A, mu = 0.71 cm-1, F(000) = 592, T = 293 K, final R = 0.043 for 1400 observed [F0 greater than or equal to 5 sigma(F0)] reflections. The observed structure confirms a trans stereorelationship for the two substituents and an envelope conformation for the lactone ring. There is no crystallographically imposed symmetry. An analysis of the closest contacts in the cell lattice reveals two types of intermolecular interactions for this compound.

  10. Platelet-Activating Factor (PAF)-Induced Cardiopulmonary Dysfunctions and their Reversal with a PAF Antagonist (BN 52021) in Strain 13 Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    human Lassa fever (Jahrling et al.. 1981: Peters et al.. •987). Reasons for selecting inbred (strain 13). instead of using outbred (Hartley), guinea...may be involved in the development of cardiopulmonary disturbances during arenavirus - induced hemorrhagic fever (Qian et al., 1991; Liu et al., 1992...1989- Barnes et al., 1989). Strain 13 guinea pigs. inocodatel, with Fichindo virus , an arenavir,,,. ,.,ve i’,,en used as an experimental model to mimic

  11. Attenuation of amiodarone induced lung fibrosis and phospholipidosis in hamsters, by treatment with the platelet activating factor receptor antagonist, WEB 2086

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, D. M.; Haynam, D. R.; Casias, M.

    1993-01-01

    Therapeutic use of amiodarone (AMD), a Class III antiarrhythmic drug is complicated by the development of lung fibrosis (LF) and phospholipidosis (PL). In the present study, the effectiveness of a PAF antagonist, WEB 2086, against AMD induced LF and PL has been tested in hamsters. The animals were randomly divided into four groups: (1) saline + H2O; (2) WEB + H2O; (3) saline + AMD; and (4) WEB + AMD. Saline or WEB (10 mg/kg i.p.) was given 2 days prior to intratracheal instillation of water or AMD (1.5 μmol/0.25 ml/100 g BW) and thereafter daily throughout the study. Twenty-eight days after intratracheal instillation, the animals were killed and the lungs processed for various assays. The amount of lung hydroxyproline, an index of LF, in saline + H2O, WEB + H2O, saline + AMD, and WEB + AMD groups were 959 ± 46, 1035 ± 51, 1605 ± 85 and 1374 ± 69 μg/lung, respectively. Total lung PL, an index of phospholipidosis, in the corresponding groups were 8.4 ± 0.4, 8.3 ± 0.3, 11.7 ± 0.3 and 9.9 μg/lung. Lung malondialdehyde, an index of lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase activity in saline + H2O WEB + H2O, saline + AMD, and WEB + AMD were 93.0 ± 4.3, 93.0 ± 2.7, 138.9 ± 6.0 and 109.0 ± 3.8 nmol/lung and 359.7 ± 13.9, 394.0 ± 22.8, 497.5 ± 19.7 and 425.5 ± 4.9 units/lung, respectively. Administration of AMD alone caused significant increases in all the above indexes of lung toxicity, and treatment with WEB 2086 minimized the AMD induced toxicity as reflected by significant decreases in these indexes. Histopathological studies revealed a marked reduction in the extent and severity of lung lesions in the WEB + AMD group compared with the saline + AMD group. Treatment with WEB 2086 also reduced the acute mortality from 35% in saline + AMD group to 22% in WEB + AMD group. It was concluded that PAF is involved in the AMD induced lung fibrosis and phospholipidosis and that the PAF receptor antagonist may, therefore, be potentially useful in reducing AMD induced lung toxicity. PMID:18475534

  12. The Effects of Platelet-Activating Factor (PAF) and a PAF Antagonist (CV-3988) on Smoke Inhalation Injury in an Ovine Model,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-01

    decyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3- phosphorylcholine ) has following PAF injection. In models of endotoxin shock, been reported to be one of the principal...instillation of 1-0-octadecyl-2- 25. Traber DL, Herndon DN, Stein MD, et al: The pulmonary lesion acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3- phosphorylcholine or of native platelet-ac...glyceryl ether phosphorylcholine infusion in the change (abstr). Proceedings of the American Burn Association rabbit. Am Rev Respir Dis 124:416, 1981 22nd

  13. In vitro production of alkaloids: Factors, approaches, challenges and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Sayeed; Garg, Madhukar; Tamboli, Ennus Tajuddin; Abdin, M. Z.; Ansari, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    The wide diversity of plant secondary metabolites is largely used for the production of various pharmaceutical compounds. In vitro cell tissue or organ culture has been employed as a possible alternative to produce such industrial compounds. Tissue culture techniques provide continuous, reliable, and renewable source of valuable plant pharmaceuticals and might be used for the large-scale culture of the plant cells from which these secondary metabolites can be extracted. Alkaloids are one of the most important secondary metabolites known to play a vital role in various pharmaceutical applications leading to an increased commercial importance in recent years. The tissue culture techniques may be utilized to improve their production of alkaloids via somaclonal variations and genetic transformations. The focus of this review is toward the application of different tissue culture methods/techniques employed for the in vitro production of alkaloids with a systematic approach to improve their production. PMID:23922453

  14. Some factors affecting tannase production by Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem

    PubMed Central

    Aboubakr, Hamada A.; El-Sahn, Malak A.; El-Banna, Amr A.

    2013-01-01

    One variable at a time procedure was used to evaluate the effect of qualitative variables on the production of tannase from Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem. These variables including: fermentation technique, agitation condition, tannins source, adding carbohydrates incorporation with tannic acid, nitrogen source type and divalent cations. Submerged fermentation under intermittent shaking gave the highest total tannase activity. Maximum extracellular tannase activity (305 units/50 mL) was attained in medium containing tannic acid as tannins source and sodium nitrate as nitrogen source at 30 °C for 96 h. All added carbohydrates showed significant adverse effects on the production of tannase. All tested divalent cations significantly decreased tannase production. Moreover, split plot design was carried out to study the effect of fermentation temperature and fermentation time on tannase production. The results indicated maximum tannase production (312.7 units/50 mL) at 35 °C for 96 h. In other words, increasing fermentation temperature from 30 °C to 35 °C resulted in increasing tannase production. PMID:24294255

  15. Some factors affecting tannase production by Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Hamada A; El-Sahn, Malak A; El-Banna, Amr A

    2013-01-01

    One variable at a time procedure was used to evaluate the effect of qualitative variables on the production of tannase from Aspergillus niger Van Tieghem. These variables including: fermentation technique, agitation condition, tannins source, adding carbohydrates incorporation with tannic acid, nitrogen source type and divalent cations. Submerged fermentation under intermittent shaking gave the highest total tannase activity. Maximum extracellular tannase activity (305 units/50 mL) was attained in medium containing tannic acid as tannins source and sodium nitrate as nitrogen source at 30 °C for 96 h. All added carbohydrates showed significant adverse effects on the production of tannase. All tested divalent cations significantly decreased tannase production. Moreover, split plot design was carried out to study the effect of fermentation temperature and fermentation time on tannase production. The results indicated maximum tannase production (312.7 units/50 mL) at 35 °C for 96 h. In other words, increasing fermentation temperature from 30 °C to 35 °C resulted in increasing tannase production.

  16. Cbl proteins in platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Buitrago, Lorena; Tsygankov, Alexander; Sanjay, Archana; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a fundamental role in hemostasis. Their functional responses have to be tightly controlled as any disturbance may lead to bleeding disorders or thrombosis. It is thus important to clearly identify and understand the signaling mechanisms involved in platelet function. An important role of c-Cbl and Cbl-b ubiquitin ligases in platelet functional responses and in hematological malignancies has been recently described. Cbl proteins perform negative and positive regulation of several signaling pathways in platelets. In this review, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in platelet functional responses.

  17. [Application of risk-based approach for determination of critical factors in technology transfer of production of medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Beregovykh, V V; Spitskiy, O R

    2014-01-01

    Risk-based approach is used for examination of impact of different factors on quality of medicinal products in technology transfer. A general diagram is offered for risk analysis execution in technology transfer from pharmaceutical development to production. When transferring technology to full- scale commercial production it is necessary to investigate and simulate production process application beforehand in new real conditions. The manufacturing process is the core factorfor risk analysis having the most impact on quality attributes of a medicinal product. Further importantfactors are linked to materials and products to be handled and manufacturing environmental conditions such as premises, equipment and personnel. Usage of risk-based approach in designing of multipurpose production facility of medicinal products is shown where quantitative risk analysis tool RAMM (Risk Analysis and Mitigation Matrix) was applied.

  18. Irrigation water productivity is more influenced by agronomic practice factors than by climatic factors in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Xiaotao; Niu, Jun; Tong, Ling; Kang, Shaozhong; Du, Taisheng; Li, Sien; Ding, Risheng

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the influence of driving factors on irrigation water productivity (IWP) is vital for efficient agricultural water use. This study analyzed contributions of agronomic practice and climatic factors to the changes of IWP, based on the data from 1981 to 2012 in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China. Cobb-Douglas production functions were developed by the partial least squares method and contribution rates of the driving factors were calculated. Results showed that IWP and its driving factors increased during the study period, with different changing patterns. IWP was significantly correlated with the agronomic practice factors, daily mean temperature and solar radiation of the crop growing period. The agronomic practice factors including irrigation, fertilization, agricultural film, and agricultural pesticide contributed 20.6%, 32.8%, 42.3% and 11.1% respectively to the increase of IWP; and the contribution rates of the climatic factors, i.e. daily mean temperature and solar radiation, are −0.9% and 0.9%. And the contributions of these factors changed in different sub-periods. It is concluded that agronomic practice factors influenced IWP much more than climatic factors. The improvement of IWP should rely on advanced water-saving technology and application of optimum (need-based) fertilizer, agricultural film and pesticide, ensuring efficient use of agronomic inputs in the study area. PMID:27905483

  19. Irrigation water productivity is more influenced by agronomic practice factors than by climatic factors in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Xiaotao; Niu, Jun; Tong, Ling; Kang, Shaozhong; Du, Taisheng; Li, Sien; Ding, Risheng

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the influence of driving factors on irrigation water productivity (IWP) is vital for efficient agricultural water use. This study analyzed contributions of agronomic practice and climatic factors to the changes of IWP, based on the data from 1981 to 2012 in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China. Cobb-Douglas production functions were developed by the partial least squares method and contribution rates of the driving factors were calculated. Results showed that IWP and its driving factors increased during the study period, with different changing patterns. IWP was significantly correlated with the agronomic practice factors, daily mean temperature and solar radiation of the crop growing period. The agronomic practice factors including irrigation, fertilization, agricultural film, and agricultural pesticide contributed 20.6%, 32.8%, 42.3% and 11.1% respectively to the increase of IWP; and the contribution rates of the climatic factors, i.e. daily mean temperature and solar radiation, are ‑0.9% and 0.9%. And the contributions of these factors changed in different sub-periods. It is concluded that agronomic practice factors influenced IWP much more than climatic factors. The improvement of IWP should rely on advanced water-saving technology and application of optimum (need-based) fertilizer, agricultural film and pesticide, ensuring efficient use of agronomic inputs in the study area.

