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Sample records for platinum alloys

  1. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  2. De-alloyed platinum nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Strasser, Peter; Koh, Shirlaine; Mani, Prasanna; Ratndeep, Srivastava

    2011-08-09

    A method of producing de-alloyed nanoparticles. In an embodiment, the method comprises admixing metal precursors, freeze-drying, annealing, and de-alloying the nanoparticles in situ. Further, in an embodiment de-alloyed nanoparticle formed by the method, wherein the nanoparticle further comprises a core-shell arrangement. The nanoparticle is suitable for electrocatalytic processes and devices.

  3. Oxidation performance of platinum-clad Mo-47Re alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald K.; Wallace, Terryl A.

    1994-01-01

    The alloy Mo-47Re has favorable mechanical properties at temperatures above 1400 C, but it undergoes severe oxidation when used in air with no protective coating. To shield the alloy from oxidation, platinum cladding has been evaluated. The unprotected alloy undergoes catastrophic oxidation under static and dynamic oxidation conditions. The platinum cladding provides good protection from static and dynamic oxidation for moderate times at 1260 C. Samples tested for longer times under static oxidation conditions experienced severe oxidation. The data suggest that oxidation results from the transport of oxygen through the grain boundaries and through the pinhole defects of the platinum cladding.

  4. Bimetallic alloy electrocatalysts with multilayered platinum-skin surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Wang, Chao; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-01-26

    Compositions and methods of preparing a bimetallic alloy having enhanced electrocatalytic properties are provided. The composition comprises a PtNi substrate having a surface layer, a near-surface layer, and an inner layer, where the surface layer comprises a nickel-depleted composition, such that the surface layer comprises a platinum skin having at least one atomic layer of platinum.

  5. Platinum- and platinum alloy-coated palladium and palladium alloy particles and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir Branko

    2010-04-06

    The present invention relates to particle and nanoparticle composites useful as oxygen-reduction electrocatalysts. The particle composites are composed of a palladium or palladium-alloy particle or nanoparticle substrate coated with an atomic submonolayer, monolayer, bilayer, or trilayer of zerovalent platinum atoms. The invention also relates to a catalyst and a fuel cell containing the particle or nanoparticle composites of the invention. The invention additionally includes methods for oxygen reduction and production of electrical energy by using the particle and nanoparticle composites of the invention.

  6. Platinum oxidation responsible for degradation of platinum-cobalt alloy cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidai, Shoichi; Kobayashi, Masaki; Niwa, Hideharu; Harada, Yoshihisa; Oshima, Masaharu; Nakamori, Yoji; Aoki, Tsutomu

    2012-10-01

    Platinum oxidation of Pt-Co alloy catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells was investigated for a series of Pt-Co alloy catalysts with different specification. The chemical state of platinum evaluated by soft X-ray photoemission spectroscopy was compared with the electrochemical properties to elucidate the origin of catalyst degradation. Increase in the particle size of Pt-Co alloy catalysts caused the decrease in the concentration of platinum hydroxide and improved the catalyst durability. Applying potential cycling below 1.0 V, only platinum hydroxide was observed, while platinum oxides, PtO and PtO2, appeared after potential cycling up to 1.2 V. The peak shift of Pt 4f spectra after the potential cycling implies that these platinum hydroxide and oxide are dissolved and deposited on another platinum catalyst in a reduced metallic state, which causes the catalyst degradation.

  7. Hollow platinum alloy tailored counter electrodes for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pinjiang; Zhang, Yange; Fa, Wenjun; Yang, Xiaogang; Wang, Liang

    2017-08-01

    Without sacrifice of photovoltaic performances, low-platinum alloy counter electrodes (CEs) are promising in bringing down the fabrication cost of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We present here the realization of ZnO nanostructure assisted hollow platinum-nickel (PtNi) alloy microstructure CEs with a simple hydrothermal methods and maximization of electrocatalytic behaviors by tuning Zn precursors. The maximal power conversion efficiency is up to 8.74% for the liquid-junction dye-sensitized solar cells with alloyed PtNi0.41 electrode, yielding a 37.6% cell efficiency enhancement in comparison with pristine solar cell from planar Pt electrode. Moreover, the dissolution-resistant and charge-transfer abilities toward I-/I3- redox electrolyte have also been markedly enhanced due to competitive dissolution reactions and alloying effects.

  8. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium alloys for use as a fuel cell catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2002-01-01

    A noble metal alloy composition for a fuel cell catalyst, a ternary alloy composition containing platinum, ruthenium and palladium. The alloy shows increased activity as compared to well-known catalysts.

  9. Joining lead wires to thin platinum alloy films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przybyszewski, J. S.; Claing, R. G. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A two step process of joining a lead wire to .000002 m thick platinum alloy film which rests upon an equally thin alumina insulating layer which is adhered to a metal substrate is described. Typically the platinum alloy film forms part of a thermocouple for measuring the surface temperature of a gas turbine airfoil. In the first step the lead wire is deformed 30 to 60% at room temperature while the characteristic one million ohm resistance of the alumina insulating layer is monitored for degradation. In the second step the cold pressed assembly is heated at 865 to 1025 C for 4 to 75 hr in air. During the heating step any degradation of insulating layer resistance may be reversed, provided the resistance was not decreased below 100 ohm in the cold pressing.

  10. Rumpling phenomenon in platinum modified Ni-Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Benjamin Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Surface undulations known as rumpling have been shown to develop at the surface of bond coats used in advanced thermal barrier coating systems. Rumpling can result in cracking and eventual spallation of the top coat. Many mechanisms to explain rumpling have been proposed, and among them is a martensitic transformation. High-temperature x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and potentiometry were used to investigate the nature of the martensitic transformation in bulk platinum-modified nickel aluminides. It was found that the martensitic transformation has strong time dependence and can form over a range of temperatures. Cyclic oxidation experiments were performed on the bulk alloys to investigate the effect of the martensitic transformation on surface rumpling. It was found that the occurrence of rumpling was associated with the martensitic transformation. The degree of rumpling was found to increase with an increasing number of cycles and was independent of the heating and cooling rates used. The thickness of the oxide layer at the surface of the samples had a significant impact on the amplitude of the resulting undulations, with amplitude increasing with increasing oxide-layer thickness. Rumpling was also observed in an alloy based on the γ-γ' region of the nickel-aluminum-platinum phase diagram. Rumpling in this alloy was found to occur during isothermal oxidation and is associated with a subsurface layer containing a platinum-rich phase known as a. Rumpling in both alloy systems may be explained by creep deformation of a weakened subsurface layer in response to the compressive stresses in the thermally grown oxide layer.

  11. Engineering Platinum Alloy Electrocatalysts in Nanoscale for PEMFC Application

    SciTech Connect

    He, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Fuel cells are expected to be a key next-generation energy source used for vehicles and homes, offering high energy conversion efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. However, due to large overpotentials on anode and cathode, the efficiency is still much lower than theoretically predicted. During the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate synergy effect of platinum alloyed with base metals. But, engineering the alloy particles in nanoscale has been a challenge. Most important challenges in developing nanostructured materials are the abilities to control size, monodispersity, microcomposition, and even morphology or self-assembly capability, so called Nanomaterials-by-Design, which requires interdisciplinary collaborations among computational modeling, chemical synthesis, nanoscale characterization as well as manufacturing processing. Electrocatalysts, particularly fuel cell catalysts, are dramatically different from heterogeneous catalysts because the surface area in micropores cannot be electrochemically controlled on the same time scale as more transport accessible surfaces. Therefore, electrocatalytic architectures need minimal microporous surface area while maximizing surfaces accessible through mesopores or macropores, and to "pin" the most active, highest performance physicochemical state of the materials even when exposed to thermodynamic forces, which would otherwise drive restructuring, crystallization, or densification of the nanoscale materials. In this presentation, results of engineering nanoscale platinum alloy particles down to 2 ~ 4 nm will be discussed. Based on nature of alloyed base metals, various synthesis technologies have been studied and developed to achieve capabilities of controlling particle size and particle microcomposition, namely, core-shell synthesis, microemulsion technique, thermal decomposition process, surface organometallic chemical method, etc. The results show that by careful engineering the

  12. BOWIEITE: A NEW RHODIUM-IRIDIUM-PLATINUM SULFIDE IN PLATINUM-ALLOY NUGGETS, GOODNEWS BAY, ALASKA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Criddle, Alan J.

    1984-01-01

    Bowieite (Rh,Ir,Pt)//2S//3, a new mineral species, is found in three nuggets of platinum from Goodnews Bay, Alaska. In linearly polarized reflected light, and compared to the host, higher reflecting white platinum-iridium alloy, bowieite is pale gray to pale gray-brown; neither bireflectance nor reflectance pleochroism is apparent. With polars crossed, its anisotropic rotation tints vary from gray to dark brown. Luminance values (relative to the CIE illuminant C) for R//1 and R//2, computed from full spectral data for the most bireflectant grain, are 45. 8% and 48. 2% in air, and 30. 5% and 33. 0% in oil, respectively. VHN//1//0//0 1288 (858 to 1635). Bowieite is orthorhombic, space group Pnca, with a 8. 454(7) -8. 473(8), b 5. 995(1)-6. 002(7), c 6. 143(1)-6. 121(8) A, Z equals 4. Some grains that are 2. 6 to 3. 8 atomic % metal-deficient occur as an optically coherent rim on bowieite; the rim and the bowieite grain are not optically continuous.

  13. Thermoelectric homogeneity and stability of platinum-rhodium alloyed thermoelements of different compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, F.; Ederer, P.

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses the different oxidation behavior of platinum and rhodium and their alloys usable as thermocouple materials. A specially prepared thermocouple containing thermoelements of different platinum-rhodium alloys (Pt-5%Rh, Pt-6%Rh, Pt-13%Rh, Pt-17%Rh and Pt-20%Rh) and a Pt-67 thermoelement was investigated. It was annealed at different temperatures in air. The thermoelectric homogeneity and stability of the thermocouple was tested by measurements of immersion profiles at 400 °C in a salt bath. The alloys of Pt-17%Rh and Pt-20%Rh were found to be the most suitable compositions with regard to thermoelectric homogeneity and stability.

  14. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires.

  15. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon.

  16. Electrodeposition of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires for hermetic packaging of microelectronics.

    PubMed

    Petrossians, Artin; Whalen, John J; Weiland, James D; Mansfeld, Florian

    2012-01-01

    An electrodeposition technique was applied for fabrication of dense platinum-iridium alloy nanowires as interconnect structures in hermetic microelectronic packaging to be used in implantable devices. Vertically aligned arrays of platinum-iridium alloy nanowires with controllable length and a diameter of about 200 nm were fabricated using a cyclic potential technique from a novel electrodeposition bath in nanoporous aluminum oxide templates. Ti/Au thin films were sputter deposited on one side of the alumina membranes to form a base material for electrodeposition. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the morphology and the chemical composition of the nanowires, respectively. SEM micrographs revealed that the electrodeposited nanowires have dense and compact structures. EDS analysis showed a 60:40% platinum-iridium nanowire composition. Deposition rates were estimated by determining nanowire length as a function of deposition time. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) images revealed that the nanowires have a nanocrystalline structure with grain sizes ranging from 3 nm to 5 nm. Helium leak tests performed using a helium leak detector showed leak rates as low as 1 × 10(-11) mbar L s(-1) indicating that dense nanowires were electrodeposited inside the nanoporous membranes. Comparison of electrical measurements on platinum and platinum-iridium nanowires revealed that platinum-iridium nanowires have improved electrical conductivity.

  17. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum-copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum-copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C-C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  18. Chemically synthesized Iron-Platinum binary alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, Levent

    In this dissertation, we explored the fabrication of FePt nanoparticles prepared by a solution-phase synthesis route and characterized their structural/ microstructural and magnetic properties both to gain a fundamental understanding and to check their compatibility for technological applications in ultra high density magnetic storage media. Monodispersed Fe-Pt alloy NPs (nanoparticles) have been prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO)5] and reduction of platinum acetylacetonate [Pt(acac)2] with dibenzyl ether in the presence of oleic acid (OA) and oleyl amine (OAm) as surfactants. The composition of the nanoparticles was adjusted by changing the Fe(CO)5/Pt(acac) 2 molar ratio while fixing the Pt(acac)2 amount. Two phases of Fe-Pt binary alloy, FePt3 and FePt, were obtained successfully with the molar ratios of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. The size of FePt NPs was tuned in the range of 3-6 nm by controlling the injection temperature of the iron precursor. It was found that, low injection temperature of precursors and the usage of surfactants as a reaction solvent, together with a slow heating to a low refluxing temperature were the key parameters for the formation of cubic nanoparticles. Spherical, cubic (with rounded edges) and octapod shapes were successfully produced by changing the OAm/OA molar ratio. Nanorods were formed by simply adjusting the injection time of the surfactants. Although it was reported in the literature that the dominant mechanism of formation of NPs involves the initial formation of platinum rich clusters followed by the gradual diffusion of iron atoms into these clusters during the synthesis, in this work it is clearly shown that Fe rich seeds do form in the early stages of the reaction. And it was these competitive nucleation sites that cause a compositional distribution between individual FePt particles in the final sample, although a narrow distribution is measured for the overall composition. As-synthesized NPs

  19. Nanostructured Platinum Alloys for Use as Catalyst Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor); Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A series of binary and ternary Pt-alloys, that promote the important reactions for catalysis at an alloy surface; oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and hydrogen and oxygen evolution. The first two of these reactions are essential when applying the alloy for use in a PEMFC.

  20. Nanostructured Platinum Alloys for Use as Catalyst Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor); Narayan, Sri R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A series of binary and ternary Pt-alloys, that promote the important reactions for catalysis at an alloy surface; oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and hydrogen and oxygen evolution. The first two of these reactions are essential when applying the alloy for use in a PEMFC.

  1. Study of Magnetic Alloys: Critical Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAGNETIC ALLOYS, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES), ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COBALT ALLOYS, GADOLINIUM ALLOYS, GOLD ALLOYS, IRON ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, PALLADIUM ALLOYS, PLATINUM ALLOYS, RHODIUM ALLOYS

  2. Drift as a Function of Temperature in Platinum-Rhodium-Alloyed Thermoelements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, E. S.; Edler, F.

    2017-02-01

    Platinum-rhodium-alloyed thermocouples are the most commonly used high-temperature reference thermometer in national measurement institutes, second tier laboratories and industry. Despite the common use of these thermocouples, there is still a great deal that is not known about the drift processes that occur in them. Drift processes in these alloys are known to be made up of three main components: crystallographic changes, rhodium oxidation and migration, and contamination. Through careful use, contamination can be largely avoided; however, the other two processes often cannot. Research on drift in the different platinum-rhodium alloys is important because the largest uncertainty component during calibration of these thermocouple types is due to inhomogeneity, and the same mechanisms responsible for inhomogeneity are responsible for the drift. This study investigates the drift processes as a function of temperature and time for the 5 %, 13 %, 17 %, 20 %, 30 % and 40 % Rh alloys when paired with pure platinum. The use of a linear gradient furnace and high-resolution homogeneity scanner has enabled identification of drift characteristics in the temperature range 100°C to 950°C, where the bulk of reversible drift occurs. The experiments have quantified the drift rates and magnitude for thermoelements given two commonly used annealing procedures: the high-temperature quench anneal and the low-temperature vacancy anneal. Consequently, this study provides users of platinum-rhodium thermoelements with guidance on what levels of drift they should expect and exposure times before re-annealing is required. It also shows that a Pt-Rh alloy of 20 % Rh is by far the most stable and has properties comparable to the Pt-Pd thermocouple.

  3. High-temperature thermodynamic activities of zirconium in platinum alloys determined by nitrogen-nitride equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.A.

    1980-05-01

    A high-temperature nitrogen-nitride equilibrium apparatus is constructed for the study of alloy thermodynamics to 2300/sup 0/C. Zirconium-platinum alloys are studied by means of the reaction 9ZrN + 11Pt ..-->.. Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ + 9/2 N/sub 2/. Carful attention is paid to the problems of diffusion-limited reaction and ternary phase formation. The results of this study are and a/sub Zr//sup 1985/sup 0/C/ = 2.4 x 10/sup -4/ in Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ ..delta..G/sub f 1985/sup 0/C//sup 0/ Zr/sub 9/Pt/sub 11/ less than or equal to -16.6 kcal/g atom. These results are in full accord with the valence bond theory developed by Engel and Brewer; this confirms their prediction of an unusual interaction of these alloys.

  4. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  5. Dynamical computer studies on palladium-platinum alloy sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, T.; Ishida, M.; Yamamura, Y.

    1994-07-01

    Using the hybrid Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT-DIFFUSE, we have investigated the two-component target sputtering and the associated stoichiometric changes near the surface, where we employed PdxPt1?x as a two-component alloy. The present ACAT-DIFFUSE code can estimate the slowing down process of energetic ions and the thermal process of moderated atoms. If the surface segregation is ignored, the simulation showed that the Pd signal of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) should be larger than that of low energy ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS). If the segregation energy and the associated effective diffusion constant are properly selected, the simulated ISS values and the AES values of the Pd concentration are in good agreement with the experimental ISS and AES values.

  6. Nanocrystal and surface alloy properties of bimetallic Gold-Platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Derrick; Luo, Jin; Smith, Andrew; Njoki, Peter N; Wang, Lingyan

    2007-01-01

    We report on the correlation between the nanocrystal and surface alloy properties with the bimetallic composition of gold-platinum(AuPt) nanoparticles. The fundamental understanding of whether the AuPt nanocrystal core is alloyed or phase-segregated and how the surface binding properties are correlated with the nanoscale bimetallic properties is important not only for the exploitation of catalytic activity of the nanoscale bimetallic catalysts, but also to the general exploration of the surface or interfacial reactivities of bimetallic or multimetallic nanoparticles. The AuPt nanoparticles are shown to exhibit not only single-phase alloy character in the nanocrystal, but also bimetallic alloy property on the surface. The nanocrystal and surface alloy properties are directly correlated with the bimetallic composition. The FTIR probing of CO adsorption on the bimetallic nanoparticles supported on silica reveals that the surface binding sites are dependent on the bimetallic composition. The analysis of this dependence further led to the conclusion that the relative Au-atop and Pt-atop sites for the linear CO adsorption on the nanoparticle surface are not only correlated with the bimetallic composition, but also with the electronic effect as a result of the d-band shift of Pt in the bimetallic nanocrystals, which is the first demonstration of the nanoscale core-surface property correlation for the bimetallic nanoparticles over a wide range of bimetallic composition.

  7. Counter electrodes from polymorphic platinum-nickel hollow alloys for high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Yang, Peizhi

    2016-10-01

    Precious platinum counter electrode (CE) has been an economic burden for future commercialization of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Low-platinum alloy CE catalysts are promising in bringing down the solar cell cost without reducing photovoltaic performances. We present here a facile strategy of fabricating ZnO nanorods assisted platinum-nickel (PtNi) alloy microtube CEs for liquid-junction DSSCs. By adjusting the concentration of zinc precursors, the ZnO nanostructures and therefore PtNi alloys are optimized to maximize the electrocatalytic behaviors toward triiodide reduction reaction. The maximal power conversion efficiency is determined as high as 8.43% for liquid-junction DSSC device with alloyed PtNi microtube CE synthesized at 75 mM Zn(NO3)2 aqueous solution, yielding a 32.8% enhancement in cell efficiency in comparison with the solar cell from pristine platinum electrode. Moreover, the dissolution resistance and charge-transfer ability toward redox couples have also been markedly enhanced due to competitive dissolution reactions and alloyed effects.

  8. Picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, N.; Whitehead, D.; Boor, A.; Oppenlander, W.; Liu, Z.; Li, L.

    2012-03-01

    The demand for micromachining of coronary stents by means of industrial lasers rises quickly for treating coronary artery diseases, which cause more than one million deaths each year. The most widely used types of laser for stent manufacturing are Nd:YAG laser systems with a wavelength of 1064 nm with pulse lengths of 10-3-10-2 seconds. Considerable post-processing is required to remove heat-affected zones (HAZ), and to improve surface finishes and geometry. Using a third harmonic laser radiation of picosecond laser (6×10-12 s pulse duration) in UV range, the capability of the picosecond laser micromachining of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy for coronary stent applications are presented. In this study dross-free cut of nitinol and platinum-iridium alloy tubes are demonstrated and topography analysis of the cut surface is carried out. The HAZ characteristics have been investigated by means of microscopic examinations and measurement of micro-hardness distribution near the cut zones.

  9. Welding of unique and advanced alloys for space and high-temperature applications: welding and weldability of iridium and platinum alloys

    DOE PAGES

    David, Stan A.; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-08-31

    Advances have been made in developing alloys for space power systems for spacecraft that travel long distances to various planets. The spacecraft are powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the fuel element in RTGs is plutonia. For safety and containment of the radioactive fuel element, the heat source is encapsulated in iridium or platinum alloys. Ir and Pt alloys are the alloys of choice for encapsulating radioisotope fuel pellets. Ir and Pt alloys were chosen because of their high-temperature properties and compatibility with the oxide fuel element and the graphite impact shells. This review addresses the alloy design andmore » welding and weldability of Ir and Pt alloys for use in RTGs.« less

  10. Welding of unique and advanced alloys for space and high-temperature applications: welding and weldability of iridium and platinum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, Stan A.; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-08-31

    Advances have been made in developing alloys for space power systems for spacecraft that travel long distances to various planets. The spacecraft are powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the fuel element in RTGs is plutonia. For safety and containment of the radioactive fuel element, the heat source is encapsulated in iridium or platinum alloys. Ir and Pt alloys are the alloys of choice for encapsulating radioisotope fuel pellets. Ir and Pt alloys were chosen because of their high-temperature properties and compatibility with the oxide fuel element and the graphite impact shells. This review addresses the alloy design and welding and weldability of Ir and Pt alloys for use in RTGs.

  11. Welding of unique and advanced alloys for space and high-temperature applications: welding and weldability of iridium and platinum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, Stan A.; Miller, Roger G.; Feng, Zhili

    2016-08-31

    Advances have been made in developing alloys for space power systems for spacecraft that travel long distances to various planets. The spacecraft are powered by radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) and the fuel element in RTGs is plutonia. For safety and containment of the radioactive fuel element, the heat source is encapsulated in iridium or platinum alloys. Ir and Pt alloys are the alloys of choice for encapsulating radioisotope fuel pellets. Ir and Pt alloys were chosen because of their high-temperature properties and compatibility with the oxide fuel element and the graphite impact shells. This review addresses the alloy design and welding and weldability of Ir and Pt alloys for use in RTGs.

  12. Platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon for 3-pentanone hydrogenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihua; Zheng, Tuo; Yu, Changlin; Zheng, Jinbao; Tang, Zhenbiao; Zhang, Nuowei; Shu, Qing; Chen, Bing H.

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we prepared the Ni/Ni(OH)2/C sample at room temperature by hydrazine hydrate reducing method. The galvanic replacement reaction method was applied to deposit platinum on the Ni/Ni(OH)2 nanoparticles, to prepare the PtNi/Ni(OH)2/C catalyst. The catalyst of platinum-nickel alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon (signed as PtNi/C) was obtained by the thermal treatment of PtNi/Ni(OH)2/C in flowing hydrogen at 300 °C for 2 h. The size, nanostructure, surface properties, Pt and Ni chemical states of the PtNi/C catalyst were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM) and elemental energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) line scanning, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy (HS-LEIS) techniques. The as-synthesized PtNi/C catalyst showed enhanced catalytic performance relative to the Ni/Ni(OH)2/C, Ni/C, Pt/C and PtNi/Ni(OH)2/C catalysts for 3-pentanone hydrogenation due to electron synergistic effect between Pt and Ni species in the PtNi/C catalyst. The PtNi/C catalyst also had exceling stability, with industrial application value.

  13. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; ...

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendousmore » challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]« less

  14. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendous challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]

  15. Composition Tunability and (111)-Dominant Facets of Ultrathin Platinum-Gold Alloy Nanowires toward Enhanced Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fangfang; Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Skeete, Zakiya; Lu, Aolin; Ravid, Jonathan; Wu, Jinfang; Luo, Jin; Yu, Gang; Ren, Yang; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2016-09-21

    The ability for tuning not only the composition but also the type of surface facets of alloyed nanomaterials is important for the design of catalysts with enhanced activity and stability through optimizing both ensemble and ligand effects. Herein we report the first example of ultrathin platinum-gold alloy nanowires (PtAu NWs) featuring composition-tunable and (111) facet-dominant surface characteristics, and the electrocatalytic enhancement for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). PtAu NWs of different bimetallic compositions synthesized by a single-phase and surfactant-free method are shown to display an alloyed, parallel-bundled structure in which the individual nanowires exhibit Boerdijk-Coxeter helix type morphology predominant in (111) facets. Results have revealed intriguing catalytic correlation with the binary composition, exhibiting an activity maximum at a Pt:Au ratio of ∼3:1. As revealed by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atomic pair distribution function analysis, NWs of this ratio exhibit a clear shrinkage in interatomic bonding distances. In comparison with PtAu nanoparticles of a similar composition and degree of shrinking of atomic-pair distances, the PtAu NWs display a remarkably higher electrocatalytic activity and stability. The outperformance of NWs over nanoparticles is attributed to the predominant (111)-type facets on the surface balancing the contribution of ensemble and ligand effects, in addition to the composition synergy due to optimal adsorption energies for molecular and atomic oxygen species on the surface as supported by DFT computation of models of the catalysts. The findings open up a new pathway to the design and engineering of alloy nanocatalysts with enhanced activity and durability.

  16. LDRD final report on synthesis of shape-and size-controlled platinum and platinum alloy nanostructures on carbon with improved durability.

    SciTech Connect

    Shelnutt, John Allen; Garcia, Robert M.; Song, Yujiang; Moreno, Andres M.; Stanis, Ronald J.

    2008-10-01

    This project is aimed to gain added durability by supporting ripening-resistant dendritic platinum and/or platinum-based alloy nanostructures on carbon. We have developed a new synthetic approach suitable for directly supporting dendritic nanostructures on VXC-72 carbon black (CB), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The key of the synthesis is to creating a unique supporting/confining reaction environment by incorporating carbon within lipid bilayer relying on a hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction. In order to realize size uniformity control over the supported dendritic nanostructures, a fast photocatalytic seeding method based on tin(IV) porphyrins (SnP) developed at Sandia was applied to the synthesis by using SnP-containing liposomes under tungsten light irradiation. For concept approval, one created dendritic platinum nanostructure supported on CB was fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for durability examination via potential cycling. It appears that carbon supporting is essentially beneficial to an enhanced durability according to our preliminary results.

  17. Age-hardening mechanisms in a commercial dental gold alloy containing platinum and palladium.

    PubMed

    Tani, T; Udoh, K; Yasuda, K; Van Tendeloo, G; Van Landuyt, J

    1991-10-01

    The age-hardening mechanism of a commercial dental gold alloy containing platinum and palladium (in wt.%, 15 Cu, 6 Ag, 5 Pt, 3 Pd, 3 Zn, with the balance as gold) was elucidated by means of electrical resistivity, hardness tests, x-ray and electron diffraction and electron microscopy, as well as high-resolution electron microscopy. The sequence of phase transformations during isothermal aging below the critical temperature, Tc = 825 K, was described as follows: disordered solid solution alpha 0 (FCC)----metastable AuCu I' ordered phase (FCT)----metastable alpha 2 disordered phase (FCC) equilibrium AuCu I ordered phase (FCT) + equilibrium alpha 2 disordered phase (FCC). The hardening was due to the introduction of coherency strain at the interface between the AuCu I' platelet and the matrix. These ordered platelets had mutually perpendicular c-axes to compensate for the strain introduced by their tetragonality. A loss of coherency at the interface brought about softening of the alloy, i.e., over-aging.

  18. In situ XAFS studies of the oxygen reduction reaction on carbon supported platinum and platinum nickel nano-scale alloys as cathode catalysts in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qingying

    Platinum based bimetallic alloys have been investigated by conducting Pt L3 and Ni K edge in situ XAFS measurements on carbon supported Pt and PtNi(1:1) nanoscale catalysts under a wide range of operating potentials. We observed that (1) the Pt-Pt bond distance in PtNi alloys is shorter than that of Pt, and the bond distance between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is longer for PtNi. (2) Pt has a tendency to stay on the surface while Ni is mostly underneath the surface. (3) While a change in oxidation of pure Pt was clearly observed at different potentials, the Pt in the PtNi alloy remained nearly oxygen-free at all potentials, but an accompanying oxidation change of Ni was observed instead. (4) PtNi has higher open circuit voltage than Pt/C. These results indicate that the chemisorption energy between Pt and oxygen adsorbate is reduced in PtNi alloys, which prevents the poison of oxygen adsorbate and hence improves the reactivity. In addition, the strain and ligand effects in PtNi nanoparticle alloys were studied by FEW calculations using experimental data as a guide to understand the factors causing the reduction of chemisorptions energy of Pt. Our calculation indicates that Pt d-band is broader and lower in energy when the bond distance between Pt is shorter, resulting in weaker chemisorption energy between Pt and absorbed oxygen atom on top, and vice verse. Meanwhile, the investigation of ligand effect shows two trends in modifying Pt's properties within alloyed transition metals. The strain effect dominates in PtNi bimetallic system, corresponding to weaker chemisorptions energy and lower white intensity of Pt L3 edge, which is in consistent with our experimental results. The implications of these results afford a good guideline in understanding the reactivity enhancement mechanism and in the context of alloy catalysts design.

  19. Platinum Alloy Tailored All-Weather Solar Cells for Energy Harvesting from Sun and Rain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qunwei; Duan, Yanyan; He, Benlin; Chen, Haiyan

    2016-11-07

    Solar cells that can harvest energy in all weathers are promising in solving the energy crisis and environmental problems. The power outputs are nearly zero under dark conditions for state-of-the-art solar cells. To address this issue, we present herein a class of platinum alloy (PtMx , M=Ni, Fe, Co, Cu, Mo) tailored all-weather solar cells that can harvest energy from rain and realize photoelectric conversion under sun illumination. By tuning the stoichiometric Pt/M ratio and M species, the optimized solar cell yields a photoelectric conversion efficiency of 10.38 % under simulated sunlight irradiation (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2) ) as well as current of 3.90 μA and voltage of 115.52 μV under simulated raindrops. Moreover, the electric signals are highly dependent on the dripping velocity and the concentration of simulated raindrops along with concentrations of cation and anion. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Partitioning of Si and platinum group elements between liquid and solid Fe-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Siebert, J.; Badro, J.

    2014-05-01

    Crystallization of the Earth's inner core fractionates major and minor elements between the solid and liquid metal, leaving physical and geochemical imprints on the Earth's core. For example, the density jump observed at the Inner Core Boundary (ICB) is related to the preferential partitioning of lighter elements in the liquid outer core. The fractionation of Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid during inner core crystallization has been invoked as a process that explains the observed Os isotopic signature of mantle plume-derived lavas (Brandon et al., 1998; Brandon and Walker, 2005) in terms of core-mantle interaction. In this article we measured partitioning of Si, Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid metal. Isobaric (2 GPa) experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder press at temperatures between 1250 °C and 1600 °C in which an imposed thermal gradient through the sample provided solid-liquid coexistence in the Fe-Si system. We determined the narrow melting loop in the Fe-Si system using Si partitioning values and showed that order-disorder transition in the Fe-Si solid phases can have a large effect on Si partitioning. We also found constant partition coefficients (DOs, DPt, DRe) between liquid and solid metal, for Si concentrations ranging from 2 to 12 wt%. The compact structure of Fe-Si liquid alloys is compatible with incorporation of Si and platinum group elements (PGEs) elements precluding solid-liquid fractionation. Such phase diagram properties are relevant for other light elements such as S and C at high pressure and is not consistent with inter-elemental fractionation of PGEs during metal crystallization at Earth's inner core conditions. We therefore propose that the peculiar Os isotopic signature observed in plume-derived lavas is more likely explained by mantle source heterogeneity (Meibom et al., 2002; Baker and Krogh Jensen, 2004; Luguet et al., 2008).

  1. Electrochemical study on the adsorption of carbon oxides and oxidation of their adsorption products on platinum group metals and alloys.

    PubMed

    Siwek, Hanna; Lukaszewski, Mariusz; Czerwiński, Andrzej

    2008-07-07

    CO(2) reduction and CO adsorption on noble metals (Pt, Rh, Pd) and their alloys (Pt-Rh, Pd-Pt, Pd-Rh, Pd-Pt-Rh) prepared as thin rough deposits have been studied by chronoamperometry (CA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The influence of alloy surface composition on the values of surface coverage, eps (electron per site) and potential of the oxidation of CO(2) reduction and CO adsorption products is shown. The oxidation of the adsorbate on Pt-Rh alloys proceeds more easily (at lower potentials) than on pure metals. On the other hand, in the case of Pd-Pt and Pd-Rh alloys the adsorbate oxidation is more difficult and requires higher potentials than on Pt or Rh. The analysis of the EQCM signal is presented for the case of adsorption and oxidation of carbon oxide adsorption products on the electrodes studied. The comparison of adsorption parameters and the EQCM response obtained for platinum group metals and alloys leads to the conclusion that reduced CO(2) cannot be totally identified with adsorbed CO.

  2. Platinum-free binary Co-Ni alloy counter electrodes for efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoxu; Tang, Qunwei; He, Benlin; Lin, Lin; Yu, Liangmin

    2014-09-26

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have attracted growing interest because of their application in renewable energy technologies in developing modern low-carbon economies. However, the commercial application of DSSCs has been hindered by the high expenses of platinum (Pt) counter electrodes (CEs). Here we use Pt-free binary Co-Ni alloys synthesized by a mild hydrothermal strategy as CE materials in efficient DSSCs. As a result of the rapid charge transfer, good electrical conduction, and reasonable electrocatalysis, the power conversion efficiencies of Co-Ni-based DSSCs are higher than those of Pt-only CEs, and the fabrication expense is markedly reduced. The DSSCs based on a CoNi0.25 alloy CE displays an impressive power conversion efficiency of 8.39%, fast start-up, multiple start/stop cycling, and good stability under extended irradiation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The equilibrium liquidus temperatures of rhenium-carbon, platinum-carbon and cobalt-carbon eutectic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, D. H.; Todd, A. D. W.; Van den Bossche, R.; Bloembergen, P.; Anhalt, K.; Ballico, M.; Bourson, F.; Briaudeau, S.; Campos, J.; Cox, M. G.; del Campo, D.; Dury, M. R.; Gavrilov, V.; Grigoryeva, I.; Hernanz, M. L.; Jahan, F.; Khlevnoy, B.; Khromchenko, V.; Lu, X.; Machin, G.; Mantilla, J. M.; Martin, M. J.; McEvoy, H. C.; Rougié, B.; Sadli, M.; Salim, S. G. R.; Sasajima, N.; Taubert, D. R.; van der Ham, E.; Wang, T.; Wei, D.; Whittam, A.; Wilthan, B.; Woods, D. J.; Woodward, J. T.; Woolliams, E. R.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoon, H. W.; Yuan, Z.

    2017-06-01

    The eutectic alloys rhenium-carbon, platinum-carbon and cobalt-carbon have been proposed as reference standards for thermometry, with temperature and uncertainty values specified within the mise en pratique of the definition of the kelvin. These alloys have been investigated in a collaboration of eleven national measurement institutes and laboratories. Published results reported the point-of-inflection in the melting curve with extremely low uncertainties. However, to be considered as standards it is necessary to stipulate what phenomenon a temperature value has been ascribed to; specifically, this should be a thermodynamic state. Therefore, the data have been further evaluated and the equilibrium liquidus temperatures determined based on a consideration of limits and assuming a rectangular probability distribution. The values are: for rhenium-carbon 2747.91  ±  0.44 K, for platinum-carbon 2011.50  ±  0.22 K and for cobalt-carbon 1597.48  ±  0.14 K, with uncertainties at approximately a 95% coverage probability. It is proposed that these values could be used as the basis of thermodynamic temperature measurement at high temperatures (above 1300 K).

  4. Platinum-TM (TM = Fe, Co) alloy nanoparticles dispersed nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide-multiwalled carbon nanotube) hybrid structure cathode electrocatalysts for high performance PEMFC applications.

    PubMed

    Vinayan, B P; Ramaprabhu, S

    2013-06-07

    The efforts to push proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) for commercial applications are being undertaken globally. In PEMFC, the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) at the cathode can be improved by the alloying of platinum with 3d-transition metals (TM = Fe, Co, etc.) and with nitrogen doping, and in the present work we have combined both of these aspects. We describe a facile method for the synthesis of a nitrogen doped (reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)) hybrid structure (N-(G-MWNTs)) by the uniform coating of a nitrogen containing polymer over the surface of the hybrid structure (positively surface charged rGO-negatively surface charged MWNTs) followed by the pyrolysis of these (rGO-MWNTs) hybrid structure-polymer composites. The N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure is used as a catalyst support for the dispersion of platinum (Pt), platinum-iron (Pt3Fe) and platinum-cobalt (Pt3Co) alloy nanoparticles. The PEMFC performances of Pt-TM alloy nanoparticle dispersed N-(G-MWNTs) hybrid structure electrocatalysts are 5.0 times higher than that of commercial Pt-C electrocatalysts along with very good stability under acidic environment conditions. This work demonstrates a considerable improvement in performance compared to existing cathode electrocatalysts being used in PEMFC and can be extended to the synthesis of metal, metal oxides or metal alloy nanoparticle decorated nitrogen doped carbon nanostructures for various electrochemical energy applications.

  5. Facile Fabrication of Platinum-Cobalt Alloy Nanoparticles with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity for a Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huihong; Hu, Xiulan; Zhang, Jianbo; Su, Nan; Cheng, Jiexu

    2017-03-01

    Decreasing the cost associated with platinum-based catalysts along with improving their catalytic properties is a major challenge for commercial direct methanol fuel cells. In this work, a simple and facile strategy was developed for the more efficient preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -supported Pt/CoPt composite nanoparticles (NPs) via solution plasma sputtering with subsequent thermal annealing. Quite different from general wet synthesis methods, Pt/CoPt composite NPs were directly derived from metal wire electrodes without any additions. The obtained Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs composite catalysts exhibited tremendous improvement in the electro-oxidation of methanol in acidic media with mass activities of 1719 mA mg-1Pt. This value is much higher than that of previous reports of Pt-Co alloy and commercial Pt/C (3.16 times) because of the many active sites and clean surface of the catalysts. The catalysts showed good stability due to the special synergistic effects of the CoPt alloy. Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs can be used as a promising catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells. In addition, this solution plasma sputtering-assisted synthesis method introduces a general and feasible route for the synthesis of binary alloys.

  6. Facile Fabrication of Platinum-Cobalt Alloy Nanoparticles with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity for a Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huihong; Hu, Xiulan; Zhang, Jianbo; Su, Nan; Cheng, JieXu

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the cost associated with platinum-based catalysts along with improving their catalytic properties is a major challenge for commercial direct methanol fuel cells. In this work, a simple and facile strategy was developed for the more efficient preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -supported Pt/CoPt composite nanoparticles (NPs) via solution plasma sputtering with subsequent thermal annealing. Quite different from general wet synthesis methods, Pt/CoPt composite NPs were directly derived from metal wire electrodes without any additions. The obtained Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs composite catalysts exhibited tremendous improvement in the electro-oxidation of methanol in acidic media with mass activities of 1719 mA mg−1Pt. This value is much higher than that of previous reports of Pt-Co alloy and commercial Pt/C (3.16 times) because of the many active sites and clean surface of the catalysts. The catalysts showed good stability due to the special synergistic effects of the CoPt alloy. Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs can be used as a promising catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells. In addition, this solution plasma sputtering-assisted synthesis method introduces a general and feasible route for the synthesis of binary alloys. PMID:28358143

  7. Development of platinum-modified gamma-nickel+gamma-nickel-aluminum-based alloys for high-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidloff, Andrew James

    Nickel-base superalloys have been used extensively in high-temperature applications where strength and structural stability are required, most notably in aero gas turbine engines. To increase the efficiency of such engines, a continuous increase in superalloy operating temperatures has been observed. As temperatures continue to increase, multiple aspects of alloy stability become increasingly important. In that regard, the high-temperature performance of superalloys can be generally discussed from two important standpoints, surface stability and structural stability. Historically, structural stability has been the primary concern to alloy designers, such that superalloys that may be exposed to high-temperature applications exceeding 1100°C typically utilize a coating for environmental protection. However, the use of coatings introduces potential deficiencies. For instance, aluminide coatings can lead to extensive instabilities when in contact with newer generation superalloys. Also, a few niche applications exist where the use of a coating is impractical. In such cases, the alloys require both environmental resistance and high-temperature strength. The primary goal of this study was to develop novel heat-treatable gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni 3Al-based alloys having excellent resistance to both high-temperature oxidation and creep. The alloys were developed in a systematic manner using multiple alloying additions, including Pt and Ir, i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs). The microstructures and environmental and thermal stabilities of the alloys studied were fully characterized through a series of experiments, including: oxidation (both isothermal and cyclic); hot corrosion (both Type I and Type II); microstructure analysis (including lattice misfit); and phase equilibria calculations with partitioning coefficient analysis. Pt modification was found to significantly affect the lattice misfit of an alloy by expanding the gamma' lattice parameter through its Ni sublattice site

  8. Binary platinum alloy electrodes for hydrogen and oxygen evolutions by seawater splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jingjing

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen evolutions by seawater splitting are persistent objectives for green energy production. We present here the experimental realization of Ti foil supported PtM (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Pd) alloy electrodes by a cycle voltammetry method for seawater splitting. The preliminary results demonstrate that the resultant Ti supported PtM alloy electrodes are robust in realizing high-efficiency hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER), arising from enhanced current density, reduced potential, and good durability. By tuning M species, the Ti supported PtPd alloy electrode displays a maximal efficiency, yielding an onset potential of -52 mV and 690 mV (vs RHE) in HER and OER, respectively. The current densities of Ti supported PtPd electrode are as high as 270 mA cm-2 at 1.32 V (vs RHE) and 590 mA cm-2 at 3.99 V (vs RHE). Moreover, the long-term stability has also been increased by alloying Pt with M. Although the work presented here is far from optimized, the concept of alloying transition metals with Pt can guide us to design highly efficient alloy electrodes for hydrogen and oxygen evolutions from seawater splitting.

  9. Comparison of methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation by alloy and Core-Shell platinum based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Peled, E.

    2011-10-01

    Two Core-Shell, RuCore-PtShell and IrNiCore-PtRuShell, XC72-supported catalyst were synthesized in a two-step deposition process with NaBH4 as reducing agent. The structure and composition of the Core-Shell catalysts were determined by EDS, XPS and XRD. Electrochemical characterization was performed with the use of cyclic voltammetry. Methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation activities of the Core-Shell catalysts (in terms of surface and mass activities) were studied at 80 °C and compared to those of a commercial Pt-Ru alloy catalyst. The surface activity of the alloy based catalyst, in the case of methanol oxidation, was found to be superior as a result of optimized surface Pt:Ru composition. However, the mass activity of the PtRu/IrNi/XC72 was higher than that of the alloy based catalyst by ∼50%. Regarding ethylene glycol oxidation, while the surface activity of the alloy based catalyst was slightly higher than that of the Pt/Ru/XC72 catalyst, the latter showed ∼66% higher activities in terms of A g-1 of Pt. These results show the potential of Core-Shell catalysts for reducing the cost of catalysts for DMFC and DEGFC.

  10. Shape and composition-controlled platinum alloy nanocrystals using carbon monoxide as reducing agent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianbo; Gross, Adam; Yang, Hong

    2011-02-09

    The shape of metal alloy nanocrystals plays an important role in catalytic performances. Many methods developed so far in controlling the morphologies of nanocrystals are however limited by the synthesis that is often material and shape specific. Here we show using a gas reducing agent in liquid solution (GRAILS) method, different Pt alloy (Pt-M, M = Co, Fe, Ni, Pd) nanocrystals with cubic and octahedral morphologies can be prepared under the same kind of reducing reaction condition. A broad range of compositions can also be obtained for these Pt alloy nanocrystals. Thus, this GRAILS method is a general approach to the preparation of uniform shape and composition-controlled Pt alloy nanocrystals. The area-specific oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of Pt(3)Ni catalysts at 0.9 V are 0.85 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanocubes, and 1.26 mA/cm(2)(Pt) for the nanooctahedra. The ORR mass activity of the octahedral Pt(3)Ni catalyst reaches 0.44 A/mg(Pt).

  11. Spectrophotometric determination of platinum(IV) in alloys, complexes, environmental, and pharmaceutical samples using 4-[N,N-(diethyl)amino] benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone.

    PubMed

    Naik, P Parameshwara; Karthikeyan, J; Shetty, A Nityananda

    2010-12-01

    4-[N,N-(Diethyl)amino] benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DEABT) is proposed as an analytical reagent for the spectrophotometric determination of platinum(IV). The DEABT forms 1:2 yellow complex with Pt(IV), which is sparingly soluble in water and completely soluble in water-ethanol-DMF medium. The Pt(IV)-DEABT complex shows maximum absorbance at 405 nm. Beer's law is valid up to 7.80 μg cm(-3), and optimum concentration range for the determination of platinum(IV) is 0.48-7.02 μg cm(-3). The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of the method are found to be 1.755 × 10(4) dm(3) mol(-1) cm(-1) and 0.0012 μg cm(-2), respectively. The relative error and coefficient of variation (n=6) for the method does not exceed ± 0.43% and 0.35%, respectively. Since the method tolerates a number of metal ions commonly associated with platinum, it can be employed for the determination of platinum in environmental samples, pharmaceutical samples, alloys, catalysts, and complexes. The method is rapid as the Pt(IV)-DEABT complex is soluble in water-ethanol-DMF medium and not requiring any time consuming extraction method for the complex.

  12. High temperature oxidation behavior of gamma-nickel+gamma'-nickel aluminum alloys and coatings modified with platinum and reactive elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Nan

    was also inferred that Pt enhances the diffusive flux of aluminum from the substrate to the scale/alloy interface. Relatively low levels of hafnium addition to Pt-free gamma'-Ni 3Al increased the extent of external NiO formation due to non-protective HfO2 formation. Accordingly, this effect intensified with increasing Hf content from 0.2 to 0.5at.%. The synergistic effect of Pt and Hf co-addition was realized by examining Pt+Hf-modified gamma'-Ni3Al alloys. It was inferred that Pt decreases the chemical activity of Hf so that HfO2 formation could be suppressed with increasing Pt content. Thus, the early-stage Al2O3 formation facilitated by Pt additions and NiO development assisted by Hf additions are the competing scale growth processes that are influenced by the relative contents of Pt and Hf. Large interfacial voids were observed on the gamma'-Ni 3Al alloy after 4-days isothermal oxidation at 1150°C, which could be attributed to the Kirkendall effect. Platinum addition was also found to improve Al2O3-scale adhesion. Pt and Hf effects on two-phase gamma-Ni+gamma'-Ni3Al alloys of compositions Ni-20Al-20Pt-xHf (x ranges from 0 to 0.91) were examined by both thermal gravimetric analyses and cyclic oxidation tests. Scale microstructures were characterized by confocal photo-stimulated microspectroscopy (CPSM), in-lens SEM, and FIB-TEM. Hafnium additions up to about 0.48at.% markedly decreased the weight change of isothermally oxidized Pt-modified gamma+gamma' alloys by forming thinner oxide scales than that on the Hf-free Ni-20Al-20Pt base alloy. This could be attributed to an Al2O3 grain boundary blocking effect imparted by the segregated Hf. However, an over-doped alloy with 0.91at.% Hf exhibited detrimental effect by forming internal HfO 2. It was observed that Hf additions altered the Al2O3 scale microstructure. The most remarkable difference was that the columnar width of the Al2O3 scale grains formed on Ni-20Al-20Pt was much larger than it was on Ni-20Al-20Pt-0

  13. Order-Disorder Phenomena in the Binary Alloys Platinum(x)titanium, Platinum(x)vanadium (3 Less than or Equal to X Less than or Equal to 8) and NICKEL(3)MOLYBDENUM Studied by High Resolution Electron Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schryvers, Dominique

    In this work the results of an experimental study on the order-disorder behaviour of three different binary alloy systems are presented. The investigations were performed mainly using electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy techniques. In the first chapter an introduction with respect to the general aspects of ordering in alloys is given. The second chapter describes the most important properties of the investigation techniques. Both chapters are written in function of the needs in following chapters. Chapter III comprehends the results obtained in the platinum rich part of the Pt-Ti alloy system, while those of Pt-V are described in chapter IV. The main results in these alloy systems concern the characterization of new ordered phases. The complex dynamical ordering mechanism existing in {rm Ni_3 Mo} is discussed in chapter V. In chapter VI a calculation of possible ground state structures of a binary system based on the face centered cubic lattice and including the fourth nearest neighbour pair interaction is presented. A comparison between the theoretical results and the experimental ones of chapters III and IV is given.