  20. Irrigation water productivity is more influenced by agronomic practice factors than by climatic factors in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Xiaotao; Niu, Jun; Tong, Ling; Kang, Shaozhong; Du, Taisheng; Li, Sien; Ding, Risheng

    2016-12-01

    Quantifying the influence of driving factors on irrigation water productivity (IWP) is vital for efficient agricultural water use. This study analyzed contributions of agronomic practice and climatic factors to the changes of IWP, based on the data from 1981 to 2012 in Hexi Corridor, Northwest China. Cobb-Douglas production functions were developed by the partial least squares method and contribution rates of the driving factors were calculated. Results showed that IWP and its driving factors increased during the study period, with different changing patterns. IWP was significantly correlated with the agronomic practice factors, daily mean temperature and solar radiation of the crop growing period. The agronomic practice factors including irrigation, fertilization, agricultural film, and agricultural pesticide contributed 20.6%, 32.8%, 42.3% and 11.1% respectively to the increase of IWP; and the contribution rates of the climatic factors, i.e. daily mean temperature and solar radiation, are -0.9% and 0.9%. And the contributions of these factors changed in different sub-periods. It is concluded that agronomic practice factors influenced IWP much more than climatic factors. The improvement of IWP should rely on advanced water-saving technology and application of optimum (need-based) fertilizer, agricultural film and pesticide, ensuring efficient use of agronomic inputs in the study area.

  1. Box products in nilpotent normal form theory: The factoring method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdock, James

    2016-01-01

    Let N be a nilpotent matrix and consider vector fields x ˙ = Nx + v (x) in normal form. Then v is equivariant under the flow eN*t for the inner product normal form or eMt for the sl2 normal form. These vector equivariants can be found by finding the scalar invariants for the Jordan blocks in N* or M; taking the box product of these to obtain the invariants for N* or M itself; and then boosting the invariants to equivariants by another box product. These methods, developed by Murdock and Sanders in 2007, are here given a self-contained exposition with new foundations and new algorithms yielding improved (simpler) Stanley decompositions for the invariants and equivariants. Ideas used include transvectants (from classical invariant theory), Stanley decompositions (from commutative algebra), and integer cones (from integer programming). This approach can be extended to covariants of sl2k for k > 1, known as SLOCC in quantum computing.

  2. Factors Associated with Research Productivity among Oral Healthcare Educators in an Asian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Bernardo E., Jr.; Clerigo, Maria Eloisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Research writing confidence and organizational support toward research activities are two essential factors that may affect research productivity among higher educational institutions. This study investigated the possible relationships of these two factors to research productivity among faculty members of the College of Dentistry at Lyceum of the…

  3. Associations between individual cow factors and milk-protein production.

    PubMed

    Sargeant, J M; Martin, S W; Lissemore, K D; Leslie, K E; Gibson, J P; Scott, H M; Kelton, D F

    1998-02-06

    Associations between stage of lactation, cow characteristics, and protein production were evaluated using data from a 2-year period on 75 Ontario, 5 Alberta, and 3 Nova Scotia dairy farms. Individual-cow protein production was defined by 305-day protein yield and by the estimated breeding value for protein yield. Lactation curves for average daily protein yield were computed by parity, breed, and season of calving. Mean protein yield was highest in early lactation. However, there was no pronounced peak in daily protein yield. Parity was positively associated with 305-day protein yield and negatively associated with the estimated breeding values for protein yield. First-calf heifers had lower protein yields in early lactation and a slower rate of decline in protein yield in late lactation, as compared to later parity cows. Holstein cows had higher unadjusted protein yields and lower protein yields after adjusting for milk yield than other breeds. Holstein cows had significantly higher protein yields early in lactation compared to other breeds, but the rate of decline in protein production in late lactation was also greater. Season was associated with 305-day protein yield; the highest protein yields occurred in cows calving in the fall and winter months, but these cows had the greatest rate of decline in protein production in late lactation.

  4. Factors Common to High-Utilization Evaluations. Evaluation Productivity Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin; And Others

    This paper reports on the factors that characterize high-utilization evaluations. It is based on materials submitted to an American Educational Research Association (AERA) Division H competition for outstanding examples of evaluation utilization. The paper is organized into three sections. The first section outlines the background of the study:…

  5. Pantomime Production by People with Aphasia: What Are Influencing Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Nispen, Karin; van de Sandt-Koenderman, Mieke; Mol, Lisette; Krahmer, Emiel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present article aimed to inform clinical practice on whether people with aphasia (PWA) deploy pantomime techniques similarly to participants without brain damage (PWBD) and if not, what factors influence these differences. Method: We compared 38 PWA to 20 PWBD in their use of 6 representation techniques ("handling,"…

  6. Trends in hospital labor and total factor productivity, 1981-86

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry; Pope, Gregory C.

    1989-01-01

    The per-case payment rates of Medicare's prospective payment system are annually updated. As one element of the update factor, Congress required consideration of changes in hospital productivity. In this article, calculations of annual changes in labor and total factor productivity during 1981-86 of hospitals eligible for prospective payment are presented using several output and input variants. Generally, productivity has declined since 1980, although the rates of decline have slowed since prospective payment implementation. According to the series of analyses most relevant for policy, significant hospital productivity gains occurred during 1983-86. This may justify a lower update factor. PMID:10313278

  7. Influences on Group Productivity. 2. Factors Inherent in the Person

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-15

    Tuckman , 1967 36 M 3 Navy, enlisted men Hornsby, 1974 72 F 8 undergraduates Hovey, 1974 96 ? 4 college students Petzel, Johnson, Johnson...Problem 11 B Factor analysis of 23 measures of liberalism. Church Problem (B) Fame Problem Tuckman , 1967 Interpersonal Topical Inventory (ITI) of...partners than those working on the Church Problem first. Therefore, hypothesis three was not supported. Tuckman , B.W. Group composition and group

  8. A method for the production of rheumatoid factor in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Biro, C. E.

    1968-01-01

    Rabbits rendered immunologically unresponsive to native human IgG and then injected with a single large dose of heat-aggregated human IgG produce an antibody which resembles rheumatoid factor in all its properties that were tested. It is an exclusively IgM antibody which reacts with both human and rabbit (autologous) aggregated IgG, but not with either protein in the native state. PMID:5303049

  9. Faculty Research Productivity: Exploring the Role of Gender and Family-Related Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sax, Linda J.; Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Arredondo, Marisol; DiCrisi, Frank A., III

    2002-01-01

    Examined the role of marriage, children, and aging parents on research productivity of a large national sample of college faculty. Found that factors affecting research productivity are nearly identical for men and women and that family-related variables exhibit little or no effects on productivity. (EV)

  10. Clinical Safety of a High Dose of Phycocyanin-Enriched Aqueous Extract from Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis: Results from a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study with a Focus on Anticoagulant Activity and Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Gitte S; Drapeau, Cassandra; Lenninger, Miki; Benson, Kathleen F

    2016-07-01

    The goal for this study was to evaluate safety regarding anticoagulant activity and platelet activation during daily consumption of an aqueous cyanophyta extract (ACE), containing a high dose of phycocyanin. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, 24 men and women were enrolled after informed consent, and consumed either ACE (2.3 g/day) or placebo daily for 2 weeks. The ACE dose was equivalent to ∼1 g phycocyanin per day, chosen based on the highest dose Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Consuming ACE did not alter markers for platelet activation (P-selectin expression) or serum P-selectin levels. No changes were seen for activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin clotting time, or fibrinogen activity. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) showed a significant reduction after 2 weeks of ACE consumption (P < .001), in contrast to placebo where no changes were seen; the difference in AST levels between the two groups was significant at 2 weeks (P < .02). Reduced levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) were also seen in the group consuming ACE (P < .08). Previous studies showed reduction of chronic pain when consuming 1 g ACE per day. The higher dose of 2.3 g/day in this study was associated with significant reduction of chronic pain at rest and when physically active (P < .05). Consumption of ACE showed safety regarding markers pertaining to anticoagulant activity and platelet activation status, in conjunction with rapid and robust relief of chronic pain. Reduction in AST and ALT suggested improvement in liver function and metabolism.

  11. Clinical Safety of a High Dose of Phycocyanin-Enriched Aqueous Extract from Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis: Results from a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study with a Focus on Anticoagulant Activity and Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Drapeau, Cassandra; Lenninger, Miki; Benson, Kathleen F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal for this study was to evaluate safety regarding anticoagulant activity and platelet activation during daily consumption of an aqueous cyanophyta extract (ACE), containing a high dose of phycocyanin. Using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, 24 men and women were enrolled after informed consent, and consumed either ACE (2.3 g/day) or placebo daily for 2 weeks. The ACE dose was equivalent to ∼1 g phycocyanin per day, chosen based on the highest dose Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Consuming ACE did not alter markers for platelet activation (P-selectin expression) or serum P-selectin levels. No changes were seen for activated partial thromboplastin time, thrombin clotting time, or fibrinogen activity. Serum levels of aspartate transaminase (AST) showed a significant reduction after 2 weeks of ACE consumption (P < .001), in contrast to placebo where no changes were seen; the difference in AST levels between the two groups was significant at 2 weeks (P < .02). Reduced levels of alanine transaminase (ALT) were also seen in the group consuming ACE (P < .08). Previous studies showed reduction of chronic pain when consuming 1 g ACE per day. The higher dose of 2.3 g/day in this study was associated with significant reduction of chronic pain at rest and when physically active (P < .05). Consumption of ACE showed safety regarding markers pertaining to anticoagulant activity and platelet activation status, in conjunction with rapid and robust relief of chronic pain. Reduction in AST and ALT suggested improvement in liver function and metabolism. PMID:27362442

  12. Transgenic Soybean Production of Bioactive Human Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF)

    PubMed Central

    He, Yonghua; Schmidt, Monica A.; Erwin, Christopher; Guo, Jun; Sun, Raphael; Pendarvis, Ken; Warner, Brad W.; Herman, Eliot M.

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating condition of premature infants that results from the gut microbiome invading immature intestinal tissues. This results in a life-threatening disease that is frequently treated with the surgical removal of diseased and dead tissues. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), typically found in bodily fluids, such as amniotic fluid, salvia and mother’s breast milk, is an intestinotrophic growth factor and may reduce the onset of NEC in premature infants. We have produced human EGF in soybean seeds to levels biologically relevant and demonstrated its comparable activity to commercially available EGF. Transgenic soybean seeds expressing a seed-specific codon optimized gene encoding of the human EGF protein with an added ER signal tag at the N’ terminal were produced. Seven independent lines were grown to homozygous and found to accumulate a range of 6.7 +/- 3.1 to 129.0 +/- 36.7 μg EGF/g of dry soybean seed. Proteomic and immunoblot analysis indicates that the inserted EGF is the same as the human EGF protein. Phosphorylation and immunohistochemical assays on the EGF receptor in HeLa cells indicate the EGF protein produced in soybean seed is bioactive and comparable to commercially available human EGF. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using soybean seeds as a biofactory to produce therapeutic agents in a soymilk delivery platform. PMID:27314851

  13. Production of virulence factors in Candida strains isolated from patients with denture stomatitis and control individuals.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Domingues, Nádia; Araújo, Maria Izabel Daniel Santos Alves; Junqueira, Juliana Campos; Back-Brito, Graziella Nuernberg; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the production of virulence factors in Candida isolates from the oral cavities of 50 patients with different degrees of denture stomatitis (DS, type I, II and III) and 50 individuals without signs of DS. We evaluated the enzymatic and hemolytic activities, the biofilm formation, and the cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) in all isolates. Germ tube (GT) production was also evaluated in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis isolates. In C. albicans and C. dubliniensis the secretion of hemolysin and GT production was significantly different between isolates from patients with DS and individuals without DS. No significant difference was observed in the production of virulence factors by Candida glabrata isolates. Candida isolates expressed a wide range of virulence factors. However, in the majority of isolates from the type III lesions, the production of the virulence factors was higher than for the other groups.