  14. Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Platinum-Terminated “Onion-structured” Alloy Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Herron, Jeffrey A.; Jiao, Jiao; Hahn, Konstanze; Peng, Guowen; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-12-17

    Using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (GGA-PW91) calculations, a series of onion-structured metal alloys have been investigated for their catalytic performance towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The onion-structures consist of a varying number of atomic layers of one or two metals each, pseudomorphically deposited on top of one another to form the overall structure. All catalysts studied feature a Pt overlayer, and often consist of at least one Pd layer below the surface. Three distinct ORR mechanisms were analyzed on the close-packed facets of all the structures considered. These mechanisms include a direct route of O2 dissociation and two hydrogen-assisted routes of O–O bond-breaking in peroxyl (OOH) and in hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) intermediates. A thermochemical analysis of the elementary steps provides information on the operating potential, and thereby energy efficiency of each electrocatalyst. A Sabatier analysis of catalytic activity based on thermochemistry of proton/electron transfer steps and activation energy barrier for O–O bond-breaking steps leads to a “volcano” relation between the surfaces’ activity and the binding energy of O. Several of the onion-structured alloys studied here show promise for achieving energy efficiency higher than that of Pt, by being active at potentials higher than the operating potential of Pt. Furthermore, some have at least as good activity as pure Pt at that operating potential. Thus, a number of the onion-structured alloys studied here are promising as cathode electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

  15. Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses - Melting experiments in iron-platinum alloy capsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H.-K.; Lindsley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes two techniques that have been developed to produce Fe-Pt alloy capsules for hgh-pressure experiments, and reports liquidus-phase relations of the Apollo 14 very low titanium glasses determined using Fe-rich capsules (a/Fe/ approximately 0.6). The liquid is multiply saturated with olivine and clinopyroxene at equal to or greater than 22 kbar. The multiple saturation is at least 3 kbar higher than that determined using pure Fe capsules and corresponds to a source region at least 60 km deeper if olivine and clinopyroxene were the residual phases. However, independent data on iron activity or oxygen fugacity of the glasses are still needed in order to choose a container of optimum composition. Preliminary experiments in Fe-poor alloy capsules suggest that the valence state of iron and the crystallization sequence in the melt have changed, possibly as a result of oxidizing materials entrapped during the iron-plating processes. The FeO content of the charge decreases linearly with increasing run duration in experiments using pure Fe capsules. The observation that iron-rich globules grow with time suggests that the equilibrium Fe (bleb) + Fe2O3 (liq) = 3 FeO (liq) might be established in the liquid at high pressure. If this explanation is correct, an appreciable amount of 'FeO' in the liquid could actually be Fe2O3, and some natural lunar volcanic glasses may contain ferric iron as well.

  16. Highly active and durable platinum-lead bimetallic alloy nanoflowers for formic acid electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Mingxing; Li, Fumin; Yao, Zhigang; Zhang, Suqi; Dong, Jingwen; Chen, Yu; Tang, Yawen

    2015-03-01

    The Pt84Pb16 (atomic ratio) bimetallic alloy nanoflowers (Pt84Pb16 BANFs) are synthesized by a simple one-pot hydrothermal reduction method that effectively enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR) due to the ensemble effect and the electronic effect. As a result, the mass activity of Pt84Pb16 BANFs for the FAOR is 16.7 times higher than that of commercial Pt black at 0.3 V potential.The Pt84Pb16 (atomic ratio) bimetallic alloy nanoflowers (Pt84Pb16 BANFs) are synthesized by a simple one-pot hydrothermal reduction method that effectively enhance the dehydrogenation pathway of the formic acid oxidation reaction (FAOR) due to the ensemble effect and the electronic effect. As a result, the mass activity of Pt84Pb16 BANFs for the FAOR is 16.7 times higher than that of commercial Pt black at 0.3 V potential. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07375d

  17. Development of Ultra-Low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, Branko N.; Weidner, John

    2016-01-07

    The goal of this project is to synthesize a low cost PEM fuel cell cathode catalyst and support with optimized average mass activity, stability of mass activity, initial high current density performance under H2/air (power density), and catalyst and support stability able to meet 2017 DOE targets for electrocatalysts for transportation applications. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst was synthesized according to a novel methodology developed at USC through: (i) surface modification, (ii) metal catalyzed pyrolysis and (iii) chemical leaching to remove excess meal used to dope the support. Pt* stands for suppressed platinum catalyst synthesized with Co doped platinum. The procedure results in increasing carbon graphitization, inclusion of cobalt in the bulk and formation of non-metallic active sites on the carbon surface. Catalytic activity of the support shows an onset potential of 0.86 V for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) with well-defined kinetic and mass transfer regions and 2.5% H2O2 production. Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst durability under 0.6-1.0 V potential cycling and support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling was evaluated. The results indicated excellent catalyst and support performance under simulated start-up/shut down operating conditions (1.0 – 1.5 V, 5000 cycles) which satisfy DOE 2017 catalyst and support durability and activity. The 30% Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed high initial mass activity of 0.34 A/mgPGM at 0.9 ViR-free and loss of mass activity of 45% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The catalyst performance under H2-air fuel cell operating conditions showed only 24 mV (iR-free) loss at 0.8 A/cm2 with an ECSA loss of 42% after 30,000 cycles (0.6-1.0 V). The support stability under 1.0-1.5 V potential cycling showed mass activity loss of 50% and potential loss of 8 mV (iR-free) at 1.5 A/cm2. The ECSA loss was 22% after 5,000 cycles. Furthermore, the Pt*/ACCS-2 catalyst showed an

  18. Carbon-supported platinum alloy catalysts for phenol hydrogenation for making industrial chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, S.T.; Song, C.

    1999-07-01

    Phenol is available in large quantities in liquids derived from coal and biomass. Phenol hydrogenation is an industrially important reaction to produce cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Cyclohexane, cyclohexene and benzene are obtained as minor products in this reaction. Cyclohexanone is an important intermediate in the production of caprolactam for nylon 6 and cyclohexanol for adipic acid production. In USA, cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone are produced by benzene hydrogenation to cyclohexane over nickel or noble metal catalysts, followed by oxidation of cyclohexane to produce a mixture of cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Then cyclohexanol is dehydrogenated in the presence of Cu-Zn catalyst to cyclohexanone. Usually phenol hydrogenation is also carried out by using Ni catalyst in liquid phase. However, a direct single-step vapor phase hydrogenation of phenol to give cyclohexanone selectively is more advantageous in terms of energy savings and process economics, since processing is simplified and the endothermic step of cyclohexanol dehydrogenation can be avoided, as demonstrated by Montedipe and Johnson Matthey using promoted Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. While it is not the purpose of this paper to dwell on the relative merits of these routes, it is necessary to mention that while using monometallic catalysts, generally the problem of catalyst deactivation of sintering as well as coking is frequently encountered. Addition and alloying of noble metal (e.g. Pt) with a second metal can result in a catalyst with better selectivity and activity in the reaction which is more resistant to deactivation. This paper presents the results on the single-step vapor phase hydrogenation of phenol over carbon-supported Pt-M (M=Cr, V, Zr) alloy catalysts to yield mainly cyclohexanone or cyclohexanol.

  19. In vitro biocompatibility and electrical stability of thick-film platinum/gold alloy electrodes printed on alumina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnicer-Lombarte, Alejandro; Lancashire, Henry T.; Vanhoestenberghe, Anne

    2017-06-01

    Objective. High-density electrode arrays are a powerful tool in both clinical neuroscience and basic research. However, current manufacturing techniques require the use of specialised techniques and equipment, which are available to few labs. We have developed a high-density electrode array with customisable design, manufactured using simple printing techniques and with commercially available materials. Approach. Electrode arrays were manufactured by thick-film printing a platinum-gold alloy (Pt/Au) and an insulating dielectric on 96% alumina ceramic plates. Arrays were conditioned in serum and serum-free conditions, with and without 1 kHz, 200 µA, charge balanced stimulation for up to 21 d. Array biocompatibility was assessed using an extract assay and a PC-12 cell contact assay. Electrode impedance, charge storage capacity and charge injection capacity were before and after array conditioning. Main results. The manufactured Pt/Au electrodes have a highly porous surface and exhibit electrical properties comparable to arrays manufactured using alternative techniques. Materials used in array manufacture were found to be non-toxic to L929 fibroblasts by extract assay, and neuronal-like PC-12 cells adhered and extended neurites on the array surfaces. Arrays remained functional after long-term delivery of electrical pulses while exposed to protein-rich environments. Charge storage capacities and charge injection capacities increased following stimulation accounted for by an increase in surface index (real surface area) observed by vertical scanning interferometry. Further, we observed accumulation of proteins at the electrode sites following conditioning in the presence of serum. Significance. This study demonstrates the in vitro biocompatibility of commercially available thick-film printing materials. The printing technique is both simple and versatile, with layouts readily modified to produce customized electrode arrays. Thick-film electrode arrays are an

  20. l-Glutamic acid assisted eco-friendly one-pot synthesis of sheet-assembled platinum-palladium alloy networks for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ya-Cheng; Mei, Li-Ping; Wang, Ai-Jun; Yuan, Tao; Chen, Sai-Sai; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2017-10-15

    In this work, bimetallic platinum-palladium sheet-assembled alloy networks (PtPd SAANs) were facilely synthesized by an eco-friendly one-pot aqueous approach under the guidance of l-glutamic acid at room temperature, without any additive, seed, toxic or organic solvent involved. l-Glutamic acid was served as the green shape-director and weak-stabilizing agent. A series of characterization techniques were employed to examine the morphology, structure and formation mechanism of the product. The architectures exhibited improved electrocatalytic activity and durable ability toward methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in contrast with commercial Pt black and Pd black catalysts. This is ascribed to the unique structures of the obtained PtPd SAANs and the synergistic effects of the bimetals. These results demonstrate the potential application of the prepared catalyst in fuel cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Platinum-alloy and sulfur saturation in an arc-related basalt to rhyolite suite: Evidence from the Pual Ridge lavas, the Eastern Manus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Campbell, Ian H.; Arculus, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the platinum group element (PGE) and Re concentrations of arc-type lavas from the Pual Ridge and the surrounding area in the Eastern Manus Basin. These magmas followed an Fe-enrichment trend to produce a wide range of compositions with MgO varying between 8 and 0.1 wt.%. We found distinct differences in the PGE geochemistry of the high (>3 wt.% MgO) and the low-Mg lavas (<3 wt.% MgO). During the early stages of fractionation, the concentrations of Pd, Cu, Au and Re increase whereas Ir, Ru, Rh and Pt decrease. Co-variations of Ir, Ru and Rh with Pt in the high-Mg lavas suggest that the depletion of these elements is due to Pt-rich alloy saturation. This is consistent with the high Pt contents in the high-Mg lavas, which is close to the solubility of Pt in the basaltic melt at similar conditions. In contrast, the concentrations of all PGE and Re drop rapidly in the low-Mg lavas (except for Ru and Ir), with the PGE concentrations falling at a rate that is appreciably faster than Cu, which we attribute to sulfide saturation. As a consequence, there is a marked decline in Pd/Cu in the low-Mg lavas and we suggest that this ratio is the best indicator of sulfide saturation in an evolving magmatic system. A feature of the data is that duplicate analyses of the same sample often do not agree within error. We attribute this scatter to the nugget effect, with nuggets of a Pt-rich alloy in the high-Mg lavas and sulfide blebs in the low-Mg lavas. The PGE concentrations of phenocryst-bearing high-Mg lavas are higher than in the associated glassy lavas, and scatter on MgO variation diagrams is significantly reduced if only glassy lavas are considered, which indicates that the micron scale Pt-rich alloy grains are intimately associated with the phenocrysts. Our results provide strong evidence that Pt-rich alloys can crystallize from a basaltic-andesitic magma, along with the silicate minerals, and fractionate Pt from Pd during magmatic differentiation. As a

  2. Tuning of platinum nano-particles by Au usage in their binary alloy for direct ethanol fuel cell: Controlled synthesis, electrode kinetics and mechanistic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Abhijit; Mondal, Achintya; Datta, Jayati

    2015-06-01

    Understanding of the electrode-kinetics and mechanism of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) is of considerable interest for optimizing electro-catalysis in direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC). This work attempts to design Pt based electro-catalyst on carbon support, tuned with gold nano-particles (NPs), for their use in DEFC operating in alkaline medium. The platinum-gold alloyed NPs are synthesized at desired compositions and size (2-10 nm) by controlled borohydride reduction method and successfully characterized by XRD, TEM, EDS and XPS techniques. The kinetic parameters along with the activation energies for the EOR are evaluated over the temperature range 20-80 °C and the oxidation reaction products estimated through ion chromatographic analysis. Compared to single Pt/C catalyst, the over potential of EOR is reduced by ca. 500 mV, at the onset during the reaction, for PtAu/C alloy with only 23% Pt content demonstrating the ability of Au and/or its surface oxides providing oxygen species at much lower potentials compared to Pt. Furthermore, a considerable increase in the peak power density (>191%) is observed in an in-house fabricated direct ethanol anion exchange membrane fuel cell, DE(AEM)FC using the best performing Au covered Pt electrode (23% Pt) compared to the monometallic Pt catalyst.

  3. Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles obtained by nanosecond laser irradiation of gold and platinum bulk targets in an ethylene glycol solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Samira; Reza Hantehzadeh, Mohammad; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Asadi Asadabad, Mohsen

    2017-07-01

    Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions ( Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 were obtained using the nanosecond laser ablation of gold and platinum bulk targets in ethylene glycol, followed by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Pt nanocolloids, for the first time. UV-vis absorption spectra of NPs showed that by increasing the Au content in the Au-Pt NPs, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak red-shifted, from 260 to 573nm in a nonlinear way. In addition, the mean crystalline size, crystal structure, d-spacing, and lattice parameters of NPs were estimated from the XRD spectra. Microscopy studies revealed the most NPs have a spherical or near-spherical shape, and the average sizes of Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 NPs were calculated to be 12.50, 14.15, 18.53, 19.29, and 26.38nm, respectively. Also, the chemical identity of the molecules adhering to the NPs surface was considered by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. Among different synthesis methods, the demonstrated technique allows easy synthesis of alloy NPs in aqueous media at room temperature with no formation of by-products.

  4. Experimental partitioning of Zr, Ti, and Nb between silicate liquid and a complex noble metal alloy and the partitioning of Ti between perovskite and platinum metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurewicz, Stephen R.; Jones, John H.

    1993-01-01

    El Goresy et al.'s observation of Nb, Zr, and Ta in refractory platinum metal nuggets (RPMN's) from Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) in the Allende meteorite led them to propose that these lithophile elements alloyed in the metallic state with noble metals in the early solar nebula. However, Grossman pointed out that the thermodynamic stability of Zr in the oxide phase is vastly greater than metallic Zr at estimated solar nebula conditions. Jones and Burnett suggested this discrepancy may be explained by the very non-ideal behavior of some lithophile transition elements in noble metal solutions and/or intermetallic compounds. Subsequently, Fegley and Kornacki used thermodynamic data taken from the literature to predict the stability of several of these intermetallic compounds at estimated solar nebula conditions. Palme and Schmitt and Treiman et al. conducted experiments to quantify the partitioning behavior of certain lithophile elements between silicate liquid and Pt-metal. Although their results were somewhat variable, they did suggest that Zr partition coefficients were too small to explain the observed 'percent' levels in some RPMN's. Palme and Schmitt also observed large partition coefficients for Nb and Ta. No intermetallic phases were identified. Following the work of Treiman et al., Jurewicz and Jones performed experiments to examine Zr, Nb, and Ti partitioning near solar nebula conditions. Their results showed that Zr, Nb, and Ti all have an affinity for the platinum metal, with Nb and Ti having a very strong preference for the metal. The intermetallic phases (Zr,Fe)Pt3, (Nb,Fe)Pt3, and (Ti,Fe)Pt3 were identified. Curiously, although both experiments and calculations indicate that Ti should partition strongly into Pt-metal (possibly as TiPt3), no Ti has ever been observed in any RPMN's. Fegley and Kornacki also noticed this discrepancy and hypothesized that the Ti was stabilized in perovskite which is a common phase in Allende CAI's.

  5. Synthesis of hollow and nanoporous gold/platinum alloy nanoparticles and their electrocatalytic activity for formic acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doori; Jang, Ho Young; Hong, Soonchang; Park, Sungho

    2012-12-15

    In this work, hollow Au/Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with porous surfaces were synthesized in a two-step procedure. In the first step, tri-component Ag/Au/Pt alloy NPs were synthesized through the galvanic replacement reaction between Ag NPs and aqueous solutions containing a mixture of HAuCl(4) and H(2)PtCl(4). In the second step, the Ag component was selectively dealloyed with nitric acid (HNO(3)), resulting in hollow di-component Au/Pt alloy NPs with a porous surface morphology. The atomic ratio of Au to Pt in the NPs was easily tunable by controlling the molar ratio of the precursor solution (HAuCl(4) and H(2)PtCl(6)). Hollow, porous Au/Pt alloy NPs showed enhanced catalytic activity toward formic acid electrooxidation compared to the analogous pure Pt NPs. This improved activity can be attributable to the suppression of CO poisoning via the "ensemble" effect. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium alloy with enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Si, Conghui; Gao, Yulai; Frenzel, Jan; Sun, Junzhe; Eggeler, Gunther; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    Multi-component nanoporous platinum-ruthenium-copper-osmium-iridium (np-PtRuCuOsIr) electrocatalyst has been facilely fabricated by chemical dealloying of mechanically alloyed AlCuPtRuOsIr precursor. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst exhibits a typical three-dimensional bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of ∼2.5 nm. The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst reaches a higher level in the mass activity (857.5 mA mgPt-1) and specific activity (3.0 mA cm-2) towards methanol oxidation compared to the commercial PtC catalyst (229.5 mA mgPt-1 and 0.5 mA cm-2 respectively). Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.54 V (vs. SCE), 130 mV negative shift in comparison with the commercial PtC (0.67 V vs. SCE). The half-wave potential of np-PtRuCuOsIr is 0.900 V vs. RHE, 36 mV positive compared with that of the commercial PtC (0.864 V vs. RHE). The np-PtRuCuOsIr catalyst also shows 1.8 and 3.8 times enhancement in the mass and specific activity towards oxygen reduction than the commercial PtC. Moreover, the np-PtRuCuOsIr alloy exhibits superior oxygen reduction activities even after 15 K cycles, indicating its excellent long-term stability. The present np-PtRuCuOsIr can act as a promising candidate for the electrocatalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  7. Intense pulsed light induced platinum-gold alloy formation on carbon nanotubes for non-enzymatic glucose detection.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jongeun; Kim, Kyunghyun; Kim, Hak-Sung; Hahn, H Thomas; Lashmore, David

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrated a novel method for the formation of alloy nano-islands on carbon nanotube (CNT). The two metal layers (Pt, Au) were sputtered on CNTs and the intense pulsed light (IPL) was irradiated on the metal layers. The absorbed light provides enough energy for the diffusion mixing between Pt and Au, forming Pt-Au alloy phase. While the alloy is being formed by the IPL irradiation, the metal layers are broken into nano-islands on CNT due to the surface energy minimization between the metal layers and CNT. The surface characterizations of the Pt-Au/CNT were performed with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Different compositions of alloy nanoparticles were obtained by adjusting the deposition thicknesses of Pt and Au on CNT. Pt50Au50/CNT electrode showed the highest glucose oxidation current peak among Pt, Pt70Au30, Pt50Au50, Pt30Au70, and Au/CNT electrodes while the electroactive surface areas of them are kept to be similar (average surface area=7.00 cm2, coefficient of variation=0.06). The amperometric response of Pt50Au50/CNT electrode to the glucose concentrations showed a wide linear range up to 24.44 mM with a high detection sensitivity of 10.71 μA mM(-1) cm(-2). Reproducibility and long-term stability of the Pt-Au/CNT electrode were also proven in the experiments.

  8. Gold-tip electrodes--a new "deep lesion" technology for catheter ablation? In vitro comparison of a gold alloy versus platinum-iridium tip electrode ablation catheter.

    PubMed

    Lewalter, Thorsten; Bitzen, Alexander; Wurtz, Sabine; Blum, Robert; Schlodder, Karsten; Yang, Alexander; Lickfett, Lars; Schwab, Jörg O; Schrickel, Jan W; Tiemann, Klaus; Linhart, Markus; Zima, Endre; Merkely, Bela; Lüderitz, Berndt

    2005-07-01

    Gold-tip electrodes. Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation is widely used to induce focal myocardial necrosis using the effect of resistive heating through high-frequency current delivery. It is current standard to limit the target tissue-electrode interface temperature to a maximum of 60-70 degrees C to avoid char formation. Gold (Au) exhibits a thermal conductivity of nearly four times greater than platinum (Pt-Ir) (3.17 W/cm Kelvin vs 0.716 W/cm Kelvin), it was therefore hypothesized that RF ablation using a gold electrode would create broader and deeper lesions as a result of a better heat conduction from the tissue-electrode interface and additional cooling of the gold electrode by "heat loss" to the intracardiac blood. Both mechanisms would allow applying more RF power to the tissue before the electrode-tissue interface temperature limit is reached. To test this hypothesis, we performed in vitro isolated liver and pig heart investigations comparing lesion depths of a new Au-alloy-tip electrode to standard Pt-Ir electrode material. Mean lesion depth in liver tissue for Pt-Ir was 4.33+/-0.45 mm (n=60) whereas Au electrode was able to achieve significantly deeper lesions (5.86+/-0.37 mm [n=60; P<0.001]). The mean power delivered using Pt-Ir was 6.95+/-2.41 W whereas Au tip electrode delivered 9.64+/-3.78 W indicating a statistically significant difference (P<0.05). In vitro pig heart tissue Au ablation (n=20) increased significantly the lesion depth (Au: 4.85+/-1.01 mm, Pt-Ir: 2.96+/-0.81 mm, n=20; P<0.001). Au tip electrode again applied significantly more power (P<0.001). Gold-tip electrode catheters were able to induce deeper lesions using RF ablation in vitro as compared to Pt-Ir tip electrode material. In liver and in pig heart tissue, the increase in lesion depth was associated with a significant increase in the average power applied with the gold electrode at the same level of electrode-tissue temperature as compared to platinum material.

  9. Thermal Stability of Platinum-Cobalt Bimetallic Nanoparticles: Chemically Disordered Alloys, Ordered Intermetallics, and Core-Shell Structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zhang, Yang; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2017-04-12

    Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles are promising candidates for Pt-based nanocatalysts and magnetic-storage materials. By using molecular dynamics simulations, we here present a detailed examination on the thermal stabilities of Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles with three configurations including chemically disordered alloy, ordered intermetallics, and core-shell structures. It has been revealed that ordered intermetallic nanoparticles possess better structural and thermal stability than disordered alloyed ones for both Pt3Co and PtCo systems, and Pt3Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles exhibit the highest melting points and the best thermal stability among Pt-Co bimetallic nanoparticles, although their meltings all initiate at the surface and evolve inward with increasing temperatures. In contrast, Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles display the worst thermal stability compared with the aforementioned nanoparticles. Furthermore, their melting initiates in the core and extends outward surface, showing a typical two-stage melting mode. The solid-solid phase transition is discovered in Co core before its melting. This work demonstrates the importance of composition distribution to tuning the properties of binary nanoparticles.

  10. A DFT study of oxygen dissociation on platinum based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Paul C; Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Neyman, Konstantin M; Johnston, Roy L

    2014-01-21

    Density functional theory calculations are performed on 38 and 79 metal atom truncated octahedron clusters to study oxygen dissociation as a model for the initial stage of the oxygen reduction reaction. Pure platinum and alloyed platinum-titanium core-shell systems are investigated. It is found that barrierless oxygen dissociation occurs on the (111) facet of the pure platinum clusters. A barrier of ~0.3 eV is observed on the (100) facet. For the alloyed cluster, dissociation barriers are found on both facets, typically ~0.6 eV. The differences between the two systems are attributed to the ability of oxygen to distort the (111) surface of the pure platinum clusters. We show that flexibility of the platinum shell is crucial in promotion of fast oxygen dissociation. However, the titanium core stabilises the platinum shell upon alloying, resulting in a less easily distortable surface. Therefore, whilst an alloyed platinum-titanium electrocatalyst has certain advantages over the pure platinum electrocatalyst, we suggest alloying with a more weakly interacting metal will be beneficial for facilitating oxygen dissociation.

  11. Chemical and Electrochemical Synthesis of Platinum Black.

    PubMed

    Stanca, S E; Hänschke, F; Ihring, A; Zieger, G; Dellith, J; Kessler, E; Meyer, H-G

    2017-04-21

    We present electrochemical and chemical synthesis of platinum black at room temperature in aqueous and non-aqueous media. X-ray analysis established the purity and crystalline nature. The electron micrographs indicate that the nanostructures consist of platinum crystals that interconnect to form porous assemblies. Additionally, the electron micrographs of the platinum black thin layer, which was electrochemically deposited on different metallic and semiconductive substrates (aluminium, platinum, silver, gold, tin-cooper alloy, indium-tin-oxide, stainless steel, and copper), indicate that the substrate influences its porous features but not its absorbance characteristics. The platinum black exhibited a broad absorbance and low reflectance in the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared regions. These characteristics make this material suitable for use as a high-temperature resistant absorber layer for the fabrication of microelectronics.

  12. Facile synthesis of platinum-gold alloyed string-bead nanochain networks with the assistance of allantoin and their enhanced electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li-Li; Zheng, Jie-Ning; Song, Pei; Zhong, Shu-Xian; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Zhaojiang; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2015-02-01

    In this work, a facile one-pot wet-chemical method is developed for preparation of bimetallic platinum-gold (Pt-Au) alloyed string-bead nanochain networks, using allantoin as a structure-directing agent, without any template, surfactant, or seed. The characterization experiments are mainly performed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The as-prepared Pt-Au nanocrystals show enhanced electrocatalytic performance toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mainly predominated by a four-electron pathway, and display improved catalytic activity and high stability for methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) over commercial Pt black and Pt-Ru black.

  13. Electrocatalysts having platium monolayers on palladium, palladium alloy, and gold alloy core-shell nanoparticles, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-12-21

    The invention relates to platinum-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of a noble metal or metal alloy core at least partially encapsulated by an atomically thin surface layer of platinum atoms. The invention particularly relates to such particles having a palladium, palladium alloy, gold alloy, or rhenium alloy core encapsulated by an atomic monolayer of platinum. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  14. Controlled synthesis of porous platinum nanostructures for catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanqin; Zhang, Junwei; Yang, Yong; Huang, Zhengren; Long, Nguyen Viet; Nogami, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Porous platinum, that has outstanding catalytic and electrical properties and superior resistant characteristics to corrosion, has been widely applied in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronic, and automotive industries. As the catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the size, shape and structure of nanomaterials, the strategies for controlling these factors of platinum nanomaterials to get excellent catalytic properties are discussed. Here, recent advances in the design and preparation of various porous platinum nanostructures are reviewed, including wet-chemical synthesis, electro-deposition, galvanic replacement reaction and de-alloying technology. The applications of various platinum nanostructures are also discussed, especially in fuel cells.

  15. Nanoporous PdZr surface alloy as highly active non-platinum electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction with unique structure stability and methanol-tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Huimei; Xu, Caixia

    2016-06-01

    Nanoporous (NP) PdZr alloy with controllable bimetallic ratio is successfully fabricated by a simple dealloying method. By leaching out the more reactive Al from PdZrAl precursor alloy, NP-PdZr alloy with smaller ligament size was generated, characterized by the nanoscaled interconnected network skeleton and hollow channels extending in all three dimensions. Upon voltammetric scan in acid solution, the dissolution of surface Zr atoms generates the highly active Pd-Zr surface alloy with a nearly pure Pd surface and Pd-Zr alloy core. The NP-Pd80Zr20 surface alloy exhibits markedly enhanced specific and mass activities as well as higher catalytic stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared with NP-Pd and the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts. In addition, the NP-Pd80Zr20 surface alloy shows a better selectivity for ORR than methanol in the 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.1 M methanol mixed solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations both demonstrate that the weakened Pd-O bond and improved ORR performances in turn depend on the downshifted d-band center of Pd due to the alloying Pd with Zr (20 at.%). The as-made NP-PdZr alloy holds prospective applications as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel-cell-related technologies with the advantages of superior overall ORR performances, unique structure stability, and easy preparation.

  16. Platinum adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles, method for preparing, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Tong, YuYe; Du, Bingchen

    2015-08-11

    A superior, industrially scalable one-pot ethylene glycol-based wet chemistry method to prepare platinum-adlayered ruthenium nanoparticles has been developed that offers an exquisite control of the platinum packing density of the adlayers and effectively prevents sintering of the nanoparticles during the deposition process. The wet chemistry based method for the controlled deposition of submonolayer platinum is advantageous in terms of processing and maximizing the use of platinum and can, in principle, be scaled up straightforwardly to an industrial level. The reactivity of the Pt(31)-Ru sample was about 150% higher than that of the industrial benchmark PtRu (1:1) alloy sample but with 3.5 times less platinum loading. Using the Pt(31)-Ru nanoparticles would lower the electrode material cost compared to using the industrial benchmark alloy nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  17. Three-dimensional hierarchical porous platinum-copper alloy networks with enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Zhang, Zong-Wen; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Porous Pt-Cu alloy networks are synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal process, with ethylene glycol as the reducing agent and the block copolymer Pluronic F127 as structure-directing agent. The structure, porosity and surface chemical state of as-prepared Pt-Cu alloy with different composition are characterized. The formation mechanism of the porous structure is investigated by time sequential experiments. The obtained Pt53Cu47 alloy possesses a unique 3D hierarchical porous network structure assembled by interconnected nanodendrites as building blocks. Because of the high surface area, concave surface topology and open porous structure, the Pt53Cu47 alloy catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation in comparison with commercial Pt black and the Pt73Cu27 alloy synthesized following the same process as Pt53Cu47.

  18. Enhanced methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction performance of ultrafine nanoporous platinum-copper alloy: Experiment and density functional theory calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junzhe; Shi, Jun; Xu, Junling; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peng, Zhangquan

    2015-04-01

    Novel ultrafine nanoporous Pt-Cu alloy with a Pt:Cu stoichiometric ratio of 3:1 (np-Pt3Cu) has been prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent two-step chemical dealloying. The obtained np-Pt3Cu has uniform and bicontinuous ligament(metal)-channel(void) structure with the ligament size of 3.3 ± 0.7 nm. To explore its potential application in energy conversion reactions, the np-Pt3Cu alloy has been examined as electrocatalyst for the operating reactions in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Compared with the commercial JM Pt/C, a benchmark catalyst extensively used in fuel cell research, the np-Pt3Cu alloy demonstrates better performance in both the methanol electro-oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions in acidic medium. Theoretical calculations reveal that the electronic structure of Pt has been modified with the shift of Pt d-band center due to alloying with Cu, which can decrease CO poisoning and enhance the methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reaction activities.

  19. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  20. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  1. Platinum-nickel alloy excavated nano-multipods with hexagonal close-packed structure and superior activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenming; Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Huiqi; Jiang, Yaqi; Shen, Shouyu; Fu, Gang; Lu, Bang-an; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2017-01-01

    Crystal phase regulations may endow materials with enhanced or new functionalities. However, syntheses of noble metal-based allomorphic nanomaterials are extremely difficult, and only a few successful examples have been found. Herein, we report the discovery of hexagonal close-packed Pt–Ni alloy, despite the fact that Pt–Ni alloys are typically crystallized in face-centred cubic structures. The hexagonal close-packed Pt–Ni alloy nano-multipods are synthesized via a facile one-pot solvothermal route, where the branches of nano-multipods take the shape of excavated hexagonal prisms assembled by six nanosheets of 2.5 nm thickness. The hexagonal close-packed Pt–Ni excavated nano-multipods exhibit superior catalytic property towards the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline electrolyte. The overpotential is only 65 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode at a current density of 10 mA cm−2, and the mass current density reaches 3.03 mA μgPt−1 at −70 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode, which outperforms currently reported catalysts to the best of our knowledge. PMID:28436494

  2. Platinum-nickel alloy excavated nano-multipods with hexagonal close-packed structure and superior activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhenming; Chen, Qiaoli; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Huiqi; Jiang, Yaqi; Shen, Shouyu; Fu, Gang; Lu, Bang-An; Xie, Zhaoxiong; Zheng, Lansun

    2017-04-01

    Crystal phase regulations may endow materials with enhanced or new functionalities. However, syntheses of noble metal-based allomorphic nanomaterials are extremely difficult, and only a few successful examples have been found. Herein, we report the discovery of hexagonal close-packed Pt-Ni alloy, despite the fact that Pt-Ni alloys are typically crystallized in face-centred cubic structures. The hexagonal close-packed Pt-Ni alloy nano-multipods are synthesized via a facile one-pot solvothermal route, where the branches of nano-multipods take the shape of excavated hexagonal prisms assembled by six nanosheets of 2.5 nm thickness. The hexagonal close-packed Pt-Ni excavated nano-multipods exhibit superior catalytic property towards the hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline electrolyte. The overpotential is only 65 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode at a current density of 10 mA cm-2, and the mass current density reaches 3.03 mA μgPt-1 at -70 mV versus reversible hydrogen electrode, which outperforms currently reported catalysts to the best of our knowledge.

  3. Method for producing electricity using a platinum-ruthenium-palladium catalyst in a fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2004-01-27

    A method for producing electricity using a fuel cell that utilizes a ternary alloy composition as a fuel cell catalyst, the ternary alloy composition containing platinum, ruthenium and palladium. The alloy shows increased activity as compared to well-known catalysts.

  4. Mechanisms of Oxidase and Superoxide Dismutation-like Activities of Gold, Silver, Platinum, and Palladium, and Their Alloys: A General Way to the Activation of Molecular Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiaomei; Liu, Wenqi; Gao, Xuejiao; Lu, Zhanghui; Wu, Xiaochun; Gao, Xingfa

    2015-12-23

    Metal and alloy nanomaterials have intriguing oxidase- and superoxide dismutation-like (SOD-like) activities. However, origins of these activities remain to be studied. Using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigate mechanisms of oxidase- and SOD-like properties for metals Au, Ag, Pd and Pt and alloys Au4-xMx (x = 1, 2, 3; M = Ag, Pd, Pt). We find that the simple reaction-dissociation of O2-supported on metal surfaces can profoundly account for the oxidase-like activities of the metals. The activation (Eact) and reaction energies (Er) calculated by DFT can be used to effectively predict the activity. As verification, the calculated activity orders for series of metal and alloy nanomaterials are in excellent agreement with those obtained by experiments. Briefly, the activity is critically dependent on two factors, metal compositions and exposed facets. On the basis of these results, an energy-based model is proposed to account for the activation of molecular oxygen. As for SOD-like activities, the mechanisms mainly consist of protonation of O2(•-) and adsorption and rearrangement of HO2(•) on metal surfaces. Our results provide atomistic-level insights into the oxidase- and SOD-like activities of metals and pave a way to the rational design of mimetic enzymes based on metal nanomaterials. Especially, the O2 dissociative adsorption mechanism will serve as a general way to the activation of molecular oxygen by nanosurfaces and help understand the catalytic role of nanomaterials as pro-oxidants and antioxidants.

  5. Growing Platinum-Ruthenium-Tin ternary alloy nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide for strong ligand effect toward enhanced ethanol oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qing Qing; Zhang, Lian Ying; Zhao, Zhi Liang; Li, Chang Ming

    2017-11-15

    Uniform Pt1Ru0.5Sn0.5 ternary alloy nanoparticles are in situ deposited on reduced graphene oxide (Pt1Ru0.5Sn0.5-RGO) through its functional groups and defects as nucleation sites to greatly electrocatalyze ethanol oxidation reaction for much higher mass current densities, larger apparent specific current densities and better stability than commercial Pt-C catalyst (Pt-C(commer)). Mechanistic studies indicate that the excellent electrocatalytic activity and anti-poisoning are resulted from a strong ligand effect of the ternary alloy components, in which the charge transfer is boosted while decreasing the density of states close to the Fermi level of Pt to reduce bond energy between Pt and CO-like adsorbates for greatly improved anti-poisoning ability. This work holds a great promise to fabricate a high performance anode catalyst with a low Pt loading for direct ethanol fuel cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Corrosion-resistant iridium-platinum anode material for high polarization application in corrosive acids

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.

    1993-09-08

    The present invention relates to highly corrosion resistant components for use in an electrochemical cell. Specifically, these components are resistant to corrosion under very extreme conditions such as exposure to aqua regia in the presence of a constant current density of 100mA/m{sup 2}. The components are comprised of an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy comprises 15-20% iridium. In another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the iridium-platinum alloy is deposited on the surface of an electrochemical cell component by magnetron sputtering. The present invention also relates to a method for conducting an electrochemical reaction in the presence of highly corrosive acids under a high degree of polarization wherein the electrochemical cell comprises a component, preferably the anode, containing an iridium-platinum alloy that comprises less than 30% iridium.

  7. Oligonucleotide-assisted successive coreduction synthesis of dendritic platinum-gold core-shell alloy nanocrystals with improved electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Li-Xian; Liu, Lei; Feng, Jiu-Ju; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Ai-Jun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, well-defined dendritic Pt-Au core-shell alloy nanocrystals (Pt-Au CSANCs) are synthesized on a large scale via a simple one-pot oligonucleotide-assisted successive coreduction route. The atomic ratios of Pt to Au in the core and shell of Pt-Au CSANCs are 4:1 and 2:3, respectively. Polyinosinic acid (PIA), a commercially available oligonucleotide, is employed as a capping agent. Control experiments demonstrate that the dosage of PIA and the successive coreduction are essential to form dendritic Pt-Au CSANCs. The as-synthesized architectures show enhanced electrocatalytic activity and improved stability for methanol oxidation in alkaline media by comparison with PtAu nanocrystals and commercial Pt black catalysts.

  8. Electrocatalysts having gold monolayers on platinum nanoparticle cores, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to gold-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of an electrocatalytically active core at least partially encapsulated by an outer shell of gold or gold alloy. The invention more particularly relates to such particles having a noble metal-containing core, and more particularly, a platinum or platinum alloy core. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  9. Synthesis of platinum nanowheels using a bicellar template.

    PubMed

    Song, Yujiang; Dorin, Rachel M; Garcia, Robert M; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Wang, Haorong; Li, Peng; Qiu, Yan; van Swol, Frank; Miller, James E; Shelnutt, John A

    2008-09-24

    Disk-like surfactant bicelles provide a unique meso-structured reaction environment for templating the wet-chemical reduction of platinum(II) salt by ascorbic acid to produce platinum nanowheels. The Pt wheels are 496 +/-55 nm in diameter and possess thickened centers and radial dendritic nanosheets (about 2-nm in thickness) culminating in flared dendritic rims. The structural features of the platinum wheels arise from confined growth of platinum within the bilayer that is also limited at edges of the bicelles. The size of CTAB/FC7 bicelles is observed to evolve with the addition of Pt(II) complex and ascorbic acid. Synthetic control is demonstrated by varying the reaction parameters including metal salt concentration, temperature, and total surfactant concentration. This study opens up opportunities for the use of other inhomogeneous soft templates for synthesizing metals, metal alloys, and possibly semiconductors with complex nanostructures.

  10. Elastic-like deformation and elastocaloric effect of a partly ordered iron-platinum alloy exhibiting a weak first-order martensitic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the temperature dependencies of elastic-like deformation and the elastocaloric effect in an L12-type Fe3Pt alloy with degree of order S  =  0.75, which exhibits a weak first-order martensitic transformation (MT) near 85 K (T M). The stress–strain curve under a compressive stress applied in the [0 0 1] direction shows a small stage in the vicinity of T M due to the stress-induced MT. The transformation strain is 0.17% at T M; it decreases linearly as temperature decreases and disappears at 130 K. Thereseems to be a critical point of the MT in the stress–temperature phase diagram at (20 MPa, 130 K). The latent heat of the MT is estimated to be 0.52 J mol‑1 from the Clausius–Clapeyron equation. The adiabatic temperature change ΔT adi caused by the latent heat is 0.04 K at 90 K. In contrast, experimentally obtained ΔT is approximately 1 K at 90 K when the applied stress is 100 MPa. The main contribution to ΔT is the temperature dependence of elastic strain caused by softening; the Young’s modulus at 288 K is 55 GPa and it decreases linearly with a slope of 0.28 GPa K‑1 as temperature decreases.

  11. Enhancement of Platinum Cathode Catalysis by Addition of Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duong, Hung Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) contributes significantly to the loss of cathode overpotential in fuel cells, thus requiring high loadings of platinum (Pt), which is an expensive metal with limited supply. However, Pt and Pt-based alloys are still the best available electrocatalysts for ORR thus far. The research presented…

  12. Enhancement of Platinum Cathode Catalysis by Addition of Transition Metals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duong, Hung Tuan

    2009-01-01

    The sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) contributes significantly to the loss of cathode overpotential in fuel cells, thus requiring high loadings of platinum (Pt), which is an expensive metal with limited supply. However, Pt and Pt-based alloys are still the best available electrocatalysts for ORR thus far. The research presented…

  13. Improving Platinum Efficiency:. Nanoformulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Rolando; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-09-01

    Platinum-based drugs continue being the support of therapy for many different kinds of cancer. Cancer patients often present irreversible resistance to platinum after repeated treatment in clinic. Despite of the great efforts, chemoresistance (intrinsic or acquired) already is a major limitation in the management of this disease. In this review, the last current research on cancer characteristic and cancer chemical resistance is summarized, the major and novel strategies to reverse resistance to platinum- based drugs are discussed and this article mainly emphasizes the contribution of nanotechnology and combination therapies to target sites and reduce the cancer chemoresistance.

  14. Electronic metal-support interaction enhanced oxygen reduction activity and stability of boron carbide supported platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Colleen; Smith, Graham T.; Inwood, David W.; Leach, Andrew S.; Whalley, Penny S.; Callisti, Mauro; Polcar, Tomas; Russell, Andrea E.; Levecque, Pieter; Kramer, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Catalysing the reduction of oxygen in acidic media is a standing challenge. Although activity of platinum, the most active metal, can be substantially improved by alloying, alloy stability remains a concern. Here we report that platinum nanoparticles supported on graphite-rich boron carbide show a 50-100% increase in activity in acidic media and improved cycle stability compared to commercial carbon supported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray absorption fine structure analysis confirm similar platinum nanoparticle shapes, sizes, lattice parameters, and cluster packing on both supports, while x-ray photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy demonstrate a change in electronic structure. This shows that purely electronic metal-support interactions can significantly improve oxygen reduction activity without inducing shape, alloying or strain effects and without compromising stability. Optimizing the electronic interaction between the catalyst and support is, therefore, a promising approach for advanced electrocatalysts where optimizing the catalytic nanoparticles themselves is constrained by other concerns.

  15. Platinum hypersensitivity and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shingo; Okada, Rika; Ando, Kazumichi

    2015-09-01

    Platinum agents are drugs used for various types of cancer. With increased frequency of administration of platinum agents, hypersensitivity reactions appear more frequently, occurring in over 25% of cases from the seventh cycle or second line onward. It then becomes difficult to conduct treatment using these agents. Various approaches have been investigated to address hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents. Desensitization, which gradually increases the concentration of the anticancer drug considered to be the antigen until the target dosage, has been reported as being particularly effective, with a success rate of 80-100%. The aims of this paper are to present the current findings regarding hypersensitivity reactions to platinum agents and to discuss attempts of using desensitization against hypersensitivity reactions worldwide. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Antidepressants and platinum drugs.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Brigitte J; Ryan, John J; Farrell, Nicholas P

    2014-01-01

    Antidepressants are frequently prescribed concurrently with anti-cancer drugs and may have synergistic, additive or antagonistic effects. The present work investigated the effect of antidepressants on the cytotoxicity of platinum agents cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The cytotoxicity of platinum drugs alone or in combination with antidepressants was measured in HCT116 wild-type (wt), HCT116 (p53 -/-), HT-29, SKOV3 and A2780 cells using an apoptosis-based assay. The effect of antidepressants on platinum cytotoxicity is both cell type- and drug dependent. Mostly additive effects were observed. Desipramine and fluoxetine caused the greatest effects, with cisplatin in general being most sensitive to their presence. There is little effect of p53 status on the drug-drug interaction while the calmodulin inhibitor W7 augmented cisplatin cytotoxicity relative to carboplatin and oxaliplatin. The drug-drug interaction between antidepressants and platinum anti-cancer agents requires detailed evaluation for optimization of patient care.

  17. Platinum group element mineralization of the Svetly Bor and Veresovy Bor clinopyroxenite-dunite massifs, Middle Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S. Yu.; Malitch, K. N.; Kozlov, A. V.; Badanina, I. Yu; Antonov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    The new data for the geology and mineralogy of the platinum group element (PGE) mineralization related to the chromite-platinum ore zones within the dunite of the Svetly Bor and Veresovy Bor massifs in the Middle Urals are discussed. The geological setting of the chromite-platinum ore zones, their platinum content, compositional and morphological features of the platinum group minerals (PGM) are compared to those within the Nizhny Tagil massif, the world standard of the zonal complexes in the Platinum Ural belt. The chromite-platinum orebodies are spatially related to the contacts between differently granular dunites. Majority of PGM are formed by Pt-Fe alloys that are close in terms of stoichiometry to isoferroplatinum (Pt3Fe), and associated with Os-Ir alloys, Ru-Os and Ir-Rh sulfides, and Ir-Rh thiospinels of the cuproiridsite-cuprorhodsite-ferrorhodsite solid solution. The tetraferroplatinum (PtFe)-tulameenite (PtFe0.5Cu0.5) solid solution and Pt-Cu alloys belong to the later PGM assemblage. The established features of the chromite-platinum ore zones testify to the highly probable identification of the PGE mineralization within the dunite of the Svetly Bor and Vesesovy Bor massifs and could be used in prospecting and exploration for platinum.

  18. Alloy hardening and softening in binary molybdenum alloys as related to electron concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of hafnium, tantalum, tungsten, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum on hardness of molybdenum. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary molybdenum alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to molybdenum, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons that molybdenum failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and alloy hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and molybdenum.

  19. Electrochemical oxygen reduction behavior of selectively deposited platinum atoms on gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, A; Kerr, J B; Cairns, E J

    2013-07-22

    Carbon-supported Pt@Au "core-shell" nanoparticles with varying surface concentration of platinum atoms have been synthesized using a novel redox-mediated synthesis approach. The synthesis technique allows for a selective deposition of platinum atoms on the surface of prefabricated gold nanoparticles. Energy dispersive spectroscopic analyses in a scanning electron microscope reveal that the platinum to gold atomic ratios are close to the nominal values, validating the synthesis scheme. X-ray diffraction data indicate an un-alloyed structure. The platinum to gold surface atomic ratio determined from cyclic voltammetry and copper under-potential deposition experiments reveal good agreement with the calculated values at low platinum concentration. However, there is an increase in non-uniformity in the deposition process upon increasing the platinum concentration. Koutecky-Levich analysis of the samples indicates a transition of the total number of electrons transferred (n) in the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction from two to four electrons upon increasing the surface concentration of platinum atoms. Furthermore, the data indicate that isolated platinum atoms can reduce molecular oxygen but via a two-electron route. Moreover, successful four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen requires clusters of platinum atoms. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Biomineralization of platinum by microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, L. M.; Radomskaya, V. I.; Shumilova, L. P.; Ionov, A. M.; Sorokin, P.

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of platinum biomineralization by microscopic fungi is displayed based on data of electron microscopy, infrared and X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy. It was suggested the platinum sorption process by microscopic fungi has some stages. The initial interaction is carried out by the mechanisms of physical and chemical sorption. Hereafter the reduction process of adsorbed platinum ions up to zero state is performed, probably, for account of organic compounds, which are produced by fungi biomass as metabolism result, and the process terminates by nulvalent particles aggregating up to nanosize forms. Obtained data on the platinum biomineralization extends the concept concerning the character of forming platinum nanoparticles in carbonous paleobasin.

  1. Cubic colloidal platinum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmadi, T.S.; Wang, Z.L.; Henglein, A.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Cubic platinum nanoparticles (4-18 nm) have been synthesized for the first time in solution by the controlled reduction of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} with hydrogen gas in the presence of sodium polyacrylate as a capping material. The nanoparticles are found to have fcc structures, similar to the bulk metal with (100) facets.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3060 - Noble metal alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Noble metal alloy. 872.3060 Section 872.3060 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3060 Noble metal alloy. (a) Identification. A noble metal alloy is a device composed primarily of noble metals, such as gold, palladium, platinum, or silver,...

  7. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  8. Coulometric Study of Ethanol Adsorption at a Polycrystalline Platinum Electrode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    value of the ratio Ian/Icalc: 1. The minimal ratio would be 1, corresponding to a one- electron oxidation of one-site attached CH3CH2O surface...Coulometric Study of Ethanol Adsorption at a Polycrystalline Platinum Electrode Sol Gilman Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL...noble metals and noble metal alloys that can provide what amounts to an adsorbed oxygen “valve” for initiating adsorption/reaction on a clean and

  9. Platinum in Earth surface environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, F.; Campbell, S. G.; Ball, A. S.; Pring, A.; Southam, G.

    2014-04-01

    Platinum (Pt) is a rare precious metal that is a strategic commodity for industries in many countries. The demand for Pt has more than doubled in the last 30 years due to its role in the catalytic conversion of CO, hydrocarbons and NOx in modern automobiles. To explore for new Pt deposits, process ores and deal with ecotoxicological effects of Pt mining and usage, the fundamental processes and pathways of Pt dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments need to be understood. Hence, the aim of this review is to develop a synergistic model for the cycling of Pt in Earth surface environments. This is achieved by integrating the geological/(biogeo)chemical literature, which focuses on naturally occurring Pt mobility around ore deposits, with the environmental/ecotoxicological literature dealing with anthropogenic Pt dispersion. In Pt deposits, Pt occurs as sulfide-, telluride- and arsenide, native metal and alloyed to other PGEs and iron (Fe). Increased mining and utilization of Pt combined with the burning of fossil fuels have led to the dispersion of Pt-containing nano- and micro-particles. Hence, soils and sediments in industrialized areas, urban environments and along major roads are now commonly Pt enriched. Platinum minerals, nuggets and anthropogenic particles are transformed by physical and (bio)geochemical processes. Complexation of Pt ions with chloride, thiosulfate, ammonium, cyanide, low- and high molecular weight organic acids (LMWOAs and HMWOAs) and siderophores can facilitate Pt mobilization. Iron-oxides, clays, organic matter and (micro)biota are known to sequester Pt-complexes and -particles. Microbes and plants are capable of bioaccumulating and reductively precipitating mobile Pt complexes. Bioaccumulation can lead to toxic effects on plants and animals, including humans. (Bio)mineralization in organic matter-rich sediments can lead to the formation of secondary Pt particles and -grains. Ultimately, Pt is enriched in oceanic sediments

  10. Porous platinum-based catalysts for oxygen reduction

    DOEpatents

    Erlebacher, Jonah D; Snyder, Joshua D

    2014-11-25

    A porous metal that comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A fuel cell includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and an electrolyte arranged between the first and the second electrodes. At least one of the first and second electrodes is coated with a porous metal catalyst for oxygen reduction, and the porous metal catalyst comprises platinum and has a specific surface area that is greater than 5 m.sup.2/g and less than 75 m.sup.2/g. A method of producing a porous metal according to an embodiment of the current invention includes producing an alloy consisting essentially of platinum and nickel according to the formula Pt.sub.xNi.sub.1-x, where x is at least 0.01 and less than 0.3; and dealloying the alloy in a substantially pH neutral solution to reduce an amount of nickel in the alloy to produce the porous metal.

  11. Growth of platinum nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Movie showing the growth of platinum nanocrystals in a liquid cell observed in situ using the JEOL 3010 TEM at the National Center for Electron Microscopy. This is the first ever-real time movie showing nucleation and growth by monomer attachment or by smaller nanocrystals coalescing to form larger nanocrystals. All the nanocrystals end up being roughly the same shape and size. http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/08/04/growth-spurts/

  12. Platinum nitride with fluorite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Rong; Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2005-01-31

    The mechanical stability of platinum nitride has been studied using first-principles calculations. By calculating the single-crystal elastic constants, we show that platinum nitride can be stabilized in the fluorite structure, in which the nitrogen atoms occupy all the tetrahedral interstitial sites of the metal lattice. The stability is attributed to the pseudogap effect from analysis of the electronic structure.

  13. Platinum in phosphate laser glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Click, Carol Ann

    The platinum concentration in phosphate laser glasses has been characterized as a function of composition, melting time and temperature. The highest measured ionic platinum concentration is 2042 ppmw in a potassium-alumino-metaphosphate glass after 24 hours of melting at 900°C. The maximum platinum concentration in a given composition decreases with increasing temperature. The time, temperature and composition dependent platinum concentration in the melt depends on the relative rates of the platinum dissolution from the crucible wall into and platinum oxide volatilization out of the glass melt. As such, the platinum concentration in the melt can be seen to decrease with increasing time under some conditions. The local environment of the ionic platinum in these glasses has been investigated using optical spectroscopy. The ionic platinum is incorporated as Pt4+ ions in a distorted octahedral symmetry. This platinum is characterized by optical absorption occurring at wavelengths less than 500nm (energy > 20,000 cm-1) due to d-d electronic transitions. The addition of chlorine to the system results in an electronic transition shift to greater wavelengths in barium free glasses, which indicates that the chlorine is coordinating to the platinum in the barium free glasses. The effect of platinum on the Nd3+ 4F 3/2 → 4I11/2 fluorescence decay rate in a commercial laser glass has been investigated, and the effect is negligible. However, the effects of hydroxyl concentration and Nd2O3 concentration on the fluorescence decay rate are substantial and have been investigated in potassium-magnesium-aluminometaphosphate glasses with Nd 2O3 contents ranging from 0.5 to 8.0 weight%. The hydroxyl concentration ranged from ˜3 to 43 cm-1 at 3.33 mum, corresponding to hydroxyl concentrations of ˜300 to 4300 ppm. The fluorescence quenching rate of the Nd3+ ions by hydroxyls increases linearly with Nd atomic concentration, and when extrapolated to zero Nd concentration, has a value

  14. Understanding platinum-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Langer, Thorsten; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antoinette; Radtke, Susanne; Meitert, Johannes; Zolk, Oliver

    2013-08-01

    Childhood cancer survival rates are now nearly 80% in more developed European countries because of improved therapies and better supportive care. Platinum chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and carboplatin, are the cornerstone of many effective therapeutic protocols for childhood cancer. However, the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin and carboplatin comes at the cost of ototoxicity, which affects at least 60% of pediatric patients. Although ototoxicity is not life threatening, it can have debilitating effects on patients' quality of life. Recently, many initiatives have been launched with the ultimate goal of reducing cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin ototoxicity without compromising antitumor efficacy. This review addresses the incidence of platinum ototoxicity and its clinical presentation, time course, and early diagnostic evaluation. Genetic and non-genetic risk factors for platinum-associated ototoxicity, and their predictive value, are discussed. Recent developments in the prevention of platinum ototoxicity are also summarized. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Platinum availability for future automotive technologies.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Elisa; Field, Frank R; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2012-12-04

    Platinum is an excellent catalyst, can be used at high temperatures, and is stable in many aggressive chemical environments. Consequently, platinum is used in many current industrial applications, notably automotive catalytic converters, and prospective vehicle fuel cells are expected to rely upon it. Between 2005 and 2010, the automotive industry used approximately 40% of mined platinum. Future automotive industry growth and automotive sales shifts toward new technologies could significantly alter platinum demand. The potential risks for decreased platinum availability are evaluated, using an analysis of platinum market characteristics that describes platinum's geophysical constraints, institutional efficiency, and dynamic responsiveness. Results show that platinum demand for an automotive fleet that meets 450 ppm greenhouse gas stabilization goals would require within 10% of historical growth rates of platinum supply before 2025. However, such a fleet, due largely to sales growth in fuel cell vehicles, will more strongly constrain platinum supply in the 2050 time period. While current platinum reserves are sufficient to satisfy this increased demand, decreasing platinum ore grade and continued concentration of platinum supply in a single geographic area are availability risk factors to platinum end-users.

  16. Investigation of the oxide adhesion and growth characteristics on platinum-modified aluminide coatings. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Farrell, M.S.

    1986-09-01

    The operating environment for superalloy blades and vanes in gas turbine engines has necessitated the developed of alloy coatings to achieve satisfactory resistance of the metal to oxidation and hot corrosion. Aluminide coatings were initially developed to meet this need. Recently it was shown that platinum additions significantly improve the oxidation resistance of these aluminide coatings. The effects of pre-aluminizing surface smoothness and coating structure for both platinum modified and unmodified aluminide coatings on IN-738 in a cyclic oxidation environment at 1100 C were examined. Weight change measurements were used to determine the coating oxide scale adherence characteristics and to quantify the cyclic oxidation behavior of the various coating structures.

  17. Cross-reactivity of Halogenated Platinum Salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halogenated platinum (Pt) salts are well-known respiratory sensitizers associated with the development of asthma. People may be exposed to a variety of platinum compounds in different contexts (e.g. occupationally, automobile exhaust). Published reports suggest that sensitizati...

  18. Cross-reactivity of Halogenated Platinum Salts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Halogenated platinum (Pt) salts are well-known respiratory sensitizers associated with the development of asthma. People may be exposed to a variety of platinum compounds in different contexts (e.g. occupationally, automobile exhaust). Published reports suggest that sensitizati...

  19. Radiation and platinum drug interaction.

    PubMed

    Nias, A H

    1985-09-01

    Platinum drugs have chemical as well as biochemical and biological effects on cells, all of which may interact with radiation effects. They inhibit recovery from sublethal and potentially lethal radiation damage. They produce a pattern of chromosome aberrations analogous to that from alkylating agents. Cellular sensitivity to platinum is increased when glutathione levels are reduced, just as is radiosensitivity. There is a pattern of drug sensitivity throughout the phases of the cell cycle which is different from that for radiosensitivity. The ideal platinum drug-radiation interaction would achieve radiosensitization of hypoxic tumour cells with the use of a dose of drug which is completely non-toxic to normal tissues. Electron-affinic agents are employed with this aim, but the commoner platinum drugs are only weakly electron-affinic. They do have a quasi-alkylating action however, and this DNA targeting may account for the radiosensitizing effect which occurs with both pre- and post-radiation treatments. Because toxic drug dosage is usually required for this, the evidence of the biological responses to the drug and to the radiation, as well as to the combination, requires critical analysis before any claim of true enhancement, rather than simple additivity, can be accepted. The amount of enhancement will vary with both the platinum drug dose and the time interval between drug administration and radiation. Clinical schedules may produce an increase in tumour response and/or morbidity, depending upon such dose and time relationships.

  20. Phosphorus adlayers on Platinum (110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkinen, Olli; Riihimäki, Ari; Sainio, Jani; Lahtinen, Jouko

    2017-10-01

    Platinum is a metal utilized in many applications. Its catalytic activity can be decreased due to chemical poisoning caused e.g. by phosphorus. To gain more understanding of its poisoning, we present a study of phosphorus adsorption on a platinum (110) single crystal surface. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we have found that the adsorbate coverage saturates at around 3 monolayers. Annealing the phosphorus-covered platinum surface at 750 °C gives rise to three different ordered adlayer structures, with symmetries of 2 × 3, 11 × 4 and √{ 2} × 1 , from the lowest to the highest coverage, detected with low-energy electron diffraction. We have studied the sample topography with scanning tunnelling microscopy. We also present a tentative model for the observed structures and their evolution.

  1. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  2. Supergene leaching and formation of platinum in alluvium: evidence from Serro, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, A. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Choquette, M.; Lehmann, B.; Polônia, J. C.

    2007-05-01

    The Córrego Bom Sucesso alluvial deposit near Serro, Minas Gerais, probably provided the specimens from which the element palladium was first discovered. Its Pt-Pd nuggets are characteristically botryoidal, arborescent and coralloidal, and exhibit an external halo with the composition of palladiferous platinum to virtually pure platinum. X-ray mapping of an arborescent Pt-Pd nugget from the historical occurrence documents selective palladium depletion, similar to the high-fineness gold haloes developed on detrital Au-Ag grains under supergene conditions. The Pd-depleted alteration zone truncates inclusions of crystals stoichiometrically close to PdPt within the Pt-Pd aggregate. Selective metal leaching in the weathering environment can account for the frequently observed Pt-enriched rims on alluvial platiniferous alloys which may lead to the formation of platinum nuggets at an advanced degree of weathering.

  3. Extraction and separation studies of platinum(IV) with N-n-octylaniline.

    PubMed

    Lokhande, T N; Anuse, M A; Chavan, M B

    1998-11-01

    N-n-octylaniline in xylene is used for the extractive separation of platinum(IV) from acidic media. Platinum(IV) was extracted quantitatively with 10 ml of 3% reagent in xylene from 0.5 to 10 and 2.5 to 10 M hydrochloric and sulphuric acid, respectively. It was stripped from organic phase with water and estimated photometrically with stannous chloride. The effect of metal ion, acids, reagent concentration and of various foreign ions has been investigated. The method affords binary separation of platinum(IV) from iron(III), cobalt(II), nickel(II) and copper(II), and is applicable to the analysis of synthetic mixtures and alloys. The method is fast, accurate and precise.

  4. Method for forming porous platinum films

    DOEpatents

    Maya, Leon

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming a platinum film includes providing a substrate, sputtering a crystalline platinum oxide layer over at least a portion of the substrate, and reducing the crystalline platinum oxide layer to form the platinum film. A device includes a non-conductive substrate and a platinum layer having a density of between about 2 and 5 g/cm.sup.3 formed over at least a portion of the non-conductive substrate. The platinum films produced in accordance with the present invention provide porous films suitable for use as electrodes, yet require few processing steps. Thus, such films are less costly. Such films may be formed on both conductive and non-conductive substrates. While the invention has been illustrated with platinum, other metals, such as noble metals, that form a low density oxide when reactively sputtered may also be used.

  5. Nanocarriers for delivery of platinum anticancer drugs☆

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Nukolova, Natalia V.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum based anticancer drugs have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy, and continue to be in widespread clinical use especially for management of tumors of the ovary, testes, and the head and neck. However, several dose limiting toxicities associated with platinum drug use, partial anti-tumor response in most patients, development of drug resistance, tumor relapse, and many other challenges have severely limited the patient quality of life. These limitations have motivated an extensive research effort towards development of new strategies for improving platinum therapy. Nanocarrier-based delivery of platinum compounds is one such area of intense research effort beginning to provide encouraging preclinical and clinical results and may allow the development of the next generation of platinum chemotherapy. This review highlights current understanding on the pharmacology and limitations of platinum compounds in clinical use, and provides a comprehensive analysis of various platinum–polymer complexes, micelles, dendrimers, liposomes and other nanoparticles currently under investigation for delivery of platinum drugs. PMID:24113520

  6. [Formylation of porphyrin platinum complexes].

    PubMed

    Rumiantseva, V D; Konovalenko, L I; Nagaeva, E A; Mironov, A F

    2005-01-01

    The formylation reaction of platinum complexes of beta-unsubstituted porphyrins was studied. The interaction of deuteroporphyrin IX derivatives with the Vilsmeyer reagent led to the selective formylation of their macrocycles in the beta position. The resulting formyl derivatives of the porphyrins are of interest for fluorescent immunoassay.

  7. Ruthenium-Platinum Thin Film Analysis Using Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.

    2004-09-03

    Ruthenium (Ru, Z = 44) is a Platinum Group Metal that has a standard hexagonal close packed (HCP) crystalline structure. Platinum (Pt, Z = 78) has a face-centered cubic (FCC) crystalline structure. When these metals are co-sputtered onto a silicon substrate, creating a few nm-thin film, they form an alloy with a combination of HCP and FCC structure. Direct methanol fuel cells rely on an anode catalyst to draw hydrogen from liquid methanol. Highly efficient fuel cells based on polymer electrolyte catalysts, known as proton-exchange membrane fuel cells, have been developed, but require large amounts of a costly platinum catalyst. Thin-film nanostructure bimetallic alloys have been produced to reduce the amount of expensive Platinum needed for catalysis, and also to improve the electrochemical properties of the catalyst. Supported RuPt particles have been shown to have superior activity as anode catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation and demonstrate an improvement in resistance to poisoning in comparison to unalloyed Pt. The percentage of Ruthenium in a RuPt thin film and the process by which the alloy is produced will dictate the crystalline structure, and thus the electrochemical properties of the film. Pure Ruthenium, Pure Platinum, and eight intermediate samples at differing percent composition of Ruthenium were characterized by their X-ray diffraction patterns. The incident beam is from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory beam and operates at approximately a 1.4 Angstrom wavelength. The results show that 0% Ru through 46.17% Ru exhibit a majority FCC structure, 56.07% Ru and 60.61% Ru are mixed phase, and from 67.03% Ru through 100% Ru, the samples exhibit a HCP structure.

  8. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    SciTech Connect

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.

  9. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    PubMed Central

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2015-01-01

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One promising approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation. γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions. PMID:26449766

  10. A highly sensitive spectrophotometric determination of platinum(IV) using leuco xylene cyanol FF.

    PubMed

    Revanasiddappa, D; Kumar, N Kiran

    2003-01-01

    A new, simple, highly sensitive and rapid spectrophotometric method has been described for the determination of platinum(IV). The method is based on the oxidation of leuco xylene cyanol FF (LXCFF) to its blue form of xylene cyanol FF by platinum(IV) in sulfuric acid medium (pH 1.0-2.5), the formed dye shows an absorption maximum at 620 nm in acetate buffer medium (pH 3.0-4.5). The method obeys Beer's law over a concentration range of 0.3 to 2.6 micro g mL(-1) platinum, having molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of 5.1x10(4) L mol(-)(1) cm(-1) and 0.0038 micro g cm(-2), respectively. The optimum reaction conditions and other analytical parameters have been evaluated. The developed method has been successfully applied to the determination of platinum in pharmaceutical preparations, soil, natural water, plant material, platinum-containing catalyst, and synthetic alloy samples.

  11. Assessing contamination paths of the German adult population with gold and platinum. The German Environmental Survey 1998 (GerES III).

    PubMed

    Benemann, Jens; Lehmann, Nils; Bromen, Katja; Marr, Anja; Seiwert, Margarete; Schulz, Christine; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2005-01-01

    Even though increased environmental platinum levels were found since the introduction of automobile catalytic converters, little is known about the pathways of corporal uptake and the bioavailability of platinum in the general adult population. The aim of this study is to identify and quantify the main exposure pathways of gold and platinum in the general adult population. The German Environmental Survey 1998 (GerES III) collected population-based data on the corporal gold and platinum burden from a large sample of 1080 persons, 18-69 years of age. Urinary metal concentration was analysed by SF-ICP-MS. Exposure data were assessed by standardized questionnaires. Data were log transformed and analysed using multiple linear regression analysis with respect to exposure variables. The R2 of the linear regression model of urinary gold and platinum (ng/l) burden is 0.349 and 0.235, respectively. In both models, the number of teeth with noble metal dental alloy restorations (NMDAR) is the most important exposure pathway. One versus no tooth with NMDAR is associated with an increase of 23.7% in urinary gold and 35.6% in platinum concentration. Chewing gum intensifies the release of gold and platinum from NMDAR: every additional day per week when gum is chewed is associated with an increased gold (5.6%) and platinum (6.9%) burden. Furthermore, elevated urinary gold and platinum concentrations were found for higher creatinine concentrations, more frequent coffee consumption and for people from the upper social class. Gold burden is also increased in people with arthritis. Platinum burden is also increased in people living in western or northern Germany. Traffic-related variables had no significant effect on platinum burden.

  12. Surface characterization of platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Solla-Gullón, José; Rodríguez, Paramaconi; Herrero, Enrique; Aldaz, Antonio; Feliu, Juan M

    2008-03-14

    The quantitative analysis of the different surface sites on platinum samples is attempted from pure voltammetric data. This analysis requires independent knowledge of the fraction of two-dimensional (111) and (100) domains. Specific site-probe reactions are employed to achieve this goal. Irreversibly-adsorbed bismuth and tellurium have been revealed to be sensitive to the presence of (111) terrace domains of different width whereas almost all sites involved in (100) ordered domains have been characterized through germanium adatoms. The experimental protocol follows that used with well-defined single-crystal electrodes and, therefore, requires careful control of the surface cleanliness. Platinum basal planes and their vicinal stepped surfaces have been employed to obtain calibration plots between the charge density measured under the adatom redox peak, specific for the type of surface site, and the corresponding terrace size. The evaluation of the (100) bidimensional domains can also be achieved using the voltammetric profiles, once the fraction of (111) ordered domains present in the polyoriented platinum has been determined and their featureless contribution has been subtracted from the whole voltammetric response. Using that curve, it is possible to perform a deconvolution of the adsorption states of the polycrystalline sample different from those related to (111) domains. The fraction of (100)-related states in the deconvoluted voltammogram can then be compared to that expected from the independent estimation coming from the charge involved in the redox process undergone by the irreversibly-adsorbed germanium and thus check the result of the deconvolution. The information about the surface-site distribution can also be applied to analyze the voltammetric profile of nanocrystalline platinum electrodes.

  13. Request for Correction 11001 Toxicological Review of Halogenated Platinum Salts and Platinum Compounds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Request for Correction by the International Platinum Group Metals Association seeking the correction of information disseminated in the draft EPA document Toxicological Review of Halogenated Platinum Salts and Platinum Compounds: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS).

  14. Phosphoric acid fuel cell platinum use study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundblad, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy is promoting the private development of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) power plants for terrestrial applications. Current PAFC technology utilizes platinum as catalysts in the power electrodes. The possible repercussions that the platinum demand of PAFC power plant commercialization will have on the worldwide supply and price of platinum from the outset of commercialization to the year 2000 are investigated. The platinum demand of PAFC commercialization is estimated by developing forecasts of platinum use per unit of generating capacity and penetration of PAFC power plants into the electric generation market. The ability of the platinum supply market to meet future demands is gauged by assessing the size of platinum reserves and the capability of platinum producers to extract, refine and market sufficient quantities of these reserves. The size and timing of platinum price shifts induced by the added demand of PAFC commercialization are investigated by several analytical methods. Estimates of these price shifts are then used to calculate the subsequent effects on PAFC power plant capital costs.

  15. Alteration of detrital platinum-group-minerals (PGM) in rivers of the Eastern Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, F.; Oberthür, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Bushveld Complex, South Africa, is the world´s largest resource and leading producer of platinum-group elements (PGE). Current mines work the Merensky Reef, the UG-2 chromitite and the Platreef in the Critical Zone; limited platinum production from ultramafic pipes has long ceased. Although the initial discovery of platinum in the Bushveld Complex in 1924 was made by panning in a river bed, exploitation of placer PGM was never economic. More than 6000 PGM grains were separated from stream sediments of rivers draining the Critical Zone of the Eastern Bushveld Complex. The PGM assemblage is composed of grains of Pt-Fe alloy (73.2 %), braggite-cooperite (14.2 %), sperrylite (10.2 %), and a variety of rarer PGM including laurite, Rh-sulfides, Pd-Sb-As-Te phases and Ru-rich alloys. Unaltered PGM nuggets occur in about equal proportions as mono- or polyphase grains. Pt-Fe alloy grains are up to 1.6 mm in diameter (usually 100-200 micrometer). More than 78% of the Pt-Fe grains have compositions ranging from [Pt3Fe] to [Pt1.5Fe] (ferroan platinum). The remaining Pt-Fe alloys are solid solutions of tetraferroplatinum [PtFe], ferronickelplatinum [Pt2FeNi] and tulameenite [Pt2FeCu]. Almost 75 % of the [PtFe] grains and 43 % of the ferroan platinum grains are altered. Ferroan platinum is frequently mantled by [Pt(Fe,Cu,Ni)], and many of these rims have an additional outermost rim close to [Ni2FePt] in composition. In addition, Pd-Pb and Pd-Hg phases are also present in the alteration rims. Pt-rich or Ru-rich oxides represent further oxidation products of primary PGM. More than 50 % of the investigated Pt-Pd sulfides (braggite-cooperite) are severely corroded and rimmed by a porous phase of native Pt, which occasionally has distinct contents of Pd. In contrast, most of the sperrylite grains are unaltered. In summary, the mineralogical composition of placer PGM from the Eastern Bushveld does not unequivocally indicate a single source of PGM. Contributions from the Merensky

  16. Optical Properties and Electronic Structures of d- and F-Electron Metals and Alloys, Silver-Indium Nickel - GOLD-GALLIUM(2), PLATINUM-GALLIUM(2), - - Cobalt-Aluminum CERIUM-TIN(3), and LANTHANUM-TIN(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kwang Joo

    1990-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic structures of disordered Ag_{1-x}In_ {x} (x = 0.0, 0.04, 0.08, 0.12) and Ni_{1-x}Cu_{x }(x = 0.0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.4) alloys and ordered AuGa_2, PtGa _2, beta^' -NiAl, beta^' -CoAl, CeSn_3, and LaSn_3 have been studied. The complex dielectric functions have been determined for Ag_{1-x}In _{x},Ni_{1-x}Cu_ {x},AuGa_2, and PtGa_2 in the 1.2-5.5 eV region and for CeSn_3 and LaSn_3 in the 1.5-4.5 eV region using spectroscopic ellipsometry. Self-consistent relativistic band calculations using the linearized-augmented -plane-wave method have been performed for AuGa _2, PtGa_2,beta^' -CoAl, CeSn_3, and LaSn_3 to interpret the experimental optical spectra. In Ag_{1-x}In_{x} , the intraband scattering rate increases with increasing In concentration in the low-energy region (<3.5 eV). As the In concentration increases, the onset energy of the L_3to L_sp{2}{'}( E_{F}) transitions, 4.03 eV for pure Ag, shifts to higher energies, while that of the L_sp{2}{'}(E _{F}) to L_1 transitions, 3.87 eV for pure Ag, shifts to lower energies. This is only partly attributable to the rise of the Fermi level E_{F} caused by an increase in the average number of electrons per atom due to the In solute and to the narrowing of the Ag 4d-bands. The L_1-band may also lower as In is added. In Ni_{1-x}Cu_ {x}, the 4.7-eV edge (from transitions between the s-d-hybridized bands well below E_ {F} and the s-p-like bands above E _{F}, e.g., X_1 to X_sp{4}{'} ) shifts to higher energies, while the 1.5-eV edge (from transitions between a p-like band below E _{F} and a d-band above E _{F}, e.g., L_sp {2}{'} to L_3) remains at the same energy as the Cu concentration increases. A structure grows in the (2-3)-eV region as Cu is added, and it is interpreted as being due to transitions between the localized Cu subbands. For AuGa_2 and PtGa _2, both compounds show interband absorption at low photon energies (<1.3 eV). The interband absorption for AuGa_2 is strong at about 2 eV while

  17. On the system cerium-platinum-silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Gribanov, Alexander Grytsiv, Andriy; Royanian, Esmaeil; Rogl, Peter; Bauer, Ernst; Giester, Gerald; Seropegin, Yurii

    2008-11-15

    Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pt-Si have been established for the isothermal section at 800 deg. C based on X-ray powder diffraction, metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques on about 120 alloys, which were prepared by various methods employing arc-melting under argon or powder reaction sintering. Nineteen ternary compounds were observed. Atom order in the crystal structures of {tau}{sub 18}-Ce{sub 5}(Pt,Si){sub 4} (Pnma; a=0.77223(3) nm, b=1.53279(8) nm c=0.80054(5) nm), {tau}{sub 3}-Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 7}Si{sub 4} (Pnma; a=1.96335(8) nm, b=0.40361(4) nm, c=1.12240(6) nm) and {tau}{sub 10}-CePtSi{sub 2} (Cmcm; a=0.42943(2) nm, b=1.67357(5) nm, c=0.42372(2) nm) was determined by direct methods from X-ray single-crystal CCD data and found to be isotypic with the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type, the Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 7}Ge{sub 4}-type and the CeNiSi{sub 2}-type, respectively. Rietveld refinements established the atom arrangement in the structures of Pt{sub 3}Si (Pt{sub 3}Ge-type, C2/m, a=0.7724(2) nm, b=0.7767(2) nm, c=0.5390(2) nm, {beta}=133.86(2){sup o}), {tau}{sub 16}-Ce{sub 3}Pt{sub 5}Si (Ce{sub 3}Pd{sub 5}Si-type, Imma, a=0.74025(8) nm, b=1.2951(2) nm, c=0.7508(1) nm) and {tau}{sub 17}-Ce{sub 3}PtSi{sub 3} (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type, Immm, a=0.41065(5) nm, b=0.43221(5) nm, c=1.8375(3) nm). Phase equilibria in Ce-Pt-Si are characterised by the absence of cerium solubility in platinum silicides. Cerium silicides and cerium platinides, however, dissolve significant amounts of the third component, whereby random substitution of the almost equally sized atom species platinum and silicon is reflected in extended homogeneous regions at constant Ce content such as for {tau}{sub 13}-Ce(Pt{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}){sub 2}, {tau}{sub 6}-Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 3+x}Si{sub 5-x} or {tau}{sub 7}-CePt{sub 2-x}Si{sub 2+x}. - Graphical abstract: Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pt-Si have been established for the isothermal

  18. Platinum electrodes for electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Bacteria is detected electro-chemically by measuring evolution of hydrogen in test system with platinum and reference electrode. Using system, electrodes of platinum are used to detect and enumerate varieties of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms compared in different media.

  19. Mouse Model of Halogenated Platinum Salt Hypersensitivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. Concern for increased asthma risk exists for the general population due to the use of platinum (Pt) in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive. To investigate a...

  20. Mouse Model of Halogenated Platinum Salt Hypersensitivity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. Concern for increased asthma risk exists for the general population due to the use of platinum (Pt) in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive. To investigate a...

  1. Titanium oxynitride interlayer to influence oxygen reduction reaction activity and corrosion stability of Pt and Pt-Ni alloy.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Zahiri, Beniamin; Kohandehghan, Alireza; Karpuzov, Dimitre; Lotfabad, Elmira Memarzadeh; Li, Zhi; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2015-01-01

    A key advancement target for oxygen reduction reaction catalysts is to simultaneously improve both the electrochemical activity and durability. To this end, the efficacy of a new highly conductive support that comprises of a 0.5 nm titanium oxynitride film coated by atomic layer deposition onto an array of carbon nanotubes has been investigated. Support effects for pure platinum and for a platinum (50 at %)/nickel alloy have been considered. Oxynitride induces a downshift in the d-band center for pure platinum and fundamentally changes the platinum particle size and spatial distribution. This results in major enhancements in activity and corrosion stability relative to an identically synthesized catalyst without the interlayer. Conversely, oxynitride has a minimal effect on the electronic structure and microstructure, and therefore, on the catalytic performance of platinum-nickel. Calculations based on density functional theory add insight with regard to compositional segregation that occurs at the alloy catalyst-support interface.

  2. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  3. Beam-deposited platinum as versatile catalyst for bottom-up silicon nanowire synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hibst, N.; Strehle, S.; Knittel, P.; Kranz, C.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2014-10-13

    The controlled localized bottom-up synthesis of silicon nanowires on arbitrarily shaped surfaces is still a persisting challenge for functional device assembly. In order to address this issue, electron beam and focused ion beam-assisted catalyst deposition have been investigated with respect to platinum expected to form a PtSi alloy catalyst for a subsequent bottom-up nanowire synthesis. The effective implementation of pure platinum nanoparticles or thin films for silicon nanowire growth has been demonstrated recently. Beam-deposited platinum contains significant quantities of amorphous carbon due to the organic precursor and gallium ions for a focused ion beam-based deposition process. Nevertheless, silicon nanowires could be grown on various substrates regardless of the platinum purity. Additionally, p-type doping could be realized with diborane whereas n-type doping suppressed a nanowire growth. The rational utilization of this beam-assisted approach enables us to control the localized synthesis of single silicon nanowires at planar surfaces but succeeded also in single nanowire growth at the three-dimensional apex of an atomic force microscopy tip. Therefore, this catalyst deposition method appears to be a unique extension of current technologies to assemble complex nanowire-based devices.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of Platinum-Enhanced Radiopaque Stainless Steel (PERSS®) for Dilation-Baloon Expandable Coronary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Jr., Bernard S.; Craig, Charles H.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.; Radisch, Jr., Herbert R.; Gokcen, Nev A.; Friend, Clifford M.; Edwards, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Dilation-balloon expandable coronary stents are commonly made of implant grade stainless steels conforming to ASTM F138/F139, e.g., Biodur? 316LS (UNS S31673). Typical of such stents is the Boston Scientific/Interventional Technologies? (BS/IVT) LP-StentTM. In 2000, BS/IVT determined that the addition of 5 to 6 wt % platinum to Biodur 316LS produced a stainless steel with enhanced radiopacity to make their stents more visible radiographically and thus more effective clinically. A goal of the program was to ensure platinum additions would not adversely affect the corrosion resistance of Biodur 316LS. The corrosion resistance of 5-6 wt % PERSS? alloys and Biodur 316LS was determined using electrochemical tests for general, pitting, crevice and intergranular corrosion. Experimental methods included ASTM A262E, F746, F2129, and potentiodynamic polarization. The 6 wt % PERSS? alloy (IVT 78) had a resistance to pitting, crevice and intergranular corrosion that was similar to the Biodur 316LS base material. IVT 78 was a single-phase austenitic alloy with no evidence of inclusions or precipitates. It was more resistant to pitting corrosion than 5 wt % PERSS? alloys. Performance of the PERSS? alloys was not a function of alloy oxygen content in the range 0.01 to 0.03 wt %.

  5. Modelling oxide formation and growth on platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baroody, Heather A.; Jerkiewicz, Gregory; Eikerling, Michael H.

    2017-04-01

    We present a mathematical model of oxide formation and growth on platinum. The motivation stems from the necessity to understand platinum dissolution in the cathode catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. As is known, platinum oxide formation and reduction are strongly linked to platinum dissolution processes. However, a consistent model of the oxidation processes on platinum does not exist. Our oxide growth model links interfacial exchange processes between platinum and oxygen ions with the transport of oxygen ion vacancies via diffusion and migration. A parametric analysis is performed to rationalize vital trends in oxide growth kinetics. The rate determining step of oxide formation and growth is identified as the extraction of platinum atoms at the metal-oxide interface. A kinetic effect is observed while adjusting the potential when growing the oxide layer, and the solution indicates that a structural change occurs at high potentials, around 1.5 VRHE. The model compares well to experimental data for various materials from various sources.

  6. Platinum for neural stimulation: voltammetry considerations.

    PubMed

    Hudak, E M; Mortimer, J T; Martin, H B

    2010-04-01

    The underlying cause of electrical stimulation-induced tissue trauma is debated. Our focus has been to study effects of generating electrochemical by-products at the electrode-electrolyte interface, using the pulse-clamp technique coupled with voltammetry to analyze charge transfer. The platinum-H(2)SO(4) system has been a standard for analyzing electrochemistry on platinum-stimulating electrodes, even though the chemical differences between H(2)SO(4) and the living body are obvious. Experiments were designed to determine whether phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) could serve as a more accurate emulation of living tissue. It had been rumored that platinum's performance in PBS deviates from that in H(2)SO(4) at larger potentials. Voltammetry in PBS was performed in two potential ranges. In a conventional potential range (-0.6 V to +0.9 V versus Ag/AgCl), characteristic peaks appear very similar to published voltammograms of platinum in H(2)SO(4). However, in an extended range (-1.0 V to +1.7 V versus Ag/AgCl), platinum exhibited additional electrochemical activity: one oxidation peak and two reduction peaks. Therefore, voltammetry was performed in NaCl and a sodium phosphate mixture (i.e. PBS components) to separate their activity. The altered electrochemical performance of platinum in PBS suggests that certain reactions on platinum at potentials outside the water window will not reflect what happens in vivo.

  7. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  8. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Krebs, Leonard C.; Ishida, Takanobu

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between -0.24 and +1.25 VSCE while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-ρ-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  9. Application of cellulose anion-exchangers to separation of palladium from platinum or iridium with glycine as complexing agent and atomic-absorption spectrometry for detection.

    PubMed

    Brajter, K; Słonawska, K

    1983-07-01

    The use of glycine as complexing agent for chromatographie separation of palladium from platinum, or palladium from iridium, on cellulose anion-exchangers has been investigated and found possible over a wide range of concentration ratios. The method can be used for analysis of Pd-Ir alloys. The nature of the complexes taking part in the ion-exchange has been identified.

  10. A facile and efficient synthesis of polystyrene/gold-platinum composite particles and their application for aerobic oxidation of alcohols in water.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxing; Gao, Yan; Yang, Cheng

    2015-05-04

    Herein we develop a facile and effective method for the synthesis of composite particles composed of polystyrene microspheres decorated with gold-platinum alloy nanoparticles, which exhibited excellent catalytic activity and recyclability for 1-phenylethanol oxidation under mild conditions (without a base, air as an oxidant, in water, at 40 °C).

  11. Platinum-rare earth cathodes for direct borohydride-peroxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso, D. S. P.; Santos, D. M. F.; Šljukić, B.; Sequeira, C. A. C.; Macciò, D.; Saccone, A.

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is being actively investigated as an oxidant for direct borohydride fuel cells. Herein, platinum-rare earth (RE = Sm, Dy, Ho) alloys are prepared by arc melting and their activity for hydrogen peroxide reduction reaction (HPRR) is studied in alkaline media. Cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements show that Pt-Sm electrode displays the highest catalytic activity for HPRR with the lowest activation energy, followed by Pt-Ho, while Pt-Dy alloys show practically no activity. Laboratory direct borohydride-peroxide fuel cells (DBPFCs) are assembled using these alloys. The DBPFC with Pt-Sm cathode gives the highest peak power density of 85 mW cm-2, which is more than double of that obtained in a DBPFC with Pt electrodes.

  12. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  13. [Mechanism of Platinum Derivatives Induced Kidney Injury].

    PubMed

    Yan, Feifei; Duan, Jianchun; Wang, Jie

    2015-09-20

    Platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors, lung cancer, and colorectal cancer. Two major problems exist, however, in the clinic use of platinum derivatives. One is the development of tumor resistance to the drug during therapy, leading to treatment failure. The other is the drug's toxicity such as the cisplatin's nephrotoxicity, which limits the dose that can be administered. This paper describes the mechanism of platinum derivatives induced kidney injury.

  14. Antitumor effect of arabinogalactan and platinum complex.

    PubMed

    Starkov, A K; Zamay, T N; Savchenko, A A; Ingevatkin, E V; Titova, N M; Kolovskaya, O S; Luzan, N A; Silkin, P P; Kuznetsova, S A

    2016-03-01

    The article presents the results of investigation of antitumor properties of platinum-arabinogalactan complex. We showed the ability of the complex to inhibit the growth of Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. It is found that the distribution of the platinum-arabinogalactan complex is not specific only for tumor cells in mice. The complex was found in all tissues and organs examined (ascites cells, embryonic cells, kidney, and liver). The mechanism of action of the arabinogalactan-platinum complex may be similar to cisplatin as the complex is able to accumulate in tumor cells.

  15. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-10-01

    A carbon substrate for use in fabricating phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes was modified by catalytic oxidation to stabilize the platinum catalyst by retarding the sintering of small platinum crystallites. Results of 100-hour operational tests confirmed that the rate of platinum surface area loss observed on catalytically oxidized supports was less than that observed with unmodified supports of the same starting material. Fuel cell electrodes fabricated from Vulcan XC-72R, which was modified by catalytic in a nitric oxide atmosphere, produced low platium sintering rates and high activity for the reduction of oxygen in the phosphoric acid environment.

  16. Catalytic reforming with rhenium-platinum catalyst containing more rhenium than platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, J.P.; Yarrington, R.M.

    1982-10-26

    A new reforming process employs a new rhenium-platinum catalytic composite having a rhenium to platinum weight ratio in the range of not less than 2 to about 5, whereby longer relative cycle length is obtained when reforming a naphtha having less than about 0.5 ppm by weight of sulfur than if the rhenium-platinum ratio is outside of such range.

  17. Platinum metals magmatic sulfide ores.

    PubMed

    Naldrett, A J; Duke, J M

    1980-06-27

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example.

  18. Photoelectron holography of platinum (111)

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, B.L.; Terminello, L.J.; Barton, J.J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1993-04-01

    Platinum atoms near a (111) single-crystal face have been imaged using photoelectron holography. Electron angular intensity patterns were collected at equally spaced wavenumbers from 6 to 12{Angstrom}{sup {minus}1}. Images of atoms near expected atomic positions are obtained from single-wavenumber analyses over the range of the data set. Positions are detected further from the emitter than we have seen previously, and symmetry assumptions are not required. We have also adopted a three dimensional means of representing the data in order to help understand the results. Twin image suppression and artifact reduction in the holographically reconstructed data are set are obtained when images at different wavenumbers are correctly phase-summed. We are assessing the capability of the technique for rendering true three-dimensional structural information for unknown systems.

  19. Teaching the Chemistry of Platinum.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Robert G W

    2015-01-01

    Following colonisation of South America by the Spanish, many new naturally occurring substances were sent to Europe. One of these was the silvery, unreactive metal, platinum, discovered in New Grenada in the mid-eighteenth century. It was often found in granular form, associated with gold, and the challenge to chemists was to refine it, produce it as wire or sheet, and determine its chemical properties. This interested the professor of chemistry at the University of Edinburgh, Joseph Black, who was able to obtain samples from London-based Spanish contacts, particularly Ignacio Luzuriaga. This paper examines how Black transmitted his knowledge of the metal to large numbers of students attending his annual course.

  20. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  1. Evaluation of platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation procedure for the characterization of industrial platinum resistance thermometers (PRTs) for use in the temperature range -120 to 160 C was investigated. This evaluation procedure consisted of calibration, thermal stability and hysteresis testing of four surface measuring PRTs. Five different calibration schemes were investigated for these sensors. The IPTS-68 formulation produced the most accurate result, yielding average sensor systematic error of 0.02 C and random error of 0.1 C. The sensors were checked for thermal stability by successive and thermal cycling between room temperature, 160 C, and boiling point of nitrogen. All the PRTs suffered from instability and hysteresis. The applicability of the self-heating technique as an in situ method for checking the calibration of PRTs located inside wind tunnels was investigated.

  2. Evaluation of platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence A.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation procedure for the characterization of industrial platinum resistance thermometers (PRTs) for use in the temperature range -120 to 160 C was investigated. This evaluation procedure consisted of calibration, thermal stability and hysteresis testing of four surface measuring PRTs. Five different calibration schemes were investigated for these sensors. The IPTS-68 formulation produced the most accurate result, yielding average sensor systematic error of 0.02 C and random error of 0.1 C. The sensors were checked for thermal stability by successive and thermal cycling between room temperature, 160 C, and boiling point of nitrogen. All the PRTs suffered from instability and hysteresis. The applicability of the self-heating technique as an in situ method for checking the calibration of PRTs located inside wind tunnels was investigated.

  3. Calibration of platinum resistance thermometers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, D. H.; Terbeek, H. G.; Malone, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Results of five years experience in calibrating about 1000 commercial platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) are reported. These PRT were relatively small and rugged, with ice-point resistances from 200 to 5000 ohms. Calibrations normalized in terms of resistance-difference ratios (Cragoe Z function) were found to be remarkably uniform for five of six different types of PRT tested, and to agree very closely with normalized calibrations of the primary reference standard type PRT. The Z function normalization cancels residual resistances which are not temperature dependent and simplifies interpolation between calibration points when the quality of a given type of PRT has been established in terms of uniform values of the Z function. Measurements at five or six well spaced base-point temperatures with Z interpolation will suffice to calibrate a PRT accurately from 4 to 900 K.

  4. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst supported on a carbon substrate. During operation, the small platinum crystallites sinter, causing loss in cell performance. A support was developed that stabilizes platinum in the high surface area condition by retarding or preventing the sintering process. The approach is to form etch pits in the carbon by oxidizing the carbon in the presence of a metal oxide catalyst, remove the metal oxide by an acid wash, and then deposit platinum in these pits. Results confirm the formation of etch pits in each of the three supports chosen for investigation: Vulcan XC-72R, Vulcan XC-72 that was graphized at 2500 C, and Shawinigan Acetylene Black.

  5. Platinum-ruthenium-palladium fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2006-02-07

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 20 and about 60 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having an atomic ratio of platinum to ruthenium that is between about 0.7 and about 1.2. Alternatively, the catalyst may contain platinum at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 50 atomic percent, ruthenium at a concentration that is between about 25 and about 55 atomic percent, palladium at a concentration that is between about 5 and about 45 atomic percent, and having a difference between the concentrations of ruthenium and platinum that is no greater than about 20 atomic percent.

  6. Platinum-ruthenium-nickel fuel cell electrocatalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorer, Alexander

    2005-07-26

    A catalyst suitable for use in a fuel cell, especially as an anode catalyst, that contains platinum, ruthenium, and nickel, wherein the nickel is at a concentration that is less than about 10 atomic percent.

  7. VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    VB Platinum Tile & Carpet, Inc. (the Company) is located in Bristow, Virginia. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Washington, DC.

  8. Platinum-Resistor Differential Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolbly, R. B.; Britcliffe, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Platinum resistance elements used in bridge circuit for measuring temperature difference between two flowing liquids. Temperature errors with circuit are less than 0.01 degrees C over range of 100 degrees C.

  9. Fate of platinum metals in the environment.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Justyna; Łodyga-Chruścińska, Elżbieta; Chrustowicz, Jakub

    2014-07-01

    For many years now automotive exhaust catalysts have been used to reduce the significant amounts of harmful chemical substances generated by car engines, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and aromatic hydrocarbons. Although they considerably decrease environmental contamination with the above-mentioned compounds, it is known that catalysts contribute to the environmental load of platinum metals (essential components of catalysts), which are released with exhaust fumes. Contamination with platinum metals stems mainly from automotive exhaust converters, but other major sources also exist. Since platinum group elements (PGEs): platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru) and iridium (Ir) seem to spread in the environment and accumulate in living organisms, they may pose a threat to animals and humans. This paper discusses the modes and forms of PGE emission as well as their impact on the environment and living organisms.