  14. Industry efficiency and total factor productivity growth under resources and environmental constraint in China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Feng; Li, Ling; Xia, X H

    2012-01-01

    The growth of China's industry has been seriously depending on energy and environment. This paper attempts to apply the directional distance function and the Luenberger productivity index to measure the environmental efficiency, environmental total factor productivity, and its components at the level of subindustry in China over the period from 1999 to 2009 while considering energy consumption and emission of pollutants. This paper also empirically examines the determinants of efficiency and productivity change. The major findings are as follows. Firstly, the main sources of environmental inefficiency of China's industry are the inefficiency of gross industrial output value, the excessive energy consumption, and pollutant emissions. Secondly, the highest growth rate of environmental total factor productivity among the three industrial categories is manufacturing, followed by mining, and production and supply of electricity, gas, and water. Thirdly, foreign direct investment, capital-labor ratio, ownership structure, energy consumption structure, and environmental regulation have varying degrees of effects on the environmental efficiency and environmental total factor productivity.

  15. Meson Form Factors and Deep Exclusive Meson Production Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Tanja

    2017-03-01

    Pion and kaon electroproduction data play a unique role in Nature and our understanding of them is essential for explaining hadron structure. Precision longitudinaltransverse separated pion and kaon cross sections are of particular interest. They allow for the extraction of meson form factors and validation of understanding of hard exclusive and semi-inclusive reactions (π+, K+, π0, γ) towards 3D hadron imaging and potential future flavor decomposition. We review recent data and present prospects for deep exclusive pion and kaon electroproduction at the 12 GeV Jefferson Lab including the prospects to use projected charged- and neutral pion data to further determine the spin, charge-parity and flavor of GPDs, including the helicity-flip GPDs.

  16. Human factors and productivity on Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Brown, J. W.; Santy, P. A.

    1989-01-01

    Three main facets of man systems are investigated with reference to the Space Station Freedom program: specific hardware systems that focus on the human element; requirements definition for man-systems integration; and crew interface and operations analysis. Three key criteria have been identified for selecting individuals to constitute the human system or crew for Space Station Freedom missions: aptitude for mission specific skills, motivation, and sensitivity to self and others. Integration of the human system into the complex engineering and science systems planned on Space Station Freedom will require the close collaboration of engineers, physicians, psychologists, and human factors experts. Ground-based research and experiments on the KC-135 aircraft are providing information about how human systems will function on a space station and how to design other systems to interact with the crew. A laboratory for further research will be provided onboard Space Station Freedom.

  17. Differences in production of several extracellular virulence factors in clinical and food Aeromonas spp. strains.

    PubMed

    Pin, C; Marín, M L; Selgas, D; García, M L; Tormo, J; Casas, C

    1995-02-01

    Production of several extracellular virulence factors (lipase, protease and haemolysin) was compared in 15 Aeromonas spp. isolated from faeces of patients with Aeromonas-associated gastroenteritis and 81 strains isolated from food. Strains from food did not show differences in production of these factors when compared with strains isolated from faeces. However, if strains were considered in relation to autoagglutination (AA) character, the AA+ differed from AA- strains in lipase and protease production. Supernatant fluids of AA+ food and human strains showed 2.5-fold more protease production than that observed in AA- strains. These two characteristics of certain Aeromonas strains could be related with the more virulent capacity.

  18. Production of arabitol from glycerol: strain screening and study of factors affecting production yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glycerol is a major byproduct from biodiesel production, and developing new uses for glycerol is imperative to overall economics and sustainability of the biodiesel industry. With the aim of producing xylitol and/or arabitol as the value-added products from glycerol, 214 yeast strains, many osmotole...

  19. Production of polyclonal antibodies to feline tumor necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Otto, C M; Niagro, F; McGraw, R A; Rawlings, C A

    1997-01-01

    Two 13-amino-acid peptides were synthesized based on the putative feline tumor necrosis factor (FeTNF) sequence. The synthesized peptides were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, and injected into rabbits. The gene for FeTNF was cloned into the FLAG (International Biotechnologies Inc. [IBI], Kodak, New Haven, Conn.) fusion protein expression vector. The expressed fusion protein was purified by using the M-1 anti-FLAG octapeptide monoclonal antibody (IBI, Kodak). The fusion protein was emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant and injected into chickens. The immune sera generated to the synthetic peptides and the fusion protein recognized the recombinant FeTNF fusion protein on Western or dot blot assay. The preimmune and immune sera were incubated with naturally occurring FeTNF (supernatants from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cultured feline peritoneal exudate or peripheral mononuclear cells). The antibody raised to the recombinant FeTNF fusion protein and N-terminal synthetic peptide neutralized bioactivity of native FeTNF and recombinant human TNF. Preimmune sera did not have any neutralizing activity. The polyclonal antibodies were not specific for FeTNF, since both porcine and human recombinant TNF were neutralized by the fusion protein antibodies. The synthetic peptide antibodies recognized recombinant feline and equine TNF on a Western blot. PMID:9220170

  20. How do the full-generation poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers activate blood platelets? Activation of circulating platelets and formation of "fibrinogen aggregates" in the presence of polycations.

    PubMed

    Watala, Cezary; Karolczak, Kamil; Kassassir, Hassan; Talar, Marcin; Przygodzki, Tomasz; Maczynska, Katarzyna; Labieniec-Watala, Magdalena

    2016-04-30

    Direct use of poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimers as drugs may be limited, due to uncertain (cyto)toxicity. Peripheral blood components, which constitute the first line of a contact with administered pharmaceuticals, may become vastly affected by PAMAM dendrimers. The aim of this study was to explore how PAMAMs' polycationicity might affect blood platelet activation and reactivity, and thus trigger various haemostatic events. We monitored blood platelet reactivity in rats with experimental diabetes upon a long-term administration of the unmodified PAMAM dendrimers. In parallel, the effects on blood flow in a systemic circulation was recorded intravitally in mice administered with PAMAM G2, G3 or G4. Compounding was the in vitro approach to monitor the impact of PAMAM dendrimers on blood platelet activation and reactivity and on selected haemostatic and protein conformation parameters. We demonstrated the activating effects of polycations on blood platelets. Some diversity of the revealed outcomes considerably depended on the used approach and the particular technique employed to monitor blood platelet function. We discovered undesirable impact of plain PAMAM dendrimers on primary haemostasis and their prothrombotic influence. We emphasize the need of a more profound verifying of all the promising findings collected for PAMAMs with the use of well-designed in vivo preclinical studies.

  1. Factor Xa stimulates fibroblast procollagen production, proliferation, and calcium signaling via PAR{sub 1} activation

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc-Brude, Olivier P. . E-mail: olivier.blanc-brude@larib.inserm.fr; Archer, Fabienne; Leoni, Patricia; Derian, Claudia; Bolsover, Steven; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Chambers, Rachel C.

    2005-03-10

    Fibroblast proliferation and procollagen production are central features of tissue repair and fibrosis. In addition to its role in blood clotting, the coagulation cascade proteinase thrombin can contribute to tissue repair by stimulating fibroblasts via proteolytic activation of proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR{sub 1}). During hemostasis, the coagulation cascade proteinase factor X is converted into factor Xa. We have previously shown that factor Xa upregulates fibroblast proliferation via production of autocrine PDGF. In this study, we further examined the effects of factor Xa on fibroblast function and aimed to identify its signaling receptor. We showed that factor Xa stimulates procollagen promoter activity and protein production by human and mouse fibroblasts. This effect was independent of PDGF and thrombin production, but dependent on factor Xa proteolytic activity. We also showed that PAR{sub 1}-deficient mouse fibroblasts did not upregulate procollagen production, mobilize cytosolic calcium, or proliferate in response to factor Xa. Desensitization techniques and PAR{sub 1}-specific agonists and inhibitors were used to demonstrate that PAR{sub 1} mediates factor Xa signaling in human fibroblasts. This is the first report that factor Xa stimulates extracellular matrix production. In contrast with endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts appear to be the only cell type in which the effects of factor Xa are mediated mainly via PAR{sub 1} and not PAR{sub 2}. These findings are critical for our understanding of tissue repair and fibrotic mechanisms, and for the design of novel approaches to inhibit the profibrotic effects of the coagulation cascade without compromising blood hemostasis.

  2. Association of Lipid Accumulation Product with Cardio-Metabolic Risk Factors in Postmenopausal Women.

    PubMed

    Namazi Shabestari, Alireza; Asadi, Mojgan; Jouyandeh, Zahra; Qorbani, Mostafa; Kelishadi, Roya

    2016-06-01

    The lipid accumulation product is a novel, safe and inexpensive index of central lipid over accumulation based on waist circumference and fasting concentration of circulating triglycerides. This study was designed to investigate the ability of lipid accumulation product to predict Cardio-metabolic risk factors in postmenopausal women. In this Cross-sectional study, 264 postmenopausal women by using convenience sampling method were selected from menopause clinic in Tehran. Cardio-metabolic risk factors were measured, and lipid accumulation product (waist-58×triglycerides [nmol/L]) was calculated. Optimal cut-off point of lipid accumulation product for predicting metabolic syndrome was estimated by ROC (Receiver-operating characteristic) curve analysis. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 41.2% of subjects. Optimal cut-off point of lipid accumulation product for predicting metabolic syndrome was 47.63 (sensitivity:75%; specificity:77.9%). High lipid accumulation product increases risk of all Cardio-metabolic risk factors except overweight, high Total Cholesterol, high Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and high Fasting Blood Sugar in postmenopausal women. Our findings show that lipid accumulation product is associated with metabolic syndrome and some Cardio-metabolic risk factors Also lipid accumulation product may have been a useful tool for predicting cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome risk in postmenopausal women.