  10. Green and Facile Synthesis of Pd-Pt Alloy Nanoparticles by Laser Irradiation of Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Solid-solution palladium-platinum (Pd-Pt) alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with fully tunable compositions were directly fabricated through high-intensity laser irradiation of an aqueous solution of palladium and platinum ions without using any reducing agents or thermal processes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that nanometer-sized particles were fabricated by laser irradiation of mixed aqueous solutions of palladium and platinum ions with different feeding ratios. The crystalline nature of the NPs was precisely characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Despite the fact that, for the bulk systems, a pair of XRD peak was detected between the palladium and platinum peaks because of the large miscibility gap in the Pd-Pt binary phase diagram, only a single XRD peak was seen for the Pd-Pt NPs fabricated in the present study. Moreover, the peak position shifted from that of pure palladium towards platinum with increasing fraction of platinum ions in solution. Consequently, the interplanar spacings of the alloy NPs agreed well with the estimated values obtained from Vegard's law. These observations strongly indicate the formation of solid-solution Pd-Pt alloy NPs with fully tunable compositions. This technique is not only a "green" (environmentally-friendly) and facile process, but is also widely applicable to other binary and ternary systems.

  11. Stabilizing platinum in phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remick, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Platinum sintering on phosphoric acid fuel cell cathodes is discussed. The cathode of the phosphoric acid fuel cell uses a high surface area platinum catalyst dispersed on a conductive carbon support to minimize both cathode polarization and fabrication costs. During operation, however, the active surface area of these electrodes decreases, which in turn leads to decreased cell performance. This loss of active surface area is a major factor in the degradation of fuel cell performance over time.

  12. Methylation of platinum by methylcobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, R.T.; Hanna, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Incubation of micromolar levels of potassium hexachloroplatinate (K/sub 2/PtCl/sub 6/) and methylcobalamin (MeB-12) results in the complete conversion of MeB-12 to aquocobalamin (aquoB-12). Demethylation is optimal at approximately pH 2.0 and is accelerated by the addition of potassium tetrachloroplatinate (K/sub 2/PtCl/sub 4/). The reaction is stoichiometric between MeB-12 and the K/sub 2/PtCl/sub 6/ added (1:1). Isosbestic points at 492, 367, and 335 nm during the course of the reaction indicate that MeB-12 is demethylated to aquoB-12 with no accumulation of corrinoid intermediates. Higher alkylcobalamins and methylcobinamide react at much slower rates compared with MeB-12. Incubation of 40..mu..M K/sub 2/ PtCl/sub 6/ with either 40..mu..M (Me-/sup 14/C)MeB-12 or (Me-/sup 3/H)MeB-12 followed by lyophilization converts 70% of the label to a stable form that is associated with platinum upon subsequent paper chromatography and electrophoresis. There is no preferential loss of /sup 3/H relative to /sup 14/C in the reaction product. Difference spectra indicated that the platinum reaction product had an absorption maximum at 260 nm. When 50 ..mu..moles each of (Me-/sup 14/C)MeB-12 and K/sub 2/PtCl/sub 6/ were reacted and subjected to Sephadex G-15 chromatography, the /sup 14/C label eluted with 260 nm of absorbing material. Further chromatography on Sephadex G-15 and CM-cellulose yielded a labeled ultraviolet-absorbing product with a /sup 14/C/Pt ratio of 1.2. The overall recovery was 36 to 42% on the basis of the /sup 14/C. The /sup 14/C-Pt product has absorption maximums at 260 nm and 208 nm, with a minimum at 240 nm (A/sub 240/ nm/A/sub 260/ nm = 0.5). Proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed the presence of an H-C-Pt covalent bonding pattern (J for /sup 1/H, /sup 195/Pt = 78.2 Hz; tau for /sup 194/Pt-Me + /sup 196/Pt-Me = 6.956).

  13. Biologically Inspired Phosphino Platinum Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Avijita; Helm, Monte L.; Linehan, John C.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2012-08-01

    Platinum complexes containing phosphino amino acid and amino acid ester ligands, built upon the PPhNR’2 platform, have been synthesized and characterized (PPhNR’2= [1,3-diaza]-5-phenyl phosphacyclohexane, R’=glycine or glycine ester). These complexes were characterized by 31P, 13C, 1H, 195Pt NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The X-ray crystal structure of one of the complexes, [PtCl2(PPhNGlyester 2)2], is also reported. These biologically inspired ligands have potential use in homogeneous catalysis, with special applications in chiral chemistry and water soluble chemistry. These complexes also provide a foundation upon which larger peptides can be attached, to allow the introduction of enzyme-like features onto small molecule catalysts. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine for Primary Platinum-Resistant or Platinum-Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sayal, Karen; Gounaris, Ioannis; Basu, Bristi; Freeman, Sue; Moyle, Penny; Hosking, Karen; Iddawela, Mahesh; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Abraham, Jean; Brenton, James; Hatcher, Helen; Earl, Helena; Parkinson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Objective Primary platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is an area of unmet medical need. There is limited evidence from small studies that platinum-based combinations can overcome “resistance” in a proportion of patients. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of platinum-based combination chemotherapy in the platinum-resistant and platinum-refractory setting. Methods Epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine (ECX) combination chemotherapy was used at our institution for the treatment of relapsed EOC. From the institutional database, we identified all patients with primary platinum-refractory or platinum-resistant relapse treated with ECX as second-line therapy between 2001 and 2012. We extracted demographic, clinical, treatment, and toxicity data and outcomes. We used logistic and Cox regression models to identify predictors of response and survival respectively. Results Thirty-four 34 patients (8 refractory, 26 resistant) were treated with ECX. Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) response rate was 45%, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.4 months, and overall survival (OS) was 10.6 months. Platinum-resistant patients had better outcomes than did platinum-refractory patients (response rate, 54% vs 0%, P = 0.047; PFS 7.2 vs 1.8 months, P < 0.0001; OS 14.4 vs 3 months, P < 0.001). In regression models, time to progression after first-line treatment and platinum-refractory status were the strongest predictors of response and PFS or OS, respectively. Patients with time to progression after first-line treatment longer than 3 months showed PFS and OS of 7.9 and 14.7 months, respectively. Toxicity was manageable, with only 13% of cycles administered at reduced doses. Conclusions Epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine seems to be active in platinum-resistant relapsed EOC with manageable toxicity. Further prospective investigation of platinum-anthracycline combinations is warranted in patients who relapse 3 to 6 months after

  15. Novel platinum black electroplating technique improving mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Raeyoung; Nam, Yoonkey

    2013-01-01

    Platinum black microelectrodes are widely used as an effective neural signal recording sensor. The simple fabrication process, high quality signal recording and proper biocompatibility are the main advantages of platinum black microelectrodes. When microelectrodes are exposed to actual biological system, various physical stimuli are applied. However, the porous structure of platinum black is vulnerable to external stimuli and destroyed easily. The impedance level of the microelectrode increases when the microelectrodes are damaged resulting in decreased recording performance. In this study, we developed mechanically stable platinum black microelectrodes by adding polydopamine. The polydopamine layer was added between the platinum black structures by electrodeposition method. The initial impedance level of platinum black only microelectrodes and polydopamine added microelectrodes were similar but after applying ultrasonication the impedance value dramatically increased for platinum black only microelectrodes, whereas polydopamine added microelectrodes showed little increase which were nearly retained initial values. Polydopamine added platinum black microelectrodes are expected to extend the availability as neural sensors.

  16. Drug Delivery Systems for Platinum Drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huynh, Vien T.; Scarano, Wei; Stenzel, Martina H.

    2013-09-01

    Since the discovery of cisplatin, drugs based on platinum, have made a significant impact on the treatment of various cancers. The administration of platinum drugs is however accompanied by significant side effects. This chapter discusses the types of drug delivery systems that have been developed in order to enable the targeted delivery while maintaining controlled temporal supply of the drug. The sizes of carriers range from nanometer to micrometer sized particles. The most common types of drug carriers are micelles, liposomes, nanoparticles, and dendrimers, but also a few microspheres have been developed. Most striking aspect of the delivery of platinum drugs is the possibility of physical encapsulation but also the binding of the drug to the polymer carrier coordinate covalent bond. Since platinum drugs have typically two permanent and two leaving ligands, the polymer can be part of either ligand. As the leaving ligand, the platinum drug is released often as cisplatin. If the polymer provides the functionality for the permanent ligand, a new macromolecular drug has been formed. In addition to the attachment of pt(II) drugs, recent offorts are devoted to the conjugation via the Pt((IV) prodrug.

  17. Overcoming Platinum Resistance in Ovarian Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Koji; Lin, Yvonne G.; Roman, Lynda D.; Sood, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the field Ovarian cancer remains a deadly malignancy because most patients develop recurrent disease that is resistant to chemotherapy, including platinum. Because response rates for current treatment regimens are relatively similar and unfortunately low, no standard chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer exists. Areas covered in this review A systematic literature review of clinical studies published between January 2005 and March 2010 was conducted using search engines, PubMed and MEDLINE with the entry keywords, ovarian cancer and platinum resistance. This search revealed 40 clinical trials (1793 patients). What the reader will gain Gemcitabine was the most common drug used in clinical trials reporting higher response rates, ≥+1 SD of overall response rate (5 out of 8). Gemcitabine-based combination therapy showed an average response rate of 27.2% (95%CI 22.4–32.0). Combination of gemcitabine and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) was the most common regimen (n=3) and was associated with possible additive effects in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients: response rate, gemcitabine alone 6.1%, PLD alone 19.8%, and gemcitabine with PLD 28.7% (95%CI 20.4–37.0), respectively. Take home message Analysis of recent clinical trials showed that gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy was associated with the highest anti-tumor effects in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer patients during the study period. PMID:20815774

  18. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    . Impersistent, stratiform PGE mineralized horizons occur within the MCSS harzburgite from which drill core samples were taken for platinum-group mineral (PGM) characterization from two drill holes. Where the PGE reefs reach the surface there is residual PGE mineralization within the laterite regolith from which drill core samples were taken from various laterite lithological units for PGM characterization. As the harzburgite PGE reefs contain significant concentrations of both sulfide and chromite (including chromitite seams) they resemble the PGE-rich chromitite seams of the Bushveld Complex rather than the PGE-bearing Main Sulfide Zone of the Great Dyke and Main Sulfide Layer of the Munni Munni Complex. The dominant Pd PGM in three PGE reef samples varies, ranging ( n = 164, relative wt%) from bismuthides (63 %), bismuthtellurides (19 %), and tellurides (6 %), to tellurides (39 %), bismuthtellurides (24 %), stannides (14 %), and alloys (13 %), and to antimon-arsenides (33 %), stannides (21 %), bismuthides (17 %), tellurides (13 %), and alloys (10 %). From 13.5 % to 21.0 % of the total Pd occurs as a solid solution in pentlandite. The three samples have similar Pt PGM modal distributions ( n = 172, relative wt%); the dominant Pt mineral is sperrylite (79, 58, and 47 %) followed by tellurides (15, 17, 21 %), alloys (2, 1, 1 %), and sulfides (2, 1, 0 %). Comparison of Pd/Pt ratios from assays to those calculated from minerals show that the data for the Pt and Pd PGM are very robust, confirming the concentration methodology and characterization. Study of samples from a shallow drill hole penetrating the laterite regolith shows that the primary Pd mineralization has not survived oxidation, is mainly dispersed, but some was reconstituted to form secondary minerals: cabriite, unnamed tellurides, a selenide, a Pd-Te-Hg mineral, alloys and Pd-bearing secondary sulfides (millerite and heazlewoodite). The primary Pt minerals are more resistant to oxidation and dissolution, especially

  19. Platinum(II)-Oligonucleotide Coordination Based Aptasensor for Simple and Selective Detection of Platinum Compounds.

    PubMed

    Cai, Sheng; Tian, Xueke; Sun, Lianli; Hu, Haihong; Zheng, Shirui; Jiang, Huidi; Yu, Lushan; Zeng, Su

    2015-10-20

    Wide use of platinum-based chemotherapeutic regimens for the treatment for carcinoma calls for a simple and selective detection of platinum compound in biological samples. On the basis of the platinum(II)-base pair coordination, a novel type of aptameric platform for platinum detection has been introduced. This chemiluminescence (CL) aptasensor consists of a designed streptavidin (SA) aptamer sequence in which several base pairs were replaced by G-G mismatches. Only in the presence of platinum, coordination occurs between the platinum and G-G base pairs as opposed to the hydrogen-bonded G-C base pairs, which leads to SA aptamer sequence activation, resulting in their binding to SA coated magnetic beads. These Pt-DNA coordination events were monitored by a simple and direct luminol-peroxide CL reaction through horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalysis with a strong chemiluminescence emission. The validated ranges of quantification were 0.12-240 μM with a limit of detection of 60 nM and selectivity over other metal ions. This assay was also successfully used in urine sample determination. It will be a promising candidate for the detection of platinum in biomedical and environmental samples.

  20. Casting alloys.

    PubMed

    Wataha, John C; Messer, Regina L

    2004-04-01

    Although the role of dental casting alloys has changed in recent years with the development of improved all-ceramic materials and resin-based composites, alloys will likely continue to be critical assets in the treatment of missing and severely damaged teeth. Alloy shave physical, chemical, and biologic properties that exceed other classes of materials. The selection of the appropriate dental casting alloy is paramount to the long-term success of dental prostheses,and the selection process has become complex with the development of many new alloys. However, this selection process is manageable if the practitioner focuses on the appropriate physical and biologic properties, such as tensile strength, modulus of elasticity,corrosion, and biocompatibility, and avoids dwelling on the less important properties of alloy color and short-term cost. The appropriate selection of an alloy helps to ensure a longer-lasting restoration and better oral health for the patient.

  1. Platinum Publications, March 1–March 30, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  2. Platinum Publications, October 30 – November 26, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  3. Platinum Publications, July 31–September 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  4. Platinum Publications as of December 3, 2013 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  5. Mineral resource of the month: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The precious metals commonly referred to as platinum-group metals (PGM) include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and ruthenium. PGM are among the rarest of elements, and their market values — particularly for palladium, platinum and rhodium — are the highest of all precious metals.

  6. Platinum Publications, January 26–February 28, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  7. Platinum Publications, January 1–March 31, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Platinum Publications, March 27 – April 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications, May 1 – June 25, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, July 29–September 29, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, November 27, 2014 – February 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications, October 28–November 30, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Platinum Publications, June 26–July 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. Platinum Publications, April 28–May 31, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  15. Platinum Publications, June 1–June 30, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. Platinum Publications, January 1–March 31, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  17. Platinum Publications as of April 30, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  18. Platinum Publications, November 27, 2014 – February 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  19. Platinum Publications as of May 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  20. Platinum Publications as of September 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  1. Platinum Publications, February 27 – March 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  2. Platinum Publications, July 29–September 29, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  3. Platinum Publications as of April 30, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  4. Platinum Publications as of June 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  5. Platinum Publications as of September 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  6. Platinum Publications, July 1–July 28, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  7. Platinum Publications as of June 25, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Platinum Publications, June 1–June 29, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications as of December 3, 2013 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, October 1–29, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, June 30–July 26, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications, July 26–August 30, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Platinum Publications, September 30–October 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. Platinum Publications, October 30 – November 26, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  15. Platinum Publications, September 26 – October 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. Platinum Publications, February 27 – March 26, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  17. Platinum Publications, May 1 – June 25, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  18. Platinum Publications as of May 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  19. Platinum Publications, September 30–October 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  20. Platinum Publications, October 28–November 30, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  1. Platinum Publications, March 31–April 27, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  2. Platinum Publications as of March 6, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  3. Platinum Publications, March 27 – April 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  4. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  5. Platinum Publications, September 26 – October 29, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  6. Platinum Publications, June 1–June 30, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  7. Platinum Publications, June 26–July 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  8. Platinum Publications as of March 6, 2014 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 21 prestigious science journals. This list represents new publications generated from PubMed as of the date shown above. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  9. Platinum Publications, July 31–September 30, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  10. Platinum Publications, October 30–December 31, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  11. Platinum Publications, July 1–July 28, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  12. Platinum Publications, October 1–29, 2015 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected by Dr. Craig Reynolds, associate director, National Cancer Institute, from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  13. Platinum Publications, December 1–December 29, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  14. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold...

  15. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold...

  16. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold...

  17. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold...

  18. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold...

  19. Role of electron concentration in softening and hardening of ternary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of various combinations of hafnium, tantalum, rhenium, osmium, iridium, and platinum in ternary molybdenum alloys on alloy softening and hardening were determined. Hardness tests were conducted at four test temperatures over the temperature range 77 to 411 K. Results showed that hardness data for ternary molybdenum alloys could be correlated with anticipated results from binary data based upon expressions involving the number of s and d electrons contributed by the solute elements. The correlation indicated that electron concentration plays a dominant role in controlling the hardness of ternary molybdenum alloys.

  20. Surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciabatti, Iacopo; Femoni, Cristina; Iapalucci, Maria Carmela; Longoni, Giuliano; Zacchini, Stefano; Zarra, Salvatore

    2012-06-01

    Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters.Four molecular Pt-carbonyl clusters decorated by Cd-Br fragments, i.e., [Pt13(CO)12{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br2(dmf)3}2]2- (1), [Pt19(CO)17{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br3(Me2CO)2}{Cd5(μ-Br)5Br(Me2CO)4}]2- (2), [H2Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12]8- (3) and [H4Pt26(CO)20(CdBr)12(PtBr)x]6- (4) (x = 0-2), have been obtained from the reactions between [Pt3n(CO)6n]2- (n = 2-6) and CdBr2.H2O in dmf at 120 °C. The structures of these molecular clusters with diameters of 1.5-2 nm have been determined by X-ray crystallography. Both 1 and 2 are composed of icosahedral or bis-icosahedral Pt-CO cores decorated on the surface by Cd-Br motifs, whereas 3 and 4 display a cubic close packed Pt26Cd12 metal frame decorated by CO and Br ligands. An oversimplified and unifying approach to interpret the electron count of these surface decorated platinum carbonyl clusters is suggested, and extended to other low-valent organometallic clusters and Au-thiolate nanoclusters. CCDC 867747 and 867748. For crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30400g

  1. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Daniela A.; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2012-04-01

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity).

  2. Chiral discrimination in platinum anticancer drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Michele; Malina, Jaroslav; Kasparkova, Jana; Brabec, Viktor; Natile, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    In this article we review the biological activity of analogs of the antitumor drug cisplatin that contain chiral amine ligands. Interaction with DNA and formation of cross-links with adjacent purine bases are considered to be the crucial steps in the antitumor activity of this class of complexes. Because double-helical DNA has a chiral structure, interaction with enantiomeric complexes of platinum should lead to diastereomeric adducts. It has been demonstrated that DNA cross-links of platinum complexes with enantiomeric amine ligands not only can exhibit different conformational features but also can be processed differently by the cellular machinery as a consequence of these conformational differences. These results expand the general knowledge of how the stereochemistry of the platinum-DNA adduct can influence the cell response and contribute to understanding the processes that are crucial for antitumor activity. The steric requirements of the chiral ligands, in terms of configuration and flexibility, are also elucidated. PMID:12426131

  3. Autonomous movement of platinum-loaded stomatocytes.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Daniela A; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2012-02-26

    Polymer stomatocytes are bowl-shaped structures of nanosize dimensions formed by the controlled deformation of polymer vesicles. The stable nanocavity and strict control of the opening are ideal for the physical entrapment of nanoparticles which, when catalytically active, can turn the stomatocyte morphology into a nanoreactor. Herein we report an approach to generate autonomous movement of the polymer stomatocytes by selectively entrapping catalytically active platinum nanoparticles within their nanocavities and subsequently using catalysis as a driving force for movement. Hydrogen peroxide is free to access the inner stomatocyte cavity, where it is decomposed by the active catalyst (the entrapped platinum nanoparticles) into oxygen and water. This generates a rapid discharge, which induces thrust and directional movement. The design of the platinum-loaded stomatocytes resembles a miniature monopropellant rocket engine, in which the controlled opening of the stomatocytes directs the expulsion of the decomposition products away from the reaction chamber (inner stomatocyte cavity).

  4. Extending the platinum-free interval with a non-platinum therapy in platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. Results from the SOCRATES Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Pignata, Sandro; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scarfone, Giovanna; Scollo, Paolo; Odicino, Franco; Selvaggi, Luigi; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Frigerio, Luigi; Mereu, Liliana; Ghezzi, Fabio; Manzione, Luigi; Lauria, Rossella; Breda, Enrico; Marforio, Giovanna; Ballardini, Michela; Lombardi, Alessandra Vernaglia; Sorio, Roberto; Tumolo, Salvatore; Costa, Bruno; Magni, Giovanna; Perrone, Francesco; Favalli, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that extending the platinum-free interval with intervening non-platinum therapy increases the efficacy of a later re-treatment with platinum in platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. This hypothesis is based on data from small series and although it has not been validated prospectively, this strategy has entered general practice in Italy in the last years. The SOCRATES study retrospectively assessed the pattern of care of a cohort of patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer observed in the years 2000-2002 in 37 Italian centres. Data were collected between April and September 2005. Patients with recurrent ovarian cancer with a platinum-free interval >6 months were eligible. 493 patient files were collected and 428 were eligible and analyzed. The interval from the end of the 1st line to relapse was 6-12 months in 164 patients (39.5%) and >12 months in 251 cases (60.5%). Patients received a 2nd (100%), 3rd (80.1%), 4th (50.2%), 5th (28.3%), and 6th (11.9%) line of chemotherapy. At 2nd line 282 (65.9%) received platinum (group A), while 146 (34.1%) received non-platinum chemotherapy (group B). In the latter group, 67 patients received platinum at later progression (group B1), while 79 never received platinum (group B2). Median time to platinum re-treatment was 20 and 23.1 months in patients of groups A and B1, respectively. The response rate to the first platinum received was 74.4 and 57.4% in groups A and B1, respectively (p = 0.02). Group B2 was characterized by the worst response rate and survival. At multivariate analysis time of first platinum re-treatment (2nd line vs. later; p = 0.0132; OR = 2.34) and age (p = 0.0029; OR = 2.41) was independently associated with a higher possibility of response to platinum. With the limits of a retrospective study, our data question the hypothesis that extending the platinum-free interval with an intervening non-platinum therapy in patients with recurrent platinum-sensitive ovarian

  5. Examination of the platinum effect on the oxidation behavior ofnickel-aluminide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Peggy Y.; Tolpygo, V.K.

    2007-05-15

    Oxidation resistant nickel-aluminide coatings are designed to develop a protective alumina scale during high temperature exposure. It is well established that platinum additions, typically about 6-8 at%, provide substantial improvements in oxidation resistance of such coatings, yet the nature of the platinum effect is still not fully understood. In this work, the oxidation behavior of two commercial NiAl and NiPtAl coatings deposited on the same Ni-base single crystal alloy CMSX-4 was analyzed. Cyclic and isothermal oxidation tests were conducted at 1150 C in air. Microstructure development and alumina/coating interface chemistry were studied as a function of oxidation time. Numerous voids developed at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiAl interface, and sulfur was found to segregate at the void surfaces and at the contact interface, leading to spallation of the scale over the convex areas along ridges on the coating surface. The presence of platinum prevented sulfur segregation and void formation at the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/NiPtAl interface. As a result, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale on the NiPtAl coating remained adherent and virtually no spallation was observed even after prolonged cyclic oxidation.

  6. Tracking the shape-dependent sintering of platinum-rhodium model catalysts under operando conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejral, Uta; Müller, Patrick; Balmes, Olivier; Pontoni, Diego; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticle sintering during catalytic reactions is a major cause for catalyst deactivation. Understanding its atomic-scale processes and finding strategies to reduce it is of paramount scientific and economic interest. Here, we report on the composition-dependent three-dimensional restructuring of epitaxial platinum-rhodium alloy nanoparticles on alumina during carbon monoxide oxidation at 550 K and near-atmospheric pressures employing in situ high-energy grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, online mass spectrometry and a combinatorial sample design. For platinum-rich particles our results disclose a dramatic reaction-induced height increase, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of the total particle surface coverage. We find this restructuring to be progressively reduced for particles with increasing rhodium composition. We explain our observations by a carbon monoxide oxidation promoted non-classical Ostwald ripening process during which smaller particles are destabilized by the heat of reaction. Its driving force lies in the initial particle shape which features for platinum-rich particles a kinetically stabilized, low aspect ratio.

  7. Tracking the shape-dependent sintering of platinum-rhodium model catalysts under operando conditions.

    PubMed

    Hejral, Uta; Müller, Patrick; Balmes, Olivier; Pontoni, Diego; Stierle, Andreas

    2016-03-09

    Nanoparticle sintering during catalytic reactions is a major cause for catalyst deactivation. Understanding its atomic-scale processes and finding strategies to reduce it is of paramount scientific and economic interest. Here, we report on the composition-dependent three-dimensional restructuring of epitaxial platinum-rhodium alloy nanoparticles on alumina during carbon monoxide oxidation at 550 K and near-atmospheric pressures employing in situ high-energy grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, online mass spectrometry and a combinatorial sample design. For platinum-rich particles our results disclose a dramatic reaction-induced height increase, accompanied by a corresponding reduction of the total particle surface coverage. We find this restructuring to be progressively reduced for particles with increasing rhodium composition. We explain our observations by a carbon monoxide oxidation promoted non-classical Ostwald ripening process during which smaller particles are destabilized by the heat of reaction. Its driving force lies in the initial particle shape which features for platinum-rich particles a kinetically stabilized, low aspect ratio.

  8. Transformation in iron-platinum thin film via nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Yutaka; Yatsu, Shigeo; Watanabe, Seiichi; Yamauchi, Akira; Shibano, Jun-ichi

    2017-10-01

    The composite consists of disordered and ordered iron-platinum (FePt) alloys was induced by nanosecond pulsed laser (NPL) irradiation. The process was investigated by laser high-voltage electron microscopy (laser-HVEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The structural transformation upon NPL irradiation was monitored by laser-HVEM imaging, with the structure being modified in a short second after the one pulse. XRD analyses revealed expanded and contracted lattice distances before and after NPL irradiation, respectively. According to the XRD and TEM results, the surface of FePt alloys was transformed from fct to fcc structure with structural strain by NPL irradiation.

  9. Coadsorbed H and CO interaction on platinum.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tanglaw; Nakanishi, Hiroshi; Kasai, Hideaki

    2008-10-21

    The behavior of hydrogen near a platinum-surface-adsorbed carbon monoxide molecule is described using a potential energy term constructed from density functional theory. A clear nonattractive interaction of hydrogen with CO is confirmed, most notably with oxygen, which retains its strong H-repulsive traits in the Pt-bound CO case. Inhibiting effects of CO greater than what is expected from simple adsorption site exclusion are discussed with regard to adsorption/desorption and mobility on platinum, as well as possibilities of COH and HCO formation.

  10. Quantitative skin prick and bronchial provocation tests with platinum salt.

    PubMed Central

    Merget, R; Schultze-Werninghaus, G; Bode, F; Bergmann, E M; Zachgo, W; Meier-Sydow, J

    1991-01-01

    Occupational asthma due to platinum salts is a frequent disease in platinum refineries. The diagnosis is based upon a history of work related symptoms and a positive skin prick test with platinum salts. Bronchial provocation tests have not been performed in epidemiological studies because the skin test is believed to be highly specific and sensitive. As no reliable data about this issue currently exist, this study assesses the use of skin prick and bronchial provocation tests with methacholine and platinum salt in platinum refinery workers. Twenty seven of 35 workers, who were referred to our clinic with work related symptoms and nine control subjects with bronchial hyperreactivity underwent a skin prick test and bronchial provocation with methacholine and platinum salt. For skin prick and bronchial provocation tests with platinum salt a 10(-2)-10(-8) mol/l hexachloroplatinic acid solution, in 10-fold dilutions was used. Four of the 27 subjects and all controls showed neither a bronchial reaction nor a skin reaction. Twenty three subjects were considered allergic to platinum salt; 22 of these showed a fall of 50% or more in specific airway conductance after inhalation of the platinum salt solution. Four workers experienced a positive bronchial reaction despite a negative skin prick test. No correlation of responsiveness to methacholine with responsiveness to platinum salt was found, but the skin prick test correlated with the bronchial reaction to platinum salt (rs = 0.50, p less than 0.023, n = 22). One dual reaction was seen in bronchial provocation tests. Side effects of both skin tests and bronchial provocation tests with platinum salt were rare and were not encountered in workers without a skin reaction to platinum salt. It is concluded that bronchial provocation tests with platinum salts should be performed on workers with work related symptoms but negative skin tests with platinum salts. PMID:1772797

  11. Use of platinum electrodes for the electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Platinum electrodes with surface area ratios of four to one were used to detect and enumerate a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Linear relationships were established between inoculum size and detection time. End points for platinum electrodes were similar to those obtained with a platinum-reference electrode combination. Shape of the overall response curves and length of detection times for gram-positive organisms were markedly different than those for the majority of gram-negative species. Platinum electrodes are better than the platinum-reference electrode combination because of cost, ease of handling, and clearer definition of the end point.

  12. Platinum recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry E.

    2001-01-01

    In the United States, catalytic converters are the major source of secondary platinum for recycling. Other sources of platinum scrap include reforming and chemical process catalysts. The glass industry is a small but significant source of platinum scrap. In North America, it has been estimated that in 1998 more than 20,000 kilograms per year of platinum-group metals from automobile catalysts were available for recycling. In 1998, an estimated 7,690 kilograms of platinum were recycled in the United States. U.S. recycling efficiency was calculated to have been 76 percent in 1998; the recycling rate was estimated at 16 percent.

  13. Use of platinum electrodes for the electrochemical detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1978-01-01

    Platinum electrodes with surface area ratios of four to one were used to detect and enumerate a variety of gram-positive and gram-negative organisms. Linear relationships were established between inoculum size and detection time. End points for platinum electrodes were similar to those obtained with a platinum-reference electrode combination. Shape of the overall response curves and length of detection times for gram-positive organisms were markedly different than those for the majority of gram-negative species. Platinum electrodes are better than the platinum-reference electrode combination because of cost, ease of handling, and clearer definition of the end point.

  14. Outpatient desensitization in selected patients with platinum hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, David M; Vetter, Monica Hagan; Cohn, David E; Khan, Ambar; Hays, John L

    2017-06-01

    Platinum-based chemotherapies are a standard treatment for both initial and recurrent gynecologic cancers. Given this widespread use, it is important to be aware of the features of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the subsequent treatment of these reactions. There is also increasing interest in the development of desensitization protocols to allow patients with a history of platinum hypersensitivity to receive further platinum based therapy. In this review, we describe the management of platinum hypersensitivity reactions and the desensitization protocols utilized at our institution. We also describe the clinical categorizations utilized to triage patients to appropriate desensitization protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of new platinum(II) and platinum(IV) triphyrin complexes.

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhaoli; Kuzuhara, Daiki; Ikeda, Shinya; Okujima, Tetsuo; Mori, Shigeki; Uno, Hidemitsu; Yamada, Hiroko

    2013-02-18

    Metalation of 6,13,20,21-tetrakis(4-methylphenyl)-22H-tribenzo[14]triphyrin(2.1.1) with PtCl(2) gave a platinum(II) complex having a square-planar coordination structure with two pyrrolic nitrogen atoms and two chloride ions, with a saddle-shaped macrocycle. This platinum(II) complex was easily oxidized by air to an octahedral platinum(IV) complex coordinated by three pyrrolic nitrogen atoms as a tridentate monoanionic cyclic ligand and three chloride ions. When platinum(II) triphyrin was crystallized in air, an oxygen atom was incorporated between two α-carbon atoms of the pyrroles as an oxygen bridge to intercept the 14π aromatic system.

  16. Synthesis and characterization of nanostructured palladium-based alloy electrocatalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Arindam

    Low temperature fuel cells like proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are expected to play a crucial role in the future hydrogen economy, especially for transportation applications. These electrochemical devices offer significantly higher efficiency compared to conventional heat engines. However, use of exotic and expensive platinum as the electrocatalyst poses serious problems for commercial viability. In this regard, there is an urgent need to develop low-platinum or non-platinum electrocatalysts with electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) superior or comparable to that of platinum. This dissertation first investigates non-platinum, palladium-based alloy electrocatalysts for ORR. Particularly, Pd-M (M = Mo and W) alloys are synthesized by a novel thermal decomposition of organo-metallic precursors. The carbon-supported Pd-M (M = Mo, W) electrocatalyts are then heat treated up to 900°C in H2 atmosphere and investigated for their phase behavior. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements reveal that the alloying of Pd with Mo or W significantly enhances the catalytic activity for ORR as well as the stability (durability) of the electrocatalysts. Additionally, both the alloy systems exhibit high tolerance to methanol, which is particularly advantageous for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC). The dissertation then focuses on one-pot synthesis of carbon-supported multi-metallic Pt-Pd-Co nanoalloys by a rapid microwave-assisted solvothermal (MW-ST) method. The multi-metallic alloy compositions synthesized by the MW-ST method show much higher catalytic activity for ORR compared to their counterparts synthesized by the conventional borohydride reduction method. Additionally, a series of Pt encapsulated Pd-Co nanoparticle electrocatalysts are synthesized by the MW-ST method and characterized to understand their phase behavior, surface composition, and electrocatalytic activity for ORR. Finally, the dissertation

  17. The preparation and characterization of rhenium modified Pt(111) and Pt(100), and platinum modified Re(0001) single crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godbey, David J.; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    1988-08-01

    Rhenium metal grows epitaxially on Pt(111) and Pt(100) in a layer by layer mode as shown by Auger electron spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction. The growth mode of platinum metal on Re(0001) was also found to be layer by layer. Rhenium evaporated onto Pt(111) grows with a hexagonal close-packed structure exposing the (0001) face while on Pt(100) it grows with a face centered cubic structure exposing the (100) face. The surface composition of the bimetallic Re-Pt surface can be determined from the Auger spectrum when the coverage of rhenium is less than three monolayers. Following rhenium deposition on platinum, chemical shifts were detected in the 4f levels of both adsorbate and substrate using XPS, and this is indicative of the formation of a surface alloy between the two metals. Annealing the bimetallic surface to 1150 K caused further shifts to higher binding energies for both the platinum and the rhenium 4f lines. The presence of platinum on a partially oxidized Re(0001) surface was found to catalyze the decomposition of rhenium oxides under UHV and at a temperature as low as 400° C.

  18. Altered glutamine metabolism in platinum resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Chantelle D.; Savadelis, Alyssa; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Avril, Stefanie; DiFeo, Analisa; Avril, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by an increase in cellular energy metabolism, which is predominantly satisfied by glucose and glutamine. Targeting metabolic pathways is an attractive approach to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness and to potentially overcome drug resistance in ovarian cancer. In platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines the metabolism of both, glucose and glutamine was initially up-regulated in response to platinum treatment. In contrast, platinum-resistant cells revealed a significant dependency on the presence of glutamine, with an upregulated expression of glutamine transporter ASCT2 and glutaminase. This resulted in a higher oxygen consumption rate compared to platinum-sensitive cell lines reflecting the increased dependency of glutamine utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The important role of glutamine metabolism was confirmed by stable overexpression of glutaminase, which conferred platinum resistance. Conversely, shRNA knockdown of glutaminase in platinum resistant cells resulted in re-sensitization to platinum treatment. Importantly, combining the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES with platinum synergistically inhibited platinum sensitive and resistant ovarian cancers in vitro. Apoptotic induction was significantly increased using platinum together with BPTES compared to either treatment alone. Our findings suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism together with platinum based chemotherapy offers a potential treatment strategy particularly in drug resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:27191653

  19. Altered glutamine metabolism in platinum resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Chantelle D; Savadelis, Alyssa; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Avril, Stefanie; DiFeo, Analisa; Avril, Norbert

    2016-07-05

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by an increase in cellular energy metabolism, which is predominantly satisfied by glucose and glutamine. Targeting metabolic pathways is an attractive approach to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness and to potentially overcome drug resistance in ovarian cancer. In platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines the metabolism of both, glucose and glutamine was initially up-regulated in response to platinum treatment. In contrast, platinum-resistant cells revealed a significant dependency on the presence of glutamine, with an upregulated expression of glutamine transporter ASCT2 and glutaminase. This resulted in a higher oxygen consumption rate compared to platinum-sensitive cell lines reflecting the increased dependency of glutamine utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The important role of glutamine metabolism was confirmed by stable overexpression of glutaminase, which conferred platinum resistance. Conversely, shRNA knockdown of glutaminase in platinum resistant cells resulted in re-sensitization to platinum treatment. Importantly, combining the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES with platinum synergistically inhibited platinum sensitive and resistant ovarian cancers in vitro. Apoptotic induction was significantly increased using platinum together with BPTES compared to either treatment alone. Our findings suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism together with platinum based chemotherapy offers a potential treatment strategy particularly in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

  20. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Claudia; Dubois, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. PMID:26345228

  1. Carbon monoxide tolerant platinum electrocatalysts on niobium doped titania and carbon nanotube composite supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigdon, William A.; Huang, Xinyu

    2014-12-01

    In the anode of electrochemical cells operating at low temperature, the hydrogen oxidation reaction is susceptible to poisoning from carbon monoxide (CO) which strongly adsorbs on platinum (Pt) catalysts and increases activation overpotential. Adsorbed CO is removed by oxidative processes such as electrochemical stripping, though cleaning can also cause corrosion. One approach to improve the tolerance of Pt is through alloying with less-noble metals, but the durability of alloyed electrocatalysts is a critical concern. Without sacrificing stability, tolerance can be improved by careful design of the support composition using metal oxides. The bifunctional mechanism is promoted at junctions of the catalyst and metal oxides used in the support. Stable metal oxides can also form strong interactions with catalysts, as is the case for platinum on titania (TiOx). In this study, niobium (Nb) serves as an electron donor dopant in titania. The transition metal oxides are joined to functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) supports in order to synthesize composite supports. Pt is then deposited to form electrocatalysts which are characterized before fabrication into anodes for tests as an electrochemical hydrogen pump. Comparisons are made between the control from Pt-CNT to Pt-TiOx-CNT and Pt-Ti0.9Nb0.1Ox-CNT in order to demonstrate advantages.

  2. VANADIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Smith, K.F.; Van Thyne, R.J.

    1959-05-12

    This patent deals with vanadium based ternary alloys useful as fuel element jackets. According to the invention the ternary vanadium alloys, prepared in an arc furnace, contain from 2.5 to 15% by weight titanium and from 0.5 to 10% by weight niobium. Characteristics of these alloys are good thermal conductivity, low neutron capture cross section, good corrosion resistance, good welding and fabricating properties, low expansion coefficient, and high strength.

  3. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1963-02-26

    A brazing alloy which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability, said alloy being capable of forming a corrosion resistant brazed joint wherein at least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion resistant refractory metal, said alloy consisting essentially of 20 to 50 per cent by weight of gold, 20 to 50 per cent by weight of nickel, and 15 to 45 per cent by weight of molybdenum. (AEC)

  4. Anticancer platinum (IV) prodrugs with novel modes of activity.

    PubMed

    Chin, Chee Fei; Wong, Daniel Yuan Qiang; Jothibasu, Ramasamy; Ang, Wee Han

    2011-01-01

    Over the past four decades, the search for improved platinum drugs based on the classical platinum (II)-diam(m)ine pharmacophore has yielded only a handful of successful candidates. New methodologies centred on platinum (IV) complexes, with better stability and expanded coordination spheres, offer the possibility of overcoming limitations inherent to platinum (II) drugs. In this review, novel strategies of targeting and killing cancer cells using platinum (IV) constructs are discussed. These approaches exploit the unique electrochemical characteristics and structural attributes of platinum (IV) complexes as a means of developing anticancer prodrugs that can target and selectively destroy cancer cells. Anticancer platinum (IV) prodrugs represent promising new strategies as targeted chemotherapeutic agents in the ongoing battle against cancer.

  5. Porous platinum mesoflowers with enhanced activity for methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang Lina; Wang Wenjin; Hong Feng; Yang Shengchun; You Hongjun; Fang Jixiang; Ding Bingjun

    2012-07-15

    Porous Pt and Pt-Ag alloy mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesized using Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic reaction. The silver content in Pt-Ag alloys can be facilely controlled by nitric acid treatment. And the pure Pt MFs can be obtained by selective removal of silver element from Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} MFs electrochemically. Both Pt{sub 45}Ag{sub 55}, Pt{sub 72}Ag{sub 28} and pure Pt show a high catalytic performance in methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Especially, pure Pt MFs exhibited a 2 to 3 times current density enhancement in MOR compared with the commercial used Pt black, which can be attributed to their porous nanostructure with 3-dimentional nature and small crystal sizes. - Graphical Abstract: The CVs of MOR on Pt (red) and Pt black (green) catalysts in 0.1 M HClO{sub 4} and 0.5 M CH{sub 3}OH for specific mass current. The insert shows the SEM images of two porous Pt MFs. Platinum mesoflowers (MFs) with about 2 {mu}m in diameter and high porosity were synthesised with Ag mesoflowers as sacrificial template by galvanic replacement. The porous Pt MFs exhibited a more than 3 times enhancement in electrocatalytic performance for methanol oxidation reaction compared the commercial used Pt black. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous Pt and Pt-Ag mesoflowers (MFs) were synthesized using Ag MFs sacrifical template. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt MFs presents an improved catalytic activity in MOR compared with Pt black. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provided a facile approach for the development of high performance Pt electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  6. Fraction of platinum surface covered with carbonaceous species following hydrogenolysis of hexane on platinum alumina catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Rivera Latas, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming plays a major role in satisfying the demand for unleaded, high octane gasoline. Hydrogen containing carbonaceous deposits (coke) accumulation on the surface of the catalysts during reforming operation. This study investigated the following question: what is the fraction of the platinum surface covered with the deposits following a typical reforming reaction. These observations prompted us to prepare a platinum-alumina catalyst with a high metal content (5%) to enhance the sensitivity of experiments designed to examine the platinum surface following hexane hydrogenolysis. The reaction was selected because it is a good model reaction for catalytic reforming and it was also studied by the Somorjai group in the higher temperature range of their work. Hydrogenolysis of hexane was carried out in a flow system for 3 h at 713 K, at atmospheric pressure, and around 0.1 total conversion. The catalyst was cooled down to room temperature in the reactant mixture, and the fraction of surface platinum atoms exposed was measured in situ by four independent methods: titration of adsorbed oxygen by dihydrogen, chemisorption of carbon monoxide, infra-red spectroscopy of carbon monoxide bonded to platinum, and rate of ethylene hydrogenation. Independent gravimetric studies showed that coke deposits of around 1% by weight were formed on the same catalyst during hydrogenolysis of hexane under similar conditions. Each of the four methods indicate that approximately 50% of the platinum surface remains exposed under the conditions.

  7. Platinum-containing compound platinum pyrithione is stronger and safer than cisplatin in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Dan; Lan, Xiaoying; Liao, Siyan; Yang, Changshan; Zhang, Peiquan; Wu, Jinjie; Li, Xiaofen; Liu, Ningning; Liao, Yuning; Huang, Hongbiao; Shi, Xianping; Jiang, Lili; Liu, Xiuhua; He, Zhimin; Wang, Xuejun; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-01-01

    DNA is the well-known molecular target of current platinum-based anticancer drugs; consequently, their clinical use is severely restricted by their systemic toxicities and drug resistance originating from non-selective DNA damage. Various strategies have been developed to circumvent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy but the inherent problem remains unsolved. Here we report that platinum pyrithione (PtPT), a chemically well-characterized synthetic complex of platinum, inhibits proteasome function and thereby exhibits greater and more selective cytotoxicity to multiple cancer cells than cisplatin, without showing discernible DNA damage both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, unlike the classical proteasome inhibitor bortezomib/Velcade which inhibits the proteasome via blocking the peptidase activity of 20S proteasomes, PtPT primarily deactivates 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases USP14 and UCHL5. Furthermore, PtPT can selectively induce cytotoxicity and proteasome inhibition in cancer cells from leukemia patients but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans. In nude mice, PtPT also remarkably inhibited tumor xenograft growth, without showing the adverse effects that were induced by cisplatin. Hence, we have discovered a new platinum-based anti-tumor agent PtPT which targets 26S proteasome-associated deubiquitinases rather than DNA in the cell and thereby exerts safer and more potent anti-tumor effects, identifying a highly translatable new platinum-based anti-cancer strategy. PMID:27381943

  8. Evaluation of industrial platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Dillontownes, Lawrence A.; Alderfer, David W.

    1987-01-01

    The calibration and stability of four surface temperature measuring industrial platinum resistance thermometers for use in the temperature range -120 C to 160 C was investigated. It was found that the calibration formulation of the International Practical Temperature Scale of 1968 provided the most accurate calibration. It was also found that all the resistance thermometers suffered from varying degrees of instability and hysteresis.

  9. Skin Sensitizing Potency of Halogenated Platinum Salts.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between occupational exposure to halogenated platinum (Pt) salts and Pt-specific allergic sensitization is well-established. Although human case reports and clinical studies demonstrate that Pt salts are potent skin sensitizers, no studies have been published tha...

  10. Skin Sensitizing Potency of Halogenated Platinum Salts.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relationship between occupational exposure to halogenated platinum (Pt) salts and Pt-specific allergic sensitization is well-established. Although human case reports and clinical studies demonstrate that Pt salts are potent skin sensitizers, no studies have been published tha...

  11. On the enzymatic formation of platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Y.; Riddin, T. L.; Gericke, M.; Whiteley, C. G.

    2010-01-01

    A dimeric hydrogenase enzyme (44.5 and 39.4 kDa sub units) was isolated in a 39.5% yield from the fungus Fusarium oxysporum and purified 4.64-fold by ion exchange chromatography on Sephacryl S-200. Characterisation of the enzyme afforded pH and temperature optima of 7.5 and 38 °C, respectively, a half-life stability of 36 min and a V max and K m of 3.57 nmol min-1 mL-1 and 2.25 mM, respectively. This enzyme was inhibited (non-competitively) by hydrogen hexachloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) at 1 or 2 mM with a K i value of 118 μM. Incubation of the platinum salt with the pure enzyme under an atmosphere of hydrogen and optimum enzyme conditions (pH 7.5, 38 °C) afforded <10% bioreduction after 8 h while at conditions suitable for platinum nanoparticle formation (pH 9, 65 °C) over 90% reduction took place after the same length of time. Cell-free extract from the fungal isolates produced nearly 90% bioreduction of the platinum salt under both pH and temperature conditions. The bioreduction of the platinum salt by a hydrogenase enzyme takes place by a passive process and not an active one as previously understood.

  12. Functionalization of Platinum Complexes for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Wang, Xiaohui; Guo, Zijian

    2015-09-15

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs are the mainstay of chemotherapy regimens in clinic. Nevertheless, the efficacy of platinum drugs is badly affected by serious systemic toxicities and drug resistance, and the pharmacokinetics of most platinum drugs is largely unknown. In recent years, a keen interest in functionalizing platinum complexes with bioactive molecules, targeting groups, photosensitizers, fluorophores, or nanomaterials has been sparked among chemical and biomedical researchers. The motivation for functionalization comes from some of the following demands: to improve the tumor selectivity or minimize the systemic toxicity of the drugs, to enhance the cellular accumulation of the drugs, to overcome the tumor resistance to the drugs, to visualize the drug molecules in vitro or in vivo, to achieve a synergistic anticancer effect between different therapeutic modalities, or to add extra functionality to the drugs. In this Account, we present different strategies being used for functionalizing platinum complexes, including conjugation with bisphosphonates, peptides, receptor-specific ligands, polymers, nanoparticles, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents, metal chelators, or photosensitizers. Among them, bisphosphonates, peptides, and receptor-specific ligands are used for actively targeted drug delivery, polymers and nanoparticles are for passively targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents are for theranostic purposes, metal chelators are for the treatment or prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and photosensitizers are for photodynamic therapy of cancers. The rationales behind these designs are explained and justified at the molecular or cellular level, associating with the requirements for diagnosis, therapy, and visualization of biological processes. To illustrate the wide range of opportunities and challenges that are emerging in this realm, representative examples of targeted drug delivery systems, anticancer conjugates

  13. Pyrometallurgical Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Tang, Huimin; Ye, Lei; Ma, Yutian; Rao, Mingjun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    As an important secondary resource with abundant platinum group metals (PGMs), spent catalysts demand recycling for both economic and environmental benefits. This article reviews the main pyrometallurgical processes for PGM recovery from spent catalysts. Existing processes, including smelting, vaporization, and sintering processes, are discussed based in part on a review of the physiochemical characteristics of PGMs in spent catalysts. The smelting technology, which produces a PGM-containing alloy, is significantly influenced by the addition of various collectors, such as lead, copper, iron, matte, or printed circuit board (PCB), considering their chemical affinities for PGMs. The vaporization process can recover PGMs in vapor form at low temperatures (250-700°C), but it suffers high corrosion and potential environmental and health risks as a result of involvement of the hazardous gases, mainly Cl2 and CO. The sintering process serves as a reforming means for recycling of the spent catalysts by in situ reduction of their oxidized PGMs components. Among these processes, the smelting process seems more promising although its overall performance can be further improved by seeking a suitable target-oriented collector and flux, together with proper pretreatment and process intensification using an external field.