  3. Enhanced Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I Protein in Escherichia coli by Optimization of Five Key Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbari, Javad; Babaeipour, Valiollah; Vahidi, Hossein; Moghimi, Hamidreza; Mofid, Mohammad Reza; Namvaran, Mohammad Mehdi; Jafari, Sevda

    2015-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) is a kind of growth factor with clinical significance in medicine. Up to now, E. coli expression system has been widely used as a host to produce rhIGF-1 with high yields. Batch cultures as non-continuous fermentations were carried out to overproduce rhIGF-I in E. coli. The major objective of this study is over- production of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor I (rhIGF-I) through a developed process by recruiting effective factors in order to achieve the most recombinant protein. In this study we investigated the effect of culture medium, induction temperature and amount of inducer on cell growth and IGF-1 production. Taguchi design of experiments (DOE) method was used as the statistical method. Analysis of experimental data showed that maximum production of rhIGF-I was occurred in 32y culture medium at 32 °C and 0.05 Mm IPTG. Under this condition, 0.694 g/L of rhIGF-I was produced as the inclusion bodies. Following optimization of these three factors, we have also optimized the amount of glucose and induction time in 5 liter top bench bioreactor. Full factorial design of experiment method was used for these two factors as the statistical method. 10 g/L and OD600=5 were selected as the optimum point of Glucose amount and induction time, respectively. Finally, we reached to a concentration of 1.26 g/L rhIGF-1 at optimum condition. PMID:26330880

  4. Breakdown of QCD factorization for P-wave quarkonium production at low transverse momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. P.; Wang, J. X.; Zhao, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quarkonium production at low transverse momentum in hadron collisions can be used to extract Transverse-Momentum-Dependent (TMD) gluon distribution functions, if TMD factorization holds there. We show that TMD factorization for the case of P-wave quarkonium with JPC =0++ ,2++ holds at one-loop level, but is violated beyond one-loop level. TMD factorization for other P-wave quarkonium is also violated already at one-loop level.

  5. Evaluation of two platelet-rich plasma processing methods and two platelet-activation techniques for use in llamas and alpacas.

    PubMed

    Semevolos, Stacy A; Youngblood, Cori D; Grissom, Stephanie K; Gorman, M Elena; Larson, Maureen K

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate 2 processing methods (commercial kit vs conical tube centrifugation) for preparing platelet rich plasma (PRP) for use in llamas and alpacas. SAMPLES Blood samples (30 mL each) aseptically collected from 6 healthy llamas and 6 healthy alpacas. PROCEDURES PRP was prepared from blood samples by use of a commercial kit and by double-step conical tube centrifugation. A CBC was performed for blood and PRP samples. Platelets in PRP samples were activated by means of a freeze-thaw method with or without 23mM CaCl2, and concentrations of platelet-derived growth factor-BB and transforming growth factor-β1 were measured. Values were compared between processing methods and camelid species. RESULTS Blood CBC values for llamas and alpacas were similar. The commercial kit yielded a significantly greater degree of platelet enrichment (mean increase, 8.5 fold vs 2.8 fold) and WBC enrichment (mean increase, 3.7 fold vs 1.9 fold) than did conical tube centrifugation. Llamas had a significantly greater degree of platelet enrichment than alpacas by either processing method. No difference in WBC enrichment was identified between species. Concentrations of both growth factors were significantly greater in PRP samples obtained by use of the commercial kit versus those obtained by conical tube centrifugation. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE For blood samples from camelids, the commercial kit yielded a PRP product with a higher platelet and WBC concentration than achieved by conical tube centrifugation. Optimal PRP platelet and WBC concentrations for various applications need to be determined for llamas and alpacas.

  6. Skin rejuvenation using cosmetic products containing growth factors, cytokines, and matrikines: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Aldag, Caroline; Nogueira Teixeira, Diana; Leventhal, Phillip S

    2016-01-01

    Skin aging is primarily due to alterations in the dermal extracellular matrix, especially a decrease in collagen I content, fragmentation of collagen fibrils, and accumulation of amorphous elastin material, also known as elastosis. Growth factors and cytokines are included in several cosmetic products intended for skin rejuvenation because of their ability to promote collagen synthesis. Matrikines and matrikine-like peptides offer the advantage of growth factor-like activities but better skin penetration due to their much smaller molecular size. In this review, we summarize the commercially available products containing growth factors, cytokines, and matrikines for which there is evidence that they promote skin rejuvenation. PMID:27877059

  7. Cultural and environmental factors governing tomato production: Local food production under elevated temperature conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long-term fresh tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) production data was used to estimate cultural and environmental impacts on marketable tomato yields in eastern Oklahoma. Quantifying the interactive effects of planting date and growing season duration and the effects of cumulative heat units and heat...

  8. Macrophages that have ingested apoptotic cells in vitro inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms involving TGF-beta, PGE2, and PAF.

    PubMed Central

    Fadok, V A; Bratton, D L; Konowal, A; Freed, P W; Westcott, J Y; Henson, P M

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis in vivo is followed almost inevitably by rapid uptake into adjacent phagocytic cells, a critical process in tissue remodeling, regulation of the immune response, or resolution of inflammation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages has been suggested to be a quiet process that does not lead to production of inflammatory mediators. Here we show that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils (in contrast to immunoglobulin G-opsonized apoptotic cells) actively inhibited the production of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-8, IL-10, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as well as leukotriene C4 and thromboxane B2, by human monocyte-derived macrophages. In contrast, production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, prostaglandin E2, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was increased. The latter appeared to be involved in the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production because addition of exogenous TGF-beta1, prostaglandin E2, or PAF resulted in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cytokine production. Furthermore, anti-TGF-beta antibody, indomethacin, or PAF receptor antagonists restored cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages that had phagocytosed apoptotic cells. These results suggest that binding and/or phagocytosis of apoptotic cells induces active antiinflammatory or suppressive properties in human macrophages. Therefore, it is likely that resolution of inflammation depends not only on the removal of apoptotic cells but on active suppression of inflammatory mediator production. Disorders in either could result in chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:9466984

  9. Macrophages that have ingested apoptotic cells in vitro inhibit proinflammatory cytokine production through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms involving TGF-beta, PGE2, and PAF.

    PubMed

    Fadok, V A; Bratton, D L; Konowal, A; Freed, P W; Westcott, J Y; Henson, P M

    1998-02-15

    Apoptosis in vivo is followed almost inevitably by rapid uptake into adjacent phagocytic cells, a critical process in tissue remodeling, regulation of the immune response, or resolution of inflammation. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by macrophages has been suggested to be a quiet process that does not lead to production of inflammatory mediators. Here we show that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils (in contrast to immunoglobulin G-opsonized apoptotic cells) actively inhibited the production of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-8, IL-10, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as well as leukotriene C4 and thromboxane B2, by human monocyte-derived macrophages. In contrast, production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, prostaglandin E2, and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was increased. The latter appeared to be involved in the inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production because addition of exogenous TGF-beta1, prostaglandin E2, or PAF resulted in inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cytokine production. Furthermore, anti-TGF-beta antibody, indomethacin, or PAF receptor antagonists restored cytokine production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages that had phagocytosed apoptotic cells. These results suggest that binding and/or phagocytosis of apoptotic cells induces active antiinflammatory or suppressive properties in human macrophages. Therefore, it is likely that resolution of inflammation depends not only on the removal of apoptotic cells but on active suppression of inflammatory mediator production. Disorders in either could result in chronic inflammatory diseases.

  10. A review on factors affecting microcystins production by algae in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ruihua; Wang, Pinfei; Jia, Peili; Zhang, Yi; Chu, Xincheng; Wang, Yifei

    2016-03-01

    Microcystins, a toxin produced by Microcystis aeruginosa have become a global environmental issue in recent years. As a consequence of eutrophication, microcystins have become widely disseminated in drinking water sources, seriously impairing drinking water quality. This review focuses on the relationship between microcystins synthesis and physical, chemical, and biological environmental factors that are significant in controlling their production. Light intensity and temperature are the more important physical factors, and in many cases, an optimum level for these two factors has been observed. Nitrogen and phosphorus are the key chemical factors causing frequent occurrence of harmful algal blooms and microcystins production. The absorption of nutrients and metabolic activities of algae are affected by different concentrations and forms of nitrogen and phosphorus, leading to variations in microcystins production Metal ions and emerging pollutants are other significant chemical factors, whose comprehensive impact is still being studied. Algae can also interact with biological agents like predators and competitors in aquatic environments, and such interactions are suggested to promote MCs production and release. This review further highlights areas that require further research in order to gain a better understanding of microcystins production. It provides a theoretical basis for the control of microcystins production and releasing into aquatic environments.

  11. Factors affecting RFID adoption in the agricultural product distribution industry: empirical evidence from China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ping; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an exploratory investigation of factors influencing the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) methods in the agricultural product distribution industry. Through a literature review and field research, and based on the technology-organization-environment (TOE) theoretical framework, this paper analyzes factors influencing RFID adoption in the agricultural product distribution industry in reference to three contexts: technological, organizational, and environmental contexts. An empirical analysis of the TOE framework was conducted by applying structural equation modeling based on actual data from a questionnaire survey on the agricultural product distribution industry in China. The results show that employee resistance and uncertainty are not supported by the model. Technological compatibility, perceived effectiveness, organizational size, upper management support, trust between enterprises, technical knowledge, competitive pressure and support from the Chinese government, which are supported by the model, have significantly positive effects on RFID adoption. Meanwhile, organizational size has the strongest positive effect, while competitive pressure levels have the smallest effect. Technological complexities and costs have significantly negative effects on RFID adoption, with cost being the most significantly negative influencing factor. These research findings will afford enterprises in the agricultural products supply chain with a stronger understanding of the factors that influence RFID adoption in the agricultural product distribution industry. In addition, these findings will help enterprises remain aware of how these factors affect RFID adoption and will thus help enterprises make more accurate and rational decisions by promoting RFID application in the agricultural product distribution industry.

  12. Factors governing phytoplankton biomass and production in tropical estuaries of western Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ching-Wen; Chuang, Yi-Li; Chou, Lien-Siang; Chen, Meng-Hsien; Lin, Hsing-Juh

    2016-04-01

    Factors governing phytoplankton community composition and production in tropical estuaries remain mostly unknown. We aimed to quantify phytoplankton biomass, production, and community composition seasonally in 2 tropical estuaries with different levels of nutrient concentrations and turbidity, and we compared them with an offshore control site on the western coast of central Taiwan for two years. Phytoplankton biomass and production varied with season and site. Annual integrated primary production showed that these three sites were mesotrophic systems. Spearman rank correlations showed that phytoplankton biomass and production were positively correlated with water temperature, but negatively correlated with turbidity. The threshold of turbidity was 12 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU), above which phytoplankton chlorophyll a concentrations were <0.5 mg m-3, and gross production rate was <100 mg C m-3 d-1. The results of nonmetric multidimensional scaling (MDS) showed that the community was primarily structured by season and secondarily by site. The functional traits further showed that turbidity, water temperature, and SiO2 concentration were governing factors for the variations in the community. In summary, turbidity was the main factor governing phytoplankton biomass and production, whereas water temperature and SiO2 concentration had both a direct effect on production and an indirect effect by changing community composition.

  13. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  14. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  15. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  16. 40 CFR Table Mm-1 to Subpart Mm of... - Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Default Factors for Petroleum Products... Suppliers of Petroleum Products Pt. 98, Subpt. MM, Table MM-1 Table MM-1 to Subpart MM of Part 98—Default Factors for Petroleum Products and Natural Gas Liquids 1 2 Products Column A: density(metric...