  14. Pyrometallurgical Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Tang, Huimin; Ye, Lei; Ma, Yutian; Rao, Mingjun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-07-01

    As an important secondary resource with abundant platinum group metals (PGMs), spent catalysts demand recycling for both economic and environmental benefits. This article reviews the main pyrometallurgical processes for PGM recovery from spent catalysts. Existing processes, including smelting, vaporization, and sintering processes, are discussed based in part on a review of the physiochemical characteristics of PGMs in spent catalysts. The smelting technology, which produces a PGM-containing alloy, is significantly influenced by the addition of various collectors, such as lead, copper, iron, matte, or printed circuit board (PCB), considering their chemical affinities for PGMs. The vaporization process can recover PGMs in vapor form at low temperatures (250-700°C), but it suffers high corrosion and potential environmental and health risks as a result of involvement of the hazardous gases, mainly Cl2 and CO. The sintering process serves as a reforming means for recycling of the spent catalysts by in situ reduction of their oxidized PGMs components. Among these processes, the smelting process seems more promising although its overall performance can be further improved by seeking a suitable target-oriented collector and flux, together with proper pretreatment and process intensification using an external field.

  15. Ag-Pt alloy nanoparticles with the compositions in the miscibility gap

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Zhenmeng; Yang Hong

    2008-07-15

    Silver platinum binary alloys with compositions between about Ag{sub 2}Pt{sub 98} and Ag{sub 95}Pt{sub 5} at <{approx} 400 deg. C have largely not been observed in bulk due to the large immiscibility between these two metals. We present in this paper that Ag-Pt alloy nanostructures can be made in a broad composition range. The formation of Ag-Pt nanostructures is studied by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX). Our results indicate that lattice parameter changes almost linearly with composition in these Ag-Pt nanomaterials. In another word, lattice parameter and composition relationship follows the Vegard's law, which is a strong indication for the formation of metal alloys. Our transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study shows that the silver-rich Ag-Pt alloy nanostructures have spherical shape, while the platinum-rich ones possess wire-like morphology. The stability and crystal phase are investigated by annealing the alloy nanostructures directly or on carbon supports. - Graphical abstract: While platinum and silver cannot form a solid solution with the composition between about Ag{sub 2}Pt{sub 98} and Ag{sub 95}Pt{sub 5} at 400 deg. C or below in bulk form, alloy particles and wires can be made within this miscibility gap at the nanometer scale.

  16. PILOT EVALUATION OF VANADIUM ALLOYS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ARCS, SHEETS, ROLLING(METALLURGY), HIGH TEMPERATURE, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, COMPRESSIVE PROPERTIES, DUCTILITY, CREEP, OXIDATION, COATINGS , SILICIDES , HARDNESS, WELDING, EXTRUSION, TANTALUM ALLOYS, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS....VANADIUM ALLOYS, * NIOBIUM ALLOYS, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, TITANIUM ALLOYS, ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS, CARBON ALLOYS, MELTING, ELECTRIC

  17. Nonswelling alloy

    DOEpatents

    Harkness, S.D.

    1975-12-23

    An aluminum alloy containing one weight percent copper has been found to be resistant to void formation and thus is useful in all nuclear applications which currently use aluminum or other aluminum alloys in reactor positions which are subjected to high neutron doses.

  18. URANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1958-04-15

    Uranium alloys containing from 0.1 to 10% by weight, but preferably at least 5%, of either zirconium, niobium, or molybdenum exhibit highly desirable nuclear and structural properties which may be improved by heating the alloy to about 900 d C for an extended period of time and then rapidly quenching it.

  19. ZIRCONIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Wilhelm, H.A.; Ames, D.P.

    1959-02-01

    A binary zirconiuin--antimony alloy is presented which is corrosion resistant and hard containing from 0.07% to 1.6% by weight of Sb. The alloys have good corrosion resistance and are useful in building equipment for the chemical industry.

  20. Platinum stable isotopes in ferromanganese crust and nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcoran, Loretta; Seward, Terry; Handler, Monica R.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrogenetic ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crust and nodules are slow-growing chemical sediments that form by direct precipitation from seawater, resulting in a record of changing seawater chemistry. These sediments are the primary sink for platinum in the modern oxic marine environment, hosting well-documented enrichments over other platinum-group elements (PGEs): the Pt anomaly [1]. Platinum is a non-bio-essential, highly siderophile, transition metal with six stable isotopes (190Pt, 192Pt, 194Pt, 195Pt, 196Pt, and 198Pt) with several oxidation states (Pt0, Pt2+ and Pt4+). Platinum is generally considered to exist in the hydrosphere as Pt2+ although its behaviour in the marine environment is poorly constrained, and Pt4+may also be present. Variations in ocean redox state, together with changes in source fluxes to the oceans, may therefore lead to small variations (< ±1) in the stable isotopic composition of marine platinum, raising the potential of adding platinum to the growing arsenal of paleoceanographic tracers. A method has been developed to measure the platinum isotopic composition using double spike MC-ICPMS analysis [2]and applied to a global suite of modern Fe-Mn crust and nodules. Combining synchrotron XAFS analyses of platinum adsorbed onto Fe-Mn oxide and oxyhydroxide surfaces to determine oxidation state and bonding environment, with platinum stable isotopic measurements allowing us to evaluate both platinum incorporation onto these sediments and the associated degree of platinum isotopic fractionation. Leaching experiments conducted on platinum rich terrestrial materials underwent platinum stable isotopic measurement as an analogue for the Pt isotopic fractionation associated with continental weathering. [1] Hodge, V.F. et al. (1985) Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 72, 158-162. [2] Creech, J. et al. (2013) Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 28. 853-865.

  1. Platinum group minerals in podiform chromitites of the Bou Azzer ophiolite, Anti Atlas, Central Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghorfi, M.; Melcher, F.; Oberthür, T.; Boukhari, A. E.; Maacha, L.; Maddi, A.; Mhaili, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Bou Azzer ophiolite complex hosts numerous, small lenticular bodies of massive and disseminated chromite. Metallurgical-grade high-Mg and high-Cr spinels (cores with 48-62 wt% Cr2O3) reveal complex alteration patterns of successive Cr and Mn enrichment and loss of Al towards the rims, while the Mg# ratios [(Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)] remain almost constant. Concentration patterns of platinum-group elements are typical for ophiolitic chromitite poor in sulfides, with predominance of the IPGE, variable Rh, and low Pt and Pd. The most abundant platinum-group mineral is Rh-bearing laurite that occurs either included in spinel or in silicate matrix, whereas Os-Ir-Ru alloy is always included in spinel. Laurite inclusions reveal complex intergrowth textures with Rh-Ru-Pt rich alloy, and with Rh-rich sulfide. Most laurites display trends to sulfur-poor compositions leading to local formation of very fine-grained Ru-Os-Ir alloy phases. Ni-Co-Fe sulfides, arsenides and sulfarsenides devoid of PGE are associated with the alteration of chromite. Textural position and chemical composition of the base metal inclusions, as well as comparison of alteration features between chromite and accessory chromian spinel in the Co-Ni-As ores of the Bou Azzer ophiolite indicate a close connection. It is suggested that hydrothermal fluids percolated through the marginal zones of the ophiolite belt during greenschist facies metamorphism and deposited Ni-Co-Fe arsenides, sulfarsenides and minor sulfides as accessories within altered chromitites, and also in structurally favourable zones as Ni-Co-As ores.

  2. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    PubMed Central

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms. PMID:25429995

  3. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms.

    PubMed

    Narula, Chaitanya K; Allard, Lawrence F; Stocks, G M; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3 supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. Thus, the overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  4. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; Moses-DeBusk, Melanie

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-alumina-supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3-supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms are as active as fully formed platinum particles. The overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.

  5. Remarkable NO oxidation on single supported platinum atoms

    DOE PAGES

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Stocks, G. M.; ...

    2014-11-28

    Our first-principles density functional theoretical modeling suggests that NO oxidation is feasible on fully oxidized single θ-alumina-supported platinum atoms via a modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood pathway. This is in contrast to the known decrease in NO oxidation activity of supported platinum with decreasing Pt particle size believed to be due to increased platinum oxidation. In order to validate our theoretical study, we evaluated single θ-Al2O3-supported platinum atoms and found them to exhibit remarkable NO oxidation activity. A comparison of turnover frequencies (TOF) of single supported Pt atoms with those of platinum particles for NO oxidation shows that single supported Pt atoms aremore » as active as fully formed platinum particles. The overall picture of NO oxidation on supported Pt is that NO oxidation activity decreases with decreasing Pt particle size but accelerates when Pt is present only as single atoms.« less

  6. Luminol chemiluminescence catalysed by colloidal platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sheng-Liang; Cui, Hua

    2007-01-01

    Platinum colloids prepared by the reduction of hexachloroplatinic acid with citrate in the presence of different stabilizers were found to enhance the chemiluminescence (CL) of the luminol-H(2)O(2) system, and the most intensive CL signals were obtained with citrate-protected Pt colloids synthesized with citrate as both a reductant and a stabilizer. Light emission was intense and reproducible. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies were conducted before and after the CL reaction to investigate the possible CL enhancement mechanism. It is suggested that this CL enhancement is attributed to the catalysis of platinum nanoparticles, which could accelerate the electron-transfer process and facilitate the CL radical generation in aqueous solution. The effects of Pt colloids prepared by the hydroborate reduction were also investigated. The application of the luminol-H(2)O(2)-Pt colloids system was exploited for the determination of compounds such as uric acid, ascorbic acid, phenols and amino acids.

  7. A Change to the Platinum Publications | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Please be advised that the Poster will no longer publish the “Platinum Publications” series listing recent NCI at Frederick publications. All published research represents a valuable addition to the fight against cancer, AIDS, and infectious diseases—thus, the “Platinum Publications” did not adequately commend all of the important work done by NCI at Frederick researchers. Going forward, we will highlight a broad cross section of research with more tightly focused stories that should interest the entire NCI at Frederick community. In addition, we encourage readers to visit the Scientific Library's NCI at Frederick Scientific Publications database to see recently published research as well as a list of past NCI at Frederick publications. Thank you.

  8. Synthesis and properties of platinum hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Thomas; Degtyareva, Olga; Marqués, Miriam; Guillaume, Christophe L.; Proctor, John E.; Evans, Shaun; Gregoryanz, Eugene

    2011-06-01

    Synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments on compressed platinum-hydrogen mixtures reveal the formation of platinum hydride at a pressure of 27(1) GPa at room temperature. This compound exhibits two phases, PtH-I and PtH-II, coexisting up to the pressure of 42 GPa, above which the single phase of PtH-II is observed. Pt atoms in the PtH-II phase are shown to form a hexagonal closed-packed structure. This phase exhibits a high bulk modulus of 310 (10) GPa and is stable up to at least 53 GPa. Ab initio calculations show that PtH-II is superconducting with Tc = 12 K at 90 GPa, the highest temperature of superconducting transition among any known metal hydride.

  9. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  10. Aluminum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B. (Inventor); Starke, Edgar A., Jr. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates to aluminum alloys, particularly to aluminum-copper-lithium alloys containing at least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium as an essential component, which are suitable for applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles. At least about 0.1 percent by weight of indium is added as an essential component to an alloy which precipitates a T1 phase (Al2CuLi). This addition enhances the nucleation of the precipitate T1 phase, producing a microstructure which provides excellent strength as indicated by Rockwell hardness values and confirmed by standard tensile tests.

  11. PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Chynoweth, W.

    1959-06-16

    The preparation of low-melting-point plutonium alloys is described. In a MgO crucible Pu is placed on top of the lighter alloying metal (Fe, Co, or Ni) and the temperature raised to 1000 or 1200 deg C. Upon cooling, the alloy slug is broke out of the crucible. With 14 at. % Ni the m.p. is 465 deg C; with 9.5 at. % Fe the m.p. is 410 deg C; and with 12.0 at. % Co the m.p. is 405 deg C. (T.R.H.) l6262 l6263 ((((((((Abstract unscannable))))))))

  12. Electron transmission through a macroscopic platinum capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka, D.; Borka Jovanović, V.; Lemell, C.; Tőkési, K.

    2017-09-01

    We present simulations for electron transmission through a platinum macrocapillary (diameter d = 3.3 mm, length l = 48 mm) using classical transport theory. Both elastic and inelastic scattering events of primary electrons colliding with the inner wall of the capillary are taken into account. We also model the generation and transport of secondary electrons inside the material. We find excellent agreement of our simulated electron-energy spectra with recent experimental data for 200 eV primary electrons.

  13. Treatment of multiple ceramic alloys before recasting.

    PubMed

    Lin, Honglei; Zhang, Hai; Li, Xiurong; Cheng, Hui

    2013-07-01

    Dental laboratories often reuse dental casting alloys by recasting them, but the processing methods before recasting require further research. The purpose of the study was to determine the treatment methods to remove the surface contamination of the previously melted alloys before recasting. Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr), commercially pure titanium (CP Ti), palladium-copper-gallium (Pd-Cu-Ga), and gold-platinum (Au-Pt) ceramic alloys were investigated in the present study. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to evaluate the changes in the surface structures and compositions of Co-Cr, CP Ti, Pd-Cu-Ga, and Au-Pt ceramic alloys after airborne-particle abrasion and immersion in various chemical solutions for different time periods. The data obtained by EDAX and XPS were statistically analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Nemenyi tests (α=.05). By using appropriate mechanical and chemical treatment procedures, the contamination content of previously cast ceramic alloys was found to be below the detection limits of EDAX and XPS. The statistical results showed that, compared to the control group (new alloys after polishing), the impurity element was not detected after being treated with these methods, which was not statistically different to control group. The surface contamination of ceramic alloys was effectively removed by using certain mechanical and/or chemical treatment methods. Within the limitations of the present study, the most appropriate ways to treat ceramic alloys before recasting were as follows: (1) for Co-Cr ceramic alloys: Al2O3 airborne-particle abrasion and immersion in aqua regia for 15 min; (2) for CP Ti ceramic alloys: Al2O3 airborne-particle abrasion and immersion in 65% HNO3 and 40% HF 1:7 (V/V) for 60 min; (3) for Pd-Cu-Ga ceramic alloys: glass bead airborne-particle abrasion and immersion in 40% HF solution for 30 min; and (4) for Au-Pt ceramic alloys

  14. Strategies for the fabrication of porous platinum electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kloke, Arne; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Kerzenmacher, Sven

    2011-11-16

    Porous platinum is of high technological importance due to its various applications in fuel cells, sensors, stimulation electrodes, mechanical actuators and catalysis in general. Based on a discussion of the general principles behind the reduction of platinum salts and corresponding deposition processes this article discusses techniques available for platinum electrode fabrication. The numerous, different strategies available to fabricate platinum electrodes are reviewed and discussed in the context of their tuning parameters, strengths and weaknesses. These strategies comprise bottom-up approaches as well as top-down approaches. In bottom-up approaches nanoparticles are synthesized in a fi rst step by chemical, photochemical or sonochemical means followed by an electrode formation step by e.g. thin fi lm technology or network formation to create a contiguous and conducting solid electrode structure. In top-down approaches fabrication starts with an already conductive electrode substrate. Corresponding strategies enable the fabrication of substrate-based electrodes by e.g. electrodeposition or the fabrication of self-supporting electrodes by dealloying. As a further top-down strategy, this review describes methods to decorate porous metals other than platinum with a surface layer of platinum. This way, fabrication methods not performable with platinum can be applied to the fabrication of platinum electrodes with the special benefit of low platinum consumption.

  15. COATED ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Harman, C.G.; O'Bannon, L.S.

    1958-07-15

    A coating is described for iron group metals and alloys, that is particularly suitable for use with nickel containing alloys. The coating is glassy in nature and consists of a mixture containing an alkali metal oxide, strontium oxide, and silicon oxide. When the glass coated nickel base metal is"fired'' at less than the melting point of the coating, it appears the nlckel diffuses into the vitreous coating, thus providing a closely adherent and protective cladding.

  16. BRAZING ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, R.G.; Gilliland, R.G.; Slaughter, G.M.

    1962-02-20

    A brazing alloy is described which, in the molten state, is characterized by excellent wettability and flowability and is capable of forming a corrosion-resistant brazed joint. At least one component of said joint is graphite and the other component is a corrosion-resistant refractory metal. The brazing alloy consists essentially of 40 to 90 wt % of gold, 5 to 35 wt% of nickel, and 1 to 45 wt% of tantalum. (AEC)

  17. E platinum, a newly synthesized platinum compound, induces apoptosis through ROS-triggered ER stress in gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Guo, Qinglong; Tao, Lei; Zhao, Li; Chen, Yan; An, Teng; Chen, Zhen; Fu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still one of the leading causes of death in cancer-related diseases. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antitumor effect of E Platinum, a newly platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent bearing the basic structure of Oxaliplatin, in a variety of gastric carcinoma cells and the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrated that E Platinum significantly induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as a result of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that E Platinum enhanced Ca(2+) flux out from the endoplasmic reticulum by increasing the protein expression of IP3R type 1 (IP3R1) and decreasing the expression of ERp44. Dysfunction of Ca(2+) homeostasis in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) leads to accumulation of unfolded proteins and ER stress. Mechanically, E Platinum increased ER stress associated protein expression such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4, and CHOP. However, knocking down CHOP reversed E Platinum-induced apoptosis by blocking mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, 10 mg/kg of E Platinum significantly suppressed BGC-823 tumor growth in vivo without toxicity, which correlated with induction of apoptosis and expression of ER stress related proteins in tumor tissues. Taken together, E Platinum inhibited tumor growth and induced apoptosis by ROS-mediated ER stress activation both in vitro and in vivo. Our study indicated that E Platinum may be a potential and effective treatment for gastric cancer in clinical. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical studies of novel platinum-based nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingpeng

    2009-12-01

    Platinum (Pt) as well as its alloys represent some of the most efficient catalyst materials among intermetallic compounds and alloys. An important clue throughout this work is the development of a desired synthetic approach of Pt-based nanomaterials---a one-step hydrothermal co-reduction of inorganic metal precursors. Slight modifications in experimental conditions have led to the production of Pt-based nanostructured materials with two distinct morphologies: (i) three-dimensional (3D) nanoporous Pt-M networks (M= Ru, Ir, Pb, Pd) when formaldehyde is used as a reducing agent; and (ii) 3D intermetallic Pt-M nanodendrites (M= Au, Pb, Bi or Pd) when formate ligands are present as multi-functional reagents in the hydrothermal process. Those as-synthesized Pt-based nanoporous catalysts not only possess significantly high surface areas, but also exhibit superb electrocatalytic activities towards the electrochemical oxidation of methanol and formic acid. Among them, the nanoporous PtPb networks were further tested towards the electro-oxidation of glucose. Voltammetric and amperometric results demonstrate that the PtPb electrodes have strong and sensitive current responses to the incremental glucose concentrations, and are capable of sensing glucose with excellent selectivity in neutral media. In the case of synthesizing Pt-based nanodendritic materials, ammonium formate and formic acid were used as multi-functional reagents in the hydrothermal-assisted fabrication of alloyed PtAu and PtPb nanodendrites, respectively. Electrochemical studies reveal that both PtAu and PtPb nanodendrites exhibit exceptionally high electrocatalytic activities in formic acid oxidation owing to their unique alloyed intermetallic crystal structures. The proposed coordination and co-reduction alloying mechanism together with the foreign particle-induced dendritic growth mechanism have been further proved to be universal for fabricating a wide range of intermetallic nanodendrites, including

  19. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene on platinum–copper alloys at the single-atom limit

    DOE PAGES

    Lucci, Felicia R.; Liu, Jilei; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; ...

    2015-10-09

    Platinum is ubiquitous in the production sectors of chemicals and fuels; however, its scarcity in nature and high price will limit future proliferation of platinum-catalysed reactions. One definite approach to conserve platinum involves understanding the smallest number of platinum atoms needed to catalyse a reaction, then designing catalysts with the minimal platinum ensembles. Here we design and test a new generation of platinum–copper nanoparticle catalysts for the selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene,, an industrially important reaction. Isolated platinum atom geometries enable hydrogen activation and spillover but are incapable of C–C bond scission that leads to loss of selectivity and catalyst deactivation.more » γ-Alumina-supported single-atom alloy nanoparticle catalysts with <1 platinum atom per 100 copper atoms are found to exhibit high activity and selectivity for butadiene hydrogenation to butenes under mild conditions, demonstrating transferability from the model study to the catalytic reaction under practical conditions.« less

  20. A brief review of the management of platinum-resistant-platinum-refractory ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Oronsky, Bryan; Ray, Carolyn M; Spira, Alexander I; Trepel, Jane B; Carter, Corey A; Cottrill, Hope M

    2017-06-01

    Ovarian cancer, which ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most common histologic type, with the 5-year survival for all stages estimated at 45.6%. This rate increases to more than 70% in the minority of patients who are diagnosed at an early stage, but declines to 35% in the vast majority of patients diagnosed at advanced stage. Recurrent EOC is incurable. Platinum sensitivity (or lack thereof) is a major determinant of prognosis. The current standard treatment is primary surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. In recurrent platinum-resistant/platinum-refractory EOC, sequential single-agent salvage chemotherapy is superior to multiagent chemotherapy. Multiagent regimens increase toxicity without clear benefit; however, no preferred sequence of single agents is recommended. The impact of targeted therapies and immunotherapies on progression-free survival and overall survival, which remains dismal, is under active investigation. Currently, clinical trials offer the best hope for the development of a new treatment paradigm in this recalcitrant disease.

  1. Interactions of platinum metals and their complexes in biological systems.

    PubMed Central

    LeRoy, A F

    1975-01-01

    Platinum-metal oxidation catalysts are to be introduced in exhaust systems of many 1975 model-year automobiles in the U.S. to meet Clean Air Act standards. Small quantities of finely divided catalyst have been found issuing from prototype systems; platinum and palladium compounds may be found also. Although platinum exhibits a remarkable resistance to oxidation and chemical attack, it reacts chemically under some conditions producing coordination complex compounds. Palladium reacts more readily than platinum. Some platinum-metal complexes interact with biological systems as bacteriostatic, bacteriocidal, viricidal, and immunosuppressive agents. Workers chronically exposed to platinum complexes often develop asthma-like respiratory distress and skin reactions called platinosis. Platinum complexes used alone and in combination therapy with other drugs have recently emerged as effective agents in cancer chemotherapy. Understanding toxic and favorable interactions of metal species with living organisms requires basic information on quantities and chemical characteristics of complexes at trace concentrations in biological materials. Some basic chemical kinetic and thermodynamic data are presented to characterize the chemical behavior of the complex cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2] used therapeutically. A brief discussion of platinum at manogram levels in biological tissue is discussed. PMID:50943

  2. Interactions of platinum metals and their complexes in biological systems.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, A F

    1975-04-01

    Platinum-metal oxidation catalysts are to be introduced in exhaust systems of many 1975 model-year automobiles in the U.S. to meet Clean Air Act standards. Small quantities of finely divided catalyst have been found issuing from prototype systems; platinum and palladium compounds may be found also. Although platinum exhibits a remarkable resistance to oxidation and chemical attack, it reacts chemically under some conditions producing coordination complex compounds. Palladium reacts more readily than platinum. Some platinum-metal complexes interact with biological systems as bacteriostatic, bacteriocidal, viricidal, and immunosuppressive agents. Workers chronically exposed to platinum complexes often develop asthma-like respiratory distress and skin reactions called platinosis. Platinum complexes used alone and in combination therapy with other drugs have recently emerged as effective agents in cancer chemotherapy. Understanding toxic and favorable interactions of metal species with living organisms requires basic information on quantities and chemical characteristics of complexes at trace concentrations in biological materials. Some basic chemical kinetic and thermodynamic data are presented to characterize the chemical behavior of the complex cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2] used therapeutically. A brief discussion of platinum at manogram levels in biological tissue is discussed.

  3. Vapor-deposited platinum as a fuel-cell catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, W. J.; Batzold, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    Electrodes are prepared by vacuum deposition of platinum on nickel substrate with conventional vapor-deposition apparatus. Amount of platinum loaded on substrate can be veried by changing exposure time during deposition. These electrodes are significantly more effective than conventional oxygen electrodes.

  4. Platinum(II)-Acyclovir Complexes: Synthesis, Antiviral and Antitumour Activity

    PubMed Central

    Coluccia, M.; Boccarelli, A.; Cermelli, C.; Portolani, M.; Natile, G.

    1995-01-01

    A platinum(II) complex with the antiviral drug acyclovir was synthesized and its antiviral and anticancer properties were investigated in comparison to those of acyclovir and cisplatin. The platinum-acyclovir complex maintained the antiviral activity of the parent drug acyclovir, though showing a minor efficacy on a molar basis (ID50  =   7.85 and 1.02 μΜ for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). As anticancer agent, the platinum-acyclovir complex was markedly less potent than cisplatin on a mole-equivalent basis, but it was as effective as cisplatin when equitoxic dosages were administered in vivo to P388 leukaemia-bearing mice (%T/C = 209 and 211 for platinum-acyclovir and cisplatin, respectively). The platinum-acyclovir complex was also active against a cisplatin-resistant subline of the P388 leukaemia (%T/C = 140), thus suggesting a different mechanism of action. The DNA interaction properties (sequence specificity and interstrand cross-linking ability) of platinum-acyclovir were also investigated in comparison to those of cisplatin and [Pt(dien)Cl]+, an antitumour-inactive platinum-triamine compound. The results of this study point to a potential new drug endowed, at the same time, with antiviral and anticancer activity and characterized by DNA interaction properties different from those of cisplatin. PMID:18472776

  5. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan [Havana, IL; Silver, Ronald G [Peoria, IL; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna [Edelstein, IL; Eckstein, Colleen J [Metamora, IL

    2011-12-06

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  6. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2012-08-07

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  7. Porcelain veneer fabrication. Platinum foil and refractory model techniques.

    PubMed

    Williams, T

    1994-05-01

    A quality porcelain veneer restoration can be made by either the refractory die method or by platinum foil. The platinum foil method produces excellent results with more traditional means. The refractory method can produce equally excellent results as well, but requires more effort in model making.

  8. Elevated temperature aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meschter, Peter (Inventor); Lederich, Richard J. (Inventor); O'Neal, James E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Three aluminum-lithium alloys are provided for high performance aircraft structures and engines. All three alloys contain 3 wt % copper, 2 wt % lithium, 1 wt % magnesium, and 0.2 wt % zirconium. Alloy 1 has no further alloying elements. Alloy 2 has the addition of 1 wt % iron and 1 wt % nickel. Alloy 3 has the addition of 1.6 wt % chromium to the shared alloy composition of the three alloys. The balance of the three alloys, except for incidentql impurities, is aluminum. These alloys have low densities and improved strengths at temperatures up to 260.degree. C. for long periods of time.

  9. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOEpatents

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  10. Rapid synthesis and characterization of silver nanoparticle/bis(o-phenolpropyl)silicone composites by platinum.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myoung-Hee; Kim, Do-Heyoung; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Woo, Hee-Gweon; Lee, Byeong-Gweon; Yang, Kap-Seung; Kim, Bo-Hye; Park, Yeong-Joon; Sohn, Honglae

    2011-08-01

    The formation of silver nanoparticle/bis(o-phenolpropyl)silicone composites have been promoted by the addition of chloroplatinic acid (<2 wt%) to the reaction of silver nitrate with bis(o-phenolpropyl)silicone BPPS [(o-phenolpropyl)2(SiMe2O)n, = 2, 3, 8, 236]. TEM and FE-SEM data exhibit that the silver nanoparticles having the size of <20 nm are well dispersed throughout the BPPS matrix in the composites. XRD patterns are consistent with those for polycrystalline silver. The addition of small amount of platinum to the silver accelerated the rate of composite formation by forming a Ag-Pt bimetallic alloy. The size of silver nanoparticles increased with increasing the relative molar concentration of silver salts added with respect to BPPS. However, the addition of platinum (1-5 wt%) to the AgNO3-BPPS mixture did not affect the size distribution of silver nanoparticles appreciably. It was found that in the absence of BPPS, most of the silver nanoparticles undergo macroscopic precipitation by agglomeration, indicating that BPPS is essential to stabilize the silver nanoparticles by coordination.

  11. Miniaturized platinum silicide focal plane array camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Joseph W.; Stetson, Norman B.

    1994-07-01

    With the introduction of the Inframetrics InfraCAM, a new standard is established for small, lightweight, low power, hand- held, high sensitivity, high resolution thermal imaging systems. A unique design approach to video processing as well as the compact and efficient Inframetrics patented Sterling cycle microcooler allow the unit to require less than 5 watts of power during operation. The unit is smaller than most commercially available `palm-corders' with both the sensor and processing electronics housed in the same package. This paper reviews both the architecture and performance of our 256 X 256 platinum silicide array based imager.

  12. Platinum Acetylide Two-Photon Chromophores (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    L.; Pierce, B. M. Science 1994, 265, 632. (14) Prasad, P. N.; Reinhardt, B. A. Chem. Mater. 1990, 2, 660. (15) Larson, E . J.; Friesen , L. A.; Johnson...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 4348 5e. TASK NUMBER RG 6. AUTHOR(S) Joy E . Rogers (UES) Jonathan E . Slagle (AT&T Government...afford T1. Platinum Acetylide Two-Photon Chromophores Joy E . Rogers,†,‡ Jonathan E . Slagle,†,§ Douglas M. Krein,†,| Aaron R. Burke,†,| Benjamin C. Hall

  13. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  14. Response time correlations for platinum resistance thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandey, D. K.; Ash, R. L.; Dillon-Townes, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    The 'plunge method' recommended by ASTM has been used to determine the time constant of 100-ohm platinum resistance thermometers (PRT) considered for use in the National Transonic Facility. It is shown that the response time of ventilated PRT can be correlated with the reciprocal of the heat transfer coefficient in a given field. Universal correlations are established for the 100- and 1000-ohm PRT with uncertainties of 20 and 30 percent, respectively. The correlations are found to be consistent with the uncertainty involved in heat transfer correlations available in the literature and are recommended for use in flowing liquids and gases.

  15. Placer and lode platinum-group minerals in south Kalimantan, Indonesia: evidence for derivation from Alaskan-type ultramafic intrusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Platinum-group minerals occur in significant proportions in placer deposits in several localities in South Kalimantan. They consist of Pt-Fe alloy that may be intergrown with or contain inclusions of Ir-Os-Ru alloy, laurite and chromite. Alluvial PGM found along Sungai Tambanio are in part derived from chromatite schlieren in dunitic bodies intruded into clinopyroxene cumulates that may be part of an Alaskan-type ultramafic complex. A chromitite schlieren in serpentinite from one of these dunitic bodies is anomalous in PGE. The chondrite-normalized PGE pattern for this rock, pan concentrates from this area, and PGM concentrates from diamond-Au-PGM placer deposits have an "M'-shaped pattern enriched in Ir and Pt that is typical of PGE-mineralization associated with Alaskan-type ultramafic complexes. -Authors

  16. Effect of titania on the characteristics of a Tin-Platinum catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales-Gil, P.; Nava, N.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.

    2015-06-01

    Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts dispersed on alumina are commonly used for reforming and dehydrogenation reactions. In this research work, Pt and Sn were supported on titania. The resulting interactions between the components in the prepared samples, before and after treatment with hydrogen, were studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Rietveld refinement. The results show the presence of Pt and SnO2 after calcinations. After the reduction process, metallic Pt, PtSn, and Pt3Sn alloys were identified. The Rietveld refinement analysis shows that some Ti4+ atoms were replaced by Sn4+ atoms in the titania structure. Finally, the Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction results indicate that metallic platinum and SnO2 are encapsulated by a TiOx layer.

  17. Dealloying of Platinum-Aluminum Thin Films: Dynamics of Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinski, Henning; Ryll, Thomas; Schlagenhauf, Lukas; Rechberger, Felix; Ying, Sun; Gauckler, Ludwig J.; Mornaghini, Flavio C. F.; Ries, Yasmina; Spolenak, Ralph; Döbeli, Max

    2011-11-01

    The application of focused ion beam (FIB) nanotomography and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) to dealloyed platinum-aluminum thin films allows for an in-depth analysis of the dominating physical mechanisms of nanoporosity formation during the dealloying process. The porosity formation due to the dissolution of the less noble aluminum in the alloy is treated as result of a reaction-diffusion system. The RBS and FIB analysis yields that the porosity evolution has to be regarded as superposition of two independent processes, a linearly propagating diffusion front with a uniform speed and a slower dissolution process in regions which have already been passed by the diffusion front. The experimentally observed front evolution is captured by the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP). The slower dissolution is represented by a zero-order rate law which causes a gradual porosity in the thin film.

  18. Platinum-tin oxide core-shell catalysts for efficient electro-oxidation of ethanol.

    PubMed

    Du, Wenxin; Yang, Guangxing; Wong, Emily; Deskins, N Aaron; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Su, Dong; Teng, Xiaowei

    2014-08-06

    Platinum-tin (Pt/Sn) binary nanoparticles are active electrocatalysts for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR), but inactive for splitting the C-C bond of ethanol to CO2. Here we studied detailed structure properties of Pt/Sn catalysts for the EOR, especially CO2 generation in situ using a CO2 microelectrode. We found that composition and crystalline structure of the tin element played important roles in the CO2 generation: non-alloyed Pt46-(SnO2)54 core-shell particles demonstrated a strong capability for C-C bond breaking of ethanol than pure Pt and intermetallic Pt/Sn, showing 4.1 times higher CO2 peak partial pressure generated from EOR than commercial Pt/C.

  19. Microwave-induced formation of platinum nanostructured networks with superior electrochemical activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Jia, Falong; Wang, Fangfang; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Lizhi

    2011-12-16

    Platinum nanostructured networks (PNNs) can be synthesized through the chemical reduction of H(2)PtCl(6) by benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation without the introduction of any surfactants, templates, or seeds. The synthesis route utilizes benzyl alcohol as both the reductant and the structure-directing agent, and thus, the process is particularly simple and highly repeatable. The formation of the PNN structure was ascribed to the collision-induced fusion of Pt nanocrystals owing to the cooperative functions of microwave irradiation and benzyl alcohol. Compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the as-prepared PNNs possessed superior electrochemical activity and stability on the oxidation of methanol because of the unique 3D nanostructured networks and abundant defects formed during the assembly process. This study may provide a facile microwave-induced approach for the synthesis of other 3D nanostructured noble metals or their alloys.

  20. Investigation of ternary and quaternary high-temperature fixed-point cells, based on platinum-carbon-X, as blind comparison artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Machin, G.; Bloembergen, P.; Lowe, D.; Wang, T.

    2016-11-01

    Extensive studies of platinum-carbon eutectic alloy based high temperature fixed point cells have shown that this alloy has extremely good metrological potential as a temperature reference. However, it’s possible adoption as an accepted reference standard means that its eutectic temperature value will soon be agreed with an uncertainty less than most radiation thermometry scales at that temperature. Thus it will lack credibility if used as a future scale comparison artefact. To avoid this, the fixed-point cell can be deliberately doped with an impurity to change its transition temperature by an amount sufficient to test the accuracy of the scales of the institutes, involved in the comparison. In this study dopants of palladium and iridium were added to platinum-carbon to produce ternary alloy and quaternary alloy fixed-point cells. The stability of these artefacts was demonstrated and the fixed-point cells were used to compare the ITS-90 scales of NIM and NPL. It was found that the fixed point temperatures could be changed by an appreciable amount while retaining the stability and repeatability required for comparison artefacts.

  1. Orthodontic silver brazing alloys.

    PubMed

    Brockhurst, P J; Pham, H L

    1989-10-01

    Orthodontic silver brazing alloys suffer from the presence of cadmium, excessive flow temperatures, and crevice corrosion on stainless steel. Seven alloys were examined. Two alloys contained cadmium. The lowest flow temperature observed was 629 degrees C for a cadmium alloy and 651 degrees C for two cadmium free alloys. Three alloys had corrosion resistance superior to the other solders. Addition of low melting temperature elements gallium and indium reduced flow temperature in some cases but produced brittleness in the brazing alloy.

  2. Restoring platinum sensitivity in recurrent ovarian cancer by extending the platinum-free interval: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Tomao, Federica; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Biagioli, Elena; Peccatori, Fedro A; Colombo, Nicoletta

    2017-09-15

    The platinum-free interval is the most important predictive factor of a response to subsequent lines of chemotherapy and the most important prognostic factor for progression-free and overall survival in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. A nonplatinum regimen is generally considered the most appropriate approach when the disease recurs very early after the end of chemotherapy, whereas platinum-based chemotherapy is usually adopted when the platinum-free interval exceeds 12 months. However, the therapeutic management of patients with intermediate sensitivity (ie, when the relapse occurs between 6 and 12 months) remains debatable. Preclinical and clinical data suggest that the extension of platinum-free interval (using a nonplatinum-based regimen) might restore platinum sensitivity, thus allowing survival improvement. The objective of this review was to critically analyze preclinical and clinical evidences supporting this hypothesis. Cancer 2017;123:3450-9. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  4. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  5. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of this subpart K are applicable to discharges from (a) mines that produce platinum ore and...

  6. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    K Sasaki; H Naohara; Y Cai; Y Choi; P Liu; M Vukmirovic; J Wang; R Adzic

    2011-12-31

    Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200,000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  7. Core-Protected Platinum Monolayer Shell High-Stability Electrocatalysts for Fuel-Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, R.R.; Sasaki, K.; Naohara, H.; Cai, Y.; Choi, Y.M.; Liu, P.; Vukmirovic, M.B.; Wang, J.X.

    2010-11-08

    More than skin deep: Platinum monolayers can act as shells for palladium nanoparticles to lead to electrocatalysts with high activities and an ultralow platinum content, but high platinum utilization. The stability derives from the core protecting the shell from dissolution. In fuel-cell tests, no loss of platinum was observed in 200?000 potential cycles, whereas loss of palladium was significant.

  8. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Ascites and Plasma in Patients with Platinum-Sensitive, Platinum-Resistant, and Platinum-Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cantón-Romero, Juan Carlos; Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Bañuelos-Ramírez, Jose Luis; Carrillo-Ibarra, Sandra; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Castellanos-González, José Alberto; Rodríguez-Carrizalez, Adolfo Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Diverse proinflammatory biomarkers and oxidative stress are strongly associated with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Objective. To determine the behavior of markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in plasma and ascites fluid in patients with platinum-sensitive, platinum-resistant, and platinum-refractory EOC. Methods. A prospective cohort study. The colorimetric method was used to determine levels of the markers 8-isoprostanes (8-IP), lipid peroxidation products (LPO), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in plasma and ascites fluid; and with ELISA, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined in patients with EOC. Results. In ascites fluid, a significant increase in 8-IP versus baseline plasma levels was found (p = 0.002). There was an important leakage of the TAC levels in ascites fluid versus baseline plasma levels (p < 0.001). The IL-6 was elevated in ascites fluid versus baseline plasma levels (p = 0.003), and there were diminished levels of TNF-α in ascites fluid versus baseline plasma levels (p = 0.001). Discussion. We hypothesize that the ascites fluid influences the behavior and dissemination of the tumor. Deregulation between oxidants, antioxidants, and the proinflammatory cytokines was found to vary among platinum-sensitive, platinum-resistant, and platinum-refractory patients.

  9. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Ascites and Plasma in Patients with Platinum-Sensitive, Platinum-Resistant, and Platinum-Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cantón-Romero, Juan Carlos; Bañuelos-Ramírez, Jose Luis; Sifuentes-Franco, Sonia; Castellanos-González, José Alberto

    2017-01-01

    Diverse proinflammatory biomarkers and oxidative stress are strongly associated with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Objective. To determine the behavior of markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in plasma and ascites fluid in patients with platinum-sensitive, platinum-resistant, and platinum-refractory EOC. Methods. A prospective cohort study. The colorimetric method was used to determine levels of the markers 8-isoprostanes (8-IP), lipid peroxidation products (LPO), and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in plasma and ascites fluid; and with ELISA, the levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined in patients with EOC. Results. In ascites fluid, a significant increase in 8-IP versus baseline plasma levels was found (p = 0.002). There was an important leakage of the TAC levels in ascites fluid versus baseline plasma levels (p < 0.001). The IL-6 was elevated in ascites fluid versus baseline plasma levels (p = 0.003), and there were diminished levels of TNF-α in ascites fluid versus baseline plasma levels (p = 0.001). Discussion. We hypothesize that the ascites fluid influences the behavior and dissemination of the tumor. Deregulation between oxidants, antioxidants, and the proinflammatory cytokines was found to vary among platinum-sensitive, platinum-resistant, and platinum-refractory patients. PMID:28848618

  10. Mouse Model of Halogenated Platinum Salt Hypersensitivity ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Occupational exposure to halogenated platinum salts can trigger the development of asthma. Concern for increased asthma risk exists for the general population due to the use of platinum (Pt) in catalytic converters and its emerging use as a diesel fuel additive. To investigate airway responses to Pt, we developed a mouse model of Pt hypersensitivity. Previously, we confirmed the dermal sensitizing potency of ammonium hexachloroplatinate (AHCP) using an ex vivo [3H]methyl thymidine labeling version of the local lymph node assay in BALB/c mice. Here, we investigated the ability of AHCP to induce airway responses in mice sensitized by the dermal route. Mice were sensitized through application of 100 µL 1% AHCP in DMSO to the shaved back on days 0, 5 and 19, and 25 µl to each ear on days 10, 11 and 12. Unsensitized mice received vehicle. On day 24, mice were challenged by oropharyngeal aspiration (OPA) with 0 or 100 µg AHCP in saline. Before and immediately after challenge, airway responses were assessed using whole body plethysmography (WBP). On day 26, changes in ventilatory responses to methacholine (Mch) aerosol were assessed by WBP; dose-dependent increases in Mch responsiveness occurred in sensitized mice. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid harvested from sensitized mice contained an average of 7.5% eosinophils compared to less than 0.5% in control mice (p < 0.05). This model will be useful for assessing both relative sensitizing potency and cross-reacti

  11. Therapeutic gold, silver, and platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Miko; Foote, Matthew; Prow, Tarl W

    2015-01-01

    There are an abundance of nanoparticle technologies being developed for use as part of therapeutic strategies. This review focuses on a narrow class of metal nanoparticles that have therapeutic potential that is a consequence of elemental composition and size. The most widely known of these are gold nanoshells that have been developed over the last two decades for photothermal ablation in superficial cancers. The therapeutic effect is the outcome of the thickness and diameter of the gold shell that enables fine tuning of the plasmon resonance. When these metal nanoparticles are exposed to the relevant wavelength of light, their temperature rapidly increases. This in turn induces a localized photothermal ablation that kills the surrounding tumor tissue. Similarly, gold nanoparticles have been developed to enhance radiotherapy. The high-Z nature of gold dramatically increases the photoelectric cross-section. Thus, the photoelectric effects are significantly increased. The outcome of these interactions is enhanced tumor killing with lower doses of radiation, all while sparing tissue without gold nanoparticles. Silver nanoparticles have been used for their wound healing properties in addition to enhancing the tumor-killing effects of anticancer drugs. Finally, platinum nanoparticles are thought to serve as a reservoir for platinum ions that can induce DNA damage in cancer cells. The future is bright with the path to clinical trials is largely cleared for some of the less complex therapeutic metal nanoparticle systems.

  12. The sixth spectrum of platinum (Pt VI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarov, Vladimir I.; Gayasov, Robert R.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum of platinum was observed in the (300-2100) Å wavelength region. The (5d5 + 5d4 6 s) - 5d4 6 p transition array of five times ionized platinum, Pt VI, has been investigated and 1390 spectral lines have been classified in the region of (399-1564) Å. The analysis has led to the determination of the 5d5, 5d4 6 s and 5d4 6 p configurations. All 37 theoretically possible 5d5 levels, 46 of 63 possible 5d4 6 s levels and 167 of 180 possible 5d4 6 p levels have been established. The orthogonal operators technique was used to calculate the level structure and transition probabilities. The energy parameters have been determined by the least squares fit to the observed levels. Calculated transition probability and energy values, as well as LS-compositions obtained from the fitted parameters are presented. The uncertainties of the established energy levels and calculated (Ritz) wavenumbers are included.

  13. HRTEM analyses of the platinum nanoparticles prepared on graphite particles using coaxial arc plasma deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazawa, Kun'ichi; Yoshitake, Masaru; Tanaka, Yumi

    2017-06-01

    Platinum nanoparticles with diameters less than ˜5 nm were prepared on graphite particles by the coaxial arc plasma deposition, and the structure of platinum nanoparticles was investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. {110} facets of platinum nanoparticles parallel to the surface (0001) planes of graphite particles were most frequently observed. The platinum nanoparticles were found to be anisotropically deformed from the bulk face-centered cubic structure, and the lattice parameters of platinum nanoparticles were estimated by assuming monoclinic structures. No correlation was observed between the diameter and the lattice parameters of the platinum nanoparticles. Approximately two-thirds of the platinum nanoparticles were compressively strained, and the other platinum nanoparticles showed the expanded unit cells. The cube root of monoclinic unit cell of the platinum nanoparticles varied from a compression of 5.9% to an expansion of 2.8% as compared with the bulk lattice constant of platinum.

  14. Cathodic processes of platinum electrodes during Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 3/-MoO/sub 3/ melt electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Komarov, V.E.; Bove, A.L.; Smolenskii, V.V.; Zyryanov, V.G.

    1985-09-01

    It has been shown previously that during polarization of a platinum cathode in the Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/-MoO/sub 3/ system the evolution of molybdenum dioxide is preceded by a wave which, in the authors' opinion, can be attributed to changes in ionic composition of the melt layer next to the cathode, and in particular to the appearance of lower, reduced forms of the ions. In tungstate melts, the evolution of bronze or other products is preceded by alloy electrolysis of molybdate melts. The present work was undertaken in order to elucidate the conditions under which a platinum electrode can be used as an indicator electrode for electrochemical investigations in molybdate melts. The experiments used ''chemically pure'' MoO/sub 3/ and ''analytically pure'' Na/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/.2H/sub 2/O. On the basis of the investigation it is concluded that alloys of platinum with molybdenum are formed at the cathode when the melt contains relatively small amounts of MoO/sub 3/.

  15. Electron Beam Welder Used to Braze Sapphire to Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsgren, Roger C.; Vannuyen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A new use for electron beam brazing was recently developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Manufacturing Engineering Division. This work was done to fabricate a fiberoptic probe (developed by Sentec Corporation) that could measure high temperatures less than 600 deg C of vibrating machinery, such as in jet engine combustion research. Under normal circumstances, a sapphire fiber would be attached to platinum by a ceramic epoxy. However, no epoxies can adhere ceramic fibers to platinum under such high temperatures and vibration. Also, since sapphire and platinum have different thermal properties, the epoxy bond is subjected to creep over time. Therefore, a new method had to be developed that would permanently and reliably attach a sapphire fiber to platinum. Brazing a sapphire fiber to a platinum shell. The fiber-optic probe assembly consists of a 0.015-in.-diameter sapphire fiber attached to a 0.25-in.-long, 0.059-in.-diameter platinum shell. Because of the small size of this assembly, electron beam brazing was chosen instead of conventional vacuum brazing. The advantage of the electron beam is that it can generate a localized heat source in a vacuum. Gold reactive braze was used to join the sapphire fiber and the platinum. Consequently, the sapphire fiber was not affected by the total heat needed to braze the components together.

  16. Electron Beam Welder Used to Braze Sapphire to Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsgren, Roger C.; Vannuyen, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    A new use for electron beam brazing was recently developed by NASA Lewis Research Center's Manufacturing Engineering Division. This work was done to fabricate a fiberoptic probe (developed by Sentec Corporation) that could measure high temperatures less than 600 deg C of vibrating machinery, such as in jet engine combustion research. Under normal circumstances, a sapphire fiber would be attached to platinum by a ceramic epoxy. However, no epoxies can adhere ceramic fibers to platinum under such high temperatures and vibration. Also, since sapphire and platinum have different thermal properties, the epoxy bond is subjected to creep over time. Therefore, a new method had to be developed that would permanently and reliably attach a sapphire fiber to platinum. Brazing a sapphire fiber to a platinum shell. The fiber-optic probe assembly consists of a 0.015-in.-diameter sapphire fiber attached to a 0.25-in.-long, 0.059-in.-diameter platinum shell. Because of the small size of this assembly, electron beam brazing was chosen instead of conventional vacuum brazing. The advantage of the electron beam is that it can generate a localized heat source in a vacuum. Gold reactive braze was used to join the sapphire fiber and the platinum. Consequently, the sapphire fiber was not affected by the total heat needed to braze the components together.

  17. Monofunctional and Higher-Valent Platinum Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Wilson, Justin J.

    2013-01-01

    Platinum compounds represent one of the great success stories of metals in medicine. Following the serendipitous discovery of the anticancer activity of cisplatin by Rosenberg, a large number of cisplatin variants have been prepared and tested for their ability to kill cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. These efforts continue today with increased realization that new strategies are needed to overcome issues of toxicity and resistance inherent to treatment by the approved platinum anticancer agents. One approach has been the use of so-called “non-traditional” platinum(II) and platinum(IV) compounds that violate the structure-activity relationships that governed platinum drug-development research for many years. Another is the use of specialized drug delivery strategies. Here we describe recent developments from our laboratory involving monofunctional platinum(II) complexes together with an historical account of the manner by which we came to investigate these compounds and their relationship to previously studied molecules. We also discuss work carried out using platinum(IV) prodrugs and the development of nanoconstructs designed to deliver them in vivo. PMID:23738524

  18. Surface Analysis of 4-Aminothiophenol Adsorption at Polycrystalline Platinum Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Fachini, Estevao R.; Contes, Enid J.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2008-01-01

    Formation of self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) on polycrystalline platinum electrodes has been studied by surface analysis and electrochemistry techniques. The 4-ATP monolayer was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Raman spectroscopy, reflection absorption infrared (RAIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments give an idea about the packing quality of the monolayer. RAIR and Raman spectra for 4-ATP modified platinum electrodes showed the characteristic adsorption bands for neat 4-ATP indicating the adsorption of 4-ATP molecules on platinum surface. The adsorption on platinum was also evidenced by the presence of sulfur and nitrogen peaks by XPS survey spectra of the modified platinum electrodes. High resolution XPS studies and RAIR spectrum for platinum electrodes modified with 4-ATP indicate that molecules are sulfur-bonded to the platinum surface. The formation of S-Pt bond suggests that ATP adsorption gives up an amino terminated SAM. Thickness of the monolayer was evaluated via angle-resolved XPS (AR-XPS) analyses. Derivatization of 4-ATP SAM was performed using 16-Br hexadecanoic acid.

  19. [Structure-activity relations of antineoplastic platinum II and platinum IV coordination compounds].

    PubMed

    Gutsche, W; Baumgart, J; Schröer, H P

    1989-01-01

    Five diammine-Pt(II) or Pt(IV) coordination compounds, namely cis-diammine-dichloro-platinum (II) "cis-DDP", transdihydroxy-cis-diammine-dichloro-platinum (IV) "trans-ODDP", and derived substitution products of lactic acid (racemates or L-forms) with diminished toxicity in comparison to cis-DDP have been tested against mouse leukemia P388, and partly on melanoma B16 for antineoplastic activity. The results have been compared with those obtained with the clinical approved cis-DDP. They were not in every way equal to the antitumor efficiency of cis-DDP. Improved physicochemical properties as well as favorable differences of side effects in contrast to cis-DDP, could be decisive for the potential value of these substances.

  20. Preparation of low-sulfur platinum and platinum aluminide layers in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitsberg, Irene T. (Inventor); Walston, William S. (Inventor); Schaeffer, Jon C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method for preparing a coated nickel-base superalloy article reduces the sulfur content of the surface region of the metallic coating layers to low levels, thereby improving the adhesion of the coating layers to the article. The method includes depositing a first layer of platinum overlying the surface of a substrate, depositing a second layer of aluminum over the platinum, and final desulfurizing the article by heating the article to elevated temperature, preferably in hydrogen, and removing a small amount of material from the surface that was exposed during the step of heating. A ceramic layer may be deposited over the desulfurized article. The article may also be similarly desulfurized at other points in the fabrication procedure.

  1. Bio-inspired routes for synthesizing efficient nanoscale platinum electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, Jennifer N.; Wang, Joseph

    2014-08-31

    The overall objective of the proposed research is to use fundamental advances in bionanotechnology to design powerful platinum nanocrystal electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications. The new economically-viable, environmentally-friendly, bottom-up biochemical synthetic strategy will produce platinum nanocrystals with tailored size, shape and crystal orientation, hence leading to a maximum electrochemical reactivity. There are five specific aims to the proposed bio-inspired strategy for synthesizing efficient electrocatalytic platinum nanocrystals: (1) isolate peptides that both selectively bind particular crystal faces of platinum and promote the nucleation and growth of particular nanocrystal morphologies, (2) pattern nanoscale 2-dimensional arrays of platinum nucleating peptides from DNA scaffolds, (3) investigate the combined use of substrate patterned peptides and soluble peptides on nanocrystal morphology and growth (4) synthesize platinum crystals on planar and large-area carbon electrode supports, and (5) perform detailed characterization of the electrocatalytic behavior as a function of catalyst size, shape and morphology. Project Description and Impact: This bio-inspired collaborative research effort will address key challenges in designing powerful electrocatalysts for fuel cell applications by employing nucleic acid scaffolds in combination with peptides to perform specific, environmentally-friendly, simultaneous bottom-up biochemical synthesis and patterned assembly of highly uniform and efficient platinum nanocrystal catalysts. Bulk synthesis of nanoparticles usually produces a range of sizes, accessible catalytic sites, crystal morphologies, and orientations, all of which lead to inconsistent catalytic activities. In contrast, biological systems routinely demonstrate exquisite control over inorganic syntheses at neutral pH and ambient temperature and pressures. Because the orientation and arrangement of the templating biomolecules can be precisely

  2. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype.

  3. The RSC Faraday prize lecture of 1989 on platinum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, John Meurig

    2017-08-25

    In 1861, Michael Faraday gave one of his last Friday Evening Discourses at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, London, on platinum, which he described as "this beautiful, magnificent and valuable metal". More than a hundred and twenty years later (in 1989), the author re-enacted, at the Royal Institution, many of the demonstrations that Faraday carried out in his memorable Discourse. This article outlines many of Faraday's views on, and experiments with, platinum. It also describes the continuing importance and utilization of platinum, both as perceived in 1989 and from present perspectives.

  4. Alteration of platinum-group minerals and dispersion of platinum-group elements during progressive weathering of the Aguablanca Ni-Cu deposit, SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Saioa; Prichard, Hazel M.; Velasco, Francisco; Fisher, Peter C.; McDonald, Iain

    2010-04-01

    The distribution, mineralogy and mobility of the platinum-group elements (PGE) in the surface environment are poorly understood. This study of the lower, less altered and upper, more altered gossan, overlying the Aguablanca Ni-Cu-(PGE) magmatic deposit (Spain), has shown that the platinum-group minerals (PGM) are progressively oxidised and dispersed into iron oxides that form the gossan. A combination of the characterization of PGE in host PGM, using a scanning electron microscope, and measurement of PGE at lower concentrations in host iron oxides, using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), has for the first time allowed the total distribution of the PGE within a gossan to be documented. This study has revealed a complete in situ alteration and dispersion sequence of the PGM including (1) breakdown of both the more stable Pt-arsenides, Pt/Pd-tellurides and the less stable bismuthotellurides, (2) formation of partially oxidised PGM, (3) development of a wide range of oxidised Pt- and Pd-bearing phases, (4) subsequent formation of Fe-PGE-oxides and PGE-hydroxides, (5) incorporation of PGE into ferruginous supergene products and lastly (6) concentration of PGE at the edges of veins and iron oxides. Dispersion of Pd is greater than for the other PGE with Pd being widely distributed throughout the iron oxides. This oxidising environment produced PGE-oxides rather than PGE-alloys, also commonly found in the surface environment, especially in placers. These results provide critical evidence for the stages of mineralogical change from PGE host mineralogy in magmatic ores to surface weathering producing PGE-oxides.

  5. Platinum(II) and platinum(IV) complexes stabilized by abnormal/mesoionic C4-bound dicarbenes.

    PubMed

    Khlebnikov, Vsevolod; Heckenroth, Marion; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Albrecht, Martin

    2013-03-28

    Platinum(II) complexes comprising abnormal diimidazolylidene ligands were synthesized from cis-PtMe(2)(DMSO)(2) using microwave-assisted double C-H bond activation. NMR analysis revealed an unusual solvolysis process, induced by coordinating solvents such as DMSO and MeCN, which has not been observed in related normal dicarbene complexes. NMR and IR spectroscopy and crystallographic analysis of the mono-substituted DMSO complex indicate a sulfur-bonding of the DMSO ligand to the platinum(II) center. Analysis of the DMSO exchange kinetics provided for the first time a quantitative measure of the trans effect of abnormal carbene ligands. The kinetic exchange rate in these bidentate abnormal dicarbene complexes is 0.050(±2) s(-1) and thus similar to analogous platinum(II) complexes containing phenylpyridine, yet significantly slower than that induced by pyridylidene pyridine. Reaction of the dicarbene platinum(II) complexes with PhICl(2), Br(2) and I(2) afforded the corresponding platinum(IV) complexes. Linkage isomerism of the Pt(IV)-bound DMSO was observed when the bromination reaction was performed in DMSO solution. Moreover, solvolysis was less pronounced in the platinum(IV) complexes than in the corresponding platinum(II) analogues.

  6. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; ...

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  7. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  8. Superconductivity observed in platinum-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Pai-Chia; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lee, Ku-Pin; Shiue, Jessie

    2014-05-26

    We report the discovery of superconductivity with an onset temperature of ∼0.6 K in a platinum-silicon interface. The interface was formed by using a unique focused ion beam sputtering micro-deposition method in which the energies of most sputtered Pt atoms are ∼2.5 eV. Structural and elemental analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal a ∼ 7 nm interface layer with abundant Pt, which is the layer likely responsible for the superconducting transport behavior. Similar transport behavior was also observed in a gold-silicon interface prepared by the same technique, indicating the possible generality of this phenomenon.

  9. Thermodynamic ground states of platinum metal nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aberg, D; Sadigh, B; Crowhurst, J; Goncharov, A

    2007-10-09

    We have systematically studied the thermodynamic stabilities of various phases of the nitrides of the platinum metal elements using density functional theory. We show that for the nitrides of Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt two new crystal structures, in which the metal ions occupy simple tetragonal lattice sites, have lower formation enthalpies at ambient conditions than any previously proposed structures. The region of stability can extend up to 17 GPa for PtN{sub 2}. Furthermore, we show that according to calculations using the local density approximation, these new compounds are also thermodynamically stable at ambient pressure and thus may be the ground state phases for these materials. We further discuss the fact that the local density and generalized gradient approximations predict different values of the absolute formation enthalpies as well different relative stabilities between simple tetragonal and the pyrite or marcasite structures.

  10. Platinum group nuggets in deep sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Bates, B. A.; Wheelock, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of iron meteor oblation spheres in deep sea sediments was known for over a century. These spheres generally were believed to be composed of either pure magnetite and wustite or an oxide shell surrounding a NiFe metal core. A large number of 300 micron to 600 micron spheres found were pure oxide spheres, usually containing a solitary 10 micron platinum group nugget (pgn) composed almost entirely of group VIII metals. Twelve PGN's were analyzed and most had chondritic abundances with some depletions that correlate with element volatility. PGN formation by oxidation of a molten metal sphere entering the atmosphere cannot occur if the oxygen abundance in the atmosphere is less than half of its present value. The first appearance of PGN's in the geological record should mark when, in the Earth's history, oxygen rose to this level.

  11. Excursions in polynuclear platinum DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Mangrum, John B.; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2011-01-01

    Polynuclear platinum agents are a structurally unique class of anti-cancer drugs, distinct from the cisplatin family. To describe the chemistry and biology of this class, it was necessary to challenge the accepted paradigms for the structure–activity relationships; design new chemotypes and delineate the structures and consequences of their DNA binding modes. This article summarizes the structural changes induced in DNA by both covalent (bond-forming) and non-covalent (ligand recognition) adducts. Solution (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), solid state (crystallography) and gas-phase (Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry) techniques have all been used to describe the new DNA structures along with molecular biological techniques. The combined approaches allow molecular description of hitherto unobserved adducts such as long-range major-groove interstrand crosslinks; directional isomers on DNA and a third class of ligand–DNA binding, the phosphate clamp. The phosphate recognition is distinct from “classic” minor-groove recognition or intercalation. PMID:20694266

  12. Electrooxidation of saccharides at platinum electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Chung, Taek Dong

    2012-10-01

    Saccharides have been emerging as promising fuels for future energy industry because they possess high energy density and tremendous amount of them can be obtained from abundant biomass. Direct electrochemical oxidation of saccharides to generate electricity is a potentially competitive approach in terms of the demand for small, handy, and cost-effective electric power sources. To develop efficient sugar fuel cell, it is necessary to understand mechanism of electrooxidation of saccharide at electrode surface. Although glucose oxidation at platinum surface has been well known, fundamental mechanism study on electrooxidation of other sugars is still in its infancy. Based on research of glucose oxidation, we will predict the electrooxidation of other saccharides such as fructose.

  13. Voltage controlled interfacial magnetism through platinum orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Motohiro; Tsujikawa, Masahito; Matsuda, Kensho; Nozaki, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kazuhito; Tsukahara, Takuya; Nawaoka, Kohei; Goto, Minori; Kotani, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Bonell, Frédéric; Tamura, Eiiti; Hono, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Shirai, Masafumi; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2017-06-01

    Electric fields at interfaces exhibit useful phenomena, such as switching functions in transistors, through electron accumulations and/or electric dipole inductions. We find one potentially unique situation in a metal-dielectric interface in which the electric field is atomically inhomogeneous because of the strong electrostatic screening effect in metals. Such electric fields enable us to access electric quadrupoles of the electron shell. Here we show, by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electric field induction of magnetic dipole moments in a platinum monatomic layer placed on ferromagnetic iron. Our theoretical analysis indicates that electric quadrupole induction produces magnetic dipole moments and provides a large magnetic anisotropy change. In contrast with the inability of current designs to offer ultrahigh-density memory devices using electric-field-induced spin control, our findings enable a material design showing more than ten times larger anisotropy energy change for such a use and highlight a path in electric-field control of condensed matter.

  14. Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenxian; Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue; Tian, Dongliang

    2014-07-21

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ∼4 nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

  15. Effects of Palladium Content, Quaternary Alloying, and Thermomechanical Processing on the Behavior of Ni-Ti-Pd Shape Memory Alloys for Actuator Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Glen

    2008-01-01

    The need for compact, solid-state actuation systems for use in the aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries is currently driving research in high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) having transformation temperatures above 100 C. One of the basic high temperature systems under investigation to fill this need is NiTiPd. Prior work on this alloy system has focused on phase transformations and respective temperatures, no-load shape memory behavior (strain recovery), and tensile behavior for selected alloys. In addition, a few tests have been done to determine the effect of boron additions and thermomechanical treatment on the aforementioned properties. The main properties that affect the performance of a solid state actuator, namely work output, transformation strain, and permanent deformation during thermal cycling under load have mainly been neglected. There is also no consistent data representing the mechanical behavior of this alloy system over a broad range of compositions. For this thesis, ternary NiTiPd alloys containing 15 to 46 at.% palladium were processed and the transformation temperatures, basic tensile properties, and work characteristics determined. However, testing reveals that at higher levels of alloying addition, the benefit of increased transformation temperature begins to be offset by lowered work output and permanent deformation or "walking" of the alloy during thermal cycling under load. In response to this dilemma, NiTiPd alloys have been further alloyed with gold, platinum, and hafnium additions to solid solution strengthen the martensite and parent austenite phases in order to improve the thermomechanical behavior of these materials. The tensile properties, work behavior, and dimensional stability during repeated thermal cycling under load for the ternary and quaternary alloys were compared and discussed. In addition, the benefits of more advanced thermomechanical processing or training on the dimensional stability of

  16. Alloy softening in binary molybdenum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. R.; Witzke, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of alloy additions of Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt on the hardness of Mo. Special emphasis was placed on alloy softening in these binary Mo alloys. Results showed that alloy softening was produced by those elements having an excess of s+d electrons compared to Mo, while those elements having an equal number or fewer s+d electrons than Mo failed to produce alloy softening. Alloy softening and hardening can be correlated with the difference in number of s+d electrons of the solute element and Mo.

  17. Platinum Publications, April 1–May 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed.

  18. Platinum Publications, April 1–May 27, 2016 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed.

  19. Safety profile of Colgate Platinum Professional Toothwhitening System.

    PubMed

    Adam-Rodwell, G; Kong, B M; Bagley, D M; Tonucci, D; Christina, L M

    1994-01-01

    Colgate Platinum, a professional tooth-whitening paste containing 10% urea peroxide as the active ingredient, was evaluated for potential acute oral toxicity, genotoxicity, and irritation to oral mucosa. Oral administration to rats of a single dose of 5 g/kg of Colgate Platinum did not induce any adverse effects. Colgate Platinum was not mutagenic in Ames/Salmonella Plate Incorporation assay and did not induce primary DNA damage in the bone marrow hematopoietic cells of rats that were given oral doses of up to 1 g/kg for 5 consecutive days. Results of the oral mucosa irritation study in rats indicated that Colgate Platinum did not induce damage to soft and hard tissues of oral cavity after repeated applications for 28 days. Collectively, the data from these studies document the safety of the product for the intended use.

  20. [Surfacant sensitizing kinetic spectrophotometric determination of trace platinum].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Wang, X

    2000-06-01

    A new kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amount of platinum sensitizing by surfacant of emolsifier OP was proposed. It is based on the inhibition effect of platinum (IV) on the oxidizing decoloration of acid fuchsin by potassium bromate in 0.1 mol.L-1 sulphuric acid medium. The linear range for the determination of platinum is 0-2.2 micrograms.L-1. The detection limit is 0.06 microgram.L-1. Several parameter of the kinetic reaction were determined. The method is sensitive, selective and simple. It has been applied to the determination of trace platinum in chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin and serum from patients with satisfactory results.

  1. Platinum blue staining of cells grown in electrospun scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Mohammed; Millas, Ana Luiza G; Estandarte, Ana Katrina C; Bhella, Gurdeep K; McKean, Robert; Bittencourt, Edison; Robinson, Ian K

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast cells grown in electrospun polymer scaffolds were stained with platinum blue, a heavy metal stain, and imaged using scanning electron microscopy. Good contrast on the cells was achieved compared with samples that were gold sputter coated. The cell morphology could be clearly observed, and the cells could be distinguished from the scaffold fibers. Here we optimized the required concentration of platinum blue for imaging cells grown in scaffolds and show that a higher concentration causes platinum aggregation. Overall, platinum blue is a useful stain for imaging cells because of its enhanced contrast using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the future it would be useful to investigate cell growth and morphology using three-dimensional imaging methods.

  2. Internalization of Ineffective Platinum Complex in Nanocapsules Renders It Cytotoxic.

    PubMed

    Vrana, Oldrich; Novohradsky, Vojtech; Medrikova, Zdenka; Burdikova, Jana; Stuchlikova, Olga; Kasparkova, Jana; Brabec, Viktor

    2016-02-18

    Anticancer therapy by platinum complexes, based on nanocarrier-based delivery, may offer a new approach to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the platinum family of anticancer drugs. The original rules for the design of new anticancer platinum drugs were affected by the fact that, although cisplatin (cis-[PtCl2 (NH3)2) was an anticancer drug, its isomer transplatin was not cytotoxic. For the first time, it is demonstrated that simple encapsulation of an inactive platinum compound in phospholipid bilayers transforms it into an efficient cytotoxic agent. Notably, the encapsulation of transplatin makes it possible to overcome the resistance mechanisms operating in cancer cells treated with cisplatin and prevents inactivation of transplatin in the extracellular environment. It is also shown that transplatin delivered to the cells in nanocapsules, in contrast to free (nonencapsulated) complex, forms cytotoxic cross-links on DNA.

  3. Interfacial electronic effects control the reaction selectivity of platinum catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guangxu; Xu, Chaofa; Huang, Xiaoqing; Ye, Jinyu; Gu, Lin; Li, Gang; Tang, Zichao; Wu, Binghui; Yang, Huayan; Zhao, Zipeng; Zhou, Zhiyou; Fu, Gang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2016-05-01

    Tuning the electronic structure of heterogeneous metal catalysts has emerged as an effective strategy to optimize their catalytic activities. By preparing ethylenediamine-coated ultrathin platinum nanowires as a model catalyst, here we demonstrate an interfacial electronic effect induced by simple organic modifications to control the selectivity of metal nanocatalysts during catalytic hydrogenation. This we apply to produce thermodynamically unfavourable but industrially important compounds, with ultrathin platinum nanowires exhibiting an unexpectedly high selectivity for the production of N-hydroxylanilines, through the partial hydrogenation of nitroaromatics. Mechanistic studies reveal that the electron donation from ethylenediamine makes the surface of platinum nanowires highly electron rich. During catalysis, such an interfacial electronic effect makes the catalytic surface favour the adsorption of electron-deficient reactants over electron-rich substrates (that is, N-hydroxylanilines), thus preventing full hydrogenation. More importantly, this interfacial electronic effect, achieved through simple organic modifications, may now be used for the optimization of commercial platinum catalysts.

  4. Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and

  5. Platinum electrodeposition from a dinitrosulfatoplatinate(II) electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiser, Mathias; Schulze, Claudia; Schneider, Michael; Michaelis, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    In this work a halogen-free electrolyte to deposit platinum nanoparticle is studied. The investigated [Pt(NO2)2SO4]2--complex is suitable for electrochemical deposition on halogen sensitive substrates. The mechanism and kinetic of particle deposition is investigated using a glassy carbon rotating disk electrode. Nano sized platinum particles are deposited by using pulse plating technique. The size of the smallest platinum nanoparticle is 5 nm. The shape of the particle distribution strictly depends on the plating time. The platinum deposition is usually superimposed with hydrogen evolution. A diffusion coefficient of the [Pt(NO2)2SO4]2--complex is determined to 5.4 × 10-6 cm2s-1. The current efficiency depends on the deposition parameters and amounts to 37% under the chosen pulse plating conditions.

  6. Phase properties of carbon-supported platinum-gold nanoparticles for formic acid eletro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mengyin; Xiong, Jihai; Fan, Min; Shi, Jinming; Luo, Chenglong; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Chen, Bing H.

    2015-10-01

    The design of active and robust bimetallic nanocatalysts requires the control of the nanoscale alloying, phase-segregation and the correlation between nanoscale phase-segregation and catalytic properties. To enhance the performance and durability of formic acid oxidation reaction in fuel-cell applications, we prepared a platinum-gold (PtAu) nanocatalyst with controlled morphology and composition. The catalyst is further treated by calcination under controlled temperature and atmosphere. The morphology of the bimetallic nanoparticles is determined by transmission electron microscopy. The nanoscale phase properties and surface composition are carried out by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cyclic voltammetry measurements demonstrated that the catalytic activity is highly dependent on the nanoscale evolution of alloying and phase segregation. The mass activity of as-prepared Pt50Au50/C with 600 °C treatment temperature is about 11 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C. Stability tests showed no obvious loss of activity after 500 potential cycles. The high activity and stability are attributed to lattice contraction effect as a result of the high thermal treatment condition. Our findings demonstrate the importance of phase segregation at the nanoscale in harnessing the true electrocatalytic potential of bimetallic nanoparticles.

  7. Mineral resource of the month: platinum group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on platinum group metals (PGMs) and their properties. According to the author, PGMs, which include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium, and ruthenium, are among the rarest mineral commodities in the Earth's crust. PGMs are primarily used as catalytic converters that clean harmful exhaust from vehicle engines. They are also used in the chemical industry as catalysts in the production of nitric acid and in the petroleum refining industry.

  8. Platinum nanostructures formed by femtosecond laser irradiation in water

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Haibin; Shen Mengyan

    2012-11-15

    Platinum nanostructures with various morphologies, such as spike-like, ripple-like and array-like structures, have been fabricated by 400 nm and 800 nm femtosecond laser irradiation in water. Different structures can be formed on the surfaces as a function of the laser wavelength, the fluence and scan methods. The reflectance measurements of these structures show much larger absorption on the irradiated surfaces than untreated platinum surfaces.

  9. A Possible Calorimetric Error in Heavy Water Electrolysis on Platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    2001-03-16

    A systematic error in mass flow calorimetry calibration procedures potentially capable of explaining most positive excess power measurements is described. Data recently interpreted as providing evidence of the Pons-Fleischmann effect with a platinum cathode are reinterpreted with the opposite conclusion. This indicates it is premature to conclude platinum displays a Pons and Fleischmann effect, and places the requirement to evaluate the error's magnitude on all mass flow calorimetric experiments.

  10. Modified anthracites as selective sorbents for platinum metals

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonova, L.P.; Lyubchik, S.B.; Tarasenko, Y.A.; Goncharik, V.P.; Galushko, O.L.; Fonseca, I.

    2006-05-15

    Methods of preliminary modification were used to obtain activated carbons with low ash content (0.2%), developed pi-conjugated electronic system, large surface area, and wide pore size distribution, from exclusively microporous carbons to those of mesoporous type. The adsorption of compounds of platinum-group metals on activated anthracite from single-component (as regards the platinum metal: Pd, Pt, or Rh) and multicomponent (Pd, Pt) solutions containing compounds of concomitant metals was studied.

  11. Synthesis of nanosized platinum based catalyst using sol-gel process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingale, S. V.; Wagh, P. B.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Singh, I. K.; Tewari, R.; Gupta, S. C.

    2015-02-01

    The nano-sized platinum based catalysts using high surface area silica support have been prepared by sol-gel method. Tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) diluted in methanol was hydrolyzed to form a porous silica gel. Platinum (2%) was loaded at sol state using platinum chloride solution. After gelation, the solvent from the gel pores was extracted at ambient temperature which resulted in porous silica matrix incorporated with nanosized platinum. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the presence of elemental platinum in the silica-platinum composites. Transmission electron microscopy of the platinum -silica composites revealed that nanosized platinum particles of about 5-10 nm are homogeneously dispersed in silica matrix. Chemisorptions studies showed high dispersion (more than 50%) of platinum on silica support with specific surface area of 400 m2/g which puts them as promising candidates as catalyst in heterogeneous reactions.

  12. Long-term platinum retention after treatment with cisplatin and oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Brouwers, Elke EM; Huitema, Alwin DR; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan HM

    2008-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term platinum retention in patients treated with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Methods 45 patients, treated 8–75 months before participating in this study, were included. Platinum levels in plasma and plasma ultrafiltrate (pUF) were determined. In addition, the reactivity of platinum species in pUF was evaluated. Relationships between platinum retention and possible determinants were evaluated. Results Platinum plasma concentrations ranged between 142–2.99 × 103 ng/L. Up to 24% of plasma platinum was recovered in pUF. No platinum-DNA adducts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) could be detected. Ex vivo incubation of DNA with pUF of patients revealed that up to 10% of the reactivity of platinum species was retained. Protein binding proceeded during sample storage. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) appeared to release platinum from the plasma proteins. Platinum levels were related to time, dose, STS co-administration, and glomerular filtration rates (GFR). Conclusion Our data suggest that plasma platinum levels are related to time, age, dose, GFR, and STS use. Platinum in plasma, probably, represent platinum eliminated from regenerating tissue. Platinum species in pUF were partly present in a reactive form. The effects of the reactivity on long-term consequences of Pt-containing chemotherapy, however, remains to be established. PMID:18796166

  13. Liposomes, a promising strategy for clinical application of platinum derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zalba, Sara; Garrido, María J

    2013-06-01

    Liposomes represent a versatile system for drug delivery in various pathologies. Platinum derivatives have been demonstrated to have therapeutic efficacy against several solid tumors. But their use is limited due to their side effects. Since liposomal formulations are known to reduce the toxicity of some conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, the encapsulation of platinum derivatives in these systems may be useful in reducing toxicity and maintaining an adequate therapeutic response. This review describes the strategies applied to platinum derivatives in order to improve their therapeutic activity, while reducing the incidence of side effects. It also reviews the results found in the literature for the different platinum-drugs liposomal formulations and their current status. The design of liposomes to achieve effectiveness in antitumor treatment is a goal for platinum derivatives. Liposomes can change the pharmacokinetic parameters of these encapsulated drugs, reducing their side effects. However, few liposomal formulations have demonstrated a significant advantage in therapeutic terms. Lipoplatin, a cisplatin formulation in Phase III, combines a reduction in the toxicity associated with an antitumor activity similar to the free drug. Thermosensitive or targeted liposomes for tumor therapy are also included in this review. Few articles about this strategy applied to platinum drugs can be found in the literature.

  14. Platinum drugs and DNA repair mechanisms in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Laura; Favaretto, Adolfo; Rosell, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The standard first-line treatment for around 80% of newly-diagnosed advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is chemotherapy. Currently, patients are allocated to chemotherapy on the basis of clinical conditions, comorbidities and histology. If feasible, platinum-based chemotherapy is considered as the most efficacious option. Due to the heterogeneity in terms of platinum-sensitivity among patients with NSCLC, great efforts have been made in order to identify molecular predictive markers of platinum resistance. Based on the mechanism of action of platinum, several components of DNA repair pathways have been investigated as potential predictive markers. The main DNA repair pathways involved in the repair of platinum-induced DNA damage are nucleotide excision repair and homologous recombination. The most studied potential predictive markers of platinum-sensitivity are Excision Repair Cross Complementing-1 (ERCC1) and Brest Cancer Type-I Susceptibility protein (BRCA1); however, increasing biological knowledge about DNA repair pathways suggests the potential clinical usefulness of integrated analysis of multiple DNA repair components.

  15. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-01-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm−2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm−2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW−1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction. PMID:28737170

  16. In vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through Caucasian skin.

    PubMed

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; Du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Jordaan, A; Du Plessis, J L

    2014-12-01

    During platinum group metals (PGMs) refining the possibility exists for dermal exposure to PGM salts. The dermal route has been questioned as an alternative route of exposure that could contribute to employee sensitisation, even though literature has been focused on respiratory exposure. This study aimed to investigate the in vitro permeation of platinum and rhodium through intact Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3mg/ml of metal, K2PtCl4 and RhCl3 respectively, was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24h experiment, and analysed with high resolution ICP-MS. Skin was digested and analysed by ICP-OES. Results indicated cumulative permeation with prolonged exposure, with a significantly higher mass of platinum permeating after 24h when compared to rhodium. The mass of platinum retained inside the skin and the flux of platinum across the skin was significantly higher than that of rhodium. Permeated and skin retained platinum and rhodium may therefore contribute to sensitisation and indicates a health risk associated with dermal exposure in the workplace.

  17. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M.; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-01

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm-2 at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm-2, corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW-1 in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  18. High performance platinum single atom electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Jiao, Menggai; Lu, Lanlu; Barkholtz, Heather M; Li, Yuping; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Luhua; Wu, Zhijian; Liu, Di-Jia; Zhuang, Lin; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dangsheng; Song, Ping; Xing, Wei; Xu, Weilin; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Zheng; Sun, Gongquan

    2017-07-24

    For the large-scale sustainable implementation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells in vehicles, high-performance electrocatalysts with low platinum consumption are desirable for use as cathode material during the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Here we report a carbon black-supported cost-effective, efficient and durable platinum single-atom electrocatalyst with carbon monoxide/methanol tolerance for the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. The acidic single-cell with such a catalyst as cathode delivers high performance, with power density up to 680 mW cm(-2) at 80 °C with a low platinum loading of 0.09 mgPt cm(-2), corresponding to a platinum utilization of 0.13 gPt kW(-1) in the fuel cell. Good fuel cell durability is also observed. Theoretical calculations reveal that the main effective sites on such platinum single-atom electrocatalysts are single-pyridinic-nitrogen-atom-anchored single-platinum-atom centres, which are tolerant to carbon monoxide/methanol, but highly active for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  19. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    PubMed Central

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and highly soluble in water. Platinum conjugates synthesized using the pegylated peptides are also water soluble with reduced or eliminated peptide immunogenicity. The choice of carboplatin as our untargeted platinum complex was due to the fact that malonate linker chelates platinum in a manner similar to carboplatin. Cell toxicity assay and competition assay on the PC-3 cells (CD13 positive receptors) revealed selective delivery and destruction of PC-3 cells using targeted Pt-peptide conjugates 7 and 8 significantly more than untargeted carboplatin. Platinum uptake on PC-3 cells was 12-fold more for conjugate 7 and 3-fold more for conjugate 8 compared to the untargeted carboplatin indicating selectively activation of the CD13 receptors and delivery of the conjugates to CD13 positive cells. Further analysis on effects of conjugates 7 and 8 on PC-3 cells using caspase-3/7, fluorescence microscopy and DNA fragmentation confirmed that the cells were dying by apoptosis. PMID:19775102

  20. Ultra-trace analysis of platinum in human tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Elisabeth; Hann, Stephan; Stingeder, Gerhard; Reiter, Christian

    2005-08-01

    Background levels of platinum were determined in human autopsy tissues taken from five individuals. The investigated specimens were lung, liver and kidney. Sample preparation involved microwave digestion followed by an open vessel treatment. Inductively-coupled plasma sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS) was applied in combination with an ultrasonic nebulization/membrane desolvation system for sample introduction. Isotope dilution analysis was employed for accurate quantification of platinum. Excellent procedural detection limits (3 s validation) of 20, 20 and 34 pg g(-1) dry weight were obtained for lung, liver and kidney tissue, respectively. Due to the lack of appropriate biological reference material, road dust (BCR-723) was used for method validation. Platinum levels ranging between 0.03 and 1.42 ng g(-1) were determined in the investigated samples. The platinum concentrations observed in human lung tissue may reflect the increasing atmospheric background levels of platinum originating from car catalysts. The presence of platinum in kidney and liver tissue samples clearly indicates the bioavailability of the element.

  1. Exosomes as mediators of platinum resistance in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Jennifer; Atay, Safinur; Banskota, Samagya; Artale, Brittany; Schmitt, Sarah; Godwin, Andrew K

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes have been implicated in the cell-cell transfer of oncogenic proteins and genetic material. We speculated this may be one mechanism by which an intrinsically platinum-resistant population of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cells imparts its influence on surrounding tumor cells. To explore this possibility we utilized a platinum-sensitive cell line, A2780 and exosomes derived from its resistant subclones, and an unselected, platinum-resistant EOC line, OVCAR10. A2780 cells demonstrate a ~2-fold increase in viability upon treatment with carboplatin when pre-exposed to exosomes from platinum-resistant cells as compared to controls. This coincided with increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). DNA sequencing of EOC cell lines revealed previously unreported somatic mutations in the Mothers Against Decapentaplegic Homolog 4 (SMAD4) within platinum-resistant cells. A2780 cells engineered to exogenously express these SMAD4 mutations demonstrate up-regulation of EMT markers following carboplatin treatment, are more resistant to carboplatin, and release exosomes which impart a ~1.7-fold increase in resistance in naive A2780 recipient cells as compared to controls. These studies provide the first evidence that acquired SMAD4 mutations enhance the chemo-resistance profile of EOC and present a novel mechanism in which exchange of tumor-derived exosomes perpetuates an EMT phenotype, leading to the development of subpopulations of platinum-refractory cells. PMID:28060758

  2. Combination of irinotecan and platinum for platinum-resistant or refractory recurrent ovarian cancers: A preliminary case series.

    PubMed

    Shibutani, Takashi; Takano, Masashi; Miyamoto, Morikazu; Yoshikawa, Tomoyuki; Aoyama, Tadashi; Soyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Junko; Suzuki, Ayako; Sasa, Hidenori; Furuya, Kenichi

    2017-07-01

    Non-platinum single agents are usually used for patients with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancers (ROC). However, the efficacy of these drugs is limited. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and adverse events (AE) of combination therapy with irinotecan and platinum (CPT-Pt) for ROC. A total of 28 platinum-resistant or refractory patients with ROC treated with CPT-Pt at the National Defense Medical College Hospital institution between 2002 and 2012 were identified. All patients received taxane and carboplatin (TC) as a first-line treatment and relapsed within 6 months after completion of TC, or progressed during TC therapy. The median age was 59 years (range, 16-78), and median number of CPT-Pt therapy cycles was 5.5 (range, 2-16). The overall response rate was 14%, with a complete response (CR) in 2 patients and partial response (PR) in 2 patients. Stable disease (SD) for >3 months was observed in 15 patients (54%), resulting in a clinical benefit rate (CBR = CR + PR + SD) of 68%. The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 8 and 15 months, respectively. Fifteen cases (68%) developed grade 3/4 hematological AE and 3 cases (11%) developed non-hematological grade 3/4 AE, which were resolved by conservative management or dose reduction. Platinum re-treatment with irinotecan for platinum refractory or resistant ROC may be a candidate in such clinical settings.

  3. A Single-Site Platinum CO Oxidation Catalyst in Zeolite KLTL: Microscopic and Spectroscopic Determination of the Locations of the Platinum Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, Joseph D.; Chotigkrai, Nutchapon; Xu, Pinghong; Enderle, Bryan; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Chen, Cong-Yan; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2014-07-01

    A stable site-isolated mononuclear platinum catalyst with a well-defined structure is presented. Platinum complexes supported in zeolite KLTL were synthesized from [Pt(NH3)4](NO3)2, oxidized at 633 K, and used to catalyze CO oxidation. Finally, IR and X-ray absorption spectra and electron micrographs determine the structures and locations of the platinum complexes in the zeolite pores, demonstrate the platinum-support bonding, and show that the platinum remained site isolated after oxidation and catalysis.

  4. Development of Ductile Cr-Re Alloys for High Temperature Application in Aggresive Atmosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    to 1600°C) – Joining and welding – Resistance to propellant – Thermomechanical fatigue The demonstration alloys Cr-35ReCr-18Re Manufacturing method... Heating kinetics of 500 K/s (700 cycles) Materials history 1960 Cobalt base 800 °C 1970 Nickel base 1000 °C 1990 Platinum base 1700 °C Investigated...Powder Metallurgy VS Ingot Metallugy – Short to mid term: Ingot Metallurgy · Prototype alloys by Arc Melting · Production by Induction Melting and

  5. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  6. Evaluation of cellular influences of platinum nanoparticles by stable medium dispersion.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanori; Kato, Haruhisa; Endoh, Shigehisa; Fujita, Katsuhide; Nishio, Keiko; Komaba, Lilian Kaede; Fukui, Hiroko; Nakamura, Ayako; Miyauchi, Arisa; Nakazato, Tetsuya; Kinugasa, Shinichi; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Morimoto, Yasuo; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2011-11-01

    Platinum nanoparticles have industrial application, for example in catalysis, and are used in consumer products such as cosmetics and supplements. Therefore, among the many nanoparticles, platinum is one of the more accessible nanoparticles for consumers. Most platinum nanoparticles that are used in cosmetics and supplements which have an anti-oxidant activity are modified particles. However, the cellular influences of pristine platinum nanoparticles are still unclear, although it has been reported that platinum nanoparticles induce oxidative stress. In this study, we investigated the cellular influences induced by pure pristine platinum nanoparticles. Platinum nanoparticles of 100% purity were dispersed in a cell culture medium and stable medium dispersion was obtained. The platinum nanoparticle medium dispersion was applied to two kinds of cultured cells, A549 and HaCaT cells, and the cellular influences were examined. Cell viability (MTT assay), cell proliferation (clonogenic assay), apoptosis induction (caspase-3 activity), intracellular ROS level (DCFH assay), and lipid peroxidation level (DPPP assay) were measured as markers of cellular influences. Transmission electron microscope observation showed cellular uptake of platinum nanoparticles. However, the platinum nanoparticles did not drive any markers. It is known that some metal oxide nanoparticles such as NiO and CuO show severe cytotoxicity via metal ion release. Compared with these toxic nanoparticles, the platinum nanoparticles used in this study did not release platinum ions into the culture media. These results suggest that the physically and chemically inactive cellular influences of platinum nanoparticles are small.

  7. Atomic concentration effect on thermal properties during solidification of Pt-Rh alloy: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildiz, A. K.; Celik, F. A.

    2017-04-01

    The solidification process of Platinum-Rhodium alloy from liquid phase to solid state is investigated at the nano-scale by using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) for different atomic concentration ratios of Pt. The critical nucleus radius, the bond order parameter, interfacial free energies and total energy based on nucleation theory of the alloy are examined with respect to the temperature changes. The heat of fusion from high temperatures to low temperatures during solidification of the alloy system is determined from molecular dynamics simulation. The structural development is determined from the radial distribution function. It is observed from the results that the melting point of the alloy system decreases with increasing concentration of Pt and that variation of Pt ratio in the alloy shows a remarkable effect on solidification to understand the cooling process of thermal effects.

  8. Eribulin mesylate (halichondrin B Analog E7389) in platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer: a two-cohort, phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Martee L.; Kravetz, Sara; Jia, Xiaoyu; Iasonos, Alexia; Tew, William; Pereira, Lauren; Sabbatini, Paul; Whalen, Christin; Aghajanian, Carol A.; Zarwan, Corinne; Berlin, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    Background Eribulin mesylate is a tubulin inhibitor with activity superior to paclitaxel in NIH:OVCAR-3 human epithelial ovarian cancer xenograft models. We sought to assess the efficacy of eribulin in platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. Methods Patients with recurrent measurable epithelial ovarian cancer, ≤2 prior cytotoxic regimens, and adequate organ function were enrolled into two separate cohorts: 1) Platinum resistant (progression-free interval from last platinum-based therapy <6 months); and 2) Platinum sensitive (progression-free interval from last platinum-based therapy ≥6 months). Treatment: Eribulin 1.4 mg/m2 over 15 minutes by vein on days 1 and 8, every 21 days. Efficacy was determined by objective response by computed tomography. Results Platinum-resistant cohort: Thirty-seven patients enrolled. Thirty-six patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. Two patients achieved partial response (PR, 5.5%). Sixteen (44%) had a best response of stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% confidence interval, 1.4–2.8 months). Platinum-sensitive cohort: Thirty-seven patients enrolled, and all were evaluable for response. Seven patients achieved partial response (PR, 19%). Median progression-free survival was 4.1 months (95% confidence interval, 2.8–5.8 months). The major toxicity was grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (42% in platinum-resistant patients; 54% in platinum-sensitive patients). Conclusions Eribulin achieved objective response in 5.5% of women with platinum-resistant recurrent ovarian cancer and in 19% of women with platinum-sensitive disease. Median progression-free survival was 1.8 months in the platinum-resistant group and 4.1 months in the platinum-sensitive group. PMID:21935916

  9. The combination of gemcitabine and carboplatin shows similar efficacy in the treatment of platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Safra, Tamar; Asna, Noam; Veizman, Anat; Shpigel, Shulem; Matcejevsky, Dianna; Inbar, Moshe; Grisaru, Dan

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate progression-free survival, overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and clinical benefit in recurrent ovarian cancer patients treated with gemcitabine and carboplatin and to compare the outcome among platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive patients. A retrospective study using the medical records of patients diagnosed and treated for recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer, fallopian tube carcinoma, or primary peritoneal carcinoma with gemcitabine and carboplatin from 2005 through 2012 at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. The treatment regimen was carboplatin (area under the curve=5) administered on day 1 and gemcitabine 850 mg/m administered on days 1 and 8 in a 21-day cycle. Seventy patients with a median age of 57 years (range: 38-86) were included in the study. Most patients (94.3%) were initially diagnosed with stage III-IV disease and 44.3% had platinum-sensitive disease. Median progression-free survival in platinum-sensitive patients was 6.3 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.3-8.3] and 6.3 months (95% CI: 4.6-7.9) in platinum-resistant patients. Median overall survival was 15.8 months (95% CI: 13.6-18.1) in the platinum-sensitive patients and 18.4 months (95% CI: 10.0-27.8) in the platinum-resistant patients. Platinum-sensitive patients had a RR of 43.2% and platinum-resistant patients had a RR of 39.1%. The clinical benefit was 70.5% in platinum-sensitive patients and 65.2% in platinum-resistant patients. Overall treatment had a favorable safety profile. Gemcitabine and carboplatin demonstrate moderate toxicity with similar efficacy in both platinum-sensitive and platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer, suggesting reversal of platinum resistance by gemcitabine.

  10. Eribulin mesylate (halichondrin B analog E7389) in platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer: a 2-cohort, phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Hensley, Martee L; Kravetz, Sara; Jia, Xiaoyu; Iasonos, Alexia; Tew, William; Pereira, Lauren; Sabbatini, Paul; Whalen, Christin; Aghajanian, Carol A; Zarwan, Corinne; Berlin, Suzanne

    2012-05-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a tubulin inhibitor with activity superior to paclitaxel in NIH:OVCAR-3 human epithelial ovarian cancer xenograft models. In this study, the authors assessed the efficacy of eribulin in platinum-resistant and platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer. Patients with recurrent, measurable epithelial ovarian cancer who had received ≤2 prior cytotoxic regimens and who had adequate organ function were enrolled into 2 separate cohorts: 1) platinum-resistant patients (who had a progression-free interval <6 months after their last platinum-based therapy) and 2) platinum-sensitive patients (who had a progression-free interval ≥6 months after their last platinum-based therapy). Eribulin 1.4 mg/m(2) was administered over 15 minutes intravenously on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. Efficacy was determined by objective response on computed tomography studies. In the platinum-resistant cohort, 37 patients enrolled, and 36 patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. Two patients achieved a partial response (5.5%), and 16 patients (44%) had stable disease as their best response. The median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.8 months). In the platinum-sensitive cohort, 37 patients enrolled, and all were evaluable for response. Seven patients achieved a partial response (19%). The median progression-free survival was 4.1 months (95% confidence interval, 2.8-5.8 months). The major toxicity was grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (42% of platinum-resistant patients; 54% of platinum-sensitive patients). Eribulin produced an objective response in 5.5% of women with platinum-resistant, recurrent ovarian cancer and in 19% of women with platinum-sensitive disease. The median progression-free survival was 1.8 months in the platinum-resistant group and 4.1 months in the platinum-sensitive group. Copyright © 2011 American Cancer Society.