  17. Total factor productivity change in dairy farming: Empirical evidence from southern Chile.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Víctor H; Bravo-Ureta, Boris E

    2016-10-01

    Despite the importance of productivity growth, many studies carried out at the farm level focus primarily on the technical efficiency (TE) component of farm productivity. Therefore, the general purpose of this paper is to measure total factor productivity change and then to decompose this change into several distinct elements. The data were an unbalanced panel for the period from 2005 to 2010 containing 477 farms and 1,426 observations obtained from TODOAGRO, a farm-management center created in 1996 in the southern part of Chile. The region where the data come from accounts for 20% of the total milk processed in the country. Stochastic production frontiers along with the translog functional form were used to analyze total factor productivity change. The econometric evidence indicates that farms exhibit decreasing returns to size implying that costs of production rise as farm size increases, which suggests that the motivation for farm growth stems from the search for income rather than from lowering costs. The main results indicated that productivity gains through TE improvements are limited, with an average TE for the whole sample of 91.0%, and average technical efficiency change of 0.05% per year. By contrast, average technological progress at the sample mean was rather high at 1.90%, which suggests that additional investments in research and subsequent adoption of improved technologies would have a positive effect on productivity growth. The findings also revealed that farm size is not associated with productivity growth for the dairy farms in the sample.

  18. Exploring the role of sigma factor gene expression on production by Corynebacterium glutamicum: sigma factor H and FMN as example

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Hironori; Wendisch, Volker F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are known to cope with environmental changes by using alternative sigma factors binding to RNA polymerase core enzyme. Sigma factor is one of the targets to modify transcription regulation in bacteria and to influence production capacities. In this study, the effect of overexpressing each annotated sigma factor gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum WT was assayed using an IPTG inducible plasmid system and different IPTG concentrations. It was revealed that growth was severely decreased when sigD or sigH were overexpressed with IPTG concentrations higher than 50 μM. Overexpression of sigH led to an obvious phenotypic change, a yellow-colored supernatant. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that riboflavin was excreted to the medium when sigH was overexpressed and DNA microarray analysis confirmed increased expression of riboflavin biosynthesis genes. In addition, genes for enzymes related to the pentose phosphate pathway and for enzymes dependent on flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), or NADPH as cofactor were upregulated when sigH was overexpressed. To test if sigH overexpression can be exploited for production of riboflavin-derived FMN or FAD, the endogenous gene for bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenyltransferase was co-expressed with sigH from a plasmid. Balanced expression of sigH and ribF improved accumulation of riboflavin (19.8 ± 0.3 μM) and allowed for its conversion to FMN (33.1 ± 1.8 μM) in the supernatant. While a proof-of-concept was reached, conversion was not complete and titers were not high. This study revealed that inducible and gradable overexpression of sigma factor genes is an interesting approach to switch gene expression profiles and to discover untapped potential of bacteria for chemical production. PMID:26257719

  19. Exploring the role of sigma factor gene expression on production by Corynebacterium glutamicum: sigma factor H and FMN as example.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hironori; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are known to cope with environmental changes by using alternative sigma factors binding to RNA polymerase core enzyme. Sigma factor is one of the targets to modify transcription regulation in bacteria and to influence production capacities. In this study, the effect of overexpressing each annotated sigma factor gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum WT was assayed using an IPTG inducible plasmid system and different IPTG concentrations. It was revealed that growth was severely decreased when sigD or sigH were overexpressed with IPTG concentrations higher than 50 μM. Overexpression of sigH led to an obvious phenotypic change, a yellow-colored supernatant. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that riboflavin was excreted to the medium when sigH was overexpressed and DNA microarray analysis confirmed increased expression of riboflavin biosynthesis genes. In addition, genes for enzymes related to the pentose phosphate pathway and for enzymes dependent on flavin mononucleotide (FMN), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), or NADPH as cofactor were upregulated when sigH was overexpressed. To test if sigH overexpression can be exploited for production of riboflavin-derived FMN or FAD, the endogenous gene for bifunctional riboflavin kinase/FMN adenyltransferase was co-expressed with sigH from a plasmid. Balanced expression of sigH and ribF improved accumulation of riboflavin (19.8 ± 0.3 μM) and allowed for its conversion to FMN (33.1 ± 1.8 μM) in the supernatant. While a proof-of-concept was reached, conversion was not complete and titers were not high. This study revealed that inducible and gradable overexpression of sigma factor genes is an interesting approach to switch gene expression profiles and to discover untapped potential of bacteria for chemical production.

  20. Negative regulation of germination-arrest factor production in Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6 by a putative extracytoplasmic function sigma factor.

    PubMed

    Okrent, Rachel A; Halgren, Anne B; Azevedo, Mark D; Chang, Jeff H; Mills, Dallice I; Maselko, Maciej; Armstrong, Donald J; Banowetz, Gary M; Trippe, Kristin M

    2014-11-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6 secretes a germination-arrest factor (GAF) that we have identified previously as 4-formylaminooxyvinylglycine. GAF irreversibly inhibits germination of the seeds of numerous grassy weeds and selectively inhibits growth of the bacterial plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora. WH6-3, a mutant that has lost the ability to produce GAF, contains a Tn5 insertion in prtR, a gene that has been described previously in some strains of P. fluorescens as encoding a transmembrane regulator. As in these other pseudomonads, in WH6, prtR occurs immediately downstream of prtI, which encodes a protein homologous to extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. These two genes have been proposed to function as a dicistronic operon. In this study, we demonstrated that deletion of prtI in WT WH6 had no effect on GAF production. However, deletion of prtI in the WH6-3 mutant overcame the effects of the Tn5 insertion in prtR and restored GAF production in the resulting double mutant. Complementation of the double prtIR mutant with prtI suppressed GAF production. This overall pattern of prtIR regulation was also observed for the activity of an AprX protease. Furthermore, reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that alterations in GAF production were mirrored by changes in the transcription of two putative GAF biosynthetic genes. Thus, we concluded that PrtI exerted a negative regulatory effect on GAF production, although the mechanism has not yet been determined. In addition, evidence was obtained that the transcription of prtI and prtR in WH6 may be more complex than predicted by existing models.

  1. Analysis of extrinsic and intrinsic factors affecting event related desynchronization production.

    PubMed

    Takata, Yohei; Kondo, Toshiyuki; Saeki, Midori; Izawa, Jun; Takeda, Kotaro; Otaka, Yohei; It, Koji

    2012-01-01

    Recently there has been an increase in the number of stroke patients with motor paralysis. Appropriate re-afferent sensory feedback synchronized with a voluntary motor intention would be effective for promoting neural plasticity in the stroke rehabilitation. Therefore, BCI technology is considered to be a promising approach in the neuro-rehabilitation. To estimate human motor intention, an event-related desynchronization (ERD), a feature of electroencephalogram (EEG) evoked by motor execution or motor imagery is usually used. However, there exists various factors that affect ERD production, and its neural mechanism is still an open question. As a preliminary stage, we evaluate mutual effects of intrinsic (voluntary motor imagery) and extrinsic (visual and somatosensory stimuli) factors on the ERD production. Experimental results indicate that these three factors are not always additively interacting with each other and affecting the ERD production.

  2. Effects of pretreatment factors on fermentable sugar production and enzymatic hydrolysis of mixed hardwood.

    PubMed

    Lim, Woo-Seok; Lee, Jae-Won

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of different acid catalysts and pretreatment factors on the hydrolysis of biomass compounds over a range of thermochemical pretreatments; maleic, oxalic, and sulfuric acids were each used under different pretreatment conditions. The most influential factor for fermentable sugar production in the dicarboxylic acid-pretreated mixed hardwood was pH. Reaction time was the next significant factor followed by reaction temperature. However, fermentable sugar production was more dependent on reaction temperature than time during sulfuric acid pretreatment, whereas the effect of acid concentration was considerably lower. Maleic acid pretreatment was very effective for attaining high glucose yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic hydrolysis yield was found following maleic acid pretreatment, which reached 95.56%. The trend in enzymatic hydrolysis yields that were detected concomitantly with pretreatment condition or type of acid catalyst was closely related to xylose production in the hydrolysate.

  3. Design for human factors (DfHF): a grounded theory for integrating human factors into production design processes.

    PubMed

    Village, Judy; Searcy, Cory; Salustri, Filipo; Patrick Neumann, W

    2015-01-01

    The 'design for human factors' grounded theory explains 'how' human factors (HF) went from a reactive, after-injury programme in safety, to being proactively integrated into each step of the production design process. In this longitudinal case study collaboration with engineers and HF Specialists in a large electronics manufacturer, qualitative data (e.g. meetings, interviews, observations and reflections) were analysed using a grounded theory methodology. The central tenet in the theory is that when HF Specialists acclimated to the engineering process, language and tools, and strategically aligned HF to the design and business goals of the organisation, HF became a means to improve business performance. This led to engineers 'pulling' HF Specialists onto their team. HF targets were adopted into engineering tools to communicate HF concerns quantitatively, drive continuous improvement, visibly demonstrate change and lead to benchmarking. Senior management held engineers accountable for HF as a key performance indicator, thus integrating HF into the production design process. Practitioner Summary: Research and practice lack explanations about how HF can be integrated early in design of production systems. This three-year case study and the theory derived demonstrate how ergonomists changed their focus to align with design and business goals to integrate HF into the design process.

  4. Factors that promote renewable energy production in U.S. states: A fixed effect estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokeji, Ekwuniru Chika

    2011-12-01

    The unsustainability of conventional energy sources and its environmental destructions are well-known; the sustainability of renewable energy and its environmental benefits are also well-documented. The United States in common with many other countries is increasingly focused on developing renewable energy. At first, the pursuit of this strategy in U.S. was seen more as a way to reduce dependence on oil importation. With increased awareness of environmental challenges resulting from the consumption and production of conventional energy, an additional strategy for the continued interest in renewable energy development in the United States was as a result of its potential to ameliorate environmental problems. The U.S. government are utilizing policy measures and dedicating funding to encourage the development of renewable energy technologies. Beside government policies, there are contextual factors that also affect renewable energy production. These include, but not limited to population growth, energy demand, economic growth, and public acceptance. Given the pressing need to develop a sustainable energy, this study embarks on an outcome assessment of the nature of relationship of renewable energy policy incentives, and selected contextual factors on renewable energy production in the United States. The policy incentive evaluated in this study is the Renewable Energy Production Incentive program. The contextual factors evaluated in this study are energy consumption, population growth, employment, and poverty. Understanding the contextual factors within which policies are placed is essential to defining the most appropriate policy features. The methodological approach to the study is quantitative, using panel data from 1976 to 2007. The study tested two hypotheses using fixed effect estimation with robust standard error as a statistical model. Statistical analyses reveal several interesting results which lend support that besides policy incentives, contextual factors

  5. Exposure factors for cleaning, automotive care, and surface protection products for exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Lim, Miyoung; Yang, Wonho; Lee, Kiyoung

    2017-01-01

    Accurately measuring the usage patterns of consumer products (CPs) is important to conduct realistic exposure assessments. We determined the exposure factors for 18 consumer products: household bleach, mold stain remover, all-purpose cleaner, washing machine cleaner, air conditioner cleaner, glass cleaner, drain cleaner, adhesive remover, liquid snow chain, tire shine spray, wheel cleaner, rain repellent, car wax spray, leather polish, furniture polish, anti-fog product, fabric waterproofing spray, and rust inhibitor. Field survey staff visited homes and collected product use information via face-to-face interviews. In total, 10,000 participants (5010 men and 4990 women) aged 15 years and older completed the questionnaire. Household bleach had the highest use rate of 47.4% and use rates for the other products ranged from 0.8 to 21.7%. The use rates of many CPs differed by age group and gender. Many household cleaning products were used regularly, but some products, such as air conditioner cleaner and liquid snow chain, were used in specific seasons or for specific purposes; therefore, they were used less frequently compared to cleaning products. These exposure factor data will be useful as input data for exposure and risk assessments and setting safety guidelines.