  11. High-thiotolerant Pt-Ge/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} naphtha reforming catalysts by in-situ alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Garetto, T.F.; Borgna, A.; Apesteguia, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    The effect of alloying on the generation of high-thiotolerant Pt-Ge/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} naphtha reforming catalysts was studied. The state of the metallic fraction after successively reducing the bimetallic catalyst with H{sub 2} at 300{degrees}C and 500{degrees}C was characterized by a variety of physical, spectroscopic, and catalytic techniques. It was found that the high-temperature treatment reduces a part of germanium cations to metallic Ge and forms Pt-Ge alloy clusters. In such alloyed bimetallic particles, Ge acts as an electron-acceptor element, decreasing the electronic density of platinum. Alloying diminishes dramatically both the H{sub 2} uptake and the activity for dehydrogenation reactions but, on the other hand, clearly enhances the resistance to sulfur poisoning. Catalyst thiotolerance is increased because alloying weakens the strength of the S-Pt bond and thereby reduces the amount of irreversibly held sulfur on platinum. It was found that the alloy formation is reversible when the catalyst is submitted to oxidation-reduction cycles. Although treatment with an oxidizing atmosphere at 450{degrees}C destroys the alloyed bimetallic particles, subsequent reduction with H{sub 2} at 500{degrees}C restores the Pt-Ge alloying and enhances the catalyst thiotolerance.

  12. Platinum metals in magmatic sulfide ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naldrett, A.J.; Duke, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) are mined predominantly from deposits that have formed by the segregation of molten iron-nickel-copper sulfides from silicate magmas. The absolute concentrations of PGE in sulfides from different deposits vary over a range of five orders of magnitude, whereas those of other chalcophile elements vary by factors of only 2 to 100. However, the relative proportions of the different PGE in a given deposit are systematically related to the nature of the parent magma. The absolute and relative concentrations of PGE in magmatic sulfides are explained in terms of the degree of partial melting of mantle peridotite required to produce the parent magma and the processes of batch equilibration and fractional segregation of sulfides. The Republic of South Africa and the U.S.S.R. together possess more than 97 percent of the world PGE reserves, but significant undeveloped resources occur in North America. The Stillwater complex in Montana is perhaps the most important example. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  13. EXAFS Model of 2-Dimensional Platinum Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. D.; Charochak, M. E.; Blackwell, N.; Bare, S. R.

    2013-04-01

    Highly dispersed supported platinum clusters have been extensively studied because of their many uses as the active metallic component in heterogeneous catalysts, including catalytic reforming. EXAFS modelling has been used to determine the average coordination number for the first through fifth Pt shells and thereby determine the average cluster size and shape. Several studies have shown that Pt clusters on γ-Al2O3 are truncated to form plate-like clusters in the hexagonal (111) plane as evidenced by an overly reduced second shell coordination number, which would be zero for a truly 2-dimensional cluster. In our system of Pt on γ-Al2O3 the average Pt morphology is determined, on the average, to be small ~13 atom clusters that are 2-diminsional in the hexagonal (111) plane morphology as determined by first and, nearly zero, second nearest neighbour coordination numbers of 4.4 ± 0.6 and 0.5 ± 0.3, respectively.

  14. Platinum Nanoparticles Strongly Bonded to Freestanding Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibado, Paul; Schoelz, J. K.; Ghosh, P. K.; Thompson, J.; Dong, L.; Neek-Amal, M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-03-01

    Freestanding graphene membranes were successfully functionalized with platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs). The membranes were imaged using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, revealing a homogeneous distribution of uniformly sized, single-crystal Pt NPs that exhibit a preferred orientation and nearest-neighbor distance. The Pt NPs were also found to be partially elevated by the graphene substrate, as deduced from atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images. Furthermore, the electrostatic force between the STM tip and sample was utilized to estimate the binding energy of the Pt NPs to the suspended graphene. Local strain accumulation due to strong sp3 bond formation is thought to be the origin of the Pt NP self-organization. Such detailed insight into the atomic nature of this functionalized system was only possible through the cooperation of dual microscopic techniques combined with molecular dynamics simulations. The findings are expected to shape future approaches to develop high-performance electronics based on nanoparticle-functionalized graphene as well as fuel cells using Pt NP catalysts. Financial support provided by the Office of Naval Research under Grant No. N00014-10-1-0181 and the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-0855358.

  15. Superlattices of platinum and palladium nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN,JAMES E.; WILCOXON,JESS P.; ODINEK,JUDY G.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.

    2000-04-06

    The authors have used a nonionic inverse micelle synthesis technique to form nanoclusters of platinum and palladium. These nanoclusters can be rendered hydrophobic or hydrophilic by the appropriate choice of capping ligand. Unlike Au nanoclusters, Pt nanoclusters show great stability with thiol ligands in aqueous media. Alkane thiols, with alkane chains ranging from C{sub 6} to C{sub 18} were used as hydrophobic ligands, and with some of these they were able to form 2-D and/or 3-D superlattices of Pt nanoclusters as small as 2.7 nm in diameter. Image processing techniques were developed to reliably extract from transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) the particle size distribution, and information about the superlattice domains and their boundaries. The latter permits one to compute the intradomain vector pair correlation function of the particle centers, from which they can accurately determine the lattice spacing and the coherent domain size. From these data the gap between the particles in the coherent domains can be determined as a function of the thiol chain length. It is found that as the thiol chain length increases, the gaps between particles within superlattice domains increases, but more slowly than one might expect, possibly indicating thiol chain interdigitation.

  16. Voltage controlled interfacial magnetism through platinum orbits

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Motohiro; Tsujikawa, Masahito; Matsuda, Kensho; Nozaki, Takayuki; Tanaka, Kazuhito; Tsukahara, Takuya; Nawaoka, Kohei; Goto, Minori; Kotani, Yoshinori; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu; Bonell, Frédéric; Tamura, Eiiti; Hono, Kazuhiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Shirai, Masafumi; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2017-01-01

    Electric fields at interfaces exhibit useful phenomena, such as switching functions in transistors, through electron accumulations and/or electric dipole inductions. We find one potentially unique situation in a metal–dielectric interface in which the electric field is atomically inhomogeneous because of the strong electrostatic screening effect in metals. Such electric fields enable us to access electric quadrupoles of the electron shell. Here we show, by synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy, electric field induction of magnetic dipole moments in a platinum monatomic layer placed on ferromagnetic iron. Our theoretical analysis indicates that electric quadrupole induction produces magnetic dipole moments and provides a large magnetic anisotropy change. In contrast with the inability of current designs to offer ultrahigh-density memory devices using electric-field-induced spin control, our findings enable a material design showing more than ten times larger anisotropy energy change for such a use and highlight a path in electric-field control of condensed matter. PMID:28643780

  17. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  18. Platinum states in citrate sols by EXAFS.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Shiang; Khan, Maksudur R; Lin, Shawn D

    2005-07-01

    Platinum sols have been prepared by citrate reduction in the temperature range of 343-363 K. The Pt state in the solution was examined by EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy). It did not show any PtPt bonding, a characteristic for reduced Pt sols. EXAFS model fitting further proved the presence of PtO with 4 oxygen neighbors, which suggests a tetraplanar coordination configuration. The possibility of neighboring Pt sharing oxygen ligand or the formation of PtO(x) is rejected by EXAFS model fitting. Citrate was found to be the most likely ligand to orient its oxygen end toward a charged Pt center. Thus we have revealed that the citrate treatment at this temperature range was clearly insufficient to reduce H2PtCl(6(aq)). Neither an extended period of reaction time nor an excess citrate reduced the Pt precursor. It is therefore highly recommended that the citrate sols should be carefully prepared and used.

  19. Characterization of Platinum and Iridium Oxyhydrate Surface Layers from Platinum and Iridium Foils.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin; Ranjan, Chinmoy; Greiner, Mark; Arrigo, Rosa; Schuster, Manfred Erwin; Höpfner, Britta; Gorgoi, Mihaela; Lauermann, Iver; Willinger, Marc; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-07-07

    Platinum and iridium polycrystalline foils were oxidized electrochemically through anodization to create thin platinum and iridium hydrous oxide layers, which were analyzed through laboratory photoelectron spectroscopy during heating and time series (temperature-programmed spectroscopy). The films contain oxygen in the form of bound oxides, water, and hydroxides and were investigated by depth profiling with high-energy photoelectron spectroscopy. The Pt films are unstable and begin to degrade immediately after removal from the electrolyte to form core-shell structures with a metallic inner core and a hydrous oxide outer shell almost devoid of Pt. However, evidence was found for metastable intermediate states of degradation; therefore, it may be possible to manufacture PtOx phases with increased stability. Heating the film to even 100 °C causes accelerated degradation, which shows that stoichiometric oxides such as PtO2 or PtO are not the active species in the electrolyte. The Ir films exhibit increased stability and higher surface Ir content, and gentle heating at low temperatures leads to a decrease in defect density. Although both layers are based on noble metals, their surface structures are markedly different. The complexity of such hydrous oxide systems is discussed in detail with the goal of identifying the film composition more precisely. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Platinum recovery from industrial process streams by halophilic bacteria: Influence of salt species and platinum speciation.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Claus, Mathias; Verbeken, Kim; Wallaert, Elien; De Smet, Rebecca; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-11-15

    The increased use and criticality of platinum asks for the development of effective low-cost strategies for metal recovery from process and waste streams. Although biotechnological processes can be applied for the valorization of diluted aqueous industrial streams, investigations considering real stream conditions (e.g., high salt levels, acidic pH, metal speciation) are lacking. This study investigated the recovery of platinum by a halophilic microbial community in the presence of increased salt concentrations (10-80 g L(-1)), different salt matrices (phosphate salts, sea salts and NH4Cl) and a refinery process stream. The halophiles were able to recover 79-99% of the Pt at 10-80 g L(-1) salts and at pH 2.3. Transmission electron microscopy suggested a positive correlation between intracellular Pt cluster size and elevated salt concentrations. Furthermore, the halophiles recovered 46-95% of the Pt-amine complex Pt[NH3]4(2+) from a process stream after the addition of an alternative Pt source (K2PtCl4, 0.1-1.0 g L(-1) Pt). Repeated Pt-tetraamine recovery (from an industrial process stream) was obtained after concomitant addition of fresh biomass and harvesting of Pt saturated biomass. This study demonstrates how aqueous Pt streams can be transformed into Pt rich biomass, which would be an interesting feed of a precious metals refinery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ribonucleotide reductase inhibition restores platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Abdul-Karim, Fadi W; Fanning, James; Abulafia, Ovadia; Bonebrake, Albert J; Usha, Lydia

    2012-04-27

    The potent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxyaldehyde-thiosemicarbazone (3-AP) was tested as a chemosensitizer for restored cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Preclinical in vitro platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell survival, RNR activity, and DNA damage assays were done after cisplatin or cisplatin plus 3-AP treatments. Six women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer underwent four-day 3-AP (96 mg/m(2), day one to four) and cisplatin (25 mg/m(2), day two and three) infusions every 21 days until disease progression or adverse effects prohibited further therapy. Pre-therapy ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for RNR subunit expression as an indicator of cisplatin plus 3-AP treatment response. 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells was not as effective as sequencing cisplatin plus 3-AP together in cell survival assays. Platinum-mediated DNA damage (i.e., γH2AX foci) resolved quickly after cisplatin-alone or 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure, but persisted after a cisplatin plus 3-AP sequence. On trial, 25 four-day overlapping 3-AP and cisplatin cycles were administered to six women (median 4.2 cycles per patient). 3-AP-related methemoglobinemia (range seven to 10%) occurred in two (33%) of six women, halting trial accrual. When sequenced cisplatin plus 3-AP, RNR inhibition restored platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancers. 3-AP (96 mg/m(2)) infusions produced modest methemoglobinemia, the expected consequence of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors disrupting collateral proteins containing iron. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00081276.

  2. Ribonucleotide reductase inhibition restores platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The potent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) inhibitor 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxyaldehyde-thiosemicarbazone (3-AP) was tested as a chemosensitizer for restored cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. Methods Preclinical in vitro platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell survival, RNR activity, and DNA damage assays were done after cisplatin or cisplatin plus 3-AP treatments. Six women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer underwent four-day 3-AP (96 mg/m2, day one to four) and cisplatin (25 mg/m2, day two and three) infusions every 21 days until disease progression or adverse effects prohibited further therapy. Pre-therapy ovarian cancer tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for RNR subunit expression as an indicator of cisplatin plus 3-AP treatment response. Results 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure in platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cells was not as effective as sequencing cisplatin plus 3-AP together in cell survival assays. Platinum-mediated DNA damage (i.e., γH2AX foci) resolved quickly after cisplatin-alone or 3-AP preceding cisplatin exposure, but persisted after a cisplatin plus 3-AP sequence. On trial, 25 four-day overlapping 3-AP and cisplatin cycles were administered to six women (median 4.2 cycles per patient). 3-AP-related methemoglobinemia (range seven to 10%) occurred in two (33%) of six women, halting trial accrual. Conclusions When sequenced cisplatin plus 3-AP, RNR inhibition restored platinum-sensitivity in platinum-resistant ovarian cancers. 3-AP (96 mg/m2) infusions produced modest methemoglobinemia, the expected consequence of ribonucleotide reductase inhibitors disrupting collateral proteins containing iron. Trial registry ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00081276 PMID:22541066

  3. Oxidation-induced structural changes in sub-nanometer platinum supported on alumina

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Blom, Douglas Allen; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2015-06-26

    Platinum supported on alumina is an essential component of emission treatment catalysts used in transportation. Theoretical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of platinum particles supported on a variety of supports have been extensively studied; however, available experimental information on the behavior of single vs. sub-nanometer platinum is extremely limited. To bridge the knowledge gap between single supported platinum and well-formed supported platinum nanoparticles, we have carried out synthesis, characterization, and CO and NO oxidation studies of sub-nanometer platinum supported on α, θ, and γ-Al2O3 and monitored changes in structure upon exposure to CO and NO oxidation conditions. Furthermore, we find that sub-nanometer Pt is highly effective for CO oxidation due to high platinum dispersion but is not very efficient as NO oxidation catalyst. Lastly, sub-nanometer platinum agglomerates rapidly under CO or NO oxidation conditions to form nanoparticles.

  4. Oxidation-induced structural changes in sub-nanometer platinum supported on alumina

    DOE PAGES

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Allard, Jr, Lawrence Frederick; Blom, Douglas Allen; ...

    2015-06-26

    Platinum supported on alumina is an essential component of emission treatment catalysts used in transportation. Theoretical, experimental, and mechanistic aspects of platinum particles supported on a variety of supports have been extensively studied; however, available experimental information on the behavior of single vs. sub-nanometer platinum is extremely limited. To bridge the knowledge gap between single supported platinum and well-formed supported platinum nanoparticles, we have carried out synthesis, characterization, and CO and NO oxidation studies of sub-nanometer platinum supported on α, θ, and γ-Al2O3 and monitored changes in structure upon exposure to CO and NO oxidation conditions. Furthermore, we find thatmore » sub-nanometer Pt is highly effective for CO oxidation due to high platinum dispersion but is not very efficient as NO oxidation catalyst. Lastly, sub-nanometer platinum agglomerates rapidly under CO or NO oxidation conditions to form nanoparticles.« less

  5. A dual-emissive ionic liquid based on an anionic platinum(ii) complex.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Masaki; Ohara, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Atsushi; Kato, Masako

    2015-09-07

    An ionic liquid fabricated from an anionic cyclometalated platinum(ii) complex and an imidazolium cation exhibits dual emission from the monomeric and aggregated forms of the platinum complex anions, leading to temperature-dependent color changes of luminescence.

  6. Structures of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, Yee Pin; Yoon, Tiem Leong; Lim, Thong Leng

    2015-04-24

    Bimetallic nanoclusters, such as gold-platinum nanoclusters, are nanomaterials promising wide range of applications. We perform a numerical study of 38-atom gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters, Au{sub n}Pt{sub 38−n} (0 ≤ n ≤ 38), to elucidate the geometrical structures of these clusters. The lowest-energy structures of these bimetallic nanoclusters at the semi-empirical level are obtained via a global-minimum search algorithm known as parallel tempering multi-canonical basin hopping plus genetic algorithm (PTMBHGA), in which empirical Gupta many-body potential is used to describe the inter-atomic interactions among the constituent atoms. The structures of gold-platinum nanoalloy clusters are predicted to be core-shell segregated nanoclusters. Gold atoms are observed to preferentially occupy the surface of the clusters, while platinum atoms tend to occupy the core due to the slightly smaller atomic radius of platinum as compared to gold’s. The evolution of the geometrical structure of 38-atom Au-Pt clusters displays striking similarity with that of 38-atom Au-Cu nanoalloy clusters as reported in the literature.

  7. PLATINUM HEXAFLUORIDE AND METHOD OF FLUORINATING PLUTONIUM CONTAINING MIXTURES THERE-WITH

    DOEpatents

    Malm, J.G.; Weinstock, B.; Claassen, H.H.

    1959-07-01

    The preparation of platinum hexafluoride and its use as a fluorinating agent in a process for separating plutonium from fission products is presented. According to the invention, platinum is reacted with fluorine gas at from 900 to 1100 deg C to form platinum hexafluoride. The platinum hexafluoride is then contacted with the plutonium containing mixture at room temperature to form plutonium hexafluoride which is more volatile than the fission products fluorides and therefore can be isolated by distillation.

  8. Superconductivity in Metals and Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    LEAD(METAL), LIQUEFIED GASES, LOW TEMPERATURE RESEARCH, METAL FILMS, METALLIC SOAPS, NIOBIUM ALLOYS, PHASE STUDIES, RESISTANCE (ELECTRICAL), SAMARIUM...SYNTHESIS, TANTALUM ALLOYS, TIN, TIN ALLOYS, TRANSITION TEMPERATURE, VANADIUM ALLOYS

  9. Epirubicin, Cisplatin, and Capecitabine for Primary Platinum-Resistant or Platinum-Refractory Epithelial Ovarian Cancer: Results of a Retrospective, Single-Institution Study.

    PubMed

    Sayal, Karen; Gounaris, Ioannis; Basu, Bristi; Freeman, Sue; Moyle, Penny; Hosking, Karen; Iddawela, Mahesh; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Abraham, Jean; Brenton, James; Hatcher, Helen; Earl, Helena; Parkinson, Christine

    2015-07-01

    Primary platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is an area of unmet medical need. There is limited evidence from small studies that platinum-based combinations can overcome "resistance" in a proportion of patients. We investigated the efficacy and toxicity of platinum-based combination chemotherapy in the platinum-resistant and platinum-refractory setting. Epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine (ECX) combination chemotherapy was used at our institution for the treatment of relapsed EOC. From the institutional database, we identified all patients with primary platinum-refractory or platinum-resistant relapse treated with ECX as second-line therapy between 2001 and 2012. We extracted demographic, clinical, treatment, and toxicity data and outcomes. We used logistic and Cox regression models to identify predictors of response and survival respectively. Thirty-four 34 patients (8 refractory, 26 resistant) were treated with ECX. Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) response rate was 45%, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6.4 months, and overall survival (OS) was 10.6 months. Platinum-resistant patients had better outcomes than did platinum-refractory patients (response rate, 54% vs 0%, P = 0.047; PFS 7.2 vs 1.8 months, P < 0.0001; OS 14.4 vs 3 months, P < 0.001). In regression models, time to progression after first-line treatment and platinum-refractory status were the strongest predictors of response and PFS or OS, respectively. Patients with time to progression after first-line treatment longer than 3 months showed PFS and OS of 7.9 and 14.7 months, respectively. Toxicity was manageable, with only 13% of cycles administered at reduced doses. Epirubicin, cisplatin, and capecitabine seems to be active in platinum-resistant relapsed EOC with manageable toxicity. Further prospective investigation of platinum-anthracycline combinations is warranted in patients who relapse 3 to 6 months after first-line platinum-taxane treatment.

  10. Low Energy Electron Diffraction and Cyclic Voltammetry Studies of Flame-Annealed Platinum Single Crystals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and cyclic voltammetry were used to examine the surface structure of flame-annealed platinum (I 00), (II 0...electron diffraction studies of platinum single crystal surfaces, Cyclic voltammetry of flamed-annealed platinum single crystal.

  11. 75 FR 77572 - Proposed Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum AK AGENCY... action proposes to revise Class E airspace at Platinum AK. The creation of a new Standard Instrument Approach Procedure (SIAP) at the Platinum Airport has made this action necessary to enhance safety...

  12. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  13. The effects of platinum on nickel electrodes in the nickel hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1991-01-01

    Interactions of platinum and platinum compounds with the nickel electrode that are possible in the nickel hydrogen cell, where both the nickel electrode and a platinum catalyst hydrogen electrode are in intimate contact with the alkaline electrolyte, are examined. Additionally, a mechanism of nickel cobalt oxyhydroxide formation in NiH2 cells is presented.

  14. 40 CFR 440.110 - Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... platinum ore subcategory. 440.110 Section 440.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS ORE MINING AND DRESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Platinum Ores Subcategory § 440.110 Applicability; description of the platinum ore subcategory. The provisions of...

  15. Platinum Publications, December 30, 2016–January 25, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  16. Platinum Publications, December 30, 2016–January 25, 2017 | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Platinum Publications are selected from articles by NCI at Frederick scientists published in 42 prestigious science journals. This list represents articles published during the time period shown above, as generated from PubMed. Articles designated as Platinum Highlights are noteworthy articles selected from among the most recently published Platinum Publications.

  17. Flow Injection Analysis with Electrochemical Detection for Rapid Identification of Platinum-Based Cytostatics and Platinum Chlorides in Water

    PubMed Central

    Kominkova, Marketa; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Kynicky, Jindrich; Pohanka, Miroslav; Beklova, Miroslava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based cytostatics, such as cisplatin, carboplatin or oxaliplatin are widely used agents in the treatment of various types of tumors. Large amounts of these drugs are excreted through the urine of patients into wastewaters in unmetabolised forms. This phenomenon leads to increased amounts of platinum ions in the water environment. The impacts of these pollutants on the water ecosystem are not sufficiently investigated as well as their content in water sources. In order to facilitate the detection of various types of platinum, we have developed a new, rapid, screening flow injection analysis method with electrochemical detection (FIA-ED). Our method, based on monitoring of the changes in electrochemical behavior of analytes, maintained by various pH buffers (Britton-Robinson and phosphate buffer) and potential changes (1,000, 1,100 and 1,200 mV) offers rapid and cheap selective determination of platinum-based cytostatics and platinum chlorides, which can also be present as contaminants in water environments. PMID:24499878

  18. Flow injection analysis with electrochemical detection for rapid identification of platinum-based cytostatics and platinum chlorides in water.

    PubMed

    Kominkova, Marketa; Heger, Zbynek; Zitka, Ondrej; Kynicky, Jindrich; Pohanka, Miroslav; Beklova, Miroslava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-02-04

    Platinum-based cytostatics, such as cisplatin, carboplatin or oxaliplatin are widely used agents in the treatment of various types of tumors. Large amounts of these drugs are excreted through the urine of patients into wastewaters in unmetabolised forms. This phenomenon leads to increased amounts of platinum ions in the water environment. The impacts of these pollutants on the water ecosystem are not sufficiently investigated as well as their content in water sources. In order to facilitate the detection of various types of platinum, we have developed a new, rapid, screening flow injection analysis method with electrochemical detection (FIA-ED). Our method, based on monitoring of the changes in electrochemical behavior of analytes, maintained by various pH buffers (Britton-Robinson and phosphate buffer) and potential changes (1,000, 1,100 and 1,200 mV) offers rapid and cheap selective determination of platinum-based cytostatics and platinum chlorides, which can also be present as contaminants in water environments.

  19. Upper eyelid platinum chain placement for treating paralytic lagophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, B; Ferri, A; Leporati, M; Ferrari, S; Lanfranco, D; Ferri, T; Sesenna, E

    2014-12-01

    For the definitive treatment of lagophthalmos and satisfactory rehabilitation of the affected eye, different surgical strategies have been proposed, including static or dynamic procedures. Although some of these can have good results, lid loading is now the most common technique for treating paralytic long-term lagophthalmos. Among the different types of loading, the use of a platinum chain is preferred to the use of a standard gold weight because platinum has a higher density than gold and is also more biocompatible. In this paper authors retrospectively analyzed 43 patients with regards to functional and cosmetic results. Questionnaires were also employed to assess changes and improvements in the patients' quality of life. Analysis of the excellent results achieved confirmed that platinum chain lid loading should be considered as a first-line treatment for paralytic lagophthalmos rehabilitation. It is a simple, reliable, and effective technique that significantly improves the health-related quality of life of patients.

  20. One-dimensional Magnus-type platinum double salts

    PubMed Central

    Hendon, Christopher H.; Walsh, Aron; Akiyama, Norinobu; Konno, Yosuke; Kajiwara, Takashi; Ito, Tasuku; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Sakai, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Interest in platinum-chain complexes arose from their unusual oxidation states and physical properties. Despite their compositional diversity, isolation of crystalline chains has remained challenging. Here we report a simple crystallization technique that yields a series of dimer-based 1D platinum chains. The colour of the Pt2+ compounds can be switched between yellow, orange and blue. Spontaneous oxidation in air is used to form black Pt2.33+ needles. The loss of one electron per double salt results in a metallic state, as supported by quantum chemical calculations, and displays conductivity of 11 S cm−1 at room temperature. This behaviour may open up a new avenue for controllable platinum chemistry. PMID:27320502

  1. Design of experimentation with a platinum-magnesium bioelectric battery.

    PubMed

    Fontenier, G; Freschard, R; Mourot, M

    1975-01-01

    The utilization of metal electrodes in the fabrication of a bioelectric battery has been the subject of intensive study for several years. Up to this date, subcutaneous cathodes of black platinum or of silver-silver chloride have been used in conjunction with anodes of aluminum or zinc. The subcutaneous black platinum is not reliable as a function of time due to the growth of overlying heterogeneous tissues. The utilization of a smooth platinum cathode in the right endoauricular position allows good reliability with time, but does not allow using a large surface area. Furthermore we have a reduction of the H-+ ions and not of the oxygen. A pure Domal magnesium anode was utilized with this cathode, which seemed to be a good compromise between to battery's voltage, its lifetime, and its lack of toxicity to body tissues.

  2. Synthesis and properties of magnetic iron oxide/platinum nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serga, V.; Maiorov, M.; Kulikova, L.; Krumina, A.; Karashanova, D.

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide/platinum nanocomposites have been synthesized by the extractive-pyrolytic method (EPM) involving gradual decomposition of iron capronate and n-trioctylammonium hexachloroplatinate initially produced by solvent extraction. The content of platinum in the composites was 1.2 wt%, 2.4 wt% and 4.8 wt%. Phase composition, morphology and magnetic properties of the produced materials were investigated. XRD analysis and magnetic measurements show that the magnetic phase (magnetite Fe3O4) dominates in a carrier sample produced by the pyrolysis of iron carboxylate, but hematite α-Fe2O3 exists there as an admixture. Referring to the TEM results, the produced composites contain ultra-disperse platinum particles on the carrier, and the mean size of these varies from 3 nm to 9 nm.

  3. Electron Field Emission Properties of Textured Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.

    2002-01-01

    During ground tests of electric microthrusters and space tests of electrodynamic tethers the electron emitters must successfully operate at environmental pressures possibly as high as 1x10(exp -4) Pa. High partial pressures of oxygen, nitrogen, and water vapor are expected in such environments. A textured platinum surface was used in this work for field emission cathode assessments because platinum does not form oxide films at low temperatures. Although a reproducible cathode conditioning process did not evolve from this work, some short term tests for periods of 1 to 4 hours showed no degradation of emission current at an electric field of 8 V/mm and background pressures of about 1x10(exp -6) Pa. Increases of background pressure by air flow to about 3x10(exp -4) Pa yield a hostile environment for the textured platinum field emission cathode.

  4. Dissolution of Platinum in the Operational Range of Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Keeley, Gareth P.; Geiger, Simon; Zeradjanin, Aleksandar R.; Hodnik, Nejc; Kulyk, Nadiia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract One of the most important practical issues in low‐temperature fuel‐cell catalyst degradation is platinum dissolution. According to the literature, it initiates at 0.6–0.9 VRHE, whereas previous time‐ and potential‐resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP–MS) experiments, however, revealed dissolution onset at only 1.05 VRHE. In this manuscript, the apparent discrepancy is addressed by investigating bulk and nanoparticulated catalysts. It is shown that, given enough time for accumulation, traces of platinum can be detected at potentials as low as 0.85 VRHE. At these low potentials, anodic dissolution is the dominant process, whereas, at more positive potentials, more platinum dissolves during the oxide reduction after accumulation. Interestingly, the potential and time dissolution dependence is similar for both types of electrode. Dissolution processes are discussed with relevance to fuel‐cell operation and plausible dissolution mechanisms are considered. PMID:27525206

  5. Synthesis and Electrocatalytic Performance of BDD-Supported Platinum Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Xiao; Hu, Jingping; Foord, John S.; Lou, Changsheng; Zhang, Weiqiang

    2015-02-01

    Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on boron-doped diamond substrate by electroless method without pre-activation. The mechanism of this deposition is a galvanic process along with a chemical process. Platinum particles are in nanoscale with diameter around 30-50 nm and height of around 3 nm observed from AFM and SEM images. The electrochemical activity of Pt nanoparticles was evaluated by cyclic voltammograms of hydrogen desorption process in 0.5 M H2SO4. The deposited platinum shows great stability in subsequent cycling in sulfuric acid and exhibits a high selectivity toward H2O2 detection in the range of 1 to 400 μM compared with those produced by electrochemical deposition.

  6. Hypersensitivity Reactions Associated with Platinum Antineoplastic Agents: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Makrilia, Nektaria; Syrigou, Ekaterini; Kaklamanos, Ioannis; Manolopoulos, Leonidas; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2010-01-01

    Platinum-containing chemotherapy agents (cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin) have been approved in the first-line setting of numerous malignancies, such as ovarian, bladder, head and neck, colorectal, and lung cancer. Their extensive use over the last decade has led to a significant increase in the incidence of hypersensitivity reactions, which are defined as unforeseen reactions whose signs and symptoms cannot be explained by the known toxicity of these drugs. Skin rash, flushing, abdominal cramping, itchy palms, and back pain are common symptoms. Cardiovascular and respiratory complications can prove fatal. Multiple pathogenetic mechanisms have been suggested. Hypersensitivity usually appears after multiple infusions, suggesting type I allergic reactions; however, other types of hypersensitivity also seem to be implicated. Several management options are available to treating physicians: discontinuation of chemotherapy, premedication, prolonging of infusion duration, desensitization protocols, and replacement with a different platinum compound after performing skin tests that rule out cross-reactions among platinum agents. PMID:20886011

  7. Transport Magnetic Proximity Effects in Platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ssu-Yen

    2013-03-01

    Platinum (Pt) metal, being non-magnetic and having a strong spin-orbit coupling interaction, has been central in detecting pure spin current and establishing most of the recent spin-based phenomena. Thus, it is important to ascertain the transport and magnetic characteristics of thin Pt films in contact with a ferromagnet. In this work, we use both electric and thermal means to conclusively show the transport magnetic proximity effects (MPE) of thin Pt film in contact with ferromagnetic insulator YIG. At thicknesses comparable to, and less than, the spin diffusion length, the strong ferromagnetic characteristics in Pt films on YIG are indistinguishable from those of ferromagnetic permalloy on YIG. The MPE occurs at the interface and decreases exponentially away from the interface, concentrating in only a few monolayers. As a result, the pure spin current detected by a thin Pt is tainted with a spin polarized current. The pure spin current phenomena, such as the inverse spin Hall effect and the spin Seebeck effect, have been contaminated with the anomalous Hall effect and the anomalous Nernst effect respectively. These results raise serious questions about the suitability, and the validity, of using Pt in establishing pure spin current phenomena; on the other hand, a much stronger spin-based effect can be induced by the MPE at the interface. This research is in collaboration with X. Fin, Y. P. Chen, J. Wu, and J. Q. Xiao (University of Delaware), T. Y. Chen (Arizona State University) and D. Qu, W. G. Wang, and C. L. Chien (The Johns Hopkins University).

  8. Water-soluble platinum phthalocyanines as potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Bologna, Giuseppina; Lanuti, Paola; D'Ambrosio, Primiano; Tonucci, Lucia; Pierdomenico, Laura; D'Emilio, Carlo; Celli, Nicola; Marchisio, Marco; d'Alessandro, Nicola; Santavenere, Eugenio; Bressan, Mario; Miscia, Sebastiano

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer represents the second cause of death in the European female population. The lack of specific therapies together with its high invasive potential are the major problems associated to such a tumor. In the last three decades platinum-based drugs have been considered essential constituents of many therapeutic strategies, even though with side effects and frequent generation of drug resistance. These drugs have been the guide for the research, in last years, of novel platinum and ruthenium based compounds, able to overcome these limitations. In this work, ruthenium and platinum based phthalocyanines were synthesized through conventional techniques and their antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic actions were tested. Normal mammary gland (MCF10A) and several models of mammarian carcinoma at different degrees of invasiveness (BT474, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) were used. Cells were treated with different concentrations (5-100 μM) of the above reported compounds, to evaluate toxic concentration and to underline possible dose-response effects. The study included growth curves made by trypan blue exclusion test and scratch assay to study cellular motility and its possible negative modulation by phthalocyanine. Moreover, we investigated cell cycle and apoptosis through flow cytometry and AMNIS Image Stream cytometer. Among all the tested drugs, tetrasulfonated phthalocyanine of platinum resulted to be the molecule with the best cytostatic action on neoplastic cell lines at the concentration of 30 μM. Interestingly, platinum tetrasulfophtalocyanine, at low doses, had no antiproliferative effects on normal cells. Therefore, such platinum complex, appears to be a promising drug for mammarian carcinoma treatment.

  9. Investigation of the usefulness of NTA, EDTA and DTPA in separation of some platinum metals on cellulose exchangers.

    PubMed

    Brajter, K; Słonawska, K

    1980-09-01

    The possibility of using NTA, EDTA and DTPA as complexing agents for separation of some platinum group ions on cellulose ion-exchangers has been investigated. The greatest differences in the affinities of Pd(II) and Pt(IV) toward the cellulose ion-exchangers are obtained in the presence of DPTA, Cellex D (as ion-exchanger) in hydroxide form. The column separation of Pd(II) from Pt(IV), Rh(III) from Pd(II) and of a Rh(III)Pd(II)Pt(IV) mixture can be achieved with DPTA and chloride solutions. The method can be for determination of the components of RhPdPt alloys.

  10. Determination of palladium and platinum by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schnepfe, M.M.; Grimaldi, F.S.

    1969-01-01

    Palladium and platinum are determined by atomic absorption after fire-assay concentration into a gold bead. The limit of determination is ~0??06 ppm in a 20-g sample. Serious depressive interelement interferences are removed by buffering the solutions with a mixture of cadmium and copper sulphates with cadmium and copper concentrations each at 0??5%. Substantial amounts of Ag, Al, Au, Bi, Ca, Co, Cr, Fe, Hg, K, La, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Ni, Pb, Te, Ti, V, Y, Zn, and the platinum metals do not interfere in the atomic-absorption determination. ?? 1969.

  11. Synthesis of platinum nanoparticle electrocatalysts by atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubers, Alia Marie

    Demand for energy continues to increase, and without alternatives to fossil fuel combustion the effects on our environment will become increasingly severe. Fuel cells offer a promising improvement on current methods of energy generation; they are able to convert hydrogen fuel into electricity with a theoretical efficiency of up to 83% and interface smoothly with renewable hydrogen production. Fuel cells can replace internal combustion engines in vehicles and are used in stationary applications to power homes and businesses. The efficiency of a fuel cell is maximized by its catalyst, which is often composed of platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon. Economical production of fuel cell catalysts will promote adoption of this technology. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a possible method for producing catalysts at a large scale when employed in a fluidized bed. ALD relies on sequential dosing of gas-phase precursors to grow a material layer by layer. We have synthesized platinum nanoparticles on a carbon particle support (Pt/C) by ALD for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and electrochemical hydrogen pumps. Platinum nanoparticles with different characteristics were deposited by changing two chemistries: the carbon substrate through functionalization; and the deposition process by use of either oxygen or hydrogen as ligand removing reactants. The metal depositing reactant was trimethyl(methylcyclopentadienyl)platinum(IV). Functionalizing the carbon substrate increased nucleation during deposition resulting in smaller and more dispersed nanoparticles. Use of hydrogen produced smaller nanoparticles than oxygen, due to a gentler hydrogenation reaction compared to using oxygen's destructive combustion reaction. Synthesized Pt/C materials were used as catalysts in an electrochemical hydrogen pump, a device used to separate hydrogen fuel from contaminants. Catalysts deposited by ALD on functionalized carbon using a hydrogen chemistry were the most

  12. Amphiphilic Cyanine-Platinum Conjugates as Fluorescent Nanodrugs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tingting; Li, Zhensheng; Xie, Zhigang; Jing, Xiabin

    2016-01-01

    Two fluorescent nanomedicines based on small molecular cyanine-platinum conjugates have been prepared via a nanoprecipitation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as dynamic light scattering (DLS). The conjugates exhibited an enhanced fluorescence in their nanoparticle formulation compared to that in solution. The nanomedicines could be endocytosed by cancer cells as revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and showed high cellular proliferation inhibition. Fluorescent platinum nanomedicines prepared directly from small molecules could be an alternative strategy for developing new drugs with simultaneous cellular imaging and cancer therapy functions.

  13. Addition of platinum and silver nanoparticles to toughen dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Fujieda, Tokushi; Uno, Mitsunori; Ishigami, Hajime; Kurachi, Masakazu; Wakamatsu, Nobukazu; Doi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have investigated toughening porcelain that is layered over a frame or a core. The introduction of residual compressive stress to the surface of porcelain has been shown to be effective to strengthen it. In the present study, nanoparticles of precious metals of silver and platinum (rather than non-precious metals) were used to evaluate if they could increase the fracture resistance of porcelain. The addition of silver and platinum nanoparticles was found to improve the mechanical properties of porcelain since it increased both the Young's modulus and the fracture toughness of commercial porcelain.

  14. Distribution of platinum and cobalt atoms in a bimetallic nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chui, Yu Hang; Chan, Kwong-Yu

    2005-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the atomic distribution and the structure of platinum-cobalt nanoparticles. Heating and cooling techniques are applied before getting equilibrated structures at 298 K. Both crystalline (fcc) and amorphous structures are partly observed depending on cooling rates. The atomic distributions in different regions of a bimetallic nanoparticle are analyzed. Although platinum tends to occupy surface and near-surface sites of the bimetallic nanoparticle, a complete segregation to form a core-shell structure is not observed.

  15. Cement luting thickness beneath porcelain veneers made on platinum foil.

    PubMed

    Wall, J G; Reisbick, M H; Espeleta, K G

    1992-09-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers were made using a platinum foil matrix and were subsequently cemented to mandibular anterior Cymel teeth. Cement film thickness was measured in six predetermined locations. Repeated measures analysis of variance and single degree of freedom contrasts delineated a significant difference between marginal openings at the incisal edge where foil is folded and in four of the other vertical areas (132 versus 74.1 microns). Marginal cement film thickness of veneers made on platinum foil is less than that reported for veneers made on a refractory investment.

  16. Preparation of MgO supported platinum nanoparticle catalyst using toluene dispersed platinum sol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Jhumur; Nepak, Devadutta; Chaudhari, Vijay R.; Prasad, Bhagavatula L. V.

    2017-10-01

    An effective way of anchoring Pt nanoparticles on MgO using toluene dispersed platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs) as one of the ingredient is demonstrated. The usage of particles dispersed in toluene allows the retention of size and size distribution of preformed Pt-NPs even after deposition on MgO support with high active surface area, which is crucial for heterogeneous catalysis. The catalyst thus prepared, displayed selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to cinnamyl alcohol with high turn on frequency (TOF - 105 h-1) with respect to the total Pt content. We attribute this efficient catalytic performance to the uniform distribution and deposition of Pt on the active MgO support and its better accessible surface as evidenced by the cyclic-voltammetry results.

  17. Platinum-group elements and minerals in the lower and middle group chromitites of the western Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junge, Malte; Oberthür, Thomas; Osbahr, Inga; Gutter, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The chromitites of the Bushveld Complex in South Africa contain vast resources of platinum-group elements (PGE). However, knowledge of the distribution and the mineralogical siting of the PGE in the lower group (LG) and middle group (MG) chromitite seams of the Bushveld Complex is limited. We studied concentrates from the LG-6 and MG-2 chromitites of the western Bushveld Complex by a variety of microanalytical techniques. The dominant PGM are sulfides, namely laurite, cooperite-braggite, and malanite-cuprorhodsite, followed by PGE-sulfarsenides, sperrylite, and Pt-Fe alloys. Laurite is the most abundant PGM (vol%). The matching sets of PGM present in the LG and MG chromitites of both the western and the eastern Bushveld Complex, and in the UG-2 chromitite, show strong similarities which support the assumption of a characteristic and general chromitite-related PGM assemblage. Palladium and Rh contents in pentlandite are low and erratic although maximum contents of 7730 ppm Pd and 6020 ppm Rh were detected. Rare thiospinels of the polydymite-linnaeite-greigite series have PGE contents of 1430 ppm Pt, 5370 ppm Rh, and 1460 ppm Pd. The various PGE occur in different deportment: Platinum is generally present in the form of discrete PGM (sulfides, arsenides, alloys). Palladium is present as a large variety of discrete PGM and also incorporated in pentlandite. Rhodium forms discrete PGM and is occasionally present in pentlandite. The IPGE (Os, Ir, and Ru) are dominantly incorporated in laurite (often as inclusions in chromite) and also occur as sulfarsenides.

  18. Oxidation Behavior of Binary Niobium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Charles A.; Corey, James L.

    1960-01-01

    This investigation concludes a study to determine the effects of up to 25 atomic percent of 55 alloying additions on the oxidation characteristics of niobium. The alloys were evaluated by oxidizing in an air atmosphere for 4 hours at 1000 C and 2 hours at 1200 C. Titanium and chromium improved oxidation resistance at both evaluation conditions. Vanadium and aluminum improved oxidation resistance at 1000 C, even though the V scale tended to liquefy and the Al specimens became brittle and the scale powdery. Copper, cobalt, iron, and iridium improved oxidation resistance at 1200 C. Other investigations report tungsten and molybdenum are protective up to about 1000 C, and tantalum at 1100 C. The most important factor influencing the rate of oxidation was the ion size of the alloy additions. Ions slightly smaller than the Nb(5+) ion are soluble in the oxide lattice and tend to lower the compressive stresses in the bulk scale that lead to cracking. The solubility of the alloying addition also depends on the valence to some extent. All of the elements mentioned that improve the oxidation resistance of Nb fit this size criterion with the possible exception of Al, whose extremely small size in large concentrations would probably lead to the formation of a powdery scale. Maintenance of a crack-free bulk scale for as long as possible may contribute to the formation of a dark subscale that ultimately is rate- controlling in the oxidation process. The platinum-group metals, especially Ir, appear to protect by entrapment of the finely dispersed alloying element by the incoming Nb2O5 metal-oxide interface. This inert metallic Ir when alloyed in a sufficient amount with Yb appears to give a ductile phase dispersed in the brittle oxide. This scale would then flow more easily to relieve the large compressive stresses to delay cracking. Complex oxide formation (which both Ti and Zr tend to initiate) and valence effects, which probably change the vacancy concentration in the scale

  19. Recent strikes in South Africa’s platinum-group metal mines: effects upon world platinum-group metal supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Thomas R.; Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Barry, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The recent labor disputes over wages and working conditions that have affected South Africa’s three leading platinum-group metal (PGM) producers have affected an industry already plagued by market pressures and labor unrest and raised the specter of constraints in the world’s supply of these metals. Although low demand for these metals in 2011 and 2012 helped to offset production losses of recent years, and particularly those losses caused by the strikes in 2012, a prolonged resumption of strikes could cause severe shortages of iridium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, and, to a lesser extent, palladium.

  20. Turbine Blade Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacKay, Rebecca

    2001-01-01

    The High Speed Research Airfoil Alloy Program developed a fourth-generation alloy with up to an +85 F increase in creep rupture capability over current production airfoil alloys. Since improved strength is typically obtained when the limits of microstructural stability are exceeded slightly, it is not surprising that this alloy has a tendency to exhibit microstructural instabilities after high temperature exposures. This presentation will discuss recent results obtained on coated fourth-generation alloys for subsonic turbine blade applications under the NASA Ultra-Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) Program. Progress made in reducing microstructural instabilities in these alloys will be presented. In addition, plans will be presented for advanced alloy development and for computational modeling, which will aid future alloy development efforts.

  1. Advanced Cast Aluminum Alloys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    microstructure of the Al - Zn -Mg- Cu alloys was similar to the as-cast microstructure ...Further, new research has been initiated on ultra-high strength, microalloyed Al - Zn -Mg- Cu alloys with the goal of producing complex castings with...wrought 2519 alloy . Further, new research has been initiated on ultra-high strength, microalloyed Al - Zn -Mg- Cu alloys with the goal of producing

  2. Contributions of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor to Acquisition of Platinum Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Granados, Michaela L.; Hudson, Laurie G.; Samudio-Ruiz, Sabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of platinum resistance following first line platinum/taxane therapy is commonly observed in ovarian cancer patients and prevents clinical effectiveness. There are few options to prevent platinum resistance; however, demethylating agents have been shown to resensitize patients to platinum therapy thereby demonstrating that DNA methylation is a critical contributor to the development of platinum resistance. We previously reported the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is a novel regulator of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) activity and DNA methylation. Others have shown that EGFR activation is linked to cisplatin treatment and platinum resistance. We hypothesized that cisplatin induced activation of the EGFR mediates changes in DNA methylation associated with the development of platinum resistance. To investigate this, we evaluated EGFR signaling and DNMT activity after acute cisplatin exposure. We also developed an in vitro model of platinum resistance to examine the effects of EGFR inhibition on acquisition of cisplatin resistance. Acute cisplatin treatment activates the EGFR and downstream signaling pathways, and induces an EGFR mediated increase in DNMT activity. Cisplatin resistant cells also showed increased DNMT activity and global methylation. EGFR inhibition during repeated cisplatin treatments generated cells that were more sensitive to cisplatin and did not develop increases in DNA methylation or DNMT activity compared to controls. These findings suggest that activation of EGFR during platinum treatment contributes to the development of platinum resistance. Furthermore, EGFR inhibition may be an effective strategy at attenuating the development of platinum resistance thereby enhancing the effectiveness of chemotherapeutic treatment in ovarian cancer. PMID:26351843

  3. Biological role in the transformation of platinum-group mineral grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, Frank; Zammit, Carla M.; Shar, Sahar S.; Etschmann, Barbara; Bottrill, Ralph; Southam, Gordon; Ta, Christine; Kilburn, Matthew; Oberthür, Thomas; Ball, Andrew S.; Brugger, Joël

    2016-04-01

    Platinum-group elements are strategically important metals. Finding new deposits is becoming increasingly difficult owing to our limited understanding of the processes that affect their mobility in surface environments. Microorganisms have been shown to promote the mobility of metals around ore deposits. Here we show that microorganisms influence the mobility of platinum-group elements in mineral grains collected from Brazil, Australia and Colombia. Scanning electron microscopy showed biofilms covering the platinum-group mineral grains. The biofilms contained abundant platinum-group element nanoparticles and microcrystalline aggregates, and were dominated by Proteobacteria, many of which were closely related to known metal-resistant species. Some platinum-group mineral grains contained carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, selenium and iodine, suggesting the grains may be biogenic in origin. Molecular analyses show that Brazilian platinum-palladium grains hosted specific bacterial communities, which were different in composition from communities associated with gold grains, or communities in surrounding soils and sediments. Nano-phase metallic platinum accumulated when a metallophillic bacterium was incubated with a percolating platinum-containing medium, suggesting that biofilms can cause the precipitation of mobile platinum complexes. We conclude that biofilms are capable of forming or transforming platinum-group mineral grains, and may play an important role for platinum-group element dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments.

  4. Single-Atom Catalyst of Platinum Supported on Titanium Nitride for Selective Electrochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sungeun; Kim, Jiwhan; Tak, Young Joo; Soon, Aloysius; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-02-05

    As a catalyst, single-atom platinum may provide an ideal structure for platinum minimization. Herein, a single-atom catalyst of platinum supported on titanium nitride nanoparticles were successfully prepared with the aid of chlorine ligands. Unlike platinum nanoparticles, the single-atom active sites predominantly produced hydrogen peroxide in the electrochemical oxygen reduction with the highest mass activity reported so far. The electrocatalytic oxidation of small organic molecules, such as formic acid and methanol, also exhibited unique selectivity on the single-atom platinum catalyst. A lack of platinum ensemble sites changed the reaction pathway for the oxygen-reduction reaction toward a two-electron pathway and formic acid oxidation toward direct dehydrogenation, and also induced no activity for the methanol oxidation. This work demonstrates that single-atom platinum can be an efficient electrocatalyst with high mass activity and unique selectivity.

  5. Density Functional Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2013-03-14

    We used density functional theory to study the difference in the structure, stability and catalytic reactivity between ultrathin, 0.5–1.0 nm diameter, platinum nanotubes and nanowires. Model nanowires were formed by inserting an inner chain of platinum atoms in small diameter nanotubes. In this way more stable, non-hollow structures were formed. The difference in the electronic structure of platinum nanotubes and nanowires was examined by inspecting the density of surface states and band structure. Furthermore, reactivity toward the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum nanowires was assessed by studying the change in the chemisorption energies of oxygen, hydroxyl, and hydroperoxyl groups, induced by converting the nanotube models to nanowires. Both ultrathin platinum nanotubes and nanowires show distinct properties compared to bulk platinum. Single-wall nanotubes and platinum nanowires with diameters larger than 1 nm show promise for use as oxygen reduction catalysts.

  6. Theoretical Study of the Structure, Stability and Oxygen Reduction Activity of Ultrathin Platinum Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Matanovic, Ivana; Kent, Paul; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2012-10-10

    We use density functional theory to study the difference in the structure, stability and catalytic reactivity between ultrathin, 0.5- 1.0 nm diameter, platinum nanotubes and nanowires. Model nanowires were formed by inserting an inner chain of platinum atoms in small diameter nanotubes. In this way more stable, nonhollow structures were formed. The difference in the electronic structure of platinum nanotubes and nanowires was examined by inspecting the density of surface states and band structure. Furthermore, reactivity towards the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum nanowires was addressed by studying the change in the chemisorption energies of oxygen and hydroxyl groups, induced by inserting the inner chain of platinum atoms into the hollow nanotubes. Both ultrathin platinum nanotubes and nanowires show distinct properties compared to bulk platinum. Nanotubes with diameters larger than 1 nm show promise for use as oxygen reduction catalysts.

  7. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Properties of Novel Single-Site and Nanosized Platinum Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bonati, Matteo L.M.; Douglas, Thomas M.; Gaemers, Sander; Guo, Neng

    2013-01-10

    Novel single-site platinum catalysts have been synthesized by reacting platinum(II) organometallics with partially dehydroxylated silica. The resulting materials have been characterized by various methods such as IR, MAS NMR, and EXAFS. Further, the single-site platinum catalysts were calcined in air to remove the ligand and produce nanosized platinum particles, that were characterized by TEM and H{sub 2} chemisorption. All catalysts were tested for the hydrogenation of toluene. The single-site platinum catalysts were less active than a commercial Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst with comparable platinum loading, and this has been ascribed to ligand effects. Conversely, the nanosized platinum catalysts were more active than the commercial Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst due to their high dispersion and small particle sizes.

  8. Platinum single-atom and cluster catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Niancai; Stambula, Samantha; Wang, Da; Banis, Mohammad Norouzi; Liu, Jian; Riese, Adam; Xiao, Biwei; Li, Ruying; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Liu, Li-Min; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Sun, Xueliang

    2016-11-01

    Platinum-based catalysts have been considered the most effective electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction in water splitting. However, platinum utilization in these electrocatalysts is extremely low, as the active sites are only located on the surface of the catalyst particles. Downsizing catalyst nanoparticles to single atoms is highly desirable to maximize their efficiency by utilizing nearly all platinum atoms. Here we report on a practical synthesis method to produce isolated single platinum atoms and clusters using the atomic layer deposition technique. The single platinum atom catalysts are investigated for the hydrogen evolution reaction, where they exhibit significantly enhanced catalytic activity (up to 37 times) and high stability in comparison with the state-of-the-art commercial platinum/carbon catalysts. The X-ray absorption fine structure and density functional theory analyses indicate that the partially unoccupied density of states of the platinum atoms' 5d orbitals on the nitrogen-doped graphene are responsible for the excellent performance.

  9. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  10. PLUTONIUM-THORIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schonfeld, F.W.

    1959-09-15

    New plutonium-base binary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuel are described. The alloys consist of 50 to 98 at.% thorium with the remainder plutonium. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are easy fabrication, phase stability, and the accompanying advantuge of providing a means for converting Th/sup 232/ into U/sup 233/.

  11. DELTA PHASE PLUTONIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Cramer, E.M.; Ellinger, F.H.; Land. C.C.

    1960-03-22

    Delta-phase plutonium alloys were developed suitable for use as reactor fuels. The alloys consist of from 1 to 4 at.% zinc and the balance plutonium. The alloys have good neutronic, corrosion, and fabrication characteristics snd possess good dimensional characteristics throughout an operating temperature range from 300 to 490 deg C.

  12. Weldability of intermetallic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    David, S.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic alloys are a unique class of material that have potential for structural applications at elevated temperatures. The paper describes the welding and weldability of these alloys. The alloys studied were nickel aluminide (Ni[sub 3]Al), titanium aluminide (Ti[sub 3]Al), and iron aluminide.

  13. Separation in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frazier, D. O.; Facemire, B. R.; Kaukler, W. F.; Witherow, W. K.; Fanning, U.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of monotectic alloys and alloy analogs reviewed. Report surveys research on liquid/liquid and solid/liquid separation in binary monotectic alloys. Emphasizes separation processes in low gravity, such as in outer space or in free fall in drop towers. Advances in methods of controlling separation in experiments highlighted.

  14. Platinum-, rhenium-, indium-containing catalysts for conversion of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, G.J.; Wang, L.

    1986-12-16

    A process is described for the catalytic reforming of naphtha-boiling range charge stock at reforming conditions with a catalytic composite comprising: (a) a refractory inorganic oxide; (b) a first uniform dispersion of a platinum component and a rhenium component; (c) a second dispersion of an indium component thereover; (d) a halogen component; and (e) a sulfur component.

  15. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum

    PubMed Central

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T.; Koós, Antal A.; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min−1) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials. PMID:26175062

  16. Molybdenum-platinum-oxide electrodes for thermoelectric generators

    DOEpatents

    Schmatz, Duane J.

    1990-01-01

    The invention is directed to a composite article suitable for use in thermoelectric generators. The article comprises a solid electrolyte carrying a thin film comprising molybdenum-platinum-oxide as an electrode deposited by physical deposition techniques. The invention is also directed to the method of making same.

  17. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T; Koós, Antal A; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A; Nicholas, Robin J; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-07-15

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min(-1)) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials.

  18. Concentration of some platinum-group metals in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    New data on some platinum group metals in coal indicate that the concentration of Pt is generally less than about 5 ppb, that of Pd is generally less than 1 ppb, and that of Rh is generally less than 0.5 ppb. No conclusive evidence was obtained concerning the mode of occurrence of these elements in coal. ?? 1981.

  19. Polyamide platinum anticancer complexes designed to target specific DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, David; Wheate, Nial J; Ralph, Stephen F; Howard, Warren A; Tor, Yitzhak; Aldrich-Wright, Janice R

    2006-07-24

    Two new platinum complexes, trans-chlorodiammine[N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-2) and trans-chlorodiammine[N-(6-aminohexyl)-4-[4-(N-methylimidazole-2-carboxamido)-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamido]-N-methylpyrrole-2-carboxamide]platinum(II) chloride (DJ1953-6) have been synthesized as proof-of-concept molecules in the design of agents that can specifically target genes in DNA. Coordinate covalent binding to DNA was demonstrated with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Using circular dichroism, these complexes were found to show greater DNA binding affinity to the target sequence: d(CATTGTCAGAC)(2), than toward either d(GTCTGTCAATG)(2,) which contains different flanking sequences, or d(CATTGAGAGAC)(2), which contains a double base pair mismatch sequence. DJ1953-2 unwinds the DNA helix by around 13 degrees , but neither metal complex significantly affects the DNA melting temperature. Unlike simple DNA minor groove binders, DJ1953-2 is able to inhibit, in vitro, RNA synthesis. The cytotoxicity of both metal complexes in the L1210 murine leukaemia cell line was also determined, with DJ1953-6 (34 microM) more active than DJ1953-2 (>50 microM). These results demonstrate the potential of polyamide platinum complexes and provide the structural basis for designer agents that are able to recognize biologically relevant sequences and prevent DNA transcription and replication.

  20. Platinum-induced hearing loss after treatment for childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    van As, Jorrit W; van den Berg, Henk; van Dalen, Elvira C

    2016-08-03

    Platinum-based therapy, including cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin or a combination of these, is used to treat a variety of paediatric malignancies. Unfortunately, one of the most important adverse effects is the occurrence of hearing loss or ototoxicity. There is a wide variation in the reported prevalence of platinum-induced ototoxicity and the associated risk factors. More insight into the prevalence of and risk factors for platinum-induced hearing loss is essential in order to develop less ototoxic treatment protocols for the future treatment of children with cancer and to develop adequate follow-up protocols for childhood cancer survivors treated with platinum-based therapy. To evaluate the existing evidence on the association between childhood cancer treatment including platinum analogues and the occurrence of hearing loss. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 8), MEDLINE (PubMed) (1945 to 23 September 2015) and EMBASE (Ovid) (1980 to 23 September 2015). In addition, we searched reference lists of relevant articles and the conference proceedings of the International Society for Paediatric Oncology (2008 to 2014), the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (2008 to 2015) and the International Conference on Long-Term Complications of Treatment of Children and Adolescents for Cancer (2010 to 2015). Experts in the field provided information on additional studies. All study designs, except case reports, case series (i.e. a description of non-consecutive participants) and studies including fewer than 100 participants treated with platinum-based therapy who had an ototoxicity assessment, examining the association between childhood cancer treatment including platinum analogues and the occurrence of hearing loss. Two review authors independently performed the study selection. One review author performed data extraction and risk of bias assessment, which was checked by another review author. We identified

  1. The platinum-catalyzed decomposition of methanol: A deceptive demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Coffing, D.L.; Wile, J.L. )

    1993-07-01

    The platinum-catalyzed gas-phase decomposition of methanol can be used for classroom demonstration in an exciting, interesting fashion. The platinum catalysts, after being heated until it glows, can be made to continue glowing for hours by suspending it over the methanol. This demonstration is useful in a classroom setting for several reasons. First it is more complicated than it appears initially, involving a reaction that is not immediately obvious and is, therefore, more challenging for students to understand. Second, the platinum illustrates the phenomenon of exothermic reactions in a distinctive and memorable way. Because the platinum foil has to be heated before the reactions will proceed, this demonstration also is a perfect example of the temperature dependence of [Delta]G in determining the spontaneity of a reaction. Finally, this demonstration can be used to explain the mutual interaction of two reactions. Because an explanation of this demonstration requires the use of many chemical concepts, it is an ideal activity for stimulating synthesis among students near the end of the course.

  2. Methane conversation on the oxidized platinum-rhenium-alumina crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Abasov, S.I.; Babaeva, F.A.; Dadashev, B.A.

    1995-05-01

    The conversion of methane on the oxidized platinum-rhenium-alumina catalysts is studied. The catalytic dehydrocyclohexamerization to benzene is found to proceed on the catalyst after its partial reduction with methane and subsequent coke deposition on the catalyst surface. The effect of both the framework oxygen and coke deposition on the dehydrocyclohexamerization process is discussed.

  3. Method of maintaining activity of hydrogen-sensing platinum electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, J. N., III

    1968-01-01

    Three-electrode hydrogen sensor containing a platinum electrode maintained in a highly catalytic state, operates with a minimal response time and maximal sensitivity to the hydrogen gas being sensed. Electronic control and readout circuitry reactivates the working electrode of the sensor to a state of maximal catalytic activity.

  4. Acute and chronic nephrotoxicity of platinum nanoparticles in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Watari, Akihiro; Hayata, Yuya; Li, Xiangru; Kondoh, Masuo; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Tsutsumi, Yasuo; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2013-09-01

    Platinum nanoparticles are being utilized in various industrial applications, including in catalysis, cosmetics, and dietary supplements. Although reducing the size of the nanoparticles improves the physicochemical properties and provides useful performance characteristics, the safety of the material remains a major concern. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological effects of platinum particles less than 1 nm in size (snPt1). In mice administered with a single intravenous dose of snPt1, histological analysis revealed necrosis of tubular epithelial cells and urinary casts in the kidney, without obvious toxic effects in the lung, spleen, and heart. These mice exhibited dose-dependent elevation of blood urea nitrogen, an indicator of kidney damage. Direct application of snPt1 to in vitro cultures of renal cells induced significant cytotoxicity. In mice administered for 4 weeks with twice-weekly intraperitoneal snPt1, histological analysis of the kidney revealed urinary casts, tubular atrophy, and inflammatory cell accumulation. Notably, these toxic effects were not observed in mice injected with 8-nm platinum particles, either by single- or multiple-dose administration. Our findings suggest that exposure to platinum particles of less than 1 nm in size may induce nephrotoxicity and disrupt some kidney functions. However, this toxicity may be reduced by increasing the nanoparticle size.

  5. Platinum Recovery from Synthetic Extreme Environments by Halophilic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Maes, Synthia; Props, Ruben; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Smet, Rebecca De; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Vital, Marius; Pieper, Dietmar H; Vanhaecke, Frank; Boon, Nico; Hennebel, Tom

    2016-03-01

    Metal recycling based on urban mining needs to be established to tackle the increasing supply risk of critical metals such as platinum. Presently, efficient strategies are missing for the recovery of platinum from diluted industrial process streams, often characterized by extremely low pHs and high salt concentrations. In this research, halophilic mixed cultures were employed for the biological recovery of platinum (Pt). Halophilic bacteria were enriched from Artemia cysts, living in salt lakes, in different salt matrices (sea salt mixture and NH4Cl; 20-210 g L(-1) salts) and at low to neutral pH (pH 3-7). The main taxonomic families present in the halophilic cultures were Halomonadaceae, Bacillaceae, and Idiomarinaceae. The halophilic cultures were able to recover >98% Pt(II) and >97% Pt(IV) at pH 2 within 3-21 h (4-453 mg Ptrecovered h(-1) g(-1) biomass). X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the reduction to Pt(0) and transmission electron microscopy revealed both intra- and extracellular Pt precipitates, with median diameters of 9-30 nm and 11-13 nm, for Pt(II) and Pt(IV), respectively. Flow cytometric membrane integrity staining demonstrated the preservation of cell viability during platinum recovery. This study demonstrates the Pt recovery potential of halophilic mixed cultures in acidic saline conditions.

  6. In vitro permeation of platinum through African and Caucasian skin.

    PubMed

    Franken, A; Eloff, F C; du Plessis, J; Badenhorst, C J; Du Plessis, J L

    2015-02-03

    The majority of the South African workforce are Africans, therefore potential racial differences should be considered in risk and exposure assessments in the workplace. Literature suggests African skin to be a superior barrier against permeation and irritants. Previous in vitro studies on metals only included skin from Caucasian donors, whereas this study compared the permeation of platinum through African and Caucasian skin. A donor solution of 0.3 mg/ml of potassium tetrachloroplatinate (K₂PtCl₄) dissolved in synthetic sweat was applied to the vertical Franz diffusion cells with full thickness abdominal skin. Skin from three female African and three female Caucasian donors were included (n=21). The receptor solution was removed at various intervals during the 24 h experiment, and analysed with high resolution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Skin was digested and analysed by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Significantly higher permeation of platinum through intact African skin (p=0.044), as well as a significantly higher mass of platinum retention in African skin in comparison with Caucasian skin (p=0.002) occurred. Significant inter-donor variation was found in both racial groups (p<0.02). Results indicate that African workers have increased risk of dermal permeation and therefore possible sensitisation caused by dermal exposure to platinum salts. These results are contradictory to limited literature suggesting a superior barrier in African skin and further investigation is necessary to explain the higher permeation through African skin.

  7. Chitosan sorbents for platinum sorption from dilute solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Guibal, E.; Larkin, A.; Vincent, T.; Tobin, J.M.

    1999-10-01

    Chitosan has proved efficient at removing platinum in dilute effluents. The maximum uptake capacity reaches 300 mg/g (almost 1.5 mmol/g). The optimum pH for sorption is pH 2. A glutaraldehyde cross-linking pretreatment is necessary to stabilize the biopolymer in acidic solutions. Sorption isotherms have been studied as a function of pH, sorbent particle size, and the cross-linking ratio. Surprisingly, the extent of the cross-linking (determined by the concentration of the cross-linking agent in the treatment bath) has no significant influence on uptake capacity. Competitor anions such as chloride or nitrate induce a large decrease in the sorption efficiency. Sorption kinetics show also that uptake rate is not significantly changed by increasing either the cross-linking ratio or the particle size of the sorbent. Mass transfer rates are significantly affected by the initial platinum concentration and by the conditioning of the biopolymer. Gel-bead conditioning appears to reduce the sorption rate. While for molybdate and vanadate ions, mass transfer was governed by intraparticle mass transfer, for platinum, both external and intraparticle diffusion control the uptake rate. In contrast with the former ions, platinum does not form polynuclear hydrolyzed species, which are responsible for steric hindrance of diffusion into the polymer network.

  8. Article having an improved platinum-aluminum-hafnium protective coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagaraj, Bangalore Aswatha (Inventor); Williams, Jeffrey Lawrence (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An article protected by a protective coating has a substrate and a protective coating having an outer layer deposited upon the substrate surface and a diffusion zone formed by interdiffusion of the outer layer and the substrate. The protective coating includes platinum, aluminum, no more than about 2 weight percent hafnium, and substantially no silicon. The outer layer is substantially a single phase.

  9. Operation of platinum-palladium catalysts with leaded gasoline.

    PubMed Central

    Teague, D M; Clougherty, L B; Speca, A N

    1975-01-01

    The effect of various fuel additives on the ability of platinum-palladium catalytic converters to remove the carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon components of automotive exhaust has been examined. Engine dynamometer studies suggest that these catalysts may be successfully used in conjunction with fuels of relatively high tetraethyllead concentrations, provided the ethylene dibromide portion of the scavenger is excluded. PMID:50929

  10. EGFR-targeting peptide-coupled platinum(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Josef; Hager, Sonja; Koblmüller, Bettina; Klose, Matthias H M; Holste, Katharina; Fischer, Britta; Pelivan, Karla; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra; Kowol, Christian R; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2017-06-01

    The high mortality rate of lung cancer patients and the frequent occurrence of side effects during cancer therapy demonstrate the need for more selective and targeted drugs. An important and well-established target for lung cancer treatment is the occasionally mutated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). As platinum(II) drugs are still the most important therapeutics against lung cancer, we synthesized in this study the first platinum(IV) complexes coupled to the EGFR-targeting peptide LARLLT (and the shuffled RTALLL as reference). Notably, HPLC-MS measurements revealed two different peaks with the same molecular mass, which turned out to be a transcyclization reaction in the linker between maleimide and the coupled cysteine moiety. With regard to the EGFR specificity, subsequent biological investigations (3-day viability, 14-day clonogenic assays and platinum uptake) on four different cell lines with different verified EGFR expression levels were performed. Unexpectedly, the results showed neither an enhanced activity nor an EGFR expression-dependent uptake of our new compounds. Consequently, fluorophore-coupled peptides were synthesized to re-evaluate the targeting ability of LARLLT itself. However, also with these molecules, flow cytometry measurements showed no correlation of drug uptake with the EGFR expression levels. Taken together, we successfully synthesized the first platinum(IV) complexes coupled to an EGFR-targeting peptide; however, the biological investigations revealed that LARLLT is not an appropriate peptide for enhancing the specific uptake of small-molecule drugs into EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells.

  11. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry.

    PubMed

    Goldratt, E; Yeshurun, Y; Greenfield, A J

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  12. Effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldratt, E.; Yeshurun, Y.; Greenfield, A. J.

    1980-03-01

    The effect of heat leaks in platinum resistance thermometry is analyzed. An experimental method is proposed for estimating the magnitude of this effect. Results are reported for the measurement of the temperature of a hot, solid body under different heat-leak configurations. Design criteria for thermometers are presented which minimize the effect of such heat leaks.

  13. First platinum moderated positron beam based on neutron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenschmidt, C.; Kögel, G.; Repper, R.; Schreckenbach, K.; Sperr, P.; Triftshäuser, W.

    2002-12-01

    A positron beam based on absorption of high energy prompt γ-rays from thermal neutron capture in 113Cd was installed at a neutron guide of the high flux reactor at the ILL in Grenoble. Measurements were performed for various source geometries, dependent on converter mass, moderator surface and extraction voltages. The results lead to an optimised design of the in-pile positron source which will be implemented at the Munich research reactor FRM-II. The positron source consists of platinum foils acting as γ-e +e --converter and positron moderator. Due to the negative positron work function moderation in heated platinum leads to emission of monoenergetic positrons. The positron work function of polycrystalline platinum was determined to 1.95(5) eV. After acceleration to several keV by four electrical lenses the beam was magnetically guided in a solenoid field of 7.5 mT leading to a NaI-detector in order to detect the 511 keV γ-radiation of the annihilating positrons. The positron beam with a diameter of less than 20 mm yielded an intensity of 3.1×10 4 moderated positrons per second. The total moderation efficiency of the positron source was about ɛ=1.06(16)×10 -4. Within the first 20 h of operation a degradation of the moderation efficiency of 30% was observed. An annealing procedure at 873 K in air recovers the platinum moderator.

  14. Rapid epitaxy-free graphene synthesis on silicidated polycrystalline platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babenko, Vitaliy; Murdock, Adrian T.; Koós, Antal A.; Britton, Jude; Crossley, Alison; Holdway, Philip; Moffat, Jonathan; Huang, Jian; Alexander-Webber, Jack A.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Grobert, Nicole

    2015-07-01

    Large-area synthesis of high-quality graphene by chemical vapour deposition on metallic substrates requires polishing or substrate grain enlargement followed by a lengthy growth period. Here we demonstrate a novel substrate processing method for facile synthesis of mm-sized, single-crystal graphene by coating polycrystalline platinum foils with a silicon-containing film. The film reacts with platinum on heating, resulting in the formation of a liquid platinum silicide layer that screens the platinum lattice and fills topographic defects. This reduces the dependence on the surface properties of the catalytic substrate, improving the crystallinity, uniformity and size of graphene domains. At elevated temperatures growth rates of more than an order of magnitude higher (120 μm min-1) than typically reported are achieved, allowing savings in costs for consumable materials, energy and time. This generic technique paves the way for using a whole new range of eutectic substrates for the large-area synthesis of 2D materials.

  15. Electrode kinetics at a platinum anode in chloroacetic acid solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lotvin, B.M.; Vasil'ev, Yu.B.

    1987-02-01

    It was shown by direct comparison of kinetic and adsorption data that at platinum in solutions of mono- and trichloroacetic acid, the anodic processes are entirely analogous in character to the processes occurring in acetate solutions. The lack of Kolbe electrosynthesis products in the electrolysis of chloroacetic acids is to the special reaction features of the secondary chloroalkyl radicals.

  16. Production of platinum radioisotopes at Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Suzanne V.; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Gürdal, Gülhan; Lister, Christopher; Muench, Lisa; Nino, Michael; Sonzogni, Alexandro; Herman, Michal; Nobre, Gustavo; Cullen, Chris; Chillery, Thomas; Chowdury, Partha; Harding, Robert

    2017-09-01

    The accelerator production of platinum isotopes was investigated at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP). In this study high purity natural platinum foils were irradiated at 53.2, 65.7, 105.2, 151.9, 162.9 and 173.3.MeV. The irradiated foils were digested in aqua regia and then converted to their hydrochloride salt with concentrated hydrochloric acid before analyzing by gamma spectrometry periodically for at least 10 days post end of bombardment. A wide range of platinum (Pt), gold (Au) and iridium (Ir) isotopes were identified. Effective cross sections at BLIP for Pt-188, Pt-189, Pt-191 and Pt-195m were compared to literature and theoretical cross sections determined using Empire-3.2. The majority of the effective cross sections (<70 MeV) confirm those reported in the literature. While the absolute values of the theoretical cross sections were up to a factor of 3 lower, Empire 3.2 modeled thresholds and maxima correlated well with experimental values. Preliminary evaluation into a rapid separation of Pt isotopes from high levels of Ir and Au isotopes proved to be a promising approach for large scale production. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that with the use of isotopically enriched target material accelerator production of selected platinum isotopes is feasible over a wide proton energy range.

  17. 76 FR 8627 - Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Revision of Class E Airspace; Platinum, AK AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action revises Class E airspace at... 7th Avenue, Box 14, Anchorage, AK 99513-7587; telephone number (907) 271-5898; fax: (907) 271-2850;...

  18. The activation energy values estimated by the Arrhenius equation as a controlling factor of platinum-group mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Athinoula L.; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2009-03-01

    In ophiolite complexes and Ural/Alaskan-type intrusions the platinum-group element minerals (PGM) occur as laurite (RuS 2), erlichmanite (OsS 2), irarsite (IrAsS) and alloys (Os-Ir-Ru and Pt-Fe). They are commonly found as small inclusions (normally less than 10 μm, occasionally up to 100 μm) in chromite. The origin of coarse-grained PGM, in the form of 0.5-10 mm nuggets, in placer deposits related with mafic/ultramafic complexes remains still unclear. Literature data on grain size ( r) of platinum-group minerals (PGM) and their formation temperature (range of temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C), revealed an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Correlation of the rate of crystal formation that depends on temperature (T) with the size ( r) of the grain results in a linear relationship between ln( r) and 1/T. From the slope of the line n × ln( r) = -const. + Eact/ RT the activation energy for the formation of IPGM (Ir-platinum-group minerals) was estimated, for the first time in the present study, to be approximately 450 ± 45 kJ mol -1. Applying the Arrhenius equation, the corresponding formation temperature for extremely large IPGM grains (up to 1.3 mm) in chromite ores related to ophiolites was found to be approximately 740 °C. It seems to be consistent with a lower formation temperature than with the typical formation temperature of small PGM grains associated with ophiolitic chromitites. This suggests that coarse-grained PGM in mafic/ultramafic complexes, along the permeable shear zones, may have been re-crystallized during plastic deformation at relatively lower temperatures (700-800 °C), under appropriate pressure, temperature, redox conditions and an increased H 2O content. Thus, applying the plot of ln( r) versus 1/T on large Os-Ir-Ru-minerals (sulfides or alloys), characterized by an r value falling into the linear part of the graph and having evidence supporting their formation at relatively high temperatures, then the corresponding formation

  19. Computational and Experimental Development of Novel High Temperature Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, M.J.; Ray, P.K.; and Akinc, M.

    2010-06-29

    The work done in this paper is based on our earlier work on developing an extended Miedema model and then using it to downselect potential alloy systems. Our approach is to closely couple the semi-empirical methodologies to more accurate ab initio methods to dentify the best candidates for ternary alloying additions. The architectural framework for our material's design is a refractory base metal with a high temperature intermetallic which provides both high temperature creep strength and a source of oxidatively stable elements. Potential refractory base metals are groups IIIA, IVA and VA. For Fossil applications, Ni-Al appears to be the best choice to provide the source of oxidatively stable elements but this system requires a 'boost' in melting temperatures to be a viable candidate in the ultra-high temperature regime (> 1200C). Some late transition metals and noble elements are known to increase the melting temperature of Ni-Al phases. Such an approach suggested that a Mo-Ni-Al system would be a good base alloy system that could be further improved upon by dding Platinum group metals (PGMs). In this paper, we demonstrate the variety of microstructures that can be synthesized for the base alloy system, its oxidation behavior as well as the oxidation behavior of the PGM substituted oxidation resistant B2 NiAl phase.

  20. Desorption of oxygen from alloyed Ag/Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, Maciej; Wormeester, Herbert Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Poelsema, Bene

    2014-06-21

    We have investigated the interaction of oxygen with the Ag/Pt(111) surface alloy by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). The surface alloy was formed during the deposition of sub-monolayer amounts of silver on Pt(111) at 800 K and subsequent cooling to 300 K. The low-temperature phase of the surface alloy is composed of nanometer-sized silver rich stripes, embedded within platinum-rich domains, which were characterized with spot profile analysis low energy electron diffraction. The TDS measurements show that oxygen adsorption is blocked on Ag sites: the saturation coverage of oxygen decreases with increasing Ag coverage. Also, the activation energy for desorption (E{sub des}) decreases with Ag coverage. The analysis of the desorption spectra from clean Pt(111) shows a linear decay of E{sub des} with oxygen coverage, which indicates repulsive interactions between the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, adsorption on alloyed Ag/Pt(111) leads to an attractive interaction between adsorbed oxygen atoms.

  1. Tissue Platinum Concentration and Tumor Response in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eric S.; Lee, J. Jack; He, Guangan; Chow, Chi-Wan; Fujimoto, Junya; Kalhor, Neda; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Stewart, David J.; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Platinum resistance is a major limitation in the treatment of advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Reduced intracellular drug accumulation is one of the most consistently identified features of platinum-resistant cell lines, but clinical data are limited. We assessed the effects of tissue platinum concentrations on response and survival in NSCLC. Patients and Methods We measured total platinum concentrations by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 44 archived fresh-frozen NSCLC specimens from patients who underwent surgical resection after neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Tissue platinum concentration was correlated with percent reduction in tumor size on post- versus prechemotherapy computed tomography scans. The relationship between tissue platinum concentration and survival was assessed by univariate and multicovariate Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Tissue platinum concentration correlated significantly with percent reduction in tumor size (P < .001). The same correlations were seen with cisplatin, carboplatin, and all histology subgroups. Furthermore, there was no significant impact of potential variables such as number of cycles and time lapse from last chemotherapy on platinum concentration. Patients with higher platinum concentration had longer time to recurrence (P = .034), progression-free survival (P = .018), and overall survival (P = .005) in the multicovariate Cox model analysis after adjusting for number of cycles. Conclusion This clinical study established a relationship between tissue platinum concentration and response in NSCLC. It suggests that reduced platinum accumulation might be an important mechanism of platinum resistance in the clinical setting. Further studies investigating factors that modulate intracellular platinum concentration are warranted. PMID:22891266

  2. Novel Pentacyano Complexes of Tri- and Tetravalent Platinum.

    PubMed

    Maliarik, Mikhail; Glaser, Julius; Tóth, Imre

    1998-10-19

    New pentacyano complexes of tri- and tetravalent platinum were obtained in aqueous solution and characterized by multinuclear NMR ((195)Pt, (13)C) supported by Raman spectroscopy. The complexes form as products of redox decomposition of metal-metal bonded platinum-thallium compounds. The trimetallic [(NC)(5)Pt-Tl-Pt(CN)(5)](3)(-) yields a new dimeric compound of Pt(III), [(NC)(5)Pt-Pt(CN)(5)](4)(-). The latter is a rare representative of unbridged dimeric complexes of trivalent platinum; it was obtained through an oxidation of monomeric square-planar platinum(II) species by a metal complex. From the bimetallic compounds [(NC)(5)Pt-Tl(CN)(n)()](n)()(-) (n = 0-2) tetravalent platinum complexes are formed. Depending on the Pt-Tl species, electron transfer is initiated either by heat or by exposition to light; it results in [Pt(CN)(6)](2)(-) or in the hitherto unknown complexes [Pt(CN)(5)(OH)](2)(-) and [Pt(CN)(5)(H(2)O)](-), with the (195)Pt NMR chemical shift values 1638.7 (+/-0.6) and 1766.7 (+/-0.6), respectively. Proton dissociation constant of [Pt(CN)(5)(H(2)O)](-) has been determined, pK(a) = 2.51 (+/-0.01). In both Pt(III) and Pt(IV) pentacyano complexes platinum is hexacoordinated forming a pseudo-octahedron with two types of cyano ligands: four equivalent equatorial cyanides and one apical. Related platinum(IV) species, [Pt(CN)(5)X](2)(-) (X = Cl, Br, I), have also been studied. In all the pentacyano complexes a pronounced trans influence is reflected in a substantial difference between the (195)Pt-(13)C spin-spin coupling constant for the apical (trans) and the equatorial (cis) carbon sites. In this respect, the studied X ligands can be ordered in a series of decreasing (195)Pt-(13)C(trans) coupling constant: H(2)O > Cl(-) > Br(-) > I(-) > OH(-) > CN(-).

  3. Rhenium alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    German, R.M.; Bose, A.; Jerman, G.

    1989-01-01

    Alloying experiments were performed using rhenium additions to a classic 90 mass % tungsten heavy alloy. The mixed-powder system was liquid phase sintered to full density at 1500 C in 60 min The rhenium-modified alloys exhibited a smaller grain size, higher hardness, higher strength, and lower ductility than the unalloyed system. For an alloy with a composition of 84W-6Re-8Ni-2Fe, the sintered density was 17, 4 Mg/m{sup 3} with a yield strength of 815 MPa, tensile strength of 1180 MPa, and elongation to failure of 13%. This property combination results from the aggregate effects of grain size reduction and solid solution hardening due to rhenium. In the unalloyed system these properties require post-sintering swaging and aging; thus, alloying with rhenium is most attractive for applications where net shaping is desired, such as by powder injection molding.

  4. Palladium, platinum, rhodium, iridium and ruthenium in chromite- rich rocks from the Samail ophiolite, Oman.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Pallister, J.S.; Brown, M.A.; Smewing, J.D.; Haffty, J.

    1982-01-01

    30 samples of chromitite and chromite-rich rocks from two stratigraphic sections, 250 km apart, through the basal ultramafic member of the Samail ophiolite were spectrographically analysed for platinum-group elements (PGE) and for Co, Cu, Ni and V. These data are reported as are Cr/(Cr + Al), Mg/(Mg + Fe) and wt.% TiO2 for most samples. The chromitite occurs as pods or lenses in rocks of mantle origin or as discontinuous layers at the base of the overlying cumulus sequence. PGE abundances in both sections are similar, with average contents in chromite-rich rocks: Pd 8 ppb, Pt 14 ppb, Rh 6 ppb, Ir 48 ppb and Ru 135 ppb. The PGE data, combined with major-element and petrographic data on the chromitite, suggest: 1) relatively larger Ir and Ru contents and highest total PGE in the middle part of each section; 2) PGE concentrations and ratios do not correlate with coexisting silicate and chromite abundances or chromite compositions; 3) Pd/PGE, on average, increases upward in each section; 4) Samail PGE concentrations, particularly Rh, Pt and Pd, are lower than the average values for chromite-rich rocks in stratiform intrusions. 2) suggests that PGEs occur in discrete alloy or sulphide phases rather than in the major oxides or silicates, and 4) suggests that chromite-rich rocks from the oceanic upper mantle are depleted in PGE with respect to chondrites. L.C.C.

  5. Sequential separation and spectrophotometric determination of osmium and platinum with 5-chloro-2-hydroxythiobenzhydrazide.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Shakuntala S

    2009-06-01

    Osmium was determined spectrophotometrically after coprecipitation with 5-chloro-2-hydroxythiobenzhydrazide at room temperature in the pH range 2.5-5.0 and collection on microcrystalline naphthalene. Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 1.8-14.4 ppm of osmium in a chloroform solution at 510 nm. The molar absorptivity and Sandell sensitivity were 1.056 x 10(4) l mol(-1) cm(-1) and 0.018 ppm, respectively. Six replicate analyses of a solution containing 7.2 ppm of osmium gave a mean absorbance of 0.405 with a standard deviation of 0.013 and a relative standard deviation of 0.92%. The complex was stable for over 72 h. The metal-to-ligand ratio in the complex was 1:2. Interference from various ions was studied, and the method was applied to the determination of osmium in various synthetic mixtures containing commonly associated metals and corresponding to the alloy composition. The sequential separation and determination of osmium and platinum is reported.

  6. Processing and alloying of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, A.; Dowding, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Tungsten heavy alloys are two-phase metal matrix composites with a unique combination of density, strength, and ductility. They are processed by liquid-phase sintering of mixed elemental powders. The final microstructure consists of a contiguous network of nearly pure tungsten grains embedded in a matrix of a ductile W-Ni-Fe alloy. Due to the unique property combination of the material, they are used extensively as kinetic energy penetrators, radiation shields. counterbalances, and a number of other applications in the defense industry. The properties of these alloys are extremely sensitive to the processing conditions. Porosity levels as low as 1% can drastically degrade the properties of these alloys. During processing, care must be taken to reduce or prevent incomplete densification, hydrogen embrittlement, impurity segregation to the grain boundaries, solidification shrinkage induced porosity, and in situ formation of pores due to the sintering atmosphere. This paper will discuss some of the key processing issues for obtaining tungsten heavy alloys with good properties. High strength tungsten heavy alloys are usually fabricated by swaging and aging the conventional as-sintered material. The influence of this on the shear localization tendency of a W-Ni-Co alloy will also be demonstrated. Recent developments have shown that the addition of certain refractory metals partially replacing tungsten can significantly improve the strength of the conventional heavy alloys. This development becomes significant due to the recent interest in near net shaping techniques such as powder injection moldings. The role of suitable alloying additions to the classic W-Ni-Fe based heavy alloys and their processing techniques will also be discussed in this paper.

  7. Castability of Magnesium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowles, A. L.; Han, Q.; Horton, J. A.

    There is intense research effort into the development of high pressure die cast-able creep resistant magnesium alloys. One of the difficulties encountered in magnesium alloy development for creep resistance is that many additions made to improve the creep properties have reportedly resulted in alloys that are difficult to cast. It is therefore important to have an understanding of the effect of alloying elements on the castability. This paper gives a review of the state of the knowledge of the castability of magnesium alloys.

  8. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  9. High strength alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  10. Extrusion of aluminium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sheppard, T.

    1999-01-01

    In recent years the importance of extruded alloys has increased due to the decline in copper extrusion, increased use in structural applications, environmental impact and reduced energy consumption. There have also been huge technical advances. This text provides comprehensive coverage of the metallurgical, mathematical and practical features of the process. The contents include: continuum principles; metallurgical features affecting the extrusion of Al-alloys; extrusion processing; homogenization and extrusion conditions for specific alloys; processing of 6XXX alloys; plant utilization; Appendix A: specification of AA alloys and DIN equivalents; Appendix B: chemical compositions; and Appendix C: typical properties.

  11. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum–nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum–nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum–nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum–nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  12. [In situ FTIR spectroscopy studies of HCOOH oxidation on surface alloy electrocatalysts].

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-pei; Huang, Tao; Zhen, Chun-hua; Zhang, Qi; Gong, Hui; Sun, Shi-gang

    2003-04-01

    Electrocatalytic properties of three electrodes for formic acid oxidation were studied by using electrochemical in situ FTIR spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry in this paper. It is demonstrated that the electrocatalytical mechanism of formic acid oxidation on platinum-dispersed carbon(Pt/GC) is similar to that on massive platinum, which involves two paths, i.e. one way through active intermediate and the other through poison intermediate to CO2. The Pt/GC exhibits higher catalytivity than pure platinum. The electrode of Pt/GC modified by Sb (Sb-Pt/GC) was also prepared in the work. It was observed that the onset potential (Ei) for formic acid oxidation on Sb-Pt/GC was shift negatively for 0.20 V. The peak potential (Ep) was observed to shifted negatively to 0.34 V and the value of oxidation current (jp) was enhanced nearly 7.28 times. Similar results were also observed on surface alloy/GC prepared. In this case, Ei and Ep were -0.12 and 0.32 V, respectively, jp was enhanced about 8.15 times, and FWHM (full width at half maximum) was 0.50 V. It is indicated that Sb-Pt/GC and surface alloy/GC can not only effectively restrain the formation of poison intermediate CO, but also significantly increase the electrocatalytic activities for oxidation of active intermediates.

  13. Creep Resistant Zinc Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Frank E. Goodwin

    2002-12-31

    This report covers the development of Hot Chamber Die Castable Zinc Alloys with High Creep Strengths. This project commenced in 2000, with the primary objective of developing a hot chamber zinc die-casting alloy, capable of satisfactory service at 140 C. The core objectives of the development program were to: (1) fill in missing alloy data areas and develop a more complete empirical model of the influence of alloy composition on creep strength and other selected properties, and (2) based on the results from this model, examine promising alloy composition areas, for further development and for meeting the property combination targets, with the view to designing an optimized alloy composition. The target properties identified by ILZRO for an improved creep resistant zinc die-casting alloy were identified as follows: (1) temperature capability of 1470 C; (2) creep stress of 31 MPa (4500 psi); (3) exposure time of 1000 hours; and (4) maximum creep elongation under these conditions of 1%. The project was broadly divided into three tasks: (1) Task 1--General and Modeling, covering Experimental design of a first batch of alloys, alloy preparation and characterization. (2) Task 2--Refinement and Optimization, covering Experimental design of a second batch of alloys. (3) Task 3--Creep Testing and Technology transfer, covering the finalization of testing and the transfer of technology to the Zinc industry should have at least one improved alloy result from this work.

  14. Gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, M.; Inui, H.; Kishida, K.; Matsumuro, M.; Shirai, Y.

    1995-08-01

    Extensive progress and improvements have been made in the science and technology of gamma titanium aluminide alloys within the last decade. In particular, the understanding of their microstructural characteristics and property/microstructure relationships has been substantially deepened. Based on these achievements, various engineering two-phase gamma alloys have been developed and their mechanical and chemical properties have been assessed. Aircraft and automotive industries arc pursuing their introduction for various structural components. At the same time, recent basic studies on the mechanical properties of two-phase gamma alloys, in particular with a controlled lamellar structure have provided a considerable amount of fundamental information on the deformation and fracture mechanisms of the two-phase gamma alloys. The results of such basic studies are incorporated in the recent alloy and microstructure design of two-phase gamma alloys. In this paper, such recent advances in the research and development of the two-phase gamma alloys and industrial involvement are summarized.

  15. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  16. Optimizing treatment of the partially platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Nicoletta

    2013-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of gynecological cancer deaths worldwide. Despite primary treatment with platinum-containing regimens, the majority of women will experience recurrent disease and subsequent death. Recurrent ovarian cancer remains a challenge for successful management, and the choice of second-line chemotherapy is complex due to the range of different factors that need to be considered. One of the main considerations is the platinum-free interval and, specifically, the optimal treatment for patients who are partially platinum-sensitive (platinum-free interval: 6-12 months). Data from the large, multicenter, randomized OVA-301 study have shown that combined trabectedin-pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) significantly prolonged median overall survival compared with PLD alone (p = 0.0027) in 214 patients with partially platinum-sensitive advanced relapsed ovarian cancer. Furthermore, in OVA-301 patients with partially platinum-sensitive disease who received platinum therapy immediately after disease progression (n = 94), final median overall survival was improved by 9 months (p = 0.0153) in trabectedin-PLD patients compared with PLD alone. In addition to demonstrating a survival advantage, trabectedin-PLD may also allow the treatment of patients having not yet recovered from previous platinum toxicity. In summary, the data suggest the use of combined trabectedin-PLD as a second-line treatment option in patients with partially platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, followed by a third-line platinum-containing regimen.

  17. Rapid biological synthesis of platinum nanoparticles using Ocimum sanctum for water electrolysis applications.

    PubMed

    Soundarrajan, C; Sankari, A; Dhandapani, P; Maruthamuthu, S; Ravichandran, S; Sozhan, G; Palaniswamy, N

    2012-06-01

    The leaf extract of Ocimum sanctum was used as a reducing agent for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticles from an aqueous chloroplatinic acid (H(2)PtCl(6)·6H(2)O). A greater conversion of platinum ions to nanoparticles was achieved by employing a tulsi leaf broth with a reaction temperature of 100 °C. Energy-dispersive absorption X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the platinum particles as major constituent in the reduction process. It is evident from scanning electron microscopy that the reduced platinum particles were found as aggregates with irregular shape. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that the compounds such as ascorbic acid, gallic acid, terpenoids, certain proteins and amino acids act as reducing agents for platinum ions reduction. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy suggested the associated forms of platinum with other molecules and the average particle size of platinum nanoparticle was 23 nm, calculated using Scherer equation. The reduced platinum showed similar hydrogen evolution potential and catalytic activity like pure platinum using linear scan voltammetry. This environmentally friendly method of biological platinum nanoparticles production increases the rates of synthesis faster which can potentially be used in water electrolysis applications.

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of VEGF predicts response to platinum based chemotherapy in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, G K; Maclean, A B; Elmasry, K; Wong te Fong, A; Morris, R W; Rashid, M; Begent, R H J; Boxer, G M

    2011-05-01

    For patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cytoreduction, with a combination of taxane and platinum, is the standard of care. Despite this, approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease will relapse and moreover 15-20% of cases of EOC are resistant to platinum based chemotherapy. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), an angiogenic factor, is associated with poor prognosis. This study was undertaken to examine whether there is an association between VEGF-A expression in the tumour of EOC patients and their response to platinum based chemotherapy. The study cohort consisted of 66 patients with advanced stage EOC (FIGO III-IV). Ovarian cancer tissue was analysed for VEGF-A expression immunohistochemically. Protein expression was measured and correlated, with platinum sensitivity and overall patient survival. Median age of patients was 53 years, 45 patients had platinum sensitive disease (68%), the remaining patients being platinum resistant (32%). Of the platinum resistant group, 18 (86%) patients had high VEGF score compared to only 1 (2%) with high VEGF score in the platinum sensitive group. Median survival was 11 months in the patient group with high VEGF score versus 32 months in that cohort with low VEGF score. VEGF expression was significantly inversely correlated with overall survival (P < 0.0001). We demonstrated that tumours of patients with platinum resistant EOC exhibit higher levels of VEGF expression compared to the platinum sensitive group. VEGF in EOC, may be of clinical and therapeutic relevance and suggests a role for first line anti-angiogenic therapy.

  19. Comparison of Intracellular Stress Response of NCI-H526 Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Cells to Platinum(II) Cisplatin and Platinum(IV) Oxoplatin

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    In attempts to develop an orally applicable platinum-based drug, platinum(IV) drugs which exhibit higher in vivo stability compared to the platinum(II) drug cisplatin were formulated. The first such chemotherapeutic agent, namely satraplatin, failed to receive approval. In the present work, we checked the initial cellular stress response of the chemosensitive NCI-H526 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cells by determination of the relative phosphorylation of 46 specific phosphorylation sites of 38 selected proteins in a six hours response to cisplatin (platinum(II)) or oxoplatin (platinum(IV)), respectively. Oxoplatin is considered as prodrug of cisplatin, although several findings point to differences in intracellular effects. Cisplatin induced hyperphosphorylation of p38α MAPK and AMPKα1, whereas oxoplatin treatment resulted in increased phosphorylation of a large number of signaling proteins involved in stress response/drug resistance, including JNK, GSK-3α, AMPKα1, src kinases, STATs, CHK-2 and especially focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Cisplatin exerts markedly higher cytotoxicity upon four hours short-term exposure in comparison to oxoplatin and, correspondingly, the extended initial stress response to the platinum(IV) drug oxoplatin thus is expected to increase clinical drug resistance. Induction of a substantial stress response to any prodrug of a platinum-based compound may likewise limit the effectivity of its active metabolite(s), such contributing to the failure of selected derivatized platinum complexes. PMID:25006835

  20. Alloy 10: A 1300F Disk Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayda, John

    2000-01-01

    Gas turbine engines for future subsonic transports will probably have higher pressure ratios which will require nickel-base superalloy disks with 13000 to 1400 F temperature capability. Several advanced disk alloys are being developed to fill this need. One of these, Allied Signal's Alloy 10, is a promising candidate for gas turbine engines to be used on smaller, regional aircraft. For this application, compressor/turbine disks must withstand temperatures of 1300 F for several hundred hours over the life of the engine. In this paper, three key properties of Alloy 10--tensile, 0.2% creep, and fatigue crack growth--will be assessed at 1300 F.