  6. Analytic model for academic research productivity having factors, interactions and implications

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Financial support is dear in academia and will tighten further. How can the research mission be accomplished within new restraints? A model is presented for evaluating source components of academic research productivity. It comprises six factors: funding; investigator quality; efficiency of the research institution; the research mix of novelty, incremental advancement, and confirmatory studies; analytic accuracy; and passion. Their interactions produce output and patterned influences between factors. Strategies for optimizing output are enabled. PMID:22130145

  7. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    SciTech Connect

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the photon to quark, antiquark and gluon transition within Balitsky’s shock-wave formalism. We also rederive the impact factor for photon to quark and antiquark transition. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering as well as for two and three jets diffractive production which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  8. Components of breeding productivity in a marine bird community: key factors and concordance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.; Hatch, Martha A.

    1990-01-01

    We estimated components of annual breeding productivity for eight species of marine birds on the Semidi Islands in the western Gulf of Alaska. Mortality of eggs and young, caused primarily by avian predators, accounted for most of the annual variation in productivity. Failure to produce eggs, clutch size variation, and the hatchability of eggs were generally less important. The stage of breeding at which annual productivity was most strongly regulated differed among species. In murres, chick-rearing success accounted for the largest share of annual variation in overall productivity, whereas incubation success was the key factor in fulmars, kittiwakes, and puffins. Although avian predators were the dominant proximate cause of egg and chick losses in some species, food supply seemed ultimately responsible for variation in all the major components of productivity. Concordance of productivity among species was low for the marine bird community as a whole, but selected pairs of species exhibited a greater tendency for high and low productivities to occur in the same years. Compared with the same or similar species outside Alaska, Semidi Islands birds were in one of three categories: (i) species whose productivity was about the same as reported from other areas (fulmars and gulls), (ii) species with comparatively low productivity (murres, puffins, kittiwakes), and (iii) species with similar mean productivity but greater annual variation (cormorants). These patterns suggest that specialized consumers of forage fish experienced food shortages at the Semidi Islands and that surface feeders were more severely affected than divers.

  9. The thermodynamics and kinetics of phosphoester bond formation, use, and dissociation in biology, with the example of polyphosphate in platelet activation, trasience, and mineralization.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omelon, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondria condense orthophosphates (Pi), forming phosphoester bonds for ATP production that is important to life. This represents an exchange of energy from dissociated carbohydrate bonds to phosophoester bonds. These bonds are available to phosphorylate organic compounds or hydrolyze to Pi, driving many biochemical processes. The benthic bacteria T. namibiensis 1 and Beggiatoa 2 condense Pi into phosphate polymers in oxygenated environments. These polyphosphates (polyPs) are stored until the environment becomes anoxic, when these bacteria retrieve the energy from polyP dissociation into Pi3. Dissociated Pi is released outside of the bacteria, where it precipitates as apatite.The Gibbs free energy of polyP phosphoester bond hydrolysis is negative, however, the kinetics are slow4. Diatoms contain a polyP pool that is stable until after death, after which the polyPs hydrolyze and form apatite5. The roles of polyP in eukaryotic organism biochemistry continue to be discovered. PolyPs have a range of biochemical roles, such as bioavailable P-storage, stress adaptation, and blood clotting6. PolyP-containing granules are released from anuclear platelets to activate factor V7 and factor XII in the blood clotting process due to their polyanionic charge8. Platelets have a lifespan of approximately 8 days, after which they undergo apoptosis9. Data will be presented that demonstrate the bioactive, thermodynamically unstable polyP pool within older platelets in vitro can spontaneously hydrolyze and form phosphate minerals. This process is likely avoided by platelet digestion in the spleen and liver, possibly recycling platelet polyPs with their phosphoester bond energy for other biochemical roles. 1 Schulz HN et al. Science (2005) 307: 416-4182 Brüchert V et al. Geochim Cosmochim Acta (2003) 67: 4505-45183 Goldhammer T et al. Nat Geosci (2010) 3: 557-5614 de Jager H-J et al. J Phys Chem A (1988) 102: 2838-28415 Diaz, J et al. Science (2008) 320: 652-6556 Mason KD et al

  10. Institutional Factors Women Academics Perceive To Be Associated with Their Publishing Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creamer, Elizabeth G.; Engstrom, Catherine McHugh

    This study examined the attitudes of women academics in the field of education regarding institutional factors that they associate with their publishing productivity. Twenty-three senior-level faculty women in education participated in semi-structured interviews and supplied copies of their curriculum vitae. Of these, 18 qualified as being highly…

  11. Experimental wrap-up: p (d) A - particle production and nuclear modification factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morsch, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    The 6th International Conference on Hard and Electromagnetic Probes in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions was held in November 2013 in Cape Town, South Africa. This contribution is a summary of the results presented on particle production and nuclear modification factors in p-A like collisions.

  12. Enhanced production of recombinant nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis by the elimination of limiting factors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po Ting; Chao, Yun-Peng

    2006-10-01

    By systematic investigation, glutamate and a mixture of metal ions were identified as factors limiting the production of nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis. Consequently, in medium supplemented with these materials, the recombinant strain secreted 4 times more nattokinase (260 mg l(-1)) than when grown in the unsupplemented medium.

  13. Risk and Protective Factors Associated with Gambling Products and Services: Indigenous Gamblers in North Queensland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breen, Helen

    2012-01-01

    As part of a larger study, this paper reports on findings into risk and protective factors associated with gambling products and services by Indigenous Australians. Both Indigenous card gambling (traditional or unregulated) and commercial gambling (regulated) were investigated. Permission was granted by Indigenous Elders and by a university ethics…

  14. Factors that Affect Student Motivation in a Dairy Products Elective Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Baraem; Hayes, Kirby

    2005-01-01

    Student motivation is influenced by instructional approach. Motivation is a function of initiating and sustaining goal-directed behavior. The objective of this study was to identify factors (positive and negative) that affect motivation in a junior-level dairy products elective course. Student attitudes were surveyed each year half-way through the…

  15. Factors affecting pheromone production by the pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and collection efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several factors which might affect pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), were investigated. Included were a comparison of porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q), the effect of male age, the effect of time of day, the effect of mal...

  16. Natural Products for the Prevention and Alleviation of Risk Factors for Diabetes: Chromium and Cinnamon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural products are widespread for the alleviation and prevention of the risk factors of the metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We have shown that glucose, insulin, cholesterol, and hemoglobin A1c levels are all improved in people with type 2 diabetes following chromium supplementation in a double-b...

  17. Determining the exposure factors of personal and home care products for exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Lee, Kiyoung; Hwang, Yunhyung; Kim, Jin Hee

    2015-03-01

    An accurate understanding of the usage patterns of consumer products is important for realistic exposure assessment. Since such patterns differ by country, a Korean national database for exposure factors is needed. We determined the exposure factors of 10 consumer products (face cleanser, toothpaste, shampoo, hair conditioner, body wash, dish and laundry detergents, fabric deodorizer, antistatic spray, and shoe polish. Field survey staff visited homes and collected product use information by questionnaire. In total, 816 men and 2517 women aged 15 years and older from 2500 households completed the questionnaire. Field technicians also re-visited 85 households to investigate the circumstances of use and the reliability of the questionnaire data. Greater than 97% of the sampled population reported use of toothpaste and shampoo. Hair conditioner, body wash, and face cleanser were used by ~60% of the population and by specific age groups and genders. The amount of consumer products used was comparable between that reported in the questionnaire and that measured directly during house visits, and the ratios of usage amounts ranged from 0.75 to 1.69. The exposure factor data obtained from this study could be useful for regulatory agencies when setting safety guidelines for product use.

  18. Influence of intraspecific variability and abiotic factors on mycotoxin production in Penicillium roqueforti.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, Kévin; Hymery, Nolwenn; Lacroix, Marlène Z; Puel, Sylvie; Puel, Olivier; Rigalma, Karim; Gaydou, Vincent; Coton, Emmanuel; Mounier, Jérôme

    2015-12-23

    Penicillium roqueforti has the ability to produce secondary metabolites, including roquefortine C (ROQC) and mycophenolic acid (MPA). In a previous study, the presence of these mycotoxins, alone or in co-occurrence, has been reported in blue-veined cheese. A high variability of mycotoxin content has also been observed, although the majority of samples exhibited relatively low concentrations. The observed variability raises the question of the factors impacting ROQC and MPA production. In this context, the mycotoxigenic potential of 96 P. roqueforti strains (biotic factor) and the effect of some abiotic factors (pH, temperature, NaCl and O2 contents, and C/N ratio) on mycotoxin production were evaluated. A high intraspecific diversity, established via genotypic (RAPD) and phenotypic (FTIR) approaches, was observed. It was associated with mycotoxigenic potential variability and may thus explain part of the observed variability in mycotoxin content of blue-veined cheese. Moreover, a significant decrease of ROQC and MPA production was observed for conditions (temperature, C/N ratio, O2 and NaCl concentrations) encountered during cheese-making compared with optimal growth conditions. The results also highlighted that there was no significant effect of addition of ROQC amino-acid precursor on the production of both mycotoxins whereas a pH increase from 4.5 to 6.5 slightly reduced MPA but not ROQC production.

  19. Charmonium production at high energy in the kT-factorization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniehl, B. A.; Vasin, D. V.; Saleev, V. A.

    2006-04-01

    We study charmonium production at high-energy colliders (Tevatron, HERA, and LEP2) in the framework of the kT-factorization approach and the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics at leading order in the strong-coupling constant αs and the relative velocity v. The transverse-momentum distributions of direct and prompt J/ψ-meson production measured at the Fermilab Tevatron are fitted to obtain the nonperturbative long-distance matrix elements for different choices of unintegrated gluon distribution functions in the proton. Using the matrix elements thus obtained, we predict charmonium production rates in γγ, γp, and deep-inelastic ep collisions including the contributions from both direct and resolved photons. The results are compared with the known ones obtained in the conventional parton model and with recent experimental data from HERA and LEP2.

  20. Measuring the impact of arthritis on worker productivity: perspectives, methodologic issues, and contextual factors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Kenneth; Escorpizo, Reuben; Beaton, Dorcas E; Bombardier, Claire; Lacaille, Diane; Zhang, Wei; Anis, Aslam H; Boonen, Annelies; Verstappen, Suzanne M M; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Osborne, Richard H; Fautrel, Bruno; Gignac, Monique A M; Tugwell, Peter S

    2011-08-01

    Leading up to the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) 10 meeting, the goal of the Worker Productivity Special Interest Group (WP-SIG) was to make progress on 3 key issues that relate to the application and interpretation of worker productivity outcomes in arthritis: (1) to review existing conceptual frameworks to help consolidate our intended target and scope of measurement; (2) to examine the methodologic issues associated with our goal of combining multiple indicators of worker productivity loss (e.g., absenteeism <-> presenteeism) into a single comprehensive outcome; and (3) to examine the relevant contextual factors of work and potential implications for the interpretation of scores derived from existing outcome measures. Progress was made on all 3 issues at OMERACT 10. We identified 3 theoretical frameworks that offered unique but converging perspectives on worker productivity loss and/or work disability to provide guidance with classification, selection, and future recommendation of outcomes. Several measurement and analytic approaches to combine absenteeism and presenteeism outcomes were proposed, and the need for further validation of such approaches was also recognized. Finally, participants at the WP-SIG were engaged to brainstorm and provide preliminary endorsements to support key contextual factors of worker productivity through an anonymous "dot voting" exercise. A total of 24 specific factors were identified, with 16 receiving ≥ 1 vote among members, reflecting highly diverse views on specific factors that were considered most important. Moving forward, further progress on these issues remains a priority to help inform the best application of worker productivity outcomes in arthritis research.

  1. Efficacy and safety of recombinant factor VIII products in patients with hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Musso, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The introduction of recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) clotting factor concentrates nearly 20 years ago represented a significant advance in the treatment of hemophilia A. The major advantage of rFVIII products compared with plasma-derived FVIII products is related to product safety, with rFVIII products virtually eliminating bloodborne pathogen transmission. The most challenging aspect of hemophilia A management today is the development of FVIII inhibitors; previously untreated patients are at the highest risk for inhibitor formation. Presented in this article are results of clinical trials in previously treated and untreated patients and postmarketing surveillance studies for the four commercially available rFVIII products (Recombinate, ReFacto, Kogenate FS/Kogenate Bayer and Advate). Recombinant FVIII therapies are highly efficacious when used ondemand and prophylactically, and they have excellent safety profiles; there have been no reports of viral- or prion-based disease transmission associated with rFVIII administration. The incidence rate of inhibitors in previously untreated patients ranges from 15% to approximately 30%. Because rFVIII concentrates have proven efficacy and safety profiles, a number of hemophilia treatment groups recommend rFVIII products as first-line therapy in the management of hemophilia A.

  2. Study on the Key Factor Parameters to Increase Productivity in Construction and Manufacturing Industries.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almazyed, K.; Alaswad, A.; Olabi, A. G.

    2016-02-01

    Proper management of human and non-human resources in construction and manufacturing projects can give-in considerable savings in time and cost. Construction and Manufacturing industry faces issues in connection with problems related with productivity and the problems are usually connected with performance of employees. The performance of employees is affected by many factors. In this paper a survey was made on respondents who are employed various projects of Saudi Arabia. The researcher developed a theoretical framework from the existing research which was used as a Model to collect and analyze the field data to test the hypothesis. In this research activity three predictors (commitment, job satisfaction and job performance) for determining the change in productivity. The results highlight that commitment and job performance (respectively) are the two predictors which are explaining 37% of variation in the productivity of the companies. The results also show that Job Satisfaction has no role in the prediction of productivity.

  3. Transcription factor Fli-1 positively regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-27 production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yuan, Ming; Ma, Xianwei; Jiang, Wei; Zhu, Lingxi; Wen, Mingyue; Xu, Jing; Liu, Qiuyan; An, Huazhang

    2016-03-01

    IL-27 is an important regulator of TLR4-activated innate immune. The mechanism by which IL-27 production is regulated in TLR4-activated innate immune remains largely unclear. Here we show that expression of transcription factor Fli-1 at protein level is increased in macrophages following LPS stimulation. Fli-1 overexpression increases LPS-activated IL-27 production in macrophages. Consistently, Fli-1 knockdown inhibits LPS-induced IL-27 production in macrophages. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay reveals that Fli-1 binds the promoter of IL-27 p28 subunit. Further experiments manifest that Fli-1 binds the region between -250 and -150 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of p28 gene and increases p28 gene promoter-controlled transcription. These results demonstrate that Fli-1 positively regulates IL-27 production in TLR4-activated immune response by promoting transcription of IL-27 p28 gene.

  4. The transcription factor FOXM1 is a cellular target of the natural product thiostrepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Nagaratna S.; Sanders, Deborah A.; Rodriguez, Raphaël; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2011-09-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind specifically to defined DNA sequences to promote gene expression. Targeting transcription factors with small molecules to modulate the expression of certain genes has been notoriously difficult to achieve. The natural product thiostrepton is known to reduce the transcriptional activity of FOXM1, a transcription factor involved in tumorigenesis and cancer progression. Herein we demonstrate that thiostrepton interacts directly with FOXM1 protein in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7. Biophysical analyses of the thiostrepton-FOXM1 interaction provide additional insights on the molecular mode of action of thiostrepton. In cellular experiments, we show that thiostrepton can inhibit the binding of FOXM1 to genomic target sites. These findings illustrate the potential druggability of transcription factors and provide a molecular basis for targeting the FOXM1 family with small molecules.

  5. Evaluation of phytochemicals from medicinal plants of Myrtaceae family on virulence factor production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Musthafa, Khadar Syed; Sianglum, Wipawadee; Saising, Jongkon; Lethongkam, Sakkarin; Voravuthikunchai, Supayang Piyawan

    2017-03-15

    Virulence factors regulated by quorum sensing (QS) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of an opportunistic human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa in causing infections to the host. Hence, in the present work, the anti-virulence potential of the medicinal plant extracts and their derived phytochemicals from Myrtaceae family was evaluated against P. aeruginosa. In the preliminary screening of the tested medicinal plant extracts, Syzygium jambos and Syzygium antisepticum demonstrated a maximum inhibition in QS-dependent violacein pigment production by Chromobacterium violaceum DMST 21761. These extracts demonstrated an inhibitory activity over a virulence factor, pyoverdin, production by P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis revealed the presence of 23 and 12 phytochemicals from the extracts of S. jambos and S. antisepticum respectively. Three top-ranking phytochemicals, including phytol, ethyl linoleate and methyl linolenate, selected on the basis of docking score in molecular docking studies lowered virulence factors such as pyoverdin production, protease and haemolytic activities of P. aeruginosa to a significant level. In addition, the phytochemicals reduced rhamnolipid production by the organism. The work demonstrated an importance of plant-derived compounds as anti-virulence drugs to conquer P. aeruginosa virulence towards the host.

  6. Biologic significance of constitutive and subliminal growth factor production by bone marrow stroma.

    PubMed

    Kittler, E L; McGrath, H; Temeles, D; Crittenden, R B; Kister, V K; Quesenberry, P J

    1992-06-15

    The "stromal" or adherent cells of long-term murine Dexter explant bone marrow cultures provide the best in vitro model of the bone marrow microenvironment. Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) is produced constitutively by these cells and is easily detected, but most investigators have not found constitutive production of the other hemolymphopoietic cytokines. We have previously reported the detection of granulocyte-macrophage-CSF (GM-CSF) in murine stromal cultures and its induction by the lectin Pokeweed mitogen. The present studies analyzing stromal cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) production by standard Northern blot analysis show constitutive production of mRNAs for CSF-1, GM-CSF, granulocyte-CSF (G-CSF), c-kit ligand (KL), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but not IL-3, IL-4, or IL-5 by 3-week irradiated or nonirradiated murine Dexter stromal cells. Exposure of stromal cells to Pokeweed mitogen or IL-1 16 hours before RNA harvest induces the messages for GM-CSF, G-CSF, KL, and IL-6, but not IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, or CSF-1. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNA made with reverse transcriptase from stromal RNA using two separate sets of IL-3-specific primers shows the presence of IL-3 message in irradiated stromal cells, which is only detectable with this more sensitive technique. The factor-dependent cell lines FDC-P1 and 32D are supported by the stromal cells without the addition of exogenous growth factors, demonstrating a cytokine activity in these cultures that is inhibited by the addition of anti-IL-3 or anti-GM-CSF antibodies. These data indicate that murine Dexter stromal cells constitutively produce CSF-1, GM-CSF, G-CSF, IL-6, KL, and IL-3. This growth factor production could explain the support of granulocyte, macrophage, and megakaryocyte production and stem cell maintenance in Dexter-type long-term murine bone marrow cultures.

  7. Production of functional active human growth factors in insects used as living biofactories.

    PubMed

    Dudognon, Benoit; Romero-Santacreu, Lorena; Gómez-Sebastián, Silvia; Hidalgo, Ana B; López-Vidal, Javier; Bellido, María L; Muñoz, Eduardo; Escribano, José M

    2014-08-20

    Growth factors (GFs) are naturally signalling proteins, which bind to specific receptors on the cell surface. Numerous families of GFs have already been identified and remarkable progresses have been made in understanding the pathways that these proteins use to activate/regulate the complex signalling network involved in cell proliferation or wound healing processes. The bottleneck for a wider clinical and commercial application of these factors relay on their scalable cost-efficient production as bioactive molecules. The present work describes the capacity of Trichoplusia ni insect larvae used as living bioreactors in combination with the baculovirus vector expression system to produce three fully functional human GFs, the human epidermal growth factor (huEGF), the human fibroblast growth factor 2 (huFGF2) and the human keratinocyte growth factor 1 (huKGF1). The expression levels obtained per g of insect biomass were of 9.1, 2.6 and 3mg for huEGF, huFGF2 and huKGF1, respectively. Attempts to increase the productivity of the insect/baculovirus system we have used different modifications to optimize their production. Additionally, recombinant proteins were expressed fused to different tags to facilitate their purification. Interestingly, the expression of huKGF1 was significantly improved when expressed fused to the fragment crystallizable region (Fc) of the human antibody IgG. The insect-derived recombinant GFs were finally characterized in terms of biological activity in keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The present work opens the possibility of a cost-efficient and scalable production of these highly valuable molecules in a system that favours its wide use in therapeutic or cosmetic applications.

  8. Investigation of factors influencing production of the monocyclic carotenoid torulene in metabolically engineered Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Pyung Cheon; Mijts, Benjamin N; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2004-10-01

    Factors influencing production of the monocyclic carotenoid torulene in recombinant Escherichia coli were investigated by modulating enzyme expression level, culture conditions, and engineering of the isoprenoid precursor pathway. The gene dosage of in vitro evolved lycopene cyclase crtY2 significantly changed the carotenoid profile. A culture temperature of 28 degrees C showed better production of torulene than 37 degrees C while initial culture pH had no significant effect on torulene production. Glucose-containing LB, 2xYT, TB and MR media significantly repressed the production of torulene, and the other carotenoids lycopene, tetradehydrolycopene, and beta-carotene, in E. coli. In contrast, glycerol-containing LB, 2xYT, TB, and MR media enhanced torulene production. Overexpression of dxs, dxr, idi and/or ispA, individually and combinatorially, enhanced torulene production up to 3.1-3.3 fold. High torulene production was observed in a high dissolved oxygen level bioreactor in TB and MR media containing glycerol. Lycopene was efficiently converted into torulene during aerobic cultures, indicating that the engineered torulene synthesis pathway is well coordinated, and maintains the functionality and integrity of the carotenogenic enzyme complex.

  9. Factors influencing consumption of farmed seafood products in the Pacific northwest.

    PubMed

    Hall, Troy E; Amberg, Shannon M

    2013-07-01

    This study used a mail survey (n=1159 usable surveys) of Pacific northwest (US) residents to understand general seafood preferences (familiarity, price, freshness, health and environmental concerns), beliefs and attitudes specific to aquaculture versus wild products, and how those cognitive factors affect decisions to consume types of farmed seafood products. Respondents strongly agreed that seafood is healthy, and they preferred wild over farmed products. Many respondents were uncertain about human health and environmental benefits and problems associated with aquaculture. While there was agreement that aquaculture reduces pressure on wild fish, there was equally strong agreement that it has the same problems as other agricultural practices. Belief in the superiority of wild seafood was a strong predictor of consumption choices. Belief in the benefits of aquaculture was positively related to higher consumption of farmed products, but--unexpectedly--beliefs related to environmental and health problems associated with aquaculture did not predict specific consumption choices. Nearly half of respondents recalled hearing or reading about aquaculture in the mass media, and recall of negative stories contributed to a general preference for wild products, but not consumption of specific types of farmed products. Consumption of the different classes of products had some different predictors, and communication efforts directed at different beliefs may have different impacts on consumer behavior.

  10. Advanced glycation end-products: modifiable environmental factors profoundly mediate insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ottum, Mona S.; Mistry, Anahita M.

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end-products are toxic by-products of metabolism and are also acquired from high-temperature processed foods. They promote oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and nucleotides. Aging and chronic diseases are strongly associated with markers for oxidative stress, especially advanced glycation end-products, and resistance to peripheral insulin-mediated glucose uptake. Modifiable environmental factors including high levels of refined and simple carbohydrate diets, hypercaloric diets and sedentary lifestyles drive endogenous formation of advanced glycation end-products via accumulation of highly reactive glycolysis intermediates and activation of the polyol/aldose reductase pathway producing high intracellular fructose. High advanced glycation end-products overwhelm innate defenses of enzymes and receptor-mediated endocytosis and promote cell damage via the pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Oxidative stress disturbs cell signal transduction, especially insulin-mediated metabolic responses. Here we review emerging evidence that restriction of dietary advanced glycation end-products significantly reduces total systemic load and insulin resistance in animals and humans in diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome, healthy populations and dementia. Of clinical importance, this insulin sensitizing effect is independent of physical activity, caloric intake and adiposity level. PMID:26236094

  11. [Production and reception of growth factors in the placenta during physiological and gestosis complicated pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Krukier, I I; Pogorelova, T N; Orlov, V I

    2007-01-01

    30 women with physiological pregnancy and 28 women with gestosis were examined. In the early chorion obtained after abortion and on the full-term placenta the content of the epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and their receptors were studied by means of the ELISA method. In the process of normal gestation the increase of the placental production both of the EGF and VEGF was found. During the pregnancy complicated with gestosis and miscarriage in the first trimester the content of EGF and its receptor was lower compared to the physiological values. For VEGF and its receptor opposite changes were found: the increase of quantity of the growth factor and the decrease of its receptor. In the case of gestosis and term pregnancy the content of the both growth factors and their receptors was lower than in controls. The revealed changes in production of the angiogenic growth factors and their receptors in the placenta may have the pathogenic importance in the development of gestosis.

  12. Enhancement of alkaloid production in opium and California poppy by transactivation using heterologous regulatory factors.

    PubMed

    Apuya, Nestor R; Park, Joon-Hyun; Zhang, Liping; Ahyow, Maurice; Davidow, Patricia; Van Fleet, Jennifer; Rarang, Joel C; Hippley, Matthew; Johnson, Thomas W; Yoo, Hye-Dong; Trieu, Anthony; Krueger, Shannon; Wu, Chuan-yin; Lu, Yu-ping; Flavell, Richard B; Bobzin, Steven C

    2008-02-01

    Genes encoding regulatory factors isolated from Arabidopsis, soybean and corn have been screened to identify those that modulate the expression of genes encoding for enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of morphinan alkaloids in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and benzophenanthridine alkaloids in California poppy (Eschscholzia californica). In opium poppy, the over-expression of selected regulatory factors increased the levels of PsCOR (codeinone reductase), Ps4'OMT (S-adenosyl-l-methionine:3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine 4'-O-methyltransferase) and Ps6OMT [(R,S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase] transcripts by 10- to more than 100-fold. These transcriptional activations translated into an enhancement of alkaloid production in opium poppy of up to at least 10-fold. In California poppy, the transactivation effect of regulatory factor WRKY1 resulted in an increase of up to 60-fold in the level of EcCYP80B1 [(S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase] and EcBBE (berberine bridge enzyme) transcripts. As a result, the accumulations of selected alkaloid intermediates were enhanced up to 30-fold. The transactivation effects of other regulatory factors led to the accumulation of the same intermediates. These regulatory factors also led to the production of new alkaloids in California poppy callus culture.

  13. A summary of ammonia emission factors and quality criteria for commercial poultry production in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, David; Cowherd, Savannah; Van Heyst, Bill

    2015-08-01

    Efforts to quantify emissions of ammonia to the atmosphere from poultry housing in North America have been underway for the past two decades. In order to accurately estimate emissions from facilities in each poultry sector, emission factors used to derive the average must be of sufficiently high quality. However, it has become evident that current methods are inadequate and emission factors do not accurately reflect North American poultry production. Using an initial screening, based on measurement methods for ammonia and ventilation rates as well as study duration, a collection of studies have been identified that report the highest quality emission factors currently available. Each study was rated for data quality and then an average emission factor was developed for each sector of poultry production and rated based its ability to represent that sector. The laying hen sector, using deep pit manure storage, received a C (average) emission factor quality rating, which is the highest of all the poultry sectors evaluated. Laying hen with manure belts, broiler chicken, and turkey sectors received quality ratings considered to be below average or poor. This study highlights the need for additional research that needs to be conducted in order to accurately quantify ammonia releases from housing in most poultry sectors in North America.

  14. CT effective dose per dose length product using ICRP 103 weighting factors

    SciTech Connect

    Huda, Walter; Magill, Dennise; He Wenjun

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To generate effective dose per unit dose length product (E/DLP) conversion factors incorporating ICRP Publication 103 tissue weighting factors. Methods: Effective doses for CT examinations were obtained using the IMPACT Dosimetry Calculator using all 23 dose data sets that are offered by this spreadsheet. CT examinations were simulated for scans performed along the patient long axis for each dosimetry data set using a 4 cm beam width ranging from the upper thighs to top of the head. Five basic body regions (head, neck, chest, abdomen, and pelvis), as well as combinations of the regions (head/neck, chest/abdomen, abdomen/pelvis, and chest/abdomen/pelvis) and whole body CT scans were investigated. Correction factors were generated that can be applied to convert E/DLP conversion factors based on ICRP 60 data to conversion factors that are valid for ICRP 103 data (i.e., E{sub 103}/E{sub 60}). Results: Use of ICRP 103 weighting factors increase effective doses for head scans by {approx}11%, for chest scans by {approx}20%, and decrease effective doses for pelvis scans by {approx}25%. Current E/DLP conversion factors are estimated to be 2.4 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for head CT examinations and range between 14 and 20 {mu}Sv/mGy cm for body CT examinations. Conclusions: Factors that enable patient CT doses to be adjusted to account for ICRP 103 tissue weighting factors are provided, which result in E/DLP factors that were increased in head and chest CT, reduced in pelvis CT, and showed no marked change in neck and abdomen CT.

  15. Factors affecting production of the group A streptococcus bacteriocin SA-FF22.

    PubMed

    Jack, R W; Tagg, J R

    1992-02-01

    Factors influencing the production of streptococcin A-FF22 (SA-FF22) in liquid media were examined. Despite good growth of the producer strain, no SA-FF22 was detected during incubation at 40 degrees C, at pH 7, in Brain Heart Infusion Broth or in Mg(2+)-supplemented media. Optimal SA-FF22 production occurred at 32 degrees C, at pH 6.7, in cultures in Tryptic Soy Broth supplemented with glucose 2.25% and yeast extract 1%. Under these conditions SA-FF22 remained cell-associated but could be extracted with acid.

  16. Wick Product for Commutation Relations Connected with Yang-Baxter Operators and New Constructions of Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krsolarlak, Ilona

    We analyze a certain class of von Neumann algebras generated by selfadjoint elements , for satisfying the general commutation relations: Such algebras can be continuously embedded into some closure of the set of finite linear combinations of vectors , where is an orthonormal basis of a Hilbert space . The operator which represents the vector is denoted by and called the ``Wick product'' of the operators . We describe explicitly the form of this product. Also, we estimate the operator norm of for . Finally we apply these two results and prove that under the assumption all the von Neumann algebras considered are II1 factors.

  17. Identification of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor as the c-met proto-oncogene product

    SciTech Connect

    Bottaro, D.P.; Rubin, J.S.; Chan, A.M.L.; Aaronson, S.A. ); Faletto, D.L.; Kmiecik, T.E.; Vande Woude, G.F. )

    1991-02-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a plasminogen-like protein thought to be a humoral mediator of liver regeneration. A 145-kilodalton tyrosyl phosphoprotein observed in rapid response to HGF treatment of intact target cells was identified by immunoblot analysis as the {beta} subunit of the c-met proto-oncogene product, a membrane-spanning tyrosine kinase. Covalent cross-linking of {sup 125}I-labeled ligand to cellular proteins of appropriate size that were recognized by antibodies to c-met directly established the c-met product as the cell-surface receptor for HGF.

  18. Potassium inhibits dietary salt-induced transforming growth factor-beta production.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W

    2009-11-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-beta. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-beta demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-beta in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-beta but did not affect production of TGF-beta by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the alpha subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-beta but did not alter TGF-beta production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-beta in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake.

  19. Potassium Inhibits Dietary Salt-Induced Transforming Growth FactorProduction

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wei-Zhong; Aaron, Kristal; Wang, Pei-Xuan; Sanders, Paul W.

    2009-01-01

    Human and animal studies demonstrate an untoward effect of excess dietary NaCl (salt) intake on cardiovascular function and life span. The endothelium in particular augments the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, a fibrogenic growth factor, in response to excess dietary salt intake. This study explored the initiating mechanism that regulates salt-induced endothelial cell production of TGF-β. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given diets containing different amounts of NaCl and potassium for 4 days. A bioassay for TGF-β demonstrated increased (35.2%) amounts of active TGF-β in the medium of aortic ring segments from rats on the high-salt diet compared with rats maintained on a 0.3% NaCl diet. Inhibition of the large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel inhibited dietary salt-induced vascular production of TGF-β but did not affect production of TGF-β by ring segments from rats on the low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical and Western analyses demonstrated the α subunit of the calcium-activated potassium channel in endothelial cells. Increasing medium [K+] inhibited production of dietary salt-induced vascular production levels of total and active TGF-β but did not alter TGF-β production by aortic rings from rats on the 0.3% NaCl diet. Increasing dietary potassium content decreased urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the high-salt diet but did not change urinary active TGF-β in animals receiving the low-salt diet. The findings demonstrated an interesting interaction between the dietary intake of potassium and excess NaCl and further showed the fundamental role of the endothelial calcium-activated potassium channel in the vascular response to excess salt intake. PMID:19738156

  20. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  1. Factorization and NNLL Resummation for Higgs production with a jet veto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias

    2012-07-01

    Using methods of effective field theory, we derive the first all-order factorization theorem for the Higgs-boson production</